WorldWideScience

Sample records for effect rhd molecule

  1. Quantitation of RHD by real-time polymerase chain reaction for determination of RHD zygosity and RHD mosaicism/chimerism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Grethe Risum; Clausen, Frederik Banch; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2007-01-01

    Determination of RHD zygosity of the spouse is crucial in preconception counseling of families with history of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-D. RHD zygosity can be determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) basically by determining RHD dosage,......, and this feature is relevant in investigating RHD mosaicism and chimerism....

  2. RHD alleles in the Tunisian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchari, Mouna; Jemni-Yaacoub, Saloua; Chakroun, Taher; Abdelkefi, Saida; Houissa, Batoul; Hmida, Slama

    2013-01-01

    Background: A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in Tunisia population was lacking. The aim of this study was to use a multiplex RHD typing assay for simultaneous detection of partial D especially with RHD/RHCE deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence exchange mechanism and some weak D alleles. Materials and Methods: Six RHD specific primer sets were designed to amplify RHD exons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9. DNA from 2000 blood donors (1777 D+ and 223 D-) from several regions was selected for RHD genotyping using a PCR multiplex assay. Further molecular investigations were done to characterize the RHD variants that were identified by the PCR multiplex assay. Results: In the 1777 D+ samples, only 10 individuals showed the absence of amplification of exons 4 and 5 that were subsequently identified by PCR-SSP as weak D type 4 variants. No hybrid allele was detected. In the 223 D-, RHD amplification of some exons was observed only in 5 samples: 4 individuals expressed only RHD exon 9, and one subject lacking exons 4 and 5. These samples were then screened by PCR-SSPs on d(C) ces and weak D type 4, respectively. Conclusion: The weak D type 4 appears to be the most common D variant allele. We have not found any partial D variant. Findings also indicated that RHD gene deletion is the most prevalent cause of the D- phenotype in the Tunisian population. PMID:24014941

  3. Reliable test for prenatal prediction of fetal RhD type using maternal plasma from RhD negative women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Krog, Grethe Risum; Rieneck, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a reliable test for prenatal prediction of fetal RhD type using maternal plasma from RhD negative women. This test is needed for future prenatal Rh prophylaxis.......The objective of this study was to establish a reliable test for prenatal prediction of fetal RhD type using maternal plasma from RhD negative women. This test is needed for future prenatal Rh prophylaxis....

  4. Noninvasive fetal RhD genotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Damkjær, Merete Berthu; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against RhD is the major cause of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), which causes fetal or neonatal death. The introduction of postnatal immune prophylaxis in the 1960s drastically reduced immunization incidents in pregnant, D-negative women. In several countries, ant...

  5. Non-invasive fetal RHD genotyping for RhD negative women stratified into RHD gene deletion or variant groups: comparative accuracy using two blood collection tube types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Catherine A; Millard, Glenda M; O'Brien, Helen; Schoeman, Elizna M; Lopez, Genghis H; McGowan, Eunike C; Tremellen, Anne; Puddephatt, Rachel; Gaerty, Kirsten; Flower, Robert L; Hyett, Jonathan A; Gardener, Glenn J

    2017-12-01

    Non-invasive fetal RHD genotyping in Australia to reduce anti-D usage will need to accommodate both prolonged sample transport times and a diverse population demographic harbouring a range of RHD blood group gene variants. We compared RHD genotyping accuracy using two blood sample collection tube types for RhD negative women stratified into deleted RHD gene haplotype and RHD gene variant cohorts. Maternal blood samples were collected into EDTA and cell-free (cf)DNA stabilising (BCT) tubes from two sites, one interstate. Automated DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to amplify RHD exons 5 and 10 and CCR5. Automated analysis flagged maternal RHD variants, which were classified by genotyping. Time between sample collection and processing ranged from 2.9 to 187.5 hours. cfDNA levels increased with time for EDTA (range 0.03-138 ng/μL) but not BCT samples (0.01-3.24 ng/μL). For the 'deleted' cohort (n=647) all fetal RHD genotyping outcomes were concordant, excepting for one unexplained false negative EDTA sample. Matched against cord RhD serology, negative predictive values using BCT and EDTA tubes were 100% and 99.6%, respectively. Positive predictive values were 99.7% for both types. Overall 37.2% of subjects carried an RhD negative baby. The 'variant' cohort (n=15) included one novel RHD and eight hybrid or African pseudogene variants. Review for fetal RHD specific signals, based on one exon, showed three EDTA samples discordant to BCT, attributed to high maternal cfDNA levels arising from prolonged transport times. For the deleted haplotype cohort, fetal RHD genotyping accuracy was comparable for samples collected in EDTA and BCT tubes despite higher cfDNA levels in the EDTA tubes. Capacity to predict fetal RHD genotype for maternal carriers of hybrid or pseudogene RHD variants requires stringent control of cfDNA levels. We conclude that fetal RHD genotyping is feasible in the Australian environment to avoid unnecessary anti

  6. Pre-analytical conditions in non-invasive prenatal testing of cell-free fetal RHD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Banch Clausen

    Full Text Available Non-invasive prenatal testing of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA in maternal plasma can predict the fetal RhD type in D negative pregnant women. In Denmark, routine antenatal screening for the fetal RhD gene (RHD directs the administration of antenatal anti-D prophylaxis only to women who carry an RhD positive fetus. Prophylaxis reduces the risk of immunization that may lead to hemolytic disease of the fetus and the newborn. The reliability of predicting the fetal RhD type depends on pre-analytical factors and assay sensitivity. We evaluated the testing setup in the Capital Region of Denmark, based on data from routine antenatal RHD screening.Blood samples were drawn at gestational age 25 weeks. DNA extracted from 1 mL of plasma was analyzed for fetal RHD using a duplex method for exon 7/10. We investigated the effect of blood sample transportation time (n = 110 and ambient outdoor temperatures (n = 1539 on the levels of cffDNA and total DNA. We compared two different quantification methods, the delta Ct method and a universal standard curve. PCR pipetting was compared on two systems (n = 104.The cffDNA level was unaffected by blood sample transportation for up to 9 days and by ambient outdoor temperatures ranging from -10 °C to 28 °C during transport. The universal standard curve was applicable for cffDNA quantification. Identical levels of cffDNA were observed using the two automated PCR pipetting systems. We detected a mean of 100 fetal DNA copies/mL at a median gestational age of 25 weeks (range 10-39, n = 1317.The setup for real-time PCR-based, non-invasive prenatal testing of cffDNA in the Capital Region of Denmark is very robust. Our findings regarding the transportation of blood samples demonstrate the high stability of cffDNA. The applicability of a universal standard curve facilitates easy cffDNA quantification.

  7. RhD Specific Antibodies Are Not Detectable in HLA-DRB11501* Mice Challenged with Human RhD Positive Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidice Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to study the immune response to the RhD antigen in the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn has been hampered by the lack of a mouse model of RhD immunization. However, the ability of transgenic mice expressing human HLA DRB11501* to respond to immunization with purified RhD has allowed this question to be revisited. In this work we aimed at inducing anti-RhD antibodies by administering human RhD+ RBCs to mice transgenic for the human HLA DRB11501* as well as to several standard inbred and outbred laboratory strains including C57BL/6, DBA1/J, CFW(SW, CD1(ICR, and NSA(CF-1. DRB11501* mice were additionally immunized with putative extracellular immunogenic RhD peptides. DRB11501* mice immunized with RhD+ erythrocytes developed an erythrocyte-reactive antibody response. Antibodies specific for RhD could not however be detected by flow cytometry. Despite this, DRB11501* mice were capable of recognizing immunogenic sequences of Rh as injection with Rh peptides induced antibodies reactive with RhD sequences, consistent with the presence of B cell repertoires capable of recognizing RhD. We conclude that while HLA DRB11501* transgenic mice may have the capability of responding to immunogenic sequences within RhD, an immune response to human RBC expressing RhD is not directly observed.

  8. Prevalence of weak RhD phenotype in the blood donor population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The weak RhD phenotype is a form of RhD antigen that, in routine RhD typing, does not react by agglutination with potent monoclonal anti-D serum, but requires addition of antiglobulin serum to demonstrate the presence of the antigen. However, the weak D antigen can cause immunization or sensitization ...

  9. Evaluation of two real-time multiplex PCR screening assays detecting fetal RHD in plasma from RhD negative women to ascertain the requirement for antenatal RhD prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Krog, Grethe Risum; Rieneck, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    and 5. We used the same fluorescent dye for the exon 7 and 10 probes to increase sensitivity; exon 5 was VIC labeled. We evaluated possible inhibition of DNA amplification with dilution experiments. We then tested the two multiplex assays with DNA extracted from 97 plasma samples from 38 RhD negative......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate two different multiplex real-time PCR assays detecting fetal RHD for screening of RhD negative women in relation to antenatal RhD prophylaxis. METHODS: We designed a duplex assay for the detection of RHD exon 7 and 10 and a triplex assay for the detection of RHD exon 7, 10...... assay (exon 7/10), accuracy was 94.2%. Detection of exon 5 was less reliable. CONCLUSION: The duplex assay using exon 7/10 was the most reliable for prenatal prediction of fetal RhD type as a candidate assay for screening of RhD negative women in relation to antenatal RhD prophylaxis. The triplex assay...

  10. [Hemolytic disease of the newborn has not vanished from Finland--routine protection of RhD negative mothers during pregnancy is justifiable].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainio, Susanna; Kuosmanen, Malla

    2012-01-01

    Prophylaxis of RhD negative mothers with anti-D immunoglobulin after childbirth is the most important procedure reducing the immunization of the mother and the risk of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn. In spite of this, anti-D antibodies having relevance to pregnancy are later detected in 1.8% of RhD negative mothers. Half of these cases could be prevented by routine anti-D prophylaxis given to the mothers during weeks 28 to 34 of pregnancy. Convincing evidence of the effectiveness of this measure has accumulated in the last few years, and application of the treatment is justified also in Finland.

  11. Impact of a confirmatory RhD test on the correct serologic typing of blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cayres Schmidt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The RHD gene is highly polymorphic, which results in a large number of RhD variant phenotypes. Discrepancies in RhD typing are still a problem in blood banks and increase the risk of alloimmunization. In this study, the RhD typing strategy at a blood bank in Brazil was evaluated.METHODS: One-hundred and fifty-two samples typed as RhD negative and C or E positive by routine tests (automated system and indirect antiglobulin test using the tube technique were reevaluated for RhD status by three methods. The method with the best performance was implemented and evaluated for a period of one year (n = 4897 samples. Samples that were D positive exclusively in the confirmatory test were submitted to molecular analysis.RESULTS: The gel test for indirect antiglobulin testing with anti-D immunoglobulin G (clone ESD1 presented the best results. Seventy samples (1.43% previously typed as RhD negative showed reactivity in the gel test for indirect antiglobulin testing and were reclassified as D positive. D variants that may cause alloimmunization, such as weak D type 2 and partial DVI, were detected.CONCLUSION: The confirmatory RhD test using the gel test for indirect antiglobulin testing represents a breakthrough in transfusion safety in this blood center. Our results emphasize the importance of assessing the blood group typing strategy in blood banks.

  12. Anti-D Antibodies in Pregnant D Variant Antigen Carriers Initially Typed as RhD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacevic Krstic, Jelena; Dajak, Slavica; Bingulac-Popovic, Jasna; Dogic, Vesna; Mratinovic-Mikulandra, Jela

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the incidence, the consequences, and the prevention strategy of anti-D alloimmunizations of D variant carriers in the obstetric population of Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia. RhD immunization events were evaluated retrospectively for the period between 1993 and 2012. Women were tested for RhD antigen and irregular antibodies. Those with anti-D antibody who were not serologically D- were genotyped for RHD. They were evaluated for their obstetric and transfusion history and their titer of anti-D. The neonates were evaluated for RhD status, direct antiglobulin test (DAT), hemoglobin and bilirubin levels, transfusion therapy as well as phototherapy and outcome. Out of 104,884 live births 102,982 women were tested for RhD antigen. Anti-D immunization occurred in 184 women which accounts for 0.9% of individuals at risk of anti-D formation. 181 cases occurred in women serologically typed as D-. Three women were partial D carriers (DVa n = 2, DNB n = 1), initially typed RhD+, and recognized as D variant carriers after the immunization occurred. Anti-D titer varied from 1:1 to 1:16. Six children were RhD+, four had positive DAT, and two underwent phototherapy. Anti-D immunization occurred in pregnant partial D carriers (DVa, DNB). RhD+ children had serologic markers of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), with no cases of severe HDFN.

  13. Prenatal RhD Testing : A Review of Studies Published from 2006 to 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, Tobias Joerg; Mueller, Sina Patricia; Haverkamp, Alexander; Grill, Simon; Hahn, Sinuhe

    2009-01-01

    The availability of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for the fetal RhD status (NIPD RhD) is an obvious benefit for alloimmunized pregnant women. This review gives information about the performance characteristics of current diagnostic technologies and recent promising proof-of-principle studies.

  14. Dried blood spots of pooled samples for RHD gene screening in blood donors of mixed ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Malta, M C F; Araujo, N C Fidélis; Vieira, O V Neves; Schmidt, L Cayres; Gonçalves, P de Cassia; Martins, M Lobato

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present a strategy for RHD gene screening based on real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using dried blood spots of pooled samples. Molecular analysis of blood donors may be used to detect RHD variants among the presumed D-negative individuals. RHD genotyping using pooled samples is a strategy to test a large number of samples at a more reasonable cost. RHD gene detection based on real-time PCR using dried blood spots of pooled samples was standardised and used to evaluate 1550 Brazilian blood donors phenotyped as RhD-negative. Positive results were re-evaluated by retesting single samples using real-time PCR and conventional multiplex PCR to amplify five RHD-specific exons. PCR-sequence-specific primers was used to amplify RHDψ allele. We devised a strategy for RHD gene screening using dried blood spots of five pooled samples. Among 1550 serologically D-negative blood donors, 58 (3.74%) had the RHD gene. The non-functional RHDψ allele was detected in 47 samples (3.02%). The present method is a promising strategy to detect the RHD gene among presumed RhD-negative blood donors, particularly for populations with African ancestry. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  15. Environmental effects on molecules immersed in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sese, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology to study environmental effects is thoroughly discussed. It combines molecular quantum mechanics and classical statistical mechanics of molecular fluids. Pair distribution functions collecting statistical information appear quite naturally in the quantum equations describing a single molecule. As well as allowing the computation of any individual molecular property in a liquid phase, this approach satisfies a number of theoretical requirements (dependence on density and temperature, validity in the thermodynamic limit). In a sense, it can be regarded as a useful alternative to the well-known Monte Carlo averaging processes for calculating molecular properties. Numerical applications studying liquid carbon disulphide and liquid carbon tetrachloride at several state points are given. Results cover typical RHF information (CNDO/2) on molecules, and show the sensitivity of the presented methodology to structural changes in liquids. (orig.)

  16. Molecular determination of RHD zygosity: predicting risk of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn related to anti-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirelli, Kevin J; Pietz, Bradley C; Johnson, Susan T; Pinder, Holly L; Bellissimo, Daniel B

    2010-12-01

    Development of an accurate molecular method for paternal RHD zygosity to predict risk to a fetus for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) related to anti-D. Quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) was used to detect RHD exons 5 and 7, using RHCE exon 7 as an internal control. The genotype and zygosity were determined from the peak area ratios of RHD exon 5 or 7 to RHCE exon 7. We tested 25 Caucasian and 25 African American (AA) samples whose zygosity was predicted from the Rh phenotype and an alternate molecular method. In addition, we tested 71 paternal samples from prenatal cases where fetal testing was performed. RHD/RHCE ratios clearly distinguished the RHD/D and RHD/d genotypes. RHD variants were recognized when RHD exon 5 copy number was discordant with exon 7. The molecular assay identified eight cases where the phenotype incorrectly assigned zygosity and we observed three false-negatives in the hybrid Rhesus box assay. The prenatal results were consistent with the zygosity determined for the paternal samples in our study. This QF-PCR method accurately determines RHD zygosity in Caucasians and AAs and will help predict the risk that a fetus will inherit RHD. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Is current serologic RhD typing of blood donors sufficient for avoiding immunization of recipients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Grethe Risum; Clausen, Frederik Banch; Berkowicz, Adela

    2011-01-01

    Avoiding immunization with clinically important antibodies is a primary objective in transfusion medicine. Therefore, it is central to identify the extent of D antigens that escape routine RhD typing of blood donors and to improve methodology if necessary.......Avoiding immunization with clinically important antibodies is a primary objective in transfusion medicine. Therefore, it is central to identify the extent of D antigens that escape routine RhD typing of blood donors and to improve methodology if necessary....

  18. Report of the first nationally implemented clinical routine screening for fetal RHD in D- pregnant women to ascertain the requirement for antenatal RhD prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Christiansen, Mette; Steffensen, Rudi Nora

    2012-01-01

    - women who carry a D+ fetus. We present an evaluation of the first national clinical application of antenatal RHD screening. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: In each of the five Danish health care regions, blood samples were drawn from D- women in Gestational Week 25. DNA was extracted from the maternal plasma...

  19. Memory effects in single-molecule spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Daniel T.; Schulz, Michael; Reineker, Peter

    2007-01-01

    From the time series of LH2 optical single-molecule fluorescence excitation spectra of Rhodospirillum molischianum the memory function of the Mori-Zwanzig equation for the optical intensity is derived numerically. We show that the time dependence of the excited states is determined by at least three different non-Markovian stochastic processes with decay constants for the Mori-Zwanzig kernel on the order of 1-5min -1 . We suggest that this decay stems from the conformational motion of the protein scaffold of LH2

  20. Quantum theory of anharmonic effects in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Konstantin V

    2012-01-01

    Presented in a clear and straightforward analysis, this book explores quantum mechanics and the application of quantum mechanics to interpret spectral phenomena. Specifically, the book discusses the relation between spectral features in mid or rear infrared regions, or in Raman scattering spectrum, and interactions between molecules or molecular species such as molecular ions, and their respective motions in gaseous or crystalline conditions. Beginning with an overview of conventional methods and problems which arise in molecular spectroscopy, the second half of the book suggests original t

  1. Quantum Effects in Molecule-Based Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Stephen

    2005-11-01

    Research into molecule-based-magnets has made immense strides in recent years, with the discoveries of all organic molecular magnets, room temperature 3D ordered permanent magnets, and single-molecule magnets (SMMs), the latter exhibiting a host of spectacular quantum phenomena; for a review, see ref. [1]. SMMs represent a molecular approach to nanoscale and sub-nanoscale magnetic particles. They offer all of the advantages of molecular chemistry as well as displaying the superparamagnetic properties of mesoscale magnetic particles of much larger dimensions. They also straddle the interface between classical and quantum behavior; for example, they exhibit quantum tunneling of their magnetization. I will give a general introduction to this area of research, followed by an overview of recent results obtained using high-frequency (40-800 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance techniques developed at the University of Florida. These results include: an elucidation of the role of molecular symmetry in the magnetic quantum tunneling phenomenon [2]; and the observation of quantum entanglement between pairs of nanomagnets within a supramolecular dimer [3]. 1. D. Gatteschi and R. Sessoli, Angew. Chem. 42, 268 (2003). 2. E. del Barco et al., J. Low Temp. Phys. 140, 119-174 (2005). 3. S. Hill et al., Science 302, 1015 (2003).

  2. Fetal RHD Genotyping Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis of Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Pregnancy of RhD Negative Women in South of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Moezzi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maternal-fetal RhD antigen incompatibility causes approximately 50% of clinically significant alloimmunization cases. The routine use of prophylactic anti-D immunoglobulin has dramatically reduced hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Recently, fetal RHD genotyping in RhD negative pregnant women has been suggested for appropriate use of anti-D immunoglobulin antenatal prophylaxis and decrease unnecessary prenatal interventions. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, in order to develop a reliable and non-invasive method for fetal RHD genotyping, cell free fetal DNA (cffDNA was extracted from maternal plasma. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for detection of RHD exons 7, 5, 10 and intron 4 was performed and the results were compared to the serological results of cord blood cells as the gold standard method. SRY gene and hypermethylated Ras-association domain family member 1 (RASSF1A gene were used to confirm the presence of fetal DNA in male and female fetuses, respectively. Results: Out of 48 fetuses between 8 and 32 weeks (wks of gestational age (GA, we correctly diagnosed 45 cases (93.75% of RHD positive fetuses and 2 cases (4.16% of the RHD negative one. Exon 7 was amplified in one sample, while three other RHD gene sequences were not detected; the sample was classified as inconclusive, and the RhD serology result after birth showed that the fetus was RhD-negative. Conclusion: Our results showed high accuracy of the qPCR method using cffDNA for fetal RHD genotyping and implicate on the efficiency of this technique to predict the competence of anti-D immunoglobulin administration.

  3. Is current serologic RhD typing of blood donors sufficient for avoiding immunization of recipients? (CME)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Grethe Risum; Clausen, Frederik Banch; Berkowicz, Adela

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Avoiding immunization with clinically important antibodies is a primary objective in transfusion medicine. Therefore, it is central to identify the extent of D antigens that escape routine RhD typing of blood donors and to improve methodology if necessary. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We...... screened 5058 D- donors for the presence of the RHD gene, targeting Exons 5, 7, and 10 with real-time polymerase chain reaction. Samples that were positive in the screen test were investigated further by adsorption-elution, antibody consumption, flow cytometry, and sequencing of all RHD exons with intron......-specific primers. Lookback was performed on all recipients of RBCs from RHD+ donors. RESULTS: We found 13 RHD+ samples (0.26%). No variants or chimeras were found. Characterization of DNA revealed a novel DEL type (IVS2-2 A>G). In the lookback of the 136 transfusions with subsequent antibody follow-up, of which 13...

  4. Prevalence and gene frequencies of A1A2BO and Rh(D) blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ruqaiya Hussain

    2012-08-03

    Aug 3, 2012 ... Human Genetics and Toxicology Lab, Section of Genetics, Department of Zoology ... alence and gene frequencies of A1A2BO and Rh(D) blood groups among the Muslim populations of ..... The principal bio-clinical significance of the erythrocytic ... (CST), UP, which funded the major project, titled '' Genomic.

  5. Pre-Analytical Conditions in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing of Cell-Free Fetal RHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Jakobsen, Tanja Roien; Rieneck, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    D positive fetus. Prophylaxis reduces the risk of immunization that may lead to hemolytic disease of the fetus and the newborn. The reliability of predicting the fetal RhD type depends on pre-analytical factors and assay sensitivity. We evaluated the testing setup in the Capital Region of Denmark, based...

  6. Risk Factors for RhD Immunisation Despite Antenatal and Postnatal Anti-D Prophylaxis COMMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelewijn, J. M.; de Haas, M.; Vrijkotte, T. G. M.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Bonsel, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite routine antenatal and postnatal administration of anti-D immunoglobulin (Ig) during pregnancy and delivery in a previous pregnancy, 0.1% to 0.3% of women are found to have Rhesus D (RhD) antibodies in their next pregnancy. The primary aim of this case-control study was to identify causative

  7. Risk factors for RhD immunisation despite antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelewijn, J. M.; de Haas, M.; Vrijkotte, T. G. M.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Bonsel, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for Rhesus D (RhD) immunisation in pregnancy, despite adequate antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis in the previous pregnancy. To generate evidence for improved primary prevention by extra administration of anti-D Ig in the presence of a risk factor. Design

  8. Frequency of ABO, subgroup ABO and Rh(D) blood groups in major sudanese ethnic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, F.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There are differences in the distribution of ABO, sub group A BO and Rh(D) blood groups in different populations of the world. Relatively little information is available about blood group distributions in Sudanese population. To see the frequency of ABO, subgroup ABO and Rh(D) blood groups in major Sudanese ethnic groups(Danagla Shaygia and Gaaleen). Blood testing for ABO, subgroup ABO and Rh(D) typing was done over six months, in 300 unrelated individuals, from both genders. Blood samples were collected from students of the college of medical laboratory science - Sudan University of Science and Technology using finger prick method and following routine slide method. Blood group 'O' was the most predominant ( 52.7%) in both Rh positive and negative subjects followed by blood group A, B and AB. Majority (98.0%)o f the subjects were Rh(D) positive and only 2% were Rh negative. The predominant subgroup of ABO was A2 (14.1% ). The frequency of ABO blood groups in both Rh positive and negative subjects among the major Sudanese ethnic group was similar to that reported from neighbouring regions. (author)

  9. Women's attitude towards prenatal screening for red blood cell antibodies, other than RhD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Koelewijn; T.G.M. Vrijkotte (Tanja); M. de Haas; C.E. van der Schoot (Ellen); G.J. Bonsel (Gouke)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Since July 1998 all Dutch women (± 200,000/y) are screened for red cell antibodies, other than anti-RhesusD (RhD) in the first trimester of pregnancy, to facilitate timely treatment of pregnancies at risk for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Evidence for

  10. Genotyping of Kell, Duffy, Kidd and RHD in patients with b Thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castilho Lilian

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of Rh, Kell, Duffy and Kidd phenotypes in addition to ABO is used to prevent the alloimmunization to red blood cells (RBCs antigens and as part of the antibody identification process in patients with beta Thalassemia. However, phenotyping in these patients can be time consuming and difficult to interpret. In these situations, it would be valuable to have an alternative to hemagglutination tests to determine the patient's antigen profile. We used PCR-RFLP to genotype such patients. DNA was prepared from 50 patients with beta Thalassemia who had been phenotyped by routine hemagglutination, and tested for Kell, Kidd, Duffy/GATA mutation by PCR-RFLP. RHD/non-D was analysed by PCR product size associated to RHD gene sequence in intron 4 and exon 10/3'UTR. The genotyping assays were performed without knowledge of phenotype results. For RHD/non-D, 47 were RhD+ and RHD+/RHCE+, and 3 were RhD- and RHD-/RHCE+. For Kell, 48 kk were K2K2 and 2 Kk were K1K2. For Duffy, of 44 samples that had normal GATA box, 8 Fy(a+b- were FYA/FYA, 15 Fy(a+b+ were FYB/FYB, and 19 Fy(a+b+ were FYA/FYB; of the other 4 samples 3 were FYA/FYB and heterozygous GATA mutation, and 1 Fy(a-b- was FYB/FYB, homozygous GATA mutation. Two samples phenotyped as Fy(a+b- that had normal GATA , presented the 265T/298A mutations and two samples phenotyped as Fy(a-b+ were genotyped was FYA/FYB.. For Kidd , 15 Jk(a+b were JKA/JKA, 12 Jk(a-b+ were JKB/JKB, and 20 Jk(a+b+ were JKA/JKB. Three samples phenotyped as JK(a+b+ were genotyped as JKB/JKB. Genotype is more accurate than phenotype for determination of blood groups in polytransfused patients with betaThalassemia. Genotyping in these patients can be helpful to select antigen-negative RBCs for transfusion.

  11. Relevance and costs of RHD genotyping in women with a weak D phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laget, L; Izard, C; Durieux-Roussel, E; Gouvitsos, J; Dettori, I; Chiaroni, J; Ferrera-Tourenc, V

    2018-06-01

    For pregnant women, the serologic test results of D antigen will determine the frequency of RBC antibody detection as well as the indication for RhIG prophylaxis. RHD genotyping is the only method that may provide clear guidance on prophylaxis for women with a weak D phenotype. This analysis evaluated the economical implications of using RHD genotyping to guide RhIG prophylaxis among pregnant women with a serological weak D phenotype. We compared the costs of 2 strategies in a cohort of 273 women with weak D phenotype. In the first strategy, we did not perform genotyping and all women with weak D phenotypes were treated as if they were D-, thus considered to be a risk of RhD alloimmunization. These women all received the prophylactic follow up. In the second strategy, RHD genotyping was performed on all women with a serologic weak D phenotype. Then, the follow-up will be determined by phenotype deduced from genotype. On the studied cohort, the additional expense occurred by genotyping is 26,536 €. RHD Genotyping has highlighted 162 weak D Type 1, 2 3, that could safely be managed as D+ and 111 partial D to consider as D-. By comparing the 2 strategies, the savings generated by genotyping the patients of our cohort are € 12,046 for the follow up of one pregnancy. Knowing that in France, a woman has on average 2 pregnancies and that the genotyping is carried out only once, the savings generated for the following pregnancies would be € 38,581. Performing RHD genotyping for pregnant women with a weak D phenotype enables to clearly identify weak D type 1, 2 or 3 from the other variants at risk of alloimmunization. This analysis generates savings in terms of follow-up schedule of pregnant women and RhIG prophylaxis. It also allows saving of D- products for patient with a weak D type 1, 2 or 3 in case of a transfusion need. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Grupos sanguíneos ABO, RhD y esclerosis múltiple ABO and RhD blood groups in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Pérez-Ruiz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La fisiopatología de la esclerosis múltiple es incierta; la hipótesis más fundada es la existencia de un proceso autoinmune en el que existe predisposición genética. El sistema de grupos sanguíneos está compuesto por antígenos fácilmente detectables, por lo que constituye excelente marcador genético. Para determinar frecuencia de distribución de los grupos sanguíneos en pacientes con esclerosis múltiple, se estudiaron 70 enfermos, de quienes se obtuvieron datos demográficos, clínicos y de escalas evolutivas. Se seleccionaron 180 controles al azar simple mediante muestreo multietápico del universo integrado por 4 747 donantes de sangre. Se determinaron los grupo sanguíneos ABO y RhD. Se calculó X² con precisión del 95 % e intervalo de confianza de las diferencias porcentuales. En ambos grupos fue más frecuente el RhD+ (85,7 % casos y 90 % controles. El grupo sanguíneo A estuvo en el 60 % de los pacientes y el grupo O predominó en los donantes (55 %, con diferencia significativa p=0,003 y OR=2,85. De acuerdo con este estudio, existe una asociación entre el grupo sanguíneo A con la esclerosis múltiple.The physiopathology of multiple sclerosis is uncertain. The best founded hypothesis is the existence of an autoimmune process in which genetic predisposition plays a role. The system of blood groups consists of easily detectable antigens; therefore, it is an excellent genetic marker. To determine the distribution frequency of blood groups in patients with multiple sclerosis, 70 ill persons were studied, about whom demographic, clinical and evolutionary scale data were obtained. 180 controls were selected by simple random multistage sampling of a universe of 4 747 blood donors. Blood groups ABO and RhD were determined. X² was calculated with a 95% accuracy and confidence interval of percent differences. RhD+ was more frequent in both groups (85.7 % cases and 90% controls. Blood group A was found in 60 % patients, whereas

  13. Effects of molecular orientation in the laser ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xinhua Xie; Gerald Jordan; Christopher Ede; Armin Scrinzi

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Time-dependent electron momentum distributions are calculated during ionization of linear molecules by a strong laser pulse and upon recollision. For typical experimental laser parameters, we find a strong influence of molecular orientation and initial state symmetry on the total ionization rates and also on momentum distributions, compared to which the effect of electron correlation is less important for simple molecules. The dynamics of electron release and subsequent recollision with the parent ion largely determines the time-frequency structure of harmonic radiation, which underlies the generation of attosecond XUV pulses and the time-resolved imaging techniques for the electronic structure of molecules. In the present work, the effects of orientation and initial orbital symmetry are investigated by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a two-dimensional diatomic molecule in the single-active electron approximation. As in the presence of strong external fields recolliding electrons cannot be easily separated from bound electrons, the electron wave packet is probed at some distance from where all electrons can be safety considered as detached. We find that momentum distributions strongly depend on molecular size, orientation of the molecular axis, and node structure of the initial state. In order to determine the momentum spectra at the time of electron release and upon recollision, we classically propagate the Wigner distributions of probed wavepackets backward and forward in time, respectively. We find that the times of peak recollision current can vary strongly with the orientation of the molecule. Moreover, correlation effects on the electron spectra are included using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method. The calculations are performed in three spatial dimensions with the restriction to cylindrical symmetry, where the molecule is aligned with the laser field. Correlation is studied

  14. Acquired RhD mosaicism identifies fibrotic transformation of thrombopoietin receptor-mutated essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemayor-Garcia, Celina; Coward, Rebecca; Albitar, Maher; Udani, Rupa; Jain, Prachi; Koklanaris, Eleftheria; Battiwalla, Minoo; Keel, Siobán; Klein, Harvey G; Barrett, A John; Ito, Sawa

    2017-09-01

    Acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity has been described in myeloid malignant progression with an otherwise normal karyotype. A 65-year-old woman with MPL-mutated essential thrombocythemia and progression to myelofibrosis was noted upon routine pretransplant testing to have mixed field reactivity with anti-D and an historic discrepancy in RhD type. The patient had never received transfusions or transplantation. Gel immunoagglutination revealed group A red blood cells and a mixed-field reaction for the D phenotype, with a predominant D-negative population and a small subset of circulating red blood cells carrying the D antigen. Subsequent genomic microarray single nucleotide polymorphism profiling revealed copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 1 p36.33-p34.2, a known molecular mechanism underlying fibrotic progression of MPL-mutated essential thrombocythemia. The chromosomal region affected by this copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity encompassed the RHD, RHCE, and MPL genes. We propose a model of chronological molecular events that is supported by RHD zygosity assays in peripheral lymphoid and myeloid-derived cells. Copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity events that lead to clonal selection and myeloid malignant progression may also affect the expression of adjacent unrelated genes, including those encoding for blood group antigens. Detection of mixed-field reactions and investigation of discrepant blood typing results are important for proper transfusion support of these patients and can provide useful surrogate markers of myeloproliferative disease progression. © 2017 AABB.

