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Sample records for effective electron mass

  1. Effective Electron Mass in Low-Dimensional Semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Sitangshu

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with the Effective Electron Mass (EEM) in low dimensional semiconductors. The materials considered are quantum confined non-linear optical, III-V, II-VI, GaP, Ge, PtSb2, zero-gap, stressed, Bismuth, carbon nanotubes, GaSb, IV-VI, Te, II-V, Bi2Te3, Sb, III-V, II-VI, IV-VI semiconductors and quantized III-V, II-VI, IV-VI and HgTe/CdTe superlattices with graded interfaces and effective mass superlattices. The presence of intense electric field and the light waves change the band structure of optoelectronic semiconductors in fundamental ways, which have also been incorporated in the study of the EEM in quantized structures of optoelectronic compounds that control the studies of the quantum effect devices under strong fields. The importance of measurement of band gap in optoelectronic materials under strong electric field and external photo excitation has also been discussed in this context. The influence of crossed electric and quantizing magnetic fields on the EEM and the EEM in heavily doped sem...

  2. Intrinsic Carrier Concentration and Electron Effective Mass in Hg(1-x) Zn(x) Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yi-Gao; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    In this work, the intrinsic carrier concentration and electron effective mass in Hg(l-x)Zn(x)Te were numerically calculated. We adopt the procedures similar to those used by Su et. al. for calculating intrinsic carrier concentrations in Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te which solve the exact dispersion relation in Kane model for the calculation of the conduction band electron concentrations and the corresponding electron effective masses. No approximation beyond those inherent in the k centered dot p model was used here.

  3. Effect of electron-to-ion mass ratio on radial electric field generation in tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenqian; Dong, Jiaqi; Sheng, Zhengmao; Yu, M. Y.; Wang, Weixing

    2018-01-01

    Generation of coherent radial electric fields in plasma by drift-wave turbulence driven by plasma inhomogeneities is ab initio studied using gyro-kinetic particle simulation for conditions of operational tokamaks. In particular, the effect of the electron-to-ion mass ratio ɛ on the entire evolution of the plasma is considered. It is found that the electric field can be increased, and the turbulence-induced particle transport reduced, by making ɛ smaller, in agreement with many existing experimental observations.

  4. Reduction of space charge effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a supplemental electron source inside the skimmer: ion transmission and mass spectral characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praphairaksit; Houk

    2000-06-01

    An electron source consisting of a heated filament has been added to the skimmer to suppress space charge effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Electrons from this source can reduce the space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the ion beam. As a result, ion transmission efficiency and analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved across the full mass range. MO+/M+ abundance ratios are not affected, M2+/M+ abundance ratios increase only slightly, and no new background ions are created by this electron injection technique.

  5. Observation of free electron cyclotron resonance in NaAlSi3O8 feldspar: Direct determination of the effective electron mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Nicholis, J.E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    2001-01-01

    We report the first observation of cyclotron resonances in alkali feldspars, using highly sensitive optical detection methods. In Na-feldspar (NaAlSi3O8). a near isotropic effective electron mass value of m(c)(*) = 0.79m, has been determined. The significance of this measurement in terms of the o......We report the first observation of cyclotron resonances in alkali feldspars, using highly sensitive optical detection methods. In Na-feldspar (NaAlSi3O8). a near isotropic effective electron mass value of m(c)(*) = 0.79m, has been determined. The significance of this measurement in terms...

  6. Chemical electron-transfer reactions in electrospray mass spectrometry: Effective oxidation potentials of electron-transfer reagents in methylene chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, G.J.; Zhou, F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1994-10-15

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV), UV/visible absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) are used in conjunction to study the mono- and /or dications produced in solution from the reaction of three model compounds ([beta]-carotene, cobalt(II) octaethylporphyrin (Co[sup II]OEP), nickel(II) octaethylporphyrin (Ni[sup II]OEP), in three different solvent/electron-transfer reagent systems (methylene chloride/0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) (v/v), methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) v/v/200 [mu]M), methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/0.1% antimony pentafluoride (SbF[sub 5]) (v/v/v)). The reactions were carried out on-line with ES-MS by means of flow injection. Correlation of the CV data for these analytes with the ionic species determined to be in the solution on the basis of UV/visible absorption spectra and/or on the basis of the ionic species observed in the gas phase by ES-MS, along with our previously published data on these solvent/reagent systems, allowed an effective oxidation potential range, E, to be assigned to these solvent/reagent systems: methylene chloride/0.1% TFA (v/v), 0.6V [le] E[sub TFA] < 0.7 V; methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/DDQ (v/v/200 [mu]M), 0.8 [le] E[sub TFA/DDQ] < 1.0 V; methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/0.1% SbF[sub 5] (v/v/v), 1.3 [le] E[sub TFA/SbF(5)] < 1.5. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Oriented tuning the photovoltaic properties of γ-RbGeX3 by strain-induced electron effective mass mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhuo-Liang; Ma, Qi-Rui; Liu, Biao; Zhao, Yu-Qing; Wang, Lin-Zhi; Zhou, Hong; Cai, Meng-Qiu

    2017-11-01

    Based on the concept of green environmental protection, we hope to find a substitute for lead perovskites to reduce the pollution and achieve high photoelectric conversion efficiency. In this paper, the structural, electronic and optical properties of γ-RbGeX3 (X  =  Cl, Br and I) hybrid perovskites are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The result shows that the γ-RbGeI3 has direct band gap of 1.38 eV and exhibits strong optical absorption in the visible light spectrum. However, the electron effective mass in the z direction is larger, which restricts the carrier mobility in the (0 0 1) direction. The blemish can be overcome by applying the  ‑2% strain in the z direction, which causes the mutation of electron effective mass from 1.35 to 0.09 with little influence on the value of the band gap and the hole effective mass. These above findings also offer a new view to explore the inorganic perovskite for solar cell absorbers.

  8. Electron effective mass in Al{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}N alloys determined by mid-infrared optical Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schöche, S., E-mail: schoeche@huskers.unl.edu; Kühne, P.; Hofmann, T.; Schubert, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering and CNFM, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska, 68588-0511 (United States); Nilsson, D.; Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Janzén, E.; Darakchieva, V. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, 581 83 (Sweden)

    2013-11-18

    The effective electron mass parameter in Si-doped Al{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}N is determined to be m{sup ∗}=(0.336±0.020) m{sub 0} from mid-infrared optical Hall effect measurements. No significant anisotropy of the effective electron mass parameter is found supporting theoretical predictions. Assuming a linear change of the effective electron mass with the Al content in AlGaN alloys and m{sup ∗}=0.232 m{sub 0} for GaN, an average effective electron mass of m{sup ∗}=0.376 m{sub 0} can be extrapolated for AlN. The analysis of mid-infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements further confirms the two phonon mode behavior of the E{sub 1}(TO) and one phonon mode behavior of the A{sub 1}(LO) phonon mode in high-Al-content AlGaN alloys as seen in previous Raman scattering studies.

  9. Electrical transport, electrothermal transport, and effective electron mass in single-crystalline In2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Natalie; Bierwagen, Oliver; Ramu, Ashok T.; Speck, James S.

    2013-08-01

    A comprehensive study of the room-temperature electrical and electrothermal transport of single-crystalline indium oxide (In2O3) and indium tin oxide (ITO) films over a wide range of electron concentrations is reported. We measured the room-temperature Hall mobility μH and Seebeck coefficient S of unintentionally doped and Sn-doped high-quality, plasma-assisted molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown In2O3 for volume Hall electron concentrations nH from 7×1016 cm-3 (unintentionally doped) to 1×1021 cm-3 (highly Sn-doped, ITO). The resulting empirical S(nH) relation can be directly used in other In2O3 samples to estimate the volume electron concentration from simple Seebeck coefficient measurements. The mobility and Seebeck coefficient were modeled by a numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. Ionized impurity scattering and polar optical phonon scattering were found to be the dominant scattering mechanisms. Acoustic phonon scattering was found to be negligible. Fitting the temperature-dependent mobility above room temperature of an In2O3 film with high mobility allowed us to find the effective Debye temperature (ΘD=700 K) and number of phonon modes (NOPML=1.33) that best describe the polar optical phonon scattering. The modeling also yielded the Hall scattering factor rH as a function of electron concentration, which is not negligible (rH≈1.4) at nondegenerate electron concentrations. Fitting the Hall-scattering-factor corrected concentration-dependent Seebeck coefficient S(n) for nondegenerate samples to the numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and to widely used, simplified equations allowed us to extract an effective electron mass of m*=(0.30±0.03)me (with free electron mass me). The modeled mobility and Seebeck coefficient based on polar optical phonon and ionized impurity scattering describes the experimental results very accurately up to electron concentrations of 1019 cm-3, and qualitatively explains a mobility plateau or local

  10. Determination of total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for different shielding materials used in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida J, A. T. [FUNDACENTRO, Centro Regional de Minas Gerais, Brazilian Institute for Safety and Health at Work, Belo Horizonte, 30180-100 Minas Gerais (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S. [Center of Development of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santos, M. A. P., E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.br [Regional Center for Nuclear Science / CNEN, 50.740-540 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In this paper, the interaction of X-rays with some shielding materials has been studied for materials containing different amounts of barite and aggregates. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μ{sub t}) for three shielding materials has been calculated by using WinXCOM program in the energy range from RQR qualities (RQR-4, RQR-6, RQR-9, and RQR-10). They were: cream barite (density 2.99 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Sao Paulo), purple barite (density 2.95 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Bahia) and white barite (density 3.10 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Paraiba). The chemical analysis was carried out by an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer model EDX-720, through dispersive energy. The six elements of the higher concentration found in the sample and analyzed by Spectrophotometry of Energy Dispersive X-ray for the samples were Ba(60.9% - white barite), Ca(17,92% - cream barite), Ce(3,60% - white barite), Fe(17,16% - purple barite), S(12,11% - white barite) and Si(29,61% - purple barite). Also, the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and the effective electron density (N{sub eff}) were calculated using the values of the total mass attenuation coefficient. The dependence of these parameters on the incident photon energy and the chemical composition has been examined. (Author)

  11. First-principles investigation of electronic structure, effective carrier masses, and optical properties of ferromagnetic semiconductor CdCr2S4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu-Hui, Zhu; Xiang-Rong, Chen; Bang-Gui, Liu

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structures, the effective masses, and optical properties of spinel CdCr2S4 are studied by using the full-potential linearized augmented planewave method and a modified Becke-Johnson exchange functional within the density-functional theory. Most importantly, the effects of the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on the electronic structures and carrier effective masses are investigated. The calculated band structure shows a direct band gap. The electronic effective mass and the hole effective mass are analytically determined by reproducing the calculated band structures near the BZ center. SOC substantially changes the valence band top and the hole effective masses. In addition, we calculated the corresponding optical properties of the spinel structure CdCr2S4. These should be useful to deeply understand spinel CdCr2S4 as a ferromagnetic semiconductor for possible semiconductor spintronic applications. Project supported by the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. U1430117 and U1230201).

  12. Mass Customization in the electronics industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Lars

    2006-01-01

    American Power Conversion (APC), a company in the electronics industry, has used the principles of mass customisation to achieve major improvements in its efficiency and performance. APC sells, designs, produces, delivers, and installs large complex infrastructure systems for data centres...

  13. Electron mass stopping power in H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursa, Dmitry V.; Zammit, Mark C.; Threlfall, Robert L.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Bray, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Calculations of electron mass stopping power (SP) of electrons in H2 have been performed using the convergent close-coupling method for incident electron energies up to 2000 eV. Convergence of the calculated SP has been established by increasing the size of the close-coupling expansion from 9 to 491 states. Good agreement was found with the SP measurements of Munoz et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 433, 253 (2007), 10.1016/j.cplett.2006.10.114].

  14. Tuning the Electronic Properties, Effective Mass and Carrier Mobility of MoS2 Monolayer by Strain Engineering: First-Principle Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuc, Huynh V.; Hieu, Nguyen N.; Hoi, Bui D.; Hieu, Nguyen V.; Thu, Tran V.; Hung, Nguyen M.; Ilyasov, Victor V.; Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Nguyen, Chuong V.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the electronic properties, effective masses, and carrier mobility of monolayer MoS_2 using density functional theory calculations. The carrier mobility was considered by means of ab initio calculations using the Boltzmann transport equation coupled with deformation potential theory. The effects of mechanical biaxial strain on the electronic properties, effective mass, and carrier mobility of monolayer MoS_2 were also investigated. It is demonstrated that the electronic properties, such as band structure and density of state, of monolayer MoS_2 are very sensitive to biaxial strain, leading to a direct-indirect transition in semiconductor monolayer MoS_2. Moreover, we found that the carrier mobility and effective mass can be enhanced significantly by biaxial strain and by lowering temperature. The electron mobility increases over 12 times with a biaxial strain of 10%, while the carrier mobility gradually decreases with increasing temperature. These results are very useful for the future nanotechnology, and they make monolayer MoS_2 a promising candidate for application in nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Attenuation of matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with a supplemental electron source inside the skimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praphairaksit; Houk

    2000-06-01

    Electrons are added from a heated filament at the base of the skimmer to reduce the space charge repulsion in the ion beam. This technique improves the analyte sensitivity moderately and also minimizes the matrix effects caused by other elements in the sample significantly. The suppression of signal for even the most troublesome combination of light analyte and heavy matrix elements can be attenuated from 90 to 99% to only 2-10% for 2 mM matrix solutions with an ultrasonic nebulizer. The supplemental electron current can be adjusted to "titrate" out the matrix effects as desired.

  16. Mass Customization in the Electronics Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Lars

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how Amercian Power Conversion (APC), a company in the electronics industry, has used the principles of mass customization to achieve major improvements of its efficiency and performance. APC sells, designs, produces, delivers, and installs large complex infrastructure systems...

  17. New understanding of photocatalytic properties of zigzag and armchair g-C3N4 nanotubes from electronic structures and carrier effective mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Cheng, Bei

    2018-02-01

    Low-dimensional g-C3N4 nanostructures own distinct electronic structure and remarkable photocatalytic properties, hence their wide application in the photocatalysis field. However, the correlations of structures and photoinduced carrier migrations with the photocatalytic properties of g-C3N4 nanostructures remain unclear. In this study, the geometrical and electronic structures and the photocatalytic properties of zigzag (n, 0) and armchair (n, n) g-C3N4 nanotubes (n = 6, 9, 12) were systematically investigated using hybrid DFT. Results indicated that the differences in geometrical structures of g-C3N4 nanotubes changed the band gaps and effective mass of carriers. Accordingly, the photocatalytic properties of g-C3N4 nanotubes also changed. Notably, the change trends of band gaps and the effective mass of the electrons and holes were the opposite for zigzag (n, 0) and armchair (n, n) g-C3N4 nanotubes. The absolute band edge potential of (n, 0) and (n, n) g-C3N4 nanotubes can split water for hydrogen production. These theoretical results revealed the correlations of structures and carrier effective mass with the photocatalytic properties of g-C3N4 nanotubes, and provided significant guidance for designing low-dimensional g-C3N4 nanostructures.

  18. Electronic structures and effective masses of photogenerated carriers of CaZrTi2O7 photocatalyst: First-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Chen, Shifu; Zhu, Yongfa

    2012-09-01

    The band structures, density of states and effective masses of photogenerated carriers for CaZrTi2O7 photocatalyst were performed using first principles method with the virtual crystal approximation. The results indicated that CaZrTi2O7 has an indirect band gap of about 3.25 eV. The upper valence bands of CaZrTi2O7 are formed by O 2p states mixed with Ti 3d states, Zr 4d, 4p and 5s states, while the conduction bands are dominated by Ti 3d states, Zr 4d states and O 2p states. The calculated valence bands maximum (VBM) potential is located at 2.60 V (vs. normal hydrogen electrode (NHE)), while the conduction bands minimum (CBM) potential at -0.65 V. Therefore, CaZrTi2O7 has the ability to split water to hydrogen and oxygen under UV light irradiation. The calculated minimum effective mass of electron in CBM is about 1.35 m0, and the minimum effective mass of hole in VBM is about 1.23 m0. The lighter effective masses facilitate the migration of photogenerated carriers and improve photocatalytic performance.

  19. Electron impact mass spectrometry of alkanes in supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1995-02-01

    The electron impact mass spectrometry of straight chain alkanes C8H18-C40H82, squalane, methylstearate, 1-chlorohexadecane, 1-bromohexadecane, and dioctylphthalate was studied by sampling them with supersonic molecular beams. A fly-through Brink-type electron impact ion source was used, utilizing a vacuum background ion filtration technique based on differences between the kinetic energy of the supersonic beam species and that of thermal molecules. The 70-eV electron impact mass spectra of all the alkanes were characterized by a pronounced or dominant molecular weight peak together with all the fragment ions normally exhibited by the standard thermal 70-eV EI mass spectra. In contrast, the NIST library of most of these molecules did not show any molecular weight peak. By eliminating tile intramolecular thermal vibrational energy we gained control over the degree of molecular ion fragmentation by the electron energy. At an electron energy of 18 eV the molecular ion dissociation was further reduced considerably, with only a small absolute reduction in the peak height by less than a factor of 2. The effect of vibrational cooling increased with the molecular size and number of atoms. Pronounced differences were observed between the mass spectra of the straight chain triacontane and its branched isomer squalane. Similar mass spectra of octacosane (C28H58) achieved with 70-eV EI in a supersonic molecular beam were obtained with a magnetic sector mass spectrometer by using an electron energy of 14 eV and an ion source temperature of 150 °C. However, this ion source temperature precluded the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of octacosane. The GC-MS of alkanes was studied with an ion trap gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer at an ion source temperature of 230 °C. Thermal peak tailing was observed for C20H42 and heavier alkanes, whereas for C28H58 and heavier alkanes the severe peak tailing made quantitative GC-MS impractical. In contrast, no peak tailing

  20. An upper limit on electron antineutrino mass from Troitsk experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aseev, V N; Berlev, A I; Geraskin, E V; Golubev, A A; Likhovid, N A; Lobashev, V M; Nozik, A A; Pantuev, V S; Parfenov, V I; Skasyrskaya, A K; Tkachev, F V; Zadorozhny, S V

    2011-01-01

    An electron antineutrino mass has been measured in tritium beta-decay in the "Troitsk nu-mass" experiment. The setup consists of a windowless gaseous tritium source and an electrostatic electron spectrometer. The whole data set acquired from 1994 to 2004 was re-analysed. A thorough selection of data with the reliable experimental conditions has been performed. We checked every known systematic effect and got the following experimental estimate for neutrino mass squared m_{nu}^{2}=-0.67+/- 2.53 {eV}^{2}. This gives an experimental upper sensitivity limit of m_{nu}<2.2 eV and upper limit estimates m_{nu}<2.12 eV, 95% C. L. for Bayesian statistics and m_{nu}<2.05 eV, 95% C. L. for the Feldman and Cousins approach.

  1. Electron Ionization Mass Spectrum of Tellurium Hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Richard A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Peterson, James M.; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2015-05-18

    The first electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5+, TeF4+ TeF3+, TeF2+, TeF1+, and Te+, Te2+. A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the even fluoride bearing ions: TeF1+ < TeF3+ < TeF5+, and a decreasing abundance was observed for the even fragment series: Te(0)+ > TeF2+ > TeF4+ > TeF6+, with the molecular ion TeF6+ not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6+.

  2. EFFECTIVE ELECTRONIC TUTORIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Fedoseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes effective electronic tutorials creation and application based on the theory of pedagogy. Herewith the issues of necessary electronic tutorial functional, ways of the educational process organization with the use of information and communication technologies and the logistics of electronic educational resources are touched upon. 

  3. The Mass Attenuation Coefficients, Electronic, Atomic, and Molecular Cross Sections, Effective Atomic Numbers, and Electron Densities for Compounds of Some Biomedically Important Elements at 59.5 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Akça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mass attenuation coefficients for compounds of biomedically important some elements (Na, Mg, Al, Ca, and Fe have been measured by using an extremely narrow collimated-beam transmission method in the energy 59.5 keV. Total electronic, atomic, and molecular cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities have been obtained by using these results. Gamma-rays of 241Am passed through compounds have been detected by a high-resolution Si(Li detector and by using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDXRF. Obtained results have been compared with theoretically calculated values of WinXCom and FFAST. The relative difference between the experimental and theoretical values are −9.4% to +11.9% with WinXCom and −11.8% to +11.7% FFAST. Results have been presented and discussed in this paper.

  4. Electronic Equipment Cooling by Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, COOLING, HEAT TRANSFER, SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT, HIGH ALTITUDE, DENSITY, THERMAL STRESSES, AIR, COOLING AND VENTILATING EQUIPMENT, FLUIDS, COOLANTS, HEAT EXCHANGERS, WATER, MASS TRANSFER .

  5. Crystallization in mass-asymmetric electron-hole bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, P.; Filinov, A.; Bonitz, M.; Stolz, H.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2007-03-01

    We analyze hole crystallization [1] in an electron-hole bilayer system and specifically study the effect of the hole to electron mass ratio M. Varying M between 1 and 100 at a fixed layer separation at low temperature and high density, we demonstrate that the hole behavior can be tuned from delocalized (liquid-like) to localized (crystal-like), while the electrons remain delocalized all the time. As was recently demonstrated [1] in bulk systems holes undergo a crystallization transition if M exceeds a critical value of 83. Here we extend this analysis to bilayer systems and demonstrate that the critical mass ratio can be drastically reduced by properly choosing the layer separation. The complicated interplay between Coulomb correlations and quantum effects of electrons and holes is fully taken into account by performing first principle path integral Monte Carlo simulations. [1] M. Bonitz, V.S. Filinov, V.E. Fortov, P.R. Levashov, and H. Fehske, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 235006 (2005) and J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39, 4717 (2006); Phys. Rev. Focus, December 2 2005 [2] P. Ludwig, A. Filinov, Yu. Lozovik, H. Stolz, and M. Bonitz, Contrib. Plasma Phys. (2007)

  6. Large positive correlation between the effective electron mass and the multipolar fluctuation in the heavy-fermion metal Ce1-xLaxB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dongjin; Portnichenko, Pavlo Y.; Cameron, Alistair S.; Friemel, Gerd; Dukhnenko, Anatoliy V.; Shitsevalova, Natalya Y.; Filipov, Volodymyr B.; Schneidewind, Astrid; Ivanov, Alexandre; Inosov, Dmytro S.; Brando, Manuel

    2017-11-01

    For the last few decades, researchers have been intrigued by multipolar ordering phenomena and related quantum phase transitions in heavy-fermion Kondo systems. However, a criticality induced by substitution level (x), temperature (T), or magnetic field (B) is poorly understood even in the prototypical material, Ce1-xLaxB6, despite a large collection of experimental results is available. In this work, we present T-B, x-T, and x-B phase diagrams of Ce1-xLaxB6 (B || [110]). These are completed by investigating heat capacity, magnetocaloric effect (MCE), and elastic neutron scattering. A drastic increase of the Sommerfeld coefficient γ0, which is estimated from the heat capacity down to 0.05 K, is observed with increasing x. The precise T-B phase diagram including a high-entropy region is derived from the MCE analysis in which a knowledge beyond the equilibrium thermodynamics is involved. Finally, the x-B phase diagram at T = 0, which supports the existence of a quantum critical point at x > 0.75, is obtained by the same analysis. A detailed interpretation of phase diagrams strongly indicates positive correlation between the fluctuating multipoles and the effective electron mass.

  7. THE ELECTRONIC COURSE OF HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Solodov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electronic course of heat and mass transfer in power engineering is presented containing the full Electronic book as the structured hypertext document, the full set of Mathcad-documents with the whole set of educative computer models of heat and mass transfer, the computer labs, and selected educational presentations. 

  8. AM1 and electron impact mass spectrometry study of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, in electron impact mass spectrometry (EIMS), it has been found a good correlation between the fragmentation processes of coumarins and the electronic charges of the atoms of their skeleton. In this paper, the same analytical method has been applied to 4-acyl isochroman-1,3-diones, whose mass spectra had ...

  9. Determination of Effective Thoracic Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H. Marcus

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective thoracic mass is an important parameter in specifying mathematical and mechanical models (such as crash dummies of humans exposed to impact conditions. A method is developed using a numerical optimizer to determine effective thoracic mass (and mass distribution given a number of acceleration signals and a force signal response. Utilizing previously reported lateral and frontal impact tests with human cadaveric test specimens in a number of different conditions, the effective thoracic mass is computed. The effective thoracic masses are then computed for a variety of crash dummies exposed to identical test conditions.

  10. Reconstruction of Low-Mass Electron Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    This note discusses the reconstruction of J/y and ¡ decays to electron pairs based on ATLAS Monte Carlo simulated signal and background samples. The possible trigger strategies are described, one geared to select two low-energy electromagnetic objects in direct production, the second one taking advantage of the possible presence of a muon in the final state in b¯b production followed by the decay of one b-quark to J/y +X. The low-energy electrons are reconstructed using a dedicated algorithm seeded by a track reconstructed in the inner detector and identified combining information from the inner detector and the electromagnetic calorimeter. The performance of this algorithm is presented and the potential of using such events for early LHC data studies is investigated.

  11. Proton–electron mass ratio from HD+ revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Sayan; Karr, J.-Ph; Hilico, L.; Germann, M.; Korobov, V. I.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present a new derivation of the proton–electron mass ratio from the hydrogen molecular ion, HD+. The derivation entails the adjustment of the mass ratio in highly precise theory so as to reproduce accurately measured ro-vibrational frequencies. This work is motivated by recent improvements of the theory, as well as the more accurate value of the electron mass in the recently published CODATA-14 set of fundamental constants, which justifies using it as input data in the adjustment, rather than the proton mass value as done in previous works. This leads to significantly different sensitivity coefficients and, consequently, a different value and larger uncertainty margin of the proton–electron mass ratio as obtained from HD+.

  12. Determination of the Electron Neutrino Mass from Experiments on Electron-Capture Beta-Decay (EC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the programme is to measure the electron-neutrino mass, for which at present an upper limit of 500~eV is known. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment studies the shape of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum in electron-capture near its upper end-point and deduces a mass from small shape changes completely analogous to those in the well-known determination of the electron antineutrino mass in the tritium beta-minus decay. \\\\ \\\\ In a low-energy bremsstrahlung process, the capture takes place from a virtual S state associated with a radiative P~@A~S electromagnetic transition, and the resonant nature of the process leads to important enhancements of the photon intensities at low energy, in particular near the resonance energies co (X-rays). This effect gives this type of experiment a chance to compete with experiments on continuous beta spectra. \\\\ \\\\ The programme concentrates on two long-lived isotopes: \\\\ \\\\ 1)~~|1|6|3Ho. The Q value for this isotope has been found to be 2.6-2.7 keV. A detector specially construct...

  13. Neutrino mass, electron capture, and the shake-off contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faessler, Amand; Gastaldo, Loredana; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2017-04-01

    Electron capture can determine the electron neutrino mass, while the β decay of tritium measures the electron antineutrino mass and the neutrinoless double β decay observes the Majorana neutrino mass. In electron capture, e.g., Ho16367+e-→Dy16366*+νe , one can determine the electron neutrino mass from the upper end of the decay spectrum of the excited Dy, which is given by the Q value minus the neutrino mass. The excitation of Dy is described by one, two, and even three hole excitations limited by the Q value. These states decay by x-ray and Auger electron emissions. The total decay energy is measured in a bolometer. These excitations have been studied by Robertson and by Faessler et al. In addition the daughter atom Dy can also be excited by moving in the capture process one (or more) electrons into the continuum. The escape of these continuum electrons is automatically included in the experimental bolometer spectrum. Recently a method developed by Intemann and Pollock was used by DeRujula and Lusignoli for a rough estimate of this shake-off process for "s " wave electrons in capture on 163Ho. The purpose of the present work is to give a more reliable description of "s " wave shake-off in electron capture on holmium. One uses the sudden approximation to calculate the spectrum of the decay of Dy16366* after electron capture on Ho16367. For that one needs very accurate atomic wave functions of Ho in its ground state and excited atomic wave functions of Dy including a description of the continuum electrons. DeRujula and Lusignoli use screened nonrelativistic Coulomb wave functions for the Ho electrons 3 s and 4 s and calculate the Dy* states by first-order perturbation theory based on Ho. In the present approach the wave functions of Ho and Dy* are determined self-consistently with the antisymmetrized relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach. The relativistic continuum electron wave functions for the ionized Dy* are obtained in the corresponding self

  14. Effective mass of two-dimensional electrons in InGaAsN/GaAsSb type II quantum well by Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamata, Shuichi, E-mail: s-kawamata@riast.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Kawamura, Yuichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Research Organization for University-Community Collaborations, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan); Hibino, Akira; Tanaka, Sho [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2016-10-14

    In order to develop optical devices for 2–3 μm wavelength regions, the InP-based InGaAs/GaAsSb type II multiple quantum well system has been investigated. By doping nitrogen into InGaAs layers, the system becomes effective in creating the optical devices with a longer wavelength. In this report, electrical transport properties are reported on the InGaAsN/GaAsSb type II system. The epitaxial layers with the single hetero or multiple quantum well structure on InP substrates are grown by the molecular beam epitaxy. The electrical resistance of samples with different nitrogen concentrations has been measured as a function of the magnetic field up to 9 Tesla at several temperatures between 2 and 6 K. The oscillation of the resistance due to the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect has been observed at each temperature. The effective mass is obtained from the temperature dependence of the amplitude of the SdH oscillations. The value of the effective mass increases from 0.048 for N = 0.0% to 0.062 for N = 1.2 and 1.5% as the nitrogen concentration increases. The mass enhancement occurs with corresponding to the reduction of the bandgap energy. These results are consistent with the band anticrossing model.

  15. Exciton formation and dissociation in mass-asymmetric electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehske, H [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Domstrasse 10a, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Filinov, V [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Bonitz, M [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Lehrstuhl Statistische Physik, Leibnizstrasse 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Fortov, V [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Levashov, P [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation)

    2005-01-01

    First-principle path integral Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to analyze correlation effects in complex electron-hole plasmas, particularly with regard to the appearance of excitonic bound states. Results are discussed in relation to exciton formation in unconventional semiconductors with large electron hole mass asymmetry.

  16. Two old ways to measure the electron-neutrino mass

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, A

    2013-01-01

    Three decades ago, the measurement of the electron neutrino mass in atomic electron capture (EC) experiments was scrutinized in its two variants: single EC and neutrino-less double EC. For certain isotopes an atomic resonance enormously enhances the expected decay rates. The favoured technique, based on calorimeters as opposed to spectrometers, has the advantage of greatly simplifying the theoretical analysis of the data. After an initial surge of measurements, the EC approach did not seem to be competitive. But very recently, there has been great progress on micro-calorimeters and the measurement of atomic mass differences. Meanwhile, the beta-decay neutrino-mass limits have improved by a factor of 15, and the difficulty of the experiments by the cube of that figure. Can the "calorimetric" EC theory cope with this increased challenge? I answer this question affirmatively. In so doing I briefly review the subject and extensively address some persistent misunderstandings of the underlying quantum physics.

  17. Nanoscale intracellular mass-density alteration as a signature of the effect of alcohol on early carcinogenesis: A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study

    CERN Document Server

    Ghimire, Hemendra M; Sahay, Peeyush; Almabadi, Huda; Tripathi, Vibha; Skalli, Omar; Rao, R K; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption interferes with the functioning of multiple organ systems, causing changes in the chemistry, physiology and pathology of tissues and cellular organelles. Although epigenetic modifications underlie the development of cancer, exposure to carcinogenic chemicals, such as alcohol, can also contribute to disease development. However, the effects of chronic alcoholism on normal or pre-carcinogenic cells/tissues in different organelles are not well understood. Therefore, we herein study the effect of alcohol consumption on colonic nucleus using control and azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) treated carcinogenic mice. Previous studies showed that progression of carcinogenesis is associated with increase in the degree of intranuclear nanoscale structural disorder. In the present work, we quantify the degree of nanostructural disorder as a measure of carcinogenesis. To accomplish this, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of respective colonic epithelial cell nuclei are use...

  18. Effective mass of quasiparticles from thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, F. G.; Holzmann, Markus; Vignale, G.

    2017-07-01

    We discuss the potential advantages of calculating the effective mass of quasiparticles in the interacting electron liquid from the low-temperature free energy vis-a-vis the conventional approach, in which the effective mass is obtained from approximate calculations of the self-energy, or from a quantum Monte Carlo evaluation of the energy of a variational "quasiparticle wave function". While raw quantum Monte Carlo data are presently too sparse to allow for an accurate determination of the effective mass, the values estimated by this method are numerically close to the ones obtained in previous calculations using diagrammatic many-body theory. In contrast to this, a recently published parametrization of quantum Monte Carlo data for the free energy of the homogeneous electron liquid yields effective masses that considerably deviate from previous calculations and even change sign for low densities, reflecting an unphysical negative entropy. We suggest that this anomaly is related to the treatment of the exchange energy at finite temperature.

  19. Mass-Gathering Medical Care in Electronic Dance Music Festivals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGibbon, Kathleen M; Nable, Jose V; Ayd, Benjamin; Lawner, Benjamin J; Comer, Angela C; Lichenstein, Richard; Levy, Matthew J; Seaman, Kevin G; Bussey, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Introduction Electronic dance music (EDM) festivals represent a unique subset of mass-gathering events with limited guidance through literature or legislation to guide mass-gathering medical care at these events. Hypothesis/Problem Electronic dance music festivals pose unique challenges with increased patient encounters and heightened patient acuity under-estimated by current validated casualty predication models. This was a retrospective review of three separate EDM festivals with analysis of patient encounters and patient transport rates. Data obtained were inserted into the predictive Arbon and Hartman models to determine estimated patient presentation rate and patient transport rates. The Arbon model under-predicted the number of patient encounters and the number of patient transports for all three festivals, while the Hartman model under-predicted the number of patient encounters at one festival and over-predicted the number of encounters at the other two festivals. The Hartman model over-predicted patient transport rates for two of the three festivals. Electronic dance music festivals often involve distinct challenges and current predictive models are inaccurate for planning these events. The formation of a cohesive incident action plan will assist in addressing these challenges and lead to the collection of more uniform data metrics. FitzGibbon KM , Nable JV , Ayd B , Lawner BJ , Comer AC , Lichenstein R , Levy MJ , Seaman KG , Bussey I . Mass-gathering medical care in electronic dance music festivals. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):563-567.

  20. The enigmatic electron a doorway to particle masses

    CERN Document Server

    MacGregor, Malcolm H

    2013-01-01

    This book offers a new look at the electron. It was the first elementary particle discovered, is probably one of the simplest, and yet is possibly one of the most misunderstood. The author presents here a straightforward classical model that accurately reproduces the main spectroscopic features of the electron, and also its principal quantum aspects. The key to this model is the relativistically spinning sphere, RSS, which has been clamoring for recognition for decades. Although its electrical charge is point-like, the electron itself is Compton-sized, and is composed mainly of non-electromagnetic "mechanical" matter. The bridge between the electron and the other elementary particles is provided by the fine structure constant alpha~1/137, as manifested in the factor-of-137 spacings between the classical electron radius, electron Compton radius, and Bohr orbit radius. An expanded form of the constant alpha leads to equations that define the transformation of electromagnetic energy into electron mass/energy, an...

  1. Physical principles of the amplification of electromagnetic radiation due to negative electron masses in a semiconductor superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorokhov, A. V.; Pyataev, M. A.; Khvastunov, N. N.; Hyart, T.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Alekseev, K. N.

    2015-02-01

    In a superlattice placed in crossed static electric and magnetic fields, under certain conditions, the inversion of electron population can appear at which the average energy of electrons is above the middle of the mini-band and the effective mass of the electron is negative. This is the implementation of the negative effective mass amplifier and generator (NEMAG) in the superlattice. It can result in the amplification and generation of terahertz radiation even in the absence of negative differential conductivity.

  2. Mathematical model of mass transfer at electron beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Sergey V.; Sarychev, Vladimir D.; Nevskii, Sergey A.; Kobzareva, Tatyana Yu.; Gromov, Victor E.; Semin, Alexander P.

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes a model of convective mass transfer at electron beam treatment with beams in titanium alloys subjected to electro-explosion alloying by titanium diboride powder. The proposed model is based on the concept that treatment with concentrated flows of energy results in the initiation of vortices in the melted layer. The formation mechanism of these vortices rooted in the idea that the availability of temperature drop leads to the initiation of the thermo-capillary convection. For the melted layer of metal the equations of the convective heat transfer and boundary conditions in terms of the evaporated material are written. The finite element solution of these equations showed that electron-beam treatment results in the formation of multi-vortex structure that in developing captures all new areas of material. It leads to the fact that the strengthening particles are observed at the depth increasing many times the depth of their penetration according to the diffusion mechanism. The distribution of micro-hardness at depth and the thickness of strengthening zone determined from these data supported the view that proposed model of the convective mass transfer describes adequately the processes going on in the treatment with low-energy high-current electron beam.

  3. Lepton mass effects in the Bethe–Heitler process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, M.B. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Torino and INFN Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Maieron, C. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Joseph Fourier, INPG, 53 avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); Voutier, E., E-mail: voutier@lpsc.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Joseph Fourier, INPG, 53 avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France)

    2013-10-07

    We develop the full finite lepton mass formalism for the production of real photons via the Bethe–Heitler reaction of unpolarized leptons off unpolarized nucleons. Genuine lepton mass effects are described, in particular their dependence upon the lepton mass and the initial beam energy, as well as their sensitivity to the nucleon isospin. In the minimum momentum transfer region, these effects dominate the muon induced proton cross section and become significant for electron scattering at small x{sub B}.

  4. New electron spin resonance and mass spectrometric studies of metallofullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, A.; Dunsch, L.; Froehner, J.; Kirbach, U.

    1994-10-01

    The preparation by arc vaporization of graphite rods of metal-containing fullerene samples with metals inside the fullerene molecules is described. The metals lanthanum, scandium, holmium and yttrium were used for this study. Results in mass spectrometry confirm the existence and stability of several Me at C82 species. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic measurements of metallofullerene samples in the solid state and in tetrachloroethane solution favor the existence of endohedral systems. The splitting of the ESR spectra is interpreted by isotropic hyperfine coupling of an unpaired electron with the nuclear magnetic moment of a metal ion inside a fullerene molecule. It is concluded that the metal atoms exist in ionic form in endohedral fullerenes both in solid and liquid state of the fullerene. Furthermore it is shown that there is more than one stable position of the metal ion inside the fullerene molecule.

  5. An effective attractive electron-electron interaction and high-Tc superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howson, M.A.; Porter, J.; Morgan, G.J. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Leeds (UK))

    1991-01-15

    The repulsive Coulomb interaction is usually seen as opposing the attractive phonon mediated interaction giving rise to superconductivity. Here we show how the vertex part for electron-electron scattering can lead to an effective attractive Coulomb interaction. We then solve the Eliashberg equations with this effective vertex correction and calculate Tc for a model density of states as we vary the strength of the interaction and the effective mass of the electrons. (orig.).

  6. Model of neutrino effective masses

    CERN Document Server

    Dinh Nguyen Dinh; Nguyen Thi Hong Van; Phi Quang Van

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that an effective (nonrenormalizable) coupling of lepton multiplets to scalar triplets in the 331 model with sterile/exotic neutrinos, can be a good way for generating neutrino masses of different types. The method is simple and avoids radiative/loop calculations which, sometimes, are long and complicated. Basing on some astrophysical arguments it is also stated that the scale of SU(3)L symmetry breaking is at TeV scale, in agreement with earlier investigations. Or equivalently, starting from this symmetry breaking scale we could have sterile/exotic neutrinos with mass of a few keV's which could be used to explain several astrophysical and cosmological puzzles, such as the dark matter, the fast motion of the observed pulsars, the re-ionization of the Universe, etc.

  7. Project 8: Precision Electron Specroscopy to Measure the Mass of the Neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanDevender, Brent A.; Asner, David M.; Bahr, Matthew; Bradley, Rich; Doeleman, Sheperd; Jones, Anthony M.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel; Kelly, James F.; Kofron, J.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah; Patterson, Ryan B.; Rogers, Alan E.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Thummler, Thomas

    2013-10-21

    The Project 8 Collaboration is exploring a new technique for the spectroscopy of medium-energy electrons (* 1 – 100 keV) with the ultimate goal of measuring the effective mass of the electron antineutrino by the tritium endpoint method. Our method is based on the detection of microwave-frequency cyclotron radiation emitted by magnetically trapped electrons. The immediate goal of Project 8 is to demonstrate the utility of this technique for a tritium endpoint experiment through a high-precision measurement of the conversion electron spectrum of 83mKr. We present concepts for detecting this cyclotron radiation, focusing on a guided wave design currently being implemented in a prototype apparatus at the University of Washington.

  8. Effects of maltose and lysine treatment on coffee aroma by flash gas chromatography electronic nose and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuqin; Zhang, Haide; Wen, Nana; Hu, Rongsuo; Wu, Guiping; Zeng, Ying; Li, Xiong; Miao, Xiaodan

    2018-01-01

    Arabica coffee is a sub-tropical agricultural product in China. Coffee undergoes a series of thermal reactions to form abundant volatile profiles after roasting, so it loses a lot of reducing sugars and amino acids. Adding carbonyl compounds with amino acids before roasting could ensure the nutrition and flavour of coffee. The technology is versatile for the development of coffee roasting process. This investigation evaluates the effects of combining maltose and lysine (Lys) to modify coffee aroma and the possibly related mechanisms. Arabica coffee was pretreated with a series of solvent ratios of maltose and Lys with an identical concentration (0.25 mol L -1 ) before microwave heating. It was found that the combination of maltose and Lys significantly (P ≤ 0.05) influenced quality indices of coffee (pH and browning degree). Ninety-six aromatic volatiles have been isolated and identified. Twelve volatile profiles revealed the relationship between fragrance difference and compound content in coffee. Moreover, coffee aroma was modified by a large number of volatiles with different chemical classes and character. Thus, our results suggest that the combination of reagents changed overall aroma quality through a series of complex thermal reactions, especially the ratio of Lys/maltose over 2:1. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density. (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of lanthanides using mass attenuation coefficient from WinXCom and mass energy absorption coef- ficient from Hubbell and Seltzer.

  10. Electronic cigarettes: human health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan-Lyon, Priscilla

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), such as electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), users and non-users are exposed to the aerosol and product constituents. This is a review of published data on the human health effects of exposure to e-cigarettes and their components. Literature searches were conducted through September 2013 using multiple electronic databases. Forty-four articles are included in this analysis. E-cigarette aerosols may contain propylene glycol, glycerol, flavourings, other chemicals and, usually, nicotine. Aerosolised propylene glycol and glycerol produce mouth and throat irritation and dry cough. No data on the effects of flavouring inhalation were identified. Data on short-term health effects are limited and there are no adequate data on long-term effects. Aerosol exposure may be associated with respiratory function impairment, and serum cotinine levels are similar to those in traditional cigarette smokers. The high nicotine concentrations of some products increase exposure risks for non-users, particularly children. The dangers of secondhand and thirdhand aerosol exposure have not been thoroughly evaluated. Scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes is limited. While e-cigarette aerosol may contain fewer toxicants than cigarette smoke, studies evaluating whether e-cigarettes are less harmful than cigarettes are inconclusive. Some evidence suggests that e-cigarette use may facilitate smoking cessation, but definitive data are lacking. No e-cigarette has been approved by FDA as a cessation aid. Environmental concerns and issues regarding non-user exposure exist. The health impact of e-cigarettes, for users and the public, cannot be determined with currently available data.

  11. Electronic cigarettes: human health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan-Lyon, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective With the rapid increase in use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), such as electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), users and non-users are exposed to the aerosol and product constituents. This is a review of published data on the human health effects of exposure to e-cigarettes and their components. Methods Literature searches were conducted through September 2013 using multiple electronic databases. Results Forty-four articles are included in this analysis. E-cigarette aerosols may contain propylene glycol, glycerol, flavourings, other chemicals and, usually, nicotine. Aerosolised propylene glycol and glycerol produce mouth and throat irritation and dry cough. No data on the effects of flavouring inhalation were identified. Data on short-term health effects are limited and there are no adequate data on long-term effects. Aerosol exposure may be associated with respiratory function impairment, and serum cotinine levels are similar to those in traditional cigarette smokers. The high nicotine concentrations of some products increase exposure risks for non-users, particularly children. The dangers of secondhand and thirdhand aerosol exposure have not been thoroughly evaluated. Conclusions Scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes is limited. While e-cigarette aerosol may contain fewer toxicants than cigarette smoke, studies evaluating whether e-cigarettes are less harmful than cigarettes are inconclusive. Some evidence suggests that e-cigarette use may facilitate smoking cessation, but definitive data are lacking. No e-cigarette has been approved by FDA as a cessation aid. Environmental concerns and issues regarding non-user exposure exist. The health impact of e-cigarettes, for users and the public, cannot be determined with currently available data. PMID:24732161

  12. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Krucker, Säm [Also at Institute of 4-D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch, Switzerland. (Switzerland); Lin, Robert P., E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Also at Physics Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  13. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M.A.

    2012-11-30

    Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

  14. Effect of massing on larval growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aidan P; Wallman, James F

    2014-08-01

    Estimation of minimum postmortem interval commonly relies on predicting the age of blowfly larvae based on their size and an estimate of the temperatures to which they have been exposed throughout their development. The majority of larval growth rate data have been developed using small larval masses in order to avoid excess heat generation. The current study collected growth rate data for larvae at different mass volumes, and assessed the temperature production of these masses, for two forensically important blow fly species, Chrysomya rufifacies and Calliphora vicina. The growth rate of larvae in a small mass, exposed to the higher temperatures equivalent to those experienced by large masses, was also assessed to determine if observed differences were due to the known temperature effects of maggot masses. The results showed that temperature production increased with increasing mass volume, with temperature increases of 11 °C observed in the large Ch. rufifacies masses and increases of 5 °C in the large C. vicina masses. Similarly, the growth rate of the larvae was affected by mass size. The larvae from small masses grown at the higher temperatures experienced by large masses displayed an initial delay in growth, but then grew at a similar rate to those larvae at a constant 23 °C. Since these larvae from masses of equivalent sizes displayed similar patterns of growth rate, despite differing temperatures, and these growth rates differed from larger masses exposed to the same temperatures, it can be concluded that larval growth rate within a mass may be affected by additional factors other than temperature. Overall, this study highlights the importance of understanding the role of massing in larval development and provides initial developmental data for mass sizes of two forensically important blowfly species commonly encountered in Australian forensic casework. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Negative effective mass in acoustic metamaterial with nonlinear mass-in-mass subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cveticanin, L.; Zukovic, M.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper the dynamics of the nonlinear mass-in-mass system as the basic subsystem of the acoustic metamaterial is investigated. The excitation of the system is in the form of the Jacobi elliptic function. The corresponding model to this forcing is the mass-in-mass system with cubic nonlinearity of the Duffing type. Mathematical model of the motion is a system of two coupled strong nonlinear and nonhomogeneous second order differential equations. Particular solution to the system is obtained. The analytical solution of the problem is based on the simple and double integral of the cosine Jacobi function. In the paper the integrals are given in the form of series of trigonometric functions. These results are new one. After some modification the simplified solution in the first approximation is obtained. The result is convenient for discussion. Conditions for elimination of the motion of the mass 1 by connection of the nonlinear dynamic absorber (mass - spring system) are defined. In the consideration the effective mass ratio is introduced in the nonlinear mass-in-mass system. Negative effective mass ratio gives the absorption of vibrations with certain frequencies. The advantage of the nonlinear subunit in comparison to the linear one is that the frequency gap is significantly wider. Nevertheless, it has to be mentioned that the amplitude of vibration differs from zero for a small value. In the paper the analytical results are compared with numerical one and are in agreement.

  16. Negative Electron Transfer Dissociation Sequencing of Increasingly Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Oligosaccharides on an Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Franklin E.; Riley, Nicholas M.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    The structural characterization of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) carbohydrates remains an important target for analytical chemists attributable to challenges introduced by the natural complexity of these mixtures and the defined need for molecular-level details to elucidate biological structure-function relationships. Tandem mass spectrometry has proven to be the most powerful technique for this purpose. Previously, electron detachment dissociation (EDD), in comparison to other methods of ion activation, has been shown to provide the largest number of useful cleavages for de novo sequencing of GAG oligosaccharides, but such experiments are restricted to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FTICR-MS). Negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) provides similar fragmentation results, and can be achieved on any mass spectrometry platform that is designed to accommodate ion-ion reactions. Here, we examine for the first time the effectiveness of NETD-Orbitrap mass spectrometry for the structural analysis of GAG oligosaccharides. Compounds ranging in size from tetrasaccharides to decasaccharides were dissociated by NETD, producing both glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages that enabled the location of sulfate modifications. The highly-sulfated, heparin-like synthetic GAG, ArixtraTM, was also successfully sequenced by NETD. In comparison to other efforts to sequence GAG chains without fully ionized sulfate constituents, the occurrence of sulfate loss peaks is minimized by judicious precursor ion selection. The results compare quite favorably to prior results with electron detachment dissociation (EDD). Significantly, the duty cycle of the NETD experiment is sufficiently short to make it an effective tool for on-line separations, presenting a straightforward path for selective, high-throughput analysis of GAG mixtures. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Effective electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions in the Hubbard-Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprea, G. [INFM-CNR SMC Center, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Di Castro, C. [INFM-CNR SMC Center, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Grilli, M. [INFM-CNR SMC Center, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail marco.grilli@roma1.infn.it; Lorenzana, J. [INFM-CNR SMC Center, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2006-06-12

    We investigate the interplay between the electron-electron and the electron-phonon interaction in the Hubbard-Holstein model. We implement the flow-equation method to investigate within this model the effect of correlation on the electron-phonon effective coupling and, conversely, the effect of phonons in the effective electron-electron interaction. Using this technique we obtain analytical momentum-dependent expressions for the effective couplings and we study their behavior for different physical regimes. In agreement with other works on this subject, we find that the electron-electron attraction mediated by phonons in the presence of Hubbard repulsion is peaked at low transferred momenta. The role of the characteristic energies involved is also analyzed.

  18. Cardiovascular effects of electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Neal L; Fraiman, Joseph B

    2017-08-01

    Cardiovascular safety is an important consideration in the debate on the benefits versus the risks of electronic cigarette (EC) use. EC emissions that might have adverse effects on cardiovascular health include nicotine, oxidants, aldehydes, particulates, and flavourants. To date, most of the cardiovascular effects of ECs demonstrated in humans are consistent with the known effects of nicotine. Pharmacological and toxicological studies support the biological plausibility that nicotine contributes to acute cardiovascular events and accelerated atherogenesis. However, epidemiological studies assessing Swedish smokeless tobacco, which exposes users to nicotine without combustion products, generally have not found an increased risk of myocardial infarction or stroke among users, but suggest that nicotine might contribute to acute cardiovascular events, especially in those with underlying coronary heart disease. The effects of aldehydes, particulates, and flavourants derived from ECs on cardiovascular health have not been determined. Although ECs might pose some cardiovascular risk to users, particularly those with existing cardiovascular disease, the risk is thought to be less than that of cigarette smoking based on qualitative and quantitative comparisons of EC aerosol versus cigarette smoke constituents. The adoption of ECs rather than cigarette smoking might, therefore, result in an overall benefit for public health.

  19. Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 82 NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron effective attenuation lengths (EALs) in solid elements and compounds at selected electron energies between 50 eV and 2,000 eV. The database was designed mainly to provide EALs (to account for effects of elastic-eletron scattering) for applications in surface analysis by Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  20. Search for new candidates for the neutrino-oriented mass determination by electron-capture

    CERN Multimedia

    Herfurth, F; Boehm, C; Blaum, K; Beck, D

    2008-01-01

    This proposal is part of an extended program dedicated to the neutrino-mass determination in the electron-capture sector, which aims at ultra-precise mass measurements by Penning traps in combination with cryogenic micro-calorimetry for atomic de-excitation measurements. Here, precise mass measurements with ISOLTRAP are proposed for the orbital electron-capture nuclides $^{194}$Hg and $^{202}$Pb, as well as their daughters, with the goal to determine accurately their Q-values. These values are expected to be the smallest ones among a great variety of known electron-capture precursors. Therefore, these nuclides are strong candidates for an improved electron-neutrino mass determination. We ask for 8 shifts of on-line beam at ISOLDE for mass measurements of $^{194}$Hg, $^{194}$ Au, $^{202}$Pb, and $^{202}$Tl at ISOLTRAP.