  15. A study on interaction of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes for an effective ejection of the molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, N.; Wang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The ejection of DNA molecules from carbon nanotubes is reported from interaction energy perspectives by molecular dynamics simulations. The critical ejection energy, which is to be applied to a DNA molecule for a successful ejection from a carbon nanotube, is investigated based on a study on the friction and binding energy between the DNA molecule and the tube. An effective ejection is realized by subjecting a kinetic energy on the DNA molecule that is larger than the solved critical ejection energy. In addition, the relationship between ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes is investigated. -- Highlights: ► Report the ejection of DNA molecules from CNTs from interaction energy perspectives. ► Develop a methodology for the critical energy of an effective ejection of a DNA molecule from a CNT. ► Present the relationship between critical ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and CNTs. ► Provide a general guidance on the ejection of encapsulated molecules from CNTs.

  16. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with one-component Cowan-Griffin relativistic Hartree-Fock orbitals, which successfully incorporate the mass-velocity and Darwin terms present in more complicated wavefunctions such as Dirac-Hartree-Fock, one can derive relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's) to carry out molecular calculations. These potentials implicitly include the dominant relativistic terms for molecules while allowing one to use the traditional quantum chemical techniques for studying the electronic structure of molecules. The effects of spin-orbit coupling can then be included using orbitals from such calculations using an effective 1-electron, 1-center spin-orbit operator. Applications to molecular systems involving heavy atoms, show good agreement with available spectroscopic data on molecular geometries and excitation energies

  17. Kondo effect in single-molecule magnet transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael; Mucciolo, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We present a careful and thorough microscopic derivation of the anisotropic Kondo Hamiltonian for single-molecule magnet (SMM) transistors. When the molecule is strongly coupled to metallic leads, we show that by applying a transverse magnetic field it is possible to topologically induce or quench the Kondo effect in the conductance of a SMM with either an integer or a half-integer spin S>1/2. This topological Kondo effect is due to the Berry-phase interference between multiple quantum tunneling paths of the spin. We calculate the renormalized Berry-phase oscillations of the two Kondo peaks as a function of a transverse magnetic field by means of the poor man's scaling approach. We illustrate our findings with the SMM Ni4, which we propose as a possible candidate for the experimental observation of the conductance oscillations.

  18. Effect of deuteration on the vibrational spectra of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Endredi, Henrietta; Varady, Balazs

    2001-01-01

    The stable isotope substitution of organic compounds deforms their vibrational spectra. The modifications of the spectra appear as band shifts and changes in intensities and shapes of the bands. The magnitude of the effect depends on the ratio of the masses of the new and old isotopes and on the atom active position. According to these mentioned reasons large effects can be observed only if hydrogen atoms are substituted. With the effect of the substitution we dealt already in a former lecture. In this lecture we concentrate on the effect of the change of hydrogen to deuterium. We investigate the changes both experimentally and theoretically. There are two possibilities: - the hydrogen atom is in an active position, its interaction with the environment is strong, either it can dissociate or move on the skeleton of the molecule (tautomerism, resonance) and it can build hydrogen bond, (e.g. it is connected to nitrogen and oxygen atoms); - the hydrogen atom is in an indifferent position in the molecule, its interaction with the environment is weak (e.g. it joins carbon atom). When building the hydrogen bond besides the hydrogen donors also acceptors exist, namely, oxygen and nitrogen atoms having non-bonded electron pairs. When comparing the experimental and theoretical (calculated) effects of this type of isotope changes one must take into account that the calculations refer to the isolated molecule while the experimental spectra characterize the compound. The hydrogen bond is a very strong intermolecular interaction and produces tremendous changes in the infrared spectrum of the molecule in comparison to the imagined theoretical spectrum of the molecule. Some bands disappear, appear, or shift and deform drastically. The H/D change diminishes these effects. Of course, these changes entail the shift of several bands. The Raman spectrum is less sensitive to the large dipole moment changes therefore the deuteration effect is there less dramatic. Deuteration of hydrogen

  19. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    In this review an approach is outlined for studying molecules containing heavy atoms with the use of relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's). These potentials play the dual roles of (1) replacing the chemically-inert core electrons and (2) incorporating the mass velocity and Darwin term into a one-electron effective potential. This reduces the problem to a valence-electron problem and avoids computation of additional matrix elements involving relativistic operators. The spin-orbit effects are subsequently included using the molecular orbitals derived from the RECP calculation as a basis

  20. S-nitrosoglutathione promotes cell wall remodelling, alters the transcriptional profile and induces root hair formation in the hairless root hair defective 6 (rhd6) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Camila Fernandes; Gaspar, Marilia; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Salgado, Ione; Braga, Marcia Regina

    2017-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) exerts pleiotropic effects on plant development; however, its involvement in cell wall modification during root hair formation (RHF) has not yet been addressed. Here, mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered root hair phenotypes were used to assess the involvement of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), the primary NO source, in cell wall dynamics and gene expression in roots induced to form hairs. GSNO and auxin restored the root hair phenotype of the hairless root hair defective 6 (rhd6) mutant. A positive correlation was observed between increased NO production and RHF induced by auxin in rhd6 and transparent testa glabra (ttg) mutants. Deposition of an epitope within rhamnogalacturonan-I recognized by the CCRC-M2 antibody was delayed in root hair cells (trichoblasts) compared with nonhair cells (atrichoblasts). GSNO, but not auxin, restored the wild-type root glycome and transcriptome profiles in rhd6, modulating the expression of a large number of genes related to cell wall composition and metabolism, as well as those encoding ribosomal proteins, DNA and histone-modifying enzymes and proteins involved in post-translational modification. Our results demonstrate that NO plays a key role in cell wall remodelling in trichoblasts and suggest that it also participates in chromatin modification in root cells of A. thaliana. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Spin thermoelectric effects in organic single-molecule devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Wang, M.X.; Qian, C.; Hong, X.K.; Zhang, D.B.; Liu, Y.S.; Yang, X.F., E-mail: xfyang@cslg.edu.cn

    2017-05-25

    Highlights: • A stronger spin thermoelectric performance in a polyacetylene device is observed. • For the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, a transport gap is opened. Thus the thermoelectric effects are largely enhanced. - Abstract: The spin thermoelectric performance of a polyacetylene chain bridging two zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) is investigated based on first principles method. Two different edge spin arrangements in ZGNRs are considered. For ferromagnetic (FM) ordering, transmission eigenstates with different spin indices distributed below and above Fermi level are observed, leading directly to a strong spin thermoelectric effect in a wide temperature range. With the edge spins arranged in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, an obvious transport gap appears in the system, which greatly enhances the thermoelectric effects. The presence of a small spin splitting also induces a spin thermoelectric effect greater than the charge thermoelectric effect in certain temperature range. In general, the single-molecule junction exhibits the potential to be used for the design of perfect thermospin devices.

  2. Serological Survey for RHD Antibodies in Rabbits from Two Types of Rabbit Breeding Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, A; Niedbalski, W

    2016-09-01

    Seroprevalence studies of RHDV antibodies in domestic rabbits were conducted between 2008-2014. A total of 12,169 sera from the provinces of central, southern and south-east Poland, including 7,570 samples collected from mixed-breed rabbits reared in smallholder farms and nearly 4,600 sera taken mainly from unvaccinated rabbits kept in industrial farms, were examined using ELISA tests. Additionally, cross-reactivity of selected tested and control archival sera using both classic RHDV and RHDVa antigens was determined by HI assay. The overall seroprevalence was 13.3%. In rabbits with unkown history of immunisation or RHD infection which came from small farms, RHDV antibodies were detected in 6.1% ranging between 1.0% to 17.2% of animals. In rabbits of the same group, but with a declared vaccination status, or confirmed exposure to an infectious virus, or coming from exposed females, the seroprevalence ranged from 83% to 100%. Among unvaccinated meat rabbits aged 71 to 90 days from industrial farms, low (1.85%, 4.17%, 11%), medium (34%, 54%) or high rates (98.7%) of seropositivity were detected. The seroconversion recorded in adult vaccinated females from industrial farms was 70% and 95%. Generally, the antibody levels examined by ELISAs and HI were comparable. However, a number of sera from the rabbits from small farms, as well as archival sera, showed clear differences. Several-fold differences in antibody titers, evidenced mainly in the postoutbreak sera, indictaed the contact of animals with RHDVa antigen. The overall results of the survey revealed a great proportion of seronegative rabbits potentially highly susceptible to RHD infection. In combination with the emergence of a novel pathogenic RHD virus type (RHDV2), it poses a severe risk of a next wave of fatal disease cases spreading in the native population of domestic rabbits, especially in farms with a traditional system of husbandry.

  3. Ethical precepts for medical volunteerism: including local voices and values to guide RHD surgery in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coors, Marilyn E; Matthew, Thomas L; Matthew, Dayna B

    2015-10-01

    At the invitation of the Rwandan Government, Team Heart, a team of American healthcare professionals, performs volunteer rheumatic heart disease (RHD) surgery in Rwanda every year, and confronts ethical concerns that call for cultural sensitivity. This article describes how five standard bioethical precepts are applied in practice in medical volunteerism related to RHD surgery in Rwanda. The content for the applied precepts stems from semiscripted, transcribed conversations with the authors, two Rwandan cardiologists, a Rwandan nurse and a Rwandan premedical student. The conversations revealed that the criteria for RHD surgical selection in Rwanda are analogous to the patient-selection process involving material scarcity in the USA. Rwandan notions of benefit and harm focus more attention on structural issues, such as shared benefit, national reputation and expansion of expertise, than traditional Western notions. Harm caused by inadequate patient follow-up remains a critical concern. Gender disparities regarding biological and social implications of surgical valve choices impact considerations of justice. Individual agency remains important, but not central to Rwandan concepts of justice, transparency and respect, particularly regarding women. The Rwandan understanding of standard bioethical precepts is substantively similar to the traditionally recognised interpretation with important contextual differences. The communal importance of improving the health of a small number of individuals may be underestimated in previous literature. Moreover, openness and the incorporation of Rwandan stakeholders in difficult ethical choices and long-term contributions to indigenous medical capacity appear to be valued by Rwandans. These descriptions of applied precepts are applicable to different medical missions in other emerging nations following a similar process of inclusion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  4. Excited states rotational effects on the behavior of excited molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 7 is a collection of papers that discusses the excited states of molecules. The first paper reviews the rotational involvement in intra-molecular in vibrational redistribution. This paper analyzes the vibrational Hamiltonian as to its efficacy in detecting the manifestations of intra-molecular state-mixing in time-resolved and time-averaged spectroscopic measurements. The next paper examines the temporal behavior of intra-molecular vibration-rotation energy transfer (IVRET) and the effects of IVRET on collision, reaction, and the decomposition processes. This paper also

  5. Effects of Perchlorate on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was discovered in the northern polar region of Mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and has also been recently detected by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater [1,2]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [3]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about the effects of perchlorate on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate on organic molecules under martian surface conditions. Although perchlorate is typically inert under Mars-typical temperatures [5], perchlorate does absorb high energy UV radiation, and has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-) when exposed to martian conditions including UV or ionizing radiation [6,7]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate on the organic molecules tryptophan, benzoic acid and mellitic acid in order to determine how perchlorate may alter these compounds under Mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination. References: [1] Kounaves et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol. 115, p. E00E10, 2010 [2] Glavin et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol

  6. Routine noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal RHD in plasma of RhD-negative pregnant women-2years of screening experience from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, F. Banch; Steffensen, R.; Christiansen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Prenatal and postnatal RhD prophylaxis reduces the risk of RhD immunization in pregnancies of RhD-negative women. Based on the result from prenatal screening for the fetal RHD gene, prenatal RhD prophylaxis in Denmark is targeted to RhD-negative women who carry an RhD-positive fetus...... of newborns in 12,668 pregnancies. Early compliance was assessed for 690 pregnancies. Results: The sensitivity for the detection of fetal RHD was 99.9% (95% CI: 99.7-99.9%). Unnecessary recommendation of prenatal RhD prophylaxis was avoided in 97.3% of the women carrying an RhD-negative fetus. Fetuses...... that were seropositive for RhD were not detected in 11 pregnancies (0.087%). The sample uptake percentage was 84.2%, and the compliance for prenatal anti-D administration was 93.2%. Conclusion: The high sensitivity, maintained over 2years, underlines the reliability of routine prenatal fetal RHD screening...

  7. A DEL phenotype attributed to RHD Exon 9 sequence deletion: slipped-strand mispairing and blood group polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Genghis H; Turner, Robyn M; McGowan, Eunike C; Schoeman, Elizna M; Scott, Stacy A; O'Brien, Helen; Millard, Glenda M; Roulis, Eileen V; Allen, Amanda J; Liew, Yew-Wah; Flower, Robert L; Hyland, Catherine A

    2018-03-01

    The RhD blood group antigen is extremely polymorphic and the DEL phenotype represents one such class of polymorphisms. The DEL phenotype prevalent in East Asian populations arises from a synonymous substitution defined as RHD*1227A. However, initially, based on genomic and cDNA studies, the genetic basis for a DEL phenotype in Taiwan was attributed to a deletion of RHD Exon 9 that was never verified at the genomic level by any other independent group. Here we investigate the genetic basis for a Caucasian donor with a DEL partial D phenotype and compare the genomic findings to those initial molecular studies. The 3'-region of the RHD gene was amplified by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for massively parallel sequencing. Primers were designed to encompass a deletion, flanking Exon 9, by standard PCR for Sanger sequencing. Targeted sequencing of exons and flanking introns was also performed. Genomic DNA exhibited a 1012-bp deletion spanning from Intron 8, across Exon 9 into Intron 9. The deletion breakpoints occurred between two 25-bp repeat motifs flanking Exon 9 such that one repeat sequence remained. Deletion mutations bordered by repeat sequences are a hallmark of slipped-strand mispairing (SSM) event. We propose this genetic mechanism generated the germline deletion in the Caucasian donor. Extensive studies show that the RHD*1227A is the most prevalent DEL allele in East Asian populations and may have confounded the initial molecular studies. Review of the literature revealed that the SSM model explains some of the extreme polymorphisms observed in the clinically significant RhD blood group antigen. © 2017 AABB.

  8. Fano effect in the transport of an artificial molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimoto, Shota; Nakamura, Shuji; Okazaki, Yuma; Arakawa, Tomonori; Asano, Kenichi; Onomitsu, Koji; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kaneko, Nobu-hisa

    2018-05-01

    The Fano effect is a ubiquitous phenomenon arising from interference between a discrete energy state and an energy continuum. We explore this effect in an artificial molecule, namely, two lateral quantum dots (QDs) fabricated from a two-dimensional electron gas system and coupled in series. When the coupling between the leads and QDs is small, the charge stability diagram of the system shows a honeycomb lattice structure that is characteristic of a double QD system. As the coupling increases, a honeycomb structure consisting of the Fano resonances emerges. A numerical simulation based on the T-matrix method can satisfactorily reproduce our experimental observation. This report constitutes a clear example of the ubiquitous nature of the Fano effect in mesoscopic transport.

  9. Correlation and symmetry effects in transport through an artificial molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, F. [Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Cota, E. [Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada-UNAM, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Ulloa, S.E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Condensed Matter and Surface Sciences Program, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701-2979 (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Spectral weights and current-voltage characteristics of an artificial diatomic molecule are calculated, considering cases where the dots connected in series are in general different. The spectral weights allow us to understand the effects of correlations, their connection with selection rules for transport, and the role of excited states in the experimental conductance spectra of these coupled double dot systems (DDS). An extended Hubbard Hamiltonian with varying interdot tunneling strength is used as a model, incorporating quantum confinement in the DDS, interdot tunneling as well as intra- and interdot Coulomb interactions. We find that interdot tunneling values determine to a great extent the resulting eigenstates and corresponding spectral weights. Details of the state correlations strongly suppress most of the possible conduction channels, giving rise to effective selection rules for conductance through the molecule. Most states are found to make insignificant contributions to the total current for finite biases. We find also that the symmetry of the structure is reflected in the I-V characteristics, and is in qualitative agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Rh(D) fraction incompatibility causing hemolytic disease of the newborn. Report of two cases in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S K; Tham, K T; Cheung, K P; Jenkins, W J

    1982-07-01

    Two cases of hemolytic disease of new born in a Chinese family are reported. The hemolysis was due to the production in the mother of antibodies against fractions A, C, and D of Rh(D) antigen. The fractions were absent in the mother's red blood cells which are Rh(DB) but present in her babies. Rh(DB) may be detected by the use of two types of anti-D sera, one with and the other without anti-DB activity. For transfusion purpose, all DB patients so tested, would be regarded as Rh(D) negative.

  11. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinemann@tu-berlin.de; Klapp, Sabine H. L., E-mail: klapp@physik.tu-berlin.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Palczynski, Karol, E-mail: karol.palczynski@helmholtz-berlin.de; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Institut für Physik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB), Institute of Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  12. A new fetal RHD genotyping test: costs and benefits of mass testing to target antenatal anti-D prophylaxis in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepura, Ala; Osipenko, Leeza; Freeman, Karoline

    2011-01-18

    Postnatal and antenatal anti-D prophylaxis have dramatically reduced maternal sensitisations and cases of rhesus disease in babies born to women with RhD negative blood group. Recent scientific advances mean that non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD), based on the presence of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma, could be used to target prophylaxis on "at risk" pregnancies where the fetus is RhD positive. This paper provides the first assessment of cost-effectiveness of NIPD-targeted prophylaxis compared to current policies. We conducted an economic analysis of NIPD implementation in England and Wales. Two scenarios were considered. Scenario 1 assumed that NIPD will be only used to target antenatal prophylaxis with serology tests continuing to direct post-delivery prophylaxis. In Scenario 2, NIPD would also displace postnatal serology testing if an RhD negative fetus was identified. Costs were estimated from the provider's perspective for both scenarios together with a threshold royalty fee per test. Incremental costs were compared with clinical implications. The basic cost of an NIPD in-house test is £16.25 per sample (excluding royalty fee). The two-dose antenatal prophylaxis policy recommended by NICE is estimated to cost the NHS £3.37 million each year. The estimated threshold royalty fee is £2.18 and £8.83 for Scenarios 1 and 2 respectively. At a £2.00 royalty fee, mass NIPD testing would produce no saving for Scenario 1 and £507,154 per annum for Scenario 2. Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis indicates that, at a test sensitivity of 99.7% and this royalty fee, NIPD testing in Scenario 2 will generate one additional sensitisation for every £9,190 saved. If a single-dose prophylaxis policy were implemented nationally, as recently recommended by NICE, Scenario 2 savings would fall. Currently, NIPD testing to target anti-D prophylaxis is unlikely to be sufficiently cost-effective to warrant its large scale introduction in England and Wales. Only

  13. A new fetal RHD genotyping test: Costs and benefits of mass testing to target antenatal anti-D prophylaxis in England and Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osipenko Leeza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal and antenatal anti-D prophylaxis have dramatically reduced maternal sensitisations and cases of rhesus disease in babies born to women with RhD negative blood group. Recent scientific advances mean that non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD, based on the presence of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma, could be used to target prophylaxis on "at risk" pregnancies where the fetus is RhD positive. This paper provides the first assessment of cost-effectiveness of NIPD-targeted prophylaxis compared to current policies. Methods We conducted an economic analysis of NIPD implementation in England and Wales. Two scenarios were considered. Scenario 1 assumed that NIPD will be only used to target antenatal prophylaxis with serology tests continuing to direct post-delivery prophylaxis. In Scenario 2, NIPD would also displace postnatal serology testing if an RhD negative fetus was identified. Costs were estimated from the provider's perspective for both scenarios together with a threshold royalty fee per test. Incremental costs were compared with clinical implications. Results The basic cost of an NIPD in-house test is £16.25 per sample (excluding royalty fee. The two-dose antenatal prophylaxis policy recommended by NICE is estimated to cost the NHS £3.37 million each year. The estimated threshold royalty fee is £2.18 and £8.83 for Scenarios 1 and 2 respectively. At a £2.00 royalty fee, mass NIPD testing would produce no saving for Scenario 1 and £507,154 per annum for Scenario 2. Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis indicates that, at a test sensitivity of 99.7% and this royalty fee, NIPD testing in Scenario 2 will generate one additional sensitisation for every £9,190 saved. If a single-dose prophylaxis policy were implemented nationally, as recently recommended by NICE, Scenario 2 savings would fall. Conclusions Currently, NIPD testing to target anti-D prophylaxis is unlikely to be sufficiently cost-effective to

  14. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  15. Diatomic Molecules Effective Potential for an Harmonic Oscillator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model anharmonic potential was considered and was used in the Schrödinger time independent wave equation to describe a carbon monoxide molecule. Central difference scheme was used in approximating the derivative term in the Schrödinger equation leading to a tri-diagonal band system of equation. The method of ...

  16. Modeling Exoplanetary Atmospheres using BART, TEA, and Drift-RHD; Theoretical studies and Observational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    The explosion in the number of exoplanets detected to date has revealed a surprising diversity. When attempting to model this diversity, it is crucial to account for the uncertainties resulting from our limited knowledge of chemical, dynamical, and cloud formation processes in their atmospheres. Combining a retrieval technique with theorydriven models is a particularly promising way to address these processes and constrain a physically plausible atmospheric structure. In particular, a detailed micro-physical treatment of clouds and the longitudinal and latitudinal assessments of temperature and chemical profiles, have yet to be addressed in the field. Our team members are experts in radiative-hydrodynamic modeling (Dr. Ian DobbsDixon), cloud kinetics (Dr. Christiana Helling), retrievals and thermo-equilibrium chemistry (Dr. Jasmina Blecic), and observational diagnostics and predictions (Dr. Thomas Greene). The key goals of this proposal are to extend our understanding of the 3D atmospheric structure of gas-giant exoplanets by coupling state-of-the-art selfconsistent models together with a retrieval framework to 1) address cloud kinetics in retrievals, 2) assess 3D temperature and chemical structures in retrievals, 3) model a suite of well-observed planets within the framework of our models, and 4) make observational predictions for current and future NASA missions. To address these goals we have developed a number of tools: Drift-RHD, TEA, BART, and OBS. Drift-RHD solves both the 3D radiative-hydrodynamic equations and a time dependent kinetic cloud model. TEA, Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances, calculates abundances of chemical species present in the atmosphere. BART, a Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer code, is a statistical retrieval framework to explore the parameter space of atmospheric chemical abundances and thermal profiles. OBS is a suite of tools developed to simulate observations. Though these tools exist and have been utilized independently in

  17. No Acoustic Evidence from RHD for a Right Hemisphere Role in Prosody Production: A Meta-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weed, Ethan; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    No acoustic evidence from RHD for a right hemisphere role in prosody production: A meta-analysis. Ethan Weed and Riccardo Fusaroli (Aarhus University, Denmark) Poster : The right hemisphere (RH) is often thought to have a special role in prosody comprehension and production in general...... by regression analysis of funnel plots for F0 (z = 1.5937, p = 0.1110). Intensity did show evidence of publication bias (z = -4.1582, p role for the RH in prosody...

  18. Stereoelectronic Effect-Induced Conductance Switching in Aromatic Chain Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Na; Wang, Jinying; Jia, Chuancheng; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Xisha; Yu, Chenmin; Li, Mingliang; Wang, Shuopei; Gong, Yao; Sun, Hantao; Zhang, Guanxin; Liu, Zhirong; Zhang, Guangyu; Liao, Jianhui; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2017-02-08

    Biphenyl, as the elementary unit of organic functional materials, has been widely used in electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, over decades little has been fundamentally understood regarding how the intramolecular conformation of biphenyl dynamically affects its transport properties at the single-molecule level. Here, we establish the stereoelectronic effect of biphenyl on its electrical conductance based on the platform of graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions, where a specifically designed hexaphenyl aromatic chain molecule is covalently sandwiched between nanogapped graphene point contacts to create stable single-molecule junctions. Both theoretical and temperature-dependent experimental results consistently demonstrate that phenyl twisting in the aromatic chain molecule produces different microstates with different degrees of conjugation, thus leading to stochastic switching between high- and low-conductance states. These investigations offer new molecular design insights into building functional single-molecule electrical devices.

  19. Effects of confinement on the Rydberg molecule NeH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, J M H; Klobukowski, M; Bielinska-Waz, D; Diercksen, G H F; Schreiner, E W S

    2005-01-01

    Ab initio potential energy curves of the Rydberg NeH molecule in the presence of cylindrical spatial confinement were computed by the method of multi-reference configuration interaction with extended basis sets. The influence of the applied potential to the structures and spectra of the ground and excited states of NeH was analysed in terms of perturbation theory. In addition, the phenomenon of field-induced ionization was discussed

  20. Effective intermolecular potential and critical point for C60 molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, J. Eloy

    2017-07-01

    The approximate nonconformal (ANC) theory is applied to the C60 molecule. A new binary potential function is developed for C60, which has three parameters only and is obtained by averaging the site-site carbon interactions on the surface of two C60 molecules. It is shown that the C60 molecule follows, to a good approximation, the corresponding states principle with n-C8H18, n-C4F10 and n-C5F12. The critical point of C60 is estimated in two ways: first by applying the corresponding states principle under the framework of the ANC theory, and then by using previous computer simulations. The critical parameters obtained by applying the corresponding states principle, although very different from those reported in the literature, are consistent with the previous results of the ANC theory. It is shown that the Girifalco potential does not correspond to an average of the site-site carbon-carbon interaction.

  1. Quantum interference effects at room temperature in OPV-based single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arroyo, Carlos R.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    Interference effects on charge transport through an individual molecule can lead to a notable modulation and suppression on its conductance. In this letter, we report the observation of quantum interference effects occurring at room temperature in single-molecule junctions based on oligo(3......)-phenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives, in which the central benzene ring is coupled to either para- or meta-positions. Using the break-junction technique, we find that the conductance for a single meta-OPV3 molecule wired between gold electrodes is one order of magnitude smaller than that of a para-OPV3 molecule...

  2. Immunologic basis and immunoprophylaxis of RhD induced hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payam Khaja Pasha, Roya; Shokri, Fazel

    2008-12-01

    RhD antigen is the most immunogenic and clinically significant antigen of red blood cells after ABO system. It has historically been associated with hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) which is now routinely prevented by the administration of polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin. This management of HDN has proven to be one of the most successful cases of prophylactic treatment based on antibody mediated immune suppression (AMIS). Despite the increasing efficiency of treatment, the mechanism of action of anti-D is not completely defined. There is a widespread interest in obtaining a reliable therapeutic monoclonal anti-D, due to difficulty of maintaining a pool of high titer volunteer donors for plasma collection and also increasing demand for antenatal prophylaxis and safety issues with plasma derived products. Candidate monoclonal anti-D preparations should demonstrate appropriate functionality in both in vitro and in vivo assays comparable to polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin. These criteria are reviewed in addition to the factors regulating development of D specific immune response in D negative individuals and its suppression in HDN prophylaxis.

  3. Inferencing Processes after Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: Effects of Contextual Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Margaret Lehman

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Comprehension deficits associated with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) have been attributed to an inability to use context, but there is little direct evidence to support the claim. This study evaluated the effect of varying contextual bias on predictive inferencing by adults with RHD. Method: Fourteen adults with no brain damage…

  4. Superradiance Effects in the Linear and Nonlinear Optical Response of Quantum Dot Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, A.; Machnikowski, P.

    2008-11-01

    We calculate the linear optical response from a single quantum dot molecule and the nonlinear, four-wave-mixing response from an inhomogeneously broadened ensemble of such molecules. We show that both optical signals are affected by the coupling-dependent superradiance effect and by optical interference between the two polarizations. As a result, the linear and nonlinear responses are not identical.

  5. Effect of oscillation mode on the free-molecule squeeze-film air damping

    KAUST Repository

    Gang Hong,; Wenjing Ye,

    2010-01-01

    A 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulation approach is developed and employed to study the effect of the oscillation mode on the squeeze-film air damping in the free-molecule regime. By tracking individual gas molecule's motion and its interaction

  6. Effect of organic molecules on hydrolysis of peptide bond: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makshakova, Olga; Ermakova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► DFT study of the effects of small organic molecules on the hydrolysis reactions of peptide bonds. ► Organic molecules can activate nonenzymatic hydrolysis reaction. ► Influence of organic acids on activation energy barrier correlates with their electronegativity. - Abstract: The activation and inhibition effects of small organic molecules on peptide hydrolysis have been studied using a model compound dialanine and DFT approach. Solvent-assisted and non-assisted concerted mechanisms were analyzed. Several transition states for the systems: alanine dipeptide–water molecule in complexes with alcohol molecules, acetonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, propionic, lactic and pyruvic acids and water molecules were localized. The formation of hydrogen bonds between dipeptide, reactive water molecule and molecules of solvents influences the activation energy barrier of the peptide bond hydrolytic reaction. Strong effect of organic acids on the activation energy barrier correlates with their electronegativity. Acetonitrile can act as an inhibitor of reaction. Mechanisms of regulation of the activation energy barrier are discussed in the terms of donor-acceptor interactions

  7. Generalized transition state theory. Quantum effects for collinear reactions of hydrogen molecules and isotopically substituted hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    Canonical variational transition state theory, microcanonical variational transition state theory, and Miller's unified statistical theory were used in an attempt to correct two major deficiencies of the conventional transition state theory. These are: (1) the necessity of extra assumptions to include quantum mechanical tunneling effects and (2) the fundamental assumption that trajectories crossing a dividing surface in phase space proceed directly to products. The accuracy of these approximate methods were tested by performing calculations for several collinear reactions of hydrogen, deuterium, chlorine, or iodine, with five isotopes of hydrogen molecules and comparison of these results with those from accurate quantitative calculations of the reaction probabilities as functions of energy and of the thermal rate constants as functions of temperature. 49 references, 28 figures, 17 tables

  8. Frequencies and ethnic distribution of ABO and RhD blood groups in China: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jue; Zhang, Shikun; Wang, Qiaomei; Shen, Haiping; Zhang, Yiping; Liu, Min

    2017-12-03

    ABO and RhD blood groups are key factors affecting blood transfusion safety. The distribution of ABO and RhD blood groups varies globally, but limited data exist for ethnic distributions of these blood groups in Asian populations. We aimed to evaluate the distribution of ABO and RhD blood groups among Chinese ethnic groups. A population-based cross-sectional study. Data on ABO groups and ethnicities were obtained from the National Free Preconception Health Examination Project (NFPHEP) with participants from 220 counties of 31 provinces in China PARTICIPANTS: There were 3 832 034 participants aged 21-49 years who took part in the NFPHEP from January 2010 to December 2012 and were included in this study. The proportion of ABO and RhD blood groups among different ethnic groups was calculated. ABO and RhD blood distribution was significantly different among nine ethnic groups (Pgroups, the Yi group had more A phenotypes (34.0%), and the Manchu (33.7%) and Mongolian (33.3%) ethnic groups had more B phenotypes. The Zhuang group had the greatest proportion of O phenotypes (41.8%), followed by the Miao group (37.7%). AB phenotypes were more frequent in the Uygur ethnic group (10.6%) but lower in the Zhuang group (5.5%). Meanwhile, RhD negativity (RhD-) was greater in the Uygur group (3.3%) than in the Mongolian (0.3%) and Manchu ethnic groups (0.4%). O RhD- blood groups were more frequent in the Uygur group (0.8%) than in the other ethnic groups (0.1%-0.4%, Pblood phenotypes vary across different ethnic groups in China. The diversity in the distribution of the ABO and RhD blood groups in different ethnic groups should be considered when developing rational and evidence-based strategies for blood collection and management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Women's attitude towards prenatal screening for red blood cell antibodies, other than RhD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Schoot CE

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since July 1998 all Dutch women (± 200,000/y are screened for red cell antibodies, other than anti-RhesusD (RhD in the first trimester of pregnancy, to facilitate timely treatment of pregnancies at risk for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN. Evidence for benefits, consequences and costs of screening for non-RhD antibodies is still under discussion. The screening program was evaluated in a nation-wide study. As a part of this evaluation study we investigated, according to the sixth criterium of Wilson and Jüngner, the acceptance by pregnant women of the screening program for non-RhD antibodies. Methods Controlled longitudinal survey, including a prenatal and a postnatal measurement by structured questionnaires. Main outcome measures: information satisfaction, anxiety during the screening process (a.o. STAI state inventory and specific questionnaire modules, overall attitude on the screening program. Univariate analysis was followed by standard multivariate analysis to identify significant predictors of the outcome measures. Participants: 233 pregnant women, distributed over five groups, according to the screening result. Results Satisfaction about the provided information was moderate in all groups. All screen- positive groups desired more supportive information. Anxiety increased in screen- positives during the screening process, but decreased to basic levels postnatally. All groups showed a strongly positive balance between perceived utility and burden of the screening program, independent on test results or background characteristics. Conclusion Women highly accept the non-RhD antibody screening program. However, satisfaction about provided information is moderate. Oral and written information should be provided by obstetric care workers themselves, especially to screen-positive women.

  10. The effect of adhesion molecule blockade on pulmonary reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Adrian J; Parkes, Karen; Rooney, Stephen J; Bonser, Robert S

    2002-04-01

    Selectins are the molecules involved in the initial adhesion of the activated neutrophil on pulmonary endothelium. We investigated the efficacy of selectin blockade in a selective (monoclonal antibody RMP-1) and nonselective (Fucoidin) manner in pulmonary reperfusion injury. Groups of six rat lungs were flushed with University of Wisconsin solution then stored at 4 degrees C for 4 hours. They then underwent sanguinous reperfusion for 30 minutes during which functional measures (gas exchange, pulmonary artery pressure, and airway pressure) of lung performance were made. After reperfusion we estimated their capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc units g/cm water/minute/g wet lung tissue) using a gravimetric technique. Four groups were studied: group I had no reperfusion, group II had 30 minutes of reperfusion, group III had infusion of 20 mg/kg Fucoidin before reperfusion, and group IV had infusion of 20 microg/mL RMP-1 before reperfusion. Reperfusion injury was found between groups I and II by an increase in capillary filtration coefficient (1.048 +/- 0.316 to 3.063 +/- 0.466, p Kfc than group II (0.967 +/- 0.134 and 1.205 +/- 0.164, respectively, p < 0.01). There was no significant functional difference between groups II, III, and IV. Reperfusion-induced hyperpermeability was ameliorated by selective (RMP-1) and nonselective (Fucoidin) selectin blockade.

  11. Taiwan experience suggests that RhD typing for blood transfusion is unnecessary in southeast Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Marie

    2006-01-01

    The high frequency of RhD (D) antigen among Taiwanese persons (99.67%) often imposes unnecessary risks of under-transfusion on D- patients awaiting D- blood. Also because of the rare occurrence of anti-D among Taiwanese persons, routine pretransfusion D typing has been discontinued in the Mackay Memorial Hospital since 1988. This report is the retrospective evaluation of the outcome of abolishing RhD typing for Taiwanese. More than 10 years of alloantibody data at Mackay Memorial Hospital Blood Bank were reviewed. The cases with anti-D were further used to analyze the potency of D antigen and to observe whether there were differences in the incidence of anti-D before and after discontinuation of routine D typing among Taiwanese individuals. The incidence of anti-D before and after discontinuation of routine pretransfusion D typing has remained unchanged. The immunogenicity of D and "Mi(a)" in Taiwanese persons is found to be similar. In terms of opportunity for immunization, however, the "Mi(a)" antigen (phenotype frequency 7.3% in Taiwanese persons) has become the most important blood group antigen in Taiwan. The results strongly support the exclusion of D typing from routine compatibility testing for individuals of Taiwanese origin. Because the low incidence of D- and relatively high incidence of "Mi(a)"+ phenotypes are common findings throughout southeast Asia, and because a population genetic study revealed that the Taiwanese people are genetically related to southern Asian populations, it is suggested that RhD typing for blood transfusion is unnecessary among southeast Asian populations.

  12. DAR, a new RhD variant involving exons 4, 5, and 7, often in linkage with ceAR, a new Rhce variant frequently found in African blacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemker, M. B.; Ligthart, P. C.; Berger, L.; van Rhenen, D. J.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Wijk, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    The highly polymorphic Rh system is encoded by 2 homologous genes RHD and RHCE. Gene rearrangements, deletions, or point mutations may cause partial D and CE antigens. In this study, a new RHD variant, DAR, and a new RHCE variant, ceAR, are described in 4 Dutch African Blacks. Serologically, DAR

  13. DAR, a new RhD variant involving exons 4, 5, and 7, often in linkage with ceAR, a new Rhce variant frequently found in African blacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Hemker (Mirte); P.C. Ligthart; L. Berger (Loïc); D.J. van Rhenen (Dirk Jan); C.E. van der Schoot (Ellen); P.A. Wijk

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe highly polymorphic Rh system is encoded by 2 homologous genes RHD and RHCE. Gene rearrangements, deletions, or point mutations may cause partial D and CE antigens. In this study, a new RHD variant, DAR, and a new RHCE variant, ceAR, are described in 4

  14. [Standardization of the quantitative flow cytometric test with anti-D antibodies for fetomaternal hemorrhage in RhD negative women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychalska, Justyna; Uhrynowska, Małgorzata; Pyl, Hanna; Klimczak-Jajor, Edyta; Kopeć, Izabella; Peciakowska, Małgorzata; Gutowska, Renata; Gawlak, Maciej; Słomska, Sylwia; Dąbkowska, Syiwia; Szczecina, Roman; Dębska, Marzena; Brojer, Ewa

    2015-07-01

    In order to determine the appropriate dose of anti-D immunoglobulin to be administered as a preventive measure against hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn in the subsequent pregnancy it is necessary to assess the number of fetal red blood cells that infiltrate/penetrate into the maternal circulation as a result of fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH). One of the quantitative methods of FMH analysis is based on flow cytometry (FACS) which makes use of monoclonal antibodies to RhD antigen (anti-D test). The aim of the study was to further develop the method, evaluate its sensitivity and reproducibility and to compare it with the test based on the detection of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). The FACS study involved 20 RhD negative pregnant women and 80 RhD negative women after delivery. The following monoclonal antibodies were used: BRAD 3 FITC (anti-RhD antigen), CD45 PerCP (anti leukocyte antigen CD45), and anti-HbF PE. The fluorescence intensity of cells incubated with BRAD 3 FITC was demonstrated to depend on the RhD antigen expression, though the anti-D test also detects the weak D variant. The CD45 PerCP antibodies increased the sensitivity of anti-D test since they eliminated the leukocytes which non-specifically bind anti-D from the analysis. The presence of anti-D antibodies in maternal plasma does not affect the quantitative assessment of the fetal RhD positive fetal cells with BRAD 3 FITC. In case of FMH, the results of the anti-D test were similar to those with anti-HbF antibodies. The flow cytometric test with anti-D and anti-CD45 is useful in the assessment of the fetomaternal hemorrhage in RhD negative women. The sensitivity of the test is estimated at 0.05%.

  15. Stark--Zeeman effect of metastable hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagann, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The Stark effect of the N = 1 rotational level of orthohydrogen and the N = 2 rotational level of parahydrogen in the metastable c 3 PI/sub u/ electronic state has been measured using the molecular beam magnetic resonance method. The Stark effect of the metastable state is 10,000 times larger than that of the ground electronic state. The Stark effect of parahydrogen was found to be weakly dependent on static magnetic field strength, whereas the Stark effect of orthohydrogen was found to be more strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength. The Stark effect of orthohydrogen has been calculated using second-order perturbation theory with a pure Stark effect perturbation. The magnetic field dependence of the Stark effect was calculated using third-order perturbation theory with a mixed Stark--Zeeman effect double perturbation. A comparison of the experimental and theoretical values of α/sub perpendicular/ provides information on the electronic transition moment connecting the c 3 PI/sub u/ state to the a 3 Σ + /sub g/ state. The transition moment is needed to calculate the radiative lifetimes of the various vibrational levels of the c 3 PI/sub u/ state. The transition moment also enters the calculation of the quenching of this metastable state by an external electric field. There is a disagreement between theoretical predictions and the results of an experiment on the electric field quenching of the metastables. A test of the electronic transition moment may help shed light on this question. The experimental determination of the values of the transition moments allows one to test theory by comparing these values to those obtained by calculations employing ab initio wavefunctions

  16. Effect of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis planktonic/biofilm quorum sensing molecules on yeast morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Mariana; Martins, Margarida Isabel Barros Coelho; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2006-01-01

    One of the aims of this work was to study the effect of farnesol, a quorum sensing molecule for Candida albicans, on morphologic inhibition of Candida dubliniensis. The second goal of this work was to confirm if Candida dubliniensis also excreted quorum sensing molecules, on both planktonic and biofilm forms. The results clearly demonstrate that Candida dubliniensis undergoes morphological alterations triggered by farnesol. It was also found that supernatants of Candida dubliniensis and Ca...

  17. Effect of an improved molecular potential on strong-field tunneling ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Songfeng; Jin Cheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of one-electron model potentials on the tunneling ionization rates of molecules in strong fields. By including electron correlation using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LB α) model, the binding energies of outer shells of molecules are significantly improved. However, we show that the tunneling ionization rates from the LB α do not differ much from the earlier calculations [Phys. Rev. A 81, 033423 (2010)], in which the local correlation potential was neglected.

  18. Effect of dipole polarizability on positron binding by strongly polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribakin, G F; Swann, A R

    2015-01-01

    A model for positron binding to polar molecules is considered by combining the dipole potential outside the molecule with a strongly repulsive core of a given radius. Using existing experimental data on binding energies leads to unphysically small core radii for all of the molecules studied. This suggests that electron–positron correlations neglected in the simple model play a large role in determining the binding energy. We account for these by including the polarization potential via perturbation theory and non-perturbatively. The perturbative model makes reliable predictions of binding energies for a range of polar organic molecules and hydrogen cyanide. The model also agrees with the linear dependence of the binding energies on the polarizability inferred from the experimental data (Danielson et al 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 235203). The effective core radii, however, remain unphysically small for most molecules. Treating molecular polarization non-perturbatively leads to physically meaningful core radii for all of the molecules studied and enables even more accurate predictions of binding energies to be made for nearly all of the molecules considered. (paper)

  19. Magnetic Field Effect in Conjugated Molecules-Based Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-23

    line shapes of magnetoconductance curves for diodes of pentacene:fullerene charge transfer complexes” Org . Electron. 15, 3076 (2014). (AOARD-14-4012...2. “The origins in the transformation of ambipolar to n-type pentacene-based organic field-effect transistors” Org . Electron. 15, 1759 (2014...shell nanoparticles doped PEDOT:PSS hole-transporter. Org . Electron. : Phys. Mater. Appl. 33, 221-226 (2016). 5. Huang, X., Wang, K. Yi, C., Meng, T

  20. Frequencies and ethnic distribution of ABO and Rh(D) blood groups in Mauritania: results of first nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, C T; Bollahi, M A; Abdelhamid, I; Med Mahmoud, M A; Ba, B; Ghaber, S; Habti, N; Houmeida, A

    2012-04-01

    There is no data available on the ABO/Rh(D) frequencies in the Mauritanian population. We retrospectively analysed records of a 5-year database that contained ABO/Rh phenotype and ethnic origin of 10 116 volunteers giving blood at the national blood transfusion centre to derive the frequencies of ABO/Rh(D) groups in the Mauritanian population. The two race categories in the country and their sub-ethnic groups: the Moors (whites and black) and the black Africans (Pulhars, Soninkes and Wolof) were included in this study. Globally, group O had the highest frequency (49.10%) followed by A (28.28%), B (18.56%) and AB (4.05%). This order more common in North African populations was found in four of the five ethnic groups composing our population. Allele frequencies were, respectively, 70.20%, 17.74% and 12.04% giving the same order of O > A > B. We observed no significant variation in these frequencies between the different ethnic groups. Rhesus study showed that with a percentage of 94.23% Rh(D) positive is by far the most prevalent, while Rh(D) negative is present only in 5.77% of the total population. This frequency distribution supports the mixed-race composition of the Mauritanian population. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Desorption of large molecules with light-element clusters: Effects of cluster size and substrate nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delcorte, Arnaud, E-mail: arnaud.delcorte@uclouvain.be [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences - Bio and Soft Matter, Universite catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud, 1 bte 3, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Garrison, Barbara J. [Department of Chemistry, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    This contribution focuses on the conditions required to desorb a large hydrocarbon molecule using light-element clusters. The test molecule is a 7.5 kDa coil of polystyrene (PS61). Several projectiles are compared, from C{sub 60} to 110 kDa organic droplets and two substrates are used, amorphous polyethylene and mono-crystalline gold. Different aiming points and incidence angles are examined. Under specific conditions, 10 keV nanodrops can desorb PS61 intact from a gold substrate and from a soft polyethylene substrate. The prevalent mechanism for the desorption of intact and 'cold' molecules is one in which the molecules are washed away by the projectile constituents and entrained in their flux, with an emission angle close to {approx}70 deg. The effects of the different parameters on the dynamics and the underlying physics are discussed in detail and the predictions of the model are compared with other published studies.

  2. Desorption of large molecules with light-element clusters: Effects of cluster size and substrate nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delcorte, Arnaud; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    This contribution focuses on the conditions required to desorb a large hydrocarbon molecule using light-element clusters. The test molecule is a 7.5 kDa coil of polystyrene (PS61). Several projectiles are compared, from C 60 to 110 kDa organic droplets and two substrates are used, amorphous polyethylene and mono-crystalline gold. Different aiming points and incidence angles are examined. Under specific conditions, 10 keV nanodrops can desorb PS61 intact from a gold substrate and from a soft polyethylene substrate. The prevalent mechanism for the desorption of intact and 'cold' molecules is one in which the molecules are washed away by the projectile constituents and entrained in their flux, with an emission angle close to ∼70 deg. The effects of the different parameters on the dynamics and the underlying physics are discussed in detail and the predictions of the model are compared with other published studies.

  3. Influence of thermocleavable functionality on organic field-effect transistor performance of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Rajashree Y.; Dharmapurikar, Satej S.; Chini, Mrinmoy Kumar; Venugopalan, Vijay

    2017-06-01

    Diketopyrrolopyrrole based donor-acceptor-donor conjugated small molecules using ethylene dioxythiophene as a donor was synthesized. Electron deficient diketopyrrolopyrrole unit was substituted with thermocleavable (tert-butyl acetate) side chains. The thermal treatment of the molecules at 160 °C eliminated the tert-butyl ester group results in the formation of corresponding acid. Optical and theoretical studies revealed that the molecules adopted a change in molecular arrangement after thermolysis. The conjugated small molecules possessed p-channel charge transport characteristics in organic field effect transistors. The charge carrier mobility was increased after thermolysis of tert-butyl ester group to 5.07 × 10-5 cm2/V s.

  4. Effect of oscillation mode on the free-molecule squeeze-film air damping

    KAUST Repository

    Gang Hong,

    2010-01-01

    A 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulation approach is developed and employed to study the effect of the oscillation mode on the squeeze-film air damping in the free-molecule regime. By tracking individual gas molecule\\'s motion and its interaction with the resonator, the MC approach is by far the most accurate modeling approach for the modeling of squeeze-film damping in the free-molecule regime. The accuracy of this approach is demonstrated on several cases in which either analytical solutions or experimental measurements are available. It has been found that unlike the case when resonators oscillate in an unbounded domain, squeeze film damping is very sensitive to the mode shape, which implies that some of the existing modeling approaches based on rigid-resonator assumption may not be accurate when applied to model resonators oscillating at their deformed shape. ©2010 IEEE.

  5. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan; Domingo, M.P.; Pardo, Julian; Gräber, P.; Galvez, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► It is possible to eliminate the blinking effect of a water-soluble QD. ► We provide a direct method to study protein function and dynamics at the single level. ► QD, potent tool for single molecule studies of biochemical and biological processes. -- Abstract: Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the “on”/“off” states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein–protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  6. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Albertstrasse 23a, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Domingo, M.P. [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Miguel Luesma 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Pardo, Julian [Grupo Apoptosis, Inmunidad y Cancer, Departamento Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular y Celular, Fac. Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Fundacion Aragon I-D (ARAID), Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain); Immune Effector Cells Group, Aragon Health Research Institute (IIS Aragon), Biomedical Research Centre of Aragon (CIBA) Fundacion Aragon I-D - ARAID, Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain); Graeber, P. [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Albertstrasse 23a, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Galvez, E.M., E-mail: eva@icb.csic.es [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Miguel Luesma 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Immune Effector Cells Group, Aragon Health Research Institute (IIS Aragon), Biomedical Research Centre of Aragon (CIBA) Fundacion Aragon I-D - ARAID, Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is possible to eliminate the blinking effect of a water-soluble QD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a direct method to study protein function and dynamics at the single level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QD, potent tool for single molecule studies of biochemical and biological processes. -- Abstract: Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the 'on'/'off' states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  7. Influence of the effective mass of water molecule on thermal neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, M.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of the effective water molecule mass on the thermal neutron scattering on the nucleus of the hydrogen atom has been investigated. Besides the actual water molecule mass (M = 18) the investigations have been carried out with its two effective values (M1 = 16 and M2 = 20). The differential and total cross sections have been calculated for the incident thermal neutron energy E o = 1 eV. Investigation results show different prominence of the quantum effects and for M2 the appearance of peaks in the quasielastic scattering. (author)

  8. Acenes, Heteroacenes and Analogous Molecules for Organic Photovoltaic and Field Effect Transistor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Devin Benjamin

    donor molecules for bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics based on anthrathiophene and benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene central units like literature molecules containing fluorene and dithieno[2,3-b:2',3'-d]silole cores. The synthetic strategies of developing reduced symmetry benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene to study the effect of substitution around the central unit is also described. The optical and electronic properties of the donors and acceptors are described along with the performance and characteristics of devices employing these molecules. The final two data chapters focus on new nitrogen containing polycyclic hydrocarbons containing indolizine and (2.2.2) cyclazine units. The optical, electronic and other physical properties of these molecules are explored, in addition to the synthetic strategies for incorporating the indolizine and cyclazine units. By use of alkylsilylethynyl groups, crystal engineering was investigated for the benzo[2,3-b:5,6-b']diindolizine chromophore described in chapter 4 to target the 2-D "brick-work" packing motif for application in field effect transistor devices. Optical and electronic properties of the cyclazine end-capped acene molecules described in chapter 5 were investigated and described in relation to the base acene molecules. In both cases, density functional theory calculations were conducted to better understand unexpected optical properties of these molecules, which are like the linear acene series despite the non-linear attachment.

  9. Screening and identification of RhD antigen mimic epitopes from a phage display random peptide library for the serodiagnosis of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Song, Jingjing; Zhou, Shuimei; Fu, Yourong; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Shen, Changxin

    2018-01-16

    Identification of RhD antigen epitopes is a key component in understanding the pathogenesis of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn. Research has indicated that phage display libraries are useful tools for identifying novel mimic epitopes (mimotopes) which may help to determine antigen specificity. We selected the mimotopes of blood group RhD antigen by affinity panning a phage display library using monoclonal anti-D. After three rounds of biopanning, positive phage clones were identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then sent for sequencing and peptides synthesis. Next, competitive ELISA and erythrocyte haemagglutination inhibition tests were carried out to confirm the inhibitory activity of the synthetic peptide. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of the synthetic peptide, a diagnostic ELISA was examined. Fourteen of 35 phage clones that were chosen randomly from the titering plate were considered to be positive. Following DNA sequencing and translation, 11 phage clones were found to represent the same peptide - RMKMLMMLMRRK (P4) - whereas each of the other three clones represented a unique peptide. Through the competitive ELISA and erythrocyte haemagglutination inhibition tests, the peptide (P4) was verified to have the ability to mimic the RhD antigen. The diagnostic ELISA for P4 proved to be sensitive (82.61%) and specific (88.57%). This study reveals that the P4 peptide can mimic RhD antigen and paves the way for the development of promising targeted diagnostic and therapeutic platforms for haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn.

  10. Low dose radiation induced protein and its effect on expression of CD25 molecule in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Duicai; Su Liaoyuan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To find the substantial basis for effects of low dose radiation, on development, extraction, and the biogical activity of the low-dose radiation-induced proteins, and the effects of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Methods: 1. Healthy Kumning male mice exposed to radiation of 226 Ra γ-rays at 5, 10 and 15 cGy respectively. The mice were killed 2 hours after exposure, the spleen cells were broken with ultrasonic energy and then ultra-centrifugalized at low temperature (4 degree C). The LDR-induced proteins were obtained in the supernatant solution. Then the changes of CD25 molecule was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) with immunofluorescence technique, which was used to reflect the effect of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Results: LDR induced proteins were obtained from spleen cells in mice exposed to 5-15 cGy whole body radiation. Conclusion: The expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes was increased significantly after use of LDR induced proteins. LDR induced proteins can enhance expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes slightly

  11. Bianthrone in a Single-Molecule Junction: Conductance Switching with a Bistable Molecule Facilitated by Image Charge Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Bianthrone is a sterically hindered compound that exists in the form of two nonplanar isomers. Our experimental study of single-molecule junctions with bianthrone reveals persistent switching of electric conductance at low temperatures, which can be reasonably associated with molecular isomerizat...

  12. Charge Transfer Effect on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Furfural Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fu; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Weigen; Gu, Zhaoliang; Du, Lingling; Wang, Pinyi; Wang, Jianxin; Huang, Yingzhou

    2017-08-02

    The detection of furfural in transformer oil through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is one of the most promising online monitoring techniques in the process of transformer aging. In this work, the Raman of individual furfural molecules and SERS of furfural-M x (M = Ag, Au, Cu) complexes are investigated through density functional theory (DFT). In the Raman spectrum of individual furfural molecules, the vibration mode of each Raman peak is figured out, and the deviation from experimental data is analyzed by surface charge distribution. In the SERS of furfural-M x complexes, the influence of atom number and species on SERS chemical enhancement factors (EFs) are studied, and are further analyzed by charge transfer effect. Our studies strengthen the understanding of charge transfer effect in the SERS of furfural molecules, which is important in the online monitoring of the transformer aging process through SERS.

  13. Effect of continuous recombinant human endostatin pumping combined with TP chemotherapy on serum malignant molecules and angiogenesis molecules in patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Dong Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of continuous recombinant human endostatin pumping combined with TP chemotherapy on serum malignant molecules and angiogenesis molecules in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods: 78 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who were treated in our hospital between July 2011 and December 2015 were selected and divided into observation group and control group (n=39 according to the single-blind randomized control method. Before treatment and after 4 cycles of treatment, electrochemical luminescence immunity analyzer was used to detect serum tumor marker levels; RIA method was used to determine serum apoptosis molecule levels; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect the serum angiogenesis molecule levels. Results: Before treatment, differences in serum levels of tumor markers, apoptosis molecules and angiogenesis molecules were not statistically significant between two groups of patients (P>0.05. After 4 cycles of treatment, serum carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125, carbohydrate antigen 153 (CA153, human epididymis protein 4 (HE4, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG, Bcl-2, Survivin, Bag-1, angiogenin-2 (Ang-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF levels of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group (P<0.05 while Bax level was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Continuous recombinant human endostatin pumping combined with TP chemotherapy can decrease the malignant degree of advanced ovarian cancer and inhibit angiogenesis.

  14. ABO and RhD blood groups and gestational hypertensive disorders: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B K; Zhang, Z; Wikman, A; Lindqvist, P G; Reilly, M

    2012-09-01

    To examine the association between ABO and RhD blood groups and gestational hypertensive disorders in a large population-based cohort. Cohort study. Risks of gestational hypertensive disorders, pre-eclampsia, and severe pre-eclampsia, estimated by odds ratios for maternal ABO blood group and RhD status. National health registers of Sweden. All singleton deliveries in Sweden born to first-time mothers during the period 1987-2002 [total n = 641 926; any gestational hypertensive disorders, n = 39 011 (6.1%); pre-eclampsia cases, n = 29 337 (4.6%); severe pre-eclampsia cases, n = 8477 (1.3%)]. Using blood group O as a reference, odds ratios of gestational hypertensive disorders, pre-eclampsia, and severe pre-eclampsia were obtained from logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors. Gestational hypertensive disorders, pre-eclampsia, and severe pre-eclampsia. Compared with blood group O, all non-O blood groups had modest but statistically significantly higher odds of pre-eclampsia. Blood group AB had the highest risk for pre-eclampsia (OR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.04-1.16) and severe pre-eclampsia (OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.07-1.30). RhD-positive mothers had a small increased risk for pre-eclampsia (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03-1.10). In the largest study on this topic to date, women with AB blood group have the highest risks of gestational hypertensive disorders, pre-eclampsia, and severe pre-eclampsia, whereas women with O blood group have the lowest risks of developing these disorders. Although the magnitude of increased risk is small, this finding may help improve our understanding of the etiology of pre-eclampsia. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  15. Single Molecule Effects of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Mutations in Tropocollagen Protein Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-02

    Single molecule effects of osteogenesis imperfecta mutations in tropocollagen protein domains Alfonso Gautieri,1,2 Simone Vesentini,2 Alberto...2008 proteinscience.org Abstract: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disease characterized by fragile bones, skeletal deformities and, in severe...diagnosis and treatment, an effort referred to as materiomics. Keywords: steered molecular dynamics; osteogenesis imperfecta ; Young’s modulus; collagen

  16. Effect resonance radiation transfer of excitation porous silicon to I sub 2 molecules sorbed in pores

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharchenko, K V; Kuznetsov, M B; Chistyakov, A A; Karavanskij, V A

    2001-01-01

    One studies the effect of resonance radiation-free transfer of electronic excitation between silicon nanocrystals and iodine molecules sorbed in pores. The experiment procedure includes laser-induced luminescence and laser desorption mass spectrometry. One analyzes photoluminescence spectra prior to and upon iodine sorption. Excitation of iodine through the mechanism of resonance transfer is determined to result in desorption of the iodine sorbed molecules with relatively high kinetic energies (3-1 eV). One evaluated the peculiar distance of resonance transfer the approximate value of which was equal to 2 nm

  17. Organic Semiconductor-Containing Supramolecules: Effect of Small Molecule Crystallization and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-21

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Small molecules (SMs) with unique optical or electronic properties provide an opportunity to incorporate functionality into block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecules. However, the assembly of supramolecules based on these highly crystalline molecules differs from their less crystalline counterparts. Here, two families of organic semiconductor SMs are investigated, where the composition of the crystalline core, the location (side- vs end-functionalization) of the alkyl solubilizing groups, and the constitution (branched vs linear) of the alkyl groups are varied. With these SMs, we present a systematic study of how the phase behavior of the SMs affects the overall assembly of these organic semiconductor-based supramolecules. The incorporation of SMs has a large effect on the interfacial curvature, the supramolecular periodicity, and the overall supramolecular morphology. The crystal packing of the SM within the supramolecule does not necessarily lead to the assembly of the comb block within the BCP microdomains, as is normally observed for alkyl-containing supramolecules. An unusual lamellar morphology with a wavy interface between the microdomains is observed due to changes in the packing structure of the small molecule within BCP microdomains. Since the supramolecular approach is modular and small molecules can be readily switched out, present studies provide useful guidance toward access supramolecular assemblies over several length scales using optically active and semiconducting small molecules.