  1. Effective mass of free neutrons in neutron star crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamel, Nicolas [Copernicus Astronomical Center (CAMK), Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland) and LUTH, Paris Observatory, 5 place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France)]. E-mail: nchamel@camk.edu.pl

    2006-07-24

    The inner layers of a neutron star crust, composed of a Coulomb lattice of neutron rich nuclear clusters immersed in a sea of 'free' superfluid neutrons, are closely analogous to periodic condensed matter systems such as electronic, photonic or phononic crystals. Applying methods from solid state physics to the neutron star context, it has been recently shown that Bragg scattering leads to a strong renormalization of the neutron mass in the bottom layers of the crust. Knowledge of this effective mass throughout the crust is essential in order to understand the dynamical properties of the neutron superfluid and the origin of pulsar glitches. The purpose of the present work is to evaluate this effective mass in the outermost layers of the inner crust, near the drip point {rho}{sub drip}{approx}4x10{sup 11} g-bar cm{sup -3}. The results are compared with the case of electrons in ordinary solids and as an example the corresponding effective electron mass in copper is calculated.

  2. Proximity effect of electron beam lithography on single-electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    monly used technique in this field, and many researchers have been investigating its application to make nanopatterns. In electron beam lithography, the well-known proximity effect refers to .... electrodes are grounded. The charging effect, which blocks the injection/ejection of a single charge into/from a quantum dot, ...

  3. Precision electron-capture energy in {sup 202}Pb and its relevance for neutrino mass determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Filianin, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Althubiti, N.A.S. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Atanasov, D.; Blaum, K.; Eliseev, S.; Kreim, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cocolios, T.E. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); Herfurth, F.; Neidherr, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Lunney, D. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Manea, V. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Novikov, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Physics Faculty, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Wienholtz, F. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, Greifswald (Germany); Wolf, R.N. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); The University of Sydney, ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, Sydney (Australia); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    Within the framework of an extensive programme devoted to the search for alternative candidates for the neutrino mass determination, the atomic mass difference between {sup 202}Pb and {sup 202}Tl has been measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The obtained value Q{sub EC} = 38.8(43) keV is three times more precise than the AME2012 value. While it will probably not lead to a replacement of {sup 163}Ho in modern experiments on the determination of the electron-neutrino mass, the electron capture in {sup 202}Pb would however allow a determination of the electron-neutrino mass on the few-eV level using a cryogenic micro-calorimeter. (orig.)

  4. Effective photon mass from black-hole formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slava Emelyanov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We compute the value of effective photon mass mγ at one-loop level in QED in the background of small (1010 g≲M≪1016 g spherically symmetric black hole in asymptotically flat spacetime. This effect is associated with the modification of electron/positron propagator in presence of event horizon. Physical manifestations of black-hole environment are compared with those of hot neutral plasma. We estimate the distance to the nearest black hole from the upper bound on mγ obtained in the Coulomb-law test. We also find that corrections to electron mass me and fine structure constant α at one-loop level in QED are negligible in the weak gravity regime.

  5. Type-II superlattice hole effective masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2017-08-01

    A long wavelength infrared (LWIR) type-II superlattice (T2SL) is typically characterized by a very large valence-band-edge curvature effective mass, which is often assumed to lead to poor hole mobility. A detailed examination of the LWIR T2SL heavy-hole 1 (hh1) band structure reveals that a hole with non-zero in-plane momentum (k‖ ≠ 0) can move with a much larger group velocity component along the growth direction than one at the band edge (k‖ = 0), and that the hh1 miniband width can exhibit a very strong dependence on the in-plane wavevector k‖ . To distill the band structure effects relevant to hole transport into a simple quantity, we describe a formulation for computing the thermally averaged conductivity effective mass. We show that the LWIR T2SL hole conductivity effective masses along the growth direction can be orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding band-edge curvature effective masses. We compare the conductivities effective masses of InAs/GaSb T2SL and InAs/InAsSb T2SL grown pseudomorphically on GaSb substrate, as well as the metamorphic bulk InAsSb and InAs/InAsSb T2SL.

  6. Quantum oscillation of the cyclotron mass in two-dimensional electron systems in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaesen, K.F.; Huber, A; Lorenz, H.; Kotthaus, J.P.; Bakker, S.; Klapwijk, T.M

    1996-01-01

    The cyclotron resonance of two-dimensional electron systems in silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor devices is investigated for high electron densities in high magnetic fields. The cyclotron mass, extracted from the resonance frequency, shows an oscillatory behavior. The periodicity of this oscillation

  7. On the electron to proton mass ratio and the proton structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinhammer, Ole L.

    2013-01-01

    We derive an expression for the electron to nucleon mass ratio from a reinterpreted lattice gauge theory Hamiltonian to describe interior baryon dynamics. We use the classical electron radius as our fundamental length scale. Based on expansions on trigonometric Slater determinants for a neutral...

  8. Mass loading effect of shock accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lixue; Wong, George S. K.; Hanes, Peter; Ohm, Won-Suk

    2005-04-01

    Mass loading affects the sensitivity of an accelerometer. The mass loading effect can be corrected using mass loading correction curves published by manufacturers. These curves, however, are only applicable to the sinusoidal acceleration below 500 m/s2. The mass loading effect on the sensitivity of an Endevco 2270 accelerometer in shock calibration, from 500 m/s2 and up, was investigated using a laser vibrometer. A new method for conversion of a velocity signal to an acceleration signal was developed. With this method, the sensitivities of the above accelerometer for different mass loads at different shock levels were measured. The mass loading effect in shock calibration for this accelerometer was then obtained. The limitations of the sensitivity measurements were also studied. The variance of the measured sensitivity was mainly due to the resolution limitation (8-bit) of the A/D converter in the digital oscilloscope. A correlation matching algorithm was then developed that utilizes the similarity between the measured acceleration signal and that converted from the velocity signal to further improve the resolution of the digital oscilloscope.

  9. Simulating Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission for Low Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llama, Joe; Jardine, Moira

    2018-01-01

    Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI) is a powerful technique that enables us to map the large-scale magnetic fields of stars spanning the pre- and main-sequence. Coupling these magnetic maps with field extrapolation methods allow us to investigate the topology of the closed, X-ray bright corona, and the cooler, open stellar wind.Using ZDI maps of young M dwarfs with simultaneous radio light curves obtained from the VLA, we present the results of modeling the Electron-Cyclotron Maser (ECM) emission from these systems. We determine the X-ray luminosity and ECM emission that is produced using the ZDI maps and our field extrapolation model. We compare these findings with the observed radio light curves of these stars. This allows us to predict the relative phasing and amplitude of the stellar X-ray and radio light curves.This benchmarking of our model using these systems allows us to predict the ECM emission for all stars that have a ZDI map and an observed X-ray luminosity. Our model allows us to understand the origin of transient radio emission observations and is crucial for disentangling stellar and exoplanetary radio signals.

  10. Effects of electronic communication in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kam, WJ; Moorman, PW; Koppejan-Mulder, MJ

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To obtain insight into the effects of electronic communication on GPs by studying those publications in literature describing the effects of structured electronic clinical communication in general practice. Methods: We retrieved all publications in the English language indexed in MEDLINE

  11. Mode Interference Effect in Coherent Electron Focusing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenakker, C.W.J.; Houten, H. van; Wees, B.J. van

    1988-01-01

    A novel quantum interference effect in ballistic transport is described: the interference of coherently excited magnetic edge states in a two-dimensional electron gas. The effect explains the characteristic features of the unexpected fine structure observed recently in an electron focusing

  12. Switching Effects in Molecular Electronic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zihao; Ren, Shizhao; Guo, Xuefeng

    2017-06-01

    The creation of molecular electronic switches by using smart molecules is of great importance to the field of molecular electronics. This requires a fundamental understanding of the intrinsic electron transport mechanisms, which depend on several factors including the charge transport pathway, the molecule-electrode coupling strength, the energy of the molecular frontier orbitals, and the electron spin state. On the basis of significant progresses achieved in both experiments and theory over the past decade, in this review article we focus on new insights into the design and fabrication of different molecular switches and the corresponding switching effects, which is crucial to the development of molecular electronics. We summarize the strategies developed for single-molecule device fabrication and the mechanism of these switching effects. These analyses should be valuable for deeply understanding the switching effects in molecular electronic devices.

  13. Effective mass theory of a two-dimensional quantum dot in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effective mass theory; BenDaniel–Duke; quantum dot; electron; magnetic field. PACS Nos 73.21.La; 73.21. ... tronic structure is often understood on the basis of effective mass theory (EMT). In this paper, we use EMT to study the ..... [2] R C Ashoori, Nature (London) 379, 413 (1996). [3] Vijay A Singh and Luv Kumar, Am. J.

  14. Strain effects in the electronic structure of CrN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Tomas; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    Chromium nitride (CrN) has a promising future for its resistance to corrosion and hardness, and fascinating magnetic and electronic properties. CrN presents a phase transition in which the crystal structure, magnetic ordering, and electronic properties change at a (Neel) temperature 280K. Thin films from different groups exhibit varied conductance behavior at low temperature. We have performed ab initio calculations using the LSDA+U method, and estimate the interaction between the Cr-3d and N-2p orbitals, by analyzing the band structure near the optical gap (0.2 eV). We also calculate effective masses and investigate the effect of strain fields on the electronic structure. Our results show that for compressive strain 1.3 % the band gap closes, suggesting that realistic strains could cause a significant change in the electronic structure and could contribute to explain under what experimental conditions the material has metallic behavior. The changes in the effective mass derived from our calculations show a large anisotropy, which would result in anisotropic charge carrier mobility. The mass anisotropy is found to be connected with the magnetic ordering in the lattice. Supported by NSF-DMR 1508325, and the Ohio Supercomputer Center.

  15. Probing the electron beam induced reduction of graphite oxide by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunhua; Hao, Xiaofei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Yeping; Wang, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    The graphite oxide (GO) was reduced successfully by electron-beam irradiation without solution chemistry and high temperature, where the chemical structural changes and gaseous species released during the exposure was monitored directly by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/mass spectrometer. The degree of reduction of GO can be tuned effectively by way of electron beam intensity and irradiation time, resulting a high C/O ratio of 5.27. The evolution of C 1s spectra with irradiation time was also investigated. The CO, CO2, H2 molecules and several organic species were detected during the irradiation, confirmed that the electron beam induced the photoreduction of GO. The combined chemical structure evolution and gas species analysis make the XPS-MS highly desirable as a powerful in situ analytical instrument for tracking the reaction process. The electron-beam-induced reduction described in detail here provides potential way to fabricate graphene device from GO in one step.

  16. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-07

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  17. Hot-electron effect in spin relaxation of electrically injected electrons in intrinsic Germanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T; Wu, M W

    2015-07-01

    The hot-electron effect in the spin relaxation of electrically injected electrons in intrinsic germanium is investigated by the kinetic spin Bloch equations both analytically and numerically. It is shown that in the weak-electric-field regime with E ≲ 0.5 kV cm(-1), our calculations have reasonable agreement with the recent transport experiment in the hot-electron spin-injection configuration (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 257204). We reveal that the spin relaxation is significantly enhanced at low temperature in the presence of weak electric field E ≲ 50 V cm(-1), which originates from the obvious center-of-mass drift effect due to the weak electron-phonon interaction, whereas the hot-electron effect is demonstrated to be less important. This can explain the discrepancy between the experimental observation and the previous theoretical calculation (2012 Phys. Rev. B 86 085202), which deviates from the experimental results by about two orders of magnitude at low temperature. It is further shown that in the strong-electric-field regime with 0.5 ≲ E ≲ 2 kV cm(-1), the spin relaxation is enhanced due to the hot-electron effect, whereas the drift effect is demonstrated to be marginal. Finally, we find that when 1.4 ≲ E ≲ 2 kV cm(-1) which lies in the strong-electric-field regime, a small fraction of electrons (≲5%) can be driven from the L to Γ valley, and the spin relaxation rates are the same for the Γ and L valleys in the intrinsic sample without impurity. With the negligible influence of the spin dynamics in the Γ valley to the whole system, the spin dynamics in the L valley can be measured from the Γ valley by the standard direct optical transition method.

  18. The Use of Low Temperature Detectors for Direct Measurements of the Mass of the Electron Neutrino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nucciotti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed many exciting breakthroughs in neutrino physics. The detection of neutrino oscillations has proved that neutrinos are massive particles, but the assessment of their absolute mass scale is still an outstanding challenge in today particle physics and cosmology. Since low temperature detectors were first proposed for neutrino physics experiments in 1984, there has been tremendous technical progress: today this technique offers the high energy resolution and scalability required to perform competitive experiments challenging the lowest electron neutrino masses. This paper reviews the thirty-year effort aimed at realizing calorimetric measurements with sub-eV neutrino mass sensitivity using low temperature detectors.

  19. Effective mass spectrometer. [History and accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, D.

    1979-10-12

    The history and major accomplishments of the Effective Mass Spectrometer (EMS) are described. In the eight years since the EMS turned on, 21 experiments have been completed by groups from nine institutions in 32 months of operation. Over 400 million triggers have been recorded on magnetic tape, resulting in 29 journal publications to date. A list of experimental proposals for the EMS and a sampling of results are presented. 12 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Radiative decay of keV-mass sterile neutrino in magnetized electron plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrynina Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The radiative decay of sterile neutrinos with typical masses of 10 keV is investigated in the presence of an external magnetic field and degenerate electron plasma. Full account is taken of the modified photon dispersion relation relative to vacuum. The limiting cases of relativistic and nonrelativistic plasma are analyzed. The decay rate calculated in a strongly magnetized plasma, as a function of the electron number density, is compared with the unmagnetized plasma limit. It is found that the presence of the strong magnetic field in the electron plasma suppresses the catalyzing influence of the plasma by itself on the sterile-neutrino decay rate.

  1. Ordered structure formation in 2D mass asymmetric electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filinov, V.S. [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vladimir_filinov@mail.ru; Fehske, H. [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bonitz, M. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Leibnizstrasse 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Fortov, V.E.; Levashov, P. [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-28

    We study strong Coulomb correlations in dense two-dimensional electron-hole plasmas by means of direct path integral Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, the formation and dissociation of bound states, such as excitons, bi-excitons and many particle clusters, is analyzed and the density-temperature regions of their occurrence are identified. At high density, the Mott transition to the fully ionized state (electron-hole hexatic liquid) is detected. Particular attention is paid to the influence of the hole to electron mass ratio M on the properties of the plasma. For high enough values of M we observed the formation of Coulomb hole crystal-like structures.

  2. Effective atomic numbers and electron density of dosimetric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaginelli S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of x-rays employing NaI (Tl detector system and radioactive sources is described.in this paper. A rigid geometry arrangement and gating of the spectrometer at FWHM position and selection of absorber foils are all done following detailed investigation, to minimize the effect of small angle scattering and multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient, m/r, value. Firstly, for standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental foils such as Aluminum, Copper, Molybdenum, Tantalum and Lead are measured and then, this method is utilized for dosimetric interested material (sulfates. The experimental mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with the theoretical values to find good agreement between the theory and experiment within one to two per cent. The effective atomic numbers of the biological substitute material are calculated by sum rule and from the graph. The electron density of dosimetric material is calculated using the effective atomic number. The study has discussed in detail the attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of dosimetric material/biological substitutes.

  3. Origin of the low-mass electron pair excess in light nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakichiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A. V.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Destefanis, M.; Díaz, J.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O. V.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gil, A.; Gilardi, C.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kirschner, D.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kotte, R.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sudol, M.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y. V.; Zhou, P.; HADES Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We report measurements of electron pair production in elementary p+p and d+p reactions at 1.25 GeV/u with the HADES spectrometer. For the first time, the electron pairs were reconstructed for n+p reactions by detecting the proton spectator from the deuteron breakup. We find that the yield of electron pairs with invariant mass M>0.15 GeV/c2 is about an order of magnitude larger in n+p reactions as compared to p+p. A comparison to model calculations demonstrates that the production mechanism is not sufficiently described yet. The electron pair spectra measured in C+C reactions are compatible with a superposition of elementary n+p and p+p collisions, leaving little room for additional electron pair sources in such light collision systems.

  4. Invariant mass determination using the output from a specialized electron track reconstruction algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Gjersdal, Håvard

    2008-01-01

    The Gaussian sum filter is a track reconstruction algorithm specialized on dealing with the non-Gaussian radiative energy loss of electrons. This thesis deals with invariant mass determination from the non-Gaussian track estimates produced by the Gaussian sum filter.

  5. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  6. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using carbon nanotube field emission electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radauscher, Erich J; Keil, Adam D; Wells, Mitch; Amsden, Jason J; Piascik, Jeffrey R; Parker, Charles B; Stoner, Brian R; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemical ionization (CI) source has been developed based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron source. The CNT-based electron source was evaluated and compared with a standard filament thermionic electron source in a commercial explosives trace detection desktop mass spectrometer. This work demonstrates the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. Both positive and negative modes were investigated. Spectra were collected for a standard mass spectrometer calibration compound, perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA), as well as trace explosives including trinitrotoluene (TNT), Research Department explosive (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The electrical characteristics, lifetime at operating pressure, and power requirements of the CNT-based electron source are reported. The CNT field emission electron sources demonstrated an average lifetime of 320 h when operated in constant emission mode under elevated CI pressures. The ability of the CNT field emission source to cycle on and off can provide enhanced lifetime and reduced power consumption without sacrificing performance and detection capabilities. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Gateway effects and electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Jean-François

    2017-08-07

    E-cigarettes are alleged to be a gateway to cigarette smoking in non-smokers. This study examines whether the gateway theory has value, whether the criteria to establish causality have been met and what type of evidence is required to test this theory. Experiments are impractical, and we may not be able to test properly the gateway effects via observational studies that simply adjust for confounders. Multivariate models cannot eliminate all the variance in propensity to smoke captured by the variable 'vaping' because of the proximity of these two behaviours. It may be difficult to prove that vaping precedes smoking when product use co-occurs and when, in fact, smoking usually precedes vaping. The gateway theory is not compatible with either (1) the decrease in smoking prevalence observed in adolescents in countries where vaping increased or (2) an increase in smoking among teenagers after age restrictions were imposed on e-cigarette purchases. A spurious gateway effect can be produced artificially by mathematical models in which a propensity to use substances is correlated with opportunities to use substances. Finally, neither nicotine medications nor smokeless tobacco produce gateway effects. Available data are compatible with a common liability model in which people who are liable to use nicotine are more likely to use both e-cigarettes and cigarettes. Despite its weaknesses and scant empirical support, the gateway theory of smoking initiation has had enormous political influence. Policies based on this theory will not have the intended effects if the association between vaping and smoking is explained by common liabilities. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. Strained silicon on SiGe: Temperature dependence of carrier effective masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Soline; Cavassilas, Nicolas; Aniel, Frédéric; Fishman, Guy

    2003-10-01

    A strain Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian Hst, based on a 20 band sps* kṡp Hamiltonian Hkp, is used to describe the valence band and the first two conduction bands over the entire Brillouin zone. This full-band kṡp computation of the carrier dispersion relation is used to calculate electron and hole effective masses in strained silicon. Hole density of states masses are found to be very temperature dependent whereas electron effective masses can be considered temperature independent to first order.

  9. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  10. STRAPS v1.0: evaluating a methodology for predicting electron impact ionisation mass spectra for the aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David O.; Allan, James; Rami Alfarra, M.; Aumont, Bernard

    2017-06-01

    Our ability to model the chemical and thermodynamic processes that lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is thought to be hampered by the complexity of the system. While there are fundamental models now available that can simulate the tens of thousands of reactions thought to take place, validation against experiments is highly challenging. Techniques capable of identifying individual molecules such as chromatography are generally only capable of quantifying a subset of the material present, making it unsuitable for a carbon budget analysis. Integrative analytical methods such as the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) are capable of quantifying all mass, but because of their inability to isolate individual molecules, comparisons have been limited to simple data products such as total organic mass and the O : C ratio. More detailed comparisons could be made if more of the mass spectral information could be used, but because a discrete inversion of AMS data is not possible, this activity requires a system of predicting mass spectra based on molecular composition. In this proof-of-concept study, the ability to train supervised methods to predict electron impact ionisation (EI) mass spectra for the AMS is evaluated. Supervised Training Regression for the Arbitrary Prediction of Spectra (STRAPS) is not built from first principles. A methodology is constructed whereby the presence of specific mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) channels is fitted as a function of molecular structure before the relative peak height for each channel is similarly fitted using a range of regression methods. The widely used AMS mass spectral database is used as a basis for this, using unit mass resolution spectra of laboratory standards. Key to the fitting process is choice of structural information, or molecular fingerprint. Our approach relies on using supervised methods to automatically optimise the relationship between spectral characteristics and these molecular fingerprints. Therefore

  11. STRAPS v1.0: evaluating a methodology for predicting electron impact ionisation mass spectra for the aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to model the chemical and thermodynamic processes that lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation is thought to be hampered by the complexity of the system. While there are fundamental models now available that can simulate the tens of thousands of reactions thought to take place, validation against experiments is highly challenging. Techniques capable of identifying individual molecules such as chromatography are generally only capable of quantifying a subset of the material present, making it unsuitable for a carbon budget analysis. Integrative analytical methods such as the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS are capable of quantifying all mass, but because of their inability to isolate individual molecules, comparisons have been limited to simple data products such as total organic mass and the O : C ratio. More detailed comparisons could be made if more of the mass spectral information could be used, but because a discrete inversion of AMS data is not possible, this activity requires a system of predicting mass spectra based on molecular composition. In this proof-of-concept study, the ability to train supervised methods to predict electron impact ionisation (EI mass spectra for the AMS is evaluated. Supervised Training Regression for the Arbitrary Prediction of Spectra (STRAPS is not built from first principles. A methodology is constructed whereby the presence of specific mass-to-charge ratio (m∕z channels is fitted as a function of molecular structure before the relative peak height for each channel is similarly fitted using a range of regression methods. The widely used AMS mass spectral database is used as a basis for this, using unit mass resolution spectra of laboratory standards. Key to the fitting process is choice of structural information, or molecular fingerprint. Our approach relies on using supervised methods to automatically optimise the relationship between spectral characteristics and these molecular

  12. Electron field emission from freestanding Diamond nanomembranes and Application to time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunseok; Park, Jonghoo; Shin, Hyuncheol; Blick, Robert H.

    2013-03-01

    We introduce a prototype of a freestanding diamond nanomembrane for large protein detection in time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Doped diamond as a material for mass spectroscopy is extremely interesting due to its mechanical and electrical properties. The freestanding diamond nanomembranes we are able to fabricate have lateral extensions of 400 μm × 400 μm with a thickness of 100nm. We employ optical lithography and a Buffered Oxide Etch (BOE) of SiO2 followed by anisotropic etching of the substrate silicon using TMAH solution and finally removing SiO2. The electron field emission from the surface of the membrane is traced in the IV characteristics at room temperature. The membrane is then applied for detection of the large ionized proteins using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Ion detection is demonstrated in our nanomembrane MALDI-TOF analysis of Insulin (5,735 Da). That is when the ions with a large kinetic energy bombard the nanomembrane, their energy is thermalized upon impact into phonons. The phonons give a thermal energy to the electrons with the membrane, which are then excited to higher energetic states. Given an extraction voltage this leads to electron field emission from the membrane which we labeled phonon-assisted field emission (PAFE). In other words, the MALDI mass spectra are obtained by exploiting ballistic phonon propagation and quasi-diffusive phonon propagation.

  13. Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) Mass Spectrometer for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funsten, H. O.; Skoug, R. M.; Guthrie, A. A.; MacDonald, E. A.; Baldonado, J. R.; Harper, R. W.; Henderson, K. C.; Kihara, K. H.; Lake, J. E.; Larsen, B. A.; Puckett, A. D.; Vigil, V. J.; Friedel, R. H.; Henderson, M. G.; Niehof, J. T.; Reeves, G. D.; Thomsen, M. F.; Hanley, J. J.; George, D. E.; Jahn, J.-M.; Cortinas, S.; De Los Santos, A.; Dunn, G.; Edlund, E.; Ferris, M.; Freeman, M.; Maple, M.; Nunez, C.; Taylor, T.; Toczynski, W.; Urdiales, C.; Spence, H. E.; Cravens, J. A.; Suther, L. L.; Chen, J.

    2013-11-01

    The HOPE mass spectrometer of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission (renamed the Van Allen Probes) is designed to measure the in situ plasma ion and electron fluxes over 4 π sr at each RBSP spacecraft within the terrestrial radiation belts. The scientific goal is to understand the underlying physical processes that govern the radiation belt structure and dynamics. Spectral measurements for both ions and electrons are acquired over 1 eV to 50 keV in 36 log-spaced steps at an energy resolution Δ E FWHM/ E≈15 %. The dominant ion species (H+, He+, and O+) of the magnetosphere are identified using foil-based time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry with channel electron multiplier (CEM) detectors. Angular measurements are derived using five polar pixels coplanar with the spacecraft spin axis, and up to 16 azimuthal bins are acquired for each polar pixel over time as the spacecraft spins. Ion and electron measurements are acquired on alternate spacecraft spins. HOPE incorporates several new methods to minimize and monitor the background induced by penetrating particles in the harsh environment of the radiation belts. The absolute efficiencies of detection are continuously monitored, enabling precise, quantitative measurements of electron and ion fluxes and ion species abundances throughout the mission. We describe the engineering approaches for plasma measurements in the radiation belts and present summaries of HOPE measurement strategy and performance.

  14. Cathodoluminescence, laser ablasion inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis and electron paramagnetic resonance analyses of natural sphalerite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, M.; Hagni, R.D.; Koenig, A.; Ciftc, E.

    2008-01-01

    Natural sphalerite associated with copper, silver, lead-zinc, tin and tungsten deposits from various world-famous mineral deposits have been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL), laser ablasion inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to determine the relationship between trace element type and content and the CL properties of sphalerite. In general, sphalerite produces a spectrum of CL colour under electron bombardment that includes deep blue, turquoise, lime green, yellow-orange, orange-red and dull dark red depending on the type and concentration of trace quantities of activator ions. Sphalerite from most deposits shows a bright yellow-orange CL colour with ??max centred at 585 nm due to Mn2+ ion, and the intensity of CL is strongly dependent primarily on Fe2+ concentration. The blue emission band with ??max centred at 470-490 nm correlates with Ga and Ag at the Tsumeb, Horn Silver, Balmat and Kankoy mines. Colloform sphalerite from older well-known European lead-zinc deposits and late Cretaceous Kuroko-type VMS deposits of Turkey shows intense yellowish CL colour and their CL spectra are characterised by extremely broad emission bands ranging from 450 to 750 nm. These samples are characterised by low Mn (colours and the blue CL may be related to Se. Cathodoluminescence behaviour of sphalerite serves to characterise ore types and help detect technologically important trace elements.

  15. Mathematical modelling of coupled heat and mass transport into an electronic enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to high fidelity CFD codes which require higher computational effort/time, the well-known Resistor-Capacitor (RC) approach requires much lower calculation time, but also with a lower resolution of the geometrical arrangement. Therefore, for enclosures without too complex geometry...... in their interior, it is more efficient to use the RC method for thermal management and design of electronic compartments. Thus, the objective of this paper is to build an in-house code based on the RC approach for simulating coupled heat and mass transport into a (closed) electronic enclosure. The developed code...... has the capability of combining lumped components and a 1D description. Heat and mass transport is based on a FVM discretization of the heat conduction equation and Fick's second law. Simulation results are compared with corresponding experimental findings and good agreement is found. Second...

  16. Polyquant CT: direct electron and mass density reconstruction from a single polyenergetic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jonathan H.; Perelli, Alessandro; Nailon, William H.; Davies, Mike E.

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying material mass and electron density from computed tomography (CT) reconstructions can be highly valuable in certain medical practices, such as radiation therapy planning. However, uniquely parameterising the x-ray attenuation in terms of mass or electron density is an ill-posed problem when a single polyenergetic source is used with a spectrally indiscriminate detector. Existing approaches to single source polyenergetic modelling often impose consistency with a physical model, such as water-bone or photoelectric-Compton decompositions, which will either require detailed prior segmentation or restrictive energy dependencies, and may require further calibration to the quantity of interest. In this work, we introduce a data centric approach to fitting the attenuation with piecewise-linear functions directly to mass or electron density, and present a segmentation-free statistical reconstruction algorithm for exploiting it, with the same order of complexity as other iterative methods. We show how this allows both higher accuracy in attenuation modelling, and demonstrate its superior quantitative imaging, with numerical chest and metal implant data, and validate it with real cone-beam CT measurements.

  17. Many electron effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 26; Issue 1. Many electron effects in ... Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit shell structures, very similar to atoms. Termed as 'artificial atoms' by some, ... Our calculations have been performed in a three-dimensional quantum dot. We have carried out a study of ...

  18. Topologically distinct Feynman diagrams for mass operator in electron-phonon interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Tovstyuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The new method for designing topologically distinct Feynman diagrams for electron's mass operator in electron-phonon interaction is developed using the permutation group theory. The carried out classification of DPs allows to choose the classes, corresponding to disconnected diagrams, to singly connected diagrams, direct ("tadpole" diagrams, to diagrams corresponding to phonon Green functions. After this classification the set of considered double permutations is reduced to one class since only these are relevant to mass operator. We derive analytical expressions which allow to identify the DP, and to choose the phonon components, which are not accepted in every type. To avoid repetition of asymmetric diagrams, which correspond to the same analytical expression, we introduce the procedure of inversion in phonon component, and identify symmetric as well as a pair of asymmetric phonon components. For every type of DP (denoted by its digital encoding, taking into account its symmetry, we perform a set of transformations on this DP, list all DPs of the type and all the corresponding Feynman diagrams of mass operator automatically. It is clear that no more expressions (diagrams for the relevant order of perturbation theory for mass operator can be designed.

  19. Proximity effect of electron beam lithography on single-electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical characteristics of the single-electron transistor were observed to be consistent with the expected behavior of electron transport through gated quantum dots, up to 150 K. The dependence of the electrical characteristics on the dot size reveals that the d oscillation follows from the Coulomb blockade by poly-Si ...

  20. Tutorial: Radiation Effects in Electronic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    This tutorial presentation will give an overview of radiation effects in electrical, electronic, and electromechanical (EEE) components as it applies to civilian space systems of varying size and complexity. The natural space environment presents many unique threats to electronic systems regardless of where the systems operate from low-Earth orbit to interplanetary space. The presentation will cover several topics, including: an overview and introduction to the applicable space radiation environments common to a broad range of mission designs; definitions and impacts of effects due to impinging particles in the space environment e.g., total ionizing dose (TID), total non-ionizing dose (TNID), and single-event effects (SEE); and, testing for and evaluation of TID, TNID, and SEE in EEE components.

  1. Effects of mass defect in atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2018-01-01

    We consider some implications of the mass defect on the frequency of atomic transitions. We have found that some well-known frequency shifts (such as gravitational and quadratic Doppler shifts) can be interpreted as consequences of the mass defect, i.e., without the need for the concept of time dilation used in special and general relativity theories. Moreover, we show that the inclusion of the mass defect leads to previously unknown shifts for clocks based on trapped ions..

  2. High-efficiency cross-beam magnetic electron-impact source for improved miniature Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjar, O.; Fowler, W. K.

    2012-06-01

    We describe a newly designed cross-beam magnetic electron-impact ion source (CBM-EI). We demonstrate its superiority in comparison with a conventional source (CB-EI) when used with a commercial miniature sector-field-type, non-scanning mass spectrometer featuring Mattauch-Herzog geometry (MH-MS) and a permanent sector-field magnet. This paper clearly shows the value of the CBM-EI for enhancing MH-MS sensitivity. Unlike secondary electron-multiplier type detectors, the pixelated detector (IonCCD™) used in the commercial MH-MS has no gain. The MH-MS/IonCCD system is therefore challenged to compete with time-of-flight and quadrupole MS systems due to their higher ion transmissions and detector gains. Using the new CBM-EI, we demonstrate an instrument sensitivity increase of 20-fold to 100-fold relative to the CB-EI-equipped instrument. This remarkable signal increase by the simple addition of the magnet assembly arises from the magnet-induced gyromotion of the thermionic electrons, which vastly increases the effective path length of the electrons through the ionization region, and the collimated nature of the electron flux, which optimizes the ion transmission through the 100-μm object slit of the MH-MS. Some or all of the realized sensitivity increase may be exchanged for an increase in resolution and/or mass range through the use of a narrower object slit, or for a reduction in ion-source pressure to limit quenching. The CBM-EI should facilitate development of a differentially pumped ion source to extend the lifetime of the filament, especially in otherwise intractable applications associated with oxidizing and corrosive samples.

  3. Electronic confinement in graphene quantum rings due to substrate-induced mass radial kink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, L. J. P.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Pereira, J. M., Jr.; Farias, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate localized states of a quantum ring confinement in monolayer graphene defined by a circular mass-related potential, which can be induced e.g. by interaction with a substrate that breaks the sublattice symmetry, where a circular line defect provides a change in the sign of the induced mass term along the radial direction. Electronic properties are calculated analytically within the Dirac-Weyl approximation in the presence of an external magnetic field. Analytical results are also compared with those obtained by the tight-binding approach. Regardless of its sign, a mass term Δ is expected to open a gap for low-energy electrons in Dirac cones in graphene. Both approaches confirm the existence of confined states with energies inside the gap, even when the width of the kink modelling the mass sign transition is infinitely thin. We observe that such energy levels are inversely proportional to the defect line ring radius and independent on the mass kink height. An external magnetic field is demonstrated to lift the valley degeneracy in this system and easily tune the valley index of the ground state in this system, which can be polarized on either K or {{K}\\prime} valleys of the Brillouin zone, depending on the magnetic field intensity. Geometrical changes in the defect line shape are considered by assuming an elliptic line with different eccentricities. Our results suggest that any defect line that is closed in a loop, with any geometry, would produce the same qualitative results as the circular ones, as a manifestation of the topologically protected nature of the ring-like states investigated here.

  4. Overview of HPM Effects in Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    The following presentation contains an overview of HPM effects in modern electronics. HPM effects can be categorized into two basic level of effects, which are damaging and non-damaging. Damaging effects include junction breakdowns, dielectric breakdowns, and latch-up. These types of effects render a system inoperable until repaired. With non-damaging effects, HPM signals couple to into system components generating circuit responses that can overwhelm normal operation. Non-damaging effects can temporarily render a system inoperable or cause a system to lock and require a restart. Since modern systems are so complex, fundamental mechanisms of upset in circuit primitives are studied. All topics covered and all figured contained within are found in open literature. All data plots presented were obtained from experimental measurements conducted at the University of Maryland College Park and are also found in the open literature.

  5. Terrestrial effects on dark matter-electron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emken, Timon; Kouvaris, Chris; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2017-01-01

    techniques involving detection of dark matter-electron scattering offer new sensitivity to sub-GeV dark matter. Typically however it is implicitly assumed that the dark matter is not altered as it traverses the Earth to arrive at the detector. In this paper we study in detail the effects of terrestrial...... stopping on dark photon models of dark matter, and find that they significantly reduce the sensitivity of XENON10 and DAMIC. In particular we find that XENON10 only excludes masses in the range (5-3000) MeV while DAMIC only probes (20-50) MeV. Their corresponding cross section sensitivity is reduced...

  6. Relation between electron mass enhancement and potential shape: Numerical analysis of two-site anharmonic Holstein-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Tomoya; Hotta, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    In order to promote our understanding on the emergence of magnetically robust heavy-electron state due to the interaction between conduction electrons and local anharmonic oscillations of guest atom in cage-structure materials, we investigate how the electron mass enhancement factor depends on the potential shape of the guest atom by analyzing numerically the two-site anharmonic Holstein-Hubbard model. It is found that the electron mass enhancement factor becomes maximum when the bottom of the potential becomes wide and flat. Such a potential is called a rattling type, which appears in the transition region between single-well and double-well types. Thus, the anharmonic oscillation in the rattling potential is considered to play a key role for the formation of the heavy-electron state in cage-structure compounds. We briefly discuss the reason why the electron mass enhancement factor becomes maximum in the rattling type potential region.

  7. Two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Barna, Daniel; Andreas Dax,; Hayano, Ryugo; Friedreich, Susanne; Juhász, Bertalan; Pask, Thomas; Widmann, Eberhard; Horváth, Dezső; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola; 10.1038/nature10260

    2013-01-01

    Physical laws are believed to be invariant under the combined transformations of charge, parity and time reversal (CPT symmetry). This implies that an antimatter particle has exactly the same mass and absolute value of charge as its particle counterpart. Metastable antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}He^+$) is a three-body atom2 consisting of a normal helium nucleus, an electron in its ground state and an antiproton ($\\bar{p}$) occupying a Rydberg state with high principal and angular momentum quantum numbers, respectively n and l, such that n ≈ l + 1 ≈ 38. These atoms are amenable to precision laser spectroscopy, the results of which can in principle be used to determine the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio and to constrain the equality between the antiproton and proton charges and masses. Here we report two-photon spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium, in which $\\bar{p}^{3}He^{+}$ and $\\bar{p}^{4}He^{+}$ isotopes are irradiated by two counter-propagating laser beams. This excites nonlinear, two-phot...

  8. Nucleon effective masses in field theories of dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.H.; Reddy, S.; Prakash, M. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01

    We point out some generic trends of effective masses in commonly used field-theoretical descriptions of stellar matter in which several species of strongly interacting particles of dissimilar masses may be present. (orig.)

  9. Mass and Isospin Effects in Multifragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfienti, C.; Adrich, P.; Aumann, T.; Bacri, C. O.; Barczyk, T.; Bassini, R.; Boiano, C.; Botvina, A. S.; Boudard, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Chbihi, A.; Cibor, J.; Czech, B.; De Napoli, M.; Ducret, J.-E.; Emling, H.; Frankland, J.; Hellström, M.; Henzlova, D.; Kezzar, K.; Immé, G.; Iori, I.; Johansson, H.; Lafriakh, A.; Le Fèvre, A.; Le Gentil, E.; Leifels, Y.; Lynch, W. G.; Lühning, J.; Łukasik, J.; Lynen, U.; Majka, Z.; Mocko, M.; Müller, W. F. J.; Mykulyak, A.; Orth, H.; Otte, A. N.; Palit, R.; Pullia, A.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Sann, H.; Schwarz, C.; Simon, H.; Sokolov, A.; Sümmerer, K.; Trautmann, W.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Volant, C.; Wallace, M.; Weick, H.; Wiechula, J.; Wieloch, A.; Zwieglinski, B.

    2005-03-01

    A systematic study of isospin effects in the breakup of projectile spectators at relativistic energies has been performed with the ALADiN spectrometer at the GSI laboratory (Darmstadt). Four different projectiles 197Au, 124La, 124Sn and 107Sn, all with an incident energy of 600 AMeV, have been used, thus allowing a study of various combinations of masses and N/Z ratios in the entrance channel. The measurement of the momentum vector and of the charge of all projectile fragments with Z > 1 entering the acceptance of the ALADiN magnet has been performed with the high efficiency and resolution achieved with the TP-MUSIC IV detector. The Rise and Fall behavior of the mean multiplicity of IMFs as a function of Zbound and its dependence on the isotopic composition has been determined for the studied systems. Other observables investigated so far include mean N/Z values of the emitted light fragments and neutron multiplicities. Qualitative agreement has been obtained between the observed gross properties and the predictions of the Statistical Multifragmentation Model.

  10. Vanishing effective Majorana neutrino mass and light sterile neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Surender

    2016-02-01

    We examine the possibility of vanishing effective Majorana mass Mee in the presence of one or two sterile neutrinos taking into account the recent data on neutrino masses and mixings, particularly, on θ13. Also, within the framework of standard three active neutrinos, we find that effective Majorana mass Mee can be vanishingly small if neutrino masses observe normal hierarchy. However, the same is not valid for inverted hierarchical neutrino masses. The predictions for Majorana phases α and β have also been obtained and shown as scatter plots. We also examine the condition Mee = 0 within the framework wherein fermion sector has been extended by the addition of either one or two sterile neutrinos. The condition of vanishing effective Majorana mass is found to be inconsistent with the recent measurement of θ13 in these classes of models except for 1 + 3, 2 + 3 neutrino mass scheme for small values of the lightest neutrino mass, mlight.

  11. Mass mapping of a protein complex with the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A; Baumeister, W; Saxton, W O

    1982-01-01

    A mass map of the hexagonally packed intermediate layer (HPI-layer), a regular protein monolayer from the cell envelope of Micrococcus radiodurans, has been obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Samples were freeze-dried within the microscope, and low-dose images were recorded in the dark-field mode directly in digital form and processed by correlation averaging. The averaged projection of the unstained structure--i.e., the mass map--thus calculated shows a resolution to 3-nm period and reveals morphological features consistent with those obtained by negative staining. The mass of individual morphological domains was extracted by using variously the mass map itself or an average from a negatively stained HPI layer to define the domain boundaries. Protrusions as small as 1,300 daltons could be measured reproducibly within the unit cell of 655,000 daltons. The method developed opens an avenue to identify molecular species in situ and to correlate topographic information with biochemical data. Images PMID:6955791

  12. Characterization of neurohistone variants and post-translational modifications by electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Benjamin A.; Siuti, Nertila; Thomas, C. Eric; Mizzen, Craig A.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2007-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones are intimately involved in chromatin structure and thus have roles in cellular processes through their impact on gene activation or repression. At the forefront in histone PTM analysis are mass spectrometry-based techniques, which have capabilities to produce improved views of processes affected by chromatin remodeling via histone modifications. In this report, we take the first mass spectrometric look at histone variant expression and post-translational modifications from histones isolated from rat brain tissue. Analyses of whole rat brain identified specific histone H2A and H2B gene family members and several H4 and H3 post-translational modification sites by electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry. We subsequently compared these results to selected rat brain regions. Major differences in the expression profiles of H2A and H2B gene family members or in the post-translational modifications on histone H4 were not observed from the different brain regions using a Top Down approach. However, "Middle Down" mass spectrometry facilitating improved characterization of the histone H3 tail (1-50 residues), revealed an enrichment of trimethylation on Lys9 from cerebellum tissue compared to H3 extracted from whole brain, cerebral cortex or hypothalamus tissue. We forward this study in honor of Professor Donald F. Hunt, whose pioneering efforts in protein and PTM analyses have spawned new eras and numerous careers, many exemplified in this special issue.

  13. Electron-capture and Low-mass Iron-core-collapse Supernovae: New Neutrino-radiation-hydrodynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radice, David; Burrows, Adam; Vartanyan, David; Skinner, M. Aaron; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2017-11-01

    We present new 1D (spherical) and 2D (axisymmetric) simulations of electron-capture (EC) and low-mass iron-core-collapse supernovae (SN). We consider six progenitor models: the ECSN progenitor from Nomoto; two ECSN-like low-mass low-metallicity iron-core progenitors from A. Heger (2016, private communication); and the 9, 10, and 11 {M}⊙ (zero-age main-sequence) progenitors from Sukhbold et al. We confirm that the ECSN and ESCN-like progenitors explode easily even in 1D with explosion energies of up to a 0.15 Bethes (1 {{B}}\\equiv {10}51 {erg}), and are a viable mechanism for the production of very-low-mass neutron stars. However, the 9, 10, and 11 {M}⊙ progenitors do not explode in 1D and are not even necessarily easier to explode than higher-mass progenitor stars in 2D. We study the effect of perturbations and of changes to the microphysics and we find that relatively small changes can result in qualitatively different outcomes, even in 1D, for models sufficiently close to the explosion threshold. Finally, we revisit the impact of convection below the protoneutron star (PNS) surface. We analyze 1D and 2D evolutions of PNSs subject to the same boundary conditions. We find that the impact of PNS convection has been underestimated in previous studies and could result in an increase of the neutrino luminosity by up to factors of two.

  14. Global proteomic profiling of phosphopeptides using electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Henrik; Horn, David M; Tang, Ning

    2007-01-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a recently introduced mass spectrometric technique that provides a more comprehensive coverage of peptide sequences and posttranslational modifications. Here, we evaluated the use of ETD for a global phosphoproteome analysis. In all, we identified a total...... of 1,435 phosphorylation sites from human embryonic kidney 293T cells, of which 1,141 ( approximately 80%) were not previously described. A detailed comparison of ETD and collision-induced dissociation (CID) modes showed that ETD identified 60% more phosphopeptides than CID, with an average of 40% more...

  15. Chlorine and Bromine Isotope Fractionation of Halogenated Organic Compounds in Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Caiming; Tan, Jianhua; Shi, Zhiqiang; Tang, Caixing; Xiong, Songsong; Liu, Jun; Fan, Yujuan; Peng, Xianzhi

    2017-01-01

    Revelation of chlorine and bromine isotope fractionation of halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) in electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS) is crucial for compound-specific chlorine/bromine isotope analysis (CSIA-Cl/Br) using gas chromatography EI-MS (GC-EI-MS). This study systematically investigated chlorine/bromine isotope fractionation in EI-MS of HOCs including 12 organochlorines and 5 organobromines using GC-double focus magnetic-sector high resolution MS (GC-DFS-HRMS). Chlorine/br...

  16. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-03

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints.

  17. Electron-electron interactions in the chemical bond:``1/3” Effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The prominent ``1/3” effect observed in the Hall effect plateaus of twodimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems has been postulated to indicating 1/3 fractional charge quasiparticle excitations arising from electron-electron interactions. Tunneling shot-noise experiments on 2DEF exhibiting fractional quantum Hall effect ...

  18. Comparison of quantification methods for the analysis of polychlorinated alkanes using electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusina, T.; Korytar, P.; de Boer, J.

    2011-01-01

    Four quantification methods for short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) or polychlorinated alkanes (PCAs) using gas chromatography electron capture negative ionisation low resolution mass spectrometry (GC-ECNI-LRMS) were investigated. The method based on visual comparison of congener group

  19. Association between electronic equipment in the bedroom and sedentary lifestyle, physical activity, and body mass index of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Luis de Moraes Ferrari

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: Electronic equipment in the children's bedroom can negatively affect moderate‐to‐vigorous physical activity and body mass index regardless of gender, school, and annual family income, which can contribute to physical inactivity and childhood obesity.

  20. Comparison of quantification methods for the analysis of polychlorinated alkanes using electron capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusina, T.; Korytar, P.; Boer, de J.

    2011-01-01

    Four quantification methods for short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) or polychlorinated alkanes (PCAs) using gas chromatography electron capture negative ionisation low resolution mass spectrometry (GC-ECNI-LRMS) were investigated. The method based on visual comparison of congener group

  1. [Quality and effectiveness of electronic fetal monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biringer, K; Danko, J

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate effectiveness of electronic fetal monitoring methods during labor. A case series study. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Martin, Slovak Republic. We followed 112 fetuses with simultaneous continuous monitoring (cardiotocography (CTG), intrapartal fetal pulse oxymetry (IFPO), and analysis of ST segment in fetal electrocardiogram (STAN)) during labor. We determined the effective time for every diagnostic tool. histograms, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Spearman's coefficient; significance (alfa): p STAN > IFPO (94.8% +/- 15.1% vs. 90.4% +/- 18.3% vs. 87.4% +/- 21.2%). STAN was the most effective tool in the second stage of labor (91.3% +/- 9.4%). The most effective fetal monitoring tool is CTG. However STAN is the best diagnostic method in the second stage of labor, because of its bio-signal quality.

  2. Effects of water stress and seed mass on germination and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... plant growth. X. sorbifolia seed varies greatly in mass. Thus, whether water and seed mass influence the germination of X. sorbifolia in this region must be determined. The primary objectives of this current study were as follows: (1) to analyze individually the effect of water stress and seed mass as well as ...

  3. Information Feedback and Mass Media Effects in Cultural Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    González-Avella, Juan Carlos; Mario G. Cosenza; Klemm, Konstantin; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; San Miguel, Maxi

    2007-01-01

    We study the effects of different forms of information feedback associated with mass media on an agent-agent based model of the dynamics of cultural dissemination. In addition to some processes previously considered, we also examine a model of local mass media influence in cultural dynamics. Two mechanisms of information feedback are investigated: (i) direct mass media influence, where local or global mass media act as an additional element in the network of interactions of each agent, and (i...

  4. Nonadiabatic effects in electronic and nuclear dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P. Bircher

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their very nature, ultrafast phenomena are often accompanied by the occurrence of nonadiabatic effects. From a theoretical perspective, the treatment of nonadiabatic processes makes it necessary to go beyond the (quasi static picture provided by the time-independent Schrödinger equation within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and to find ways to tackle instead the full time-dependent electronic and nuclear quantum problem. In this review, we give an overview of different nonadiabatic processes that manifest themselves in electronic and nuclear dynamics ranging from the nonadiabatic phenomena taking place during tunnel ionization of atoms in strong laser fields to the radiationless relaxation through conical intersections and the nonadiabatic coupling of vibrational modes and discuss the computational approaches that have been developed to describe such phenomena. These methods range from the full solution of the combined nuclear-electronic quantum problem to a hierarchy of semiclassical approaches and even purely classical frameworks. The power of these simulation tools is illustrated by representative applications and the direct confrontation with experimental measurements performed in the National Centre of Competence for Molecular Ultrafast Science and Technology.

  5. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  6. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Hans G.J.; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS

  7. Study of High Mass Electron Pairs and High pT Phenomena

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment involves a modification of the apparatus used in R108, which extends the region of photon and electron detection to the entire azimuth, complementing the full azimuth charged particle detection already available. A five-fold increase in the acceptance for high mass e|+e|- pairs is thus achieved; the study of jets is also improved by extending the region of @g and @p|0 detection. An active converter consisting of lead glass and followed by a cathode strip read out MWPC is placed in front of each of the R108 lead glass arrays to improve @g/@p|0 discrimination. The modified apparatus is shown in the Figure. The specific physics aims of the experiment are: \\item 1) Search for high mass states decaying into e|+e|-. In a 3000-hour run the sensitivity is 2\\% of the @U cross-section for 10 detected events. \\item 2) Study of e|+e|- pair production above the @U mass. As well as the cross-section, the transverse momentum and rapidity distributions will be measured, providing a crucial test of QCD as appl...

  8. Analysis of naphthenic acid mixtures as pentafluorobenzyl derivatives by gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Villagomez, Juan Manuel; Vázquez-Martínez, Juan; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Trudeau, Vance L

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report for the first time the efficiency of pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFBBr) for naphthenic acid (NA) mixtures derivatization, and the comparison in the optimal conditions to the most common NAs derivatization reagents, BF3/MeOH and N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Naphthenic acids are carboxylic acid mixtures of petrochemical origin. These compounds are important for the oil industry because of their corrosive properties, which can damage oil distillation infrastructure. Moreover, NAs are commercially used in a wide range of products such as paint and ink driers, wood and fabric preservatives, fuel additives, emulsifiers, and surfactants. Naphthenic acids have also been found in sediments after major oils spills in the United States and South Korea. Furthermore, the toxicity of the oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), product of the oil sands extraction activities in Canada's oil sands, has largely been attributed to NAs. One of the main challenges for the chromatographic analysis of these mixtures is the resolution of the components. The derivatization optimization was achieved using surface response analysis with molar ratio and time as factors for derivatization signal yield. After gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry (GC/EIMS) analysis of a mixture of NA standards, it was found that the signal produced by PFB-derivatives was 2.3 and 1.4 times higher than the signal produced by methylated and MTBS-derivatives, respectively. The pentafluorobenzyl derivatives have a characteristic fragment ion at 181m/z that is diagnostic for the differentiation of carboxylic and non-carboxylic acid components within mixtures. In the analysis of a Sigma and a Merichem derivatized oil extract NA mixtures, it was found that some peaks lack the characteristic fragment ion; therefore they are not carboxylic acids. Open column chromatography was used to obtain a hexane and a methanol fraction of the Sigma and

  9. Sampling: Making Electronic Discovery More Cost Effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Luoma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available With the huge volumes of electronic data subject to discovery in virtually every instance of litigation, time and costs of conducting discovery have become exceedingly important when litigants plan their discovery strategies.  Rather than incurring the costs of having lawyers review every document produced in response to a discovery request in search of relevant evidence, a cost effective strategy for document review planning is to use statistical sampling of the database of documents to determine the likelihood of finding relevant evidence by reviewing additional documents.  This paper reviews and discusses how sampling can be used to make document review more cost effective by considering issues such as an appropriate sample size, how to develop a sampling strategy, and taking into account the potential value of the litigation in relation to the costs of additional discovery efforts. 