  18. Effects of Environmental Factors and Metallic Electrodes on AC Electrical Conduction Through DNA Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S; Obaid, A; Al-Marzouki, F M

    2017-12-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is one of the best candidate materials for various device applications such as in electrodes for rechargeable batteries, biosensors, molecular electronics, medical- and biomedical-applications etc. Hence, it is worthwhile to examine the mechanism of charge transport in the DNA molecule, however, still a question without a clear answer is DNA a molecular conducting material (wire), semiconductor, or insulator? The answer, after the published data, is still ambiguous without any confirmed and clear scientific answer. DNA is found to be always surrounded with different electric charges, ions, and dipoles. These surrounding charges and electric barrier(s) due to metallic electrodes (as environmental factors (EFs)) play a substantial role when measuring the electrical conductivity through λ-double helix (DNA) molecule suspended between metallic electrodes. We found that strong frequency dependence of AC-complex conductivity comes from the electrical conduction of EFs. This leads to superimposing serious incorrect experimental data to measured ones. At 1 MHz, we carried out a first control experiment on electrical conductivity with and without the presence of DNA molecule. If there are possible electrical conduction due to stray ions and contribution of substrate, we will detected them. This control experiment revealed that there is an important role played by the environmental-charges around DNA molecule and any experiment should consider this role. We have succeeded to measure both electrical conductivity due to EFs (σ ENV ) and electrical conductivity due to DNA molecule (σ DNA ) independently by carrying the measurements at different DNA-lengths and subtracting the data. We carried out measurements as a function of frequency (f) and temperature (T) in the ranges 0.1 Hz molecule from all EFs effects that surround the molecule, but also to present accurate values of σ DNA and the dielectric constant of the molecule ε' DNA as a

  19. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E.; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Koopman, Werner J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  20. A case of high-titer anti-D hemolytic disease of the newborn in which late onset and mild course is associated with the D variant, RHD-CE(9)-D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne A; Nielsen, Christian; Sprogøe, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The RhD antigen is very immunogenic and is a significant cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The RHD-CE(8-9)-D hybrid allele is commonly associated with a D- phenotype. Here, we report a case of high-titer maternal anti-D and late onset of HDN in a newborn carrying a RHD......-CE(9)-D variant supposedly encoding the same partial D antigen as the RHD-CE(8-9)-D allele, but with significant expression of D antigen. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: To elucidate the blood group antigen background of the case, we carried out serologic, flow cytometric, and genetics studies of the newborn...

  1. Observation of Resonant Effects in Ultracold Collisions between Heteronuclear Feshbach Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Wang, Fudong; Zhu, Bing; Guo, Mingyang; Lu, Bo; Wang, Dajun

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field dependent dimer-dimer collisional losses are studied with ultracold 23 Na87 Rb Feshbach molecules. By ramping the magnetic field across the 347.8 G inter-species Feshbach resonance and removing residual atoms with a magnetic field gradient, ~ 8000 pure NaRb Feshbach molecules with a temperature below 1 μK are produced. By holding the pure molecule sample in a crossed optical dipole trap and measuring the time-dependent loss curves under different magnetic fields near the Feshbach resonance, the dimer-dimer loss rates with respect to the atomic scattering length a are mapped out. We observe a resonant feature at around a = 600a0 and a rising tail at above a = 1600a0 . This behavior resembles previous theoretical works on homonuclear Feshbach molecule, where resonant effects between dimer-dimer collisions tied to tetramer bound states were predicted. Our work shows the possibility of exploring four-body physics within a heteronuclear system. We are supported by Hong Kong RGC General Research Fund no. CUHK403813.

  2. Analytical calculation of spin tunneling effect in single molecule magnet Fe8 with considering quadrupole excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Y Yousefi; H Fakhari; K Muminov; M R Benam

    2018-01-01

    Spin tunneling effect in Single Molecule Magnet Fe8 is studied by instanton calculation technique using SU(3) generalized spin coherent state in real parameter as a trial function. For this SMM, tunnel splitting arises due to the presence of a Berry like phase in action, which causes interference between tunneling trajectories (instantons). For this SMM, it is established that the use of quadrupole excitation (g dependence) changes not only the location of the quenching points, but also the n...

  3. Effects of a donor on the bond property of quantum-dot molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Min; Luo Ying; Ma Ben-Kun; Duan Su-Qing; Zhao Xian-Geng

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of effective mass approximation, we have calculated the electronic structure of the two laterally coupled quantum dots with a donor by the finite element method. The calculated results show that the bond states of quantum-dot molecules are quite sensitive to the donor positions. By varying the donor position, the transition from covalent to ionic bond state is realized for some electronic states. Some extreme cases are also discussed for comparison.

  4. Molecular effects in the neutrino mass determination from beta-decay of the tritium molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fackler, O.; Jeziorski, B.; Kolos, W.; Szalewicz, K.; Monkhorst, H.J.; Mugge, M.

    1986-03-01

    Molecular final state energies and transition probabilities have been computed for beta-decay of the tritium molecule. The results are of sufficient accuracy to make a determination of the electron neutrino rest mass with an error not exceeding a few tenths of an electron volt. Effects of approximate models of tritium beta-decay on the neutrino mass determination are discussed. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Revealing time bunching effect in single-molecule enzyme conformational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H Peter

    2011-04-21

    In this perspective, we focus our discussion on how the single-molecule spectroscopy and statistical analysis are able to reveal enzyme hidden properties, taking the study of T4 lysozyme as an example. Protein conformational fluctuations and dynamics play a crucial role in biomolecular functions, such as in enzymatic reactions. Single-molecule spectroscopy is a powerful approach to analyze protein conformational dynamics under physiological conditions, providing dynamic perspectives on a molecular-level understanding of protein structure-function mechanisms. Using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, we have probed T4 lysozyme conformational motions under the hydrolysis reaction of a polysaccharide of E. coli B cell walls by monitoring the fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between a donor-acceptor probe pair tethered to T4 lysozyme domains involving open-close hinge-bending motions. Based on the single-molecule spectroscopic results, molecular dynamics simulation, a random walk model analysis, and a novel 2D statistical correlation analysis, we have revealed a time bunching effect in protein conformational motion dynamics that is critical to enzymatic functions. Bunching effect implies that conformational motion times tend to bunch in a finite and narrow time window. We show that convoluted multiple Poisson rate processes give rise to the bunching effect in the enzymatic reaction dynamics. Evidently, the bunching effect is likely common in protein conformational dynamics involving in conformation-gated protein functions. In this perspective, we will also discuss a new approach of 2D regional correlation analysis capable of analyzing fluctuation dynamics of complex multiple correlated and anti-correlated fluctuations under a non-correlated noise background. Using this new method, we are able to map out any defined segments along the fluctuation trajectories and determine whether they are correlated, anti-correlated, or non-correlated; after which, a

  6. The Therapeutic Effect of the Antitumor Drug 11 Beta and Related Molecules on Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    models (Somlo, Yale). Preparation work to assemble a collection of probes specific for oxidative stress genes and other PKD specific genes (as part... Worked : 6 Contribution to Project: Performance of experiments including those related to mitochondrial biology in vivo and unfolded protein...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0364 TITLE: THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECT OF THE ANTITUMOR DRUG 11 BETA AND RELATED MOLECULES ON POLYYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE

  7. Polarization effects on the electric properties of urea and thiourea molecules in solid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, O. L.; Fonseca, T. L.; Sabino, J. R.; Georg, H. C.; Castro, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We present theoretical results for the dipole moment, linear polarizability, and first hyperpolarizability of the urea and thiourea molecules in solid phase. The in-crystal electric properties were determined by applying a supermolecule approach in combination with an iterative electrostatic scheme, in which the surrounding molecules are represented by point charges. It is found for both urea and thiourea molecules that the influence of the polarization effects is mild for the linear polarizability, but it is marked for the dipole moment and first hyperpolarizability. The replacement of oxygen atoms by sulfur atoms increases, in general, the electric responses. Our second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory based iterative scheme predicts for the in-crystal dipole moment of urea and thiourea the values of 7.54 and 9.19 D which are, respectively, increased by 61% and 58%, in comparison with the corresponding isolated values. The result for urea is in agreement with the available experimental result of 6.56 D. In addition, we present an estimate of macroscopic quantities considering explicit unit cells of urea and thiourea crystals including environment polarization effects. These supermolecule calculations take into account partially the exchange and dispersion effects. The results illustrate the role played by the electrostatic interactions on the static second-order nonlinear susceptibility of the urea crystal

  8. Anti-D in a mother, hemizygous for the variant RHD*DNB gene, associated with hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantock, Kelli M; Lopez, Genghis H; Hyland, Catherine A; Liew, Yew-Wah; Flower, Robert L; Niemann, Frans J; Joyce, Arthur

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with the partial D phenotype when exposed to D+ red blood cells (RBCs) carrying the epitopes they lack may develop anti-D specific for the missing epitopes. DNB is the most common partial D in Caucasians and the clinical significance for anti-D in these individuals is unknown. This article describes the serologic genotyping results and clinical manifestations in two group D+ babies of a mother presenting as group O, D+ with alloanti-D. The mother was hemizygous for RHD*DNB gene and sequencing confirmed a single-nucleotide change at c.1063G>A. One baby (group A, D+) displayed bilirubinemia at birth with a normal hemoglobin level. Anti-A and anti-D were eluted from the RBCs. For the next ongoing pregnancy, the anti-D titer increased from 32 to 256. On delivery the baby typed group O and anti-D was eluted from the RBCs. This baby at birth exhibited anemia, reticulocytosis, and hyperbilirubinemia requiring intensive phototherapy treatment from Day 0 to Day 9 after birth and was discharged on Day 13. Intravenous immunoglobulin was also administered. Both babies were heterozygous for RHD and RHD*DNB. The anti-D produced by this woman with partial D DNB resulted in a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) requiring intensive treatment in the perinatal period. Anti-D formed by women with the partial D DNB phenotype has the potential to cause HDFN where the fetus is D+. Women carrying RHD*DNB should be offered appropriate prophylactic anti-D and be transfused with D- RBCs if not already alloimmunized. © 2017 AABB.

  9. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  10. Distribution of ABO and Rh-D blood groups in the Benin area of Niger-Delta: Implication for regional blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enosolease Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABO and Rhesus (Rh blood group antigens are hereditary characters and are useful in population genetic studies, in resolving medico-legal issues and more importantly in compatibility test in blood transfusion practice. Data on frequency distribution of ABO and Rh-D in Niger-Delta region of Nigeria are not available; hence we made an attempt to retrospectively analyze the records on the blood donors, transfusion recipients and patients attending antenatal care or some other medical interventions. Over a twenty-year period between 1986 and 2005, a total of 160,431 blood samples were grouped for ABO and Rh-D at the blood bank of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Blood group distribution among these samples showed phenotypes A, B, AB and O as 23.72%, 20.09%, 2.97% and 53.22%, respectively. The Rh-D negative phenotype was found among 6.01% of the samples tested.

  11. Kondo effect in a deformed molecule coupled asymmetrically to ferromagnetic electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui-Qiang, Wang; Kai-Ming, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    The nonequilibrium Kondo effect is studied in a molecule quantum dot coupled asymmetrically to two ferromagnetic electrodes by employing the nonequilibrium Green function technique. The current-induced deformation of the molecule is taken into account, modeled as interactions with a phonon system, and phonon-assisted Kondo satellites arise on both sides of the usual main Kondo peak. In the antiparallel electrode configuration, the Kondo satellites can be split only for the asymmetric dot-lead couplings, distinguished from the parallel configuration where splitting also exists, even though it is for symmetric case. We also analyze how to compensate the splitting and restore the suppressed zero-bias Kondo resonance. It is shown that one can change the TMR ratio significantly from a negative dip to a positive peak only by slightly modulating a local external magnetic field, whose value is greatly dependent on the electron–phonon coupling strength. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  12. Electron transport in liquids: effect of unbalancing the methane molecule by deuteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floriano, M.A.; Freeman, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The mobility of electrons in nonpolar liquids is strongly dependent on the molecular shape. In spherelike methane the mobility is three orders of magnitude greater than in the rodlike ethane. To investigate the enormous gap between methane and ethane, the effect of slightly perturbing the symmetry of the methane molecule by progressive deuterium substitution was studied. At temperatures near the triple point (T/Tsub(c) approximately 0.48) and near the mobility maximum (T/Tsub(c) approximately 0.93) the mobilities change in the order: CH 4 > CH 3 D > CH 2 D 2 3 approximately CD 4 . The differences are related to the symmetries of the molecules and to the rotational motions. (Authors)

  13. Effects of Magnetic Field on the Valence Bond Property of the Double-Quantum-Dot Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立民; 罗莹; 马本堃

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic field on the valence bond property of the double-quantum-dot molecule are numerically studied by the finite element method and perturbation approach because of the absence of cylindrical symmetry in the horizontally coupled dots. The calculation results show that the energy value of the ground state changes differently from that of the first excited state with increasing magnetic field strength, and they cross under a certain magnetic field. The increasing magnetic field makes the covalent bond state change into an ionic bond state, which agrees qualitatively with experimental results and makes ionic bond states remain. The oscillator strength of transition between covalent bond states decreases distinctly with the increasing magnetic field strength, when the molecule is irradiated by polarized light. Such a phenomenon is possibly useful for actual applications.

  14. Small molecules make big differences: molecular doping effects on electronic and optical properties of phosphorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Yu; Tang, Qing; He, Peng; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Panwen

    2015-01-01

    Systematical computations on the density functional theory were performed to investigate the adsorption of three typical organic molecules, tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), on the surface of phosphorene monolayers and thicker layers. There exist considerable charge transfer and strong non-covalent interaction between these molecules and phosphorene. In particular, the band gap of phosphorene decreases dramatically due to the molecular modification and can be further tuned by applying an external electric field. Meanwhile, surface molecular modification has proven to be an effective way to enhance the light harvesting of phosphorene in different directions. Our results predict a flexible method toward modulating the electronic and optical properties of phosphorene and shed light on its experimental applications. (paper)

  15. Theory of tunneling ionization of molecules: Weak-field asymptotics including dipole effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of the parabolic adiabatic expansion approach to the problem of ionization of atomic systems in a static electric field, originally developed for the axially symmetric case [ Phys. Rev. A 82 023416 (2010)], is generalized to arbitrary potentials. This approach is used to rederive...... the asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization in the weak-field limit. In the atomic case, the resulting formulas for the ionization rate coincide with previously known results. In addition, the present theory accounts for the possible existence of a permanent dipole moment of the unperturbed system and, hence......, applies to polar molecules. Accounting for dipole effects constitutes an important difference of the present theory from the so-called molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov theory. The theory is illustrated by comparing exact and asymptotic results for a set of model polar molecules and a realistic molecular...

  16. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Counteracting chemical chaperone effects on the single-molecule α-synuclein structural landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreon, Allan Chris M; Moosa, Mahdi Muhammad; Gambin, Yann; Deniz, Ashok A

    2012-10-30

    Protein structure and function depend on a close interplay between intrinsic folding energy landscapes and the chemistry of the protein environment. Osmolytes are small-molecule compounds that can act as chemical chaperones by altering the environment in a cellular context. Despite their importance, detailed studies on the role of these chemical chaperones in modulating structure and dimensions of intrinsically disordered proteins have been limited. Here, we used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to test the counteraction hypothesis of counterbalancing effects between the protecting osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and denaturing osmolyte urea for the case of α-synuclein, a Parkinson's disease-linked protein whose monomer exhibits significant disorder. The single-molecule experiments, which avoid complications from protein aggregation, do not exhibit clear solvent-induced cooperative protein transitions for these osmolytes, unlike results from previous studies on globular proteins. Our data demonstrate the ability of TMAO and urea to shift α-synuclein structures towards either more compact or expanded average dimensions. Strikingly, the experiments directly reveal that a 21 [urea][TMAO] ratio has a net neutral effect on the protein's dimensions, a result that holds regardless of the absolute osmolyte concentrations. Our findings shed light on a surprisingly simple aspect of the interplay between urea and TMAO on α-synuclein in the context of intrinsically disordered proteins, with potential implications for the biological roles of such chemical chaperones. The results also highlight the strengths of single-molecule experiments in directly probing the chemical physics of protein structure and disorder in more chemically complex environments.

  18. Counteracting chemical chaperone effects on the single-molecule α-synuclein structural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreon, Allan Chris M.; Moosa, Mahdi Muhammad; Deniz, Ashok A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure and function depend on a close interplay between intrinsic folding energy landscapes and the chemistry of the protein environment. Osmolytes are small-molecule compounds that can act as chemical chaperones by altering the environment in a cellular context. Despite their importance, detailed studies on the role of these chemical chaperones in modulating structure and dimensions of intrinsically disordered proteins have been limited. Here, we used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to test the counteraction hypothesis of counterbalancing effects between the protecting osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and denaturing osmolyte urea for the case of α-synuclein, a Parkinson’s disease-linked protein whose monomer exhibits significant disorder. The single-molecule experiments, which avoid complications from protein aggregation, do not exhibit clear solvent-induced cooperative protein transitions for these osmolytes, unlike results from previous studies on globular proteins. Our data demonstrate the ability of TMAO and urea to shift α-synuclein structures towards either more compact or expanded average dimensions. Strikingly, the experiments directly reveal that a 2∶1 [urea]∶[TMAO] ratio has a net neutral effect on the protein’s dimensions, a result that holds regardless of the absolute osmolyte concentrations. Our findings shed light on a surprisingly simple aspect of the interplay between urea and TMAO on α-synuclein in the context of intrinsically disordered proteins, with potential implications for the biological roles of such chemical chaperones. The results also highlight the strengths of single-molecule experiments in directly probing the chemical physics of protein structure and disorder in more chemically complex environments. PMID:22826265

  19. Effect of the environment on the electrical conductance of the single benzene-1,4-diamine molecule junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeto Nakashima

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of the environment on the electrical conductance of a single benzene-1,4-diamine (BDA molecule bridging Au electrodes, using the scanning tunneling microscope (STM. The conductance of the single BDA molecule junction decreased upon a change in the environment from tetraglyme, to mesitylene, to water, and finally to N2 gas, while the spread in the conductance value increased. The order of the conductance values of the single BDA molecule junction was explained by the strength of the interaction between the solvent molecules and the Au electrodes. The order of the spread in the conductance values was explained by the diversity in the coverage of the BDA molecule at metal electrodes and atomic and molecular motion of the single-molecule junction.

  20. Absolute carrier phase effects in the two-color excitation of dipolar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Alex; Meath, W.J.; Kondo, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    The pump-probe excitation of a two-level dipolar (d≠0) molecule, where the pump frequency is tuned to the energy level separation while the probe frequency is extremely small, is examined theoretically as an example of absolute phase control of excitation processes. The state populations depend on the probe field's absolute carrier phase but are independent of the pump field's absolute carrier phase. Interestingly, the absolute phase effects occur for pulse durations much longer and field intensities much weaker than those required to see such effects in single pulse excitation

  1. Effect of osteogenesis imperfecta mutations in tropocollagen molecule on strength of biomimetic tropocollagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Devendra K.; Tomar, Vikas

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that affects cellular synthesis of Type-I collagen fibrils and causes extreme bone fragility. This study reports the effects of OI mutations in Tropocollagen (TC) molecules on strength of model Tropocollagen-Hydroxyapatite biomaterials with two different mineral [hydroxyapatite (HAP)] distributions using three dimensional atomistic simulations. Results show that the effect of TC mutations on the strength of TC-HAP biomaterials is insignificant. Instead, change in mineral distribution showed significant impact on the overall strength of TC-HAP biomaterials. Study suggests that TC mutations manifest themselves by changing the mineral distribution during hydroxyapatite growth and nucleation period.

  2. Doping effect on photoabsorption and charge-separation dynamics in light-harvesting organic molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ohmura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using ab-initio theoretical methods, we demonstrate possible enhancement of photo-conversion efficiency of an organic solar cell via intentional doping in molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction [the hexabenzocoronene (HBC-triethylene glycol (TEG–C60 molecule]. Photoabsorption analysis indicates oxygen substitution into HBC leads to an extension of the spectra up to an infrared regime. A quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals that a dissociated charge state (D+ and A- in the O-doped system is more stable than the pristine case due to the presence of an effective barrier by the TEG HOMO/LUMO level. We also find that oxygen doping in HBC enhances the intermolecular carrier mobility after charge separation. On the other hand, the pristine molecule undergoes rapid recombination between donor and acceptor charges at the interface. These analyses suggest that the graphene oxidation opens a new window in the application of organic super-molecules to solar cells.

  3. Doping effect on photoabsorption and charge-separation dynamics in light-harvesting organic molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmura, Satoshi, E-mail: s.ohmura.m4@cc.it-hiroshima.ac.jp [Research Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Civil Engineering and Urban Design, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Tsuruta, Kenji [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Shimojo, Fuyuki [Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 Japan (Japan); Nakano, Aiichiro [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Computer Science, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, CA90089-024 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Using ab-initio theoretical methods, we demonstrate possible enhancement of photo-conversion efficiency of an organic solar cell via intentional doping in molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction [the hexabenzocoronene (HBC)-triethylene glycol (TEG)–C{sub 60} molecule]. Photoabsorption analysis indicates oxygen substitution into HBC leads to an extension of the spectra up to an infrared regime. A quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals that a dissociated charge state (D{sup +} and A{sup -}) in the O-doped system is more stable than the pristine case due to the presence of an effective barrier by the TEG HOMO/LUMO level. We also find that oxygen doping in HBC enhances the intermolecular carrier mobility after charge separation. On the other hand, the pristine molecule undergoes rapid recombination between donor and acceptor charges at the interface. These analyses suggest that the graphene oxidation opens a new window in the application of organic super-molecules to solar cells.

  4. Frequency of ABO blood groups and RhD factor in the female population of District Peshawar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazli, Rubina; Haider, Jamila; Khan, Mohammad Akmal; Akhtar, Tasleem; Aslam, Hina

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of ABO blood group and Rhesus (Rh) D antigen in the females of "District" Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 429 women having pregnancy induced hypertension, admitted in the three teaching hospitals of Peshawar, over a period of one year. Blood sample was collected from each subject after taking informed consent. The antigen antibody agglutination slide test for "blood grouping (ABO)" and RhD factors was done by using IgM and IgG monoclonal reagents. The antisera used were from Biolaboratory, USA. Data was analyzed for percentage calculation. The blood group distribution was 134 (31.2%), 43 (10.1%), 116 (27%), 136 (31.7%) for blood groups A, AB, O and B, respectively. Subjects having blood group B was slightly more dominant, followed by A and O, while blood group AB was rare in these females. Blood group A Rh negative is more in female 12 (37.5%) followed by group O 10 (31.3%), group B 09 (28.1%) and group AB 01 (3.1%). Frequency of "Rh-positive blood group" is B, A, O and AB, whereas the frequency of the most common Rh-negative blood group are A, O, B and AB respectively. The determination of the frequency of blood groups in the region would not only help in blood transfusion services, but also reduce the risk of erythroblastosis foetalis in the neonates.

  5. [The effect of spermine on acid-base equilibrium in DNA molecule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonitskiĭ, S V; Kuptsov, V Iu

    1990-01-01

    The influence of spermine (Sp) on the acid-induced predenaturational and denaturational transitions in the DNA molecule structure has been studied by means of circular dichroism, spectrophotometric and viscometric titration at supporting electrolyte concentration 10 mM NaCl. The data available indicate that at [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.60 (here [N] and [P] are molar concentrations of Sp nitrogen and DNA phosphours, respectively) the cooperative structural B----B(+)----S transitions are accompanied by the DNA double-helice winding. No competition for proton acceptor sites in the DNA molecule between H+ and Sp4+ cations has been observed when binding to neutral macromolecule. At 0.60 less than or equal to [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.75 the displacement of the B----B(+)----S transitions midpoints to acidic pH region has been established. This is accompanied by DNA condensation and the appearance of differential scattering of circularly polarized light. The calculations carried out in the framework of the two-variable Manning theory have shown that the acid-induced reduction of the effective polyion charge density facilitates the Sp-induced DNA condensation. It has been shown that the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule is determined by local [H+] in the 2-3 A hydrated monolayer of the macromolecule. An adequate estimation of [H+] can be obtained on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzman approach. The data obtained are consistent with recently proposed hypothesis of polyelectrolyte invariance of the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule.

  6. Perturbed path integrals in imaginary time: Efficiently modeling nuclear quantum effects in molecules and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavsky, Igor; DiStasio, Robert A.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear quantum effects (NQE), which include both zero-point motion and tunneling, exhibit quite an impressive range of influence over the equilibrium and dynamical properties of molecules and materials. In this work, we extend our recently proposed perturbed path-integral (PPI) approach for modeling NQE in molecular systems [I. Poltavsky and A. Tkatchenko, Chem. Sci. 7, 1368 (2016)], which successfully combines the advantages of thermodynamic perturbation theory with path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), in a number of important directions. First, we demonstrate the accuracy, performance, and general applicability of the PPI approach to both molecules and extended (condensed-phase) materials. Second, we derive a series of estimators within the PPI approach to enable calculations of structural properties such as radial distribution functions (RDFs) that exhibit rapid convergence with respect to the number of beads in the PIMD simulation. Finally, we introduce an effective nuclear temperature formalism within the framework of the PPI approach and demonstrate that such effective temperatures can be an extremely useful tool in quantitatively estimating the "quantumness" associated with different degrees of freedom in the system as well as providing a reliable quantitative assessment of the convergence of PIMD simulations. Since the PPI approach only requires the use of standard second-order imaginary-time PIMD simulations, these developments enable one to include a treatment of NQE in equilibrium thermodynamic properties (such as energies, heat capacities, and RDFs) with the accuracy of higher-order methods but at a fraction of the computational cost, thereby enabling first-principles modeling that simultaneously accounts for the quantum mechanical nature of both electrons and nuclei in large-scale molecules and materials.

  7. Effects of autoionizing states on two-photon double ionization of the H2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus; Schneider, Barry I; Koesterke, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Treating the effects of autoionizing intermediate states on two-photon double ionization (DI) of the H 2 molecule using time-dependent laser pulses is a significant computational challenge. Relatively long exposure times are critical to understanding the dynamics. Using the fixed-nuclei approximation, we demonstrate how the doubly excited states enhance the angle-integrated generalized cross sections in H 2 , and how they affect the angular distribution pattern of the ejected electrons. As the energy approaches the threshold for sequential DI, there is a sharp rise in the cross section due to virtual sequential ionization

  8. Bias voltage induced resistance switching effect in single-molecule magnets' tunneling junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang

    2014-09-12

    An electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance change effect in a molecular magnetic tunneling junction, consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) sandwiched in one nonmagnetic and one ferromagnetic electrode, is theoretically investigated. By applying a time-varying bias voltage, the SMM's spin orientation can be manipulated with large bias voltage pulses. Moreover, the different magnetic configuration at high-resistance/low-resistance states can be 'read out' by utilizing relative low bias voltage. This device scheme can be implemented with current technologies (Khajetoorians et al 2013 Science 339 55) and has potential application in molecular spintronics and high-density nonvolatile memory devices.

  9. Effects of microwave on spin tunneling in single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwang-Hee; Kim, Tae-Suk

    2005-03-01

    We study theoretically the effects of the irradiated microwave on the magnetization in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) like V15 and Fe8. We find that the shape of magnetization depends on the microwave intensity as well as the microwave polarization. The applied microwave field enhances the tunneling probability. The linearly polarized microwaves induce the suppression of magnetization at both positive and negative magnetic fields. The circularly polarized microwaves are absorbed either at one direction of magnetic field or at both directions of magnetic fields, depending on the polarization directions with respect to the direction of longitudinal magnetic field. The generic features we found will be compared with the recent experimental results.

  10. Calculations of relativistic effects in atoms and molecules from the Schroedinger wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detrich, J.H.; Roothaan, C.C.J.

    1981-01-01

    The traditional method for dealing with relativistic effects in atoms and molecules consists of a somewhat heuristic combination of quantum electrodynamics and a many-electron quantum mechanics generalized from the one-electron Dirac theory. On the whole, results calculated from this theory agree with experimental data. Nevertheless, the theory is by no means entirely satisfactory; in its development, certain ambiguities and divergencies must be resolved by somewhat arbitrary and/or questionable means. This paper illuminates - and sidesteps - some of the more questionable aspects of the traditional method, by reformulating electromagnetic interactions between particles in a different way

  11. Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting

    KAUST Repository

    Pérez, Louis A.

    2013-09-04

    Solvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Bias voltage induced resistance switching effect in single-molecule magnets’ tunneling junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang

    2014-09-01

    An electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance change effect in a molecular magnetic tunneling junction, consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) sandwiched in one nonmagnetic and one ferromagnetic electrode, is theoretically investigated. By applying a time-varying bias voltage, the SMM's spin orientation can be manipulated with large bias voltage pulses. Moreover, the different magnetic configuration at high-resistance/low-resistance states can be ‘read out’ by utilizing relative low bias voltage. This device scheme can be implemented with current technologies (Khajetoorians et al 2013 Science 339 55) and has potential application in molecular spintronics and high-density nonvolatile memory devices.

  13. Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting

    KAUST Repository

    Pé rez, Louis A.; Chou, Kang Wei; Love, John A.; Van Der Poll, Thomas S.; Smilgies, Detlef Matthias; Nguyen, Thuc Quyen; Krä mer, Edward J.; Amassian, Aram; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2013-01-01

    Solvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Relativistic and Electron Correlation Effects in Molecules and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) on "R@lativistic and Electron Correlation Effects in Molecules and Solids", co-sponsored by Simon Fraser University (SFU) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) was held Aug 10- 21, 1992 at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada. A total of 90 lecturers and students with backgrounds in Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and various interdisciplinary subjects attended the ASI. In my proposal submitted to NATO for financial support for this ASI, I pointed out that a NATO ASI on the effects of relativity in many-electron systems was held ten years ago, [See G.L. Malli, (ed) Relativistic Effects in Atoms, Molecules and Solids, Plenum Press, Vol B87, New York, 1983]. Moreover, at a NATO Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on advanced methods for molecular electronic structure "an assessment of state-of­ the-art of Electron Correlation ... " was carried out [see C.E. Dykstra, (ed), Advanced Theories and Computational Approa...

  15. New Perspectives on the Search for a Parity Violation Effect in Chiral Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguste, F.; Tokunaga, S. K.; Shelkovnikov, A.; Daussy, C.; Amy-Klein, A.; Chardonnet, C.; Darquie, B.

    2013-06-01

    Parity violation (PV) effects have so far never been observed in chiral molecules. Originating from the weak interaction, PV should lead to frequency differences in the rovibrational spectra of the two enantiomers of a chiral molecule. However the smallness of the effect represents a very difficult experimental challenge. We propose to compare the rovibrational spectra (around 10 μm) of two enantiomers, recorded using the ultra-high resolution spectroscopy technique of Doppler-free two-photon Ramsey interferometry in a supersonic molecular beam. With an alternate beam of left- and right-handed molecules and thanks to our expertise in the control of the absolute frequency of the probe CO_2 lasers, we should reach a fractional sensitivity better around 10^{-15} (a few tens of millihertz), on the frequency difference between enantiomers. We will review our latest results on the high-resolution spectroscopy, either in cell or in a supersonic beam, of methyltrioxorhenium. B. Darquié, C. Stoeffler, A. Shelkovnikov, C. Daussy, A. Amy-Klein, C. Chardonnet, S. Zrig, L. Guy, J. Crassous, P. Soulard, P. Asselin, T. R. Huet, P. Schwerdtfeger, R. Bast and T. Saue, Chirality 22, 870 (2010). C. Stoeffler, B. Darquié, A. Shelkovnikov, C. Daussy, A. Amy-Klein, C. Chardonnet, L. Guy, J. Crassous, T. R. Huet, P. Soulard and P. Asselin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 854 (2011). N. Saleh, S. Zrig, L. Guy, R. Bast, T. Saue, B. Darquié and J. Crassous, submitted to Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. (2013).

  16. The Effects of Perchlorate and its Precursors on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, B. L.; Beegle, L. W.; Bhartia, R.; Abbey, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was first detected on Mars by the Phoenix Lander in 2008 [1] and has subsequently been detected by Curiosity in Gale Crater [2], in Mars meteorite EETA79001 [3], and has been proposed as a possible explanation for results obtained by Viking [4]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [5]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about its effects on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [2, 4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate and its precursors on organic molecules prior to analysis. Perchlorate is typically inert under Mars temperatures and pressures, but it has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-), hypochlorite (ClO-) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) when exposed to Mars conditions including ionizing radiation [6]. The oxidation of chloride to perchlorate also results in the formation of reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorate (ClO3-) [5]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate and its oxychlorine precursors on organic molecules. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of Mojave Mars Simulant (MMS) [7] and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate and/or chloride salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination

  17. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  18. Effect of different substitution position on the switching behavior in single-molecule device with carbon nanotube electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingjuan; Han, Xiaoxiao; Yuan, Peipei; Bian, Baoan; Wang, Yixiang

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of dihydroazulene (DHA) and vinylheptafulvene (VHF) molecule sandwiched between two carbon nanotubes using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function. The device displays significantly switching behavior between DHA and VHF isomerizations. It is found the different substitution position of F in the molecule influences the switching ratio of device, which is analyzed by transmission spectra and molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian. The observed negative differential resistance effect is explained by transmission spectra and transmission eigenstates of transmission peak in the bias window. The observed reverse of current in VHF form in which two H atoms on the right side of the benzene ring of the molecule are replaced by F is explained by transmission spectra and molecule-electrode coupling with the varied bias. The results suggest that the reasonable substitution position of molecule may improve the switching ratio, displaying a potential application in future molecular circuit.

  19. Single-molecule study on polymer diffusion in a melt state: Effect of chain topology

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Takuya; Vá cha, Martin; Tezuka, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We report a new methodology for studying diffusion of individual polymer chains in a melt state, with special emphasis on the effect of chain topology. A perylene diimide fluorophore was incorporated into the linear and cyclic poly(THF)s, and real-time diffusion behavior of individual chains in a melt of linear poly(THF) was measured by means of a single-molecule fluorescence imaging technique. The combination of mean squared displacement (MSD) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) analysis demonstrated the broad distribution of diffusion coefficient of both the linear and cyclic polymer chains in the melt state. This indicates the presence of spatiotemporal heterogeneity of the polymer diffusion which occurs at much larger time and length scales than those expected from the current polymer physics theory. We further demonstrated that the cyclic chains showed marginally slower diffusion in comparison with the linear counterparts, to suggest the effective suppression of the translocation through the threading-entanglement with the linear matrix chains. This coincides with the higher activation energy for the diffusion of the cyclic chains than of the linear chains. These results suggest that the single-molecule imaging technique provides a powerful tool to analyze complicated polymer dynamics and contributes to the molecular level understanding of the chain interaction. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. Single-molecule study on polymer diffusion in a melt state: Effect of chain topology

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2013-08-06

    We report a new methodology for studying diffusion of individual polymer chains in a melt state, with special emphasis on the effect of chain topology. A perylene diimide fluorophore was incorporated into the linear and cyclic poly(THF)s, and real-time diffusion behavior of individual chains in a melt of linear poly(THF) was measured by means of a single-molecule fluorescence imaging technique. The combination of mean squared displacement (MSD) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) analysis demonstrated the broad distribution of diffusion coefficient of both the linear and cyclic polymer chains in the melt state. This indicates the presence of spatiotemporal heterogeneity of the polymer diffusion which occurs at much larger time and length scales than those expected from the current polymer physics theory. We further demonstrated that the cyclic chains showed marginally slower diffusion in comparison with the linear counterparts, to suggest the effective suppression of the translocation through the threading-entanglement with the linear matrix chains. This coincides with the higher activation energy for the diffusion of the cyclic chains than of the linear chains. These results suggest that the single-molecule imaging technique provides a powerful tool to analyze complicated polymer dynamics and contributes to the molecular level understanding of the chain interaction. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Plasma-neutral gas interaction in a tokamak divertor: effects of hydrogen molecules and plasma recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Soboleva, T.K.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the influence of hydrogen molecules on plasma recombination using a collisional-radiative model for multispecies hydrogen plasmas and tokamak detached divertor parameters. The rate constant found for molecular activated recombination of a plasma can be as high as 2 x 10 -10 cm 3 /s, confirming our pervious estimates. We investigate the effects of hydrogen molecules and plasma recombination on self-consistent plasma-neutral gas interactions in the recycling region of a tokamak divertor. We treat the plasma flow in a fluid approximation retaining the effects of plasma recombination and employing a Knudsen neutral transport model for a 'gas box' divertor geometry. For the model of plasma-neutral interactions we employ we find: (a) molecular activated recombination is a dominant channel of divertor plasma recombination; and (b) plasma recombination is a key element leading to a decrease in the plasma flux onto the target and substantial plasma pressure drop which are the main features of detached divertor regimes. (orig.)

  2. Effect of molecular structure on fragmentation of isolated organic molecules in solid rare gas matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzarenko, A.V.; Sukhov, F.F.; Orlov, A.Yu.; Kovalev, G.V.; Baranova, I.A.; Feldman, V.I.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of excess energy on the primary radical cations of bifunctional carbonyl compounds and aliphatic alkynes was simulated by matrix isolation method using rare gas matrices with various ionization potentials. The formation of fragmentation products was monitored by EPR and FTIR spectroscopy. It was shown that the radical cations of bifunctional compounds (CH 3 OCH 2 COCH 3 and CH 3 COCOCH 3 ) dissociated effectively yielding · CH 3 radicals upon irradiation in solid argon matrix at T≤16 K. In addition to isolated methyl radicals, the radical pairs consisting of two methyl radicals separated by two CO molecules were detected in the case of diacetyl. The probability of fragmentation decreases with the decreasing excess energy by switching from Ar to Xe. In general, bifunctional molecules were found to be less stable to “hot” ionic fragmentation in low-temperature solids in comparison with simple prototype compounds. In the case of alkynes of the R--C≡CH type, a noticeable yield of fragmentation products was observed when R=–C(CH 3 ) 3 , but it was negligible for R=–CH 3 . The mechanisms of “hot” reactions and excess energy relaxation are discussed. - Highlights: ► Radiolysis of bifunctional organic compounds and alkynes. ► Dependence of “hot” fragmentation probability from molecular structure. ► Ions of bifunctional compounds are less stable than those of monofunctional ones. ► Alkynes are rather stable to “hot” fragmentation.

  3. Live-cell microscopy reveals small molecule inhibitor effects on MAPK pathway dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Anderson

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway are prevalent in human tumors, making this pathway a target of drug development efforts. Recently, ATP-competitive Raf inhibitors were shown to cause MAPK pathway activation via Raf kinase priming in wild-type BRaf cells and tumors, highlighting the need for a thorough understanding of signaling in the context of small molecule kinase inhibitors. Here, we present critical improvements in cell-line engineering and image analysis coupled with automated image acquisition that allow for the simultaneous identification of cellular localization of multiple MAPK pathway components (KRas, CRaf, Mek1 and Erk2. We use these assays in a systematic study of the effect of small molecule inhibitors across the MAPK cascade either as single agents or in combination. Both Raf inhibitor priming as well as the release from negative feedback induced by Mek and Erk inhibitors cause translocation of CRaf to the plasma membrane via mechanisms that are additive in pathway activation. Analysis of Erk activation and sub-cellular localization upon inhibitor treatments reveals differential inhibition and activation with the Raf inhibitors AZD628 and GDC0879 respectively. Since both single agent and combination studies of Raf and Mek inhibitors are currently in the clinic, our assays provide valuable insight into their effects on MAPK signaling in live cells.

  4. Effect of molecular structure on fragmentation of isolated organic molecules in solid rare gas matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobrazenko, A.V.; Sukhov, F.F.; Orlov, A.Yu.; Kovalev, G.V.; Baranova, I.A.; Feldman, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Elucidation of high-energy reaction pathways in the condensed phase is an important issue for basic understanding of the radiation stability of complex organic molecules. As was shown previously, organic radical cations (RC) may undergo fragmentation or rearrangement in solid matrices due to excess energy. The probability of this process depends on both ionization potential (IP) of the molecule and molecular structure. In the present work we have studied the role of 'hot' ionic reaction channels for RC of some bifunctional compounds and alkynes. The effect of excess energy was simulated by matrix isolation method as described in detail earlier. The formation of fragmentation products was monitored by EPR and FTIR spectroscopy. In the present work it was shown that the RC of bifunctional compounds (CH 3 OCH 2 COCH 3 , CH 3 CO(CH 2 ) n COCH 3 , n 0/2) dissociated efficiently producing · CH 3 radicals upon irradiation in solid argon matrix at T ≤ 16 K. The probability of fragmentation decreases with decrease of excess energy by switching from Ar to Xe. It is worth noting that acetone RC does not show fragmentation under these conditions. Thus, bifunctional molecules were found to be less stable to 'hot' ionic fragmentation in low-temperature solids in comparison with simple prototype carbonyl compounds. In the case of alkynes of the R-C ≡ CH type, a noticeable yield of fragmentation products was observed when R = -C(CH 3 ) 3 , but it was negligible for R = -CH 3 . It means that the presence of triple bond stabilizes the molecular skeleton of linear alkynes toward 'hot' fragmentation, similarly as it was shown for alkenes. The mechanisms of 'hot' reactions and excess energy relaxation are discussed. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 09-03-00848a).

  5. Clinical chemistry, haematology, immune response and histological evaluation of rabbits after immunisation and challenge with rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Stancu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Following their immunisation and infection with a VSHI-CN-6 viral strain, a group of 15 rabbits were examined in a study of Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD. Serum samples were collected from the external ear vein at 0, 15, 30 and 60 days post-immunisation. The recorded platelet numbers were closer to the lower physiological limit, indicating a mild thrombocytopenia, with values ranging from 26.6 to 30.43×104/mm3. The phagocytic index revealed significant differences (P<0.001 between the mean values obtained before vaccination (day 0 and the 3 post-vaccination measurements, confirming the increase in phagocytic capacity after immunisation. Additionally, the serum lysozyme average value equalled 9.14 mg/mL post-vaccination. The analysis of variance revealed significant statistical differences (P<0.05 between the average values obtained before vaccination (0 and the post-vaccination values, measured on day 14 and 30, respectively. The morphology of the samples collected from the main organs involved in immune protection, spleen and gastric and portal lymph nodes highlighted changes corresponding to the post-vaccination immunological response. The white pulp of the spleen appeared as a diffuse lymphoid tissue, presenting with primary and secondary lymphoid follicles. The ratio of white/red pulp was in favour of the white pulp and multiple lymphoid follicles were present, indicating their reactivation. In the medullary area of gastric and portal lymph nodes, narrow lymphoid cords, circumscribed by relatively large lymphatic sinuses, and well defined lymphocytolysis were observed. Moreover, the exudate and lymphoid follicles during activation were noted in the cortical area. Furthermore, the inflammatory processes were identified, morphologically manifested by the thickening of connective tissue in the lymph node capsule, dilacerations of the connective fibres and the presence of light acidophilic serous exudate with rare inflammatory cells (serous

  6. A case of high-titer anti-D hemolytic disease of the newborn in which late onset and mild course is associated with the D variant, RHD-CE(9)-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Marianne A; Nielsen, Christian; Sprogøe, Ulrik

    2014-10-01

    The RhD antigen is very immunogenic and is a significant cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The RHD-CE(8-9)-D hybrid allele is commonly associated with a D- phenotype. Here, we report a case of high-titer maternal anti-D and late onset of HDN in a newborn carrying a RHD-CE(9)-D variant supposedly encoding the same partial D antigen as the RHD-CE(8-9)-D allele, but with significant expression of D antigen. To elucidate the blood group antigen background of the case, we carried out serologic, flow cytometric, and genetics studies of the newborn and his father. Individuals carrying the RHD-CE(9)-D allele do express D antigen, but do so at significantly lower levels than those carrying the more common D+ phenotypes (e.g., DCe/dce). It may mitigate and delay otherwise severe HDN in pregnancies complicated by high-titer anti-D. © 2014 AABB.

  7. The kinetic energy operator for distance-dependent effective nuclear masses: Derivation for a triatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoma, Mykhaylo; Jaquet, Ralph

    2017-09-21

    The kinetic energy operator for triatomic molecules with coordinate or distance-dependent nuclear masses has been derived. By combination of the chain rule method and the analysis of infinitesimal variations of molecular coordinates, a simple and general technique for the construction of the kinetic energy operator has been proposed. The asymptotic properties of the Hamiltonian have been investigated with respect to the ratio of the electron and proton mass. We have demonstrated that an ad hoc introduction of distance (and direction) dependent nuclear masses in Cartesian coordinates preserves the total rotational invariance of the problem. With the help of Wigner rotation functions, an effective Hamiltonian for nuclear motion can be derived. In the derivation, we have focused on the effective trinuclear Hamiltonian. All necessary matrix elements are given in closed analytical form. Preliminary results for the influence of non-adiabaticity on vibrational band origins are presented for H 3 + .

  8. Detection, Characterization, and Biological Effect of Quorum-Sensing Signaling Molecules in Peanut-Nodulating Bradyrhizobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Giordano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Bradyrhizobium are able to establish a symbiotic relationship with peanut (Arachis hypogaea root cells and to fix atmospheric nitrogen by converting it to nitrogenous compounds. Quorum sensing (QS is a cell-cell communication mechanism employed by a variety of bacterial species to coordinate behavior at a community level through regulation of gene expression. The QS process depends on bacterial production of various signaling molecules, among which the N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs are most commonly used by Gram-negative bacteria. Some previous reports have shown the production of QS signaling molecules by various rhizobia, but little is known regarding mechanisms of communication among peanut-nodulating strains. The aims of this study were to identify and characterize QS signals produced by peanut-nodulating bradyrhizobial strains and to evaluate their effects on processes related to cell interaction. Detection of AHLs in 53 rhizobial strains was performed using the biosensor strains Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4 and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 for AHLs with long and short acyl chains, respectively. None of the strains screened were found to produce AHLs with short acyl chains, but 14 strains produced AHLs with long acyl chains. These 14 AHL-producing strains were further studied by quantification of β-galactosidase activity levels (AHL-like inducer activity in NTL4 (pZLR4. Strains displaying moderate to high levels of AHL-like inducer activity were subjected to chemical identification of signaling molecules by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. For each AHL-producing strain, we found at least four different AHLs, corresponding to N-hexanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C6, N-(3-oxodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC10, N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC12, and N-(3-oxotetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC14. Biological roles of 3OC10, 3OC12, and 3OC14 AHLs

  9. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lifeng; Witkowski, Colette M.; Craig, Michael M.; Greenwade, Molly M.; Joseph, Katherine L.

    2009-12-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood-brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system.

  10. Ambipolar Small-Molecule:Polymer Blend Semiconductors for Solution-Processable Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minji; Hwang, Hansu; Park, Won-Tae; Khim, Dongyoon; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Kim, Yunseul; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Noh, Yong-Young; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2017-01-25

    We report on the fabrication of an organic thin-film semiconductor formed using a blend solution of soluble ambipolar small molecules and an insulating polymer binder that exhibits vertical phase separation and uniform film formation. The semiconductor thin films are produced in a single step from a mixture containing a small molecular semiconductor, namely, quinoidal biselenophene (QBS), and a binder polymer, namely, poly(2-vinylnaphthalene) (PVN). Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on QBS/PVN blend semiconductor are then assembled using top-gate/bottom-contact device configuration, which achieve almost four times higher mobility than the neat QBS semiconductor. Depth profile via secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy images indicate that the QBS domains in the films made from the blend are evenly distributed with a smooth morphology at the bottom of the PVN layer. Bias stress test and variable-temperature measurements on QBS-based OFETs reveal that the QBS/PVN blend semiconductor remarkably reduces the number of trap sites at the gate dielectric/semiconductor interface and the activation energy in the transistor channel. This work provides a one-step solution processing technique, which makes use of soluble ambipolar small molecules to form a thin-film semiconductor for application in high-performance OFETs.

  11. The effect of oxygen molecule adsorption on lead iodide perovskite surface by first-principles calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xia-Xia; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2018-01-01

    Oxygen molecule has a negative effect on perovskite solar cells, which has been investigated experimentally. However, detailed theoretical research is still rare. This study presents a microscopic view to reveal the interaction mechanism between O2 and perovskite based on the first-principles calculation. The results show that O2 is adsorbed on the (100) surface of MAPbI3 perovskite mainly by Van der Waals force. O2 adsorption makes the MAPbI3 surface generate a small number of positive charges, which leads to the increase of the work function of the MAPbI3 surface. This is in agreement with the experimental measurement. And increased work function of MAPbI3 surface is not beneficial to electron transfer from perovskite to electronic extraction layer (such as TiO2). Comparison of the density of states (DOS) of the clean (100) surface and the adsorbed system shows that an in-gap state belonging to O2 appears, which can explain the phenomenon observed from experiments that electron transfers from the surface of perovskite to O2 to form superoxide. The theoretical power conversion efficiency of the system with and without O2 adsorption is evaluated, and it turns out that the power conversion efficiency of the system with O2 adsorption is slightly lower than that of the system without O2 adsorption. This result indicates that avoiding the introduction of O2 molecules between perovskite and electronic extraction layer is beneficial to the perovskite solar cell.

  12. Effect of gold nanoparticle on stability of the DNA molecule: A study of molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izanloo, Cobra

    2017-09-02

    An understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions with gold nanoparticles is useful in today medicine applications. We have performed a molecular dynamics simulation on a B-DNA duplex (CCTCAGGCCTCC) in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle with a truncated octahedron structure composed of 201 gold atoms (diameter ∼1.8 nm) to investigate gold nanoparticle (GNP) effects on the stability of DNA. During simulation, the nanoparticle is closed to DNA and phosphate groups direct the particles into the major grooves of the DNA molecule. Because of peeling and untwisting states that are occur at end of DNA, the nucleotide base lies flat on the surface of GNP. The configuration entropy is estimated using the covariance matrix of atom-positional fluctuations for different bases. The results show that when a gold nanoparticle has interaction with DNA, entropy increases. The results of conformational energy and the hydrogen bond numbers for DNA indicated that DNA becomes unstable in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle. The radial distribution function was calculated for water hydrogen-phosphate oxygen pairs. Almost for all nucleotide, the presence of a nanoparticle around DNA caused water molecules to be released from the DNA duplex and cations were close to the DNA.

  13. Effects of Electric Field on the Valence-Bond Property of an Electron in a Quantum-Dot Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立民; 罗莹; 马本堃

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of the quantum-dot molecules in an electric field is investigated by the finite element method with the effective mass approximation. The numerical calculation results show that the valence bond of the quantum-dot molecule alternates between covalent bonds and ionic bonds as the electric field increases. The valence-bond property can be reflected by the oscillator strength of the intraband transition. The bound state with the highest energy level in the quantum-dot molecule gradually changes into a quasibound state when the electric field increases.

  14. Effects of phytoestrogens derived from soy bean on expression of adhesion molecules on HUVEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, C M de; Sá, M F Silva de; Toloi, M R Torqueti

    2012-04-01

    The risks of hormone replacement therapy have led to a search for new alternatives such as phytoestrogens, plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. Isoflavones are the phytoestrogens most extensively studied and can be found in soybean, red clover and other plants. Due to this estrogen-like activity, phytoestrogens can have some effect on atherosclerosis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) have been extensively used to study the biology and pathobiology of human endothelial cells and most of the knowledge acquired is due to experiments with cultures of these cells. To evaluate the effects of the phytoestrogen extracts from Glycine max soy bean, genistein, formononetin, biochanin A and daidzein, as well as a mixture of these extracts (Mix), on expression of adhesion molecules, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, by endothelial cell HUVEC, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. HUVEC were cultured in medium EBM(2), pretreated with isoflavones for 24 and 48 h and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide; in addition, isoflavones were added, after stimulation by lipopolysaccharide, to HUVEC. We evaluated the production of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin on cell surface, by cell-based enzyme immunoassay, and of sVCAM-1, sICAM-1 and sE-selectin in culture supernatant, by ELISA. Genistein, formononetin, biochanin A and daidzein, as well as the Mix were able to reduce VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin on cell surface and in culture supernatant. Conclusion Isoflavones extracted from Glycine max soy bean, in vitro, presented antiatherogenic effects, reducing the expression of adhesion molecules and acting as preventive agents as well as therapeutic agents.

  15. Excitation function and yield for the 103Rh(d,2n)103Pd nuclear reaction: Optimization of the production of palladium-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manenti, Simone; Alí Santoro, María del Carmen; Cotogno, Giulio; Duchemin, Charlotte; Haddad, Ferid; Holzwarth, Uwe; Groppi, Flavia

    2017-01-01

    Deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for the generation of 103 Pd were investigated using the stacked-foil activation technique on rhodium targets at deuteron energies up to E d = 33 MeV. The excitation functions of the reactions 103 Rh(d,xn) 101,103 Pd, 103 Rh(d,x) 100g,cum,101m,g,102m,g Rh and 103 Rh(d,2p) 103 Ru have been measured, and the Thick-Target Yield for 103 Pd has been calculated.

  16. Motion of Br2 molecules in clathrate cages. A computational study of the dynamic effects on its spectroscopic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I; Janda, Kenneth C; Hernández-Lamoneda, R

    2015-01-22

    This work looks into the spectroscopic behavior of bromine molecules trapped in clathrate cages combining different methodologies. We developed a semiempirical quantum mechanical model to incorporate through molecular dynamics trajectories, the effect movement of bromine molecules in clathrate cages has on its absorption spectra. A simple electrostatic model simulating the cage environment around bromine predicts a blue shift in the spectra, in good agreement with the experimental evidence.

  17. Interference, confinement and non Franck-Condon effects in photoionization of H{sub 2} molecules at high photon energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J; MartIn, F [Departamento de Quimica, C-9, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fojon, O, E-mail: jorge@phys.au.d, E-mail: ofojon@fceia.unr.edu.a, E-mail: fernando.martin@uam.e [Institute de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR), Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

    2009-11-01

    We study in detail photoionization of H{sub 2} molecules by high energy photons. Bound and continuum states are accurately evaluated by using B-spline basis functions. The usual Franck-Condon behavior is not followed when the molecule is parallel to the polarization direction. The origin of this anomaly is related to interference effects. Moreover, it is shown that at these high photon energies, the nuclear asymmetry parameter exhibits a reminiscence of these interference patterns.

  18. Analytical calculation of spin tunneling effect in single molecule magnet Fe8 with considering quadrupole excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yousefi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Spin tunneling effect in Single Molecule Magnet Fe8 is studied by instanton calculation technique using SU(3 generalized spin coherent state in real parameter as a trial function. For this SMM, tunnel splitting arises due to the presence of a Berry like phase in action, which causes interference between tunneling trajectories (instantons. For this SMM, it is established that the use of quadrupole excitation (g dependence changes not only the location of the quenching points, but also the number of these points. Also, these quenching points are the steps in hysteresis loops of this SMM. If dipole and quadrupole excitations in classical energy considered, the number of these steps equals to the number that obtained from experimental data.

  19. Effect of substrate temperature on orientation of subphthalocyanine molecule in organic photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Chi-Ta; Tang, Wei-Li; Tai, Yian; Lin, Chien-Hung; Liu, Chin-Hsin J.; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of substrate temperature (T s ) on the boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) thin film and its power conversion efficiency in SubPc/C 60 heterojunction photovoltaic cells. The orientations of SubPc molecules in thin films determined by X-ray diffraction is strongly correlated with the electronic properties of the organic thin films, and can be controlled by the substrate temperature during the vapor deposition. An optimal substrate temperature of 120 °C has been concluded to induced (221) molecular orientation over the (122) orientation and significantly improve the carrier transport of the SubPc thin film. A SubPc/C 60 heterojunction photovoltaic cells thus fabricated shows higher open-circuit voltage and up to 1.55% conversion efficiency has been achieved, which is attributed to preferential (221) orientation of the SubPc deposited at the elevated temperature.

  20. Interference effects in double ionization of spatially aligned hydrogen molecules by fast highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landers, A.L.; Alnaser, A.S.; Tanis, J.A.; Wells, E.; Osipov, T.; Carnes, K.D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C.L.; McGuire, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    Cross sections differential in target orientation angle were measured for 19 MeV F 8+ +D 2 collisions. Multihit position-sensitive detectors were used to isolate the double-ionization channel and determine a posteriori the full momentum vectors of both ejected D + fragments. A strong dependence of the double ionization cross section on the angle between the incident ion direction and the target molecular axis is observed with a ≅3.5:1 enhancement for molecules aligned perpendicular to the projectile axis. This clear asymmetry is attributed to interference effects, analogous to Young's two-slit experiment, arising from coherent contributions to the ionization from both atomic centers. The data are compared to a simple scattering model based on two center interference

  1. Effective electronic-only Kohn–Sham equations for the muonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    A set of effective electronic-only Kohn-Sham (EKS) equations are derived for the muonic molecules (containing a positively charged muon), which are completely equivalent to the coupled electronic-muonic Kohn-Sham equations derived previously within the framework of the Nuclear-Electronic Orbital density functional theory (NEO-DFT). The EKS equations contain effective non-coulombic external potentials depending on parameters describing muon vibration, which are optimized during the solution of the EKS equations making muon KS orbital reproducible. It is demonstrated that the EKS equations are derivable from a certain class of effective electronic Hamiltonians through applying the usual Hohenberg-Kohn theorems revealing a duality between the NEO-DFT and the effective electronic-only DFT methodologies. The EKS equations are computationally applied to a small set of muoniated organic radicals and it is demonstrated that a mean effective potential maybe derived for this class of muonic species while an electronic basis set is also designed for the muon. These computational ingredients are then applied to muoniated ferrocenyl radicals, which had been previously detected experimentally through adding muonium atom to ferrocene. In line with previous computational studies, from the six possible species the staggered conformer, where the muon is attached to the exo position of the cyclopentadienyl ring, is deduced to be the most stable ferrocenyl radical.

  2. Effective electronic-only Kohn-Sham equations for the muonic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2018-03-28

    A set of effective electronic-only Kohn-Sham (EKS) equations are derived for the muonic molecules (containing a positively charged muon), which are completely equivalent to the coupled electronic-muonic Kohn-Sham equations derived previously within the framework of the nuclear-electronic orbital density functional theory (NEO-DFT). The EKS equations contain effective non-coulombic external potentials depending on parameters describing the muon's vibration, which are optimized during the solution of the EKS equations making the muon's KS orbital reproducible. It is demonstrated that the EKS equations are derivable from a certain class of effective electronic Hamiltonians through applying the usual Hohenberg-Kohn theorems revealing a "duality" between the NEO-DFT and the effective electronic-only DFT methodologies. The EKS equations are computationally applied to a small set of muoniated organic radicals and it is demonstrated that a mean effective potential may be derived for this class of muonic species while an electronic basis set is also designed for the muon. These computational ingredients are then applied to muoniated ferrocenyl radicals, which had been previously detected experimentally through adding a muonium atom to ferrocene. In line with previous computational studies, from the six possible species, the staggered conformer, where the muon is attached to the exo position of the cyclopentadienyl ring, is deduced to be the most stable ferrocenyl radical.

  3. Superoxide dismutating molecules rescue the toxic effects of PINK1 and parkin loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosa, Alice; Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Filograna, Roberta; Terriente-Felix, Ana; Alam, Sarah M; Beltramini, Mariano; Bubacco, Luigi; Bisaglia, Marco; Whitworth, Alexander J

    2018-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species exert important functions in regulating several cellular signalling pathways. However, an excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species can perturb the redox homeostasis leading to oxidative stress, a condition which has been associated to many neurodegenerative disorders. Accordingly, alterations in the redox state of cells and mitochondrial homeostasis are established hallmarks in both familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease cases. PINK1 and Parkin are two genes which account for a large fraction of autosomal recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson's disease and are now firmly associated to both mitochondria and redox homeostasis. In this study we explored the hypothesis that superoxide anions participate in the generation of the Parkin and PINK1 associated phenotypic effect by testing the capacity of endogenous and exogenous superoxide dismutating molecules to rescue the toxic effects induced by loss of PINK1 or Parkin, in both cellular and fly models. Our results demonstrate the positive effect of an increased level of superoxide dismutase proteins on the pathological phenotypes, both in vitro and in vivo. A more pronounced effectiveness for mitochondrial SOD2 activity points to the superoxide radicals generated in the mitochondrial matrix as the prime suspect in the definition of the observed phenotypes. Moreover, we also demonstrate the efficacy of a SOD-mimetic compound, M40403, to partially ameliorate PINK1/Parkin phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. These results support the further exploration of SOD-mimetic compounds as a therapeutic strategy against Parkinson's disease.