  10. Thermal Mass & Dynamic Effects Danish Building Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Selman, Ayser Dawod; Heiselberg, Per

    will focus on three main aspects: ♦ Assess the robustness of the monthly calculation method by varying the input parameters (Part 3) ♦ Better take into consideration the thermal mass in the actual tool by updating the utilisation factors used for the calculation of cooling and heating (Part 3) ♦ Find...... a method to evaluate night-time ventilation in the monthly calculation (Part 4)...

  11. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces: Effect on the Secondary Electron Yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F.

    2004-12-13

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (< 1.3, value of many pure elements [1] ), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  12. Electronic states and nature of bonding in the molecule YC by all electron ab initio multiconfiguration self-consistent-field calculations and mass spectrometric equilibrium experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Pelino, Mario; Gingerich, Karl A.

    1992-01-01

    In the present work we present results of all electron ab initio multiconfiguration self-consistent-field calculations of eight electronic states of the molecule YC. Also reported are the calculated spectroscopic constants. The predicted electronic ground state is 4PI, but this state is found......, and they hardly contribute to the bonding. The chemical bond in the YC molecule is polar with charge transfer from Y to C giving rise to a dipole moment of 3.90 D at 3.9 a.u. in the 4PI ground state. Mass spectrometric equilibrium investigations in the temperature range 2365-2792 K have resulted...

  13. Robotics-assisted mass spectrometry assay platform enabled by open-source electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Shih-Hao; Urban, Pawel L

    2015-02-15

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is an important analytical technique with numerous applications in clinical analysis, biochemistry, environmental analysis, geology and physics. Its success builds on the ability of MS to determine molecular weights of analytes, and elucidate their structures. However, sample handling prior to MS requires a lot of attention and labor. In this work we were aiming to automate processing samples for MS so that analyses could be conducted without much supervision of experienced analysts. The goal of this study was to develop a robotics and information technology-oriented platform that could control the whole analysis process including sample delivery, reaction-based assay, data acquisition, and interaction with the analyst. The proposed platform incorporates a robotic arm for handling sample vials delivered to the laboratory, and several auxiliary devices which facilitate and secure the analysis process. They include: multi-relay board, infrared sensors, photo-interrupters, gyroscopes, force sensors, fingerprint scanner, barcode scanner, touch screen panel, and internet interface. The control of all the building blocks is achieved through implementation of open-source electronics (Arduino), and enabled by custom-written programs in C language. The advantages of the proposed system include: low cost, simplicity, small size, as well as facile automation of sample delivery and processing without the intervention of the analyst. It is envisaged that this simple robotic system may be the forerunner of automated laboratories dedicated to mass spectrometric analysis of biological samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bottom-Up Two-Dimensional Electron-Capture Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Federico; van Agthoven, Maria A.; Chiron, Lionel; Wootton, Christopher A.; Lam, Pui Yiu Yuko; Barrow, Mark P.; Delsuc, Marc-André; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional mass spectrometry (2D MS) is a tandem mass spectrometry technique that allows data-independent fragmentation of all precursors in a mixture without previous isolation, through modulation of the ion cyclotron frequency in the ICR-cell prior to fragmentation. Its power as an analytical technique has been proven particularly for proteomics. Recently, a comparison study between 1D and 2D MS has been performed using infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) on calmodulin (CaM), highlighting the capabilities of the technique in both top-down (TDP) and bottom-up proteomics (BUP). The goal of this work is to expand this study on CaM using electron-capture dissociation (ECD) 2D MS as a single complementary BUP experiment in order to enhance the cleavage coverage of the protein under analysis. By adding the results of the BUP 2D ECD MS to the 2D IRMPD MS analysis of CaM, the total cleavage coverage increased from 40% to 68%. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Sensitivity of Transitions in Internal Rotor Molecules to a Possible Variation of the Proton-to-Electron Mass Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, Paul; Xu, Li-Hong; Ubachs, Wim; Bethlem, Hendrick L

    2011-01-01

    Recently, methanol was identified as a sensitive target system to probe variations of the proton-to-electron mass ratio $\\mu$ [Jansen \\emph{et al.} Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{106}, 100801 (2011)]. The high sensitivity of methanol originates from the interplay between overall rotation and hindered internal rotation of the molecule -- i.e. transitions that convert internal rotation energy into overall rotation energy, or vice versa, give rise to an enhancement of the sensitivity coefficient, $K_{\\mu}$. As internal rotation is a common phenomenon in polyatomic molecules, it is likely that other molecules display similar or even larger effects. In this paper we generalize the concepts that form the foundation of the high sensitivity in methanol and use this to construct an approximate model which allows to estimate the sensitivities of transitions in internal rotor molecules with $C_{3v}$ symmetry, without performing a full calculation of energy levels. We find that a reliable estimate of transition sensitivities c...

  16. Effects of Globalization on Mass Media in the World

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Kheeshadeh

    2012-01-01

    In this article we will discuss about globalization its history and mass media and its history then effects of mass media on all over the world. Specifically we will discuss the impact of globalization on three countries like Bangladesh, India, and Southafrica. The entire positive and the negative impacts of Globalization on media will be discussed here. Kinds of mass media and rate of the freedom of press will also be discussed. Some points of democracy are also being discussed under the glo...

  17. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Fleming, Saul Cohen, Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-10-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  18. Mass measurement with the electron microscope. [Application of scanning transmission electron microscopy in molecular weight determinations of fd phage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The use of electron scattering measurements performed in the electron microscope as a means of measurement of particle molecular weight is described. Various potential sources of errors are identified and estimated where possible. Specimen preparation and observation conditions to minimize errors are described. The fd phage is presented as an example of analysis and an illustration of the accuracy obtainable at low dose.

  19. Association between electronic equipment in the bedroom and sedentary lifestyle, physical activity, and body mass index of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Gerson Luis de Moraes; Araújo, Timóteo Leandro; Oliveira, Luis Carlos; Matsudo, Victor; Fisberg, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    To describe the association between electronic devices in the bedroom with sedentary time and physical activity, both assessed by accelerometry, in addition to body mass index in children from São Caetano do Sul. The sample consisted of 441 children. The presence of electronic equipment (television, personal computer, and videogames) in the bedroom was assessed by a questionnaire. For seven consecutive days, children used an accelerometer to objectively monitor the sedentary time and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Body mass index was categorized as suggested by the World Health Organization. Overall, 73.9%, 54.2% and 42.8% of children had TV, computer, and videogames in the bedroom, respectively, and spent an average of 500.7 and 59.1 min/day of sedentary time and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Of the children, 45.3% were overweight/obese. Girls with a computer in the bedroom (45 min/day) performed less moderate-to-vigorous physical activity than those without it (51.4 min/day). Similar results were observed for body mass index in boys. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was higher and body mass index was lower in children that had no electronic equipment in the bedroom. Presence of a computer (β=-4.798) and the combination TV+computer (β=-3.233) were negatively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Videogames and the combinations with two or three electronic devices were positively associated with body mass index. Sedentary time was not associated with electronic equipment. Electronic equipment in the children's bedroom can negatively affect moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and body mass index regardless of gender, school, and annual family income, which can contribute to physical inactivity and childhood obesity. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement of the W Boson Mass with the D0 Run II Detector using the Electron P(T) Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andeen, Jr., Timothy R. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a description of the measurement of the W boson mass using the D0 Run II detector with 770 pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collision data. These collisions were produced by the Tevatron at √s = 1.96 TeV between 2002 and 2006. We use a sample of W → ev and Z → ee decays to determine the W boson mass with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and the transverse mass distribution of the boson. We measure MW = 80340 ± 37 (stat.) ± 26 (sys. theo.) ± 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = 80340 ± 68 MeV with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and MW = 80361 ± 28 (stat.) ± 17 (sys. theo.) ± 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = 80361 ± 61 MeV with the transverse mass distribution.

  1. Conduction band edge effective mass of La-doped BaSnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Allen, S., E-mail: allen@itst.ucsb.edu; Law, Ka-Ming [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5100 (United States); Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Stemmer, Susanne [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    BaSnO{sub 3} has attracted attention as a promising material for applications requiring wide band gap, high electron mobility semiconductors, and moreover possesses the same perovskite crystal structure as many functional oxides. A key parameter for these applications and for the interpretation of its properties is the conduction band effective mass. We measure the plasma frequency of La-doped BaSnO{sub 3} thin films by glancing incidence, parallel-polarized resonant reflectivity. Using the known optical dielectric constant and measured electron density, the resonant frequency determines the band edge electron mass to be 0.19 ± 0.01. The results allow for testing band structure calculations and transport models.

  2. Effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on asthma in childhood: a Mendelian randomization study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Granell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach.We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC. A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs. 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-values<0.001 and with childhood asthma (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.38-4.76 per unit score, p = 0.003. The estimated causal RR for the effect of BMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16-2.07 per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19-3.03 than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89-2.11 though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31. The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11-1.79 per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23-4.11 per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects.Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  3. Effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on asthma in childhood: a Mendelian randomization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A John; Evans, David M; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andrew R; Lewis, Sarah; Palmer, Tom M; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2014-07-01

    Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI) and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach. We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV) estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs). 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-values<0.001) and with childhood asthma (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.38-4.76 per unit score, p = 0.003). The estimated causal RR for the effect of BMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16-2.07) per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19-3.03) than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89-2.11) though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31). The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11-1.79) per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23-4.11) per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects. Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  4. Effects of BMI, Fat Mass, and Lean Mass on Asthma in Childhood: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A. John; Evans, David M.; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andrew R.; Lewis, Sarah; Palmer, Tom M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI) and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach. Methods and Findings We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV) estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs). 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-valuesBMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16–2.07) per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19–3.03) than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89–2.11) though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31). The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11–1.79) per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23–4.11) per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects. Conclusions Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24983943

  5. Effective Mass Schrodinger Equation via Point Canonical Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Arda, Altug; Sever, Ramazan

    2010-01-01

    Exact solutions of effective radial Schr\\"{o}dinger equation are obtained for some inverse potentials by using the point canonical transformation. The energy eigenvalues and the corresponding wave functions are calculated by using a set of mass distributions

  6. Effective photon mass by Super and Lorentz symmetry breaking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonetti, Luca; dos Santos Filho, Luís R; Helayël-Neto, José A; Spallicci, Alessandro D.A.M

    2017-01-01

    .... Thus, we extract a massive Carroll–Field–Jackiw photon term in the Lagrangian and show that the effective mass is proportional to the breaking vector and moderately dependent on the direction of observation...

  7. Effects of Electronic Word - of - Mouth Messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong Hoon Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increased usage of online technologies, there has been an escalation of Electronic Word - of –Mouth (eWOM messages related to sport products and services offered and consumed. Therefore, in this original investigation by applying eWOM to the sport industry, this study examined how the combination of the quality of the eWOM message and the provider of the eWOM message affects purchaseintentions depending on the expertise level of the consumer. This study – which involved the collection of data from 134 students at a large university situated in the Midwest of the United States – utilized repeated measures of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA with tripartite groups of expertise and experimental conditions as independent variables. Purchase intention was the dependent variables. The results indicated that the quality of the eWOM message moderated the effect of the provider of the eWOM message. The subject’s level of expertise also had a moderating role on purchase intention.

  8. Discovering Electronic Effects of Substituents in Nitrations of Benzene Derivatives Using GC-MS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2007-01-01

    The nitration of six benzene derivatives having a range of substituents that differ in electronic effects were followed by GC-MS analyses of the crude reaction mixtures and adapted for the second-year organic laboratory. Students pool their results and identify the products by analyzing the mass spectral data of the isomers and by comparing them…

  9. Effects of emitted electron temperature on the plasma sheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, J. P., E-mail: sheehanj@umich.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kaganovich, I. D.; Wang, H.; Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Sydorenko, D. [Physics Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9 (Canada); Hershkowitz, N. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    It has long been known that electron emission from a surface significantly affects the sheath surrounding that surface. Typical fluid theory of a planar sheath with emitted electrons assumes that the plasma electrons follow the Boltzmann relation and the emitted electrons are emitted with zero energy and predicts a potential drop of 1.03T{sub e}/e across the sheath in the floating condition. By considering the modified velocity distribution function caused by plasma electrons lost to the wall and the half-Maxwellian distribution of the emitted electrons, it is shown that ratio of plasma electron temperature to emitted electron temperature significantly affects the sheath potential when the plasma electron temperature is within an order of magnitude of the emitted electron temperature. When the plasma electron temperature equals the emitted electron temperature the emissive sheath potential goes to zero. One dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the predictions made by this theory. The effects of the addition of a monoenergetic electron beam to the Maxwellian plasma electrons were explored, showing that the emissive sheath potential is close to the beam energy only when the emitted electron flux is less than the beam flux.

  10. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  11. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  12. Space Weather Effects of Coronal Mass Ejection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... This paper describes the space weather effects of a major CME which was accompanied by extremely violent events on the Sun. The signatures of the event in the interplanetary medium (IPM) sensed by Ooty Radio Telescope, the solar observations by LASCO coronagraph onboard SOHO, GOES X-ray ...

  13. Spectral investigations of 2,5-difluoroaniline by using mass, electronic absorption, NMR, and vibrational spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Etem; Karabacak, Mehmet; Bardak, Fehmi; Atac, Ahmet

    2016-11-01

    One of the most significant aromatic amines is aniline, a primary aromatic amine replacing one hydrogen atom of a benzene molecule with an amino group (NH2). This study reports experimental and theoretical investigation of 2,5-difluoroaniline molecule (2,5-DFA) by using mass, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared and Raman (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectra, and supported with theoretical calculations. Mass spectrum (MS) of 2,5-DFA is presented with their stabilities. The UV-vis spectra of the molecule are recorded in the range of 190-400 nm in water and ethanol solvents. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts are recorded in CDCl3 solution. The vibrational spectra are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 (FT-IR) and 4000-10 cm-1 (FT-Raman), respectively. Theoretical studies are underpinned the experimental results as described below; 2,5-DFA molecule is optimized by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The mass spectrum is evaluated and possible fragmentations are proposed based on the stable structure. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strengths, wavelengths, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), HOMO and LUMO energies, are determined by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The electrostatic potential surface (ESPs), density of state (DOS) diagrams are also prepared and evaluated. In addition to these, reduced density gradient (RDG) analysis is performed, and thermodynamic features are carried out theoretically. The NMR spectra (1H and 13C) are calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The vibrational spectra of 2,5-DFA molecule are obtained by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Fundamental vibrations are assigned based on the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes. The nonlinear optical properties (NLO) are also investigated. The theoretical and experimental results give a detailed description of

  14. Density profiles of different negative ion mass groups at Titan as observed by Cassini's CAPS electron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbrock, A.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of heavy negative ions by Cassini's CAPS electron spectrometer (ELS) in Titan's ionosphere (Coates et al., 2007, Waite et al., 2007) suggests that complex hydrocarbon and nitrile processes occur in Titan's upper atmosphere which are also linked to haze formation. Negative ions are observed during Titan encounters at altitudes different mass groups as reported by Coates et al. (2007). These have been updated by Wellbrock et al. (2013) who performed a study investigating trends of mass groups with altitude using data from 34 negative ion encounters. We continue this work here by studying individual flybys in more detail. We investigate density profiles for different mass groups and total densities.

  15. Effect of Electronic Monitoring on Social Welfare Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Højsgaard; Andersen, Signe Hald

    2014-01-01

    Research Summary We studied the effect on unemployment social welfare dependence of serving a sentence under elec-tronic monitoring rather than in prison, using Danish registry data and two policy shifts that extended the use of electronic monitoring in Denmark. We found electronic monitoring...

  16. Effects of electron beam irradiation on tin dioxide gas sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. In this paper, the effects of electron beam irradiation on the gas sensing performance of tin dioxide thin films toward H2 are studied. The tin dioxide thin films were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The results show that the sensitivity increased after electron beam irradiation. The electron beam irradiation.

  17. Electron irradiation damage effects in hydrothermal grown quartz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electron irradiation effects in synthetic quartz single crystals were investigated to determine the extent of damage of the crystals during transmission electron microscopy examination, as the rapid deterioration is of major concern. On exposure of the quartz crystals to electron flux of 3.0 x 108 e/cm2/s at 200 kV accelerating ...

  18. Algorithms for calculating mass-velocity and Darwin relativistic corrections with n-electron explicitly correlated Gaussians with shifted centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Monika; Palikot, Ewa; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-05-01

    Algorithms for calculating the leading mass-velocity (MV) and Darwin (D) relativistic corrections are derived for electronic wave functions expanded in terms of n-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions with shifted centers and without pre-exponential angular factors. The algorithms are implemented and tested in calculations of MV and D corrections for several points on the ground-state potential energy curves of the H2 and LiH molecules. The algorithms are general and can be applied in calculations of systems with an arbitrary number of electrons.

  19. Algorithms for calculating mass-velocity and Darwin relativistic corrections with n-electron explicitly correlated Gaussians with shifted centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanke, Monika, E-mail: monika@fizyka.umk.pl; Palikot, Ewa, E-mail: epalikot@doktorant.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy, and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Grudzia̧dzka 5, Toruń, PL 87-100 (Poland); Adamowicz, Ludwik, E-mail: ludwik@email.arizona.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    Algorithms for calculating the leading mass-velocity (MV) and Darwin (D) relativistic corrections are derived for electronic wave functions expanded in terms of n-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions with shifted centers and without pre-exponential angular factors. The algorithms are implemented and tested in calculations of MV and D corrections for several points on the ground-state potential energy curves of the H{sub 2} and LiH molecules. The algorithms are general and can be applied in calculations of systems with an arbitrary number of electrons.

  20. Electron ionization mass spectral fragmentation study of sulfation derivatives of polychlorinated biphenyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Larry W

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polychlorinated biphenyls are persistent organic pollutants that can be metabolized via hydroxylated PCBs to PCB sulfate metabolites. The sensitive and selective analysis of PCB sulfate monoesters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS requires their derivatization, for example, as PCB 2,2,2-trichloroethyl (TCE sulfate monoesters. To aid in the identification of unknown PCB sulfate metabolites isolated from biological samples, the electron impact MS fragmentation pathways of selected PCB TCE sulfate diesters were analyzed and compared to the fragmentation pathways of the corresponding methoxylated PCBs. Results The most abundant and characteristic fragment ions of PCB TCE sulfate diesters were formed by releasing CHCCl3, SO3, HCl2 and/or CCl3 from the TCE sulfate moiety and Cl2, HCl, ethyne and chloroethyne from an intermediate phenylcyclopentadienyl cation. The fragmentation pattern depended on the degree of chlorination and the position of the TCE sulfate moiety (i.e., ortho vs. meta/para to the second phenyl ring, but were independent of the chlorine substitution pattern. These fragmentation pathways are similar to the fragmentation pathways of structurally related methoxylated PCBs. Conclusion Knowledge of the fragmentation patterns of PCB TCE sulfate diesters will greatly aid in determining the position of sulfate moiety (ortho vs. meta/para of unknown PCB sulfate metabolites isolated from environmental or laboratory samples.

  1. Relativistic Electron Response to the Combined Magnetospheric Impact of a Coronal Mass Ejection Overlapping with a High-Speed Stream: Van Allen Probes Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, W.; Fennell, J. F.; Zheng, Y.; Richardson, I. G.; Jones, A.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; hide

    2015-01-01

    During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth. We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensor (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establish the behavior of lower energy (electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations during electron energization. Measurements characterizing the plasma waves and magnetospheric electric and magnetic fields during this period are obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on board Van Allen Probes, Search Coil Magnetometer and Flux Gate Magnetometer instruments on board Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and the low-altitude Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites. These observations suggest that during this time period, both radial transport and local in situ processes are involved in the energization of electrons. The energization attributable to radial diffusion is most clearly evident for the lower energy (electrons, while the effects of in situ energization by interaction of chorus waves are prominent in the higher-energy electrons.

  2. Calculating Cluster Masses via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Ashley; Landry, D.; Bonamente, M.; Joy, M.; Bulbul, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Culverhouse, T. L.; Gralla, M.; Greer, C.; Hawkins, D.; Lamb, J. W.; Leitch, E. M.; Marrone, D. P.; Miller, A.; Mroczkowski, T.; Muchovej, S.; Plagge, T.; Woody, D.

    2012-05-01

    Accurate measurements of the total mass of galaxy clusters are key for measuring the cluster mass function and therefore investigating the evolution of the universe. We apply two new methods to measure cluster masses for five galaxy clusters contained within the Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS), an X-ray luminous statistically complete sample of 35 clusters at z=0.15-0.30. These methods distinctively use only observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, for which the brightness is redshift independent. At the low redshifts of the BCS, X-ray observations can easily be used to determine cluster masses, providing convenient calibrators for our SZ mass calculations. These clusters have been observed with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA), an interferometer that is part of the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) that has been optimized for accurate measurement of the SZ effect in clusters of galaxies at 30 GHz. One method implements a scaling relation that relates the integrated pressure, Y, as determined by the SZ observations to the mass of the cluster calculated via optical weak lensing. The second method makes use of the Virial theorem to determine the mass given the integrated pressure of the cluster. We find that masses calculated utilizing these methods within a radius r500 are consistent with X-ray masses, calculated by manipulating the surface brightness and temperature data within the same radius, thus concluding that these are viable methods for the determination of cluster masses via the SZ effect. We present preliminary results of our analysis for five galaxy clusters.

  3. Effective Interaction in Polarized Two-dimensional Electron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Takeshi; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Lipparini, Enrico

    2004-10-01

    Multiple scattering processes in two-dimensional electron systems with an arbitrary spin polarization are expressed as a spin-dependent effective interaction operator, which allows applications in various two-dimensional electron systems. Effects of the spin polarization on the correlation energy and the pair correlation function are discussed in detail in connection with the polarization-dependence of the effective interaction.

  4. More Abstracts on Effects of Radiation on Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1987-01-01

    Second volume of bibliography summarizes literature on radiation effects on new electronic devices. Includes those of protons, electrons, neutrons, gamma rays, and cosmic rays at energies up to about 20 GeV. Volume contains 219 abstracts from unclassified sources. Organized into four sections: dose-rate effects, new technology, post-irradiaton effects, and test environments.

  5. Antiproton–to–electron mass ratio determined by two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sótér A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has recently carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. Three transition frequencies were determined with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing the results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as 1836.1526736(23.

  6. Interstitial channels that control band gaps and effective masses in tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Yu-ichiro; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2014-04-04

    We find that electron states at the bottom of the conduction bands of covalent semiconductors are distributed mainly in the interstitial channels and that this floating nature leads to the band-gap variation and the anisotropic effective masses in various polytypes of SiC. We find that the channel length, rather than the hexagonality prevailed in the past, is the decisive factor for the band-gap variation in the polytypes. We also find that the floating nature causes two-dimensional electron and hole systems at the interface of different SiC polytypes and even one-dimensional channels near the inclined SiC surface.

  7. Effect of mass transfer on the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by platinum dendrimer encapsulated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Ioana; Crooks, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report on the effect of the mass transfer rate (kt) on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) comprised of 147 and 55 atoms (Pt147 and Pt55). The experiments were carried out using a dual-electrode microelectrochemical device, which enables the study of the ORR under high kt conditions with simultaneous detection of H2O2. At low kt (0.02 to 0.12 cm s-1) the effective number of electrons involved in ORR, neff, is 3.7 for Pt147 and 3.4 for Pt55. As kt is increased, the mass-transfer-limited current for the ORR becomes significantly lower than the value predicted by the Levich equation for a 4-electron process regardless of catalyst size. However, the percentage of H2O2 detected remains constant, such that neff barely changes over the entire kt range explored (0.02 cm s-1). This suggests that mass transfer does not affect neff, which has implications for the mechanism of the ORR on Pt nanoparticles. Interestingly, there is a significant difference in neff for the two sizes of Pt DENs (neff = 3.7 and 3.5 for Pt147 and Pt55, respectively) that cannot be assigned to mass transfer effects and that we therefore attribute to a particle size effect. PMID:22665772

  8. Low Hole Effective Mass p-type Transparent Conducting Oxides: Identification and Design Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Hautier, Geoffroy; Miglio, Anna; Ceder, Gerbrand; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Gonze, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The development of high performance transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) is critical to many technologies from transparent electronics to solar cells. While n-type TCOs are present in many devices, current p-type TCOs are not largely commercialized as they exhibit much lower carrier mobilities, due to the large hole effective masses of most oxides. Here, we conduct a high-throughput computational search on thousands of binary and ternary oxides and identify several highly promising compounds ...

  9. Identification and design principles of low hole effective mass p-type transparent conducting oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Hautier, Geoffroy; Miglio, Anna; Ceder, Gerbrand; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Gonze, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The development of high-performance transparent conducting oxides is critical to many technologies from transparent electronics to solar cells. Whereas n-type transparent con- ducting oxides are present in many devices, their p-type counterparts are not largely com- mercialized, as they exhibit much lower carrier mobilities due to the large hole effective masses of most oxides. Here we conduct a high-throughput computational search on thousands of binary and ternary oxides and identify severa...

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation in Dense Hydrogen: Electronic Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Dai, Jiayu; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-10-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation is an important non-equilibrium process in the generation of dense plasmas, particularly in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Classical molecular dynamics considers electrons as point charges, ignoring important quantum processes. We use an Electron Force Field (EFF) method to study the temperature relaxation processes, considering the nuclei as semi-classical point charges and assume electrons as Gaussian wave packets which includes the influences of the size and the radial motion of electrons. At the same time, a Pauli potential is used to describe the electronic exchange effect. At this stage, quantum effects such as exchange, tunneling can be included in this model. We compare the results from EFF and classical molecular dynamics, and find that the relaxation time is much longer with including quantum effects, which can be explained directly by the deference of collision cross sections between quantum particles and classical particles. Further, the final thermal temperature of electron and ion is different compared with classical results that the electron quantum effects cannot be neglected.

  11. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microscopic effective interaction between electrons: Application to sodium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipparini, E.; Serra, Ll.; Takayanagi, K.

    1994-06-01

    The effects of short-range electronic correlations on the properties of sodium clusters are studied using the Brueckner g matrix as an effective interaction which describes the scattering of two electrons in the presence of a many-electron medium. The associated cluster Hamiltonian is solved within the Hartree-Fock approximation for the ground state and the dipole plasmon resonance is studied using the self-consistent random-phase approximation. Effects due to ionic core electrons are considered within the pseudojellium model of metal cluster, which goes beyond jellium by using ionic pseudo-Hamiltonians.

  13. Proof of Concept Coded Aperture Miniature Mass Spectrometer Using a Cycloidal Sector Mass Analyzer, a Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Field Emission Electron Ionization Source, and an Array Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsden, Jason J.; Herr, Philip J.; Landry, David M. W.; Kim, William; Vyas, Raul; Parker, Charles B.; Kirley, Matthew P.; Keil, Adam D.; Gilchrist, Kristin H.; Radauscher, Erich J.; Hall, Stephen D.; Carlson, James B.; Baldasaro, Nicholas; Stokes, David; Di Dona, Shane T.; Russell, Zachary E.; Grego, Sonia; Edwards, Steven J.; Sperline, Roger P.; Denton, M. Bonner; Stoner, Brian R.; Gehm, Michael E.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2017-10-01

    Despite many potential applications, miniature mass spectrometers have had limited adoption in the field due to the tradeoff between throughput and resolution that limits their performance relative to laboratory instruments. Recently, a solution to this tradeoff has been demonstrated by using spatially coded apertures in magnetic sector mass spectrometers, enabling throughput and signal-to-background improvements of greater than an order of magnitude with no loss of resolution. This paper describes a proof of concept demonstration of a cycloidal coded aperture miniature mass spectrometer (C-CAMMS) demonstrating use of spatially coded apertures in a cycloidal sector mass analyzer for the first time. C-CAMMS also incorporates a miniature carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron ionization source and a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) ion array detector. Results confirm the cycloidal mass analyzer's compatibility with aperture coding. A >10× increase in throughput was achieved without loss of resolution compared with a single slit instrument. Several areas where additional improvement can be realized are identified. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Effective interaction in two-dimensional electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Takeshi; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Lipparini, Enrico

    2004-03-01

    A fully microscopic derivation is proposed for an effective interaction operator between electrons in the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), which represents multiple-scattering processes in the medium. The obtained interaction features short-range behaviors between electrons, and is presented in a simple form which allows applications in various systems. Short-range correlation in the 2DEG is discussed in detail in terms of the effective interaction with special emphasis on the nonlocal aspect of the correlation.

  15. Effects of elastic and inelastic scattering in giving electrons tortuous paths in matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J E; Hamm, R N

    1995-09-01

    Heavy charged particles travel in essentially straight lines in matter, while electrons travel in tortuous paths. Frequent multiple elastic Coulomb scattering by atomic nuclei is often cited as the reason for this electron behavior. Heavy charged particles also undergo multiple Coulomb scattering. However, because they are massive, significant deflections occur only in rare, close encounters with nuclei. In contrast to heavy particles, the inelastic interaction of an electron with an atomic electron represents a collision with a particle of equal mass. In principle, therefore, repeated inelastic scattering of an electron can also produce large-angle deflections and thus contribute to the tortuous nature of an electron's track. To investigate the relative importance of elastic and inelastic scattering on determining the appearance of electron tracks, detailed Monte Carlo transport computations have been carried out for monoenergetic pencil beams of electrons normally incident on a water slab with initial energies from 1 keV to 1 MeV. The calculations have been performed with deflections due to (1) inelastic scattering only, (2) elastic scattering only, and (3) both types of scattering. Results are presented to show the spreading of the pencil beams with depth in the slab, the transmission through slabs of different thicknesses, and back-scattering from the slab. The results show that elastic nuclear scattering is indeed the principal physical process that causes electron paths to be tortuous; however, the smaller effect of inelastic electronic scattering is far from negligible.

  16. The kinetic energy operator for distance-dependent effective nuclear masses: Derivation for a triatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoma, Mykhaylo; Jaquet, Ralph

    2017-09-21

    The kinetic energy operator for triatomic molecules with coordinate or distance-dependent nuclear masses has been derived. By combination of the chain rule method and the analysis of infinitesimal variations of molecular coordinates, a simple and general technique for the construction of the kinetic energy operator has been proposed. The asymptotic properties of the Hamiltonian have been investigated with respect to the ratio of the electron and proton mass. We have demonstrated that an ad hoc introduction of distance (and direction) dependent nuclear masses in Cartesian coordinates preserves the total rotational invariance of the problem. With the help of Wigner rotation functions, an effective Hamiltonian for nuclear motion can be derived. In the derivation, we have focused on the effective trinuclear Hamiltonian. All necessary matrix elements are given in closed analytical form. Preliminary results for the influence of non-adiabaticity on vibrational band origins are presented for H3+.

  17. Strontium clusters: electronic and geometry shell effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    The optimized structure and electronic properties of neutral, singly and doubly charged strontium clusters have been investigated using it ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory. We have systematically calculated the optimized geometries of neutral, singly and doubly...

  18. The adverse effects of albendazole and praziquantel in mass drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adverse effects of albendazole and praziquantel in mass drug administration by trained schoolteachers. ... In this study, one trained schoolteacher could administer treatment to three hundred children in one day, which makes the approach cost effective and should be adopted nationally. Keywords: albendazole ...

  19. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Team, JET [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK

    2016-02-09

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass < A> weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher < A >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with < A > were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion–electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  20. Graphene synthesis on cubic SiC/Si wafers. perspectives for mass production of graphene-based electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristov, Victor Yu; Urbanik, Grzegorz; Kummer, Kurt; Vyalikh, Denis V; Molodtsova, Olga V; Preobrajenski, Alexei B; Zakharov, Alexei A; Hess, Christian; Hänke, Torben; Büchner, Bernd; Vobornik, Ivana; Fujii, Jun; Panaccione, Giancarlo; Ossipyan, Yuri A; Knupfer, Martin

    2010-03-10

    The outstanding properties of graphene, a single graphite layer, render it a top candidate for substituting silicon in future electronic devices. The so far exploited synthesis approaches, however, require conditions typically achieved in specialized laboratories and result in graphene sheets whose electronic properties are often altered by interactions with substrate materials. The development of graphene-based technologies requires an economical fabrication method compatible with mass production. Here we demonstrate for the fist time the feasibility of graphene synthesis on commercially available cubic SiC/Si substrates of >300 mm in diameter, which result in graphene flakes electronically decoupled from the substrate. After optimization of the preparation procedure, the proposed synthesis method can represent a further big step toward graphene-based electronic technologies.

  1. Electron Radiation Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Hollerman, William A.; Hubbs, Whitney S.; Gray, Perry A.; Wertz, George E.; Hoppe, David T.; Nehls, Mary K.; Semmel, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Solar sails are not limited by reaction mass and provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Once thought to be difficult or impossible, solar sailing has come out of science fiction and into the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this propulsion method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. The availability of strong, ultra lightweight, and radiation resistant materials will determine the future of solar sailing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to space environmental effects. This paper will describe the irradiation of candidate solar sail materials to energetic electrons, in vacuum, to determine the hardness of several candidate sail materials.

  2. Higgs mechanism and the added-mass effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswami, Govind S; Phatak, Sachin S

    2015-04-08

    In the Higgs mechanism, mediators of the weak force acquire masses by interacting with the Higgs condensate, leading to a vector boson mass matrix. On the other hand, a rigid body accelerated through an inviscid, incompressible and irrotational fluid feels an opposing force linearly related to its acceleration, via an added-mass tensor. We uncover a striking physical analogy between the two effects and propose a dictionary relating them. The correspondence turns the gauge Lie algebra into the space of directions in which the body can move, encodes the pattern of gauge symmetry breaking in the shape of an associated body and relates symmetries of the body to those of the scalar vacuum manifold. The new viewpoint is illustrated with numerous examples, and raises interesting questions, notably on the fluid analogues of the broken symmetry and Higgs particle, and the field-theoretic analogue of the added mass of a composite body.

  3. Active and sterile neutrino mass effects on beta decay spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boillos, Juan Manuel; Moya de Guerra, Elvira [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, U. Complutense de Madrid, Av. Complutense s/n, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Moreno, Oscar [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, U. Complutense de Madrid, Av. Complutense s/n, E-28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-10

    We study the spectra of the emitted charged leptons in charge current weak nuclear processes to analyze the effect of neutrino masses. Standard active neutrinos are studied here, with masses of the order of 1 eV or lower, as well as sterile neutrinos with masses of a few keV. The latter are warm dark matter (WDM) candidates hypothetically produced or captured as small mixtures with the active neutrinos. We compute differential decay or capture rates spectra in weak charged processes of different nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 187}Re, {sup 107}Pd, {sup 163}Ho, etc) using different masses of both active and sterile neutrinos and different values of the mixing parameter.

  4. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  5. Dynamics of interacting electrons under effect of a Morse potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, J. L. L.; Sales, M. O.; Neto, A. Ranciaro; de Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2017-05-01

    We consider interacting electrons moving in a nonlinear Morse lattice. We set the initial conditions as follows: electrons were initially localized at the center of the chain and a solitonic deformation was produced by an impulse excitation on the center of the chain. By solving quantum and classical equations for this system numerically, we found that a fraction of electronic wave function was trapped by the solitonic excitation, and trapping specificities depend on the degree of interaction among electrons. Also, there is evidence that the effective electron velocity depends on Coulomb interaction and electron-phonon coupling in a nontrivial way. This association is explained in detail along this work. In addition, we briefly discuss the dependence of our results with the type of initial condition we choose for the electrons and lattice.

  6. Mass-gathering Medicine: Risks and Patient Presentations at a 2-Day Electronic Dance Music Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Adam; Turris, Sheila A

    2015-06-01

    Music festivals, including electronic dance music events (EDMEs), increasingly are common in Canada and internationally. Part of a US $4.5 billion industry annually, the target audience is youth and young adults aged 15-25 years. Little is known about the impact of these events on local emergency departments (EDs). Drawing on prospective data over a 2-day EDME, the authors of this study employed mixed methods to describe the case mix and prospectively compared patient presentation rate (PPR) and ambulance transfer rate (ATR) between a first aid (FA) only and a higher level of care (HLC) model. There were 20,301 ticketed attendees. Seventy patient encounters were recorded over two days. The average age was 19.1 years. Roughly 69% were female (n=48/70). Forty-six percent of those seen in the main medical area were under the age of 19 years (n=32/70). The average length of stay in the main medical area was 70.8 minutes. The overall PPR was 4.09 per 1,000 attendees. The ATR with FA only would have been 1.98; ATR with HLC model was 0.52. The presence of an on-site HLC team had a significant positive effect on avoiding ambulance transfers. Twenty-nine ambulance transfers and ED visits were avoided by the presence of an on-site HLC medical team. Reduction of impact to the public health care system was substantial. Electronic dance music events have predictable risks and patient presentations, and appropriate on-site health care resources may reduce significantly the impact on the prehospital and emergency health resources in the host community.

  7. Effectiveness of en masse versus two-step retraction: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumen Z. Rizk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review aims to compare the effectiveness of en masse and two-step retraction methods during orthodontic space closure regarding anchorage preservation and anterior segment retraction and to assess their effect on the duration of treatment and root resorption. Methods An electronic search for potentially eligible randomized controlled trials and prospective controlled trials was performed in five electronic databases up to July 2017. The process of study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment was performed by two reviewers independently. A narrative review is presented in addition to a quantitative synthesis of the pooled results where possible. The Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale were used for the methodological quality assessment of the included studies. Results Eight studies were included in the qualitative synthesis in this review. Four studies were included in the quantitative synthesis. En masse/miniscrew combination showed a statistically significant standard mean difference regarding anchorage preservation − 2.55 mm (95% CI − 2.99 to − 2.11 and the amount of upper incisor retraction − 0.38 mm (95% CI − 0.70 to − 0.06 when compared to a two-step/conventional anchorage combination. Qualitative synthesis suggested that en masse retraction requires less time than two-step retraction with no difference in the amount of root resorption. Conclusions Both en masse and two-step retraction methods are effective during the space closure phase. The en masse/miniscrew combination is superior to the two-step/conventional anchorage combination with regard to anchorage preservation and amount of retraction. Limited evidence suggests that anchorage reinforcement with a headgear produces similar results with both retraction methods. Limited evidence also suggests that en masse retraction may require less time and that no significant differences exist in the amount of root

  8. Effectiveness of en masse versus two-step retraction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Mumen Z; Mohammed, Hisham; Ismael, Omar; Bearn, David R

    2018-01-05

    This review aims to compare the effectiveness of en masse and two-step retraction methods during orthodontic space closure regarding anchorage preservation and anterior segment retraction and to assess their effect on the duration of treatment and root resorption. An electronic search for potentially eligible randomized controlled trials and prospective controlled trials was performed in five electronic databases up to July 2017. The process of study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment was performed by two reviewers independently. A narrative review is presented in addition to a quantitative synthesis of the pooled results where possible. The Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale were used for the methodological quality assessment of the included studies. Eight studies were included in the qualitative synthesis in this review. Four studies were included in the quantitative synthesis. En masse/miniscrew combination showed a statistically significant standard mean difference regarding anchorage preservation - 2.55 mm (95% CI - 2.99 to - 2.11) and the amount of upper incisor retraction - 0.38 mm (95% CI - 0.70 to - 0.06) when compared to a two-step/conventional anchorage combination. Qualitative synthesis suggested that en masse retraction requires less time than two-step retraction with no difference in the amount of root resorption. Both en masse and two-step retraction methods are effective during the space closure phase. The en masse/miniscrew combination is superior to the two-step/conventional anchorage combination with regard to anchorage preservation and amount of retraction. Limited evidence suggests that anchorage reinforcement with a headgear produces similar results with both retraction methods. Limited evidence also suggests that en masse retraction may require less time and that no significant differences exist in the amount of root resorption between the two methods.

  9. Effect of Electron Seeding on Experimentally Measured Multipactor Discharge Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Jonathan; Graves, Timothy; Lemon, Colby; Looper, Mark; Farkas, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Multipactor is a vacuum phenomenon in which electrons, moving in resonance with an externally applied electric field, impact material surfaces. If the number of secondary electrons created per primary electron impact averages more than unity, the resonant interaction can lead to an electron avalanche. Multipactor is a generally undesirable phenomenon, as it can cause local heating, absorb power, or cause detuning of RF circuits. In order to increase the probability of multipactor initiation, test facilities often employ various seeding sources such as radioactive sources (Cesium 137, Strontium 90), electron guns, or photon sources. Even with these sources, the voltage for multipactor initiation is not certain as parameters such as material type, RF pulse length, and device wall thickness can all affect seed electron flux and energy in critical gap regions, and hence the measured voltage threshold. This study investigates the effects of seed electron source type (e.g., photons versus beta particles), material type, gap size, and RF pulse length variation on multipactor threshold. In addition to the experimental work, GEANT4 simulations will be used to estimate the production rate of low energy electrons (< 5 keV) by high energy electrons and photons. A comparison of the experimental fluxes to the typical energetic photon and particle fluxes experienced by spacecraft in various orbits will also be made. Initial results indicate that for a simple, parallel plate device made of aluminum, there is no threshold variation (with seed electrons versus with no seed electrons) under continuous-wave RF exposure.

  10. Body Mass Index and Risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Two Electronic Health Record Prospective Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Shaum; Preiss, David; Hyde, Craig; Bonato, Vinicius; St. Louis, Matthew; Desai, Jigar; Gill, Jason M. R.; Welsh, Paul; Waterworth, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Context: The relationship between rising body mass index (BMI) and prospective risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is virtually absent. Objective: Determine the extent of the association between BMI and risk of future NAFLD diagnosis, stratifying by sex and diabetes. Design: Two prospective studies using Humedica and Health Improvement Network (THIN) with 1.54 and 4.96 years of follow-up, respectively. Setting: Electronic health record databases. Participants: Patients with a recorded BMI measurement between 15 and 60 kg/m2, and smoking status, and 1 year of active status before baseline BMI. Patients with a diagnosis or history of chronic diseases were excluded. Interventions: None. Main Outcome Measure: Recorded diagnosis of NAFLD/NASH during follow-up (Humedica International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code 571.8, and read codes for NAFLD and NASH in THIN). Results: Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated across BMI categories using BMI of 20–22.5 kg/m2 as the reference category, adjusting for age, sex, and smoking status. Risk of recorded NAFLD/NASH increased linearly with BMI and was approximately 5-fold higher in Humedica (HR = 4.78; 95% confidence interval, 4.17–5.47) and 9-fold higher in THIN (HR = 8.93; 7.11–11.23) at a BMI of 30–32.5 kg/m2 rising to around 10-fold higher in Humedica (HR = 9.80; 8.49–11.32) and 14-fold higher in THIN (HR = 14.32; 11.04–18.57) in the 37.5- to 40-kg/m2 BMI category. Risk of NAFLD/NASH was approximately 50% higher in men and approximately double in those with diabetes. Conclusions: These data quantify the consistent and strong relationships between BMI and prospectively recorded diagnoses of NAFLD/NASH and emphasize the importance of weight reduction strategies for prevention and management of NAFLD. PMID:26672639

  11. Enrichment and Analysis of Nonenzymatically Glycated Peptides: Boronate Affinity Chromatography Coupled with Electron-Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Brock, Jonathan W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Ames, Jennifer M.; Baynes, John; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2007-06-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. However, no effective high-throughput methods exist for identifying proteins containing this low abundance post-translational modification in bottom-up proteomic studies. In this report, phenylboronate affinity chromatography was used in a two-step enrichment scheme to selectively isolate first glycated proteins and then glycated, tryptic peptides from human serum glycated in vitro. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by alternating electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. It was observed that ETD fragmentation mode resulted in a significantly higher number of glycated peptide identifications (87.6% of all identified peptides) versus CID mode (17.0% of all identified peptides), when utilizing dual glycation enrichment on both the protein and peptide level. This study illustrates that phenylboronate affinity chromatography coupled with LC-MS/MS with ETD as the fragmentation mode is an efficient approach for analyses of glycated proteins and can have broad applications in studies of diabetes mellitus.

  12. Enrichment and Analysis of Non-enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Boronate Affinity Chromatography Coupled with Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Brock, Jonathan W. C.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Ames, Jennifer M.; Baynes, John W.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. However, no effective high-throughput methods exist for identifying proteins containing this low abundance post-translational modification in bottom-up proteomic studies. In this report, phenylboronate affinity chromatography was used in a two-step enrichment scheme to selectively isolate first glycated proteins and then glycated, tryptic peptides from human serum glycated in vitro. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by alternating electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. ETD fragmentation mode permitted identification of a significantly higher number of glycated peptides (87.6% of all identified peptides) versus CID mode (17.0% of all identified peptides), when utilizing enrichment on first the protein and then the peptide level. This study illustrates that phenylboronate affinity chromatography coupled with LC-MS/MS and using ETD as the fragmentation mode is an efficient approach for analysis of glycated proteins and may have broad application in studies of diabetes mellitus. PMID:17488106

  13. Suppressed Magnetic Circular Dichroism and Valley-Selective Magnetoabsorption due to the Effective Mass Anisotropy in Bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Pieter J.; Levallois, Julien; Tran, Michaël K.; Poumirol, Jean-Marie; Nedoliuk, Ievgeniia O.; Teyssier, Jérémie; Uher, Ctirad; van der Marel, Dirk; Kuzmenko, Alexey B.

    2016-07-01

    We measure the far-infrared reflectivity and Kerr angle spectra on a high-quality crystal of pure semimetallic bismuth as a function of magnetic field, from which we extract the conductivity for left- and right-handed circular polarizations. The high spectral resolution allows us to separate the intraband Landau level transitions for electrons and holes. The hole transition exhibits 100% magnetic circular dichroism; it appears only for one polarization as expected for a circular cyclotron orbit. However, the dichroism for electron transitions is reduced to only 13 ±1 %, which is quantitatively explained by the large effective mass anisotropy of the electron pockets of the Fermi surface. This observation is a signature of the mismatch between the metric experienced by the photons and the electrons. It allows for a contactless measurement of the effective mass anisotropy and provides a direction towards valley polarized magnetooptical pumping with elliptically polarized light.

  14. Mixing of Proton and Electron Scales - Effects of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on the Electron Firehose Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A. F.; Poedts, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    We perform kinetic linear theory instability analysis in a non-drifting anisotropic electron-proton plasma to study the effects of proton temperature anisotropies on the electron firehose instability in the collisionless solar wind. We solve the Vlasov linear theory dispersion relation for hot highly anisotropic electron-proton plasma in high-beta regime to study the behavior of the solar wind plasma close to the instability thresholds as observed by different spacecraft at 1 AU. We consider temperature and anisotropy regimes for which the electrons and the protons can interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters simultaneous electron and proton firehose instabilities can be observed with the growth rate of the electron firehose instability extending towards the proton scales. The co-existance of the proton and the electron firehose and the mixing of scales for the electromagnetic fluctuations excited by the two instabilities depends on the initial temperatures, anisotropies and angle of propagation. In the case of parallel wave propagation both left and right-hand polarized waves are simultaneously excited. As we increase the angle of propagation the electron firehose starts to dominate with excitation of large-amplitude aperiodic fluctuations over a large range of wave-numbers, starting at the protons scales and extending up to the smaller electron scales. We calculate the maximum growth rate of the oblique electron firehose as a function of the proton temperature anisotropy and discuss the implications of the electron-proton scale mixing for the observed plasma properties and instability thresholds in the undisturbed solar wind.

  15. Flow injection of liquid samples to a mass spectrometer with ionization under vacuum conditions: a combined ion source for single-photon and electron impact ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepler, Claudia; Sklorz, Martin; Passig, Johannes; Famiglini, Giorgio; Cappiello, Achille; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and atmospheric pressure photo-ionization (APPI) are the most important techniques for the ionization of liquid samples. However, working under atmospheric pressure conditions, all these techniques involve some chemical rather than purely physical processes, and therefore, side reactions often yield to matrix-dependent ionization efficiencies. Here, a system is presented that combines both soft single-photon ionization (SPI) and hard 70 eV electron impact ionization (EI) of dissolved compounds under vacuum conditions. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was modified to enable direct EI, a technique developed by Cappiello et al. to obtain library-searchable EI mass spectra as well as soft SPI mass spectra of sample solutions. An electron beam-pumped rare gas excimer lamp working at 126 nm was used as well as a focusable vacuum UV light source for single-photon ionization. Both techniques, EI and SPI, were applied successfully for flow injection experiments providing library-matchable EI fragment mass spectra and soft SPI mass spectra, showing dominant signals for the molecular ion. Four model compounds were analyzed: hexadecane, propofol, chlorpropham, and eugenol, with detection limits in the picomolar range. This novel combination of EI and SPI promises great analytical benefits, thanks to the possibility of combining database alignment for EI data and molecular mass information provided by SPI. Possible applications for the presented ionization technology system are a matrix-effect-free detection and a rapid screening of different complex mixtures without time-consuming sample preparation or separation techniques (e.g., for analysis of reaction solutions in combinatorial chemistry) or a switchable hard (EI) and soft (SPI) MS method as detection step for liquid chromatography.

  16. Determination of the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio by precision laser spectroscopy of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M; Eades, John; Gomikawa, K; Hayano, R S; Ono, N; Pirkl, Werner; Widmann, E; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Barna, D; Horváth, D

    2006-01-01

    A femtosecond optical frequency comb and continuous-wave pulse- amplified laser were used to measure 12 transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium to fractional precisions of (9-16) 10/sup -9lifetimes hitherto unaccessible to our precision laser spectroscopy method. Comparisons with three-body QED calculations yielded an antiproton-to-electron mass ratio of M/sub pmacron//m/sub e/=1836.152 674(5).

  17. Probing the hydrophobic effect of noncovalent complexes by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bich, Claudia; Baer, Samuel; Jecklin, Matthias C; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-02-01

    The study of noncovalent interactions by mass spectrometry has become an active field of research in recent years. The role of the different noncovalent intermolecular forces is not yet fully understood since they tend to be modulated upon transfer into the gas phase. The hydrophobic effect, which plays a major role in protein folding, adhesion of lipid bilayers, etc., is absent in the gas phase. Here, noncovalent complexes with different types of interaction forces were investigated by mass spectrometry and compared with the complex present in solution. Creatine kinase (CK), glutathione S-transferase (GST), ribonuclease S (RNase S), and leucine zipper (LZ), which have dissociation constants in the nM range, were studied by native nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) combined with chemical cross-linking (XL). Complexes interacting with hydrogen bonds survived the transfer into gas phase intact and were observed by nanoESI-MS. Complexes that are bound largely by the hydrophobic effect in solution were not detected or only at very low intensity. Complexes with mixed polar and hydrophobic interactions were detected by nanoESI-MS, most likely due to the contribution from polar interactions. All noncovalent complexes could easily be studied by XL MALDI-MS, which demonstrates that the noncovalently bound complexes are conserved, and a real "snap-shot" of the situation in solution can be obtained. 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mass Counseling: Effective Tool to Improve Knowledge, Attitude and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mass Counseling: Effective Tool to Improve Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior Regarding Blood Donation. ... Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research ... and post‑counseling knowledge, attitude, and behavior (KAB) scores regarding blood donation were assessed using a pre‑tested semi‑structured questionnaire.

  19. The effects of phosphorus supplementation on body mass and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cant linear response to Level of P supplementation (P = 0.0560). The joint significance level for this model was. P = 0.0261. The weaning mass of calves and their average daily growth (ADG) showed significant differences only according to year of birth. The significant effect of treatment (level of P supplementation) on calf ...

  20. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis is carried out to study the viscous dissipation and variable viscosity effects on the flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics in a viscous fluid over a semi-infinite vertical porous plate in the presence of chemical reaction. The governing boundary layer equations are written into a dimensionless form by similarity ...

  1. Intertwining operator method and supersymmetry for effective mass Schroedinger equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzko, A.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); JIPENP, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)], E-mail: suzko@cv.jinr.ru; Schulze-Halberg, A. [Mathematics Department, University of Colima, Bernal Diaz del Castillo 340, Colima 28045 (Mexico)], E-mail: xbat@ucol.mx

    2008-09-08

    By application of the intertwining operator method to Schroedinger equations with position-dependent (effective) mass, we construct Darboux transformations, establish the supersymmetry factorization technique and show equivalence of both formalisms. Our findings prove equivalence of the intertwining technique and the method of point transformations.

  2. Effect of Mass Chemotherapy with Praziquantel on the Prevalence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: One of the main control measures for Schistosomiasis in Nigeria is mass chemotherapy with Praziquantel tablets in areas where the disease is prevalent. This study was carried out to determine the effect of drug treatment with Praziquantel on the prevalence of urinary and intestinal Schistosomiasis among ...

  3. Effects of water stress and seed mass on germination and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of water stress and seed mass on germination, as well as antioxidative enzymes, in Xanthoceras sorbifolia seed were studied. The germination percentage decreased gradually in all seeds with decreasing water potential. The reduction was more significant under -0.6 MPa treatment than under the -0.2 MPa ...

  4. Effects of adherence to antiretroviral therapy on body mass index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study determined the effect of adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on body mass index (BMI) and immunological and virological parameters of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) attending University College Hospital, Ibadan. Methodology: Prospective cohort of consenting PLWHA ...

  5. The effective density of randomly moving electrons and related characteristics of materials with degenerate electron gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Palenskis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of the conductivity of metals, of superconductors in the normal state and of semiconductors with highly degenerate electron gas remains a significant issue if consideration is based on the classical statistics. This study is addressed to the characterization of the effective density of randomly moving electrons and to the evaluation of carrier diffusion coefficient, mobility, and other parameters by generalization of the widely published experimental results. The generalized expressions have been derived for various kinetic parameters attributed to the non-degenerate and degenerate electron gas, by analyzing a random motion of the single type carriers in homogeneous materials. The values of the most important kinetic parameters for different metals are also systematized and discussed. It has been proved that Einstein's relation between the diffusion coefficient and the drift mobility of electrons is held for any level of degeneracy if the effective density of randomly moving carriers is properly taken into account.

  6. Effect of electron disruption in the energy recovery linac based electron ion collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Beam-beam effects present one of the major factors limiting the luminosity of colliders. In the energy recovery linac (ERL based eRHIC design, the electron beam, accelerated in a superconducting ERL, collides with the proton beam circulating in the RHIC ring. During such collisions the electron beam undergoes a very strong beam-beam interaction with the protons, which warrants careful examination. We evaluated transverse disruption and linear mismatch effects in the electron beam caused by collisions and considered several countermeasures to mitigate the emittance growth from these interactions. The minimum required aperture of transport lines is calculated that should allow the transport of the electron beam during the deceleration process.

  7. Effects of thickness on electronic structure of titanium thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of thickness on the electronic structure of e-beam evaporated thin titanium films were studied using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) technique at titanium 2,3 edge in total electron yield (TEY) mode and transmission yield mode. Thickness dependence of 2,3 branching ratio (BR) of titanium was ...

  8. Concept development of X-ray mass thickness detection for irradiated items upon electron beam irradiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huaili; Yang, Guang; Kuang, Shan; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaomin; Li, Cancan; Han, Zhiwei; Li, Yuanjing

    2018-02-01

    The present project will adopt the principle and technology of X-ray imaging to quickly measure the mass thickness (wherein the mass thickness of the item =density of the item × thickness of the item) of the irradiated items and thus to determine whether the packaging size and inside location of the item will meet the requirements for treating thickness upon electron beam irradiation processing. The development of algorithm of X-ray mass thickness detector as well as the prediction of dose distribution have been completed. The development of the algorithm was based on the X-ray attenuation. 4 standard modules, Al sheet, Al ladders, PMMA sheet and PMMA ladders, were selected for the algorithm development. The algorithm was optimized until the error between tested mass thickness and standard mass thickness was less than 5%. Dose distribution of all energy (1-10 MeV) for each mass thickness was obtained using Monte-carlo method and used for the analysis of dose distribution, which provides the information of whether the item will be penetrated or not, as well as the Max. dose, Min. dose and DUR of the whole item.

  9. Electronic structure and bonding in the RhC molecule by all-electron ab initio HF–Cl calculations and mass spectrometric measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Gingerich, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    in a singly occupied, nonbonding orbital. The chemical bond in RhC is polar with a charge transfer from Rh to C giving rise to a dipole moment of 2.82 D at the experimental equilibrium distance. Mass spectrometric equilibrium measurements over the temperature range 1970–2806 K have resulted in the selected...... with the experimental data. The chemical bond in the electronic ground state is mainly due to interaction of the 4d orbitals of Rh with the 2s and 2p orbitals of C. The bond is a triple bond composed of two pi bonds and one sigma bond. The 5s electron of Rh hardly participates in the bond formation. It is located...

  10. Disease Propagation Analysis and Mitigation Strategies for Effective Mass Dispensing*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eva K; Chen, Chien H; Pietz, Ferninand; Benecke, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Mass dispensing of medical countermeasures has been proven to be an effective and crucial means to contain the outbreak of highly infectious disease. The large influx of individuals to the point-of dispensing (POD) centers to receive vaccinations or prophylactic treatment, however, raises the potential risk of serious intra-facility cross-infections. To mitigate the effect, a thorough understanding of how disease propagates during the dispensing under different transmission parameters versus ...

  11. Photon Structure Functions: Target Photon Mass Effects and QCD Corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, Prakash(Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata, 700 064, India); Ravindran, V.

    1994-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the polarised and unpolarised processes $e^+ ~e^- \\rightarrow e^+ ~e^- X$ in the deep inelastic limit and study the effects of target photon mass (virtuality) on the photon structure functions. The effect of target photon virtuality manifests as new singly polarised structure functions and also alters the physical interpretation of the unpolarised structure functions. The physical interpretation of these structure functions in terms of hadronic components i...

  12. Effect of the charged-lepton's mass on the quasielastic neutrino cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankowski, Artur M.

    2017-09-01

    Martini et al. [Phys. Rev. C 94, 015501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.94.015501] recently observed that when the produced-lepton's mass plays an important role, the charged-current quasielastic cross section for muon neutrinos can be higher than that for electron neutrinos. Here I argue that this effect appears solely in the theoretical descriptions of nuclear effects in which nucleon knockout requires the energy and momentum transfers to lie in a narrow range of the kinematically allowed values.

  13. Hadron Mass Effects for Kaon Production on deuteron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Juan

    2017-09-01

    The spin-independent cross section for semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon scattering are derived in the framework of collinear factorization, including the effects of the target and produced hadron masses at small momentum transfer squared Q2. At leading order, the cross section factorizes into products of parton distributions and fragmentation functions evaluated in terms of new, mass-dependent scaling variables. This talk focuses on Kaon production at HERMES and COMPASS kinematics. In particular, hadron mass corrections for integrated kaon multiplicities measured by the two collaborations are shown to sizeably reduce the apparent large discrepancy between the results for both experiments. This work was supported by the DOE contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC operates Jefferson Lab, and by the DOE Contract No. DE-SC008791.

  14. The effect of electron bite-outs on artificial electron heating and the PMSE overshoot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kassa

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We have considered the effect that a local reduction in the electron density (an electron bite-out, caused by electron absorption on to dust particles, can have on the artificial electron heating in the height region between 80 to 90km, where noctilucent clouds (NLC and the radar phenomenon PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes are observed. With an electron density profile without bite-outs, the heated electron temperature Te,hot will generally decrease smoothly with height in the PMSE region or there may be no significant heating effect present. Within a bite-out Te,hot will decrease less rapidly and can even increase slightly with height if the bite-out is strong. We have looked at recent observations of PMSE which are affected by artificial electron heating, with a heater cycling producing the new overshoot effect. According to the theory for the PMSE overshoot the fractional increase in electron temperature Te,hot/Ti, where Ti is the unaffected ion temperature=neutral temperature, can be found from the reduction in PMSE intensity as the heater is switched on. We have looked at results from four days of observations with the EISCAT VHF radar (224 MHz, together with the EISCAT heating facility. We find support for the PMSE overshoot and heating model from a sequence of observations during one of the days where the heater transmitter power is varied from cycle to cycle and where the calculated Te,hot/Ti is found to vary in proportion to the transmitter power. We also looked for signatures of electron bite-outs by examining the variation of Te,hot/Ti with height for the three other days. We find that the height variation of Te,hot/Ti is very different on the three days. On one of the days we see typically that this ratio can increase with height, showing the presence of a bite-out, while on the next day the heating factor mainly decreases with height, indicating that the fractional amount of dust is low, so that the electron density is hardly

  15. Strain Effect on the Electronic and Optical Properties of CdSe Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Hao; Chen, Li; Ye, Xiang

    2017-12-01

    First-principles density functional theory (DFT) simulations were carried out to study the strain dependence on the electronic and optical properties of cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanowires (NWs). The band structures, effective masses of electron and holes, dielectric properties, and other optical properties (such as extinction coefficient, optical reflectivity, and absorption coefficient) were calculated under both compressive and tensile uniaxial strains. Size-dependence was also discussed by comparing results among CdSe wires with various diameters. Simulation results show that an interesting band-switch behavior occurs at the valence bands regardless of size. The cause and the consequences of such band-switch behavior were also studied. Further strain dependence on corresponding electronic and optical properties were examined as well. Our results provide insights to possible mechanical tuning via strain on the electronic and optical properties of CdSe NWs.

  16. Effect of body mass and clothing on carrion entomofauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewski, Szymon; Frątczak, Katarzyna; Konwerski, Szymon; Bajerlein, Daria; Szpila, Krzysztof; Jarmusz, Mateusz; Szafałowicz, Michał; Grzywacz, Andrzej; Mądra, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Carcass mass largely affects pattern and rate of carrion decomposition. Supposedly, it is similarly important for carrion entomofauna; however, most of its likely effects have not been tested experimentally. Here, simultaneous effects of carcass mass and clothing are analyzed. A factorial block experiment with four levels of carcass mass (small carcasses 5-15 kg, medium carcasses 15.1-30 kg, medium/large carcasses 35-50 kg, large carcasses 55-70 kg) and two levels of carcass clothing (clothed and unclothed) was made in a grassland habitat of Western Poland. Pig carcasses (N = 24) were grouped into spring, early summer, and late summer blocks. Insects were sampled manually and with pitfall traps. Results demonstrate that insect assemblages are more complex, abundant, and long-lasting on larger carcasses, whereas clothing is of minor importance in this respect. Only large or medium/large carcasses were colonized by all guilds of carrion insects, while small or medium carcasses revealed high underrepresentation of late-colonizing insects (e.g., Cleridae or Nitidulidae). This finding indicates that carcasses weighing about 23 kg-a standard in forensic decomposition studies-give an incomplete picture of carrion entomofauna. Residencies of all forensically relevant insects were distinctly prolonged on larger carcasses, indicating that cadaver mass is a factor of great importance in this respect. The pre-appearance interval of most taxa was found to be unrelated to mass or clothing of a carcass. Moreover, current results suggest that rate of larval development is higher on smaller carcasses. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that carcass mass is a factor of crucial importance for carrion entomofauna, whereas the importance of clothing is small.

  17. Terrestrial radiation effects in ULSI devices and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Eishi H

    2014-01-01

    A practical guide on how mathematical approaches can be used to analyze and control radiation effects in semiconductor devices within various environments Covers faults in ULSI devices to failures in electronic systems caused by a wide variety of radiation fields, including electrons, alpha -rays, muons, gamma rays, neutrons and heavy ions. Readers will learn the environmental radiation features at the ground or avionics altitude. Readers will also learn how to make numerical models from physical insight and what kind of mathematical approaches should be implemented to analyze the radiation effects. A wide variety of mitigation techniques against soft-errors are reviewed and discussed. The author shows how to model sophisticated radiation effects in condensed matter in order to quantify and control them. The book provides the reader with the knowledge on a wide variety of radiation fields and their effects on the electronic devices and systems. It explains how electronic systems including servers and rout...

  18. Effects Of Radiation On Electronics-Additional References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Bibliography abstracts summarizing literature on effects of radiation on new electronic devices. This and second volume cover years 1984 and 1985. Third volume, covers 1982 and 1983 (previously published).

  19. Comparison of LV mass and volume measurements derived from electron beam tomography using cine imaging and angiographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Songshou; Takasu, Junichiro; Child, Janis; Carson, Sivi; Oudiz, Ronald; Budoff, Matthew J

    2003-10-01

    To estimate the variation of left ventricular (LV) mass and volume measurement with cine and angiography by electron beam tomography (EBT). Sixty-three consecutive patients (41 men, 22 women; age range 46-91) referred for cardiac imaging for clinical indications underwent cine and coronary artery electron beam angiography (EBA) studies on the same day. The cine images consisted of 144 images (12 slices/level x 12 levels), taken 12 frames/s for a full cardiac cycle. The EBA images consisted of 50-70 slices triggered at end-systole, with an acquisition time of 100 ms/slice. Slice thickness was 8 mm for the cine images and 1.5 mm for the EBA images. A total volume of 120-180 ml of nonionic contrast was used for each subject. The LV mass (myocardial tissue volume), LV cavity volume and total LV volume (tissue + cavity) measurements were completed using the software from the EBT computer console (G.E., S. San Francisco, CA). The LV mass, cavity volume and total LV volumes at end-systole were 124.11 g, 45.66 and 163.86 ml when derived from the cine images and 130.74 g, 41.31 and 165.82 ml when derived from the EBA images. There were no significant differences between the cine and EBA-derived measurements, however the EBA-derived measurements showed slightly larger LV mass (mean 6.63 g), smaller cavity volume (mean -4.35 ml) and larger total LV volume (mean 1.96 ml, all p > 0.05) than did the cine-derived measurements. Based on case-by-case observations, these differences appear to be related to the higher spatial resolution of the thinner EBA images which allows better discrimination between papillary and trabecular muscle and LV. This leads to slightly smaller cavity size estimations and greater LV mass measurements. There was significant correlation between cine and EBA-derived measurements. Formulas were developed for relating the measurements made from the two modalities as follows: For LV mass: EBA value = 0.91 x cine value + 17.09, R = 0.95, p cine value - 6.91, R

  20. Electron attachment studies to musk ketone and high mass resolution anionic isobaric fragment detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauracher, A.; Sulzer, P.; Alizadeh, E.; Denifl, S.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Probst, M.; Märk, T. D.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Scheier, P.

    2008-11-01

    Gas phase electron attachment studies have been performed for musk ketone by means of a crossed electron-molecular beams experiment in an energy range from 0 to 15 eV with a resolution of ~70 meV. Additional measurements, utilizing a two-sector-field instrument, have been used to distinguish between possible isobaric products. Anion efficiency curves for 19 anions have been measured including a long-lived (metastable) non-dissociated parent anion which is formed at energies near 0 eV. Many of the dissociative electron attachment products observed at low energy arise from surprisingly complex reactions associated with multiple bond cleavages and structural and electronic rearrangement. The present results are compared with previous aromatic nitrocompounds studied in our laboratory recently. Particularly the close similarity of musk ketone and the explosive trinitrotoluene is of special interest.

  1. Selection of the Process Parameters for the Mass Plating of Discrete Electronic Components

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The miniaturisation of electronic components coupled with requirements for high temperature lead free soldering has forced the improvement of the termination finish of surface mount components to meet the critical demands of the electronic industry. In the present work the processing parameters necessary to plate miniature multilayer varistors (MLV’s) have been explored. The tooling selected was a “Rotary flow-thru’ plater” which achieved high volume plating with

  2. Disease propagation analysis and mitigation strategies for effective mass dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eva K; Chen, Chien H; Pietz, Ferninand; Benecke, Bernard

    2010-11-13

    Mass dispensing of medical countermeasures has been proven to be an effective and crucial means to contain the outbreak of highly infectious disease. The large influx of individuals to the point-of dispensing (POD) centers to receive vaccinations or prophylactic treatment, however, raises the potential risk of serious intra-facility cross-infections. To mitigate the effect, a thorough understanding of how disease propagates during the dispensing under different transmission parameters versus POD design and operational factors is necessary. In this study, we employ a large-scale simulation/optimization decision support system, RealOpt, to analyze the propagation of highly infectious disease within dispensing sites. The simulation results are validated and benchmarked by a mathematical model based on ordinary differential equations. Pros and cons of using analytical versus simulation tools are discussed. We further perform sensitivity analysis on the dynamics of intra-POD disease propagation, and explore feasible mitigation strategies for effective mass dispensing.

  3. Dissociative electron attachment to HBr: A temperature effect

    OpenAIRE

    Fedor, Juraj; Cingel, M.; Skalný, J. D.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T.D.; Čížek, M.; Kolorenč, P.; Horáček, J

    2007-01-01

    The effects of rovibrational temperature on dissociative electron attachment to hydrogen bromide has been investigated from the experimental and theoretical point of view. Theoretical calculations based on the nonlocal resonance model predict a strong temperature effect on the Br⁻ fragment ion yield due to population of higher vibrational and rotational states. A crossed beam experimental setup consisting of a temperature controlled effusive molecular beam and a trochoidal electron monochroma...

  4. Effect of fat mass and lean mass on bone mineral density in postmenopausal and perimenopausal Thai women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namwongprom S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sirianong Namwongprom,1 Sattaya Rojanasthien,2 Ampica Mangklabruks,3 Supasil Soontrapa,4 Chanpen Wongboontan,5 Boonsong Ongphiphadhanakul61Clinical Epidemiology Program and Department of Radiology, 2Department of Orthopaedics, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 4Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 5Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, ThailandBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between fat mass, lean mass, and bone mineral density (BMD in postmenopausal and perimenopausal Thai women.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1579 healthy Thai women aged 40–90 years. Total body, lumbar spine, total femur, and femoral neck BMD and body composition were measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry. To evaluate the associations between fat mass and lean mass and various measures of BMD, multivariable linear regression models were used to estimate the regression coefficients for fat mass and lean mass, first in separate equations and then with both fat mass and lean mass in the same equation.Results: Among the study population, 1448 subjects (91.7% were postmenopausal and 131 (8.3% were perimenopausal. In postmenopausal women, after controlling for age, height, and duration of menopause, both fat mass and lean mass were positively correlated with BMD when they were analyzed independently of each other. When included in the same equation, both fat mass and lean mass continued to show a positive effect, but lean mass had a significantly greater impact on BMD than fat mass at all regions except for total body. Lean mass but not fat mass had a positive effect on BMD at all skeletal sites except the lumbar spine, after controlling for age and height in perimenopausal

  5. MASS TRANSFER KINETICS AND EFFECTIVE DIFFUSIVITIES DURING COCOA ROASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. BAGHDADI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current studies investigated the effects of temperature and moisture addition on the mass transfer kinetics of cocoa nibs during roasting. Experiments were carried out by roasting 500 gm of cocoa nibs inside an air ventilated oven at three temperature levels (120°C, 140°C and 160°C under medium air flowrate for one hour. Two types of samples were prepared namely the raw and soaked nib samples. The soaked nib samples were prepared by soaking the raw nibs in 200 ml of water at room temperature for 5 and 10 hours. Mathematical modelling was carried out to model the mass transfer process using semi-empirical models. Modelling showed that both Page and two-term models were able to give close fitting between the experimental and predicted values. Effective diffusivity values were estimated in the order of magnitude of 10-5 m2/s for the mass transfer process. Results obtained from these studies fill the current knowledge gap on the mass transfer kinetics of cocoa roasting.

  6. Effect of electronic media on children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ray, Munni; Jat, Kana Ram

    2010-01-01

    .... Considering the increasing exposure of children to newer forms of media, we decided to review the current literature on the effects of media on child health both in the Western countries and India...

  7. Helium like impurity in CdTe/ Cd1-xMnxTe semimagnetic semiconductors under magnetic field: Dimensionality effect on electron - Electron interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana, Panneer Selvam; Jayakumar, Kalyanasundaram

    2017-11-01

    We study the effect of magnetic field on the Coulomb interaction between the two electrons confined inside a CdTe/Cd1-xMnxTe Quantum Well (QW), Quantum Well Wire (QWW) and Quantum Dot (QD) for the composition of Mn2+ ion, x = 0.3. The two particle Schrodinger equation has been solved using variational technique in the effective mass approximation. The results show that the applied magnetic field tremendously alters the Coulomb interaction of the electrons and their binding to the donor impurity by shrinking the spatial extension of the two particle wavefunction and leads to tunnelling through the barrier. The qualitative phenomenon involved in such variation of electron - electron interaction with the magnetic field has also been explained through the 3D - plot of the probability density function.

  8. Identification and design principles of low hole effective mass p-type transparent conducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautier, Geoffroy; Miglio, Anna; Ceder, Gerbrand; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Gonze, Xavier

    2013-08-01

    The development of high-performance transparent conducting oxides is critical to many technologies from transparent electronics to solar cells. Whereas n-type transparent conducting oxides are present in many devices, their p-type counterparts are not largely commercialized, as they exhibit much lower carrier mobilities due to the large hole effective masses of most oxides. Here we conduct a high-throughput computational search on thousands of binary and ternary oxides and identify several highly promising compounds displaying exceptionally low hole effective masses (up to an order of magnitude lower than state-of-the-art p-type transparent conducting oxides), as well as wide band gaps. In addition to the discovery of specific compounds, the chemical rationalization of our findings opens new directions, beyond current Cu-based chemistries, for the design and development of future p-type transparent conducting oxides.

  9. Effect of electronic media on children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Munni; Jat, Kana Ram

    2010-07-01

    Radio, television (TV), movies, video games, cell phones, and computer networks have assumed central roles in our children's daily lives. The media has demonstrated potentially profound effects, both positive and negative, on children's cognitive, social, and behavioral development. Considering the increasing exposure of children to newer forms of media, we decided to review the current literature on the effects of media on child health both in the Western countries and India. It is widely accepted that media has profound influence on child health, including violence, obesity, tobacco and alcohol use, and risky sexual behaviors. Simultaneously, media may have some positive effects on child health. We need to find ways to optimize the role of media in our society, taking advantage of their positive attributes and minimizing their negative ones. We need to understand better how to reverse the negative impact of media and make it more positive.

  10. The effects of electron beam rotation upon electron beam welded copper-304 couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysk, Kevin Tacy

    The United States Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center, has been using copper to 304 stainless steel couples made using the electron beam welding process during the fabrication of intrusive gas-path diagnostic probes for over five years. Only a limited physical analysis of the resulting welds had been done. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects that varying the rotation frequency of the electron beam had upon the mechanical characteristics of the copper to 304 stainless steel couples. All controllable weld process parameters were held constant with the exception of the electron beam rotation frequency; the rotation frequency was varied from 20 Hz to 180 Hz in steps of 20 Hz. Samples welded without electron beam rotation provided a baseline for comparison. Microhardness distributions showed that weld region homogeneity as evidenced by microhardness maps and optical microscopy was a function of the electron beam rotation frequency. There was no correlation between electron beam rotation frequency and weld tensile strength since each test coupon failed in the Cu base material outside of the weld region. The welds made at all electron beam rotation frequencies used for this study contained cracks within the weld region, heat affected zone (HAZ), or both. The relative number, length, and location of the individual cracks changed with electron beam rotation frequency. Cracking in the HAZ due to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) was not evident in those samples welded with the electron beam rotation frequencies below 100 Hz, Cracking due to LME outside of the weld region in the HAZ was observed to increase with the electron beam rotation frequency above 80 Hz. The relationship between weld region cracking and residual stress within the weld region was shown to be dependent on the electron beam rotation frequency. Cracking in the weld region was not observed in samples welded with the electron beam rotation frequency above 80 Hz

  11. Many electron effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    model the QD by a square well potential with finite/ infinite barrier while studying band gap enhancement and excitonic effect (Singh et al 2000). On the other hand, researchers performing Coulomb blockade calculations routinely choose parabolic confinement (Macucci et al. 1995, 1997). There is no a priori justification for ...

  12. On the effect of runaway electrons in dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Turekhanova, K.M. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96, 480012 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2003-10-01

    The effect of runaway electrons has been studied in this work. There were derived the conditions runaway electrons, the influence of electric field on the electron velocity distribution is considered for nonideal classical plasma models. The dependence of friction force on electrons on their velocities,electron-ion collision frequency as a function of the coupling parameter and the strength of critical electric field on particle density and temperature are determined. The results are compared with the asymptotic theory. It has been shown that for the definite density and temperature ranges the difference between critical electric field values is essential for various plasma models. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Paper to Electronic Questionnaires: Effects on Structured Questionnaire Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of computers, paper questionnaires are being replaced by electronic questionnaires. The formats of traditional paper questionnaires have been found to effect a subject's rating. Consequently, the transition from paper to electronic format can subtly change results. The research presented begins to determine how electronic questionnaire formats change subjective ratings. For formats where subjects used a flow chart to arrive at their rating, starting at the worst and middle ratings of the flow charts were the most accurate but subjects took slightly more time to arrive at their answers. Except for the electronic paper format, starting at the worst rating was the most preferred. The paper and electronic paper versions had the worst accuracy. Therefore, for flowchart type of questionnaires, flowcharts should start at the worst rating and work their way up to better ratings.

  14. FCNC Effects in a Minimal Theory of Fermion Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J; Pokorski, Stefan; Ziegler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As a minimal theory of fermion masses we extend the SM by heavy vectorlike fermions, with flavor-anarchical Yukawa couplings, that mix with chiral fermions such that small SM Yukawa couplings arise from small mixing angles. This model can be regarded as an effective description of the fermionic sector of a large class of existing flavor models and thus might serve as a useful reference frame for a further understanding of flavor hierarchies in the SM. Already such a minimal framework gives rise to FCNC effects through exchange of massive SM bosons whose couplings to the light fermions get modified by the mixing. We derive general formulae for these corrections and discuss the bounds on the heavy fermion masses. Particularly stringent bounds, in a few TeV range, come from the corrections to the Z couplings.

  15. Mass balance and life cycle assessment of the waste electrical and electronic equipment management system implemented in Lombardia Region (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biganzoli, L., E-mail: laura.biganzoli@mail.polimi.it; Falbo, A.; Forte, F.; Grosso, M.; Rigamonti, L.

    2015-08-15

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is one of the fastest growing waste streams in Europe, whose content of hazardous substances as well as of valuable materials makes the study of the different management options particularly interesting. The present study investigates the WEEE management system in Lombardia Region (Italy) in the year 2011 by applying the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. An extensive collection of primary data was carried out to describe the main outputs and the energy consumptions of the treatment plants. Afterwards, the benefits and burdens associated with the treatment and recovery of each of the five categories in which WEEE is classified according to the Italian legislation (heaters and refrigerators — R1, large household appliances — R2, TV and monitors — R3, small household appliances — R4 and lighting equipment — R5) were evaluated. The mass balance of the treatment and recovery system of each of the five WEEE categories showed that steel and glass are the predominant streams of materials arising from the treatment; a non-negligible amount of plastic is also recovered, together with small amounts of precious metals. The LCA of the regional WEEE management system showed that the benefits associated with materials and energy recovery balance the burdens of the treatment processes, with the sole exception of two impact categories (human toxicity-cancer effects and freshwater ecotoxicity). The WEEE categories whose treatment and recovery resulted more beneficial for the environment and the human health are R3 and R5. The contribution analysis showed that overall the main benefits are associated with the recovery of metals, as well as of plastic and glass. Some suggestions for improving the performance of the system are given, as well as an indication for a more-in-depth analysis for the toxicity categories and a proposal for a new characterisation method for WEEE. - Highlights: • The WEEE management system in

  16. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei, E-mail: lwliu2007@sinano.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications-CAS and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Guangtong [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  17. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mass balance and life cycle assessment of the waste electrical and electronic equipment management system implemented in Lombardia Region (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biganzoli, L; Falbo, A; Forte, F; Grosso, M; Rigamonti, L

    2015-08-15

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is one of the fastest growing waste streams in Europe, whose content of hazardous substances as well as of valuable materials makes the study of the different management options particularly interesting. The present study investigates the WEEE management system in Lombardia Region (Italy) in the year 2011 by applying the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. An extensive collection of primary data was carried out to describe the main outputs and the energy consumptions of the treatment plants. Afterwards, the benefits and burdens associated with the treatment and recovery of each of the five categories in which WEEE is classified according to the Italian legislation (heaters and refrigerators - R1, large household appliances - R2, TV and monitors - R3, small household appliances - R4 and lighting equipment - R5) were evaluated. The mass balance of the treatment and recovery system of each of the five WEEE categories showed that steel and glass are the predominant streams of materials arising from the treatment; a non-negligible amount of plastic is also recovered, together with small amounts of precious metals. The LCA of the regional WEEE management system showed that the benefits associated with materials and energy recovery balance the burdens of the treatment processes, with the sole exception of two impact categories (human toxicity-cancer effects and freshwater ecotoxicity). The WEEE categories whose treatment and recovery resulted more beneficial for the environment and the human health are R3 and R5. The contribution analysis showed that overall the main benefits are associated with the recovery of metals, as well as of plastic and glass. Some suggestions for improving the performance of the system are given, as well as an indication for a more-in-depth analysis for the toxicity categories and a proposal for a new characterisation method for WEEE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Stability of television viewing and electronic game/computer use in a prospective cohort study of Australian children: relationship with body mass index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Melissa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While much cross-sectional data is available, there have been few longitudinal investigations of patterns of electronic media use in children. Further, the possibility of a bi-directional relationship between electronic media use and body mass index in children has not been considered. This study aimed to describe longitudinal patterns of television viewing and electronic game/computer use, and investigate relationships with body mass index (BMI. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted in elementary schools in Victoria, Australia. 1278 children aged 5–10 years at baseline and 8–13 years at follow-up had their BMI calculated, from measured height and weight, and transformed to z-scores based on US 2000 growth data. Weight status (non-overweight, overweight and obese was based on international BMI cut-off points. Weekly television viewing and electronic game/computer use were reported by parents, these were summed to generate total weekly screen time. Children were classified as meeting electronic media use guidelines if their total screen time was ≤14 hrs/wk. Results Electronic media use increased over the course of the study; 40% met guidelines at baseline but only 18% three years later. Television viewing and electronic game/computer use tracked moderately and total screen time was positively associated with adiposity cross-sectionally. While weaker relationships with adiposity were observed longitudinally, baseline z-BMI and weight status were positively associated with follow-up screen time and baseline screen time was positively associated with z-BMI and weight status at follow-up. Children who did not meet guidelines at baseline had significantly higher z-BMI and were more likely to be classified as overweight/obese at follow-up. Conclusion Electronic media use in Australian elementary school children is high, increases with age and tracks over time. There appears to be a bi-directional association

  20. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The best-fit coefficients so obtained in the photon energy range of 279.2 to 320.07 keV, 514.0 to 661.6 keV and 1115.5 to 1332.5 keV by a piece-wise interpolation method were then used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in agreement with other ...

  1. Convection electric field effects on outer radiation belt electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, C.; Benbrook, J. R.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    A model is presented for the possible diurnal modulation of outer radiation belt electron precipitation by considering the effect of the convection electric field on geomagnetically trapped electrons. The modulation flux is the flux due to electrons in the drift loss cone, i.e., those which drift into the bounce loss cone. The electron flux in the drift loss cone is related to the time allowable for diffusion from the stably trapped population to the drift loss cone for precipitation at a specific geographic location. This time, which is termed the maximum L-shell lifetime, is obtained by computing electron trajectories, using a realistic magnetic field model and a simple model for the electric field. The maximum L-shell lifetimes are taken to be the times between successive entries into the bounce loss cone. Conservation of the first two adiabatic invariants, as electrons are slowly energized by the convection electric field, leads to variations in pitch angle, maximum L-shell lifetimes, and, consequently, to changes in the electron flux in the drift loss cone. These results are compared with observations of precipitating electrons made with sounding rocket payloads.

  2. Mass Communication and Journalism Faculty and Their Electronic Communication with College Students: A Nationwide Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Brigitta R.; Yates, Bradford L.; Adams, Jennifer Wood

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 700 U.S. journalism and mass communication faculty reported their perceptions of student e-mail use via a Web-based survey. This nationwide study focused on content of e-mail received by faculty and made comparisons based on faculty gender. Nearly half of the respondents reported that they occasionally receive e-mails from students before a…

  3. The revival of two old ways to measure the electron-neutrino mass

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Meanwhile, the Tritium-decay neutrino-mass limits have improved by a factor of 15, and the difficulty of the experiments by the cube of that figure. Can the "calorimetric" EC theory cope with this increased challenge? I shall answer this question affirmatively. I shall also broach the ongoing beta-decay and EC experiments and report on progress i...

  4. Effect of electron beam on in vitro cultured orchid organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jaihyunk; Bae, Seho; Bae, Changhyu [Sunchon National Univ., Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Suk; Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    Ionizing radiations have been effective mutagen sources to overcome the limitation of the useful genetic resources in natural environment. The study was conducted to investigate an effect of electron beam on organogenesis, growth patterns and genetic variation in the irradiated orchid organs. The in utero cultured rhizomes of orchids were irradiated with the electron beam in the dose range of 15Gy to 2240Gy under the condition of various beam energy and beam current. Significant decreases in survival, growth and organogenesis were observed by increase of intensity of electron beam irradiation. The irradiation intensity of lethal dose 50 of the in utero cultured orchid was estimated as approximately 500Gy to 1000Gy under 10MeV/n, and 1000Gy was optimal for growth and organogenesis of the cultures under 10MeV/n with 0.05mA treatment, and 15Gy {approx} 48Gy under 2MeV/n and 0.5mA electron beam condition. RAPD and ISSR analyses for the electron beam irradiated organs were performed to analyze genetic variation under the electron beam condition. Both of RAPD and ISSR analyses showed higher polymorphic rate in the electron-beam irradiated C. gangrene and C. Kaner.

  5. Low Mass Vector Meson Measurements via Di-electrons at RHIC by the PHENIX Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Deepali

    2009-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ mesons in $p+p$, $d+Au$ and $Au+Au$ collisions at \\sqn = 200 GeV via both hadronic and di-electron decay channels. The transverse momentum spectra as measured in different decay modes and at different centralities are shown and discussed here.

  6. Nonlinear model for thermal effects in free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, Eduardo Alcides; Endler, Antônio; Rizzato, Felipe Barbedo

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we extend results of a previous paper [Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 12 3104 (2013)] and develop a semi-analytical model to account for thermal effects on the nonlinear dynamics of the electron beam in free-electron lasers. We relax the condition of a cold electron beam but still use the concept of compressibility, now associated with a warm beam model, to evaluate the time scale for saturation and the peak laser intensity in high-gain regimes. Although vanishing compre...

  7. The effects of weapons of mass destruction on children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Carolyn R

    2006-04-01

    Children are especially vulnerable to the effects of chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction (WMD) because of physiologic, pharmacologic, and developmental characteristics. Presentation of signs and symptoms of exposure to biological and chemical agents are similar to those seen in adults. Pediatric considerations for decontamination and treatment of child victims of biological and chemical agents are discussed. As front-line providers, nurses need to be aware of potential agents, their uses and effects as WMD, and recommended treatments. Understanding the additional physiologic and situational needs of children, nurses can optimize the survival and outcomes of children when disaster strikes.

  8. Synthesis of nanoparticles in helium droplets-A characterization comparing mass-spectra and electron microscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Philipp; Volk, Alexander; Knez, Daniel; Lackner, Florian; Haberfehlner, Georg; Steurer, Johannes; Schnedlitz, Martin; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2015-10-07

    Micrometer sized helium droplets provide an extraordinary environment for the growth of nanoparticles. The method promises great potential for the preparation of core-shell particles as well as one-dimensional nanostructures, which agglomerate along quantum vortices, without involving solvents, ligands, or additives. Using a new apparatus, which enables us to record mass spectra of heavy dopant clusters (>10(4) amu) and to produce samples for transmission electron microscopy simultaneously, we synthesize bare and bimetallic nanoparticles consisting of various materials (Au, Ni, Cr, and Ag). We present a systematical study of the growth process of clusters and nanoparticles inside the helium droplets, which can be described with a simple theoretical model.

  9. Synthesis of nanoparticles in helium droplets—A characterization comparing mass-spectra and electron microscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaler, Philipp; Volk, Alexander; Lackner, Florian; Steurer, Johannes; Schnedlitz, Martin; Ernst, Wolfgang E., E-mail: wolfgang.ernst@tugraz.at [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Knez, Daniel; Haberfehlner, Georg [Institute for Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis & Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, TU Graz, Steyrergasse 17, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2015-10-07

    Micrometer sized helium droplets provide an extraordinary environment for the growth of nanoparticles. The method promises great potential for the preparation of core-shell particles as well as one-dimensional nanostructures, which agglomerate along quantum vortices, without involving solvents, ligands, or additives. Using a new apparatus, which enables us to record mass spectra of heavy dopant clusters (>10{sup 4} amu) and to produce samples for transmission electron microscopy simultaneously, we synthesize bare and bimetallic nanoparticles consisting of various materials (Au, Ni, Cr, and Ag). We present a systematical study of the growth process of clusters and nanoparticles inside the helium droplets, which can be described with a simple theoretical model.

  10. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Schmied

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IVMe3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. Moreover, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to even more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.

  11. Determination of effective axion masses in the helium-3 buffer of CAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruz, J

    2011-11-18

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is a ground based experiment located in Geneva (Switzerland) searching for axions coming from the Sun. Axions, hypothetical particles that not only could solve the strong CP problem but also be one of the favored candidates for dark matter, can be produced in the core of the Sun via the Primakoff effect. They can be reconverted into X-ray photons on Earth in the presence of strong electromagnetic fields. In order to look for axions, CAST points a decommissioned LHC prototype dipole magnet with different X-ray detectors installed in both ends of the magnet towards the Sun. The analysis of the data acquired during the first phase of the experiment yielded the most restrictive experimental upper limit on the axion-to-photon coupling constant for axion masses up to about 0.02 eV/c{sup 2}. During the second phase, CAST extends its mass sensitivity by tuning the electron density present in the magnetic field region. Injecting precise amounts of helium gas has enabled CAST to look for axion masses up to 1.2 eV/c{sup 2}. This paper studies the determination of the effective axion masses scanned at CAST during its second phase. The use of a helium gas buffer at temperatures of 1.8 K has required a detailed knowledge of the gas density distribution. Complete sets of computational fluid dynamic simulations validated with experimental data have been crucial to obtain accurate results.

  12. Effects of electronic massager on patients with advanced cancer of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of our prostate cancer patients also were not left out in the craze for massagers. Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the effects of the electronic massager on patients with advanced prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study done in our unit to find out any effects of using the ...

  13. Probing electron beam effects with chemoresistive nanosensors during in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, S.; Wang, Z.; Zhou, Z.; Krainer, J.; Köck, A.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Grammatikopoulos, P.; Sowwan, M.

    2017-02-01

    We report in situ and ex situ fabrication approaches to construct p-type (CuO) and n-type (SnO2) metal oxide nanowire devices for operation inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM). By taking advantage of their chemoresistive properties, the nanowire devices were employed as sensitive probes for detecting reactive species induced by the interactions of high-energy electrons with surrounding gas molecules, in particular, for the case of O2 gas pressures up to 20 mbar. In order to rationalize our experimental findings, a computational model based on the particle-in-cell method was implemented to calculate the spatial distributions of scattered electrons and ionized oxygen species in the environmental TEM. Our approach enables the a priori identification and qualitative measurement of undesirable beam effects, paving the way for future developments related to their mitigation.

  14. Modeling Spin Creation and Mass Generation in the Electron Motivated by an Angle Doubler Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    particle duality, (4) the apparent instantaneous connection between particles that are in entanglement, (5) the apparent collapse of the wave function...the field (spin down). We can prepare spin states using what are known as spin filters. The spin filter takes in a beam of particles , say electrons...continent on the surface of the sphere will then project that continent’s shape onto the planes, P1 and P2. The South Pole and its surroundings would

  15. Effects of electrons on the shape of nanopores prepared by focused electron beam induced etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebes, Yael; Ashkenasy, Nurit [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Hadad, Binyamin, E-mail: nurita@bgu.ac.il [The Ilze Kaz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653 Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    The fabrication of nanometric pores with controlled size is important for applications such as single molecule detection. We have recently suggested the use of focused electron beam induced etching (FEBIE) for the preparation of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes. The use of a scanning probe microscope as the electron beam source makes this technique comparably accessible, opening the way to widespread fabrication of nanopores. Since the shape of the nanopores is critically important for their performance, in this work we focus on its analysis and study the dependence of the nanopore shape on the electron beam acceleration voltage. We show that the nanopore adopts a funnel-like shape, with a central pore penetrating the entire membrane, surrounded by an extended shallow-etched region at the top of the membrane. While the internal nanopore size was found to depend on the electron acceleration voltage, the nanopore edges extended beyond the primary electron beam spot size due to long-range effects, such as radiolysis and diffusion. Moreover, the size of the peripheral-etched region was found to be less dependent on the acceleration voltage. We also found that chemical etching is the rate-limiting step of the process and is only slightly dependent on the acceleration voltage. Furthermore, due to the chemical etch process the chemical composition of the nanopore rims was found to maintain the bulk membrane composition.

  16. Radial Dependence of the Nucleon Effective Mass in B sup 1 sup 0

    CERN Document Server

    Bever, L J D; Hicks, R; Jager, K D; Kelly, J; Lapikas, L; Miskimen, R; Neck, D V; Peterson, G; Steenhoven, G; Vries, H D

    1998-01-01

    The dynamic properties of the atomic nucleus depend strongly on correlations between the nucleons. We present a combined analysis of inelastic electron-scattering data and electron-induced proton knockout measurements in an effort to obtain phenomenological information on nucleon-nucleon correlations. Our results indicate that the ration of radial wave functions extracted from precise B sup 1 sup 0 (e,e') and B sup 1 sup 0 (e, e'p) measurements evolve from an interior depression for small Em, characteristic of short-range correlations, to a surface-peaked enhancement for larger Em, characteristic of long-range correlations. This observation can be interpreted in terms of the nucleon effective mass.

  17. Simple theoretical analysis of the photoemission from quantum confined effective mass superlattices of optoelectronic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis De

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The photoemission from quantum wires and dots of effective mass superlattices of optoelectronic materials was investigated on the basis of newly formulated electron energy spectra, in the presence of external light waves, which controls the transport properties of ultra-small electronic devices under intense radiation. The effect of magnetic quantization on the photoemission from the aforementioned superlattices, together with quantum well superlattices under magnetic quantization, has also been investigated in this regard. It appears, taking HgTe/Hg1−xCdxTe and InxGa1−xAs/InP effective mass superlattices, that the photoemission from these quantized structures is enhanced with increasing photon energy in quantized steps and shows oscillatory dependences with the increasing carrier concentration. In addition, the photoemission decreases with increasing light intensity and wavelength as well as with increasing thickness exhibiting oscillatory spikes. The strong dependence of the photoemission on the light intensity reflects the direct signature of light waves on the carrier energy spectra. The content of this paper finds six different applications in the fields of low dimensional systems in general.

  18. The effect of electron bite-outs on artificial electron heating and the PMSE overshoot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kassa

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We have considered the effect that a local reduction in the electron density (an electron bite-out, caused by electron absorption on to dust particles, can have on the artificial electron heating in the height region between 80 to 90km, where noctilucent clouds (NLC and the radar phenomenon PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes are observed. With an electron density profile without bite-outs, the heated electron temperature Te,hot will generally decrease smoothly with height in the PMSE region or there may be no significant heating effect present. Within a bite-out Te,hot will decrease less rapidly and can even increase slightly with height if the bite-out is strong. We have looked at recent observations of PMSE which are affected by artificial electron heating, with a heater cycling producing the new overshoot effect. According to the theory for the PMSE overshoot the fractional increase in electron temperature Te,hot/Ti, where Ti is the unaffected ion temperature=neutral temperature, can be found from the reduction in PMSE intensity as the heater is switched on. We have looked at results from four days of observations with the EISCAT VHF radar (224 MHz, together with the EISCAT heating facility. We find support for the PMSE overshoot and heating model from a sequence of observations during one of the days where the heater transmitter power is varied from cycle to cycle and where the calculated Te,hot/Ti is found to vary in proportion to the transmitter power. We also looked for signatures of electron bite-outs by examining the variation of Te,hot/Ti with height for the three other days. We find that the height variation of Te,hot/Ti is very different on the three days. On one of the days we see typically that this ratio can increase

  19. Contributions to a first measurement of the W-boson mass in the electron channel with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)736721

    In this document, I present my contributions to a first measurement of the W-mass in the LHC using 4.7 fb−1 of 7 TeV data, taken in 2011. I focus on the electron decay channel, W → eν. In the first part, I discuss a study regarding the performance of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector, presenting a novel method to correct the lateral profiles of electron energy deposit, along with various studies of the different Geant4 physics lists versions. In the second part, I introduce the global methodology for the W-mass measurement used in ATLAS, and discuss my contributions in details. I show in a first step the assessment of uncertainties coming from the parton shower modeling in Pythia8, and the optimization of the lepton's transverse momentum fitting range in order to reduce the systematic uncertainty. In a second step, I present an elaborate data-driven method for the estimation of the multijet background in the W → eν channel, as well as the corresponding results in terms of event yie...

  20. Osteocalcin Effect on Human β-Cells Mass and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabek, Omaima M; Nishimoto, Satoru Ken; Fraga, Daniel; Tejpal, Neelam; Ricordi, Camillo; Gaber, A O

    2015-09-01

    The osteoblast-specific hormone osteocalcin (OC) was found to regulate glucose metabolism, fat mass, and β-cell proliferation in mice. Here, we investigate the effect of decarboxylated OC (D-OC) on human β-cell function and mass in culture and in vivo using a Nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model. We found that D-OC at dose ranges from 1.0 to 15 ng/mL significantly augmented insulin content and enhanced human β-cell proliferation of cultured human islets. This was paralleled by increased expression of sulfonylurea receptor protein; a marker of β-cell differentiation and a component of the insulin-secretory apparatus. Moreover, in a Nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model, systemic administration of D-OC at 4.5-ng/h significantly augmented production of human insulin and C-peptide from the grafted human islets. Finally, histological staining of the human islet grafts showed that the improvement in the β-cell function was attributable to an increase in β-cell mass as a result of β-cell proliferation indicated by MKI67 staining together with the increased β-cell number and decreased α-cell number data obtained using laser scanning cytometry. Our data for the first time show D-OC-enhanced β-cell function in human islets and support future exploitation of D-OC-mediated β-cell regulation for developing useful clinical treatments for patients with diabetes.

  1. Lattice effective field theory for medium-mass nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lähde, Timo A., E-mail: t.laehde@fz-juelich.de [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik, and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44870 Bochum (Germany); Lee, Dean [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Meißner, Ulf-G. [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik, and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); JARA – High Performance Computing, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Rupak, Gautam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We extend Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory (NLEFT) to medium-mass nuclei, and present results for the ground states of alpha nuclei from {sup 4}He to {sup 28}Si, calculated up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the EFT expansion. This computational advance is made possible by extrapolations of lattice data using multiple initial and final states. For our soft two-nucleon interaction, we find that the overall contribution from multi-nucleon forces must change sign from attractive to repulsive with increasing nucleon number. This effect is not produced by three-nucleon forces at NNLO, but it can be approximated by an effective four-nucleon interaction. We discuss the convergence of the EFT expansion and the broad significance of our findings for future ab initio calculations.

  2. Spin effects on the semiclassical trajectories of Dirac electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Jáuregui, R.; Pérez-Pascual, R.; Jáuregui, R.

    2017-11-01

    The relativistic semiclassical evolution of the position of an electron in the presence of an external electromagnetic field is studied in terms of a Newton equation that incorporates spin effects directly. This equation emerges from the Dirac equation and allows the identification of scenarios where spin effects are necessary to understand the main characteristics of the electron trajectories. It involves the eigenvalues of the non-Hermitian operator Σμ νFμ ν , with Σμ ν and Fμ ν as the spin and electromagnetic tensors. The formalism allows a deeper understanding on the physics behind known analytical solutions of the Dirac equation when translational dynamics seem to decouple from spin evolution. As an illustrative example, it is applied to an electron immersed in an electromagnetic field which exhibits chiral symmetry and optical vortices. It is shown that the polarization of intense structured light beams can be used to suppress or enhance spin effects on the electron semiclassical trajectory; the latter configuration yields a realization of a Stern-Gerlach apparatus for an electron.

  3. Model of convection mass transfer in titanium alloy at low energy high current electron beam action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The convection mixing model is proposed for low-energy high-current electron beam treatment of titanium alloys, pre-processed by heterogeneous plasma flows generated via explosion of carbon tape and powder TiB2. The model is based on the assumption vortices in the molten layer are formed due to the treatment by concentrated energy flows. These vortices evolve as the result of thermocapillary convection, arising because of the temperature gradient. The calculation of temperature gradient and penetration depth required solution of the heat problem with taking into account the surface evaporation. However, instead of the direct heat source the boundary conditions in phase transitions were changed in the thermal conductivity equation, assuming the evaporated material takes part in the heat exchange. The data on the penetration depth and temperature distribution are used for the thermocapillary model. The thermocapillary model embraces Navier-Stocks and convection heat transfer equations, as well as the boundary conditions with the outflow of evaporated material included. The solution of these equations by finite elements methods pointed at formation of a multi-vortices structure when electron-beam treatment and its expansion over new zones of material. As the result, strengthening particles are found at the depth exceeding manifold their penetration depth in terms of the diffusion mechanism.

  4. Isotope effects in mass-spectrometry; Les effets isotopiques en spectrometrie de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicknam, J.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Departement de physico-chimie, service des isotopes stables, section de spectrometrie de masse

    1967-05-01

    In the first part, a review is made of the work concerning the influence of isotopic substitution on the stabilities of ionised molecules and the bond-breaking probabilities; metastable transitions are also affected by this substitution. A model based on the Franck-Condon principle accounts for the experimentally observed isotopic effects for diatomic molecules; to a certain extent it is possible to generalise the calculation for the case of isotopic molecules of carbon dioxide gas. For deuterated polyatomic molecules there exist a {pi} effect making it possible to compare the relative stabilities of the X-H and X-D bonds, and a {gamma} effect which characterizes the different behaviours of the X-H bond in a normal molecule and in its partially deuterated homologue. Usually there is a very marked {pi} effect (e.g. the C-D bonds are more difficult to break than the homologous C-H bonds) and a {gamma} effect, the partial deuteration of a molecule leading in general to an increase in the probability of breakage of a given bond. An interpretation of {pi} and {gamma} effects based on Rosenstock near-equilibrium theory accounts for the observed phenomena, qualitatively at least, in the case of propane and acetylene. In the second part are gathered together results concerning isotopic effects produced during the formation of rearranged ions. The existence of cyclic transition ions has made it possible for Mc Lafferty to explain the existence of these ions in the mass spectrum; isotopic substitution leads to a modification of the rearrangement mechanism, the bonding forces being no longer the same. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie, on rassemble les travaux concernant l'influence de la substitution isotopique sur les stabilites des molecules ionisees et les probabilites de rupture des liaisons; les transitions metastables sont egalement modifiees par cette substitution. Un modele base sur le principe de Franck-Condon rend compte des effets isotopiques

  5. The role of the CMS electron and photon trigger in the study of the Higgs boson and high mass searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strebler, Thomas; CMS Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level triggering system composed of the Level-1, instrumented by custom-design hardware boards, and a software High-Level-Trigger. A new Level-1 trigger architecture with improved performance is now being used to maintain the thresholds used in LHC Run I for the more challenging conditions experienced during Run II. We present the performance of the upgraded CMS electron and photon trigger in the context of Higgs boson decays into final states with photons and electrons. The calorimeter trigger system plays a central role in achieving the ambitious physics program of Run II. The upgraded trigger uses the full granularity of the calorimeters to optimally reconstruct and calibrate the electromagnetic trigger objects. It also implements combinations of calorimeter objects to provide new Level-1 quantities such as invariant mass. Optimized software selection techniques have been developed and advanced algorithms to mitigate the impact of event pileup have been implemented. The selection techniques used to trigger efficiently on these benchmark analyses will be presented, along with the strategies employed to guarantee efficient triggering for new resonances and other new physics signals involving electron/photon final states.