  4. The Synergistic Effect between Electrical and Chemical Factors in Plasma Gene/Molecule-Transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    This study has been done to know what kind of factors in plasma and processes on cells promote plasma gene/molecule transfection. We have discovered a new plasma source using a microcapillary electrode which enables high transfection efficiency and high cell survivability simultaneously. However, the mechanism of the transfection by plasma was not clear. To clarify the transfection mechanisms by micro plasma, we focused on the effects of electrical (current, charge, field, etc.) and chemical (radicals, RONS, etc.) factors generated by the micro plasma and evaluated the contribution weight of three groups of the effects and processes, i.e. electrical, chemical and biochemical ones. At first, the necessity of the electrical factors was estimated by the laser produced plasma (LPP). Mouse L-929 fibroblast cell was cultured on a 96-well plate or 12-well micro slide chamber. Plasmids pCX-EGFP in Tris-EDTA buffer was dropped on the cells and they were exposed to the capillary discharge plasma (CDP) or the LPP. In the case of the CDP, the plasma was generated between the tip of the capillary electrode and the cells so that both electrical and chemical factors were supplied to the cells. In this setup, about 20% of average transfection efficiency was obtained. In the case of the LPP, the plasma was generated apart from the cells so that electrical factors were not supplied to the cells. In this setup, no transfection was observed. These results show that the electrical factors are necessary for the plasma gene transfection. Next, the necessity of the chemical factors was estimated the effect of catalase to remove H2O2 in CDP. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.4 by scavenging H2O2 with catalase. However, only the solution of H2O2 caused no gene transfection in cells. These results shows that H2O2 is important species to cause gene/molecule transfection but still needs a synergistic effect with electrical or other chemical factors. This work was partly supported by

  5. Understanding the relationships between molecule structure and imprinting effect of two acetyl-nitrogen heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Dong, Xiao; Xue, Min; Dong, Xuemin; Xu, Zhibin; Meng, Zihui; Luo, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for two structural analogs, 1,3,5-triacetyl-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (TRAT) and 1,3,5,7-tetraacetyl-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (TAT), have been synthesized respectively under the same conditions. The TAT-MIP showed excellent imprinting effect, whereas the TRAT-MIP did not. To understand the different imprinting effects of the MIPs prepared from these two templates, the geometric structures and energetic properties of complexes formed around TAT and TRAT were studied computationally. The results indicate that in liquid phase, for the complexes formed with TAT and its nearest neighbor molecules, the magnitude of the binding energy increases with the number of surrounding TAT, methacrylic acid, and acetonitrile (ACT), whereas for the cases of TRAT, the magnitude of the binding energy increases with the number of surrounding TRAT and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate. The studied systems form stronger and thus more stable networks encapsulating TAT than with TRAT. ACT may also play an important role in the polymerization phase in stabilizing the shapes of the cavities that TATs reside in. We propose these as the major factors that affect the different imprinting effects of the two MIPs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The effect of uniform capture molecule orientation on biosensor sensitivity : dependence on analyte properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, A.K.; Harmsen, M.M.; Ruigrok, V.J.; Zuilhof, H.; Beekwilder, J.

    2013-01-01

    Uniform orientation of capture molecules on biosensors has been reported to increase sensitivity. Here it is investigated which analyte properties contribute to sensitivity by orientation. Orientation of capture molecules on biosensors was investigated using variable domains of llama heavy-chain

  7. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaskey, A.; Yamamoto, Y.; Warnock, M.; Burzuri, E.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Park, K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters,

  8. Surface diffusion of long chainlike molecules: The role of memory effects and stiffness on effective diffusion barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelt, T.; Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio

    2000-01-01

    stiffness. Our primary aim is to consider the role played by chain stiffness and the resulting memory effects in tracer diffusion, and in particular their role in the effective tracer diffusion barrier E-A(T) extracted from the well-known Arrhenius form. We show that the memory effects in tracer diffusion......, for a single diffusing chain, about 20% of E-A(T) arises from temperature variations in the memory effects, while only the remaining part comes from thermally activated chain segment movements. At a finite coverage, the memory contribution in E-A(T) is even larger and is typically about 20%-40%. Further...... of recent experimental work as regards surface diffusion of long DNA molecules on a biological interface. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  9. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  10. Performance of Droplet Digital PCR in Non-Invasive Fetal RHD Genotyping - Comparison with a Routine Real-Time PCR Based Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Svobodová

    Full Text Available Detection and characterization of circulating cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA from maternal circulation requires an extremely sensitive and precise method due to very low cffDNA concentration. In our study, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR was implemented for fetal RHD genotyping from maternal plasma to compare this new quantification alternative with real-time PCR (qPCR as a golden standard for quantitative analysis of cffDNA. In the first stage of study, a DNA quantification standard was used. Clinical samples, including 10 non-pregnant and 35 pregnant women, were analyzed as a next step. Both methods' performance parameters-standard curve linearity, detection limit and measurement precision-were evaluated. ddPCR in comparison with qPCR has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for analysing of cffDNA and determination of fetal RhD status from maternal circulation, results of both methods strongly correlated. Despite the more demanding workflow, ddPCR was found to be slightly more precise technology, as evaluated using quantitative standard. Regarding the clinical samples, the precision of both methods equalized with decreasing concentrations of tested DNA samples. In case of cffDNA with very low concentrations, variance parameters of both techniques were comparable. Detected levels of fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma were slightly higher than expected and correlated significantly with gestational age as measured by both methods (ddPCR r = 0.459; qPCR r = 0.438.

  11. Effects of the small molecule HERG activator NS1643 on Kv11.3 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Bilet

    Full Text Available NS1643 is one of the small molecule HERG (Kv11.1 channel activators and has also been found to increase erg2 (Kv11.2 currents. We now investigated whether NS1643 is also able to act as an activator of Kv11.3 (erg3 channels expressed in CHO cells. Activation of rat Kv11.3 current occurred in a dose-dependent manner and maximal current increasing effects were obtained with 10 µM NS1643. At this concentration, steady-state outward current increased by about 80% and the current increase was associated with a significant shift in the voltage dependence of activation to more negative potentials by about 15 mV. In addition, activation kinetics were accelerated, whereas deactivation was slowed. There was no significant effect on the kinetics of inactivation and recovery from inactivation. The strong current-activating agonistic effect of NS1643 did not result from a shift in the voltage dependence of Kv11.3 channel inactivation and was independent from external Na(+ or Ca(2+. At the higher concentration of 20 µM, NS1643 induced clearly less current increase. The left shift in the voltage dependence of activation reversed and the voltage sensitivity of activation dramatically decreased along with a slowing of Kv11.3 channel activation. These data show that, in comparison to other Kv11 family members, NS1643 exerts distinct effects on Kv11.3 channels with especially pronounced partial antagonistic effects at higher concentration.

  12. Multiple molecule effects on the cooperativity of protein folding transitions in simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jacob I.; Moss, Devin J.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2012-06-01

    Though molecular simulation of proteins has made notable contributions to the study of protein folding and kinetics, disagreement between simulation and experiment still exists. One of the criticisms levied against simulation is its failure to reproduce cooperative protein folding transitions. This weakness has been attributed to many factors such as a lack of polarizability and adequate capturing of solvent effects. This work, however, investigates how increasing the number of proteins simulated simultaneously can affect the cooperativity of folding transitions — a topic that has received little attention previously. Two proteins are studied in this work: phage T4 lysozyme (Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID: 7LZM) and phage 434 repressor (PDB ID: 1R69). The results show that increasing the number of proteins molecules simulated simultaneously leads to an increase in the macroscopic cooperativity for transitions that are inherently cooperative on the molecular level but has little effect on the cooperativity of other transitions. Taken as a whole, the results identify one area of consideration to improving simulations of protein folding.

  13. The boomerang effect in electron-hydrogen molecule scattering as determined by time-dependent calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Asher, Anael; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2017-05-01

    The appearance of oscillations in the energy-dependent cross sections of the vibrational excitation ν =0 →ν ≥3 of the hydrogen molecule in its electronic ground state as predicted by Mündel, Berman, and Domcke [Phys. Rev. A 32, 181 (1985)] was confirmed in the electron scattering experiments by Allan [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 18, L451 (1985)]. These unusual structures were obtained in spite of the extremely short lifetime of H2- in its ro-vibrational states. Based on the standard (Hermitian) time-independent scattering calculations, Horáček et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 022701 (2006)] associated these oscillations with the boomerang effect. Here, we show the boomerang effect as developed in time, based on our time-dependent nuclear wavepacket (WP) calculations. The nuclear WP dynamics of H2- is determined using the non-Hermitian quantum mechanics (NH-QM) which enables the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation with complex potential energy surfaces. This NH-QM approach, which enables us the association of the nuclear WP dynamics as obtained from the complex potential energy curve of H2- with the evolution of cross section in time, can enlighten the dynamics in other scattering experiments.

  14. Effects on Energy Metabolism of Two Guanidine Molecules, (Boc)2 -Creatine and Metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbati, Patrizia; Ravera, Silvia; Scarfì, Sonia; Salis, Annalisa; Rosano, Camillo; Poggi, Alessandro; Damonte, Gianluca; Millo, Enrico; Balestrino, Maurizio

    2017-09-01

    Several enzymes are involved in the energy production, becoming a possible target for new anti-cancer drugs. In this paper, we used biochemical and in silico studies to evaluate the effects of two guanidine molecules, (Boc) 2 -creatine and metformin, on creatine kinase, an enzyme involved in the regulation of intracellular energy levels. Our results show that both drugs inhibit creatine kinase activity; however, (Boc) 2 -creatine displays a competitive inhibition, while metformin acts with a non-competitive mechanism. Moreover, (Boc) 2 -creatine is able to inhibit the activity of hexokinase with a non-competitive mechanism. Considering that creatine kinase and hexokinase are involved in energy metabolism, we evaluated the effects of (Boc) 2 -creatine and metformin on the ATP/AMP ratio and on cellular proliferation in healthy fibroblasts, human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-468), a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y), a human Hodgkin lymphoma cell line (KMH2). We found that healthy fibroblasts were only partially affected by (Boc) 2 -creatine, while both ATP/AMP ratio and viability of the three cancer cell lines were significantly decreased. By inhibiting both creatine kinase and hexokinase, (Boc) 2 -creatine appears as a promising new agent in anticancer treatment. Further research is needed to understand what types of cancer cells are most suitable to treatment by this new compound. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2700-2711, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Consistent quantum approach to new laser-electron-nuclear effects in diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, A V; Malinovskaya, S V; Loboda, A V; Shpinareva, I M; Prepelitsa, G P

    2006-01-01

    We present a consistent, quantum approach to the calculation of electron-nuclear γ. spectra (set of vibrational and rotational satellites) for nuclei in diatomic molecules. The approach generelizes the well known Letokhov-Minogin model and is based on the Dunham model potential approximation for potential curves of diatomic molecules. The method is applied to the calculation of probabilities of the vibration-rotation-nuclear transitions in a case of emission and absorption spectrum for the nucleus 127 I (E γ (0) = 203 keV) linked with the molecule H 127 I

  16. Effect of spironolactone on renal and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in Type 2 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Suwan; Li Sumei; Zhai Fei; Zhang Li; Zhang Rong; Ru Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influence of spironolactone on the serum and urine intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) level, and the change of renal structure and function of type 2 diabetic rats. Methods: 30 healthy male SD rats were chosen 10 of them were randomly selected as normal controls (group NC) n=10; Then these rats were randomly divided into type 2 diabetes group (group DM) n=10 and type 2 diabetes + spironolactone treated group (group SPI) n=10. After 8 weeks, the levels of blood glucose, serum lipids, urine biochemical, renal pathological changes were examined; while the serum and urine ICAM-1 levels changes were also detected. Results: 1. Compared with group NC, the levels of fBG and HbA1c were significantly increased in group DM and group SPI (P 0.05). 2. After 8 weeks,the levels of ACR, URBP, UICAM-1, SICAM-1 and kidney/body weight ratio in group DM and group SPI were higher than group NC (P<0.05); the five indexes were significantly lower in group SPI compared with group DM (P<0.05). In addition, UICAM-1 excretion rate and SICAM-1 level showed positive correlations with ACR, URBP excretion rate and kidney/body weight ratio (P<0.01). 3. Pathology showed that the extent of glomerular lesions in rats in group SPI apparently reduced, ICAM-1 expression was decreased compared with that in group DM (P<0.01). Conclusion: Spironolactone can definitely protect type 2 diabetic kidney,and this protective effect was independent on the hypoglycemic effect. The mechanisms might be associated with its inhibition effect on ICAM-1 expression and its excretion. (authors)

  17. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya, E-mail: jyli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Nan, Fa-Jun, E-mail: fjnan@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Li, Jia, E-mail: jli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  18. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome

  19. Organic Semiconductor-Containing Supramolecules: Effect of Small Molecule Crystallization and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.; Kim, BongSoo; Mauldin, Clayton E.; Frechet, Jean; Xu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    on these highly crystalline molecules differs from their less crystalline counterparts. Here, two families of organic semiconductor SMs are investigated, where the composition of the crystalline core, the location (side- vs end-functionalization) of the alkyl

  20. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface.

  1. Effects of ethanol and NAP on cerebellar expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule L1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon M Fitzgerald

    Full Text Available The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is critical for brain development and plays a role in learning and memory in the adult. Ethanol inhibits L1-mediated cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs, and these actions might underlie the cerebellar dysmorphology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The peptide NAP potently blocks ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis. We used quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting of extracts of cerebellar slices, CGNs, and astrocytes from postnatal day 7 (PD7 rats to investigate whether ethanol and NAP act in part by regulating the expression of L1. Treatment of cerebellar slices with 20 mM ethanol, 10(-12 M NAP, or both for 4 hours, 24 hours, and 10 days did not significantly affect L1 mRNA and protein levels. Similar treatment for 4 or 24 hours did not regulate L1 expression in primary cultures of CGNs and astrocytes, the predominant cerebellar cell types. Because ethanol also damages the adult cerebellum, we studied the effects of chronic ethanol exposure in adult rats. One year of binge drinking did not alter L1 gene and protein expression in extracts from whole cerebellum. Thus, ethanol does not alter L1 expression in the developing or adult cerebellum; more likely, ethanol disrupts L1 function by modifying its conformation and signaling. Likewise, NAP antagonizes the actions of ethanol without altering L1 expression.

  2. Effect of Dipolar Interactions on the Magnetization of Single-Molecule Magnets in a cubic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2005-03-01

    Since the one-body tunnel picture of single-molecule magnets (SMM) is not always sufficient to explain the fine structure of experimental hysteresis loops, the effect of intermolecular dipolar interactions has been investigated on an ensemble of 100 3D-systems of 5X5X4 particles, each with spin S = 5, arranged in a cubic lattice. We have solved the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for several values of the damping constant, the field sweep rate and the lattice constant. We find that the smaller the damping constant is, the stronger the maximum field needs to be to produce hysteresis. Furthermore, the shape of the hysteresis loops also depends on the damping constant. We also find that the system magnetizes and demagnetizes faster with decreasing sweep rates, resulting in smaller hysteresis loops. Variations of the lattice constant within realistic values (1.5nm and 2.5nm) show that the dipolar interaction plays an important role in magnetic hysteresis by controlling the relaxation process. Examination of temperature dependencies (0.1K and 0.7K) of the above will be presented and compared with recent experimental data on SMM.

  3. The effects of electric fields on charged molecules and particles in individual microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, K. S.; ApSimon, H. M.; Jamieson, S. S.; Bell, J. N. B.; Yost, M. G.

    Measurements of small air ion concentrations, electrostatic potential and AC electric field strengths were taken in an office setting to investigate the link between electric fields and charged molecule and particle concentrations in individual microenvironments. The results obtained indicate that the electromagnetic environments individuals can be exposed to whilst indoors can often bear little resemblance to those experienced outdoors in nature, and that many individuals may spend large periods of their time in "Faraday cage"-like conditions exposed to inappropriate levels and types of electric fields that can reduce localised concentrations of biologically essential and microbiocidal small air ions. Such conditions may escalate their risk of infection from airborne contaminants, including microbes, whilst increasing localised surface contamination. The degree of "electro-pollution" that individuals are exposed to was shown to be influenced by the type of microenvironment they occupy, with it being possible for very different types of microenvironment to exist within the same room. It is suggested that adopting suitable electromagnetic hygiene/productivity guidelines that seek to replicate the beneficial effects created by natural environments may greatly mitigate such problems.

  4. Effect of low dose irradiation on expression of membrane molecules of T lymphocytes in cord blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang'an; Yang Guang; Jia Tingzhen

    2001-01-01

    The membrane molecules expression of T lymphocytes of cord blood after low dose irradiation (LDI) was investigated. Freshly isolated lymphocytes from cord blood were irradiated with 62 mGy γ-ray. At different time (4 h, 12 h, 24 h) after irradiation the changes of TCR + , CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + cells were examined by flow cytometry with direct immunofluorescence, respectively. The experimental results showed that the proportion of CD3 + , TCR + /CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + cells increased significantly after LDI, with the most obvious enhancement noted in the 24 h experimental group. The ratio of CD4 to CD8 showed no significant changes. It is suggested that expedition of the maturation, activation and signal transduction of T lymphocytes from cord blood can be induced by irradiation of 62 mGy γ-ray. So the reconstruction of immune functions after cord blood transplantation can be accelerated, enhancing the graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and preventing the tumor from relapsing

  5. Counteracting chemical chaperone effects on the single-molecule α-synuclein structural landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreon, Allan Chris M.; Moosa, Mahdi Muhammad; Gambin, Yann; Deniz, Ashok A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure and function depend on a close interplay between intrinsic folding energy landscapes and the chemistry of the protein environment. Osmolytes are small-molecule compounds that can act as chemical chaperones by altering the environment in a cellular context. Despite their importance, detailed studies on the role of these chemical chaperones in modulating structure and dimensions of intrinsically disordered proteins have been limited. Here, we used single-molecule Förster reson...

  6. Nonequilibrium Chemical Effects in Single-Molecule SERS Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Sean A.; Apra, Edoardo; Govind, Niranjan; Hess, Wayne P.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-02-03

    Recent developments in nanophotonics have paved the way for achieving significant advances in the realm of single molecule chemical detection, imaging, and dynamics. In particular, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful analytical technique that is now routinely used to identify the chemical identity of single molecules. Understanding how nanoscale physical and chemical processes affect single molecule SERS spectra and selection rules is a challenging task, and is still actively debated. Herein, we explore underappreciated chemical phenomena in ultrasensitive SERS. We observe a fluctuating excited electronic state manifold, governed by the conformational dynamics of a molecule (4,4’-dimercaptostilbene, DMS) interacting with a metallic cluster (Ag20). This affects our simulated single molecule SERS spectra; the time trajectories of a molecule interacting with its unique local environment dictates the relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states. Ab initio molecular dynamics of a model Ag20-DMS system are used to illustrate both concepts in light of recent experimental results.

  7. Research on effects of ionizing radiation of human peripheral blood white cell adhesive molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haijun; Cheng Ying; Le Chen; Min Rui

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the links between expression and function of adhesive molecule on the surface of irradiated peripheral blood white cells. Methods: Heparinized human peripheral blood was exposed to γ rays with different dose. At the different post-radiation time adhesive molecule expression on cellular surface was determined by double fluorescence labeling antibodies which were against adhesive molecule and special mark of granulocyte or mononuclear cell respectively with flow cytometry, and cellular adhesive ability to different matrixes mediated by adhesive molecule was estimated by commercializing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit and crystalviolet dying. Results: A decline pattern of CD11b on surface of mononuclear cells and CD29 on surface of granulocyte with irradiation dose increase was found. The changes of adhesive ability of mononuclear cells to substance of β1-integrin and collagen-I was well related with irradiation dose. Conclusion: Good relationship shown by the changes of adhesive molecule expression and adhesive ability mediated by the molecules on the surface of peripheral blood white cells with radiation dose was primary base of further research on indicting exposure dose by biomarker. (authors)

  8. Effect of vibrational excitation on the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.L.

    1981-11-01

    A new experimental technique for the study of vibrational effects on ion-molecule reaction cross sections is described. Vibrational and collision energy dependent cross sections are presented for proton and H atom transfer, charge transfer and collision induced dissociation reactions in various isotopic H 2 + + H 2 systems. Charge and proton transfer cross sections are presented for the reactions of H 2 + and D 2 + with Ar, N 2 , CO, and O 2 . All the reactions are shown to be highly influenced by avoided crossings between the ground and first excited potential energy surfaces. Because of the nature of the crossings, vibrational motion of the systems can cause both adiabatic and non-adiabatic behavior of the system. This makes the vibrational dependences of the various cross sections a very sensitive probe of the dynamics of the collisions particularly, their behavior in the region of the crossings. Evidence is seen for charge transfer between reagents as they approach each other, transition to and in some cases reactions on excited potential energy surfaces, competition between different channels, and strong coupling of proton and charge transfer channels which occurs only for two of the systems studied (H 2 + + Ar, N 2 ). Oscillatory structure is observed in the collision energy dependence of the endoergic H 2 + (v = 0) + Ar charge transfer reaction for the first time, and a simple model which is commonly used for atom-atom charge transfer is used to fit the peaks. Finally a simple model is used to assess the importance of energy resonance and Franck-Condon effects on molecular charge transfer

  9. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  10. Coulomb Repulsion Effect in Two-electron Non-adiabatic Tunneling through a One-level redox Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medvedev, Igor M.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    We investigated Coulomb repulsion effects in nonadiabatic (diabatic) two-electron tunneling through a redox molecule with a single electronic level in a symmetric electrochemical contact under ambient conditions, i.e., room temperature and condensed matter environment. The electrochemical contact...

  11. The effect of small molecules on nuclear-encoded translation diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soiferman, Devorah; Ayalon, Oshrat; Weissman, Sarah; Saada, Ann

    2014-05-01

    The five complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) supply most organs and tissues with ATP produced by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Inherited mitochondrial diseases affecting OXPHOS dysfunction are heterogeneous; symptoms may present at any age and may affect a wide range of tissues, with many diseases giving rise to devastating multisystemic disorders resulting in neonatal death. Combined respiratory chain deficiency with normal complex II accounts for a third of all respiratory deficiencies; mutations in nuclear-encoded components of the mitochondrial translation machinery account for many cases. Although mutations have been identified in over 20 such genes and our understanding of the mitochondrial translation apparatus is increasing, to date no definitive cure for these disorders exists. We evaluated the effect of seven small molecules with reported therapeutic potential in fibroblasts of four patients with combined respiratory complex disorders, each harboring a known mutation in a different nuclear-encoded component of the mitochondrial translation machinery: EFTs, GFM1, MRPS22 and TRMU. Six mitochondrial parameters were screened as follows; growth in glucose-free medium, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, ATP content, mitochondrial content, mitochondrial membrane potential and complex IV activity. It was clearly evident that each patient displayed an individual response and there was no universally beneficial compound. AICAR increased complex IV activity in GFM1 cells and increased ATP content in MRPS22 fibroblasts but was detrimental to TRMU, who benefitted from bezafibrate. Two antioxidants, ascorbate and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), significantly improved cell growth, ATP content and mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in EFTs fibroblasts. This study presents an expanded repertoire of assays that can be performed using the microtiter screening system with a small number

  12. Crystal lattice desolvation effects on the magnetic quantum tunneling of single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, G.; Lampropoulos, C.; Datta, S.; Koo, C.; Stamatatos, T. C.; Chakov, N. E.; Christou, G.; Hill, S.

    2009-09-01

    High-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) and alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements are reported for a new high-symmetry Mn12 complex, [Mn12O12(O2CCH3)16(CH3OH)4]ṡCH3OH . The results are compared to those of other high-symmetry spin S=10Mn12 single-molecule magnets (SMMs), including the original acetate, [Mn12(O2CCH3)16(H2O)4]ṡ2CH3CO2Hṡ4H2O , and the [Mn12O12(O2CCH2Br)16(H2O)4]ṡ4CH2Cl2 and [Mn12O12(O2CCH2But)16(CH3OH)4]ṡCH3OH complexes. These comparisons reveal important insights into the factors that influence the values of the effective barrier to magnetization reversal, Ueff , deduced on the basis of ac susceptibility measurements. In particular, we find that variations in Ueff can be correlated with the degree of disorder in a crystal which can be controlled by desolvating (drying) samples. This highlights the importance of careful sample handling when making measurements on SMM crystals containing volatile lattice solvents. The HFEPR data additionally provide spectroscopic evidence suggesting that the relatively weak disorder induced by desolvation influences the quantum tunneling interactions and that it is under-barrier tunneling that is responsible for a consistent reduction in Ueff that is found upon drying samples. Meanwhile, the axial anisotropy deduced from HFEPR is found to be virtually identical for all four Mn12 complexes, with no measurable reduction upon desolvation.

  13. Molecular Characterisation of Small Molecule Agonists Effect on the Human Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aiysha; Stephens, Jeffrey W; Bain, Stephen C; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R), which is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways and ERK phosphorylation to stimulate insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to determine molecular details of the effect of small molecule agonists, compounds 2 and B, on GLP-1R mediated cAMP production, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and its internalisation. In human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) expressing cells, compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production but caused no intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation or hGLP-1R internalisation. GLP-1 antagonists Ex(9-39) and JANT-4 and the orthosteric binding site mutation (V36A) in hGLP-1R failed to inhibit compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, confirming that their binding site distinct from the GLP-1 binding site on GLP-1R. However, K334A mutation of hGLP-1R, which affects Gαs coupling, inhibited GLP-1 as well as compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, indicating that GLP-1, compounds 2 and B binding induce similar conformational changes in the GLP-1R for Gαs coupling. Additionally, compound 2 or B binding to the hGLP-1R had significantly reduced GLP-1 induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and hGLP-1R internalisation. This study illustrates pharmacology of differential activation of GLP-1R by GLP-1 and compounds 2 and B.

  14. Molecular Characterisation of Small Molecule Agonists Effect on the Human Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Internalisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiysha Thompson

    Full Text Available The glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R, which is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR, signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways and ERK phosphorylation to stimulate insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to determine molecular details of the effect of small molecule agonists, compounds 2 and B, on GLP-1R mediated cAMP production, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and its internalisation. In human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R expressing cells, compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production but caused no intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation or hGLP-1R internalisation. GLP-1 antagonists Ex(9-39 and JANT-4 and the orthosteric binding site mutation (V36A in hGLP-1R failed to inhibit compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, confirming that their binding site distinct from the GLP-1 binding site on GLP-1R. However, K334A mutation of hGLP-1R, which affects Gαs coupling, inhibited GLP-1 as well as compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, indicating that GLP-1, compounds 2 and B binding induce similar conformational changes in the GLP-1R for Gαs coupling. Additionally, compound 2 or B binding to the hGLP-1R had significantly reduced GLP-1 induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and hGLP-1R internalisation. This study illustrates pharmacology of differential activation of GLP-1R by GLP-1 and compounds 2 and B.

  15. Pendant unit effect on electron tunneling in U-shaped molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Chakrabarti, Subhasis; Waldeck, David H.; Oliver, Anna M.; Paddon-Row, Michael N.

    2006-01-01

    The electron transfer reactions of three U-shaped donor-bridge-acceptor molecules with different pendant groups have been studied in different solvents as a function of temperature. Analysis of the electron transfer kinetics in nonpolar and weakly polar solvents provides experimental reaction Gibbs energies that are used to parameterize a molecular solvation model. This solvation model is then used to predict energetic parameters in the electron transfer rate constant expression and allow the electronic coupling between the electron donor and electron acceptor groups to be determined from the rate data. The U-shaped molecules differ by alkylation of the aromatic pendant group, which lies in the 'line-of-sight' between the donor and acceptor groups. The findings show that the electronic coupling through the pendant group is similar for these molecules

  16. Kinetic Effects in the Self-Assembly of Pure and Mixed Tetradecyland Octadecylamine Molecules on Mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez, J.J.; Salmeron, M.

    2005-09-21

    The self-assembly of tetradecylamine (C14) and of mixtures of tetradecyl and octadecylamine (C18) molecules from chloroform solutions on mica has been studied using atomic force microscopy(AFM). For pure components self-assembly proceeds more slowly for C14 than for C18. In both cases after equilibrium is reached islands of tilted molecules cover a similar fraction of the surface. Images of films formed by mixtures of molecules acquired before equilibrium is reached (short ripening time at room temperature) show only islands with the height corresponding to C18 with many pores. After a long ripening time, when equilibrium is reached, islands of segregated pure components are formed.

  17. Antibiofilm and antibacterial effects of specific chitosan molecules on Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with bovine mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asli, Abdelhamid; Brouillette, Eric; Ster, Céline; Ghinet, Mariana Gabriela; Brzezinski, Ryszard; Lacasse, Pierre; Jacques, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major pathogens causing bovine intramammary infections (IMIs) and mastitis. Mastitis is the primary cause for the use of antibiotics in dairy farms but therapeutic failure is often observed. One of the reasons for the lack of effectiveness of antibiotic therapy despite the observed susceptibility of bacterial isolates in vitro are bacterial biofilms. In this study, we used chitosan of well-defined molecular weight (0.4–0.6, 1.3, 2.6 and 4.0 kDa) and investigated their antibiofilm and antibacterial activities in in vitro and in vivo models related to S. aureus IMIs. A chitosan of at least 6 units of glucosamine was necessary for maximum antibacterial activity. The 2.6 and 4.0 kDa forms were able to prevent biofilm production by the biofilm hyperproducer strain S. aureus 2117 and a bovine MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus). The intramammary administration of the 2.6 kDa chitosan showed no adverse effects in mice or in cows, as opposed to the slight inflammatory effect observed in mammary glands with the 4.0 kDa derivative. The 2.6 kDa chitosan killed bacteria embedded in pre-established biofilms in a dose-dependent manner with a >3 log10 reduction in CFU at 4 mg/ml. Also, the 2.6 kDa chitosan could prevent the persistence of the internalized MRSA into the mammary epithelial cell line MAC-T. An in vitro checkerboard assay showed that the 2.6 kDa chitosan produced a synergy with the macrolide class of antibiotics (e.g., tilmicosin) and reduced the MIC of both molecules by 2–8 times. Finally, the intramammary administration of the 2.6 kDa chitosan alone (P<0.01) or in combination with tilmicosin (P<0.0001) reduced the colonization of mammary glands in a murine IMI model. Our results suggest that the use of chitosan alone or in combination with a low dose of a macrolide could help reduce antibiotic use in dairy farms. PMID:28486482

  18. Antibiofilm and antibacterial effects of specific chitosan molecules on Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with bovine mastitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhamid Asli

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major pathogens causing bovine intramammary infections (IMIs and mastitis. Mastitis is the primary cause for the use of antibiotics in dairy farms but therapeutic failure is often observed. One of the reasons for the lack of effectiveness of antibiotic therapy despite the observed susceptibility of bacterial isolates in vitro are bacterial biofilms. In this study, we used chitosan of well-defined molecular weight (0.4-0.6, 1.3, 2.6 and 4.0 kDa and investigated their antibiofilm and antibacterial activities in in vitro and in vivo models related to S. aureus IMIs. A chitosan of at least 6 units of glucosamine was necessary for maximum antibacterial activity. The 2.6 and 4.0 kDa forms were able to prevent biofilm production by the biofilm hyperproducer strain S. aureus 2117 and a bovine MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The intramammary administration of the 2.6 kDa chitosan showed no adverse effects in mice or in cows, as opposed to the slight inflammatory effect observed in mammary glands with the 4.0 kDa derivative. The 2.6 kDa chitosan killed bacteria embedded in pre-established biofilms in a dose-dependent manner with a >3 log10 reduction in CFU at 4 mg/ml. Also, the 2.6 kDa chitosan could prevent the persistence of the internalized MRSA into the mammary epithelial cell line MAC-T. An in vitro checkerboard assay showed that the 2.6 kDa chitosan produced a synergy with the macrolide class of antibiotics (e.g., tilmicosin and reduced the MIC of both molecules by 2-8 times. Finally, the intramammary administration of the 2.6 kDa chitosan alone (P<0.01 or in combination with tilmicosin (P<0.0001 reduced the colonization of mammary glands in a murine IMI model. Our results suggest that the use of chitosan alone or in combination with a low dose of a macrolide could help reduce antibiotic use in dairy farms.

  19. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  20. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chang; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Roh, Tae-Young; Park, Jihwan; Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil; Choi, Sang-Yun; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. → CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. → HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. → H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. → HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56 Lck , ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56 Lck , ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new antireservoir therapy.

  1. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Chang [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Guk [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Tae-Young [Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jihwan [Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang-Yun [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Soon [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byeong-Sun, E-mail: byeongsun@korea.kr [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. {yields} H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. {yields} HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new

  2. The effect of gold nanoparticles on exchange processes in collision complexes of triplet and singlet oxygen molecules with excited eosin molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukhanov, V. V.; Minaev, B. M.; Tsibul'nikova, A. V.; Slezhkin, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied exchange processes in contact complexes of triplet eosin molecules with oxygen molecules in the triplet (3Σ{/g -}) and singlet (1Δ g ) states in thin polyvinylbutyral films in the presence of gold nanoparticles. Upon resonant excitation of surface plasmons in gold nanoparticles into the absorption band of eosin molecules-singlet oxygen sensitizers-we have obtained an increase in the intensity of the delayed fluorescence and an increase in the lifetime of the dye with simultaneous quenching of the luminescence of singlet oxygen. The kinetics of the delayed fluorescence of the dye as a result of singlet-triplet annihilation of triplet eosin molecules with singlet oxygen molecules has been investigated. To compare theoretical and experimental data, we have numerically simulated energy transfer processes. Rate constants of energy transfer and of singlet-triplet annihilation, as well as quenching constants of triplet states of the dye by molecular oxygen, have been calculated. Luminescence quantum yield 1Δ g of polyvinylbutyral has been estimated. We have analyzed quantum-chemically electronic mechanisms of singlet-triplet annihilation of oxygen and eosin.

  3. Effects of quantum chemistry models for bound electrons on positron annihilation spectra for atoms and small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Feng; Ma Xiaoguang; Selvam, Lalitha; Gribakin, Gleb; Surko, Clifford M

    2012-01-01

    The Doppler-shift spectra of the γ-rays from positron annihilation in molecules were determined by using the momentum distribution of the annihilation electron–positron pair. The effect of the positron wavefunction on spectra was analysed in a recent paper (Green et al 2012 New J. Phys. 14 035021). In this companion paper, we focus on the dominant contribution to the spectra, which arises from the momenta of the bound electrons. In particular, we use computational quantum chemistry models (Hartree–Fock with two basis sets and density functional theory (DFT)) to calculate the wavefunctions of the bound electrons. Numerical results are presented for noble gases and small molecules such as H 2 , N 2 , O 2 , CH 4 and CF 4 . The calculations reveal relatively small effects on the Doppler-shift spectra from the level of inclusion of electron correlation energy in the models. For atoms, the difference in the full-width at half-maximum of the spectra obtained using the Hartree–Fock and DFT models does not exceed 2%. For molecules the difference can be much larger, reaching 8% for some molecular orbitals. These results indicate that the predicted positron annihilation spectra for molecules are generally more sensitive to inclusion of electron correlation energies in the quantum chemistry model than the spectra for atoms are. (paper)

  4. Beneficial effects of bacteria-plant communication based on quorum sensing molecules of the N-acyl homoserine lactone group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, Adam; Schenk, Sebastian T; Hartmann, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms play a crucial role in the proper performance and ecological fitness of bacterial populations. Many key physiological processes are regulated in a QS-dependent manner by auto-inducers, like the N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) in numerous Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, also the interaction between bacteria and eukaryotic hosts can be regulated by AHLs. Those mechanisms gained much attention, because of the positive effects of different AHL molecules on plants. This positive impact ranges from growth promotion to induced resistance and is quite contrasting to the rather negative effects observed in the interactions between bacterial AHL molecules and animals. Only very recently, we began to understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning plant responses to AHL molecules. In this review, we gathered the latest information in this research field. The first part gives an overview of the bacterial aspects of quorum sensing. Later we focus on the impact of AHLs on plant growth and AHL-priming, as one of the most understood phenomena in respect to the inter-kingdom interactions based on AHL-quorum sensing molecules. Finally, we discuss the potential benefits of the understanding of bacteria-plant interaction for the future agricultural applications.

  5. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance of strained organic molecules: III estimates of steric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.R.; Leal, K.Z.; Costa, V.E.U.; Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre

    1985-01-01

    A study of cyclic organic molecules using carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy is analysed. The preparation of compounds and the use of norbornyl compounds as a basis for chemical shifts, bicyclic, tricyclic and tetracyclic derivatives are compared. Relevant distances, angles and non-bonded interactions are shown. (M.J.C.) [pt

  6. Fluorescence quenching of dye molecules near gold nanoparticles: radiative and nonradiative effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulkeith, E.; Morteani, A.C.; Niedereichholz, T.; Klar, T.A.; Feldman, J.; Levi, S.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Reinhoudt, David; Möller, M.; Gittins, D.I.

    2002-01-01

    The radiative and nonradiative decay rates of lissamine dye molecules, chemically attached to differently sized gold nanoparticles, are investigated by means of time-resolved fluorescence experiments. A pronounced fluorescence quenching is observed already for the smallest nanoparticles of 1  nm

  7. Many-spin effects and tunneling splittings in Mn12 magnetic molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H.A. De; Hams, A.H.; Dobrovitski, V.V.; Al-Saqer, M.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Harmon, B.N.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the tunneling splittings in a Mn12 magnetic molecule taking into account its internal many-spin structure. We discuss the precision and reliability of these calculations and show that restricting the basis (limiting the number of excitations taken into account) may lead to significant

  8. Collective effects, relaxation and localization of hole levels in atoms, molecules, solids, and adsorbates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendin, G.

    1979-01-01

    Recent progress in descriptions of photoelectron spectra is reviewed with emphasis on cases where the one-electron and quasi-particle approximations break down and the hole level becomes spread over a number of discrete lines or a continuum or both. Unifying aspects and similarities between interaction processes in atoms, molecules and solids are stressed. 38 references

  9. Large tunable image-charge effects in single-molecule junctions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrin, M.L.; Verzijl, C.J.; Martin, C.A.; Shaikh, A.J.; Eelkema, R.; Esch, J.H. van; Ruitenbeek, J.M. van; Thijssen, J.M.; Zant, H.S. van der; Dulic, D.

    2013-01-01

    Metal/organic interfaces critically determine the characteristics of molecular electronic devices, because they influence the arrangement of the orbital levels that participate in charge transport. Studies on self-assembled monolayers show molecule-dependent energy-level shifts as well as

  10. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Levels in Experimental Brain Injury and the Effects of Alpha-tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgun Senol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The mechanisms, responsible for the secondary injuries occuring after acute injury of the brain are; release of nitrous oxide which is an inflammatory mediator, abnormal formation of free oxygen radicals and excessive stimulation of excitatory aminoacids. In this study, it is aimed to investigate changes in intercellular adhesion molecule levels in the brain, that occur subsequent to blunt head trauma, and after administration of an antioxidant agent, vitamin E. Material and Method: In this study, rats were divided into 4 groups. In group A; rats had only skin incision, group B; rats were traumatized after the skin incision, group C; isotonic (30mg/kg was given intraperitoneally after 30 minutes of the trauma, group D; alpha-tocopherol (30mg/kg was given intraperitoneally, after 30 minutes of the trauma. All the rats in these groups were sacrified after 24 hours. Biparietal and bifrontal lobs were taken about 3x5x1mm tickness and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results: As the result of the statistical analysis, it is detected that although there is an increase in intercellular adhesion molecule levels in brain parenchyma after trauma, it is statistically unsignificant. However, as the traumatized group and the group given alpha-tocopherol after trauma was compared, a statistically significant decrease in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in the alpha-tocopherol given group was seen. Discussion: Alpha-tocopherol, an antioxidant agent, causes decrease in intercellular adhesion molecule levels, by decreasing inflammation.

  11. Effect of charged and excited states on the decomposition of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, Anna V.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shluger, Alexander L.; Kuklja, Maija M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors have calculated the electronic structure of individual 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene molecules (FOX-7) in the gas phase by means of density functional theory with the hybrid B3LYP functional and 6-31+G(d,p) basis set and considered their dissociation pathways. Positively and negatively charged states as well as the lowest excited states of the molecule were simulated. They found that charging and excitation can not only reduce the activation barriers for decomposition reactions but also change the dominating chemistry from endo- to exothermic type. In particular, they found that there are two competing primary initiation mechanisms of FOX-7 decomposition: C-NO 2 bond fission and C-NO 2 to CONO isomerization. Electronic excitation or charging of FOX-7 disfavors CONO formation and, thus, terminates this channel of decomposition. However, if CONO is formed from the neutral FOX-7 molecule, charge trapping and/or excitation results in spontaneous splitting of an NO group accompanied by the energy release. Intramolecular hydrogen transfer is found to be a rare event in FOX-7 unless free electrons are available in the vicinity of the molecule, in which case HONO formation is a feasible exothermic reaction with a relatively low energy barrier. The effect of charged and excited states on other possible reactions is also studied. Implications of the obtained results to FOX-7 decomposition in condensed state are discussed

  12. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  13. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  14. Interaction between vegetable oil based plasticizer molecules and polyvinyl chloride, and their plasticization effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryono, Agus; Triwulandari, Evi; Jiang, Pingping

    2017-01-01

    Plasticizer molecules are low molecular weight compounds that are widely used in polymer industries especially in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) resin. As an additive in PVC resin, the important role of plasticizer molecules is to improve the flexibility and processability of PVC by lowering the glass transition temperature (Tg). However, the commercial plasticizer like di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is known to cause liver cancer, at least in laboratory rats. DEHP can leach out from PVC into blood, certain drug solutions and fatty foods, which has been detected in the bloodstream of patients undergoing transfusion. Vegetable oil based plasticizers have some attractive properties such as non-toxic, bio-degradable, good heat and light stability, renewable resources, and environmentally friendly. Here we discussed the main results and development of vegetable oil based plasticizer, and especially palm oil based plasticizer. The interaction between plasticizer and polymer was discussed from the properties of the plasticized polymeric material.

  15. Polarization dependent effects in photo-fragmentation dynamics of free molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocellin, A.; Marinho, R.R.T.; Coutinho, L.H.; Burmeister, F.; Wiesner, K.; Naves de Brito, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present multicoincidence spectra of nitrogen, formic acid and methyl methacrylate. We demonstrate how to probe the local symmetry of molecular orbitals from molecules core excited with linearly polarized synchrotron radiation. The intensity distribution of the photoelectron photo-ion photo-ion coincidence (PEPIPICO) spectrum reflects the selectivity and localization of core excitation by polarized light. By simulating the spectra the angular dependence of the fragmentation is determined

  16. Polarization dependent effects in photo-fragmentation dynamics of free molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocellin, A.; Marinho, R.R.T.; Coutinho, L.H.; Burmeister, F.; Wiesner, K.; Naves de Brito, A

    2003-04-01

    We present multicoincidence spectra of nitrogen, formic acid and methyl methacrylate. We demonstrate how to probe the local symmetry of molecular orbitals from molecules core excited with linearly polarized synchrotron radiation. The intensity distribution of the photoelectron photo-ion photo-ion coincidence (PEPIPICO) spectrum reflects the selectivity and localization of core excitation by polarized light. By simulating the spectra the angular dependence of the fragmentation is determined.

  17. Effect of aromatic SAMs molecules on graphene/silicon schottky diode performance

    OpenAIRE

    Yağmurcukardeş, Nesli; Aydın, Hasan; Can, Mustafa; Yanılmaz, Alper; Mermer, Ömer; Okur, Salih; Selamet, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Au/n-Si/Graphene/Au Schottky diodes were fabricated by transferring atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposited (APCVD) graphene on silicon substrates. Graphene/n-Si interface properties were improved by using 5-[(3-methylphenyl)(phenyl) amino]isophthalic acid (MePIFA) and 5-(diphenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (DPIFA) aromatic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecules. The surface morphologies of modified and non-modified films were investigated by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron ...

  18. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Alexander; Yamamoto, Yoh; Warnock, Michael; Burzurí, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Park, Kyungwha

    2015-03-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters, vibrational energies, and electron-vibron coupling strengths of the Fe4 are computed using DFT. A giant spin model is applied to the Fe4 with only two charge states, specifically a neutral state with a total spin S =5 and a singly charged state with S =9 /2 , which is consistent with our DFT result and experiments on Fe4 single-molecule transistors. In sequential electron tunneling, we find that the magnetic anisotropy gives rise to new features in the conductance peaks arising from vibrational excitations. In particular, the peak height shows a strong, unusual dependence on the direction as well as magnitude of applied B field. The magnetic anisotropy also introduces vibrational satellite peaks whose position and height are modified with the direction and magnitude of applied B field. Furthermore, when multiple vibrational modes with considerable electron-vibron coupling have energies close to one another, a low-bias current is suppressed, independently of gate voltage and applied B field, although that is not the case for a single mode with a similar electron-vibron coupling. In the former case, the conductance peaks reveal a stronger B -field dependence than in the latter case. The new features appear because the magnetic anisotropy barrier is of the same order of magnitude as the energies of vibrational modes with significant electron-vibron coupling. Our findings clearly show the interesting interplay between magnetic anisotropy and electron-vibron coupling in electron transport via the Fe4. Similar behavior can be observed in transport via other anisotropic magnetic molecules.

  19. Isonitrile ligand effects on small-molecule-sequestering in bimetalladodecaborane clusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bould, Jonathan; Londesborough, Michael Geoffrey Stephen; Kennedy, JD.; Macias, R.; Winter, REK.; Císařová, I.; Kubát, Pavel; Lang, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 747, december (2013), s. 76-84 ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/1577; GA ČR GAP208/10/1678; GA ČR GAP207/11/0705 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : Metallaboranes * Small molecule * Sequestration * DFT * Isonitrile * Carbon monoxide Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 2.302, year: 2013

  20. Benzofuranone derivatives as effective small molecules related to insulin amyloid fibrillation: a structure-function study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Navidpour, Latifeh

    2011-01-01

    amyloid fibrils under slightly destabilizing conditions in vitro and may form amyloid structures when subcutaneously injected into patients with diabetes. There is a great deal of interest in developing novel small molecule inhibitors of amyloidogenic processes, as potential therapeutic compounds...... of the five tested compounds was observed to enhance amyloid fibrillation, while the others inhibited the process when used at micromolar concentrations, which could make them interesting potential lead compounds for the design of therapeutic antiamyloidogenic compounds....

  1. Effect of lattice-gas atoms on the adsorption behaviour of thioether molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Yang, Bing; Hulot, Catherine; Blechert, Siegfried; Nilius, Niklas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2012-08-21

    Using STM topographic imaging and spectroscopy, we have investigated the adsorption of two thioether molecules, 1,2-bis(phenylthio)benzene and (bis(3-phenylthio)-phenyl)sulfane, on noble and transition metal surfaces. The two substrates show nearly antipodal behaviour. Whereas complexes with one or two protruding centres are observed on Au(111), only flat and uniform ad-structures are found on NiAl(110). The difference is ascribed to the possibility of the thioethers to form metal-organic complexes by coordinating lattice-gas atoms on the Au(111), while only the pristine molecules adsorb on the alloy surface. The metal coordination in the first case is driven by the formation of strong Au-S bonds and enables the formation of characteristic monomer, dimer and chain-like structures of the thioethers, using the Au atoms as linkers. A similar mechanism is not available on the NiAl, because no lattice gas develops at this surface at room temperature. Our work demonstrates how surface properties, i.e. the availability of mobile ad-species, determine the interaction of organic molecules with metallic substrates.

  2. Conformational Effects in Non-Stoichiometric Complexes of Two Hyperbranched Molecules with a Linear Polyelectrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Lyulin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report results from Brownian dynamics computer simulations of systems comprised by two terminally charged hyperbranched molecules preferentially branched in the periphery, with an oppositely charged linear chain of varying length. Comparison of the findings from the present study to stoichiometric counterparts and to analogous dendrimer-based complexes, reveal that the presence of the second hyperbranched molecule incurs significant changes in the conformational characteristics of both components of the complex. Instead of step-like changes in the average size and shape of the hyperbranched component that were noted in the previously studied stoichiometric systems, a rather smooth change is observed upon increase of the length of the linear component. In addition, a markedly different behavior is also noticed in the conformational characteristics of the linear chain when compared to that in similar dendrimer-based systems. The above findings are consistent with the higher degree of deformability of the peripherally branched molecules which allow appropriate rearrangements in shape in order to accommodate the favorable Coulombic interactions between the two components of the complex. This behavior offers new insight towards the design of more efficient hyperbranched-based systems which can take advantage of the multifunctionality and the structural properties of the highly branched polymer components.

  3. The effect of the charge density on the dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.; Germano, J.S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the calculation, using the Variational Cellular Method (VCM), of the electric dipole moment of several diatomic molecules are improved. In previous calculations, the electronic charge density was treated like a spherically symmetric function in the inscribed sphere within each cell and as being the same constant value for all intercellular regions. Since the results obtained with such an approximation have not been satisfactory, an improved approximation for the charge density in the intercellular regions is needed. It is considered that the charge density is still constant outside the inscribed sphere but with different values in each intercellular region. A new expression for the dipole moment is obtained, and applied to the diatomic molecules HF, CO, BF and CS. In addition, the corresponding dipole moment curves, potential energy curves and spectroscopic constants are calculated taking into consideration our approximation and the traditional approximation for the charge density. The results of the two models are compared with each other and with experimental results for all the molecules considered. (Author) [pt

  4. Toward a muon-specific electronic structure theory: effective electronic Hartree-Fock equations for muonic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayka, Milad; Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2018-02-07

    An effective set of Hartree-Fock (HF) equations are derived for electrons of muonic systems, i.e., molecules containing a positively charged muon, conceiving the muon as a quantum oscillator, which are completely equivalent to the usual two-component HF equations used to derive stationary states of the muonic molecules. In these effective equations, a non-Coulombic potential is added to the orthodox coulomb and exchange potential energy terms, which describes the interaction of the muon and the electrons effectively and is optimized during the self-consistent field cycles. While in the two-component HF equations a muon is treated as a quantum particle, in the effective HF equations it is absorbed into the effective potential and practically transformed into an effective potential field experienced by electrons. The explicit form of the effective potential depends on the nature of muon's vibrations and is derivable from the basis set used to expand the muonic spatial orbital. The resulting effective Hartree-Fock equations are implemented computationally and used successfully, as a proof of concept, in a series of muonic molecules containing all atoms from the second and third rows of the Periodic Table. To solve the algebraic version of the equations muon-specific Gaussian basis sets are designed for both muon and surrounding electrons and it is demonstrated that the optimized exponents are quite distinct from those derived for the hydrogen isotopes. The developed effective HF theory is quite general and in principle can be used for any muonic system while it is the starting point for a general effective electronic structure theory that incorporates various types of quantum correlations into the muonic systems beyond the HF equations.

  5. From the depletion attraction to the bridging attraction: the effect of solvent molecules on the effective colloidal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2015-02-28

    Depletion attraction induced by non-adsorbing polymers or small particles in colloidal solutions has been widely used as a model colloidal interaction to understand aggregation behavior and phase diagrams, such as glass transitions and gelation. However, much less attention has been paid to study the effective colloidal interaction when small particles/molecules can be reversibly attracted to large colloidal particles. At the strong attraction limit, small particles can introduce bridging attraction as it can simultaneously attach to neighbouring large colloidal particles. We use Baxter's multi-component method for sticky hard sphere systems with the Percus-Yevick approximation to study the bridging attraction and its consequence to phase diagrams, which are controlled by the concentration of small particles and their interaction with large particles. When the concentration of small particles is very low, the bridging attraction strength increases very fast with the increase of small particle concentration. The attraction strength eventually reaches a maximum bridging attraction (MBA). Adding more small particles after the MBA concentration keeps decreasing the attraction strength until reaching a concentration above which the net effect of small particles only introduces an effective repulsion between large colloidal particles. These behaviors are qualitatively different from the concentration dependence of the depletion attraction on small particles and make phase diagrams very rich for bridging attraction systems. We calculate the spinodal and binodal regions, the percolation lines, the MBA lines, and the equivalent hard sphere interaction line for bridging attraction systems and have proposed a simple analytic solution to calculate the effective attraction strength using the concentrations of large and small particles. Our theoretical results are found to be consistent with experimental results reported recently.

  6. Matrix effect on hydrogen-atom tunneling of organic molecules in cryogenic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneki

    2000-01-01

    Although the tunneling of atoms through potential energy barriers separating the reactant and reaction systems is not paid much attention in organic reactions, this plays an important role in reactions including the transfer of light atoms. Atomic tunneling is especially important for chemical reactions at low temperatures, since the thermal activation of reactant systems is very slow process in comparison with the tunneling. One of the typical reactions of atomic tunneling is hydrogen-atom abstraction from alkanes in cryogenic solids exposed to high-energy radiation. Irradiation of alkane molecules causes the homolytic cleavage of C-H bonds, which results in the pairwise formation of free hydrogen atoms and organic free radicals. Since the activation energies for the abstraction of hydrogen atoms from alkane molecules by free hydrogen atoms are higher than 5 kcal/mol, the lifetime of free hydrogen atoms at 77 K is estimated from the Arrhenius equation of k=vexp(-E a /RT) to be longer than 10 hrs. However, except for solid methane, free hydrogen atoms immediately convert to alkyl radicals even at 4.2 K by hydrogen-atom tunneling from alkane molecules to the free hydrogen atoms. The rate of hydrogen atom tunneling does not necessary increase with decreasing activation energy or the peak height of the potential energy barrier preventing the tunneling. Although the activation energy is the lowest at the tertiary carbon of alkanes, hydrogen atom tunneling from branched alkanes with tertiary carbon at the antepenultimate position of the carbon skeleton is the fastest at the secondary penultimate carbon. Based on our experimental results, we have proposed that the peculiarity of the hydrogen-atom abstraction in cryogenic solids comes from the steric hindrance by matrix molecules to the deformation of alkane molecules from the initial sp 3 to the final sp 2 configurations. The steric hindrance causes the increase of the height of the potential energy barrier for the

  7. The effect of soy protein beverages on serum cell adhesion molecule concentrations in prehypertensive/stage 1 hypertensive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Michelle; Alekel, D Lee; Lasrado, Joanne A; Messina, Mark; Carriquiry, Alicia; Heiberger, Kevin; Stewart, Jeanne W; Franke, Warren

    2012-04-01

    Prehypertensive and hypertensive individuals are at increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), in part because hypertension contributes to endothelial dysfunction and increased cell adhesion molecule expression. Soy protein and isoflavones may favorably alter CVD risk factors, and hence the aim of this study was to determine whether intake of cow's milk compared with soy beverage prepared from whole soy bean (WSB) or soy protein isolate (SPI) would lower soluble cell adhesion molecule concentrations as a means of decreasing CVD risk. We enrolled healthy prehypertensive/stage 1 hypertensive men (n = 60; 18-63 years) and premenopausal women (n = 8; 20-48 years). Participants were randomized to 1 of 3 groups for 8 weeks: cow's milk (600 mL/d), SPI beverage (840 mL/d; 30.1 mg total isoflavones/d), or WSB beverage (840 mL/d; 91.4 mg total isoflavones/d). We measured soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (E-selectin) concentrations at baseline and week 8. Soluble CAM concentrations were not altered by treatment and did not differ between prehypertensive and hypertensive participants. However, analysis of variance indicated a treatment × gender interaction (gender effect) for ICAM-1 (p = 0.0037) but not for E-selectin (p = 0.067) or VCAM-1 (p = 0.16). Men had higher concentrations of ICAM-1 and E-selectin, respectively, at baseline (p = 0.0071, p = 0.049) and week 8 (p = 0.0054, p = 0.038) than women did. Neither intake of cow's milk nor soy beverage for 8 weeks altered soluble CAM concentrations in prehypertensive/stage 1 hypertensive individuals, suggesting that neither type of beverage diminished atherosclerotic CVD risk in mildly hypertensive individuals by way of improving circulating CAM concentrations.

  8. Jahn-Teller effect in vanadium, niobium and tantalum tetrafluoride molecules: ab initio study by the CASSCF method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomonik, V.G.; Pogrebnaya, T.P.

    2001-01-01

    The basic and the first exciting electronic state of the VF 4 , NbF 4 and TaF 4 molecules were studied by the self-consistent field multifunctional method in the approximation of active orbitals full space. The symmetry of these states is defined as 2 E and 2 T 2 at tetrahedron configuration of the nuclei. The energies of electron excitation 2 E → 2 T 2 comprise 11610 (VF 4 ), 13450 (NbF 4 ) and 12560 cm -1 (TaF 4 ). In line to Jahn-Teller theorem the calculations evidenced instability of tetrahedron configuration of the molecules in the orbital-singular electronic states 2 E and 2 T 2 . The properties of the systems of the molecule potential energies were found, in keeping with deformation of tetrahedron configuration of the nuclei along the oscillation coordinates of the e symmetry, active in the Jahn-Teller effect. Equilibrium geometric configuration of the molecules with the lowest energy has a symmetry D 2d as in the basic ( 2 A 1 ), so in the first excited electronic state. The energy of the adiabatic electronic excitation 2 A 1 → 2 B 2 is equal to 8440 (VF 4 ), 9050 (NbF 4 ) and 11920 cm -1 (TaF 4 ). Deviations of molecules equilibrium geometry on the structure of the normal tetrahedron and the energy of Jahn-Teller stabilization E JT grow essentially in the series of the molecules VF 4 → NbF 4 → TaF 4 : E JT =E(T d , 2 E)Epy - E(D 2d , 2 A 1 )=412, 1856, 5970 cm -1 ; E JT =E(T d , 2 T 2 ) - E(D 2d , 2 B 2 )=3584, 6259, 6611 cm -1 . The quadratic force constants, the frequencies of normal oscillations and the intensities in the IR spectra of the VF 4 , NbF 4 and TaF 4 molecules in the basic state were calculated [ru

  9. Effect of nontronite smectite clay on the chemical evolution of several organic molecules under simulated Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Olivier; Dequaire, Tristan; Stalport, Fabien; Jaber, Maguy; Lambert, Jean-François; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    The search for organic carbon-containing molecules at the surface of Mars, as clues of past habitability or remnants of life, is a major scientific goal for Mars exploration. Several lines of evidence, including the detection of phyllosilicates, suggest that early Mars offered favorable conditions for long-term sustaining of water. As a consequence, we can assume that in those days, endogenous chemical processes, or even primitive life, may have produced organic matter on Mars. Moreover, exogenous delivery from small bodies or dust particles is likely to have brought fresh organic molecules to the surface of Mars up today. Organic matter is therefore expected to be present at the surface/subsurface of the planet. But the current environmental conditions at the surface - UV radiation, oxidants and energetic particles - generate physico-chemical processes that may affect organic molecules. On the other hand, on Earth, phyllosilicates are known to accumulate and preserve organic matter. But are phyllosilicates efficient at preserving organic molecules under the current environmental conditions at the surface of Mars? We have monitored the qualitative and quantitative evolutions of glycine, urea and adenine interacting with the Fe3+-smectite clay nontronite, one of the most abundant phyllosilicates present at the surface of Mars, under simulated Martian surface ultraviolet light (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K) and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) in a laboratory simulation setup. We have tested organic-rich samples which may be representative of the evaporation of a warm little pond of liquid water having concentrated organics on Mars. For each molecule, we have observed how the nontronite influences the quantum efficiency of its photodecomposition and the nature of its solid evolution products. The results reveal a pronounced photoprotective effect of nontronite on the evolution of glycine and adenine: their efficiencies of photodecomposition are reduced by a factor

  10. Antioxidant effect of thiazolidine molecules in cell culture media improves stability and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschelewski, Jennifer; Schnellbaecher, Alisa; Pering, Sascha; Wehsling, Maria; Zimmer, Aline

    2017-05-01

    The ability of cell culture media components to generate reactive species as well as their sensitivity to oxidative degradation, affects the overall stability of media and the behavior of cells cultured in vitro. This study investigates the influence of thiazolidine molecules, formed from the condensation between cysteine and alpha-ketoacids, on the stability of these complex mixtures and on the performance of cell culture processes aiming to produce therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies. Results presented in this study indicate that 2-methyl-1,3-thiazolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid and 2-(2-carboxyethyl)-1,3-thiazolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid, obtained by condensation of cysteine with pyruvate or alpha-ketoglutarate, respectively, are able to stabilize cell culture media formulations, in particular redox sensitive molecules like folic acid, thiamine, l-methionine (met) and l-tryptophan (trp). The use of thiazolidine containing feeds in Chinese hamster ovary fed-batch processes showed prolonged culture duration and increased productivity. This enhanced performance was correlated with lower reactive species generation, extracellularly and intracellularly. Moreover, an anti-oxidative response was triggered via the induction of superoxide dismutase and an increase in the total glutathione pool, the major intracellular antioxidant. In total, the results confirm that cells in vitro are not cultured in an oxidant-free environment, a concept that has to be considered when studying the influence of reactive species in human diseases. Furthermore, this study indicates that thiazolidines are an interesting class of antioxidant molecules, capable of increasing cell culture media stability and process performance. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:759-770, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Effect of caffeine on the parameters of the motive and gamma-irradiated DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, N.D.; Kondrat'eva, O.P.; Erisman, Eh.V.