  6. Electron energy distribution function, effective electron temperature, and dust charge in the temporal afterglow of a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A. [School of Physics and Technology, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svobody sq. 4, 61022 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Kersten, H. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Leibnizstr. 19, Kiel D-24098 (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Analytical expressions describing the variation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an afterglow of a plasma are obtained. Especially, the case when the electron energy loss is mainly due to momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is considered. The study is carried out for different EEDFs in the steady state, including Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions. The analytical results are not only obtained for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy but also for the case when the collisions are a power function of electron energy. Using analytical expressions for the EEDF, the effective electron temperature and charge of the dust particles, which are assumed to be present in plasma, are calculated for different afterglow durations. An analytical expression for the rate describing collection of electrons by dust particles for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy is also derived. The EEDF profile and, as a result, the effective electron temperature and dust charge are sufficiently different in the cases when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy and when the rate is a power function of electron energy.

  7. Effects of electron inertia in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrés, Nahuel, E-mail: nandres@iafe.uba.ar; Gómez, Daniel [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CC. 67, suc. 28, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univrsidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univrsidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-07-15

    We present a study of collisionless magnetic reconnection within the framework of full two-fluid MHD for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure and electron inertia. We performed 2.5D simulations using a pseudo-spectral code with no dissipative effects. We check that the ideal invariants of the problem are conserved down to round-off errors. Our numerical results confirm that the change in the topology of the magnetic field lines is exclusively due to the presence of electron inertia. The computed reconnection rates remain a fair fraction of the Alfvén velocity, which therefore qualifies as fast reconnection.

  8. Robust electron pairing in the integer quantum hall effect regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H. K.; Sivan, I.; Rosenblatt, A.; Heiblum, M.; Umansky, V.; Mahalu, D.

    2015-06-01

    Electron pairing is a rare phenomenon appearing only in a few unique physical systems; for example, superconductors and Kondo-correlated quantum dots. Here, we report on an unexpected electron pairing in the integer quantum Hall effect regime. The pairing takes place within an interfering edge channel in an electronic Fabry-Perot interferometer at a wide range of bulk filling factors, between 2 and 5. We report on three main observations: high-visibility Aharonov-Bohm conductance oscillations with magnetic flux periodicity equal to half the magnetic flux quantum; an interfering quasiparticle charge equal to twice the elementary electron charge as revealed by quantum shot noise measurements, and full dephasing of the pairs' interference by induced dephasing of the adjacent inner edge channel--a manifestation of inter-channel entanglement. Although this pairing phenomenon clearly results from inter-channel interaction, the exact mechanism that leads to electron-electron attraction within a single edge channel is not clear. We believe that substantial efforts are needed in order to clarify these intriguing and unexpected findings.

  9. Effects of electron irradiation on LDPE/MWCNT composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jianqun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Chaoming; Rui, Erming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-12-15

    In this study, mutiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were incorporated into low density polyethylene (LDPE) in different concentrations (2%, 4% and 8%) using a melt blending process. Structural, thermal stability and tensile property of the unirradiated/irradiated LDPE/MWCNT composites by 110 keV electrons were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and uniaxial tensile techniques. Experimental results show that the addition of MWCNTs obviously increases the ultimate tensile strength of LDPE and decreases the elongation at break, which is attributed to the homogeneous distribution of the MWCNTs in LDPE and intense interaction between MWCNTs and LDPE matrix. Also, the electron irradiation further increases the ultimate tensile strength of LDPE/MWCNT composites, which can be ascribed to the more intense interaction between MWCNTs and LDPE matrix, and the formation of crosslinking sites in LDPE matrix induced by the electron irradiation. The addition of MWCNTs significantly enhances thermal stability of the LDPE due to the hindering effect and the scavenging free radicals, while the electron irradiation decreases thermal stability of the LDPE/MWCNT composites since the structure of the MWCNTs and LDPE matrix damages.

  10. Effective Lagrangian approach to neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Aguila, Francisco; Aparici, Alberto; Bhattacharya, Subhaditya; Santamaria, Arcadi; Wudka, Jose

    2012-06-01

    Neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay can in general produce electrons of either chirality, in contrast with the minimal Standard Model (SM) extension with only the addition of the Weinberg operator, which predicts two left-handed electrons in the final state. We classify the lepton number violating (LNV) effective operators with two leptons of either chirality but no quarks, ordered according to the magnitude of their contribution to 0 νββ decay. We point out that, for each of the three chirality assignments, e L e L , e L e R and e R e R , there is only one LNV operator of the corresponding type to lowest order, and these have dimensions 5, 7 and 9, respectively. Neutrino masses are always induced by these extra operators but can be delayed to one or two loops, depending on the number of RH leptons entering in the operator. Then, the comparison of the 0 νββ decay rate and neutrino masses should indicate the effective scenario at work, which confronted with the LHC searches should also eventually decide on the specific model elected by nature. We also list the SM additions generating these operators upon integration of the heavy modes, and discuss simple realistic examples of renormalizable theories for each case.

  11. Mass transfer effects in hygroscopic measurements of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Chan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA has been widely utilized to measure the hygroscopicity of laboratory-generated and atmospheric submicrometer particles. An important concern in investigating the hygroscopicity of the particles is if the particles have attained equilibrium state in the measurements. We present a literature survey to investigate the mass transfer effects in hygroscopicity measurements. In most TDMA studies, a residence time in the order of seconds is used for humidification (or dehumidification. NaCl and (NH42SO4 particles are usually used to verify the equilibrium measurements during this residence time, which is presumed to be sufficient for other particles. There have been observations that not all types of submicrometer particles, including atmospheric particles, attain their equilibrium sizes within this time scale. We recommend that experimentation with different residence times be conducted and that the residence time should be explicitly stated in future TDMA measurements. Mass transfer effects may also exist in the measurements of other properties related to the water uptake of atmospheric particles such as relative humidity dependent light scattering coefficients and cloud condensation nuclei activity.

  12. Effect of Body Mass Index on Left Ventricular Mass in Career Male Firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korre, Maria; Porto, Luiz Guilherme G; Farioli, Andrea; Yang, Justin; Christiani, David C; Christophi, Costas A; Lombardi, David A; Kovacs, Richard J; Mastouri, Ronald; Abbasi, Siddique; Steigner, Michael; Moffatt, Steven; Smith, Denise; Kales, Stefanos N

    2016-12-01

    Left ventricular (LV) mass is a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events; increased LV mass is common among US firefighters and plays a major role in firefighter sudden cardiac death. We aim to identify significant predictors of LV mass among firefighters. Cross-sectional study of 400 career male firefighters selected by an enriched randomization strategy. Weighted analyses were performed based on the total number of risk factors per subject with inverse probability weighting. LV mass was assessed by echocardiography (ECHO) and cardiac magnetic resonance, and normalized (indexed) for height. CVD risk parameters included vital signs at rest, body mass index (BMI)-defined obesity, obstructive sleep apnea risk, low cardiorespiratory fitness, and physical activity. Linear regression models were performed. In multivariate analyses, BMI was the only consistent significant independent predictor of LV mass indexes (all, p fitness. In conclusion, after height-indexing ECHO-measured and cardiac magnetic resonance-measured LV mass, BMI was found to be a major driver of LV mass among firefighters. Our findings taken together with previous research suggest that reducing obesity will improve CVD risk profiles and decrease on-duty CVD and sudden cardiac death events in the fire service. Our results may also support targeted noninvasive screening for LV hypertrophy with ECHO among obese firefighters. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electron kinetic effects on optical diagnostics in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Parke, E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Brower, D. L., E-mail: vvmirnov@wisc.edu; Ding, W. X. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2014-08-21

    At anticipated high electron temperatures in ITER, the effects of electron thermal motion on Thomson scattering (TS), toroidal interferometer/polarimeter (TIP) and poloidal polarimeter (PoPola) diagnostics will be significant and must be accurately treated. We calculate electron thermal corrections to the interferometric phase and polarization state of an EM wave propagating along tangential and poloidal chords (Faraday and Cotton-Mouton polarimetry) and perform analysis of the degree of polarization for incoherent TS. The precision of the previous lowest order linear in τ = T{sub e}/m{sub e}c{sup 2} model may be insufficient; we present a more precise model with τ{sup 2}-order corrections to satisfy the high accuracy required for ITER TIP and PoPola diagnostics. The linear model is extended from Maxwellian to a more general class of anisotropic electron distributions that allows us to take into account distortions caused by equilibrium current, ECRH and RF current drive effects. The classical problem of degree of polarization of incoherent Thomson scattered radiation is solved analytically exactly without any approximations for the full range of incident polarizations, scattering angles, and electron thermal motion from non-relativistic to ultra-relativistic. The results are discussed in the context of the possible use of the polarization properties of Thomson scattered light as a method of T{sup e} measurement relevant to ITER operational scenarios.

  14. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the structure and optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This work reports the effect of electron beam (EB) irradiation on the structure and optical properties of nanocrystalline nickel oxide (NiO) cubes. NiO nanocubes were synthesized by the chemical precipitation method. The characterization was carried out by employing analytical techniques like X-ray diffraction, ...

  15. Effect of alloying on the electronic structure and magnetic properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. We use the self-consistent, augmented space recursion technique to study the electronic structure and magnetic properties of alloys of the transition metals, Fe, Co and Ni with the noble metals, Ag and Au. We analyse the effect of local environment and the hybridization between the constituent bands on the elec-.

  16. Effects of Pictographs and Quoting on Flaming in Electronic Mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompsen, Philip A.; Foulger, Davis A.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the perception of flaming (hostile verbal behavior) in electronic mail by exploring, in the context of five escalating levels of socioemotional intensity, the effects of pictographs (typographic symbols used to express emotion) and quoting. Results suggest pictographs and quoting can vary in perceived intensity and meaning, depending on…

  17. Wave Chaos and HPM Effects on Electronic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    Final Report: 5/01/10 – 4/30/13 Wave Chaos and HPM Effects on Electronic Systems FA95501010106 By Thomas M. Antonsen Jr., Edward Ott, John Rodgers...Hamiltonian system has been claimed to be fully chaotic, namely, the anisotropic Kepler problem with zero angular momentum. 3 particularly easy to go

  18. Electronic spin drift in graphene field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jozsa, C.; Popinciuc, M.; Tombros, N.; Jonkman, H. T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the drift of electron spins under an applied dc electric field in single layer graphene spin valves in a field-effect transport geometry at room temperature. In the metallic conduction regime (n similar or equal to 3.5x10(16) m(-2)), for dc fields of about +/- 70 kV/m applied between the

  19. Effects of electronic outlining on students’ argumentative writing performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smet, Milou; Broekkamp, Hein; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    De Smet, M. J. R., Broekkamp, H., Brand-Gruwel, S., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011). Effects of electronic outlining on students’ argumentative writing performance. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 27(6), 557-574. doi: 0.1111/j.1365-2729.2011.00418.x

  20. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the structural, elastic and electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we present the results obtained from first-principles calculations of the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the strucural, elastic and electronic properties of (B3) boron phosphide, using the pseudopotential plane-wave method (PP-PW) based on density functional theory within the Teter and Pade ...

  1. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the structural, elastic and electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results showed a phase transition pressure from the zinc blende to rock-salt phase at around 1.56 Mbar, which is in good agreement with the theoretical data reported in the literature. Keywords. Hydrostatic pressure effect; structural, elastic and electronic properties; (B3) boron phosphide. PACS Nos 45.10.Ab; 62.20.

  2. Effects of electron beam irradiation on bovine pericardium tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polak, Roberta; Pitombo, Ronaldo N.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Tecnologia Bioquimico-Farmaceutica], e-mail: robertaplk@gmail.com, e-mail: pitombo@usp.br; Rodas, Andrea C.D.; Higa, Olga Z. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia], e-mail: andrea.ipen@gmail.com, e-mail: ozhiga@ipen.br; Kodama, Yasko; Machado, Luci D.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: ykodama@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    In this work, electron beam irradiation was studied as a way for bovine pericardium (BP) tissue crosslinking. BP samples were irradiated in an electron beam accelerator at different doses (12.5 and 25 kGy), at three different dose ratios (4.67, 9.34 kGy/s), in the presence and absence of oxygen. Irradiated samples were analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetry (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and swelling degree. DSC analysis showed a decrease in shrinkage temperature. However, for all irradiated samples, the energy required in the process was higher than the non irradiated BP. The TGA analysis showed that the thermal behavior, both the control and the irradiated samples, was characterized by three stages concerned in the loss of mass. The BP structure was characterized by swelling degree and SEM. The structure of the BP tissue suffered alteration, becoming looser, or more compact. By swelling degree, when the BP was irradiated in the presence of oxygen, the swelling degree value was higher than non irradiated BP, in the other hand the swelling degree value of BP irradiated in oxygen absence were lower than the non irradiated BP. Those results indicate that the BP irradiated in absence of oxygen could predominantly crosslinks. The BP degradation when it was irradiated in presence of oxygen was confirmed by SEM. (author)

  3. Enhanced methylarginine characterization by post-translational modification-specific targeted data acquisition and electron-transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart-Smith, Gene; Low, Jason K K; Erce, Melissa A; Wilkins, Marc R

    2012-08-01

    When localizing protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) using liquid-chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), existing implementations are limited by inefficient selection of PTM-carrying peptides for MS/MS, particularly when PTM site occupancy is sub-stoichiometric. The present contribution describes a method by which peptides carrying specific PTMs of interest-in this study, methylarginines-may be selectively targeted for MS/MS: peptide features are extracted from high mass accuracy single-stage MS data, searched against theoretical PTM-carrying peptide masses, and matching features are subjected to targeted data acquisition LC-MS/MS. Using trypsin digested Saccharomyces cerevisiae Npl3, in which evidence is presented for 18 methylarginine sites-17 of which fall within a glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) domain spanning <120 amino acids-it is shown that this approach outperforms conventional data dependent acquisition (DDA): when applied to a complex protein mixture featuring in vivo methylated Npl3, 95% more (P=0.030) methylarginine-carrying peptides are selected for MS/MS than DDA, leading to an 86% increase (P=0.044) in the number of methylated peptides producing Mascot ion scores ≥20 following electron-transfer dissociation (ETD). Notably, significantly more low abundance arginine methylated peptides (maximum ion intensities <6×10(4) cps) are selected for MS/MS using this approach relative to DDA (50% more in a digest of purified in vitro methylated Npl3). It is also demonstrated that relative to collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD facilitates a 586% increase (P=0.016) in average Mascot ion scores of methylarginine-carrying peptides. The present PTM-specific targeted data acquisition approach, though described using methylarginine, is applicable to any ionizable PTM of known mass.

  4. Investigation of effect of electron beam on various polyethylene blends

    CERN Document Server

    Morshedian, J

    2003-01-01

    With regards to the expanding usage of electron beams irradiation in polymer industries such as sterilization of polymeric disposable medical products; cable manufacturing; pipes, heat shrinkable materials, etc. In this project the effect of electron beam on polyethylene used in manufacturing of pipe and heat shrinkable products was studied. Results showed that by increasing the applied dose on samples; the crosslink density would increase and polymers with tertiary carbon atoms in their backbone structure tend to crosslink more readily. The melting temperature and crystallinity percent decreased and degradation temperature increased. Density in low doses decreased and in high doses increased.

  5. Electron cloud and space charge effects in the Fermilab Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space charge making Landau damping appear impossible. Simulations reveal a substantial buildup of electron cloud in the whole Booster ramping cycle, both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, whenever the secondary-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on the space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is investigated.

  6. High-pressure effects on intramolecular electron transfer compounds

    CERN Document Server

    He Li Ming; Li Hong; Zhang Bao Wen; Li Yi; Yang Guo Qiang

    2002-01-01

    We explore the effect of pressure on the fluorescence spectra of the intramolecular electron transfer compound N-(1-pyrenylmethyl), N-methyl-4-methoxyaniline (Py-Am) and its model version, with poly(methyl methacrylate) blended in, at high pressure up to 7 GPa. The emission properties of Py-Am and pyrene show distinct difference with the increase of pressure. This difference indicates the strength of the charge transfer interaction resulting from the adjusting of the conformation of Py-Am with increase of pressure. The relationship between the electronic state of the molecule and pressure is discussed.

  7. Identification and design principles of low hole effective mass p-type transparent conducting oxides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hautier, Geoffroy; Miglio, Anna; Ceder, Gerbrand; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Gonze, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    ... effective masses of most oxides. Here we conduct a high-throughput computational search on thousands of binary and ternary oxides and identify several highly promising compounds displaying exceptionally low hole effective masses...

  8. Effects of energetic electrons on the electrodynamics in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aksnes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available From the observations by the PIXIE and UVI cameras on board the Polar satellite, we derive global maps of the precipitating electron energy spectra from less than 1keV to 100keV. Based on the electron spectra, we generate instantaneous global maps of Hall and Pedersen conductances. The UVI camera provides good coverage of the lower electron energies contributing most to the Pedersen conductance, while PIXIE captures the high energy component of the precipitating electrons affecting the Hall conductance. By characterizing the energetic electrons from some tens of keV and up to about 100keV using PIXIE X-ray measurements, we will, in most cases, calculate a larger electron flux at higher energies than estimated from a simple extrapolation of derived electron spectra from UVI alone. Instantaneous global conductance maps derived with and without inclusion of PIXIE data have been implemented in the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE procedure, to study the effects of energetic electrons on electrodynamical parameters in the ionosphere. We find that the improved electron spectral characterization using PIXIE data most often results in a larger Hall conductance and a smaller inferred electric field. In some localized regions the increase in the Hall conductance can exceed 100%. On the contrary, the Pedersen conductance remains more or less unaffected by the inclusion of the PIXIE data. The calculated polar cap potential drop may decrease more than 10%, resulting in a reduction of the estimated Joule heating integrated over the Northern Hemisphere by up to 20%. Locally, Joule heating may decrease more than 50% in some regions. We also find that the calculated energy flux by precipitating electrons increases around 5% when including the PIXIE data. Combined with the reduction of Joule heating, this results in a decrease in the ratio between Joule heating and energy flux, sometimes exceeding 25%. An investigation of the relationship

  9. Mass metrology

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, S V

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the practical aspects of mass measurements. Concepts of gravitational, inertial and conventional mass and details of the variation of acceleration of gravity are described. The Metric Convention and International Prototype Kilogram and BIPM standards are described. The effect of change of gravity on the indication of electronic balances is derived with respect of latitude, altitude and earth topography. The classification of weights by OIML is discussed. Maximum permissible errors in different categories of weights prescribed by national and international organizations are p

  10. Magnetic field effects in electron systems with imperfect nesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.; Kugel, K. I.; Rozhkov, A. V.; Nori, Franco

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the effects of an applied magnetic field on the phase diagram of a weakly correlated electron system with imperfect nesting. The Hamiltonian under study describes two bands: electron and hole ones. Both bands have spherical Fermi surfaces, whose radii are slightly mismatched due to doping. These types of models are often used in the analysis of magnetic states in chromium and its alloys, superconducting iron pnictides, AA-type bilayer graphene, borides, etc. At zero magnetic field, the uniform ground state of the system turns out to be unstable against electronic phase separation. The applied magnetic field affects the phase diagram in several ways. In particular, the Zeeman term stabilizes new antiferromagnetic phases. It also significantly shifts the boundaries of inhomogeneous (phase-separated) states. At sufficiently high fields, the Landau quantization gives rise to oscillations of the order parameters and of the Néel temperature as a function of the magnetic field.

  11. Effective photon mass by Super and Lorentz symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Luca; dos Santos Filho, Luís R.; Helayël-Neto, José A.; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of Standard Model Extensions (SMEs), we analyse four general classes of Super Symmetry (SuSy) and Lorentz Symmetry (LoSy) breaking, leading to observable imprints at our energy scales. The photon dispersion relations show a non-Maxwellian behaviour for the CPT (Charge-Parity-Time reversal symmetry) odd and even sectors. The group velocities exhibit also a directional dependence with respect to the breaking background vector (odd CPT) or tensor (even CPT). In the former sector, the group velocity may decay following an inverse squared frequency behaviour. Thus, we extract a massive Carroll-Field-Jackiw photon term in the Lagrangian and show that the effective mass is proportional to the breaking vector and moderately dependent on the direction of observation. The breaking vector absolute value is estimated by ground measurements and leads to a photon mass upper limit of 10-19 eV or 2 ×10-55 kg, and thereby to a potentially measurable delay at low radio frequencies.

  12. Effective photon mass by Super and Lorentz symmetry breaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Bonetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of Standard Model Extensions (SMEs, we analyse four general classes of Super Symmetry (SuSy and Lorentz Symmetry (LoSy breaking, leading to observable imprints at our energy scales. The photon dispersion relations show a non-Maxwellian behaviour for the CPT (Charge-Parity-Time reversal symmetry odd and even sectors. The group velocities exhibit also a directional dependence with respect to the breaking background vector (odd CPT or tensor (even CPT. In the former sector, the group velocity may decay following an inverse squared frequency behaviour. Thus, we extract a massive Carroll–Field–Jackiw photon term in the Lagrangian and show that the effective mass is proportional to the breaking vector and moderately dependent on the direction of observation. The breaking vector absolute value is estimated by ground measurements and leads to a photon mass upper limit of 10−19 eV or 2×10−55 kg, and thereby to a potentially measurable delay at low radio frequencies.

  13. Effect of beer drinking on ultrasound bone mass in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrera-Zamorano, Juan D; Lavado-Garcia, Jesus M; Roncero-Martin, Raul; Calderon-Garcia, Julian F; Rodriguez-Dominguez, Trinidad; Canal-Macias, Maria L

    2009-10-01

    To study the effect of beer consumption on bone mass in a group of healthy women, by using phalangeal bone ultrasound to evaluate the amplitude-dependent speed of sound. This was a cross-sectional study of 1697 healthy women (mean age 48.4 y, body mass index (BMI) 19.0-32.0 kg/m(2)), recruited in a clinical convenience sample and screened for the existence of disease and/or medication that would affect calcium metabolism. Of this total, 710 were premenopausal, 176 were perimenopausal, and 811 were postmenopausal. The women recruited completed a questionnaire that contained detailed sections on current cigarette, alcohol, caffeine, and nutrient consumption. In terms of current alcohol intake, the subjects were classified as moderate drinkers, light drinkers, and nondrinkers. Drinkers were also analyzed according to the kind of alcohol consumed: wine or beer. Quantitative bone ultrasound values were greater in the beer drinkers compared with the no beer and/or wine drinkers. Taking the amplitude-dependent speed of sound as a dependent variable, and age, BMI, gonadal status, intake of beer and wine, and number of cigarettes per day as independent variables, we found age (beta = -1.52), BMI (beta = -3.86), gonadal status (beta = -27.47), and beer intake (beta = 1.06) to be significant. The greater bone density found in women beer drinkers might be a result of the phytoestrogen content of this alcoholic drink; this requires further investigation.

  14. Theory and measurement of the electron cloud effect

    CERN Document Server

    Harkay, K C

    1999-01-01

    Photoelectrons produced through the interaction of synchrotron radiation and the vacuum chamber walls can be accelerated by a charged particle beam, acquiring sufficient energy to produce secondary electrons (SEs) in collisions with the walls. If the secondary-electron yield (SEY) coefficient of the wall material is greater than one, a runaway condition can develop. In addition to the SEY, the degree of amplification depends on the beam intensity and temporal distribution. As the electron cloud builds up along a train of stored bunches, a transverse perturbation of the head bunch can be communicated to trailing bunches in a wakefield-like interaction with the cloud. The electron cloud effect is especially of concern for the high-intensity PEP-II (SLAC) and KEK B-factories and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. An initiative was undertaken at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring to characterize the electron cloud in order to provide realistic limits on critical input parameters in the models ...

  15. Constraint on a varying proton-electron mass ratio 1.5 billion years after the big bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdonaite, J; Ubachs, W; Murphy, M T; Whitmore, J B

    2015-02-20

    A molecular hydrogen absorber at a lookback time of 12.4 billion years, corresponding to 10% of the age of the Universe today, is analyzed to put a constraint on a varying proton-electron mass ratio, μ. A high resolution spectrum of the J1443+2724 quasar, which was observed with the Very Large Telescope, is used to create an accurate model of 89 Lyman and Werner band transitions whose relative frequencies are sensitive to μ, yielding a limit on the relative deviation from the current laboratory value of Δμ/μ=(-9.5 ± 5.4(stat)± 5.3(syst))×10(-6).

  16. Mass, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies on transition metal complexes with a new tetradentate 12-membered new macrocyclic ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gupta, Lokesh Kumar

    2004-11-01

    Complexes of Cr(III), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) containing a novel macrocyclic tetradentate nitrogen donor (N 4) ligand prepared via reaction of 2,3-hexanedione and ethylenediamine has been prepared and characterized. The newly synthesized ligand (L) and its complexes have been characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment susceptibility, EI-Mass, IR, Electronic and EPR spectral studies. The complexes are of high-spin type and four coordinated tetrahedral, five coordinated square pyramidal and six coordinated octahedral/tetragonal geometries. The ligand (L) and its soluble transition metal complexes have also been screened against different bacteria and plant pathogenic fungi in vitro.

  17. A multi-sample changer coupled to an electron cyclotron resonance source for accelerator mass spectrometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrasek, R; Palchan, T; Pardo, R; Peters, C; Power, M; Scott, R

    2014-02-01

    A new multi-sample changer has been constructed allowing rapid changes between samples. The sample changer has 20 positions and is capable of moving between samples in 1 min. The sample changer is part of a project using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility to measure neutron capture rates on a wide range of actinides in a reactor environment. This project will require the measurement of a large number of samples previously irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The sample material is introduced into the plasma via laser ablation chosen to limit the dependency of material feed rates upon the source material composition as well as minimize cross-talk between samples.

  18. Effectiveness of mass media interventions for HIV prevention, 1986-2013: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCroix, Jessica M; Snyder, Leslie B; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Johnson, Blair T

    2014-08-15

    This meta-analysis was conducted to synthesize evaluations of mass media-delivered HIV prevention interventions, assess the effectiveness of interventions in improving condom use and HIV-related knowledge, and identify moderators of effectiveness. We systematically searched electronic databases, relevant Web sites, related journals, and reference lists of previous reviews and included studies. Studies that quantitatively evaluated the effectiveness of mass media-delivered HIV prevention using pre-/post-campaign assessments, targeted the general population, reported outcomes of interest, and were available as of September 30, 2013 were eligible for inclusion. Raters coded report, intervention, and sample characteristics. The standardized mean difference, d, comparing pretest and posttest assessments was calculated for each study sample. Effect sizes were analyzed incorporating random-effects assumptions. Of the 433 obtained and screened reports, 54 reports containing evaluations of 72 interventions using 93 samples (N = 142,196) met the selection criteria and were included. Campaigns were associated with increases in condom use [d+ = 0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.18 to 0.21], transmission knowledge (d+ = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.41), and prevention knowledge (d+ = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.25 to 0.52). Increases in condom use were larger for longer campaigns and in nations that scored lower on the human development index. Increases in transmission knowledge were larger to the extent that respondents reported greater campaign exposure, for more recent campaigns, and for nations that scored lower on the human development index. Mass media interventions may be useful in reducing global HIV/AIDS disparities because of their reach and effectiveness.

  19. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  20. The Effective Mass of a Ball in the Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, J.; Pantaleone, J.

    2010-01-01

    The air surrounding a projectile affects the projectile's motion in three very different ways: the drag force, the buoyant force, and the added mass. The added mass is an increase in the projectile's inertia from the motion of the air around it. Here we experimentally measure the added mass of a spherical projectile in air. The results agree well…

  1. Gadolinium ring enhancement and mass effect in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyden, C.H. van der (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)); Villiers, J.F.K. de (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)); Middlecote, B.D. (Dept. of Anatomical Pathology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)); Terblanche, J. (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa))

    1994-04-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented with a subacute history of optic neuritis followed by brainstem involvement, with fever and a lymphocytic pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid. Gadolinium-enhancing ring lesions were demonstrated in the white matter of the cerebrum, brainstem and cerebellum on day 17 of the illness, all appearing simultaneously as part of a monophasic illmess. A parietal lesion exerted mass effect. Needling and biopsy yielded no evidence of a pyogenic lesion, tumour or tuberculosis and showed vasculitis. There was insufficient material for myelin staining. Dexamethasone therapy lead to rapid improvement of the radiological lesions: MRI and CT on day 34 of the illness showed complete clearing of the lesions except for residual abnormality at the biopsy site. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Hans G.J., E-mail: hans.mol@wur.nl; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50–500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg{sup −1}) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5–250 μg kg{sup −1}. The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive

  3. Statistical analysis of fragmentation patterns of electron ionization mass spectra of enolized-trimethylsilylated anabolic androgenic steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkaki, A. G.; Angelis, Y. S.; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A.; Koupparis, M.; Georgakopoulos, C.

    2009-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are included in the List of prohibited substances of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as substances abused to enhance athletic performance. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role in doping control analyses identifying AAS as their enolized-trimethylsilyl (TMS)-derivatives using the electron ionization (EI) mode. This paper explores the suitability of complementary GC-MS mass spectra and statistical analysis (principal component analysis, PCA and partial least squares-discriminant analysis, PLS-DA) to differentiate AAS as a function of their structural and conformational features expressed by their fragment ions. The results obtained showed that the application of PCA yielded a classification among the AAS molecules which became more apparent after applying PLS-DA to the dataset. The application of PLS-DA yielded a clear separation among the AAS molecules which were, thus, classified as: 1-ene-3-keto, 3-hydroxyl with saturated A-ring, 1-ene-3-hydroxyl, 4-ene-3-keto, 1,4-diene-3-keto and 3-keto with saturated A-ring anabolic steroids. The study of this paper also presents structurally diagnostic fragment ions and dissociation routes providing evidence for the presence of unknown AAS or chemically modified molecules known as designer steroids.

  4. Mapping a noncovalent protein-peptide interface by top-down FTICR mass spectrometry using electron capture dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David J; Murray, Euan; Hupp, Ted; Mackay, C Logan; Langridge-Smith, Pat R R

    2011-08-01

    Noncovalent protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes are readily detected using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). Furthermore, recent reports have demonstrated that careful use of electron capture dissociation (ECD) fragmentation allows covalent backbone bonds of protein complexes to be dissociated without disruption of noncovalent protein-ligand interactions. In this way the site of protein-ligand interfaces can be identified. To date, protein-ligand complexes, which have proven tractable to this technique, have been mediated by ionic electrostatic interactions, i.e., ion pair interactions or salt bridging. Here we extend this methodology by applying ECD to study a protein-peptide complex that contains no electrostatics interactions. We analyzed the complex between the 21 kDa p53-inhibitor protein anterior gradient-2 and its hexapeptide binding ligand (PTTIYY). ECD fragmentation of the 1:1 complex occurs with retention of protein-peptide binding and analysis of the resulting fragments allows the binding interface to be localized to a C-terminal region between residues 109 and 175. These finding are supported by a solution-phase competition assay, which implicates the region between residues 108 and 122 within AGR2 as the PTTIYY binding interface. Our study expands previous findings by demonstrating that top-down ECD mass spectrometry can be used to determine directly the sites of peptide-protein interfaces. This highlights the growing potential of using ECD and related top-down fragmentation techniques for interrogation of protein-protein interfaces.

  5. Sensing and Control Electronics for Low-Mass Low-Capacitance MEMS Accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    junction transistors ( BJT ) to be used. Field effect tran- sistors (FET), such as MOSFETs, should be used in capacitive sensing for thin-film MEMS...continuous-time voltage sensing circuit can be realized. Our noise model also shows the noise is dependent on transistor sizes and parasitic capacitance...and indicates there is an optimum transistor size that achieves capacitance matching of the sensor, the sensor/circuit interconnection and the

  6. EFFECTS OF NEUTRINO ELECTROMAGNETIC FORM FACTORS ON NEUTRINO INTERACTION WITH FINITE TEMPERATURE ELECTRON MATTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Sulaksono

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The differential cross-section of neutrino interaction with dense and warm electron gasses has been calculated by takinginto account the neutrino electromagnetic form factors. The significant effect of electromagnetic properties of neutrinocan be found if the neutrino dipole moment, μ ν , is ≥ 5.10-9 μB and neutrino charge radius, Rv, is ≥ 5.10-6 MeV-1. Theimportance of the retarded correction, detailed balance and Pauli blocking factors is shown and analyzed. Many-bodyeffects on the target matter which are included via random phase approximation (RPA correlation as well as photoneffective mass are also investigated.

  7. Electric field effects on electronic characteristics of arsenene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanwei; Li, Yuxiao; Wang, Fei; Guo, Peng; Jia, Yu

    2017-10-01

    By using the first-principles calculations, we investigate the effects of electric field on electronic structures of armchair and zigzag arsenene nanoribbons (AsNRs) with different widths. The results show that for each case, quantum size effects induce a smaller band gap in larger AsNRs. Moreover, electric field can reduce effectively the band gap of AsNRs. In addition, the electric field can induce only the transition of band structures in the A-AsNRs or Z-AsNRs with narrow size. The band gap decrease more rapidly and the threshold electric field induced metal becomes smaller in the wider AsNRs.

  8. A new approach to the exact solutions of the effective mass Schrodinger equation

    OpenAIRE

    Tezcan, Cevdet; Sever, Ramazan; Yesiltas, Ozlem

    2007-01-01

    Effective mass Schrodinger equation is solved exactly for a given potential. Nikiforov-Uvarov method is used to obtain energy eigenvalues and the corresponding wave functions. A free parameter is used in the transformation of the wave function. The effective mass Schrodinger equation is also solved for the Morse potential transforming to the constant mass Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for a potential. One can also get solution of the effective mass Schrodinger equation starting from the constant m...

  9. Electronic excitation effects in ion-irradiated high- Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, N.; Chimi, Y.; Iwase, A.; Maeta, H.; Tsuru, K.; Michikami, O.; Kambara, T.; Mitamura, T.; Awaya, Y.; Terasawa, M.

    1998-02-01

    We have measured the fluence dependence of the c-axis lattice parameter in EuBa 2Cu 3O y (EBCO) irradiated with various ions from He to Au over the wide energy range from 0.85 MeV to 3.80 GeV. We have observed a linear increase of the c-axis lattice parameter with increasing fluence for all irradiations. The slope of c-axis lattice parameter against fluence, which corresponds to the defect production rate, is separated into two contributions; the effect via elastic displacement and the effect via electronic excitation. The former contribution exhibits a linear increase against the nuclear stopping power, Sn. The latter contribution is scaled by the primary ionization rate, d J/d x, rather than by the electronic stopping power, Se, and is nearly proportional to (d J/d x) 4.

  10. Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electron Ionization and Negative-Ion Chemical Ionization for Analyses of Pesticides at Trace Levels in Atmospheric Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Raina; Patricia Hall

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with both electron ionization (EI) and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI) are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs), organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalflurali...

  11. Effects of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions on relic neutrino decoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, Gianpiero [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Miele, Gennaro [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Pastor, Sergio [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Ed. Institutos de Investigacion, Apdo. 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: sergio.pastor@ific.uv.es; Pinto, Teguayco [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Ed. Institutos de Investigacion, Apdo. 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Pisanti, Ofelia [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Serpico, Pasquale D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany)

    2006-11-06

    We consider the decoupling of neutrinos in the early Universe in presence of non-standard neutral current neutrino-electron interactions (NSI). We first discuss a semi-analytical approach to solve the relevant kinetic equations and then present the results of fully numerical and momentum-dependent calculations, including flavor neutrino oscillations. We present our results in terms of both the effective number of neutrino species (N{sub eff}) and the impact on the abundance of {sup 4}He produced during big bang nucleosynthesis. We find that the presence of neutrino-electron NSI may enhance the entropy transfer from electron-positron pairs into neutrinos instead of photons, up to a value of N{sub eff}{approx}3.12 for NSI parameters within the ranges allowed by present laboratory data, which is almost three times the effect that appears for standard weak interactions. Thus non-standard neutrino-electron interactions do not essentially modify the density of relic neutrinos nor the bounds on neutrino properties from cosmological observables, such as their mass.

  12. Detection of Large Ions in Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: Effects of Ion Mass and Acceleration Voltage on Microchannel Plate Detector Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-01-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector...

  13. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because “each-atom-counts” toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted that may be compared with the results of high-level theoretical calculations. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well

  14. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant E; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-21

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because "each-atom-counts" toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well-defined surfaces may be explored using ion soft landing (SL) in a custom

  15. Emergent Gauge Fields and Their Nonperturbative Effects in Correlated Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Seok; Tanaka, Akihiro

    The history of modern condensed matter physics may be regarded as the competition and reconciliation between Stoner's and Anderson's physical pictures, where the former is based on momentum-space descriptions focusing on long wave-length fluctuations while the latter is based on real-space physics emphasizing emergent localized excitations. In particular, these two view points compete with each other in various nonperturbative phenomena, which range from the problem of high Tc superconductivity, quantum spin liquids in organic materials and frustrated spin systems, heavy-fermion quantum criticality, metal-insulator transitions in correlated electron systems such as doped silicons and two-dimensional electron systems, the fractional quantum Hall effect, to the recently discussed Fe-based superconductors. An approach to reconcile these competing frameworks is to introduce topologically nontrivial excitations into the Stoner's description, which appear to be localized in either space or time and sometimes both, where scattering between itinerant electrons and topological excitations such as skyrmions, vortices, various forms of instantons, emergent magnetic monopoles, and etc. may catch nonperturbative local physics beyond the Stoner's paradigm. In this review article we discuss nonperturbative effects of topological excitations on dynamics of correlated electrons. First, we focus on the problem of scattering between itinerant fermions and topological excitations in antiferromagnetic doped Mott insulators, expected to be relevant for the pseudogap phase of high Tc cuprates. We propose that nonperturbative effects of topological excitations can be incorporated within the perturbative framework, where an enhanced global symmetry with a topological term plays an essential role. In the second part, we go on to discuss the subject of symmetry protected topological states in a largely similar light. While we do not introduce itinerant fermions here, the nonperturbative

  16. Quantum effective potential, electron transport and conformons in biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandoloff, Rossen [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Balakrishnan, Radha [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2005-07-08

    In the Kirchhoff model of a biopolymer, conformation dynamics can be described in terms of solitary waves, for certain special cross-section asymmetries. Applying this to the problem of electron transport, we show that the quantum effective potential arising due to the bends and twists of the polymer enables us to formalize and quantify the concept of a conformon that has been hypothesized in biology. Its connection to the soliton solution of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation emerges in a natural fashion.

  17. Laser Thomson scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in a hall-effect plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washeleski, Robert L.

    Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) are compact electric propulsion devices with high specific impulse used for a variety of space propulsion applications. HET technology is well developed but the electron properties in the discharge are not completely understood, mainly due to the difficulty involved in performing accurate measurements in the discharge. Measurements of electron temperature and density have been performed using electrostatic probes, but presence of the probes can significantly disrupt thruster operation, and thus alter the electron temperature and density. While fast-probe studies have expanded understanding of HET discharges, a non-invasive method of measuring the electron temperature and density in the plasma is highly desirable. An alternative to electrostatic probes is a non-perturbing laser diagnostic technique that measures Thomson scattering from the plasma. Thomson scattering is the process by which photons are elastically scattered from the free electrons in a plasma. Since the electrons have thermal energy their motion causes a Doppler shift in the scattered photons that is proportional to their velocity. Like electrostatic probes, laser Thomson scattering (LTS) can be used to determine the temperature and density of free electrons in the plasma. Since Thomson scattering measures the electron velocity distribution function directly no assumptions of the plasma conditions are required, allowing accurate measurements in anisotropic and non-Maxwellian plasmas. LTS requires a complicated measurement apparatus, but has the potential to provide accurate, non-perturbing measurements of electron temperature and density in HET discharges. In order to assess the feasibility of LTS diagnostics on HETs non-invasive measurements of electron temperature and density in the near-field plume of a Hall thruster were performed using a custom built laser Thomson scattering diagnostic. Laser measurements were processed using a maximum likelihood estimation method

  18. Electron injection and scaffold effects in perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Miguel; Zhang, Wei; Hames, Bruno Clasen; Li, Yuelong; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Calvo, Mauricio E; Snaith, Henry J; Míguez, Hernán; Mora-Seró, Iván

    2017-01-21

    In spite of the impressive efficiencies reported for perovskite solar cells (PSCs), key aspects of their working principles, such as electron injection at the contacts or the suitability of the utilization of a specific scaffold layer, are not yet fully understood. Increasingly complex scaffolds attained by the sequential deposition of TiO2 and SiO2 mesoporous layers onto transparent conducting substrates are used to perform a systematic characterization of both the injection process at the electron selective contact and the scaffold effect in PSCs. By forcing multiple electron injection processes at a controlled sequence of perovskite-TiO2 interfaces before extraction, interfacial injection effects are magnified and hence characterized in detail. An anomalous injection behavior is observed, the fingerprint of which is the presence of significant inductive loops in the impedance spectra with a magnitude that correlates with the number of interfaces in the scaffold. Analysis of the resistive and capacitive behavior of the impedance spectra indicates that the scaffolds could hinder ion migration, with positive consequences such as lowering the recombination rate and implications for the current-potential curve hysteresis. Our results suggest that an appropriate balance between these advantageous effects and the unavoidable charge transport resistive losses introduced by the scaffolds will help in the optimization of PSC performance.

  19. Effect of High-Intensity Interval Training on Total, Abdominal and Visceral Fat Mass: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Florie; Pereira, Bruno; Boisseau, Nathalie

    2018-02-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is promoted as a time-efficient strategy to improve body composition. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy of HIIT in reducing total, abdominal, and visceral fat mass in normal-weight and overweight/obese adults. Electronic databases were searched to identify all related articles on HIIT and fat mass. Stratified analysis was performed using the nature of HIIT (cycling versus running, target intensity), sex and/or body weight, and the methods of measuring body composition. Heterogeneity was also determined RESULTS: A total of 39 studies involving 617 subjects were included (mean age 38.8 years ± 14.4, 52% females). HIIT significantly reduced total (p = 0.003), abdominal (p = 0.007), and visceral (p = 0.018) fat mass, with no differences between the sexes. A comparison showed that running was more effective than cycling in reducing total and visceral fat mass. High-intensity (above 90% peak heart rate) training was more successful in reducing whole body adiposity, while lower intensities had a greater effect on changes in abdominal and visceral fat mass. Our analysis also indicated that only computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging showed significant abdominal and/or visceral fat-mass loss after HIIT interventions. HIIT is a time-efficient strategy to decrease fat-mass deposits, including those of abdominal and visceral fat mass. There was some evidence of the greater effectiveness of HIIT running versus cycling, but owing to the wide variety of protocols used and the lack of full details about cycling training, further comparisons need to be made. Large, multicenter, prospective studies are required to establish the best HIIT protocols for reducing fat mass according to subject characteristics.

  20. Substituents' effect in electron attachment to epigenetic modifications of cytosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Fernanda B.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Sanchez, Sergio d'Almeida

    2017-06-01

    Epigenetic modifications of cytosine have been found to influence differently in many processes in biological systems. In order to investigate the differences in electron attachment to different epigenetic modifications of cytosine, we reported the A″ component of the integral cross section of electron scattering by cytosine (C) and its epigenetic modifications 5-methylcytosine (5mC), 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Our results were obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange (SE) and static-exchange plus polarization (SEP) approximations. In addition to the scattering results, we present electron attachment energies obtained through an empirical scaling relation for the five molecules. We observed three π* resonances for C, 5mC, and 5hmC and four for 5fC and 5caC, in both SE and SEP approximations. The cross sections show that the π* resonances of 5mC and 5hmC are located at higher energies than the resonances of C, while the resonances of 5fC and 5caC are located at lower energies. In order to investigate this shift in the resonances' positions, we analyzed the π* lowest-lying orbitals and the electronic density over the molecules. Using the inductive and mesomeric effects, we were able to analyze the influence of each substituent over the molecule and on the resonances' positions.

  1. Proceedings of the Santa Fe workshop on electron effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.S.; Jason, A. [eds.

    1998-11-01

    The Workshop was held under the sponsorship of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project to further project understanding of the effects and cause of the presence of electrons in proton accelerators. In particular, the fast instability seen in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring was the major topic of discussion since it limits the particles/pulse to the LANSCE target and could have an impact on the SNS Ring. This instability is believed due to the interaction of trapped electrons in the accumulated beam, i.e., an electron-proton or e-p instability. The first day of the workshop was occupied by invited talks that included a review of e-p instability theory, an overview of PSR observations, observations at other laboratories, reviews of electron-production mechanisms, theoretical studies on the PSR instability, and design issues of the SNS ring. For the second day, the workshop was organized into three working groups: a theory and computation group, a past-experiences and proposed-experiments group, and the SNS-design-strategy group. Their charter was to summarize previous work in their respective areas and to originate a course for future progress. The results of the working groups and the workshop were summarized in a joint session during the morning of the third day. These proceedings are a simple collection of the viewgraphs used as submitted to a member of the LANL secretarial staff by speakers.

  2. The effects of analyte mass and collision gases on ion beam formation in an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jessica J.; Edmund, Alisa J.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to evaluate the effect of matrix components on the formation and focusing of a Ba ion beam in a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Cross sections of the ion beams were taken in the second vacuum stage, in front of the entrance to the mass analyzer. Under normal operating conditions, the addition of Pb shifted the position of the Ba ion beam to the right. PLIF was also used to evaluate the effect of a collision reaction interface (CRI) on Ca and Ba ion beams. A wider velocity distribution of ions and a decrease in overall intensity were observed for the CRI images. The fluorescence and mass spectrometer signals decreased with increased CRI flow rates. These effects were most obvious for Ca ions with He gas.

  3. Evaluation of gas chromatography - electron ionization - full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Hans G J; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50-500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg(-1)) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to GC-triple quadrupole MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High-mass Drell-Yan cross-section and search for new phenomena in multi-electron/positron final states with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollstadt, Simon

    2015-02-12

    The Standard Model of particle physics is a very successful theory which describes nearly all known processes of particle physics very precisely. Nevertheless, there are several observations which cannot be explained within the existing theory. In this thesis, two analyses with high energy electrons and positrons using data of the ATLAS detector are presented. One, probing the Standard Model of particle physics and another searching for phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The production of an electron-positron pair via the Drell-Yan process leads to a very clean signature in the detector with low background contributions. This allows for a very precise measurement of the cross-section and can be used as a precision test of perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) where this process has been calculated at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The invariant mass spectrum mee is sensitive to parton distribution functions (PFDs), in particular to the poorly known distribution of antiquarks at large momentum fraction (Bjoerken x). The measurement of the high-mass Drell-Yan cross-section in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=7 TeV is performed on a dataset collected with the ATLAS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb{sup -1}. The differential cross-section of pp→Z{sup 0}/γ{sup *}+X→e{sup +}e{sup -}+X is measured as a function of the invariant mass in the range 116 GeVeffects and different levels of final state radiation corrections. A comparison is made to various event generators and to predictions of pQCD calculations at NNLO. A good agreement within the uncertainties between measured cross-sections and Standard Model predictions is observed. Examples of observed phenomena which can not be explained by the Standard Model are the amount of dark matter in the

  5. Damping Effects Induced by a Mass Moving along a Pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gandino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study of damping in a time-varying inertia pendulum is presented. The system consists of a disk travelling along an oscillating pendulum: large swinging angles are reached, so that its equation of motion is not only time-varying but also nonlinear. Signals are acquired from a rotary sensor, but some remarks are also proposed as regards signals measured by piezoelectric or capacitive accelerometers. Time-varying inertia due to the relative motion of the mass is associated with the Coriolis-type effects appearing in the system, which can reduce and also amplify the oscillations. The analytical model of the pendulum is introduced and an equivalent damping ratio is estimated by applying energy considerations. An accurate model is obtained by updating the viscous damping coefficient in accordance with the experimental data. The system is analysed through the application of a subspace-based technique devoted to the identification of linear time-varying systems: the so-called short-time stochastic subspace identification (ST-SSI. This is a very simple method recently adopted for estimating the instantaneous frequencies of a system. In this paper, the ST-SSI method is demonstrated to be capable of accurately estimating damping ratios, even in the challenging cases when damping may turn to negative due to the Coriolis-type effects, thus causing amplifications of the system response.

  6. Effective mass calculations for shallow acceptors in nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert-Aronson, Jacob; Lambrecht, W. R. L.

    2012-02-01

    In the effective mass approximation for shallow acceptors in semiconductors, the defect eigenstates are written as a product of a slowly varying envelope function and the band extrema Bloch functions. The Kohn-Luttinger Hamiltonian describing the valence band manifold in zincblende, or its generalization for other crystals structures, then becomes a set of coupled differential equations for the envelope function. These can be solved by a variational approach with hydrogenic type basis functions. We have implemented this approach for the appropriate Hamiltonians for zincblende, wurtzite and an orthorhombic crystal structure occurring for II-IV-N2 semiconductors. The Hamiltonian parameters used were extracted from first-principles GW calculations. The central cell correction to the Coulomb potential was added based on pseudopotential differences as proposed by Mireles and Ulloa (Phys. Rev. B 58, 3879 (1998)). Results are presented for various acceptors in GaN, AlN, InN, ZnGeN2 and ZnSnS2. The effects of varying the crystal field splitting parameter, and the type of pseudopotentials (including or not semicore d-states) were investigated.

  7. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  8. Coronal Mass Ejections and Their Effect on the Venusian Nightglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C. L.; Chanover, N.; Slanger, T. G.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, Venus, and Mars all formed close to the Sun under similar conditions and with similar materials. While having common origins of formation, they have very different atmospheres. These difference are due to various evolutionary paths taken by each planet, resulting in two CO2 dominated atmospheres and a one N2/O2 dominated atmosphere. In order to understand the processes that led to the evolution of these atmospheres we need to understand the present chemistry. Knowing the chemical reactions occurring in the mesosphere and ionosphere of these two types of atmospheres leads to a greater understanding of physical processes, such as winds and transport mechanisms. These chemical reactions can be determined by observing nightglow. Nightglow is caused by recombination of atoms into molecules, or electrons with ions, producing excited molecules and atoms, respectively. Venus has several strong nightglow features, one of which is the O(1S-1D) transition at 5577.3 Å (oxygen green line). This feature is known to be highly temporally variable. When it was first seen in 1999, it had an intensity greater than the terrestrial nightglow, but it was too weak to be detected after 2004. The reason for this variability, and the chemistry producing the emission, have both been poorly understood. Literature review of past observations show that a week prior to every detection, at least one high energy solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) occurred directed at Venus. Solar flares produce large amounts of extreme ultra violet light and charged particles. CMEs are large plasma ejections usually connected with solar flares. We propose that the oxygen green line emission is due to CME impacts from the Sun. The charged particles of the plasma can interact with the atmosphere of Venus to produce nightglow/aurora, where dissociative recombination of O2+ is the mostly likely source of O(1S). To test our hypothesis, we observed Venus as a Target of Opportunity with the ARCES high

  9. Measurement of laser activated electron tunneling from semiconductor zinc oxide to adsorbed organic molecules by a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hongying; Fu, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shi

    2012-06-04

    Measurement of light induced heterogeneous electron transfer is important for understanding of fundamental processes involved in chemistry, physics and biology, which is still challenging by current techniques. Laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) from semiconductor metal oxides was observed and characterized by a MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) mass spectrometer in this work. Nanoparticles of ZnO were placed on a MALDI sample plate. Free fatty acids and derivatives were used as models of organic compounds and directly deposited on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. Irradiation of UV laser (λ=355 nm) with energy more than the band gap of ZnO produces ions that can be detected in negative mode. When TiO(2) nanoparticles with similar band gap but much lower electron mobility were used, these ions were not observed unless the voltage on the sample plate was increased. The experimental results indicate that laser induced electron tunneling is dependent on the electron mobility and the strength of the electric field. Capture of low energy electrons by charge-deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules causes unpaired electron-directed cleavages of chemical bonds in a nonergodic pathway. In positive detection mode, electron tunneling cannot be observed due to the reverse moving direction of electrons. It should be able to expect that laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is a new technique capable of probing the dynamics of electron tunneling. LAET offers advantages as a new ionization dissociation method for mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of body mass index on perioperative thermoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özer AB

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ayşe Belin Özer,1 Aysun Yildiz Altun,1 Ömer Lütfi Erhan,1 Tuba Çatak,2 Ümit Karatepe,1 İsmail Demirel,1 Gonca Çağlar Toprak3 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Firat University Medical School, Elaziğ, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Clinic, Bingol State Hospital, Bingöl, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Clinic, Elazig Training and Research Hospital, Elaziğ, Turkey Purpose: We evaluated the effects of body mass index (BMI on thermoregulation in obese patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Methods: Sixty patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery with no premedication were included in the study. The patients were classified into 4 groups according to BMI <24.9, 25–39.9, 40–49.9, and >50. Anesthesia was provided with routine techniques. Tympanic and peripheral temperatures were recorded every 5 minutes starting with the induction of anesthesia. The mean skin temperature (MST, mean body temperature (MBT, vasoconstriction time, and vasoconstriction threshold that triggers core warming were calculated with the following formulas: MST = 0.3 (Tchest + Tarm + 0.2 (Tthigh + Tcalf. MBT was calculated using the equation 0.64Tcore+0.36Tskin, and vasoconstriction was determined by calculating Tforearm-Tfinger. Results: There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age, gender, duration of operation, and room temperature. Compared to those with BMI <24.9, the tympanic temperature was significantly higher in those with BMI =25–39.9 in the 10th, 15th, 20th, and 50th minutes. In addition, BMI =40–49.9 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 40th, 45th, 50th, and 55th minutes and BMI >50 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 50th, and 55th minutes were less than those with BMI <24.9 (P<0.05. There was no significant difference in terms of MST and MBT. Vasoconstriction occurred later, and that vasoconstriction threshold was

  11. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoshan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the "Fassel" TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  12. Triboelectric effect: A new perspective on electron transfer process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuaihang; Zhang, Zhinan

    2017-10-01

    As interest in the triboelectric effect increases in line with the development of tribo-electrification related devices, the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon require more systematic review from the dual perspectives of developed classical insights and emerging quantum understanding. In this paper, the clear energy changing and transferring process of electrons have been proposed from the quantum point of view as the trigger for the charging initiation process in the triboelectric effect, and the phonon modes on the friction surfaces are believed to hold great importance as one of the main driving forces. Compatible with Maxwell Displacement Current theory, the complete consideration for charging steady state, i.e., the competition mechanisms between the breakdown process and the continuously charging process, and the balance mechanisms of phonon-electron interaction, built voltage, and induced polarization, are illustrated. In brief, the proposed theory emphasizes the fundamental role of electron transferring in tribo-electrical fields. By comparing certain experimental results from the previous studies, the theory is justified.

  13. Effects of Spaced versus Massed Training in Function Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Fadler, Cynthia L.; Pashler, Harold

    2013-01-01

    A robust finding in the literature is that spacing material leads to better retention than massing; however, the benefit of spacing for concept learning is less clear. When items are massed, it may help the learner to discover the relationship between instances, leading to better abstraction of the underlying concept. Two experiments addressed…

  14. Effects of electron beam irradiation on cut flowers and mites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohino, Toshiyuki; Tanabe, Kazuo [Yokohama Plant Protection Station (Japan)

    1994-08-01

    Two spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae KOCH were irradiated with electron beams (2.5MeV) to develop an alternative quarantine treatment for imported cut flowers. The tolerance of eggs increased with age (1-5-day-old). Immature stages (larva-teleiochrysalis) irradiated at 0.4-0.8kGy increased tolerance with their development. Mated mature females irradiated at 0.4kGy or higher did not produce viable eggs, although temporary recovery was observed at 0.2kGy. Adult males were sterilized at 0.4kGy because non-irradiated virgin females mated with yielded female progeny malformed and sterilized. Various effects of electron beam irradiation were observed when nine species of cut flowers were irradiated in 5MeV Dynamitron accelerator. Chrysanthemum and rose were most sensitive among cut flowers. (author).

  15. Steric-electronic effects in malarial peptides inducing sterile immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Vranich, Armando [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@mail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Is it evident that the residues position are relevant regarding of {phi} angular value. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The geometry considered for detailing the alterations undergone by HABPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inter planar interactions ruled by clashes between the atoms making them up. -- Abstract: Conserved Plasmodium falciparum high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) most relevant proteins involved in malaria parasite invasion are immunologically silent; critical binding residues must therefore be specifically replaced to render them highly immunogenic and protection-inducing. Such changes have a tremendous impact on these peptides' steric-electronic effects, such as modifications to peptide length peptide bonds and electronic orbitals' disposition, to allow a better fit into immune system MHCII molecules and better interaction with the TCR which might account for the final immunological outcome.

  16. Threshold of auroral intensification reduced by electron precipitation effect

    CERN Document Server

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that discrete aurora suddenly intensifies and deforms from an arc-like to a variety of wavy/vortex structures, especially during a substorm period. The instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves reflected from the ionosphere has been analyzed in order to comprehend the ignition process of auroral intensification. It was presented that the prime key is an enhancement of plasma convection, and the convection electric field has a threshold. This study examined effects of auroral electron precipitation, causing the ionization of neutral atmosphere, on the linear instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves. It was found that the threshold of convection electric fields is significantly reduced by increasing the ionization rate, the realistic range of which could be estimated from observed electron energy spectra.

  17. Thermoelectric effects in electron chiral tunneling in metallic carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafilo, A. V.; Ilinskaya, O. A.; Krive, I. V.; Park, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    Thermoelectric effects in a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube in the presence of long-range electrostatic and pseudomagnetic potentials (produced by strain) are considered. It is shown that for strong scattering potentials (chiral tunneling) a pronounced energy "gap" appears in the energy dependence of electron transmission coefficient. This results in strong violation of Wiedemann-Franz law and in a peak-like behavior of thermopower as a function of chemical potential. The electronic figure-of-merit (ZT) is calculated and shown to be sensitive at low temperatures to nanotube chirality. By tuning chemical potential, ZT can reach high values (ZT≃5) that makes specially engineered nanotube-based thermocouple to be a promising nano-device with a high thermoelectric performance.

  18. Electronic states and nature of bonding of the molecule PdGe by all electron ab initio HF–CI calculations and mass spectrometric equilibrium experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Kingcade, Joseph E. , Jr.; Gingerich, Karl A.

    1986-01-01

    In the present work we present all-electron ab initio Hartree–Fock (HF) and configuration interaction (CI) calculations of six electronic states of the PdGe molecule. The molecule is predicted to have a 3Pi ground state and two low-lying excited states 3Sigma− and 1Sigma+. The electronic structure...

  19. The comparative effectiveness of 2 electronic prescribing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Rainu; Barron, Yolanda; Abramson, Erika L

    2011-12-01

    The increasingly widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is substantially changing the American healthcare delivery system. Differences in the actual effectiveness of EHRs and their component applications, including electronic prescribing (e-prescribing), is not well understood. We compared the effects of 2 types of e-prescribing systems on medication safety as an example of how comparative effectiveness research (CER) can be applied to the study of healthcare delivery. We previously conducted 2 non-randomized, prospective studies with pre-post controls comparing prescribing errors among: (1) providers who adopted a standalone e-prescribing system with robust technical and clinical decision support (CDS) and (2) providers who adopted an EHR with integrated e-prescribing with less robust available CDS and technical support. Both studies evaluated small groups of ambulatory care providers in the same New York community using identical methodology including prescription and chart reviews. We undertook this comparative effectiveness study to directly compare prescribing error rates among the 2 groups of e-prescribing adopters. The stand-alone system reduced error rates from 42.5 to 6.6 errors per 100 prescriptions (P application performed less well, likely due to differences in available CDS and technical resources. Results from this small study highlight the importance of CER that directly compares components of healthcare delivery.

  20. The Determination of Diacetyl and Acetylpropionyl in Aerosols From Electronic Smoking Devices Using Gas Chromatography Triple Quad Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu Serban C.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A reliable and sensitive method for the measurement of the level of diacetyl (2,3-butanedione and acetylpropionyl (2,3-pentanedione in the aerosol (both the particles and the suspending gas of electronic smoking devices (e-cigarettes has been developed. The method uses a gas chromatographic separation on a Carbowax type column with the measurement of the analytes on a triplequadrupole mass spectrometer working in positive MRM mode. The method has been validated using standard requirements regarding selectivity, sensitivity, recovery, accuracy, and repeatability. The limit of quantitation (LOQ for the method was determined to be 0.41 ng/mL for diacetyl and 0.21 ng/mL for acetylpropionyl as measured for standards. These values translate to an LOQ of 0.082 ng/puff for diacetyl and 0.042 ng/puff for acetylpropionyl as measured for an e-cigarette with 50 puffs placed in 10 mL acetone. The samples analyzed included collected aerosols from several e-cigarettes, and a number of liquids used in electronic cigarettes (e-liquids. 3R4F Kentucky reference cigarette was also analyzed for evaluating the accuracy of the procedure, with good agreement with data from the literature. Diacetyl and acetylpropionyl were distributed in both particulate phase and also in vapor phase. The levels of diacetyl and acetylpropionyl in particulate phase collected from 3R4F cigarettes were found to represent only about 22% for diacetyl and only 31% for acetylpropionyl, while the vapor phase for diacetyl represented 78% and for acetylpropionyl 69% of the total analyte. The levels of diacetyl and acetylpropionyl in the aerosols of most electronic smoking devices were found to be very low, with a few exceptions. The analysis of the two analytes in several e-liquids available on the market showed a very large range of levels. Some of the e-liquids from the market are likely to have diacetyl and/or acetylpropionyl intentionally added.

  1. Surface electronic structure of fullerides : effects of correlation, electron-phonon coupling, and polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macovez, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenology of C60 both as isolated molecule and in condensed phases is reviewed. C60 compounds (fullerides) display a wide range of electronic ground states ranging from magnetic insulators to superconductors. The fundamental properties and interactions (electron correlation, electron-phonon

  2. The effects of incident electron current density and temperature on the total electron emission yield of polycrystalline CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhaj, M; Tondu, T; Inguimbert, V [ONERA/DESP 2, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse Cedex (France); Barroy, Pierre; Silva, Francois; Gicquel, Alix, E-mail: Mohamed.Belhaj@onera.f [LIMHP, Universite Paris 13, CNRS Institut Galilee, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2010-04-07

    The effects of temperature and incident electron current density on the total electron emission yield (TEEY) of polycrystalline diamond deposited by the chemical vapour deposition technique (CVD) were investigated at low electron beam fluence. It was found that the TEEY reversibly increases with the temperature and reversibly decreases with the current density. This behaviour is explained on the basis of a dynamic competition between the accumulation of holes (positive space charge), which internally reduces the secondary electron emission, and the thermally activated conductivity that tends to reduce the space charge formation.

  3. Electron capture dissociation and drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry coupled with site directed mutations provide insights into the conformational diversity of a metamorphic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Sophie R; Porrini, Massimiliano; Tyler, Robert C; MacPhee, Cait E; Volkman, Brian F; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-04-28

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry can be combined with data from top-down sequencing to discern adopted conformations of proteins in the absence of solvent. This multi-technique approach has particular applicability for conformationally dynamic systems. Previously, we demonstrated the use of drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (DT IM-MS) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to study the metamorphic protein lymphotactin (Ltn). Ltn exists in equilibrium between distinct monomeric (Ltn10) and dimeric (Ltn40) folds, both of which can be preserved and probed in the gas-phase. Here, we further test this mass spectrometric framework, by examining two site directed mutants of Ltn, designed to stabilise either distinct fold in solution, in addition to a truncated form consisting of a minimum model of structure for Ltn10. The truncated mutant has similar collision cross sections to the wild type (WT), for low charge states, and is resistant to ECD fragmentation. The monomer mutant (CC3) presents in similar conformational families as observed previously for the WT Ltn monomer. As with the WT, the CC3 mutant is resistant to ECD fragmentation at low charge states. The dimer mutant W55D is found here to exist as both a monomer and dimer. As a monomer W55D exhibits similar behaviour to the WT, but as a dimer presents a much larger charge state and collision cross section range than the WT dimer, suggesting a smaller interaction interface. In addition, ECD on the W55D mutant yields greater fragmentation than for the WT, suggesting a less stable β-sheet core. The results highlight the power of MS to provide insight into dynamic proteins, providing further information on each distinct fold of Ltn. In addition we observe differences in the fold stability following single or double point mutations. This approach, therefore, has potential to be a useful tool to screen for the structural effects of mutagenesis, even when sample is limited.

  4. Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect in a Magnetized Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Benjamin; Grames, Joseph; CenterInjectors; Sources Team

    2016-09-01

    Magnetized electron sources have the potential to improve ion beam cooling efficiency. At the Gun Test Stand at Jefferson Lab, a solenoid magnet will be installed adjacent to the photogun to magnetize the electron beam. Due to the photocathode operating in a vacuum chamber, measuring and monitoring the magnetic field at the beam source location with conventional probes is impractical. The Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) describes the change on polarized light by reflection from a magnetized surface. The reflection from the surface may alter the polarization direction, ellipticity, or intensity, and depends linearly upon the surface magnetization of the sample. By replacing the photocathode with a magnetized sample and reflecting polarized light from the sample surface, the magnetic field at the beam source is inferred. A controlled MOKE system has been assembled to test the magnetic field. Calibration of the solenoid magnet is performed by comparing the MOKE signal with magnetic field measurements. The apparatus will provide a description of the field at electron beam source. The report summarizes the method and results of controlled tests and calibration of the MOKE sample with the solenoid magnet field measurements. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Research Experience for Undergraduates Award 1359026 and the Department of Energy, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  5. Early detection of fungal growth in bakery products by use of an electronic nose based on mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinaixa, Maria; Marín, Sonia; Brezmes, Jesús; Llobet, Eduard; Vilanova, Xavier; Correig, Xavier; Ramos, Antonio; Sanchis, Vicent

    2004-10-06

    This paper presents the design, optimization, and evaluation of a mass spectrometry-based electronic nose (MS e-nose) for early detection of unwanted fungal growth in bakery products. Seven fungal species (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Eurotium amstelodami, Eurotium herbariorum, Eurotium rubrum, Eurotium repens, and Penicillium corylophillum) were isolated from bakery products and used for the study. Two sampling headspace techniques were tested: static headspace (SH) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Cross-validated models based on principal component analysis (PCA), coupled to discriminant function analysis (DFA) and fuzzy ARTMAP, were used as data treatment. When attempting to discriminate between inoculated and blank control vials or between genera or species of in vitro growing cultures, sampling based on SPME showed better results than those based on static headspace. The SPME-MS-based e-nose was able to predict fungal growth with 88% success after 24 h of inoculation and 98% success after 48 h when changes were monitored in the headspace of fungal cultures growing on bakery product analogues. Prediction of the right fungal genus reached 78% and 88% after 24 and 96 h, respectively.

  6. The CO A-X System for Constraining Cosmological Drift of the Proton-Electron Mass Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Salumbides, E J; Bagdonaite, J; de Oliveira, N; Joyeux, D; Nahon, L; Ubachs, W; 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.022510

    2012-01-01

    The $\\textrm{A}^1\\Pi-\\textrm{X}^1\\Sigma^+$ band system of carbon monoxide, which has been detected in six highly redshifted galaxies ($z=1.6-2.7$), is identified as a novel probe method to search for possible variations of the proton-electron mass ratio ($\\mu$) on cosmological time scales. Laboratory wavelengths of the spectral lines of the A-X ($v$,0) bands for $v=0-9$ have been determined at an accuracy of $\\Delta\\lambda/\\lambda=1.5 \\times 10^{-7}$ through VUV Fourier-transform absorption spectroscopy, providing a comprehensive and accurate zero-redshift data set. For the (0,0) and (1,0) bands, two-photon Doppler-free laser spectroscopy has been applied at the $3 \\times 10^{-8}$ accuracy level, verifying the absorption data. Sensitivity coefficients $K_{\\mu}$ for a varying $\\mu$ have been calculated for the CO A-X bands, so that an operational method results to search for $\\mu$-variation.

  7. Laboratory Activity for the Determination of Nicotine in Electronic Cigarette Liquids using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Todd; Bida, Morgan R; Robinson, Risa J

    In recent years the prevalence and popularity of electronic cigarettes (ECs) has increased noticeably and a large market for their refillable nicotine solutions (e-liquids) has also rapidly increased. These e-liquids contain nicotine, an addictive and potentially dangerous stimulant, but often the actual nicotine content differs significantly from manufacturers' labelling, due in part to lack of regulation for these products. A laboratory activity for undergraduate students was developed to directly test e-liquids for nicotine content using gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a means for teaching the instrumentation to undergraduate students using an authentic, real-world example. The activity introduces and/or re-emphasizes the theory and operation of GC-MS, standard/sample preparation, calibration curves, internal standards, selected ion monitoring mode of MS operation, and method validation. The laboratory experiment is designed for students enrolled in Quantitative Analysis courses (like Analytical Chemistry or Instrumental Analysis), but portions are also suitable for lower level chemistry courses or even those designed for allied health professionals or non-chemistry majors. Given the current popularity of ECs, this activity can provide the chemistry curriculum with a timely, real-world, and contemporary application in which crucial course content is taught. Students can also benefit from the inherent discussion of ECs, regulations, and related social aspects of smoking and EC vaping - which can serve as a secondary learning outcome.

  8. Study of Polymer Material Aging by Laser Mass Spectrometry, UV-Visible Spectroscopy, and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junien Exposito

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyed natural rubber (NR and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR, designed for outdoor applications, were exposed to an accelerated artificial aging in xenon light. The aging results in the deterioration of the exposed surface material properties. The ability of dyed polymers to withstand prolonged sunlight exposure without fading or undergoing any physical deterioration is largely determined not only by the photochemical characteristics of the absorbing dyestuff itself but also by the polymer structure and fillers. Results obtained by laser mass spectrometry, UV-visible spectroscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy indicate that dyed filled NR and SBR samples behave differently during the photo-oxidation. The fading of the dyed polymers was found to be promoted in the NR sample. This can be correlated with LDI-FTICRMS results, which show the absence of [M-H]− orange pigment pseudomolecular ion and also its fragment ions after aging. This is confirmed by both EDX and UV/Vis spectroscopy. EDX analysis indicates a concentration of chlorine atoms, which can be considered as a marker of orange pigment or its degradation products, only at the surface of SBR flooring after aging. Reactivity of radicals formed during flooring aging has been studied and seems to greatly affect the behavior of such organic pigments.

  9. Laboratory Activity for the Determination of Nicotine in Electronic Cigarette Liquids using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Todd; Bida, Morgan R.; Robinson, Risa J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the prevalence and popularity of electronic cigarettes (ECs) has increased noticeably and a large market for their refillable nicotine solutions (e-liquids) has also rapidly increased. These e-liquids contain nicotine, an addictive and potentially dangerous stimulant, but often the actual nicotine content differs significantly from manufacturers’ labelling, due in part to lack of regulation for these products. A laboratory activity for undergraduate students was developed to directly test e-liquids for nicotine content using gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a means for teaching the instrumentation to undergraduate students using an authentic, real-world example. The activity introduces and/or re-emphasizes the theory and operation of GC-MS, standard/sample preparation, calibration curves, internal standards, selected ion monitoring mode of MS operation, and method validation. The laboratory experiment is designed for students enrolled in Quantitative Analysis courses (like Analytical Chemistry or Instrumental Analysis), but portions are also suitable for lower level chemistry courses or even those designed for allied health professionals or non-chemistry majors. Given the current popularity of ECs, this activity can provide the chemistry curriculum with a timely, real-world, and contemporary application in which crucial course content is taught. Students can also benefit from the inherent discussion of ECs, regulations, and related social aspects of smoking and EC vaping – which can serve as a secondary learning outcome. PMID:26478904

  10. Finite volume effects for nucleon and heavy meson masses

    CERN Document Server

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Lanz, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We apply the resummed version of the L\\"uscher formula to analyze finite volume corrections to the mass of the nucleon and of heavy mesons. We show that by applying the subthreshold expansion of the scattering amplitudes one can express the finite volume corrections in terms of only a few physical observables and the size of the box. In the case of the nucleon, the available information about the quark mass dependence of these physical quantities is discussed and used to assess the finite volume corrections to the nucleon mass as a function of the quark mass including a detailed analysis of the remaining uncertainties. For heavy mesons, the L\\"uscher formula is derived both fully relativistically and in a nonrelativistic approximation and a first attempt at a numerical analysis is made.

  11. Adverse Effects of Electronic Cigarette Use: A Concept Mapping Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, Eric K; Nasim, Aashir; Rosas, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Electronic cigarette (ECIG) use has grown rapidly in popularity within a short period of time. As ECIG products continue to evolve and more individuals begin using ECIGs, it is important to understand the potential adverse effects that are associated with ECIG use. The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the acute adverse effects associated with ECIG use. This study used an integrated, mixed-method participatory approach called concept mapping (CM). Experienced ECIG users (n = 85) provided statements that answered the focus prompt "A specific negative or unpleasant effect (ie, physical or psychological) that I have experienced either during or immediately after using an electronic cigarette device is…" in an online program. Participants sorted these statements into piles of common themes and rated each statement. Using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis, a concept map of the adverse effects statements was created. Participants generated 79 statements that completed the focus prompt and were retained by researchers. Analysis generated a map containing five clusters that characterized perceived adverse effects of ECIG use: Stigma, Worry/Guilt, Addiction Signs, Physical Effects, and Device/Vapor Problems. ECIG use is associated with adverse effects that should be monitored as ECIGs continue to grow in popularity. If ECIGs are to be regulated, policies should be created that minimize the likelihood of user identified adverse effects. This article provides a list of adverse effects reported by experienced ECIG users. This article organizes these effects into a conceptual model that may be useful for better understanding the adverse outcomes associated with ECIG use. These identified adverse effects may be useful for health professionals and policy makers. Health professionals should be aware of potential negative health effects that may be associated with ECIG use and policy makers could design ECIG regulations that minimize the

  12. Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archubi, C. D. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gravielle, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Silkin, V. M. [Donostia International Physics Center, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 1072, E-20080 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

  13. Europium Effect on the Electron Transport in Graphene Ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobadilla, Alfredo D.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Kaminski, Michael; Kumar, Narendra; Seminario, Jorge M.

    2015-10-01

    We report in this complementary theoretical-experimental work the effect of gating on the election transport of grapheme ribbons when exposed to very low concentration of europium in an aqueous solution. We find a direct correlation between the level of concentration of europium ions in the solvent and the change in electron transport in graphene, observing a change of up to 3 orders of magnitude at the lowest level of concentration tested (0.1 mM), suggesting a possibility that graphene ribbons can be used for detecting very low concentrations of europium in liquid solutions.

  14. Effect of Holstein phonons on the electronic properties of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauber, T [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Peres, N M R [Center of Physics and Department of Physics, University of Minho, P-4710-057, Braga (Portugal)

    2008-02-06

    We obtain the self-energy of the electronic propagator due to the presence of Holstein polarons within the first Born approximation. This leads to a renormalization of the Fermi velocity of 1%. We further compute the optical conductivity of the system at the Dirac point and at finite doping within the Kubo formula. We argue that the effects due to Holstein phonons are negligible and that the Boltzmann approach, which does not include inter-band transitions and can thus not treat optical phonons due to their high energy of {Dirac_h}{omega}{sub 0} {approx} 0.1-0.2 eV, remains valid.

  15. Search for high mass resonances decaying into electron-positron pairs in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeringer, Christian

    2013-04-25

    The Standard Model of particle physics was developed to describe the fundamental particles, which form matter, and their interactions via the strong, electromagnetic and weak force. Although most measurements are described with high accuracy, some observations indicate that the Standard Model is incomplete. Numerous extensions were developed to solve these limitations. Several of these extensions predict heavy resonances, so-called Z' bosons, that can decay into an electron positron pair. The particle accelerator Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland was built to collide protons at unprecedented center-of-mass energies, namely 7 TeV in 2011. With the data set recorded in 2011 by the ATLAS detector, a large multi-purpose detector located at the LHC, the electron positron pair mass spectrum was measured up to high masses in the TeV range. The properties of electrons and the probability that other particles are mis-identified as electrons were studied in detail. Using the obtained information, a sophisticated Standard Model expectation was derived with data-driven methods and Monte Carlo simulations. In the comparison of the measurement with the expectation, no significant deviations from the Standard Model expectations were observed. Therefore exclusion limits for several Standard Model extensions were calculated. For example, Sequential Standard Model (SSM) Z' bosons with masses below 2.10 TeV were excluded with 95% Confidence Level (C.L.).

  16. Sites involved in intra- and interdomain allostery associated with the activation of factor VIIa pinpointed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Hongjian; Olsen, Ole H; Persson, Egon

    2014-01-01

    enhancement remain elusive. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation to pinpoint individual residues in the heavy chain of FVIIa whose conformation and/or local interaction pattern changes when the enzyme transitions to the active form...

  17. Characterization of polychlorinated n-alkanes using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korytar, P.; Parera, J.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Santos, F.J.; Boer, de J.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with electron-capture negative ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC¿ECNI-TOF-MS) is used to study the composition and characteristics of short-, medium- and long-chain polychlorinated n-alkane (PCA) mixtures. Distinct ordered

  18. The effects of maternal body mass index on pregnancy outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, A S

    2012-01-31

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is presenting a critical challenge to healthcare services. We examined the effect of Body Mass Index in early pregnancy on adverse pregnancy outcome. We performed a population register-based cohort study using data from the North Western Perinatal survey (N = 99,403 babies born during 2004-2006), based at The University of Manchester, UK. The main outcome measures were Caesarean section delivery, preterm birth, neonatal death, stillbirth, Macrosomia, small for gestational age and large for gestational age. The risk of preterm birth was reduced by almost 10% in overweight (RR = 0.89, [95% CI: 0.83, 0.95]) and obese women (RR = 0.90, [95% CI: 0.84, 0.97]) and was increased in underweight women (RR = 1.33, [95% CI: 1.16, 1.53]). Overweight (RR = 1.17, [95% CI: 1.09, 1.25]), obese (RR = 1.35, [95% CI: 1.25, 1.45]) and morbidly obese (RR = 1.24, [95% CI: 1.02, 1.52]) women had an elevated risk of post-term birth compared to normal women. The risk of fetal macrosomia and operative delivery increased with BMI such that morbidly obese women were at greatest risk of both (RR of macrosomia = 4.78 [95% CI: 3.86, 5.92] and RR of Caesarean section = 1.66 [95% CI: 1.61, 1.71] and a RR of emergency Caesarean section = 1.59 [95% CI: 1.45, 1.75]). Excessive leanness and obesity are associated with different adverse pregnancy outcomes with major maternal and fetal complications. Overweight and obese women have a higher risk of macrosomia and Caesarean delivery and lower risk of preterm delivery. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear and is worthy of further investigation.

  19. Frequency-independent effective rest mass of photons in the 2TDLM model

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Jian-Qi

    2003-01-01

    A physically interesting {\\it effective rest mass} of photons in electromagnetic media, which is independent of wave frequency $\\omega$, is defined in the present paper. It is verified that this frequency-independent effective rest mass of photons can be easily read off from the optical refractive index squared $n^{2}(\\omega) $ of commonly-seen electromagnetic media. As an illustrative example, we extract the frequency-independent effective rest mass of photons from $n^{2}(\\omega) $ in the {\\...

  20. Photon momentum sharing between an electron and an ion in photoionization: from one-photon (photoelectric effect) to multiphoton absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D; Corkum, Paul B

    2014-12-31

    We investigate photon-momentum sharing between an electron and an ion following different photoionization regimes. We find very different partitioning of the photon momentum in one-photon ionization (the photoelectric effect) as compared to multiphoton processes. In the photoelectric effect, the electron acquires a momentum that is much greater than the single photon momentum ℏω/c [up to (8/5) ℏω/c] whereas in the strong-field ionization regime, the photoelectron only acquires the momentum corresponding to the photons absorbed above the field-free ionization threshold plus a momentum corresponding to a fraction (3/10) of the ionization potential Ip. In both cases, due to the smallness of the electron-ion mass ratio, the ion takes nearly the entire momentum of all absorbed N photons (via the electron-ion center of mass). Additionally, the ion takes, as a recoil, the photoelectron momentum resulting from mutual electron-ion interaction in the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the momentum partitioning of the photofragments is very different in both regimes. This suggests that there is a rich, unexplored physics to be studied between these two limits which can be generated with current ultrafast laser technology.

  1. Mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of biological compounds for gamma ray interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Dhammajyot Kundlik; Pawar, Pravina P.; Selvam, T. Palani

    2017-09-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) for some enzymes, proteins, amino acids and fatty acids were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies, by performing transmission experiments using 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co and 22Na sources collimated to produce 0.52 cm diameter beams. A NaI (Tl) scintillation detector with energy resolution 8.2% at 663 keV was used for detection. The experimental values of (μ/ρ) were then used to determine the atomic cross section (σa), electronic cross section (σe), effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Neff). It was observed that (μ/ρ), σa and σe decrease initially and then tends to be almost constant at higher energies. Values of Zeff and Neff were observed roughly constant with energy. The deviations in experimental results of radiological parameters were believed to be affected by physical and chemical environments. Experimental results of radiological parameters were observed in good agreement with WinXCom values.

  2. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Spin Hall Effects of Dirac Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukazawa, Takaaki; Kohno, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Junji

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the spin Hall effect (SHE) of electrons described by the Dirac equation, which is used as an effective model near the L-points in bismuth. By considering short-range nonmagnetic impurities, we calculate the extrinsic as well as intrinsic contributions on an equal footing. The vertex corrections are taken into account within the ladder type and the so-called skew-scattering type. The intrinsic SHE which we obtain is consistent with that of Fuseya et al. [https://doi.org/10.1143/JPSJ.81.093704" xlink:type="simple">J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81, 093704 (2012)]. It is found that the extrinsic contribution dominates the intrinsic one when the system is metallic. The extrinsic SHE due to the skew scattering is proportional to Δ/niu, where 2Δ is the band gap, ni is the impurity concentration, and u is the strength of the impurity potential.

  3. Effectiveness of electronic stability control on single-vehicle accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Hels, Tove; Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of electronic stability control (ESC) on single-vehicle injury accidents while controlling for a number of confounders influencing the accident risk. Methods: Using police-registered injury accidents from 2004 to 2011 in Denmark with cars...... the following were significant. For the driver: Age, gender, driving experience, valid driving license, and seat belt use. For the vehicle: Year of registration, weight, and ESC. For the accident surroundings: Visibility, light, and location. Finally, for the road: Speed limit, surface, and section...... characteristics. Results: The present study calculated the crude odds ratio for ESC-equipped cars of getting in a single-vehicle injury accident as 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-0.47) and the adjusted odds ratio as 0.69 (95% CI, 0.54-0.88). No difference was found in the effectiveness of ESC across...

  4. The interaction effect of body mass index and age on fat-free mass, waist-to-hip ratio, and soft lean mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shahab Jahanlou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research has shown that body mass index (BMI does not take into consideration the gender and ethnicity. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the interaction effect of the BMI and age on fat-free mass (FFM, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, and soft lean mass (SLM. The secondary purpose was to evaluate the practical significance of the findings by examining effect sizes. Materials and Methods: The study was comparative in nature and employed a factorial design. Due to nonexperimental nature of the investigation, no causal inferences were drawn. The nonprobability sample consisted of 19,356 adults. Analysis of the data included factorial analysis of variance, analysis of simple effects, calculation of mean difference effect sizes, and data transformation. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22 was employed for the purpose of data manipulation and analysis. Results: The BMI by age interaction effects on FFM, F (10, 19,338 = 28.26, P < 0.01, on WHR, F (10, 19,338 = 18.46, P < 0.01, and on SLM, F (10, 19,338 = 14.65, P < 0.01, was statistically significant and ordinal in nature. Analysis of the effect sizes, ranging from 0.30 to 1.20, showed that the BMI and age influenced the WHR but their interaction effects on FFM and SLM, ranging from 0.04 to 0.36 and 0.03 to 0.33, respectively, were mainly negligible. Conclusion: Based on the examination of the statistical and practical significance of the results, it is concluded that the BMI and age together can influence the WHR but their interaction effect on the FFM and SLM is questionable.

  5. Cooper pairing of two-dimensional electrons in a quantizing magnetic field and the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashitskiĭ , E. A.

    1999-08-01

    A brief review of the current state of the theory of fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) is given along with the assumption of possible connection between the experimentally observed features of the Hall resistance RH of a two-dimensional (2D) electron system in a strong quantizing magnetic field for a fractional filling factor of the lowest Landau level ν=q/(2n+1) with q⩾2, which cannot be described by the Laughlin wave function antisymmetric relative to pair transpositions, and the Cooper pairing of 2D electrons. It is assumed that the electron-electron attraction essential for Cooper pairing can be due to the interaction of 2D electrons with the surface acoustic waves (2D phonons) and the surface 2D plasmons localized near the crystal interfaces (heterojunctions) in the vicinity of inversion layers in the metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures and heterostructures. The coexistence of coupled electron pairs and unpaired electrons under the FQHE conditions must lead to peculiarities of RH for values of ν described by the Halperin relation following from the symmetry properties of the "mixed" wave function of pairs (bosons) and electrons (fermions). This relation makes it possible in principle to describe all experimental data on FQHE. The summation of "ladder" diagrams diverging according to a power law for T→0 leads to a Bethe-Salpeter-type equation for the vertex part of the electron-electron interaction for a 2D system in a quantizing magnetic field taking into account electron-electron and electron-hole pairing in the Cooper and zero-sound channels. This equation is used to calculate the critical temperature Tc of the phase transition to the state with coupled Cooper pairs and to prove that the value of Tc in the ultra-quantum limit is independent of the effective mass of electrons, i.e., on the 2D density of states. The phase diagram of the 2D system is constructed for the variable electron concentration and magnetic field. It is shown that

  6. Effect of physical exercise on muscle mass and strength in cancer patients during treatment--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stene, G B; Helbostad, J L; Balstad, T R; Riphagen, I I; Kaasa, S; Oldervoll, L M

    2013-12-01

    Cancer treatment and its side effects may cause muscle wasting. Physical exercise has the potential to increase muscle mass and strength and to improve physical function in cancer patients undergoing treatment. A systematic review was conducted to study the effect of physical exercise (aerobic, resistance or a combination of both) on muscle mass and strength in cancer patients with different type and stage of cancer disease. Electronic searches were performed up to January 11th 2012, identifying 16 randomised controlled trials for final data synthesis. The studies demonstrated that aerobic and resistance exercise improves upper and lower body muscle strength more than usual care. Few studies have assessed the effect of exercise on muscle mass. Most studies were performed in patients with early stage breast or prostate cancer. Evidence on the effect of physical exercise on muscle strength and mass in cancer patients with advanced disease is lacking. More exercise studies in patients with advanced cancer and at risk of cancer cachexia are warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost-Effective Mass Production of Mono Bucket Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gres, Szymon; Nielsen, Søren Andreas; Fejerskov, Morten

    2015-01-01

    No recognized procedures exist for the Mono Bucket Foundation design, which is an obstruction for mass customization/production and industrialization in relation to certifying authorities. This paper presents the outcome of on-going research and development program that provides solution for inno......No recognized procedures exist for the Mono Bucket Foundation design, which is an obstruction for mass customization/production and industrialization in relation to certifying authorities. This paper presents the outcome of on-going research and development program that provides solution...

  8. Comparison of electron ionization and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry for the determination of nickel, vanadyl and free-base porphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A.J.; Van Berkel, G.J.; Doolittle, F.G.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Fast Atom Bombardment-Mass Spectrometry (FAB-MS) and Electron Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (EI-MS) at 12 and 70 eV, were used to obtain mass spectra of mesoporphyrin IX dimethylester (DME), tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), octaethylporphyrin (OEP), and the metal-loporphyrins, Ni(DME), Ni(TPP), Ni(OEP), VO(TPP), VO(OEP), as well as a VO(II) porphyrin concentrate obtained from the New Albany oil shale bitumen (Mississippian-Devonian). A mixture of dithiothreitol/dithioerythritol (Magic Bullet) was used as the FAB matrix. Greater fragmentation of free-base and metalloporphyrins was observed in FAB mass spectra compared to the EI mass spectra. Adduct ions formed by addition of sulfur and a matrix molecule to the porphyrins were observed. In FAB spectra of the VO(II) complexes, loss of oxygen was noted. The FAB mass spectra of mixtures of VO(II) geoporphyrins are much more complex than corresponding EI mass spectra because of the greater fragmentation and the multiplicity of ions (M{sup +}, M + H, M + 2H, etc.) observed in the FAB mode. Using the matrices investigated, FAB is less suitable for EI for the mass spectrometric analysis of the geoporphyrins.

  9. Fermi surface and effective masses in photoemission response of the (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derondeau, Gerald; Bisti, Federico; Kobayashi, Masaki; Braun, Jürgen; Ebert, Hubert; Rogalev, Victor A; Shi, Ming; Schmitt, Thorsten; Ma, Junzhang; Ding, Hong; Strocov, Vladimir N; Minár, Ján

    2017-08-18

    The angle-resolved photoemission spectra of the superconductor (Ba 1-x K x )Fe 2 As 2 have been investigated accounting coherently for spin-orbit coupling, disorder and electron correlation effects in the valence bands combined with final state, matrix element and surface effects. Our results explain the previously obscured origins of all salient features of the ARPES response of this paradigm pnictide compound and reveal the origin of the Lifshitz transition. Comparison of calculated ARPES spectra with the underlying DMFT band structure shows an important impact of final state effects, which result for three-dimensional states in a deviation of the ARPES spectra from the true spectral function. In particular, the apparent effective mass enhancement seen in the ARPES response is not an entirely intrinsic property of the quasiparticle valence bands but may have a significant extrinsic contribution from the photoemission process and thus differ from its true value. Because this effect is more pronounced for low photoexcitation energies, soft-X-ray ARPES delivers more accurate values of the mass enhancement due to a sharp definition of the 3D electron momentum. To demonstrate this effect in addition to the theoretical study, we show here new state of the art soft-X-ray and polarisation dependent ARPES measurments.

  10. Visualizing trace element distribution in quartz using cathodoluminescence, electron microprobe, and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusk, Brian; Koenig, Alan; Lowers, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Cathodoluminescent (CL) textures in quartz reveal successive histories of the physical and chemical fluctuations that accompany crystal growth. Such CL textures reflect trace element concentration variations that can be mapped by electron microprobe or laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Trace element maps in hydrothermal quartz from four different ore deposit types (Carlin-type Au, epithermal Ag, porphyry-Cu, and MVT Pb-Zn) reveal correlations among trace elements and between trace element concentrations and CL textures. The distributions of trace elements reflect variations in the physical and chemical conditions of quartz precipitation. These maps show that Al is the most abundant trace element in hydrothermal quartz. In crystals grown at temperatures below 300 °C, Al concentrations may vary by up to two orders of magnitude between adjacent growth zones, with no evidence for diffusion. The monovalent cations Li, Na, and K, where detectable, always correlate with Al, with Li being the most abundant of the three. In most samples, Al is more abundant than the combined total of the monovalent cations; however, in the MVT sample, molar Al/Li ratios are ~0.8. Antimony is present in concentrations up to ~120 ppm in epithermal quartz (~200–300 °C), but is not detectable in MVT, Carlin, or porphyry-Cu quartz. Concentrations of Sb do not correlate consistently with those of other trace elements or with CL textures. Titanium is only abundant enough to be mapped in quartz from porphyry-type ore deposits that precipitate at temperatures above ~400 °C. In such quartz, Ti concentration correlates positively with CL intensity, suggesting a causative relationship. In contrast, in quartz from other deposit types, there is no consistent correlation between concentrations of any trace element and CL intensity fluctuations.

  11. Electron-Induced (EI Mass Fragmentation is Directed by Intra- molecular H-Bonding in Two Isomeric Benzodipyran Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Mabic

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The striking differences observed in the electron-induced (EI mass fragmentationpathways of two isomeric benzodipyrans are attributable to hydrogen bonding in thesemolecules. In the "angular" isomer, 6-butyryl-5-hydroxy-2,2,8,8-tetramethyl-3,4,9,10-tetra-hydro-2H,8H-benzo[1,2-b:3,4-b1]dipyran (2, H-bonding occurs between the aromatic OHgroup and the alpha carbonyl moiety contained in the ortho-phenone group, whereas in the"linear" isomer, 10-butyryl-5-hydroxy-2,2,8,8-tetramethyl-3,4,6,7-tetrahydro-2H,8H-benzo-[1,2-b:5,4-b1]dipyran (3, the aromatic OH group is para to the phenone moiety, effectivelyprecluding any H-bonding. Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations (AM1 were used tocompare predicted sites of ionization with associated fragmentation patterns. In bothmolecules, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO was located predominantly on thearomatic moiety. Similarly, in the radical cation species of both compounds, maximum spindensity was located over the aromatic rings. Neither the HOMO nor the spin density mapsprovided a rational explanation for the differences in fragmentation patterns of the twobenzodipyran isomers. The H-bonding favors EI alpha aromatic ring C-O bond cleavage in the"angular" benzodipyran and in 5,7-dihydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-8-butyryl chroman (1, a relatedmonochroman also containing a hydrogen proximal to the aromatic ring C-O bond. In contrast,fragmentation of the "linear" benzodipyran followed a different route, which was exhibited byits base peak resulting from the loss of a propyl group from the butyryl side-chain.

  12. Space charge effects in intense electron beams related to electron cooling systems

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, Yu V; Petrov, A; Sidorin, A; Smirnov, A; Syresin, E M

    2000-01-01

    The review of researches performed by JINR-CERN-ITEP collaboration in 1994-1995 and by JINR group in 1996-1998 years is presented. The research has the goal to study theoretically and experimentally a possibility of electron beam space neutralization and formation of a stable and intense neutralized electron beam (NEB). (4 refs).

  13. Effects of beam quality in a free-electron laser oscillator with two electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soon-Kwon

    2017-11-01

    We have studied the electron beam quality in a free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator by using two electron beams of different harmonically related energies in the FEL facility, which is operated in the infrared and far-infrared regions. The electron beam quality, such as emittance, energy spread, and higher-order modes were studied using an extended three-dimensional (3D) FEL code for two electron beams that we have developed. The variations in the radiation amplitude of the electron beam's emittances, and energy spread were also calculated for a tapered wiggler for the multiparticle and multi-pass number using a new 3D code. The evolution of the radiation field intensity for higher-order modes of the wiggler with beam emittance and energy spread was studied for the two-electron beam's FEL performance. We found that the radiation intensity was degraded due to the energy spread and the emittance of the electron beam. We minimized the degradation of the radiation intensity by optimizing the tapered wiggler for the coupled two-beam FEL oscillator.

  14. Effect of Secondary Electron Emission on Electron Cross-Field Current in E×B Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yevgeny Raitses, Igor D. Kaganovich, Alexander Khrabrov, Dmytro Sydorenko, Nathaniel J. Fisch and Andrei Smolyakov

    2011-02-10

    This paper reviews and discusses recent experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies of plasma-wall interaction in a weakly collisional magnetized plasma bounded with channel walls made from different materials. A lowpressure ExB plasma discharge of the Hall thruster was used to characterize the electron current across the magnetic field and its dependence on the applied voltage and electron-induced secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel wall. The presence of a depleted, anisotropic electron energy distribution function with beams of secondary electrons was predicted to explain the enhancement of the electron cross-field current observed in experiments. Without the SEE, the electron crossfield transport can be reduced from anomalously high to nearly classical collisional level. The suppression of SEE was achieved using an engineered carbon velvet material for the channel walls. Both theoretically and experimentally, it is shown that the electron emission from the walls can limit the maximum achievable electric field in the magnetized plasma. With nonemitting walls, the maximum electric field in the thruster can approach a fundamental limit for a quasineutral plasma.

  15. Effect of upflowing field-aligned electron beams on the electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dispersion relation D(ω, k) for electron cyclotron waves propagating parallel to Bo in the presence of upflowing FEBs could be taken as the sum of dispersion relations due to the main body of plasma Dm(ω, k) and upflowing. FEBs, Db(ω ..... into auroral zone increasing the population of energetic electrons which provide.

  16. Testing the variability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio from observations of methanol in the dark cloud core L1498

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daprà, M.; Henkel, C.; Levshakov, S. A.; Menten, K. M.; Muller, S.; Bethlem, H. L.; Leurini, S.; Lapinov, A. V.; Ubachs, W.

    2017-12-01

    The dependence of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ, on the local matter density was investigated using methanol emission in the dense dark cloud core L1498. Towards two different positions in L1498, five methanol transitions were detected and an extra line was tentatively detected at a lower confidence level in one of the positions. The observed centroid frequencies were then compared with their rest-frame frequencies derived from least-squares fitting to a large data set. Systematic effects, as the underlying methanol hyperfine structure and the Doppler tracking of the telescope, were investigated and their effects were included in the total error budget. The comparison between the observations and the rest-frame frequencies constrains potential μ variation at the level of Δμ/μ methanol column density ratio of N(A-CH3OH)/N(E-CH3OH) ∼1.00 ± 0.15, a density of n(H2) = 3 × 105 cm-3 (again within a factor of two) and a kinetic temperature of Tkin = 6 ± 1 K. In a kinetic model including the line intensities observed for the methanol lines, the n(H2) density is higher and the temperature is lower than that derived in previous studies based on different molecular species; the intensity of the 10 → 1-1 E line strength is not well reproduced.

  17. Body mass index and its effect on serum cortisol level

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-21

    Aug 21, 2014 ... Subjects, Materials and Methods: Seventy healthy participants agreed to take part in the study. The anthropometric .... administered, the blood sample was drawn for cortisol level at 30 min. The samples were ... BMI=Body mass index, WC=Waist circumference, SBP=Systolic blood pressure, DBP=Diastolic ...

  18. Cost-Effective Mass Production of Mono Bucket Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gres, Szymon; Nielsen, Søren Andreas; Fejerskov, Morten

    2015-01-01

    No recognized procedures exist for the Mono Bucket Foundation design, which is an obstruction for mass customization/production and industrialization in relation to certifying authorities. This paper presents the outcome of on-going research and development program that provides solution...

  19. Terra MODIS Band 27 Electronic Crosstalk Effect and Its Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Wenny, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the primary instruments in the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). The first MODIS instrument was launched in December, 1999 on-board the Terra spacecraft. MODIS has 36 bands, covering a wavelength range from 0.4 micron to 14.4 micron. MODIS band 27 (6.72 micron) is a water vapor band, which is designed to be insensitive to Earth surface features. In recent Earth View (EV) images of Terra band 27, surface feature contamination is clearly seen and striping has become very pronounced. In this paper, it is shown that band 27 is impacted by electronic crosstalk from bands 28-30. An algorithm using a linear approximation is developed to correct the crosstalk effect. The crosstalk coefficients are derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations. They show that the crosstalk is strongly detector dependent and the crosstalk pattern has changed dramatically since launch. The crosstalk contributions are positive to the instrument response of band 27 early in the mission but became negative and much larger in magnitude at later stages of the mission for most detectors of the band. The algorithm is applied to both Black Body (BB) calibration and MODIS L1B products. With the crosstalk effect removed, the calibration coefficients of Terra MODIS band 27 derived from the BB show that the detector differences become smaller. With the algorithm applied to MODIS L1B products, the Earth surface features are significantly removed and the striping is substantially reduced in the images of the band. The approach developed in this report for removal of the electronic crosstalk effect can be applied to other MODIS bands if similar crosstalk behaviors occur.

  20. Feasibility of Canine Detection of Mass Storage Devices: A Study of Volatile Organic Compounds Emanating from Electronic Devices Using Solid Phase Microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGreeff, Lauryn E; Cerreta, Michelle; Rispoli, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Detection of canines are well-known to be valuable in the location of contraband, such as explosives or narcotics. More recently, canines have been trained and utilized in the detection of concealed mass storage devices that might contain evidence of illegal activity such as child pornography. To lay the analytical foundation for this detection work, research was carried out to determine the volatile organic compounds associated with mass storage devices (MSD) that could be used by trained canines for detection. Headspace analysis of a variety of electronic devices was performed using solid phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Analyses found several volatile compounds common to SIM and SD cards, as well as USB drives, including 2-propenenitrile, styrene, isophorone, hydroxycyclohexyl phenyl ketone, and 2-furanmethanol, tetrahydro. Results indicated that mass storage devices do have a characteristic odor profile making detection with minimal false alerts feasible for trained canines. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. The Physiologic Effects of Multiple Simultaneous Electronic Control Device Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Donald M.; Ho, Jeffrey D.; Reardon, Robert F.; Sweeney, James D.; Miner, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Law enforcement and military personnel use electronic control devices to control non-compliant and actively resistive subjects. The TASER® Shockwave is a new electronic control device designed specifically as an area denial device capable of delivering multiple simultaneous discharges. This is the first study to examine the effects of multiple simultaneous device discharges in humans. Methods: Volunteers were exposed to multiple (two to three), simultaneous 5-second discharges from the Shockwave device to the chest, back, chest to abdomen, or thighs. Blood was analyzed before and after discharge for pH, lactate, potassium, creatine kinase (CK), and troponin. Continuous spirometry was performed before, during, and after the discharge. In addition, electrocardiograms (ECGs) before and after discharge were recorded, and echocardiography was used to determine the rhythm during discharge. Results: Small elevations of lactate occurred. Moderate increases in CK at 24 hours occurred and appeared to be related to the number of simultaneous discharges. There was a trend to a decrease in minute ventilation in the volunteers exposed to two simultaneous discharges, but it did not reach statistical significance. ECG changes only reflected an increase in vagal tone, and there was no evidence of capture by echocardiography. Five-second, simultaneous, multiple exposures to the TASER Shockwave device were reasonably tolerated by our human volunteers. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this device may have a reasonable risk/benefit ratio when used to protect an area from a threat. PMID:20411076

  2. Electron scattering from neon via effective range theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedus, Kamil, E-mail: kamil@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Elastic cross-sections for electron scattering on neon from 0 energy up to 16 eV are analyzed by an analytical approach to the modified effective range theory (MERT). It is shown that energy and angular variations of elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross sections can be accurately parameterized by six MERT coefficients up to the energy threshold for the first Feshbach resonance. MERT parameters are determined empirically by numerical comparison with large collection of available experimental data of elastic total (integral) cross-sections. The present analysis is validated against numerous electron beams and swarm experiments. The comparison of derived MERT parameters with those found for other noble gases, helium, argon and krypton, is done. The derived scattering length (for the s-partial wave) in neon, 0.227a0, agrees well with recent theories; it is small but, differently from Ar and Kr, still positive. Analogue parameters for the p-wave and the d-wave are negative and positive respectively for all the four gases compared. (author)

  3. Electron spin relaxation in GaAs1-xBix: Effects of spin-orbit tuning by Bi incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, H.; Marie, X.; Wu, M. W.

    2012-09-01

    The electron spin relaxation in n-type and intrinsic GaAs1-xBix with Bi composition 0≤x≤0.1 is investigated from the microscopic kinetic spin Bloch equation approach. The incorporation of Bi is shown to markedly decrease the spin relaxation time as a consequence of the modification of the spin-orbit interaction, which shows the feasibility of GaAs1-xBix in the applications of spintronic devices. We demonstrate that the density and temperature dependences of spin relaxation time in GaAs1-xBix resemble the ones in GaAs. Meanwhile, the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism is found to be negligible compared to the D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism in intrinsic sample. Due to the absence of direct measurement of the electron effective mass in the whole compositional range under investigation, we further explore the effect of a possible variation of electron effective mass on the electron spin relaxation.

  4. Optical conductivity and optical effective mass in a high-mobility organic semiconductor: Implications for the nature of charge transport

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuan

    2014-12-03

    We present a multiscale modeling of the infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data that point to nonmonotonic features in the optical conductivity spectrum and small optical effective masses. We find that, in the static-disorder approximation, the nonlocal electron-phonon interactions stemming from low-frequency lattice vibrations can decrease the optical effective masses and lead to lighter quasiparticles. On the other hand, the charge-transport and infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal at room temperature are demonstrated to be governed by localized carriers driven by inherent thermal disorders. Our findings underline that the presence of apparently light carriers in high-mobility organic semiconductors does not necessarily imply bandlike transport.

  5. Effective mass properties of Al{sub 1-x}B{sub x}N ordered alloys: a first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, R. de; Azevedo, S. [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Departamento de Fisica, Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil); Nogueira, R.A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Fisica, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Kaschny, J.R. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Bahia, Coordenacao de Engenharia Eletrica, Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    We present first-principles' calculations of the structural, electronic, and effective mass properties of cubic Al{sub 1-x}B{sub x}N ordered alloys. They are based on the density functional theory within the local density approximation, and the full-potential linear augmented plane-wave method. From such calculations we obtain the equilibrium lattice constants, the bulk moduli, the bandgap energies, and the effective masses along the (111), (100), and (110) directions. The results are used to give important information on characteristics analysis of AlBN-based quantum well devices, to provide the Luttinger-like valence band parameters and the effective masses of charge carriers, connecting the first-principles' band calculations with effective-mass theory. (orig.)

  6. Effective approaches for managing electronic records and archives

    CERN Document Server

    Dearstyne, Bruce W

    2006-01-01

    This is a book of fresh insights, perspectives, strategies, and approaches for managing electronic records and archives. The authors draw on first-hand experience to present practical solutions, including recommendations for building and sustaining strong electronic records programs.

  7. A metamaterial having a frequency dependent elasticity tensor and a zero effective mass density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, Graeme [Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Seppecher, Pierre [Institut de Mathematiques de Toulon, Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France)

    2012-07-15

    Within the context of linear elasticity we show that a two-terminal network of springs and masses, can respond exactly the same as a normal spring, but with a frequency dependent spring constant. A network of such springs can have a frequency dependent effective elasticity tensor but zero effective mass density. The internal masses influence the elasticity tensor, but do not contribute to the effective mass density. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Positive effects of electronic patient records on three clinical activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2008-01-01

     Purpose: To investigate the effects of a fully functional electronic patient record (EPR) system on clinicians' work during team conferences, ward rounds, and nursing handovers. Method: In collaboration with clinicians an EPR system was configured for a stroke unit and in trial use for five days......, 24 hours a day. During the trial period the EPR system was used by all clinicians at the stroke unit and it replaced all paper records. The EPR system simulated a fully integrated clinical process EPR where the clinicians experienced the system as if all transactions were IT supported. Such systems...... records prior to the trial period. The data comprise measurements from 11 team conferences, 7 ward rounds, and 10 nursing handovers. Results: During team conferences the clinicians experienced a reduction on five of six subscales of mental workload, and the physicians experienced an overall reduction...

  9. P -wave coupled channel effects in electron-positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Meng-Lin; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    P -wave coupled channel effects arising from the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds in e+e- annihilations are systematically studied. We provide an exploratory study by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with short-ranged contact potentials obtained in the heavy quark limit. These contact potentials can be extracted from the P -wave interactions in the e+e- annihilations, and then be employed to investigate possible isosinglet P -wave hadronic molecules. In particular, such an investigation may provide information about exotic candidates with quantum numbers JPC=1-+ . In the mass region of the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds, there are two quark model bare states, i.e. the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ), which are assigned as (13D1) and (31S1) states, respectively. By an overall fit of the cross sections of e+e-→D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , D*D¯*, we determine the physical coupling constants to each channel and extract the pole positions of the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ). The deviation of the ratios from that in the heavy quark spin symmetry (HQSS) limit reflects the HQSS breaking effect due to the mass splitting between the D and the D*. Besides the two poles, we also find a pole a few MeV above the D D¯ *+c .c . threshold which can be related to the so-called G (3900 ) observed earlier by BABAR and Belle. This scenario can be further scrutinized by measuring the angular distribution in the D*D¯* channel with high luminosity experiments.

  10. Phases, quantum interferences and effective vector meson masses in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyeur, M.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the prospects for observing the mass of {rho}- and {omega}-mesons around nuclear matter density by studying their coherent photoproduction in nuclear targets and subsequent in-medium decay into e{sup +}e{sup -}pairs. The quantum interference of {rho} and {omega}-mesons in the e{sup +}e{sup -}channel and the interference between Bethe-Heitler pairs and dielectrons from vector meson decays are of particular interest. (author). 21 refs.

  11. Effective Planck Mass and the Scale of Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kleban, Matthew; Porrati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper argued that it is not possible to infer the energy scale of inflation from the amplitude of tensor fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background, because the usual connection is substantially altered if there are a large number of universally coupled fields present during inflation, with mass less than the inflationary Hubble scale. We give a simple argument demonstrating that this is incorrect.

  12. Liquid chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry: fields of application and evaluation of the performance of a Direct-EI interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappiello, Achille; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Siviero, Antonella

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation and a thorough discussion of the fields of possible applications of the Direct-EI interface are described in this review. Direct-EI allows the direct introduction of the effluent from a capillary HPLC column into the electron ionization (EI) ion source of a mass spectrometer. Thanks to the reduced liquid intake and an in-source nebulizer, the interfacing process occurs smoothly and entirely into the ion source. No intermediate interfacing mechanisms of any sort are interposed between the column and the mass spectrometer, thus circumventing any undesired sample loss and minimizing the effort for instrument modification. Theoretically, any GC-MS system can be converted into an LC-MS for EI amenable compounds. Several parameters, crucial for a successful integration of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, have been considered in the evaluation of the functioning of such an interface: limit of detection, linearity of response, reproducibility, and chromatographic compatibility. Different mobile phases, also containing non-volatile buffers, were taken into account, demonstrating an outstanding separation flexibility. The entire set of experiments was carried out at different flow rates and temperatures of the ion source. The interface behavior was also tested in real world applications, with mixtures of pesticides, hormones, nitro-PAH, and endocrine-disrupting compounds, allowing picogram level detection and the possibility to record library-matchable, readily interpretable electron ionization mass spectra, for prompt compound characterization and confirmation. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 24:978-989, 2005.

  13. Fragmentation pathways and structural characterization of organophosphorus compounds related to the Chemical Weapons Convention by electron ionization and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Esmaeil; Saeidian, Hamid; Amozadeh, Ali; Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Babri, Mehran

    2016-12-30

    For unambiguous identification of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC)-related chemicals in environmental samples, the availability of mass spectra, interpretation skills and rapid microsynthesis of suspected chemicals are essential requirements. For the first time, the electron ionization single quadrupole and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra of a series of O-alkyl N-[bis(dimethylamino)methylidene]-P-methylphosphonamidates (Scheme 1, cpd 4) were studied for CWC verification purposes. O-Alkyl N-[bis(dimethylamino)methylidene]-P-methylphosphonamidates were prepared through a microsynthetic method and were analyzed using electron ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with gas and liquid chromatography, respectively, as MS-inlet systems. General EI and ESI fragmentation pathways were proposed and discussed, and collision-induced dissociation studies of the protonated derivatives of these compounds were performed to confirm proposed fragment ion structures by analyzing mass spectra of deuterated analogs. Mass spectrometric studies revealed some interesting fragmentation pathways during the ionization process, such as McLafferty rearrangement, hydrogen rearrangement and a previously unknown intramolecular electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The EI and ESI fragmentation routes of the synthesized compounds 4 were investigated with the aim of detecting and identifying CWC-related chemicals during on-site inspection and/or off-site analysis and toxic chemical destruction monitoring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Electronic cigarettes: abuse liability, topography and subjective effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sarah E; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence evaluating the abuse liability, topography, subjective effects, craving and withdrawal suppression associated with e-cigarette use in order to identify information gaps and provide recommendations for future research. Methods Literature searches were conducted between October 2012 and January 2014 using five electronic databases. Studies were included in this review if they were peer-reviewed scientific journal articles evaluating clinical laboratory studies, national surveys or content analyses. Results A total of 15 peer-reviewed articles regarding behavioural use and effects of e-cigarettes published between 2010 and 2014 were included in this review. Abuse liability studies are limited in their generalisability. Topography (consumption behaviour) studies found that, compared with traditional cigarettes, e-cigarette average puff duration was significantly longer, and e-cigarette use required stronger suction. Data on e-cigarette subjective effects (such as anxiety, restlessness, concentration, alertness and satisfaction) and withdrawal suppression are limited and inconsistent. In general, study data should be interpreted with caution, given limitations associated with comparisons of novel and usual products, as well as the possible effects associated with subjects’ previous experience/inexperience with e-cigarettes. Conclusions Currently, very limited information is available on abuse liability, topography and subjective effects of e-cigarettes. Opportunities to examine extended e-cigarette use in a variety of settings with experienced e-cigarette users would help to more fully assess topography as well as behavioural and subjective outcomes. In addition, assessment of ‘real-world’ use, including amount and timing of use and responses to use, would clarify behavioural profiles and potential adverse health effects. PMID:24732159

  15. Optical Spring Effect in Micro-Bubble Resonators and Its Application for the Effective Mass Measurement of Optomechanical Resonant Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenmin Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a novel approach for obtaining the effective mass of mechanical vibration mode in micro-bubble resonators (MBRs. To be specific, the effective mass is deduced from the measurement of optical spring effect (OSE in MBRs. This approach is demonstrated and applied to analyze the effective mass of hollow MBRs and liquid-filled MBRs, respectively. It is found that the liquid-filled MBRs has significantly stronger OSE and a less effective mass than hollow MBRs, both of the extraordinary behaviors can be beneficial for applications such as mass sensing. Larger OSE from higher order harmonics of the mechanical modes is also observed. Our work paves a way towards the developing of OSE-based high sensitive mass sensor in MBRs.

  16. Destructive effects induced by the electron beam in scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M. C.; Bita, B. I.; Banu, M. A.; Tomescu, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscopy has been validated by its impressive imaging and reliable measuring as an essential characterization tool for a variety of applications and research fields. This paper is a comprehensive study dedicated to the undesirable influence of the accelerated electron beam associated with the dielectric materials, sensitive structures or inappropriate sample manipulation. Depending on the scanning conditions, the electron beam may deteriorate the investigated sample due to the extended focusing or excessive high voltage and probe current applied on vulnerable configurations. Our aim is to elaborate an instructive material for improved SEM visualization capabilities by overcoming the specific limitations of the technique. Particular examination and measuring methods are depicted along with essential preparation and manipulation procedures in order to protect the integrity of the sample. Various examples are mentioned and practical solutions are described in respect to the general use of the electron microscope.

  17. Electron correlation effects in the presence of non-symmetry dictated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We numerically study the effect of non-symmetry dictated nodes (NSDN) on electron correlation effects for spinless electrons. We find that repulsive interaction between electrons can enhance the overlap between nearest neighbors in the tight binding Hamiltonian, in the presence of NSDN. Normally, in the absence of ...

  18. Scale effects and morphological diversification in hindlimb segment mass proportions in neognath birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Brandon M

    2014-01-01

    In spite of considerable work on the linear proportions of limbs in amniotes, it remains unknown whether differences in scale effects between proximal and distal limb segments has the potential to influence locomotor costs in amniote lineages and how changes in the mass proportions of limbs have factored into amniote diversification. To broaden our understanding of how the mass proportions of limbs vary within amniote lineages, I collected data on hindlimb segment masses - thigh, shank, pes, tarsometatarsal segment, and digits - from 38 species of neognath birds, one of the most speciose amniote clades. I scaled each of these traits against measures of body size (body mass) and hindlimb size (hindlimb length) to test for departures from isometry. Additionally, I applied two parameters of trait evolution (Pagel's λ and δ) to understand patterns of diversification in hindlimb segment mass in neognaths. All segment masses are positively allometric with body mass. Segment masses are isometric with hindlimb length. When examining scale effects in the neognath subclade Land Birds, segment masses were again positively allometric with body mass; however, shank, pedal, and tarsometatarsal segment masses were also positively allometric with hindlimb length. Methods of branch length scaling to detect phylogenetic signal (i.e., Pagel's λ) and increasing or decreasing rates of trait change over time (i.e., Pagel's δ) suffer from wide confidence intervals, likely due to small sample size and deep divergence times. The scaling of segment masses appears to be more strongly related to the scaling of limb bone mass as opposed to length, and the scaling of hindlimb mass distribution is more a function of scale effects in limb posture than proximo-distal differences in the scaling of limb segment mass. Though negative allometry of segment masses appears to be precluded by the need for mechanically sound limbs, the positive allometry of segment masses relative to body mass may

  19. Mirror contamination and secondary electron effects during EUV reflectivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalfano, M.; Kanjilal, A.; Al-Ajlony, A.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Rice, B.

    2012-03-01

    We investigated Ru mirror contamination and subsequent EUV reflectivity loss using the IMPACT facility at Purdue University. Because Ru can either be used as a grazing mirror or as a capping layer for multilayer normal mirror, we examined the angular dependency of XPS peak area intensity at the O 1s and Ru 3d regions as well as the effects of sputtering. Although no change in intensity has been observed at lower take-off angles from the target surface, the peak area intensity starts changing with increasing θ (i.e., emission observation angle, representing the angle between the target surface plane and detector entrance). Among different components, the effect of water and oxidized carbon are found to be most notable when viewed at lower θ, and primarily responsible for degrading the reflectivity of the Ru layer. On the other hand, the effect of OH becomes dominant with increasing observation angle θ, and thus plays a key role to suppress optical transmission. Moreover, atomic carbon effect is found to peak when observed at 30°, and most likely plays an important role in degrading both reflectivity and transmission. This is also because of the total photon path length in the Ru film at different angles. During the contamination process, the EUV reflectivity of the Ru film is found to significantly degrade in the presence of additional secondary electrons from the focusing Ru mirror of the EUV setup. This effect could be explained in the light of a competition between oxidation and carbonization processes on Ru surface.

  20. Toward a suitable structural analysis of gene delivery carrier based on polycationic carbohydrates by electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przybylski, Cédric, E-mail: cedric.przybylski@upmc.fr [Université d’Evry-Val-d’Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, CNRS UMR 8587, Bâtiment Maupertuis, Bld F. Mitterrand, F-91025 Evry (France); Benito, Juan M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Químicas (IIQ), CSIC−Universidad de Sevilla, Américo Vespucio 49, Isla de la Cartuja, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Bonnet, Véronique [Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Glycochimie, des Antimicrobiens et des Agroressources, CNRS UMR 7378, 80039 Amiens (France); Mellet, Carmen Ortiz [Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41012 Sevilla (Spain); García Fernández, José M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Químicas (IIQ), CSIC−Universidad de Sevilla, Américo Vespucio 49, Isla de la Cartuja, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    Polycationic carbohydrates represent an attractive class of biomolecules for several applications and particularly as non viral gene delivery vectors. In this case, the establishment of structure-biological activity relationship requires sensitive and accurate characterization tools to both control and achieve fine structural deciphering. Electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) appears as a suitable approach to address these questions. In the study herein, we have investigated the usefulness of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to get structural data about five polycationic carbohydrates demonstrated as promising gene delivery agents. A particular attention was paid to determine the influence of charge states as well as both fluoranthene reaction time and supplementary activation (SA) on production of charge reduced species, fragmentation yield, varying from 2 to 62%, as well as to obtain the most higher both diversity and intensity of fragments, according to charge states and targeted compounds. ETD fragmentation appeared to be mainly directed toward pending group rather than carbohydrate cyclic scaffold leading to a partial sequencing for building blocks when amino groups are close to carbohydrate core, but allowing to complete structural deciphering of some of them, such as those including dithioureidocysteaminyl group which was not possible with CID only. Such findings clearly highlight the potential to help the rational choice of the suitable analytical conditions, according to the nature of the gene delivery molecules exhibiting polycationic features. Moreover, our ETD-MS/MS approach open the way to a fine sequencing/identification of grafted groups carried on various sets of oligo-/polysaccharides in various fields such as glycobiology or nanomaterials, even with unknown or questionable extraction, synthesis or modification steps. - Highlights: • The first ETD-MS/MS characterization of polycationic carbohydrate based non-viral gene delivery

  1. Sample pretreatment optimization for the analysis of short chain chlorinated paraffins in soil with gas chromatography-electron capture negative ion-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Laiguo; Huang, Yumei; Han, Shuang; Feng, Yongbin; Jiang, Guo; Tang, Caiming; Ye, Zhixiang; Zhan, Wei; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Sukun

    2013-01-25

    Accurately quantifying short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in soil samples with gas chromatograph coupled with electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry (GC-ECNI-MS) is difficult because many other polychlorinated pollutants are present in the sample matrices. These pollutants (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and toxaphene) can cause serious interferences during SCCPs analysis with GC-MS. Four main columns packed with different adsorbents, including silica gel, Florisil and alumina, were investigated in this study to determine their performance for separating interfering pollutants from SCCPs. These experimental results suggest that the optimum cleanup procedure uses a silica gel column and a multilayer silica gel-Florisil composite column. This procedure completely separated 22 PCB congeners, 23 OCPs and three toxaphene congeners from SCCPs. However, p,p'-DDD, cis-nonachlor and o,p'-DDD were not completely removed and only 53% of the total toxaphene was removed. This optimized method was successfully and effectively applied for removing interfering pollutants from real soil samples. SCCPs in 17 soil samples from different land use areas within a suburban region were analyzed with the established method. The concentrations of SCCPs in these samples were between 7 and 541 ng g(-1) (mean: 84 ng g(-1)). Similar homologue SCCPs patterns were observed between the soil samples collected from different land use areas. In addition, lower chlorinated (Cl(6/7)) C(10)- and C(11)- SCCPs were the dominant congeners. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  3. Gate induced superconductivity in layered material based electronic double layer field effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, J. T.; Inoue, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Kasahara, Y.; Yuan, H. T.; Shimotani, H.; Iwasa, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Applying the principle of field effect transistor to layered materials provides new opportunities to manipulate their electronic properties for interesting sciences and applications. Novel gate dielectrics like electronic double layer (EDL) formed by ionic liquids are demonstrated to achieve an

  4. Effect of body mass index on serum leptin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rubina Faisal; Hassan, Mukhtiar; Nazar, Hassan Shehzad; Gillani, Saima; Afzal, Naeema; Qayyum, Iftikhar

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is product of ob gene, an adipose tissue derived hormone that plays a key role in the regulation of body fat mass by regulating appetite and metabolism while balancing energy intake and energy expenditure. The objective of the study was to evaluate possible association between serum Leptin levels and Body Mass Index (BMI) of gender in adult age group. Two-hundred-seventy subjects aged 20-50 years were randomly selected from general population of Abbottabad. After complete evaluation, demographic data was recorded and BMI calculated. The subjects were grouped on the basis on BMI. Non-fasting venous blood samples were drawn to measure serum Leptin and serum glucose levels. The data were analysed using SPSS-15. Serum Leptin levels and differences between genders were significant in all body mass indices. For normal BMI group the mean values for leptin were 2.6 +/- 1.5 etag/ml in men, and 17.3 +/- 10.2 etag/ml in women. For Group-2 mean leptin levels were 9.9 +/- 6.8 etag/ml in men, and 34.8 +/- 13.6 etag/ml in women. For Group-3 BMI comprising obese subjects mean values were 21.3 +/- 14.2 etag/ml in men, and 48.21 +/- 21.2 etag/ml in women (p<0.001). A progressive increase in serum leptin concentration was observed with an increase in BMI. Significant difference between leptin concentrations in either gender was found in normal, overweight and obese subjects.

  5. Ultrasound in gas–liquid systems: Effects on solubility and mass transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Laugier, Frédéric; Andriantsiferana, Caroline; Wilhelm, Anne-Marie; Delmas, Henri

    2008-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound on the pseudo-solubility of nitrogen in water and on gas–liquid mass transfer kinetics has been investigated in an autoclave reactor equipped with a gas induced impeller. In order to use organic liquids and to investigate the effect of pressure, gas–liquid mass transfer coefficient was calculated from the evolution of autoclave pressure during gas absorption to avoid any side-effects of ultrasound on the concentrations measurements. Ultrasound effect on the apparent s...

  6. Effect of different cosmologies on the galaxy stellar mass function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Amanda R.; Gruppioni, C.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Pozzetti, L.; February, S.; Ilbert, O.; Pozzi, F.

    2017-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to understand how the underlying cosmological models may affect the analysis of the stellar masses in galaxies. We computed the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) assuming the observationally constrained Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) `giant-void' models and compared them with the results from the standard cosmological model. Based on a sample of 220 000 KS-band selected galaxies from the UltraVISTA data, we computed the GSMF up to z ≈ 4 assuming different cosmologies, since, from a cosmological perspective, the two quantities that affect the stellar mass estimation are the luminosity distance and time. The results show that the stellar mass decreased on average by ˜1.1-27.1 per cent depending on the redshift value. For the GSMF, we fitted a double-Schechter function to the data and verified that a change is only seen in two parameters, M^{*} and φ ^{*}1, but always with less than a 3σ significance. We also carried out an additional analysis for the blue and red populations in order to verify a possible change on the galaxy evolution scenario. The results showed that the GSMF derived with the red population sample is more affected by the change of cosmology than the blue one. We also found out that the LTB models overestimated the number density of galaxies with M 10^{11} M_{⊙}, as compared to the standard model over the whole studied redshift range. This feature is noted in the complete, red plus blue, sample. Once we compared the general behaviour of the GSMF derived from the alternative cosmological models with the one based on the standard cosmology we found out that the variation was not large enough to change the shape of the function. Hence, the GSMF was found to be robust under this change of cosmology. This means that all physical interpretations of the GSMF based in the standard cosmological model are valid on the LTB cosmology.

  7. Substrate Effects on Electronic Properties of Atomic Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    When the device size is reduced down to 0.07 micrometers, the number of dopant atoms in the channel will no longer be macroscopic, typically less than a hundred. A spatial distribution of these dopant atoms will fluctuate statistically from device to device even in identically designed devices, and this places a serious limitation for integration. It is, however, impractical to control dopant positions within atomic dimension. One fundamental solution to this problem is to create electronics with atomically precise, but preferably simple structures. Atomic chains, precise structures of adatoms created on an atomically regulated surface, are candidates for constituent components in future electronics. All the adatoms will be placed at designated positions on the substrate, and all the device structures will be precise, free from any deviations. It was predicted using the tight-binding calculation with universal parameters that silicon chains were metallic and magnesium chains were semiconducting regardless of the lattice spacing, and a possible doping method was also proposed. In these treatments, the substrate was assumed to serve as a non-interacting template holding the adatoms without a formation of chemical bonding with substrate atoms. However, this scheme may not be easy to implement experimentally. Adatoms will have to be fixed with a van der Waals force on the substrate, but the force is generally weak and an extremely low temperature environment has to be prepared to suppress their unwanted thermal displacement. It may be logical to seek a scheme to allow the adatoms to form chemical bonding with the substrate atoms and secure their positions. The substrate effects are studied in detail.

  8. The Physiologic Effects of Multiple Simultaneous Electronic Control Device Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawes, Donald M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Law enforcement and military personnel use electronic control devices to control non-compliant and actively resistive subjects. The TASER® Shockwave is a new electronic control device designed specifically as an area denial device capable of delivering multiple simultaneous discharges. This is the first study to examine the effects of multiple simultaneous device discharges in humans.Methods: Volunteers were exposed to multiple (two to three, simultaneous 5-second discharges from the Shockwave device to the chest, back, chest to abdomen, or thighs. Blood was analyzed before and after discharge for pH, lactate, potassium, creatine kinase (CK, and troponin. Continuous spirometry was performed before, during, and after the discharge. In addition, electrocardiograms (ECGs before and after discharge were recorded, and echocardiography was used to determine the rhythm during discharge.Results: Small elevations of lactate occurred. Moderate increases in CK at 24 hours occurred and appeared to be related to the number of simultaneous discharges. There was a trend to a decrease in minute ventilation in the volunteers exposed to two simultaneous discharges, but it did not reach statistical significance. ECG changes only reflected an increase in vagal tone, and there was no evidence of capture by echocardiography. Five-second, simultaneous, multiple exposures to the TASER Shockwave device were reasonably tolerated by our human volunteers.Conclusion: Our study suggests that this device may have a reasonable risk/benefit ratio when used to protect an area from a threat. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(1:49-56].

  9. Electron transfer reactions in condensed phase: effect of reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhole, Kajal; Jena, Naresh K; Samanta, Alok; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2012-02-01

    We propose a generalized one-dimensional kinetic equation for multidimensional reversible electron transfer (ET) reaction with a nonequilibrium situation as the initial condition. The rate constant for the forward reversible ET reaction obtained here consists of the rate for the corresponding irreversible ET reaction, and an extra term due to reversibility of the ET process which includes the rates of diffusion dynamics in the reactant and product wells. In order to understand the effect of reversibility, we consider back ET reaction in a system consisting of an electron donor-acceptor pair in a solvent modeled through low frequency solvent collective coordinates (multidimensional) characterized by the orientational polarization and slowly relaxing one-dimensional vibrational mode. We propose here a new generalized polarization energy functional corresponding to the extension of the continuum version for the same, which has opened up the possibility of inclusion of molecular nature of the solvent into the solvent reorganization energy. We then derive an exact expression for the ET rate for this model system. The numerical results calculated by using the proposed one-dimensional approach are shown to be in good agreement with the available experimental results. Non-Marcus free energy gap dependence of the rates observed here for the reversible and irreversible ET reactions are very close to each other in the barrierless region, while for other situations, the rate for the former process is found to be less than the latter. The extra term, which makes the difference between the rate constants for irreversible and reversible ET reactions, is found to be contributed by the diffusion dynamics from both reactant and product wells but the dominating contribution is provided mainly by the product well.

  10. Application and development of ion-source technology for radiation-effects testing of electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvas, T.; Javanainen, A.; Kettunen, H.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.; Virtanen, A.

    2017-09-01

    Studies of heavy-ion induced single event effect (SEE) on space electronics are necessary to verify the operation of the components in the harsh radiation environment. These studies are conducted by using high-energy heavy-ion beams to simulate the radiation effects in space. The ion beams are accelerated as so-called ion cocktails, containing several ion beam species with similar mass-to-charge ratio, covering a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) values also present in space. The use of cocktails enables fast switching between beam species during testing. Production of these high-energy ion cocktails poses challenging requirements to the ion sources because in most laboratories reaching the necessary beam energies requires very high charge state ions. There are two main technologies producing these beams: The electron beam ion source EBIS and the electron cyclotron resonance ion source ECRIS. The EBIS is most suitable for pulsed accelerators, while ECRIS is most suitable for use with cyclotrons, which are the most common accelerators used in these applications. At the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä (JYFL), radiation effects testing is currently performed using a K130 cyclotron and a 14 GHz ECRIS at a beam energy of 9.3 MeV/u. A new 18 GHz ECRIS, pushing the limits of the normal conducting ECR technology is under development at JYFL. The performances of existing 18 GHz ion sources have been compared, and based on this analysis, a 16.2 MeV/u beam cocktail with 1999 MeV 126Xe44+ being the most challenging component to has been chosen for development at JYFL. The properties of the suggested beam cocktail are introduced and discussed.

  11. Toward a muon-specific electronic structure theory: effective electronic Hartree-Fock equations for muonic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2018-02-07

    An effective set of Hartree-Fock (HF) equations are derived for electrons of muonic systems, i.e., molecules containing a positively charged muon, conceiving the muon as a quantum oscillator, which are completely equivalent to the usual two-component HF equations used to derive stationary states of the muonic molecules. In these effective equations, a non-Coulombic potential is added to the orthodox coulomb and exchange potential energy terms, which describes the interaction of the muon and the electrons effectively and is optimized during the self-consistent field cycles. While in the two-component HF equations a muon is treated as a quantum particle, in the effective HF equations it is absorbed into the effective potential and practically transformed into an effective potential field experienced by electrons. The explicit form of the effective potential depends on the nature of muon's vibrations and is derivable from the basis set used to expand the muonic spatial orbital. The resulting effective Hartree-Fock equations are implemented computationally and used successfully, as a proof of concept, in a series of muonic molecules containing all atoms from the second and third rows of the Periodic Table. To solve the algebraic version of the equations muon-specific Gaussian basis sets are designed for both muon and surrounding electrons and it is demonstrated that the optimized exponents are quite distinct from those derived for the hydrogen isotopes. The developed effective HF theory is quite general and in principle can be used for any muonic system while it is the starting point for a general effective electronic structure theory that incorporates various types of quantum correlations into the muonic systems beyond the HF equations.

  12. [Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on biological phosphorus removal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yun; Xu, Song; Dong, Tao; Wang, Bin-Fan; Wang, Xian-Yao; Peng, Dang-Cong

    2015-02-01

    Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on phosphorus uptake and release were investigated in a pilot-scale oxidation ditch. Phosphorus uptake and release rates were measured with different carbon sources (domestic sewage, sodium acetate, glucose) at 25 degrees C. The results showed that the minimum phosphorus uptake and release rates of glucose were 5.12 mg x (g x h)(-1) and 6.43 mg x (g x h)(-1), respectively, and those of domestic sewage are similar to those of sodium acetate. Phosphorus uptake and release rates increased with the increase of temperature (12, 16, 20 and 25 degrees C) using sodium acetate as carbon sources. Anoxic phosphorus uptake rate decreased with added COD. Electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite) had significant effects on phosphorus uptake rate and their order was in accordance with oxygen > nitrate > nitrite. The mass ratio of anoxic P uptake and N consumption (P(uptake)/N (consumption)) of nitrate and nitrite were 0.96 and 0.65, respectively.

  13. Effect of electron-phonon interaction on the impurity binding energy in a quantum wire

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yueh-Nan; Chuu, Der-San; Lin, Yuh-Kae

    2003-01-01

    The effect of electron-optical phonon interaction on the hydrogenic impurity binding energy in a cylindrical quantum wire is studied. By using Landau and Pekar variational method, the hamiltonian is separated into two parts which contain phonon variable and electron variable respectively. A perturbative-variational technique is then employed to construct the trial wavefunction for the electron part. The effect of confined electron-optical phonon interaction on the binding energies of the grou...

  14. The age-related positivity effect in electronic gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Phoebe E; Gonsalvez, Craig J; Maiuolo, Michelle; Leon, Tarren; Benedek, Gülten

    2018-01-01

    Older adults are increasingly spending time and money playing electronic gambling machines (EGMs). The current study assessed whether the age-related positivity effect influences responding to various EGM outcomes, including wins and losses of equivalent magnitude and frequency. We also explored cognitive mechanisms potentially underpinning the positivity effect. We recorded the skin conductance response (SCR) of healthy older and younger adults while they played for wins, losses, and fake wins (losses disguised as wins). After every win and fake win, participants were forced to choose red or black to either double their win or lose it. They also provided ratings of enjoyment and excitement, estimated number of wins and losses, and completed measures of cognitive function. Young and older adults demonstrated larger SCRs to wins relative to losses. When these wins and losses were of equivalent magnitude and frequency following a double-or-nothing scenario, only older adults responded more to a win than a loss. There were no age group differences in excitement and enjoyment, but older adults were more accurate than young adults in their recall of wins and losses. During EGM play, young and older adults demonstrate similar patterns on autonomic arousal. However, young adults' responding suggests generalized excitement, whereas older adults respond more to the prospect of financial gain.

  15. Photoacoustic microscopy of electronic acupuncture (EA) effect in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinge; Wu, Dan; Tang, Yong; Jiang, Huabei

    2017-02-01

    Acupuncture has been an effective treatment for various pain in China for several thousand years. However, the mechanisms underlying this mysterious ancient healing are still largely unknown. Here we applied photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to investigate brain hemodynamic changes in response to electronic acupuncture (EA) at ST36 (Zusanli). Due to the high optical absorption of blood at 532 nm, PAM could sensitively probe changes in hemoglobin concentration (HbT, i.e., cerebral blood volume [CBV]) of cortical regions in high resolution. Six healthy mice were stimulated at the acupoint and three healthy mice were stimulated at sham points. Remarkable CBV changes in sensorimotor and retrosplenial agranular cortex were observed. Results showed the potential of PAM as a visualization tool to study the acupuncture effect on brain hemodynamics in animal models. (a) Schematic showing the stimulation points. (b) B-scan images overlaid with mouse atlas. (c) & (d) Statistical results of CBV changes from cortical regions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effectiveness of electronic dental anesthesia for restorative care in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S Y; Drummond, B K; Anderson, M H; Williams, S

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of electronic dental anesthesia (EDA) for pain control during restorative procedures was compared with local anesthetic injection (LA) in 32 children aged 6 to 12 years. Each child selected had two antimere primary or permanent molars requiring similar-sized Class I or Class II restorations. The pain levels during restorative treatment were assessed using a visual analogue scale. Heart rates and behavior were also recorded. A crossover design was used with each child acting as his/her own control. The results showed that overall, EDA was less effective than LA for cavity preparation. The reported pain scores for EDA were higher in permanent teeth for the deeper cavities, and with one of the operators. The pre- or post-treatment anxiety scores were not found to differ significantly between the two restorative appointments. However, children with the highest pretreatment scores were more likely to report higher pain scores with EDA. Despite this, 63% of the children preferred EDA to LA. Dental anxiety, cavity depth, the tooth being treated, and operator attitude may also be important factors in determining the success of EDA.

  17. Shape and Current Profile Effects on Runaway Electron Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, V. A.; James, A. N.; Humphreys, D. A.; Granetz, R. S.; Whyte, D. G.; Olynyk, G. M.

    2011-10-01

    The potential for several MA of current carried by multi-MeV runaway electrons (REs) during ITER disruptions has motivated a variety of experiments in present-day tokamaks studying RE generation, confinement, and control. In both DIII-D and Alcator C Mod, different RE behavior is seen in limited vs. diverted plasmas, suggesting better RE confinement for limited shapes. NIMROD simulations of rapid shutdowns in both devices support this finding, and show reduced stochasticity in limited plasma shapes. Integration of RE drift-orbits also shows differences in RE strike-points that are consistent with experimental observations. In DIII-D a wide variation in RE confinement results for diverted discharges may also point to current density profile effects on RE confinement. Several DIII-D diverted discharges are modeled with NIMROD. Confined RE fractions found in NIMROD are mostly consistent with observed RE currents in DIII-D, although other effects, such as seed generation and avalanching may contribute to the experimental variation. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-06ER54861, DE-FG02-05ER54809, DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-04ER54762.

  18. Making USGS information effective in the electronic age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Debbie R.; Sanders, Rex; Faust, T.

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary -- The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) held a workshop on 'Making USGS Information Effective in the Electronic Age' in Woods Hole, MA, on 6-8 February 2001. The workshop was designed to address broad issues of knowledge and communication, and to help develop the mission, vision, and goals of the National Knowledge Bank called for in the 1999 NRC review of the CMGP. Presentations led by historians and philosophers yield to a wide-ranging review and discussion of the role of USGS science in society: USGS science is important to government to understand certain complicated public policy issues (such as the environment), but we must participate in two-way public dialogs to increase our relevance and usefulness. Presentations led by USGS communications experts reviewed the principles of audience analysis and effective communications: this focused look at audiences, markets, and products provided an introduction to the behaviors, the tools, and the terminology that might be applied to public discourse. Presentations by several information technology experts showed the potential - and pitfalls - of current schemes for Web-based information access. Finally, several brainstorming sessions developed action items, vision, and characteristics of a knowledge bank. Based on the workshop discussions and results, the authors developed the National Knowledge Bank Mission, Vision, and Goals statements.

  19. Evaluation of electronic stability control effectiveness in Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Jim; Newstead, Stuart

    2008-11-01

    Electronic stability control (ESC) is an in-vehicle technology aimed at improving primary safety by assisting the driver in avoiding loss of control of the vehicle. The aim of this study was to use available crash data from Australia and New Zealand to evaluate the effectiveness of ESC in reducing crash risk and to establish whether benefits estimated from overseas studies have translated to the Australian and New Zealand environments. The sample analysed included 7699 crashed vehicles fitted with ESC which comprised of 90 different models. Poisson regression was used to test whether the differences in the observed and expected crash counts for ESC fitted vehicles were significant, with exposure being induced from counts of rear end impacts. It was found that ESC reduced the risk of single vehicle crashes in which the driver was injured by 68% for 4WDs compared with 27% for passenger cars. The effect of ESC on multiple vehicle crashes in Australia and New Zealand was not clear. The long-term benefits of fitting ESC to all vehicles in Australia were also investigated based on the estimated single vehicle crash reductions.

  20. VIRTUAL MASS EFFECT ON CONSTRAINED OSCILLATION OF OPEN SHELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Oleg Ye. Sysoyev  Doctor of Engineering, Professor, the Civil construction and Architecture Department, Dean of the Cadastre and Civil construction faculty, Komsomolsk-on-Amur State Technical University (Russia, Komsomolsk-on-Amur. E-mail: fks@knastu.ru.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the laboratory of constructions of Komsomolsk-on-Amur State Technical University (KnAGTU an experiment has been carried on. The aim of the experiment was to identify patterns of influence of magnitude of fluctuations in the virtual mass on constrained oscillation of open shells. Constrained oscillation of curved and open-shell carrying the virtual mass was measured with the help of induction accelerometers. Steel shell is pin supported along the edges, rectangular in the plan. Pin supported open shells along both sides, as the most frequently used in the construction have not yet been investigated. The calculation was made based on the general equation of oscillation of a shell, as well as Donnell - Mushtari - Vlasov equations. In the theoretical calculation, assumptions about the flatness were not taken into account. But it seemed that the magnitude of the stresses from bending moments are comparable in magnitude to the stress of the effort. In consequence, substantial increase in the differentiation was obtained. As a result, values of theoretical constrained oscillation of a shell were obtained. We compared the theoretical and analytical data.

  1. Humidity Build-Up in a Typical Electronic Enclosure Exposed to Cycling Conditions and Effect on Corrosion Reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2016-01-01

    The design of electronic device enclosures plays a major role in determining the humidity build-up inside the device as a response to the varying external humidity. Therefore, the corrosion reliability of electronic devices has direct connection to the enclosure design. This paper describes...... the internal humidity build-up in a typical enclosure prescribed for electronic applications as a function of external humidity conditions and enclosure-related parameters. Investigated parameters include external temperature and humidity conditions, the temperature and time of the internal heating cycle......, thermal mass, and port/opening size. The effect of the internal humidity build-up on corrosion reliability has been evaluated by measuring the leakage current (LC) on interdigitated test comb patterns, which are precontaminated with sodium chloride and placed inside the enclosure. The results showed...

  2. The effects of electron thermal radiation on laser ablative shock waves from aluminum plasma into ambient air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sai Shiva, S.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P., E-mail: premkiranuoh@gmail.com, E-mail: prem@uohyd.ac.in [Advanced Centre of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Sijoy, C. D., E-mail: cjoycd@gmail.com, E-mail: sijoy@barc.gov.in; Chaturvedi, S. [Computational Analysis Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Visakhapatnam (India)

    2016-05-15

    The effect of electron thermal radiation on 7 ns laser ablative shock waves from aluminum (Al) plasma into an ambient atmospheric air has been numerically investigated using a one-dimensional, three-temperature (electron, ion, and radiation) radiation hydrodynamic code MULTI. The governing equations in Lagrangian form are solved using an implicit scheme for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. The shockwave velocities (V{sub sw}) obtained numerically are compared with our experimental values obtained over the intensity range of 2.0 × 10{sup 10} to 1.4 × 10{sup 11 }W/cm{sup 2}. It is observed that the numerically obtained V{sub sw} is significantly influenced by the thermal radiation effects which are found to be dominant in the initial stage up to 2 μs depending on the input laser energy. Also, the results are found to be sensitive to the co-ordinate geometry used in the simulation (planar, cylindrical, and spherical). Moreover, it is revealed that shock wave undergoes geometrical transitions from planar to cylindrical nature and from cylindrical to spherical nature with time during its propagation into an ambient atmospheric air. It is also observed that the spatio-temporal evolution of plasma electron and ion parameters such as temperature, specific energy, pressure, electron number density, and mass density were found to be modified significantly due to the effects of electron thermal radiation.

  3. Effect of secondary ions on the electron beam optics in the Recycler Electron Cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1-0.5 A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The unique combination of the relativistic energy ({gamma} = 9.49), an Ampere-range DC beam, and a relatively weak focusing makes the cooling efficiency particularly sensitive to ion neutralization. A capability to clear ions was recently implemented by way of interrupting the electron beam for 1-30 {micro}s with a repetition rate of up to 40 Hz. The cooling properties of the electron beam were analyzed with drag rate measurements and showed that accumulated ions significantly affect the beam optics. For a beam current of 0.3 A, the longitudinal cooling rate was increased by factor of {approx}2 when ions were removed.

  4. The static Jahn-Teller effect with regard for electron-electron repulsion in the anions of fullerene C sub 6 sub 0

    CERN Document Server

    Kupryijevich, V A

    2003-01-01

    Fullerene anions C sub 6 sub 0 sup N sup - (N = 1, ....,4) are calculated in the framework of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model completed by the electron-electron interaction with different potentials. Electron wave functions are determined in the single-configuration approximation or when the electron correlation is taken into account. Contrary to the case of short-range electron repulsion, long-range electron correlation can essentially change the features of the Jahn-Teller splitting. The correlation damps effectively the electron-lattice interaction by favoring the electron delocalization and, thus, destabilizing deformations.

  5. Electronic structure of Ge-2 and Ge-2 and thermodynamic properties of Ge-2 from all electron ab initio investigations and Knudsen effusion mass spectroscopic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Baba, M. Sai; Gingerich, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    The low-lying states of the molecule Ge-2 and of the ion Ge-2(-) have been investigated by all electron ab initio multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) and multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations. The relativistic corrections for the Darwin contact term and for t...

  6. Solution-phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange at a specific residue using nozzle-skimmer and electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Charlotte; Tsybin, Yury O; Håkansson, Per

    2006-01-01

    Information about protein conformation can be obtained with hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry. The isotopic solution-phase exchange of specific amide hydrogen atoms can be followed using low-vacuum nozzle-skimmer collision-induced dissociation (CID). In this study, the nozzle-skimmer technique was complemented by electron capture dissociation (ECD) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS). The solution-phase exchange at a specific residue is monitored by comparing isotopic distributions of two consecutive b- or c-type ions. While nozzle-skimmer fragmentation takes place in the low-vacuum region of the mass spectrometer, ECD occurs at ultra-high vacuum within the mass analyzer cell of the FTICR mass spectrometer. The dissociations take place at 10(-4) and 10(-9) mbar, respectively. Low-vacuum nozzle-skimmer fragmentation can result in intramolecular exchange between product ions and solvent molecules in the gas phase. Consequently, the solution-phase information about protein or peptide conformation is lost. It was not possible to monitor isotopic solution-phase exchange at the eighth residue in substance P, (Phe)8, with nozzle-skimmer CID. By using the in-cell ECD fragmentation method, the solution-phase exchange at the (Phe)8 residue was preserved during mass spectrometric analysis. This result shows the complementary aspects of applying fragmentation at low and at high vacuum, when studying isotopic exchange in solution at specific residues using FTICRMS. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Microsynthesis and electron ionization mass spectral studies of O(S)-alkyl N,N-dimethyl alkylphosphono(thiolo)thionoamidates for Chemical Weapons Convention verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidian, Hamdollah; Babri, Mehran; Abdoli, Morteza; Sarabadani, Mansour; Ashrafi, Davood; Naseri, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-12-15

    The availability of mass spectra and interpretation skills are essential for unambiguous identification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC)-related chemicals. The O(S)-alkyl N,N-dimethyl alkylphosphono(thiolo)thionoamidates are included in the list of scheduled CWC-related compounds, but there are very few spectra from these compounds in the literature. This paper examines these spectra and their mass spectral fragmentation routes. The title chemicals were prepared through microsynthetic protocols and were analyzed using electron ionization mass spectrometry with gas chromatography as a MS-inlet system. Structures of fragments were confirmed using analysis of fragment ions of deuterated analogs, tandem mass spectrometry and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Mass spectrometric studies revealed some interesting fragmentation pathways during the ionization process, such as alkene and amine elimination and McLafferty-type rearrangements. The most important fragmentation route of the chemicals is the thiono-thiolo rearrangement. DFT calculations are used to support MS results and to reveal relative preference formation of fragment ions. The retention indices (RIs) of all the studied compounds are also reported. Mass spectra of the synthesized compounds were investigated with the aim to enrich the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Central Analytical Database (OCAD) which may be used for detection and identification of CWC-related chemicals during on-site inspection and/or off-site analysis such as OPCW proficiency tests. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. THE EFFECT OF THE STARTING LENGTH ON MASS TRANSFER FROM A CONE IN SUPERSONIC FLOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this investigation was to see what effect, if any, the starting length had on mass transfer from a cone. A blowdown supersonic wind...tunnel was utilized to bring about a flow regime of approximately Mach 3.15. The experimental results of mass transfer from cones in supersonic flow...are presented and a comparison to theoretical values is made. The cones used in the mass transfer tests were made of copper coated with p

  9. Quasiparticle self-consistent GW theory of III-V nitride semiconductors: Bands, gap bowing, and effective masses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Axel; Christensen, Niels Egede; Gorczyca, I.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic band structures of InN, GaN, and a hypothetical ordered InGaN2 compound, all in the wurtzite crystal structure, are calculated using the quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation. This approach leads to band gaps which are significantly improved compared to gaps calculated...... on the basis of the local approximation to density functional theory, although generally overestimated by 0.2–0.3 eV in comparison with experimental gap values. Details of the electronic energies and the effective masses including their pressure dependence are compared with available experimental information....... The band gap of InGaN2 is considerably smaller than what would be expected by linear interpolation implying a significant band gap bowing in InGaN alloys....

  10. Free-electron-like Hall effect and deviations from free-electron behavior in Ca-Al amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeya, F. M.; Hickey, B. J.; Howson, M. A.

    1995-06-01

    The Hall coefficients of Ca-Al amorphous alloys have been measured at 4.2 K over a wide range of compositions. It is shown that the magnitude of the Hall coefficients are close to the nearly-free-electron (NFE) prediction for low Ca concentrations but deviate significantly from the NFE values for Ca concentration greater than 45 at. %. The deviations from the free-electron values have previously been attributed to the effects of s-d hybridization, while a reduction in magnitude by Au doping has been argued to result from the side-jump effect.

  11. Simultaneous analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples by membrane-assisted solvent extraction combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detector and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xizhi; Tang, Zigang; Sun, Aili; Zhou, Lei; Zhao, Jian; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong; Pan, Daodong

    2014-12-01

    A highly efficient and environment-friendly membrane-assisted solvent extraction system combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detector was applied in the simultaneous determination of 17 polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples. Variables affecting extraction efficiency, including extraction solvent used, stirring rate, extraction time, and temperature, were optimized extensively. Under optimal extraction conditions, recoveries between 76.9% and 104.6% in seawater samples were achieved, and relative standard deviation values below 10% were obtained. The limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio=3) and limit of quantification (signal-to-noise ratio=10) of 17 polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater ranged from 0.14ngL(-1) to 0.36ngL(-1) and 0.46ngL(-1) to 1.19ngL(-1), respectively. Matrix effects on extraction efficiency were evaluated by comparing with the results obtained using tap water. The extraction effect of developed membrane-assisted solvent extraction method was further demonstrated by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry which can provide structural information of the analytes for more accurate identification, and results identical to those produced by gas chromatography-electron capture detector were obtained. These findings demonstrate the applicability of the developed membrane-assisted solvent extraction determination method for coupling to gas chromatography-electron capture detector or tandem mass spectrometry for determining polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of low-energy electrons on DNA constituents: effective cross sections for condensed thymidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panajotovic, Radmila

    2009-05-01

    Since the first experiments of low-energy electron scattering from condensed DNA [1] have been performed, the interest in studying low-energy electron-biomolecule interactions has been increasing. Knowledge of effective cross sections for single- and double-strand breaks of DNA and for vibrational and electronic excitation of nucleic bases and nucleosides are opening the door to better understanding of effects of radiation on live tissue and possibly indicating interaction pathways leading to gene mutations and cancer. The strong variation of effective cross sections for DNA single-strand breaks with incident electron energy and the resonant enhancement at 1 eV suggested that considerable damage is inflicted by very low-energy electrons to DNA, and indicates the important role of π* shape resonances in the bond-breaking process. However, the complexity of DNA, even if studied as a short single-strand chain, imposes a need to perform measurements on its isolated constituents, such as nucleic bases and nucleosides. Thymidine is one of the most important nucleosides of DNA and an important component of antiviral compounds. In the condensed phase, thymidine's 2'-deoxyribose ring is in the pentose sugar ring form, which is a true conformation of this nucleoside in DNA. Results from High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss [2] study of monomolecular films of thymidine will be discussed and the presence of resonances in the effective cross sections at incident energy below 5 eV will be commented as a possible indication of the dissociative electron attachment. In addition, results on the resonance structures in the effective cross sections for electronic excitations for the incident electron energy from 1.5 to 12 eV will be discussed as a possible pathway for strand brakes in DNA. [4pt] [1] Boudaiffa B, Cloutier P, Hunting D, Huels M A and Sanche L 2002 Rad. Res. 157 227-234[0pt] [2] Panajotovic R, Martin F, Cloutier P, Hunting, D, and Sanche L, 2006 Rad.Res. 165 452

  13. Effects of different circuit training protocols on body mass, fat mass and blood parameters in overweight adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Contrò

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Benefits of exercise are known for a long time, but mechanisms underlying the exercise mode recommendations for specific chronic cardiovascular diseases remain unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different circuit training protocols in order to determine which is the best for weight loss and for specific overweight- related disorders. Forty-five female sedentary overweight participants from 20 to 50 years (average 31.8±11.2 were enrolled and assigned to three different groups; each group was compared with a control normal-weight group. Three different circuit protocols were randomly assigned to each overweight group: aerobictone- aerobic (ATA, aerobic-circuit-aerobic (ACA and mini-trampoline circuit (MTC, while control group performed a classic circuit weight training (CWT. Every group trained three times per week, for 12 weeks. The results show that ATA group reduced body fat and total body mass more than other groups (P<0.001; P=0.007. ACA group reduced total body mass in significant statistical way (P=0.032, as well as body fat (P<0.001 and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.013. In MTC group there was a significant reduction in every parameter we analyzed (total body mass, body fat and lipid profile: P<0.001. CWT group has shown a significant loss only in body fat (P<0.001. Every circuit protocol is optimal for reducing body fat and total body mass: however, MTC protocol has shown the best results on lipid profile.

  14. REINFORCEMENT ENHANCING EFFECTS OF ACUTE NICOTINE VIA ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kenneth A.; Karelitz, Joshua L.; Michael, Valerie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent human studies confirm animal research showing that nicotine enhances reinforcement from rewards unrelated to nicotine. These effects of acute nicotine via tobacco smoking may also occur when consumed from non-tobacco products. Methods We assessed acute effects of nicotine via electronic cigarettes (“e-cigarettes”) on responding reinforced by music, video, or monetary rewards, or for no reward (control). In a fully within-subjects design, adult dependent smokers (N=28) participated in three similar experimental sessions, each following overnight abstinence (verified by CO≤10 ppm). Varying only in e-cigarette condition, sessions involved controlled exposure to a nicotine (labeled “36 mg/ml”) or placebo (“0”) e-cigarette, or no e-cigarette use. A fourth session involved smoking one’s own tobacco cigarette brand after no abstinence, specifically to compare responses under typical nicotine satiation with these acute e-cigarette conditions after abstinence. Results Reinforced responding for video reward, but not the other rewards, was greater due to use of the nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette (i.e., nicotine per se), while no differences were found between the placebo e-cigarette and no e-cigarette conditions (i.e., e-cigarette use per se). For nicotine via tobacco smoking, responding compared to the nicotine e-cigarette was similar for video but greater for music, while both video and music reward were enhanced relative to the non-nicotine conditions (placebo and no e-cigarette). Conclusions Acute nicotine from a non-tobacco product has some reinforcement enhancing effects in humans, in a manner partly consistent with nicotine via tobacco smoking and perhaps contributing to the rising popularity of nicotine e-cigarette use. PMID:26070455

  15. Reinforcement enhancing effects of acute nicotine via electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Karelitz, Joshua L; Michael, Valerie C

    2015-08-01

    Recent human studies confirm animal research showing that nicotine enhances reinforcement from rewards unrelated to nicotine. These effects of acute nicotine via tobacco smoking may also occur when consumed from non-tobacco products. We assessed acute effects of nicotine via electronic cigarettes ("e-cigarettes") on responding reinforced by music, video, or monetary rewards, or for no reward (control). In a fully within-subjects design, adult dependent smokers (N=28) participated in three similar experimental sessions, each following overnight abstinence (verified by CO≤10ppm). Varying only in e-cigarette condition, sessions involved controlled exposure to a nicotine (labeled "36mg/ml") or placebo ("0″) e-cigarette, or no e-cigarette use. A fourth session involved smoking one's own tobacco cigarette brand after no abstinence, specifically to compare responses under typical nicotine satiation with these acute e-cigarette conditions after abstinence. Reinforced responding for video reward, but not the other rewards, was greater due to use of the nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette (i.e., nicotine per se), while no differences were found between the placebo e-cigarette and no e-cigarette conditions (i.e., e-cigarette use per se). For nicotine via tobacco smoking, responding compared to the nicotine e-cigarette was similar for video but greater for music, while both video and music reward were enhanced relative to the non-nicotine conditions (placebo and no e-cigarette). Acute nicotine from a non-tobacco product has some reinforcement enhancing effects in humans, in a manner partly consistent with nicotine via tobacco smoking and perhaps contributing to the rising popularity of nicotine e-cigarette use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic shear effect on confinement and electron heat transport in dominant electron heating experiments in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, G.T.; Saoutic, B.; Guiziou, L.; Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Clairet, F.; Colas, L.; Devynck, P.; Gil, C.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Segui, J.L.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Zou, X.L. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Budny, R.V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, New Jersey (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Various steady-state non-inductive plasmas, with strong electron heating and significant modification of the current density profile, have been routinely obtained on Tore Supra in either Lower Hybrid Current Drive or Fast Ware Heating experiments. In those dominant electron heating discharges, the dependence of electron heat diffusivity({chi}{sub e}) on the electron temperature gradient, the magnetic shear (s) and the safety factor (q) has been investigated. The increase of {chi}{sub e} with {nabla}T{sub e} indicates the existence of a critical temperature gradient. Moreover, the current density profile effect on the global confinement and the local transport is clearly observed. The electron heat flux (q{sub e}) is found to be roughly proportional to q{sup 2}. The effect of magnetic shear on {chi}{sub e} is studied in the improved confinement discharges obtained by modifying of the current profile. {chi}{sub e} decreases when the magnetic shear increases in the confinement zone and/or when it vanishes in the plasma center. When s becomes negative a decrease in {chi}{sub e} by two orders of magnitude is observed. The effect of the current profile is also observed in the saturated ohmic regime. Comparisons between experimental {chi}{sub e} and well known local transport models (Taroni, and Rebut - Lallia -Watkins) are reported. (authors). 31 refs.

  17. Symmetry-broken effects on electron momentum spectroscopy caused by adiabatic vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yinghao; Ma, Xiaoguang; Lou, Wenhua; Wang, Meishan; Yang, Chuanlu

    2017-11-01

    The vibronic coupling effect is usually studied by invoking the breakdown of Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The present study shows that the symmetry-broken effect induced by nuclei vibrations can also lead strong impact on the electronic states under the framework of Born-Oppenheimer approximation. This adiabatic-invoking vibrational effect on electron momentum spectroscopy of ethylene (C2H4), ethane (C2H6) and methanol (CH3OH) was studied with quantum mechanical method. The results show that electron momentum spectroscopy of localized electrons, especially core electrons in axial symmetric geometry molecules can be affected unusually and strongly by several asymmetric vibrational modes.

  18. Developing Argumentation Strategies in Electronic Dialogs: Is Modeling Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayweg-Paus, Elisabeth; Macagno, Fabrizio; Kuhn, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    The study presented here examines how interacting with a more capable interlocutor influences use of argumentation strategies in electronic discourse. To address this question, 54 young adolescents participating in an intervention centered on electronic peer dialogs were randomly assigned to either an experimental or control condition. In both…

  19. Phonon frequency shift and effect of correlation on the electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of phonon to thef-electrons), anisotropic Fermi surface, Kondo volume collapse etc and the manifestation of the deformation potential. (the coupling of phonons to the conduction electrons), have persuaded many to emphasize the role of the electron–phonon interaction [2,5] to explain some of the low temperature. 305 ...

  20. The Effects of Electronic Communication on American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Erin; Kozak, L. Viola; Santiago, Roberto; Stephen, Anika

    2012-01-01

    Technological and language innovation often flow in concert with one another. Casual observation by researchers has shown that electronic communication memes, in the form of abbreviations, have found their way into spoken English. This study focuses on the current use of electronic modes of communication, such as cell smartphones, and e-mail, and…

  1. Compact ultrafast orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line gas analysis by electron impact ionization and soft single photon ionization using an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp as VUV-light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlberger, F; Saraji-Bozorgzad, M; Gonin, M; Fuhrer, K; Zimmermann, R

    2007-11-01

    Orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometers (oaTOFMS), which are exhibiting a pulsed orthogonal extraction of ion bunches into the TOF mass analyzer from a continuous primary ion beam, are well-suited for continuous ionization methods such as electron impact ionization (EI). Recently an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp (EBEL) was introduced, which emits intensive vacuum UV (VUV) radiation at, e.g., 126 nm (argon excimer) and is well suited as the light source for soft single photon ionization (SPI) of organic molecules. In this paper, a new compact oaTOFMS system which allows switching between SPI, using VUV-light from an EBEL-light source, and conventional EI is described. With the oaTOFMS system, EBEL-SPI and EI mass spectral transients can be recorded at very high repetition rates (up to 100 kHz), enabling high duty cycles and therefore good detection efficiencies. By using a transient recorder card with the capability to perform on-board accumulation of the oaTOF transients, final mass spectra with a dynamic range of 106 can be saved to the hard disk at a rate of 10 Hz. As it is possible to change the ionization modes (EI and SPI) rapidly, a comprehensive monitoring of complex gases with highly dynamic compositions, such as cigarette smoke, is possible. In this context, the EI based mass spectra address the bulk composition (compounds such as water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc. in the up to percentage concentration range) as well as some inorganic trace gases such as argon, sulfur dioxide, etc. down to the low ppm level. The EBEL-SPI mass spectra on the other hand are revealing the organic composition down to the lower ppb concentration range.

  2. Incoherent Effect of Space Charge and Electron Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Franchetti, G; Fischer, W; Zimmermann, F

    2009-01-01

    Trapping by resonances or scattering off resonances induced by space charge (SC) or electron cloud (EC) in conjunction with synchrotron motion can explain observations of slow beam loss and emittance growth, which are often accompanied by changes in the longitudinal beam profile. In this paper we review the recent progress in understanding and modeling of the underlying mechanisms, highlight the differences and similarities between space charge and electron cloud, and discuss simulation results in the light of experimental observations, e.g., at GSI, CERN, and BNL. In particular, we address the role of the pinched electrons and describe in detail the complexity of the electron pinch formation. We present simulation results within a dipole or in a field-free region of the beam pipe, which reveal the morphology and main features of this phenomenon, explain the physical origin of the complex electron structures like stripe in either field configuration, and discuss the dependence on some key parameters.

  3. The Effect of Thermal Mass on Annual Heat Load and Thermal Comfort in Cold Climate Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Vanessa; Kotol, Martin; Grunau, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Thermal mass in building construction refers to a building material's ability to absorb and release heat based on changing environmental conditions. In building design, materials with high thermal mass used in climates with a diurnal temperature swing around the interior set-point temperature have...... been shown to reduce the annual heating demand. However, few studies exist regarding the effects of thermal mass in cold climates. The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of high thermal mass on the annual heat demand and thermal comfort in a typical Alaskan residence using energy...... that while increased thermal mass does have advantages in all climates, such as a decrease in summer overheating, it is not an effective strategy for decreasing annual heat demand in typical residential buildings in Alaska. (C) 2015 American Society of Civil Engineers....

  4. Isotope Effects on Trapped-Electron-Mode Driven Turbulence and Zonal Flows in Helical and Tokamak Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Motoki; Nunami, Masanori; Sugama, Hideo; Watanabe, Tomo-Hiko

    2017-04-21

    Impacts of isotope ion mass on trapped-electron-mode (TEM)-driven turbulence and zonal flows in magnetically confined fusion plasmas are investigated. Gyrokinetic simulations of TEM-driven turbulence in three-dimensional magnetic configuration of helical plasmas with hydrogen isotope ions and real-mass kinetic electrons are realized for the first time, and the linear and the nonlinear nature of the isotope and collisional effects on the turbulent transport and zonal-flow generation are clarified. It is newly found that combined effects of the collisional TEM stabilization by the isotope ions and the associated increase in the impacts of the steady zonal flows at the near-marginal linear stability lead to the significant transport reduction with the opposite ion mass dependence in comparison to the conventional gyro-Bohm scaling. The universal nature of the isotope effects on the TEM-driven turbulence and zonal flows is verified for a wide variety of toroidal plasmas, e.g., axisymmetric tokamak and non-axisymmetric helical or stellarator systems.

  5. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  6. Detection of large ions in time-of-flight mass spectrometry: effects of ion mass and acceleration voltage on microchannel plate detector response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv(3.1) (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  7. The effect of body mass index on endometrial cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenabi, E; Poorolajal, J

    2015-07-01

    Several epidemiological studies have investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and endometrial cancer in recent years. This up-to-date meta-analysis was conducted to obtain an overall effect estimate based on current evidence. A meta-analysis was conducted until March 2015. Major electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched. The reference lists and related scientific conference databases were searched for additional data. Cohort and case-control studies addressing the association between BMI and endometrial cancer were included. The exposure of interest was overweight and obesity. The outcome of interest was endometrial cancer of any type confirmed pathologically. The effect measure of choice was rate ratio (RR) for cohort studies and odds ratio (OR) for case-control studies. The random effect model was reported. Of 6241 retrieved references, 40 studies were included in the meta-analysis including 20 prospective cohort studies and 20 case-control studies involving 32,281,242 participants. The results of both cohort and case-control studies showed a significant association. Based on random effect model, compared to normal weight people, the estimated RR and OR of endometrial cancer was 1.34 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.48) and 1.43 (95% CI: 1.30, 1.56) for the overweight and 2.54 (95% CI: 2.27, 2.81) and 3.33 (95% CI: 2.87, 3.79) for the obese, respectively. The results of this meta-analysis indicated that BMI is strongly associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Further investigations are required to expect the pathophysiology of the endometrial cancer caused by overweight and obesity. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. HOLMES. The electron capture decay of {sup 163}Ho to measure the electron neutrino mass with sub-eV sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpert, B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Balata, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), Assergi, AQ (Italy); Bennett, D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Biasotti, M. [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Sezione di Genova, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genoa (Italy); Boragno, C. [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Sezione di Genova, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genoa (Italy); Brofferio, C. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (Italy); Ceriale, V. [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Sezione di Genova, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genoa (Italy); Corsini, D. [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Sezione di Genova, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genoa (Italy); Day, P.K. [California Institute of Technology (CALTECH), Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); De Gerone, M. [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Sezione di Genova, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genoa (Italy); Dressler, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Faverzani, M. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (Italy); Ferri, E. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (Italy); Fowler, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Gatti, F. [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Sezione di Genova, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genoa (Italy); Giachero, A. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (Italy); Hays-Wehle, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Heinitz, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (CH); Hilton, G. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (US); Koester, U. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (FR); Lusignoli, M. [Sezione di Roma 1, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Rome (IT); Maino, M. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (IT); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (IT); Mates, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (US); Nisi, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), Assergi, AQ (IT); Nizzolo, R. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (IT); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (IT); Nucciotti, A. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (IT); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (IT); Pessina, G. [Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (IT); Pizzigoni, G. [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (IT); Sezione di Genova, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genoa (IT); Puiu, A. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (IT); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (IT); Ragazzi, S. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (IT); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (IT); Reintsema, C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (US); Gomes, M.R. [University of Lisbon, Multidisciplinary Centre for Astrophysics (CENTRA-IST), Lisbon (PT); Schmidt, D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (US); Schumann, D. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (CH); Sisti, M. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (IT); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (IT); Swetz, D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (US); Terranova, F. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (IT); Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Milan (IT); Ullom, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (US)

    2015-03-01

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a new experiment to directly measure the neutrino mass. HOLMES will perform a calorimetric measurement of the energy released in the decay of {sup 163}Ho. The calorimetric measurement eliminates systematic uncertainties arising from the use of external beta sources, as in experiments with beta spectrometers. This measurement was proposed in 1982 by A. De Rujula and M. Lusignoli, but only recently the detector technological progress allowed to design a sensitive experiment. HOLMES will deploy a large array of low temperature microcalorimeters with implanted {sup 163}Ho nuclei. The resulting mass sensitivity will be as low as 0.4 eV. HOLMES will be an important step forward in the direct neutrino mass measurement with a calorimetric approach as an alternative to spectrometry. It will also establish the potential of this approach to extend the sensitivity down to 0.1 eV. We outline here the project with its technical challenges and perspectives. (orig.)

  9. Electronic Model of a Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen; Russell, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A pair of electronic models has been developed of a Ferroelectric Field Effect transistor. These models can be used in standard electrical circuit simulation programs to simulate the main characteristics of the FFET. The models use the Schmitt trigger circuit as a basis for their design. One model uses bipolar junction transistors and one uses MOSFET's. Each model has the main characteristics of the FFET, which are the current hysterisis with different gate voltages and decay of the drain current when the gate voltage is off. The drain current from each model has similar values to an actual FFET that was measured experimentally. T'he input and o Output resistance in the models are also similar to that of the FFET. The models are valid for all frequencies below RF levels. No attempt was made to model the high frequency characteristics of the FFET. Each model can be used to design circuits using FFET's with standard electrical simulation packages. These circuits can be used in designing non-volatile memory circuits and logic circuits and is compatible with all SPICE based circuit analysis programs. The models consist of only standard electrical components, such as BJT's, MOSFET's, diodes, resistors, and capacitors. Each model is compared to the experimental data measured from an actual FFET.

  10. Effect of photoperiod on body mass, and daily energy intake and energy expenditure in young rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, P; Visser, H; Daan, S

    1997-01-01

    In this experiment we investigate the effect of photoperiod on locomotor activity, body mass, food intake, growth efficiency (relationship between body mass change and food intake), energy expenditure, and body composition in growing Wistar rats. Two groups of animals were subjected to either a

  11. Quark mass corrections to the perturbative thrust and its effect on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider the effects of quark masses to the perturbative thrust in +- annihilation. In particular we show that perturbative power corrections resulting from non-zero quark masses considerably alters the size of the non-perturbative power corrections and consequently, significantly changes the fitted value of s.

  12. Effects of primordial mass segregation on the dynamical evolution of star clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vesperini, E.; McMillan, S.L.W.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we use N-body simulations to study the effects of primordial mass segregation on the early and long-term evolution of star clusters. Our simulations show that in segregated clusters early mass loss due to stellar evolution triggers a stronger expansion than for unsegregated clusters.

  13. Effect of Retarding Force on Mass Flow Rates of Fluid at Different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... mathematical model and software visualization to view the effect of retarding forces on the mass flow rate in term of visualization. C-sharp (C#) is the chosen program and this enable compares and us to determine the mass flow rates patterns in relation to retarding force in form of graphical tables at different temperature.

  14. Effect of mass measles vaccination on numbers of measles cases: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Low measles vaccine coverage has been a characteristic of child health indices in Uganda. A countrywide mass measles vaccination of children from 6 months to 15 years old was undertaken in October 2003 and again in October 2006. Objective. To describe the effect of mass measles vaccination on the ...

  15. Effective mass theory of a two-dimensional quantum dot in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 73; Issue 3. Effective mass theory of a two-dimensional quantum dot in the presence of magnetic field. Himanshu ... The standard kinetic energy operator of quantum mechanics for this position-dependent mass is non-Hermitian and needs to be modified. This is ...

  16. Introduction to chemistry and applications in nature of mass independent isotope effects special feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented.

  17. Introduction to Chemistry and Applications in Nature of Mass Independent Isotope Effects Special Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented. PMID:24167299

  18. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Hall Effect Studies of the Effects of Low Energy Electron Irradiation on Gallium Nitride

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greene, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    .... Samples produced via molecular beam epitaxy and hydride vapor phase epitaxy, both silicon doped and nominally undoped, were subjected to Van de Graff generator produced monoenergtic electron beams...

  19. The effects of void handling on geodetic mass balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, Robert; Nuth, Chris; Kääb, Andreas; Girod, Luc

    2017-04-01

    Glacier mass balance is a direct expression of climate change, and has implications for changes in sea level, ocean chemistry, and oceanic and terrestrial ecosystems. Glacier mass balance has traditionally been measured through in-situ measurements of surface elevation change on a glacier surface. To estimate changes on a larger spatial scale, however, in-situ measurement is not feasible, and aerial or satellite measurements of digital elevation models (DEMs) over glaciers have been used recently in order to supplement and extend ground-based measurements. Though the resolution and accuracy of these products generally increases with time, there are still often gaps ("voids") in the data, as well as errors and biases that must be addressed. The occurrence and distribution of these voids is at least partially dependent on the sensor or acquisition method used to generate the source DEMs. For example, for optical stereo DEMs, voids can be especially frequent in the accumulation area of glaciers, impacting elevation measurements and the resulting estimates of glacier volume change to an unknown degree. Several methods for handling voids in elevation datasets have been proposed and implemented in the literature, though direct investigation of the uncertainty associated with these methods is generally not reported. In order to estimate the uncertainties associated with various methods for filling voids in elevation data, we simulate typical voids in high-resolution spatially-complete DEMs of glaciers in south-central Alaska (covering the Alaska Range, Chugach, Kenai, and Wrangel Mountains), USA. This region is home to over 7000 individual glaciers covering over 23000 km2, ranging in elevation from sea level to over 6000 m, and representing many different glacier types including surging glaciers, advancing and retreating tidewater glaciers, and large and small valley glaciers. As such, it presents an ideal test region to investigate the impact of various methods for void

  20. Strain effect on electronic structure of two-dimensional γ-InSe nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Lixiu; Cheng, Xiangrong; Tao, Junguang

    2017-12-01

    We use density functional theory to calculate the electronic structure of monolayer and bilayer InSe nanosheets. The interlayer interaction is found to have a large effect on the s orbital distribution of In and Se atoms. The electronic properties of InSe change substantially under in-plane bi-axial strain, including the semiconductor-to-metal transition. Both van der Waals forces and the electron wave function overlap affect the electronic structure tunability in a delicate way. Aside from the band-nature change, the electron-transport ability is expected to be altered, which is important for InSe-based electronic devices.

  1. Cost effectiveness of fine needle aspiration cytology for breast masses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) is an excellent method for diagnosing palpable lesions. It is very cost effective and saves huge amounts of money for the patients when compared with open surgical biopsy. Objective: A prospective study carried out to evaluate the cost effectiveness of FNAC for ...

  2. Effect of microstructure of graphite on the nonreductive thermal ion emission in thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H Z; Jiang, S Y; Xiao, Y K

    2010-02-25

    The emission behavior of polyatomic ions in the ionization source of thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) was investigated. The results suggest that the presence of a graphite promoter plays a key role for the formation and stable emission of polyatomic ions, such as M(2)X(+), M(2)BO(2)(+), Cs(2)NO(2)(+), and Cs(2)CNO(+). Our data further implied that the intensity of M(2)X(+) and M(2)BO(2)(+) increases and the emission temperature decreases with increasing cationic and anionic radius. During the boron isotopic measurement using the Cs(2)BO(2)(+)-graphite-PTIMS method, the isobaric interference ion Cs(2)CNO(+) cannot be transformed from nitrate or organic compounds containing an amide group but can be induced by the existence of trace amounts of boron because of its special electron-deficiency property (B(3+)). Characterization on the planar crystalline structure of various graphite samples with SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the relationship of the emission capacity of polyatomic ions and the crystal microstructure of graphite and provides direct evidence that graphite with a perfect parallel and equidistant layer orientation shows a beneficial effect on the emission of polyatomic ions in TIMS. The mechanism study on the formation of polyatomic ions opens the possibility to establish high precision methods for isotopic composition analysis of more nonmetal elements with the TIMS technique.

  3. GGA+U investigations of impurity d-electrons effects on the electronic and magnetic properties of ZnO

    KAUST Repository

    Ul Haq, Bakhtiar

    2014-08-01

    Stimulation of novel features in ZnO by impurity electrons has attracted a remarkable attention of researchers from the past decade. Consequently, ZnO has found several applications in the field of spintronics and optoelectronics. We report, the effect of 3d-(V, Ag) electrons on the properties of ZnO in stable wurtzite (WZ) and metastable zincblende (ZB) phase using the density functional theory. Introduction of V-3d electrons was found to induce a high magnetic moment value of 5.22 in WZ and 3.26 in the ZB phase, and moreover transform the semiconductor character of ZnO into a metallic nature. Ag-d electrons result in the p-type half-metallic nature of ZnO with a weak ferromagnetic background. Our calculations for ground-state magnetic ordering show that ZnO in the presence of impure 3d-(V, Ag) electrons favors ferromagnetic ordering, and obey the double exchange mechanism. However, impurity atoms have very marginal effect on the lattice parameters of ZnO, thereby exposing its potential to absorb the impurity atoms in high concentration. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of the Electron Tunneling on the Photoelectric Hot Electrons Generation in Metallic-Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharif, Asma M.

    2018-01-01

    Semiconductor photonic crystals (MSPhC) were used to convert solar energy into hot electrons. An experimental model was designed by using metallic semiconductor photonic crystals (MSPhC). The designed MSPhC is based on TiO2/Au schottky contact. The model has similar nanocavity structure for broad gold absorption, but the materials on top of the cavity were changed to a metal and a semiconductor in order to collect the hot electrons. Detailed design steps and characterization have shown a broadband sub-bandgap photoresponse at a wavelength of 590 nm. This is due to the surface plasmon absorption by the wafer-scale Au/TiO2 metallic-semiconductor photonic crystal. Analytical calculation of the hot electron transport from the Au thin layer to the TiO2 conduction band is discussed. This theoretical study is based on the quantum tunneling effect. The photo generation of the hot electrons was undertaken at different wavelengths in Au absorber followed by tunneling through a schottky barrier into a TiO2 collector. The presence of a tunnel current from the absorber to the collector under illumination, offers a method to extract carriers from a hot-electron distribution at few bias voltages is presented in this study. The effects of doping different concentrations of the semiconductor on the evolution of the current characteristics were also investigated and discussed. The electrical characteristics were found to be sensitive to any change in the thickness of the barrier.

  5. Electron-scale reduced fluid models with gyroviscous effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Tassi, E.

    2017-08-01

    Reduced fluid models for collisionless plasmas including electron inertia and finite Larmor radius corrections are derived for scales ranging from the ion to the electron gyroradii. Based either on pressure balance or on the incompressibility of the electron fluid, they respectively capture kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) or whistler waves (WWs), and can provide suitable tools for reconnection and turbulence studies. Both isothermal regimes and Landau fluid closures permitting anisotropic pressure fluctuations are considered. For small values of the electron beta parameter e$ , a perturbative computation of the gyroviscous force valid at scales comparable to the electron inertial length is performed at order e)$ , which requires second-order contributions in a scale expansion. Comparisons with kinetic theory are performed in the linear regime. The spectrum of transverse magnetic fluctuations for strong and weak turbulence energy cascades is also phenomenologically predicted for both types of waves. In the case of moderate ion to electron temperature ratio, a new regime of KAW turbulence at scales smaller than the electron inertial length is obtained, where the magnetic energy spectrum decays like \\bot -13/3$ , thus faster than the \\bot -11/3$ spectrum of WW turbulence.

  6. Effects of electron pressure anisotropy on current sheet configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemyev, A. V., E-mail: aartemyev@igpp.ucla.edu; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Vasko, I. Y. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Recent spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetosphere have demonstrated that the magnetotail current sheet can be supported by currents of anisotropic electron population. Strong electron currents are responsible for the formation of very thin (intense) current sheets playing the crucial role in stability of the Earth's magnetotail. We explore the properties of such thin current sheets with hot isotropic ions and cold anisotropic electrons. Decoupling of the motions of ions and electrons results in the generation of a polarization electric field. The distribution of the corresponding scalar potential is derived from the electron pressure balance and the quasi-neutrality condition. We find that electron pressure anisotropy is partially balanced by a field-aligned component of this polarization electric field. We propose a 2D model that describes a thin current sheet supported by currents of anisotropic electrons embedded in an ion-dominated current sheet. Current density profiles in our model agree well with THEMIS observations in the Earth's magnetotail.

  7. Particle size distribution effects on gas-particle mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Herek L

    2006-06-15

    Varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Previous analyses have shown that the dominant mass transfer mechanism responsible for mercury capture within ESPs is gas-particle mass transfer during particulate collection. Whereas previous analyses assumed dispersions of uniform size, the present analysis reveals the effects of polydispersity on both gas-particle mass transfer and particle collection within an ESP. The analysis reveals that the idealized monodisperse particle size distribution provides the highest gas-particle mass transfer but results in the lowest particle collection efficiency (% mass). As the particle size distribution broadens, gas-particle mass transfer decreases and particle collection efficiency increases. The results suggest that more than just reporting mean particle diameter provided by the sorbent manufacturer, pilot- and field-tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control need to experimentally measure the particle size distribution of the sorbent as it is injected in order to facilitate interpretation of their results.

  8. Hot-electron effect in PdAu thin-film resistors with attached cooling fins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pleikies, J.; Usenko, O.; Stolz, R.; Fritzsch, L.; Frossati, G.; Flokstra, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity of superconducting electronics operated in the sub-Kelvin temperature range is usually limited by the hot-electron effect. Here, an increased thermal resistance due to a weakened electron–phonon coupling leads to a higher temperature of the electrons in the thin-film shunt resistors

  9. Effects of body mass index on sleep patterns during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, M M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to profile sleep patterns during pregnancy according to body mass index (BMI) and to correlate labour outcomes with both BMI and hours sleep. Data were collected from 200 postpartum women detailing sleep characteristics before and during pregnancy. A validated sleep questionnaire was employed, which comprised of questions about sleep apnoea, snoring, subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleeping medication and daytime dysfunction. Descriptive analyses were used. With advancing gestation, the mean (SD) number of hours sleep per night declined: pre-pregnancy 8.1 (SD 1.4); 1st trimester 8.3 (SD 1.8); 2nd trimester 7.7 (SD 1.7) and 3rd trimester 6.7 (SD 2.2). In the 18.5-24.9 BMI group, there was a marked difference in hours sleep per night from pre-pregnancy to 1st (8.6 h, p = 0.007), 2nd (7.9 h, p = 0.023) and 3rd (6.4 h, p = 0.000) trimesters in primiparous women. In the 25-29.9 BMI group, there was a difference from pre-pregnancy to 3rd trimester (p = 0.000). These changes were not reflected in a clinically significant difference in birth weight or mode of delivery.

  10. Measurements of the effects of wine maceration with oak chips using an electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Reis, Ana; Domingues, M Rosario M; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Debus, Bruno; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Legin, Andrey

    2017-08-15

    The use of oak products as a cheaper alternative to expensive wood barrels was recently permitted in Europe, which led to a continuous increase in the use of oak chips and staves in winemaking. The feasibility of the potentiometric electronic tongue as a tool for monitoring the effects of wine maceration with oak chips was evaluated. Four types of commercially available oak chips subjected to different thermal treatments and washing procedures and their mixture were studied. Ethanolic extracts of the chips were analysed using electrospray mass spectrometry and 28 phenolic and furanic compounds were identified. The electronic tongue comprising 22 potentiometric chemical sensors could distinguish artificial wine solutions and Cabernet Sauvignon wine macerated with different types of oak chips, quantify total and non-flavonoid phenolic content, as well as the concentrations of added oak chips. Using measurements at two pH levels, 3.2 and 6.5, improved the accuracy of quantification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of electron-electron interactions in thermoelectric power in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Fereshte; Zuev, Yuri; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Philip

    2012-02-01

    Thermoelectric power (TEP) of graphene is previously measured in the disorder limited transport regime where the semiclassical Mott relation agrees with experimental data. In this presentation, we report the TEP measurement on graphene samples deposited on hexa boron nitride substrates where drastic suppression of disorder is achieved. Our results show that at high temperatures where the inelastic scattering rate due to electron-electron (e-e) interactions is higher than the elastic scattering rate by disorders, the measured TEP exhibit a large enhancement compared to the expected TEP from the Mott relation. We also investigated TEP in the quantum Hall regime at a high magnetic fields, where we observed symmetry broken integer quantum Hall and fractional quantum Hall states due to the strong e-e interactions.

  12. Finite Gyroradius Effects in the Electron Outflow of Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgren, C.; Graham, D. B.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Andre, M.; Vaivads, A.; Chen, Li-Jen; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Marklund, G. T.; Ergun, R. E.; Magnes, W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of asymmetric magnetic reconnection showing evidence of electron demagnetization in the electron outflow. The observations were made at the magnetopause by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft, separated by approximately 15 km. The reconnecting current sheet has negligible guide field, and all four spacecraft likely pass close to the electron diffusion region just south of the X line. In the electron outflow near the X line, all four spacecraft observe highly structured electron distributions in a region comparable to a few electron gyroradii. The distributions consist of a core with T(sub parallel) greater than T(sub perpendicular) and a nongyrotropic crescent perpendicular to the magnetic field. The crescents are associated with finite gyroradius effects of partly demagnetized electrons. These observations clearly demonstrate the manifestation of finite gyroradius effects in an electron-scale reconnection current sheet.

  13. Phonon enhancement of electronic order and negative isotope effect in the Hubbard-Holstein model on a square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da; Wang, Wan-Sheng; Wang, Qiang-Hua

    2015-11-01

    In phonon mediated conventional s -wave superconductors, higher-frequency phonon (or smaller atomic mass) leads to a higher superconducting transition temperature, known as the isotope effect. However, in correlated systems, various competing electronic order (such as spin-density-wave, charge-density-wave, and unconventional superconductivity) arises and the effect of electron-phonon coupling on these orders is a long-standing problem. Using the functional renormalization group, here we investigated the interplay between the electron correlation and electron-phonon coupling in the Hubbard-Holstein model on a square lattice. At half-filling, we found spin-density-wave and charge-density-wave phases and the transition between them, while no superconducting phase arises. Upon finite doping, d -wave/s -wave superconductivity emerges in proximity to the spin-density-wave/charge-density-wave phase. Surprisingly, lower-frequency Holstein phonons are either less destructive or even beneficial to the various phases, resulting in a negative isotope effect. For the superconducting phases, such an effect is apparently beyond the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.

  14. Suppression effects of Weibel instability for fast electron divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakagami H.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Quasi-static magnetic fields, which are induced by the Weibel instability and grow to more than hundred Megagauss, lead to large divergence angle of fast electrons, hence lower energy coupling. To suppress the divergence, two different structures, namely density trough and punched out holes, are introduced to targets. In the density trough target, the Weibel instability is enhanced and the divergence is getting worse. On the other hand, the divergence angle is improved but the number of electrons is degraded for fast electrons (<3 MeV in the punched out target.

  15. The adverse effects of albendazole and praziquantel in mass drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nausea, headache and dizziness ... and headache. This shows that more pupils from Mwea, (albendazole and praziquantel) than from Ndia (albendazole alone) experienced minor side effects. ..... in pediatric infectious disease. 2000; 11: ...

  16. Effects of photoperiod on body mass, thermogenesis and body composition in Eothenomys miletus during cold exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-long Zhu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Many small mammals respond to seasonal changes in photoperiod by altering body mass and adiposity. These animals may provide valuable models for understanding the regulation of energy balance. In present study, we examined the effect on body mass, rest metabolic rate, food intake and body composition in cold-acclimated (5 °C in Eothenomys miletus by transferring them from a short (SD, 8h :16h L: D to long day photoperiod (LD, 16h: 8h L:D. During the first 4 weeks of exposure to SD, E. miletus decreased body mass. After the next 4 weeks of exposure to LD, which the average difference between body masses of LD and SD voles was 4.76 g. This 14.74% increase in body mass reflected significant increases in absolute amounts of body components, including wet carcass mass, dry carcass mass and body fat mass. After correcting body composition and organ morphology data for the differences in body mass, only livers, kidney, and small intestine were enlarged due to photoperiod treatment during cold exposure. E. miletus increased RMR and energy intake exposure to LD, but maintained a stable level to SD after 28 days. Serum leptin levels were positively correlated with body mass, body fat mass, RMR as well as energy intake. All of the results indicated that E. miletus may provide an attractive novel animal model for investigation of the regulation of body mass and energy balance at organism levels. Leptin is potentially involved in the photoperiod induced body mass regulation and thermogenesis in E. miletus during cold exposure.

  17. Effects of mass transfer between Martian satellites on surface geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-21

    suspected. Published by Elsevier Inc.1. Introduction Several features about the surface geology on the moons of Mars remain poorly understood. The grooves on...Deimos may have an effect on Phobos’ geology ; we shall attempt to estimate the magnitude of that effect in Section 4. For impacts with Mars , Phobos or...Accepted 2 December 2015 Available online 21 December 2015 Keywords: Mars Mars , satellites Impact processes Crateringa b s t r a c t Impacts on planetary

  18. Real Time Space Radiation Effects in Electronic Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to predict the occurrence and magnitude of solar particle events (coronal mass ejections and solar flares) has been elusive so exposure of astronauts and...

  19. A decomposition of the number of effectively unpaired electrons and its physical meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lain, Luis; Torre, Alicia; Alcoba, Diego R.; Bochicchio, Roberto C.

    2009-07-01

    We report a procedure which allows one to decompose the number of effectively unpaired electrons corresponding to an N -electron system into two components with well-defined physical meaning. One of these terms represents the number of net unpaired electrons arising from the spin. The second one accounts for the partial split of electron pairs that appears when multideterminantal correlated wave functions are used.

  20. Study on the effectiveness of QPS electronics shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Versaci, R

    2012-01-01

    About 30% of the 2011 LHC downtime is due to failures of the Quench Protection System (QPS) induced by the radiation affecting the electronics located below the LHC main dipoles (MB). In the view of LHC technical stop foreseen for December 2011, we have investigated, by means of FLUKA simulations, the efficiency of an iron shielding to reduce the radiation affecting the QPS electronics. These are situated in the Dispersion Suppressors where the use of radiation resistant hardware is not immediately possible.

  1. Electron-cloud effects in high-luminosity colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.

    1998-01-01

    Electron-cloud instabilities are expected to be important in most high-luminosity double-ring colliders. In this report, the author describes a few parameter regimes and some critical parameter dependences of this type of instability, and illustrate these with simulation results for the PEP-II and KEK B factories, the LHC, the VLHC, and DAPHNE. In addition, the author studies the possibility and the potential impact of an electron cloud in the interaction region.

  2. Pressure effect on electron localization in solid lithium

    OpenAIRE

    Silvi, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    International audience; External pressure applied to a solid material causes modifications of the bonding which can provide a chemical explanations of phase transitions. The behaviour of the Electron Localization Function (ELF) has been examined for the body centred cubic, face centred cubic and I ¯ 43d − 16 phase of lithium for a series of cell volumes accounting for external hydrostatic pressures in the 0-60 GPa range. It is shown that the ELF signatures of electron localization increase wi...

  3. Electron irradiation effects on 4-amino-5-mercapto- 3-[1-(4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in the technology of photonics. In all materials, nonlinear effects of various ... study the effect of high-energy electron irradiation on the crystal and to characterize by different techniques. The 1,2,4-triazole .... tive or negative due to the combination of damage, ionization diffusion effects and electronic polarization change. 4.

  4. Ion/neutral, ion/electron, ion/photon, and ion/ion interactions in tandem mass spectrometry: do we need them all? Are they enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLuckey, Scott A; Mentinova, Marija

    2011-01-01

    A range of strategies and tools have been developed to facilitate the determination of primary structures of analyte molecules of interest via tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The two main factors that determine the primary structural information present in an MS/MS spectrum are the type of ion generated from the analyte molecule and the dissociation method. The ion type subjected to dissociation is determined by the ionization method/conditions and ion transformation processes that might take place after initial gas-phase ion formation. Furthermore, the range of analyte-related ion types can be expanded via derivatization reactions prior to mass spectrometry. Dissociation methods include those that simply alter the population of internal states of the mass-selected ion (i.e., activation methods like collision-induced dissociation) as well as processes that rely on the transformation of the ion type prior to dissociation (e.g., electron capture dissociation). A variety of ion interactions have been studied for the purpose of ion dissociation and ion transformation, including ion/neutral, ion/photon, ion/electron, and ion/ion interactions. A wide range of phenomena have been observed, many of which have been explored/developed as means for structural analysis. The techniques arising from these phenomena are discussed within the context of the elements of structural determination in tandem mass spectrometry: ion-type definition and dissociation. Unique aspects of the various ion interactions are emphasized along with any barriers to widespread implementation. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  5. Component masses and inclination of binary systems containing a pulsar, determined from relativistic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumberg, V.A.; Zel' dovich, Ya.B.; Novikov, I.D.; Shakura, N.I.

    1975-01-01

    The first-order Doppler-effect term in the period of a pulsar in a binary system can yield a mass function involving the masses of both components and the orbital inclination and eccentricity. The relativistic rotation of the line of apsides would serve to establish the combined mass of the components. To determine the masses of the pulsar and its companion separately, one must include second-order effects in the pulsar frequency shift: the gravitational red shift and the quadratic Doppler effect. However, the variable part of these effects is proportional to a single component of the pulsar orbital velocity. At least two sets of observations at different positions of the line of apsides are required. The corresponding equations are given.

  6. The effects of loaded carrier mass and formulation mass on aerosolization efficiency in dry powder inhaler devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Jesslynn; Gill, Charlotte; Young, Paul M; Traini, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that particle-particle impaction may influence aerosolization properties in carrier-based dry powder inhalers, through transfer of kinetic energy from large carriers to surface-deposited active drug. The importance of particle-particle collision has yet to be compared against other mechanisms that could lead to drug liberation, such as particle-wall impaction and turbulence. In particular, particle-particle collisions are difficult to model in silico due to computational restrictions. This study investigated the effects of dry powder inhaler particle-particle collisions in vitro using an established carrier-drug model dry powder inhalation formulation. Spherical polystyrene beads of median size 82.80 μm were chosen as a model carrier as they were of uniform size, shape, surface area, density, porosity and hardness and thus eliminated potential variables that would have conflicted with the study. This model carrier was geometrically blended with micronized salbutamol sulphate (loaded blend). The correlation between the mass of loaded blend (5-40 mg) in the Rotahaler® DPI device and resulting fine particle fraction (FPF) was examined at a constant flow rate of 60 L.min(-1). In a second experiment, the mass of loaded blend was kept constant and a variable amount of blank carrier particles were added to the Rotahaler® device to ascertain if additional "blank" carrier particles affected the final FPF. The efficiency of aerosolization remained constant with varying amounts of blank carrier particles as determined by the fine particle fraction of the emitted dose (FPFED) and fine particle fraction of the loaded dose (FPFLD). No statistical difference in FPFED and FPFLD values were observed for increasing masses of blank carrier. In addition, no statistical difference in FPFED and FPFLD between the two experiments was obtained. These observations suggest that particle-particle collisions are not a driving mechanism responsible for

  7. Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electron Ionization and Negative-Ion Chemical Ionization for Analyses of Pesticides at Trace Levels in Atmospheric Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Renata; Hall, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with both electron ionization (EI) and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI) are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs), organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalfluralin). The developed GC-EI/SIM, GC-NCI/SIM, and GC-NCI/SRM are suitable for the determination of pesticides in air sample extracts at concentrations ethion, and OCs: alachlor, aldrin, perthane, and DDE, DDD, DDT). PMID:19609395

  8. Effective object planes for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, R., E-mail: ryu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy and Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lentzen, M. [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Centre, Research Centre Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Zhu, J. [Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy and Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-01-15

    In aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy, the image contrast depends sensitively on the focus value. With the point resolution extended to an information limit of below 0.1 nm, even a focus change of as small as one nanometer could give a significant change in image contrast. Therefore, it is necessary to consider in detail the optimum focus condition in order to take full advantage of aberration-correction. In this study, the thickness dependence of the minimum contrast focus has been investigated by dynamical image simulations for amorphous model structures of carbon, germanium, and tungsten, which were constructed by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculation results show that the minimum contrast focus varies with the object thickness, supporting the use of an effective object plane close to the midplane instead of the exit plane of a sample, as suggested by Bonhomme and Beorchia [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 16, 705 (1983)] and Lentzen [Microscopy and Microanalysis 12, 191 (2006)]. Thus supported particles and wedge-shaped crystals with symmetrical top and bottom surfaces could be imaged at a focus condition independent of the uneven bottom face. Image simulations of crystalline samples as a function of focus and thickness show: for an object thickness of less than 10 nm, the optimum focus condition is matched better if the midplane of the object, instead of the exit plane, is chosen as reference plane. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stringent focus condition is required for aberration-corrected TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum focus should be set with respect to the midplane of a sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The focus condition could be independent of the lateral position on a wedged sample.

  9. Determination of effective atomic numbers, effective electrons numbers, total atomic cross-sections and buildup factor of some compounds for different radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levet, A.; Özdemir, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The photon interaction parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, effective electron density, buildup factor have been measured for Fe(NO3)3, V4O2, NaCO3·H2O, C6H5FeO7·H2O and CuCI compounds using 137Ba, 157Gd and 241Am γ-rays sources in stable geometry. The mass attenuation coefficients have been determined experimentally via Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDXRF) system and theoretically by using WinXCom computer program. Then, effective atomic numbers, Zeff, and electron densities, Neff, have been calculated by using the mass attenuation coefficients. The obtained values of effective atomic numbers have been compared with the ones calculated according to a different approach proposed by Hine and the calculated ones from theory. Also, photon buildup factors were obtained by changing collimator diameters in the different photon energies. We observed that the buildup factor increased as the collimator diameter increased for all sources used.

  10. Scenario for Ultrarelativistic Nuclear Collisions: IV. Effective quark mass at the early stage

    OpenAIRE

    Makhlin, A.; Surdutovich, E.

    2000-01-01

    Using the framework of wedge dynamics, we compute the effective transverse mass of a soft quark mode propagating in the expanding background of hard quarks and gluons created at the earliest time of the collision. We discover that the wedge dynamics does not require any external infrared or collinear cut-off. The effective mass is produced mainly due to the forward quark-quark scattering mediated by the longitudinal (in sense of Gauss' law) magnetic fields. Contribution of the radiation field...

  11. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3) where fi = (ni/ ∑j nj) and Zi are the fractional abundance and atomic number respectively of the constituent element. Here, ni is the total number of atoms of the constituent element and ∑j nj are the total number of atoms of all types present in the compound as per its chemical formula. The effective atomic number, Zeff,.

  12. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    porous medium, Physics Letters A, Vol. 372, 14, pp 2355-2358. Jayanthi S. and Kumari M., 2007. Effect of variable viscosity on non-Darcy free or mixed convection flow on a vertical surface in a fluid saturated porous medium, Applied Mathematics and Computations, Vol.186, 2, pp 1643-1659. Kafoussius N.G. and Williams ...

  13. Nigeria's Mass Media Resource their Effective Organisation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These information resources as found with the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation (NBC) Schools' Unit, have not been properly organised for effective use by the public. Having highlighted the difficiencies discovered in the organisation of the information resources of the NBC Schools' Unit the employment of the services of ...

  14. Social Effects of Mass Media Advertising on the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ruth B.; And Others

    A study examined the effects of media advertising on the elderly to determine whether they use the media to help combat social disengagement, whether they perceived the elderly as positively portrayed in advertising, whether they perceive their role as consumer as declining, whether television advertising reinforced sex roles, and whether the…

  15. A correction technique for the dispersive effects of mass lumping for transport problems

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the well-known dispersion effect that mass lumping induces when solving transport-like equations. A simple anti-dispersion technique based on the lumped mass matrix is proposed. The method does not require any non-trivial matrix inversion and has the same anti-dispersive effects as the consistent mass matrix. A novel quasi-lumping technique for P2 finite elements is introduced. Higher-order extensions of the method are also discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Effect of electron-electron interaction on cyclotron resonance in high-mobility InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishtopenko, S. S., E-mail: sergey.krishtopenko@mail.ru; Gavrilenko, V. I. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Ikonnikov, A. V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Orlita, M. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI-G), CNRS, 25 rue des Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Sadofyev, Yu. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, GSP-1, 53 Leninskiy Prospect (Russian Federation); Goiran, M. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI-T), CNRS, 143 Avenue de Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Teppe, F.; Knap, W. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb (L2C), UMR CNRS 5221, GIS-TERALAB, Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-21

    We report observation of electron-electron (e-e) interaction effect on cyclotron resonance (CR) in InAs/AlSb quantum well heterostructures. High mobility values allow us to observe strongly pronounced triple splitting of CR line at noninteger filling factors of Landau levels ν. At magnetic fields, corresponding to ν > 4, experimental values of CR energies are in good agreement with single-electron calculations on the basis of eight-band k ⋅ p Hamiltonian. In the range of filling factors 3 < ν < 4 pronounced, splitting of CR line, exceeding significantly the difference in single-electron CR energies, is discovered. The strength of the splitting increases when occupation of the partially filled Landau level tends to a half, being in qualitative agreement with previous prediction by MacDonald and Kallin [Phys. Rev. B 40, 5795 (1989)]. We demonstrate that such behaviour of CR modes can be quantitatively described if one takes into account both electron correlations and the mixing between conduction and valence bands in the calculations of matrix elements of e-e interaction.

  17. Analysis of the suction effect on the mass transfer when using the heat and mass transfer analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, J.C. de la [Department of PRA and Fluid Systems, Initec-Westinghouse Technology Services, S.A., Nuclear Services Business, Central Nuclear de Vandellos II, Aptdo. de correos no 48, 43890 L' Hospitalet de L' Infant, Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: jcrosa@anacnv.com; Herranz, L.E. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Cobo, J.L. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia Camino de Vera S/N, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    The transport phenomenon between a fluid in movement and a wall is strongly affected by the permeability of the wall. The application of a correction factor standing for the transpiration effect will be required whenever a heat transfer model is based either on the use of heat, mass or momentum analogies or on the use of empirical correlations for the computation of the heat transfer coefficient. The suction factor commonly used when solving as a function of either mass or molar fractions is called the Bird suction factor. The validity of this factor rests on the hypothesis of the film theory or Couette flow. This paper reviews the Bird suction factor in laminar regime, extending the analysis to turbulent flow conditions and finding thereby that Bird's equation can overestimate the suction factor under turbulent condensation conditions in the gas phase. Finally, an alternative formulation for the suction factor under turbulent condensation conditions has been proposed and compared with Bird's original formulation. In doing this, both data and models developed by other authors and the UW-Madison test facility database have been used. The results show the suitability of the alternative formulation when calculating the condensation rate in turbulent natural circulation scenarios, whereas Bird's formulation seems to be more appropriate for laminar regimes.

  18. Interaction between Octenidine-based Solution and Sodium Hypochlorite: A Mass Spectroscopy, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and Scanning Electron Microscopy-based Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaha, Khaleel Ahamed; Varma, R Luxmi; Nair, Mali G; Sam Joseph, V G; Krishnan, Unni

    2017-01-01

    Octenisept (OCT; Schülke & Mayr, Nordersdedt, Germany), an antimicrobial, antibiofilm agent and a promising root canal irrigant, can be potentially combined with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) during endodontic treatment. The aim of this study was first to identify the precipitate formed on the interaction between OCT and NaOCl and secondly to compare its effect on dentinal tubules with that of precipitate formed on combining chlorhexidine (CHX) and NaOCl. This observational study was conducted in 3 stages. Initially, the color changes and precipitate formation were assessed when the test solution 0.1% OCT and 5.2% NaOCl were mixed. Color changes were compared with those observed when 2% CHX was mixed with 5.2% NaOCl. The residue obtained on combining OCT and NaOCl was subjected to proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and mass spectrometric (MS) analysis. In the final stage, dentinal surfaces irrigated alternatively with OCT and NaOCl were compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the dentinal surface irrigated with CHX and NaOCl. The OCT-NaOCl mixture changed in color from initial milky white to transparent over time, whereas the CHX-NaOCl mixture showed an immediate peach-brown discoloration. 1H NMR and MS analysis established that the whitish precipitate obtained on combining OCT and NaOCl solutions correlated with the structure of phenoxyethanol (PE). SEM revealed dense precipitate occluding the dentinal tubules with the CHX and NaOCl group, whereas the precipitate was sparse and partially occluded in the OCT and NaOCl group. The whitish precipitate formed with the OCT-NaOCl mixture was identified as PE, a compound already present in OCT, and it partly occluded the dentinal tubules. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  19. Merging black hole binaries: the effects of progenitor's metallicity, mass-loss rate and Eddington factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbo, Nicola; Mapelli, Michela; Spera, Mario

    2018-03-01

    The first four gravitational wave events detected by LIGO were all interpreted as merging black hole binaries (BHBs), opening a new perspective on the study of such systems. Here we use our new population-synthesis code MOBSE, an upgraded version of BSE, to investigate the demography of merging BHBs. MOBSE includes metallicity-dependent prescriptions for mass-loss of massive hot stars. It also accounts for the impact of the electron-scattering Eddington factor on mass-loss. We perform >108 simulations of isolated massive binaries, with 12 different metallicities, to study the impact of mass-loss, core-collapse supernovae and common envelope on merging BHBs. Accounting for the dependence of stellar winds on the Eddington factor leads to the formation of black holes (BHs) with mass up to 65 M⊙ at metallicity Z ˜ 0.0002. However, most BHs in merging BHBs have masses ≲ 40 M⊙. We find merging BHBs with mass ratios in the 0.1-1.0 range, even if mass ratios >0.6 are more likely. We predict that systems like GW150914, GW170814 and GW170104 can form only from progenitors with metallicity Z ≤ 0.006, Z ≤ 0.008 and Z ≤ 0.012, respectively. Most merging BHBs have gone through a common envelope phase, but up to ˜17 per cent merging BHBs at low metallicity did not undergo any common envelope phase. We find a much higher number of mergers from metal-poor progenitors than from metal-rich ones: the number of BHB mergers per unit mass is ˜10-4 M_{⊙}^{-1} at low metallicity (Z = 0.0002-0.002) and drops to ˜10-7 M_{⊙}^{-1} at high metallicity (Z ˜ 0.02).

  20. Modelling Energy Loss Mechanisms and a Determination of the Electron Energy Scale for the CDF Run II W Mass Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddick, Thomas [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The calibration of the calorimeter energy scale is vital to measuring the mass of the W boson at CDF Run II. For the second measurement of the W boson mass at CDF Run II, two independent simulations were developed. This thesis presents a detailed description of the modification and validation of Bremsstrahlung and pair production modelling in one of these simulations, UCL Fast Simulation, comparing to both geant4 and real data where appropriate. The total systematic uncertainty on the measurement of the W boson mass in the W → eve channel from residual inaccuracies in Bremsstrahlung modelling is estimated as 6.2 ±3.2 MeV/c2 and the total systematic uncertainty from residual inaccuracies in pair production modelling is estimated as 2.8± 2.7 MeV=c2. Two independent methods are used to calibrate the calorimeter energy scale in UCL Fast Simulation; the results of these two methods are compared to produce a measurement of the Z boson mass as a cross-check on the accuracy of the simulation.