    1979-01-01

    The binding of caffeine with DNA and its pole as a DNA molecule protector against radiational damage have been studied. It is shown that with the ratio of DNA and caffeine concentrations used no complex formation occurs. The irradiation of the DNA solution by 1 krad dose of γ-rays causes only a few single-strand breaks which leads to the decrease in the volume macromolecules without changing its thermodynamic ligidity. The presence of caffeine in the DNA solution before its irradiation decreases considerably the extent of radiational damage

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation on cell-matrix interactions at the single molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, Florian

    2015-04-20

    Single molecule microscopy is a technology that allows for accurate assessment of the location and motion of single fluorescent molecules, even in the context of observations on living biological samples. In the present thesis, a flexible analysis tool for single molecule data as obtained in biological experiments was established. The development of a tool to faithfully detect and localize diffraction-limited images of individual fluorescent probes was necessary since data acquired under cell cultivation conditions that account for a three-dimensional microenvironment as experienced physiologically by cells in native tissue poses a challenge not faced ordinarily. After design, implementation, quantitative tests using simulations for comparisons and verification, and evaluation of the different steps of the analysis procedure including local background estimation, local noise estimation, de-noising approaches, detection, localization, and post-processing, analysis capabilities were utilized to evaluate the impact of x-ray irradiation on the plasma membrane architecture of U2OS human osteosarcoma cells as assessed by tracking individual fluorescent lipid-mimetic dye molecules diffusing in the outer membrane leaflet. It was shown that lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane is well described as two-phase anomalous subdiffusion and presence of 3D extracellular matrix leads to lower anomalous exponents of the fast fraction in comparison to monolayer cell culture. Interestingly, even high single-dose (25 Gy) treatments known to induce membrane-mediated apoptosis in tumor microvessel endothelium via membrane viscosity enhancing ceramide generation were not observed to alter membrane architecture in U2OS cells which can be related to amplifying, feedback-driven redox-signaling in the endothelium absent in U2OS. In summary, the sensitive and accurate framework developed in this thesis to assess minute changes of plasma membrane located dynamic processes did not uncover a

  13. Electronic properties of single-molecule junction: Effect of the molecular distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W.; Zhao, M.; Jiang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    For a model system consisting of a benzenedithio (BDT) molecule sandwiched between two Au plates, the electronic properties as a function of different BDT geometry are investigated using density functional theory. The distorted BDT structures are got through stretching the electrode distance. The corresponding electronic properties, including the spatial distribution of the frontier orbits, the gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and density of states at the Fermi energy are determined. It reveals that the molecular distortion essentially determines electronic structures. The result should be beneficial to understand the stress-dependent or structure-dependent transport mechanism of electrons of the BDT junction.

  14. Effects of ionizing radiation on cell-matrix interactions at the single molecule level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy is a technology that allows for accurate assessment of the location and motion of single fluorescent molecules, even in the context of observations on living biological samples. In the present thesis, a flexible analysis tool for single molecule data as obtained in biological experiments was established. The development of a tool to faithfully detect and localize diffraction-limited images of individual fluorescent probes was necessary since data acquired under cell cultivation conditions that account for a three-dimensional microenvironment as experienced physiologically by cells in native tissue poses a challenge not faced ordinarily. After design, implementation, quantitative tests using simulations for comparisons and verification, and evaluation of the different steps of the analysis procedure including local background estimation, local noise estimation, de-noising approaches, detection, localization, and post-processing, analysis capabilities were utilized to evaluate the impact of x-ray irradiation on the plasma membrane architecture of U2OS human osteosarcoma cells as assessed by tracking individual fluorescent lipid-mimetic dye molecules diffusing in the outer membrane leaflet. It was shown that lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane is well described as two-phase anomalous subdiffusion and presence of 3D extracellular matrix leads to lower anomalous exponents of the fast fraction in comparison to monolayer cell culture. Interestingly, even high single-dose (25 Gy) treatments known to induce membrane-mediated apoptosis in tumor microvessel endothelium via membrane viscosity enhancing ceramide generation were not observed to alter membrane architecture in U2OS cells which can be related to amplifying, feedback-driven redox-signaling in the endothelium absent in U2OS. In summary, the sensitive and accurate framework developed in this thesis to assess minute changes of plasma membrane located dynamic processes did not uncover a

  15. Study of the effect of gamma radiation on the molecule of tetracycline concerning its behavior as complexing and extracting agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade e Silva, Leonardo Gondim de

    1982-01-01

    Both solvent extraction and spectrophotometric techniques were used to show the alterations that gamma radiation causes in the behavior of tetracycline molecule as far as its extracting and complexing power are concerned. The effect of gamma radiation on the solid tetracycline molecule, benzyl alcohol and on the solution of both was examined in solvent extraction systems whose aqueous phases were made up by 152 Eu- 154 Eu radioactive tracer solutions and whose organic phases were constituted by tetracycline-benzyl alcohol solutions. Experiments were performed in order to determine whether or not the water used for the pre-saturation of benzyl alcohol would influence the radiolysis of tetracycline. Solvent extraction and spectrophotometry were the techniques used to obtain the necessary data. Absorption spectra of irradiated tetracycline benzyl alcohol solutions submitted to several gamma radiation doses were examined and the alterations shown by these spectra were examined. The effect of gamma radiation on the tetracycline molecule was also studied when tetracycline-benzyl alcohol solutions were irradiated under several gaseous atmospheres, namely: O 2 , N 2 , SF 6 and N 2 O. The variation on the concentration of the tetracycline-benzyl alcohol solution caused by several doses of gamma radiation was determined by using the spectrophotometric technique. (author)

  16. Effects of irradiation on the expression of the adhesion molecules (NCAM, ICAM-1) by glioma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Ryuya; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Yoshida, Seiichi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Brain Research Inst.

    1993-11-01

    The expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) by glioma cell lines was investigated. The effects of interferon (IFN)-[gamma] or irradiation on the expression was also assessed. Two glioma cell lines showed more than 75% NCAM-positive cells. After treatment with IFN-[gamma] or irradiation, another three cell lines were induced to show more than 50% positive cells. Three glioma cell lines showed more than 50% ICAM-1-positive cells. After treatment with IFN-[gamma], another two cell lines were induced to show more than 50% positive cells. After treatment with irradiation, one more cell line was induced to show more than 50% positive cells. ICAM-1 and NCAM expression by glioma cell lines is susceptible to modulation by IFN-[gamma] or irradiation. (author).

  17. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  18. Effect of small-molecule modification on single-cell pharmacokinetics of PARP inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M; Reiner, Thomas; Yang, Katherine S; Kohler, Rainer H; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    The heterogeneous delivery of drugs in tumors is an established process contributing to variability in treatment outcome. Despite the general acceptance of variable delivery, the study of the underlying causes is challenging, given the complex tumor microenvironment including intra- and intertumor heterogeneity. The difficulty in studying this distribution is even more significant for small-molecule drugs where radiolabeled compounds or mass spectrometry detection lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to quantify the kinetics of drug distribution in vivo. In this work, we take advantage of the synthesis of fluorescent drug conjugates that retain their target binding but are designed with different physiochemical and thus pharmacokinetic properties. Using these probes, we followed the drug distribution in cell culture and tumor xenografts with temporal resolution of seconds and subcellular spatial resolution. These measurements, including in vivo permeability of small-molecule drugs, can be used directly in predictive pharmacokinetic models for the design of therapeutics and companion imaging agents as demonstrated by a finite element model.

  19. Effect of Small Molecule Modification on Single Cell Pharmacokinetics of PARP Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Reiner, Thomas; Yang, Katherine S; Kohler, Rainer; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The heterogeneous delivery of drugs in tumors is an established process contributing to variability in treatment outcome. Despite the general acceptance of variable delivery, the study of the underlying causes is challenging given the complex tumor microenvironment including intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. The difficulty in studying this distribution is even more significant for small molecule drugs where radiolabeled compounds or mass spectrometry detection lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to quantify the kinetics of drug distribution in vivo. In this work, we take advantage of the synthesis of fluorescent drug conjugates that retain their target binding but are designed with different physiochemical and thus pharmacokinetic properties. Using these probes, we followed the drug distribution in cell culture and tumor xenografts with temporal resolution of seconds and subcellular spatial resolution. These measurements, including in vivo permeability of small molecule drugs, can be used directly in predictive pharmacokinetic models for the design of therapeutics and companion imaging agents as demonstrated by a finite element model. PMID:24552776

  20. Spin-interaction effects for ultralong-range Rydberg molecules in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Frederic; Fey, Christian; Schmelcher, Peter

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the fine and spin structure of ultralong-range Rydberg molecules exposed to a homogeneous magnetic field. Each molecule consists of a 87Rb Rydberg atom the outer electron of which interacts via spin-dependent s - and p -wave scattering with a polarizable 87Rb ground-state atom. Our model includes also the hyperfine structure of the ground-state atom as well as spin-orbit couplings of the Rydberg and ground-state atom. We focus on d -Rydberg states and principal quantum numbers n in the vicinity of 40. The electronic structure and vibrational states are determined in the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for varying field strengths ranging from a few up to hundred Gauss. The results show that the interplay between the scattering interactions and the spin couplings gives rise to a large variety of molecular states in different spin configurations as well as in different spatial arrangements that can be tuned by the magnetic field. This includes relatively regularly shaped energy surfaces in a regime where the Zeeman splitting is large compared to the scattering interaction but small compared to the Rydberg fine structure, as well as more complex structures for both weaker and stronger fields. We quantify the impact of spin couplings by comparing the extended theory to a spin-independent model.

  1. Effect of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in radiation otitis media murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shengzi; Cheng Qingfang; Lu Shenbin; Liu Jianping; Wang Shuyi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the dose- and time-dependent changes in intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression and the role of this molecule as a mediator of middle ear inflammation induced by radiation. Methods: Radiation-induced otitis media animal models were established by using guinea pigs after 60 Co irradiation with 3 Gy/fraction per day, 5 times per week to a total dose of 15, 30, 45 Gy. The expression of ICAM-1 was studied by SP immunohistochemistry with the relation between radiation dose and infiltration of leukocytes investigated. Results: ICAM-1 was not expressed in the normal epithelium of the middle ear mucosa. Mucosal epithelium strongly expressed ICAM-1 after having been administered with 45 Gy of irradiation showing a significant correlation between the expression of ICAM-1 and the infiltration of leukocytes. Conclusions: Irradiation increases the expression of ICAM-1 in the middle ear mucosa. ICAM-1 may be related to the inflammation in the middle ear after irradiation

  2. The effect of acute physical and mental stress on soluble cellular adhesion molecule concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, E Blake; Franco, R Lee; Caslin, Heather L; Blanks, Anson M; Bowen, Mary K; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2016-07-15

    This study investigated the impact of acute physical and mental stress on serum concentrations of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and CX3CL1/fractalkine. Male volunteers (n=20; 21.3±0.55years of age) completed a graded treadmill test to exhaustion and a 20-minute mental stress task (Stroop Color-Word Test, mental arithmetic) on separate, non-consecutive days. Heart rate (HR) was measured at baseline and throughout exercise and mental stress. Blood was collected at baseline (PRE), immediately following (POST) and 30min after (POST30) exercise and mental stress. Soluble VCAM-1 and fractalkine were quantified in participant serum via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Both treadmill exercise and the mental stress task significantly increased participant HR; although, exercise resulted in a substantially greater increase in participant HR compared to mental stress (197.82±11.99 vs. 38.67±3.10% [pstress task did not significantly alter serum VCAM-1 or fractalkine at any time point. In conclusion, maximal aerobic exercise results in a significant elevation of the soluble adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and fractalkine in the serum of adult males that does not occur following laboratory-induced mental stress. The findings of the current investigation may suggest a novel protective role for acute aerobic exercise in vascular health via exercise-induced CAM proteolysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Obesity and Obesity-Related Molecules on Canine Mammary Gland Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H-Y; Im, K-S; Kim, N-H; Kim, H-W; Shin, J-I; Yhee, J-Y; Sur, J-H

    2015-11-01

    Obesity can affect the clinical course of a number of diseases, including breast cancer in women and mammary gland tumors in female dogs, via the secretion of various cytokines and hormones. The objective of this study was to examine the expression patterns of obesity-related molecules such as aromatase, leptin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1 R) in canine mammary carcinomas (CMCs) on the basis of the body condition score (BCS). Comparative analyses of the expression of these molecules, together with prognostic factors for CMCs, including hormone receptors (HRs; estrogen and progesterone receptors), lymphatic invasion, central necrosis of the tumor, and histologic grade, were performed on 56 CMCs. The mean age of CMC onset was lower in the overweight or obese group (8.7 ± 1.9 years) than in the lean or ideal body weight group (10.4 ± 2.7 years). The proportion of poorly differentiated (grade III) tumors was significantly higher in the overweight or obese female dogs. Aromatase expression was significantly higher in the overweight or obese group and was correlated with the expression of HRs (P = .025). These findings suggest that overweight or obese status might affect the development and behavior of CMCs by tumor-adipocyte interactions and increased HR-related tumor growth. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Adsorption of gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene and effect of applied electric field: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiong-Yi [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Ding, Ning [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Key Laboratory for Applied Technology of Sophisticated Analytical Instruments, Shandong Academy of Sciences, Jinan 250014 (China); Ng, Siu-Pang [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence, E-mail: lawrence.wu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Key Laboratory for Applied Technology of Sophisticated Analytical Instruments, Shandong Academy of Sciences, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO, NO{sub 2} and NO are physically adsorbed on pristine graphene. • The adsorption energies of all gas molecules on graphene are increased after doping with Ga. • NO{sub 2} shows the strongest affinity to Ga-doped graphene. • The electronic properties and adsorption of NO{sub 2} on graphene and can be effectively tuned using an external electric field. - Abstract: Density functional theory calculations have been carried out to study the adsorption of varous gas molecules (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO, NO{sub 2} and NO) on pristine graphene and Ga-doped graphene in order to explore the feasibility of Ga-doped graphene based gas sensor. For each gas molecule, various adsorption positions and orientations were considered. The most stable configuration was determined and the adsorption energies with van der Waals interactions were calculated. Further, electronic properties such as electron density, density of states, charge transfer and band structure were investigated to understand the mechanism of adsorption. The results showed that the gas molecules studied were only weakly adsorbed on pristine graphene with small adsorption energies. On the other hand, the adsorption energies of all gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene increased by various amounts. Adsorption of gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene can open a relatively large band gap ranging from 0.267 to 0.397 eV. NO{sub 2} was found to be very sensitive to Ga-doped graphene with adsorption energy of −1.928 eV due to strong orbital hybridization and large charge transfer. Furthermore, our study suggests that the affinity and electronic properties of NO{sub 2} on Ga-doped graphene can be dramatically changed by an external electric field. A negative electric field enhances the adsorption of NO{sub 2} on Ga-doped graphene as reflected in the increase in adsorption energy. In contrast, the interaction will be weakened under a positive electric field. The results of the DFT

  5. Adsorption of gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene and effect of applied electric field: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiong-Yi; Ding, Ning; Ng, Siu-Pang; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • H_2O, NH_3, CO, NO_2 and NO are physically adsorbed on pristine graphene. • The adsorption energies of all gas molecules on graphene are increased after doping with Ga. • NO_2 shows the strongest affinity to Ga-doped graphene. • The electronic properties and adsorption of NO_2 on graphene and can be effectively tuned using an external electric field. - Abstract: Density functional theory calculations have been carried out to study the adsorption of varous gas molecules (H_2O, NH_3, CO, NO_2 and NO) on pristine graphene and Ga-doped graphene in order to explore the feasibility of Ga-doped graphene based gas sensor. For each gas molecule, various adsorption positions and orientations were considered. The most stable configuration was determined and the adsorption energies with van der Waals interactions were calculated. Further, electronic properties such as electron density, density of states, charge transfer and band structure were investigated to understand the mechanism of adsorption. The results showed that the gas molecules studied were only weakly adsorbed on pristine graphene with small adsorption energies. On the other hand, the adsorption energies of all gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene increased by various amounts. Adsorption of gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene can open a relatively large band gap ranging from 0.267 to 0.397 eV. NO_2 was found to be very sensitive to Ga-doped graphene with adsorption energy of −1.928 eV due to strong orbital hybridization and large charge transfer. Furthermore, our study suggests that the affinity and electronic properties of NO_2 on Ga-doped graphene can be dramatically changed by an external electric field. A negative electric field enhances the adsorption of NO_2 on Ga-doped graphene as reflected in the increase in adsorption energy. In contrast, the interaction will be weakened under a positive electric field. The results of the DFT calculation indicates the potential application of Ga

  6. The effect of Atorvastatin therapy tumour necrosis factor- and vascular adhesion molecules in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with no prior history of coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Charlton-Menys, V.; Bao, W.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Colhoun, H.M.; Betteridge, D.J.; Durrington, P.; Hitman, G.; Neil, H.A.W.; Livingstone, S.J.; Fuller, J.H.; DeMicco, D.A.; Preston, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effect of atorvastatin (and placebo) on tumour necrosis factor (TNF)a, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in patients with type 2 diabetes without prior cardiovascular disease (CVD) and investigated whether

  7. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  8. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Contact-Engineered Electrical Properties of MoS2 Field-Effect Transistors via Selectively Deposited Thiol-Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyungjune; Pak, Jinsu; Kim, Jae-Keun; Kang, Keehoon; Kim, Tae-Young; Shin, Jiwon; Choi, Barbara Yuri; Chung, Seungjun; Lee, Takhee

    2018-05-01

    Although 2D molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) has gained much attention due to its unique electrical and optical properties, the limited electrical contact to 2D semiconductors still impedes the realization of high-performance 2D MoS 2 -based devices. In this regard, many studies have been conducted to improve the carrier-injection properties by inserting functional paths, such as graphene or hexagonal boron nitride, between the electrodes and 2D semiconductors. The reported strategies, however, require relatively time-consuming and low-yield transfer processes on sub-micrometer MoS 2 flakes. Here, a simple contact-engineering method is suggested, introducing chemically adsorbed thiol-molecules as thin tunneling barriers between the metal electrodes and MoS 2 channels. The selectively deposited thiol-molecules via the vapor-deposition process provide additional tunneling paths at the contact regions, improving the carrier-injection properties with lower activation energies in MoS 2 field-effect transistors. Additionally, by inserting thiol-molecules at the only one contact region, asymmetric carrier-injection is feasible depending on the temperature and gate bias. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Matrix and substrate effects on the sputtering of a 2 kDa molecule: Insights from molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delcorte, A.; Arezki, B.; Garrison, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort towards a more accurate theoretical description of matrix and substrate effects in organic sputtering, we report on molecular dynamics simulations of the desorption induced by 500 eV Ar projectiles bombarding samples composed of polystyrene (PS) oligomers embedded in a trimethylbenzene matrix or cast on a silver substrate. The ejection of intact PS molecules, sometimes accompanied by matrix molecules/silver atoms, is observed in the first 10 ps following the impact. For the 'matrix' sample, the results indicate that the emission of large amounts of organic material is mostly vibrationally induced. Extended calculations show that matrix:analyte clusters decay after emission, liberating the analyte in flight. In the case of the 'substrate' sample, the emission is oftentimes the result of the concerted upward motion of several metal atoms underneath the molecule. Finally, the comparison between a matrix:analyte sample confined in a nanostructured silver crystal and a purely organic sample under identical bombardment conditions shows that the presence of the silver medium significantly enhances the desorption yields

  11. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Banerjee

    Full Text Available DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM and spectroscopy (AFS. The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time.

  12. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, T; Banerjee, S; Sett, S; Ghosh, S; Rakshit, T; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2016-01-01

    DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy (AFS). The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time.

  13. The effect of the condensed-phase environment on the vibrational frequency shift of a hydrogen molecule inside clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Anna; Scribano, Yohann; Lauvergnat, David; Mebe, Elsy; Benoit, David M; Bačić, Zlatko

    2018-04-14

    We report a theoretical study of the frequency shift (redshift) of the stretching fundamental transition of an H 2 molecule confined inside the small dodecahedral cage of the structure II clathrate hydrate and its dependence on the condensed-phase environment. In order to determine how much the hydrate water molecules beyond the confining small cage contribute to the vibrational frequency shift, quantum five-dimensional (5D) calculations of the coupled translation-rotation eigenstates are performed for H 2 in the v=0 and v=1 vibrational states inside spherical clathrate hydrate domains of increasing radius and a growing number of water molecules, ranging from 20 for the isolated small cage to over 1900. In these calculations, both H 2 and the water domains are treated as rigid. The 5D intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of H 2 inside a hydrate domain is assumed to be pairwise additive. The H 2 -H 2 O pair interaction, represented by the 5D (rigid monomer) PES that depends on the vibrational state of H 2 , v=0 or v=1, is derived from the high-quality ab initio full-dimensional (9D) PES of the H 2 -H 2 O complex [P. Valiron et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 134306 (2008)]. The H 2 vibrational frequency shift calculated for the largest clathrate domain considered, which mimics the condensed-phase environment, is about 10% larger in magnitude than that obtained by taking into account only the small cage. The calculated splittings of the translational fundamental of H 2 change very little with the domain size, unlike the H 2 j = 1 rotational splittings that decrease significantly as the domain size increases. The changes in both the vibrational frequency shift and the j = 1 rotational splitting due to the condensed-phase effects arise predominantly from the H 2 O molecules in the first three complete hydration shells around H 2 .

  14. The effect of the condensed-phase environment on the vibrational frequency shift of a hydrogen molecule inside clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Anna; Scribano, Yohann; Lauvergnat, David; Mebe, Elsy; Benoit, David M.; Bačić, Zlatko

    2018-04-01

    We report a theoretical study of the frequency shift (redshift) of the stretching fundamental transition of an H2 molecule confined inside the small dodecahedral cage of the structure II clathrate hydrate and its dependence on the condensed-phase environment. In order to determine how much the hydrate water molecules beyond the confining small cage contribute to the vibrational frequency shift, quantum five-dimensional (5D) calculations of the coupled translation-rotation eigenstates are performed for H2 in the v =0 and v =1 vibrational states inside spherical clathrate hydrate domains of increasing radius and a growing number of water molecules, ranging from 20 for the isolated small cage to over 1900. In these calculations, both H2 and the water domains are treated as rigid. The 5D intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of H2 inside a hydrate domain is assumed to be pairwise additive. The H2-H2O pair interaction, represented by the 5D (rigid monomer) PES that depends on the vibrational state of H2, v =0 or v =1 , is derived from the high-quality ab initio full-dimensional (9D) PES of the H2-H2O complex [P. Valiron et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 134306 (2008)]. The H2 vibrational frequency shift calculated for the largest clathrate domain considered, which mimics the condensed-phase environment, is about 10% larger in magnitude than that obtained by taking into account only the small cage. The calculated splittings of the translational fundamental of H2 change very little with the domain size, unlike the H2 j = 1 rotational splittings that decrease significantly as the domain size increases. The changes in both the vibrational frequency shift and the j = 1 rotational splitting due to the condensed-phase effects arise predominantly from the H2O molecules in the first three complete hydration shells around H2.

  15. Quenching points of dimeric single-molecule magnets: Exchange interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florez, J.M.; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Vargas, P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the quenched energy-splitting (Δ E ) of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) conformed by two exchange coupled giant-spins. An assessment of two nontrivial characteristics of this quenching is presented: (i) The quenching-points of a strongly exchange-coupled dimer differ from the ones of their respective giant-spin modeled SMM and such a difference can be well described by using the Solari-Kochetov extra phase; (ii) the dependence on the exchange coupling of the magnetic field values at the quenching-points when Δ E passes from monomeric to dimeric behavior. The physics behind these exchange-modified points, their relation with the Δ E -oscillations experimentally obtained by the Landau-Zener method and with the diabolical-plane of a SMM, is discussed.

  16. Quenching points of dimeric single-molecule magnets: Exchange interaction effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florez, J.M., E-mail: juanmanuel.florez@alumnos.usm.c [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, P.O. Box 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.c [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Vargas, P., E-mail: patricio.vargas@usm.c [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, P.O. Box 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-11-15

    We study the quenched energy-splitting ({Delta}{sub E}) of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) conformed by two exchange coupled giant-spins. An assessment of two nontrivial characteristics of this quenching is presented: (i) The quenching-points of a strongly exchange-coupled dimer differ from the ones of their respective giant-spin modeled SMM and such a difference can be well described by using the Solari-Kochetov extra phase; (ii) the dependence on the exchange coupling of the magnetic field values at the quenching-points when {Delta}{sub E} passes from monomeric to dimeric behavior. The physics behind these exchange-modified points, their relation with the {Delta}{sub E}-oscillations experimentally obtained by the Landau-Zener method and with the diabolical-plane of a SMM, is discussed.

  17. Antihypertrophic Effects of Small Molecules that Maintain Mitochondrial ATP Levels Under Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Nagai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since impaired mitochondrial ATP production in cardiomyocytes is thought to lead to heart failure, a drug that protects mitochondria and improves ATP production under disease conditions would be an attractive treatment option. In this study, we identified small-molecule drugs, including the anti-parasitic agent, ivermectin, that maintain mitochondrial ATP levels under hypoxia in cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, transcriptomic analysis and gene silencing experiments revealed that ivermectin increased mitochondrial ATP production by inducing Cox6a2, a subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, ivermectin inhibited the hypertrophic response of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Pharmacological inhibition of importin β, one of the targets of ivermectin, exhibited protection against mitochondrial ATP decline and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. These findings indicate that maintaining mitochondrial ATP under hypoxia may prevent hypertrophy and improve cardiac function, providing therapeutic options for mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Effects of gelling agent and extracellular signaling molecules on the culturability of marine bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, Anita Mac; Schmidt Thøgersen, Mariane; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2017-01-01

    Only 1 % of marine bacteria are currently culturable using standard laboratory procedures and this is a major obstacle for our understanding of the biology of marine microorganisms and for the discovery of novel microbial natural products. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to invest......Only 1 % of marine bacteria are currently culturable using standard laboratory procedures and this is a major obstacle for our understanding of the biology of marine microorganisms and for the discovery of novel microbial natural products. Therefore, the purpose of the present study...... was to investigate if improved cultivation conditions, including the use of an alternative gelling agent, and supplementation with signaling molecules, could improve the culturability of bacteria from seawater. Substituting agar with gellan gum improved viable counts 3 – 40-fold, depending on medium composition...

  19. In vitro investigation of the effect of matrix molecules on the behavior of colon cancer cells under the effect of geldanamycin derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Kamil; Kosova, Funda; Kurt, Feyzan Özdal; Tuğlu, İbrahim

    2017-10-01

    The chaperone-binding drug, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, has recently come into clinical use. It is a derivative of geldanamycin, an ansamycin benzoquinone antibiotic with anti-carcinogenic effect. Understanding the effect of this drug on the cancer cells and their niche is important for treatment. We applied 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin to colon cancer cell line (Colo 205) on matrix molecules to investigate the relationship of apoptosis with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling immunocytochemistry and related gene expression. We used laminin and collagen I for matrix molecules and vascular endothelial growth factor for angiogenic structure. We also examined apoptosis-related signaling pathway including mitochondrial proteins, cytochrome c, Bcl-2, caspase-9, Apaf-1 expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction. There was clear effect of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin that killed more cells on tissue culture plastic compared to matrix molecules. The IC 50 value was 0.58 µg/mL for tissue culture plastic compared with 0.64 µg/mL for laminin and 0.75 µg/mL for collagen I. The analyses showed that more cells on matrix molecules underwent apoptosis compared to that on tissue culture plastic. Apoptosis-related gene expression was similar in which Bcl-2 expression decreased and proapoptotic gene expression of the cells on matrix molecules increased compared to that on tissue culture plastic. However, the application of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin was more effective for the cells on collagen I compared to the cells on laminin. There was also a decrease in angiogenesis as shown by the vascular endothelial growth factor staining. This was more pronounced by coating of the tissue culture plastic with matrix molecules. Our results supported the anti-cancer effect of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, and this effect depended on matrix molecules. This effect occurs through apoptosis, and related

  20. The "adjuvant effect" of the polymorphic B-G antigens of the chicken major histocompatibility complex analyzed using purified molecules incorporated in liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Eriksson, H; Skjødt, K

    1991-01-01

    The polymorphic B-G region of the chicken major histocompatibility complex has previously been shown to mediate an "adjuvant effect" on the humoral response to other erythrocyte alloantigens. We demonstrate here that B-G molecules purified with monoclonal antibodies exert this adjuvant effect...... on the production of alloantibodies to chicken class I (B-F) molecules, when the two are in the same liposome. The adjuvant effect may in part be mediated by antibodies, since the antibody response to B-G molecules occurs much faster than the response to B-F molecules, and conditions in which antibodies to B......-G are present increase the speed of the response to B-F molecules. We also found that the presence of B-G molecules in separate liposomes results in a lack of response to B-F molecules. In the light of this and other data, we consider the possible roles for the polymorphic B-G molecules, particularly...

  1. Effects of microwave electric fields on the translational diffusion of dipolar molecules in surface potential: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapranov, Sergey V.; Kouzaev, Guennadi A.

    2018-01-01

    Variations of effective diffusion coefficient of polar molecules exposed to microwave electric fields in a surface potential are studied by solving coupled stochastic differential equations of motion with a deterministic component of the surface force. Being an essential tool for the simulation interpretation, a theoretical approach to effective diffusion in surface potential is first developed. The effective diffusion coefficient is represented as the product of the normal diffusion coefficient and potential-dependent correction function, whose temperature dependence is close to the Arrhenius form. The analytically found zero-diffusion condition defines the state of thermal equilibrium at the surface. The diffusion of a water-like dipole molecule in the potential of graphite surface is simulated in the field-free conditions and in the presence of the alternating electric fields of various magnitude intensities and frequencies. Temperature dependence of the correction function exhibits field-induced variations of the effective Lennard-Jones energy parameter. It demonstrates maximum departure from the zero-field value at certain frequencies and intensities, which is associated with variations in the rotational dynamics. A concept of the amplitude-frequency resonance put forward to interpret the simulation results is explained using a heuristic reasoning and is corroborated by semi-quantitative considerations in terms of the Dissado-Hill cluster theory of dielectric relaxation.

  2. Bond-equilibrium theory of liquid Se-Te alloys. II. Effect of singly attached ring molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Melvin; Bez, Wolfgang G.

    1981-06-01

    A statistical-mechanical theory for bond equilibrium of chain polymers containing threefold (3F) and onefold (1F) bond defects is extended to include the effects of free ring molecules and ring molecules attached to chains by a single 3F atom. Positively charged singly attached rings are shown to play a key role in bond equilibrium in liquid Sex Te1-x by permitting the formation of ion pairs in which both constituents are effectively chain terminators, thus decreasing the average polymer size. The theory is applied to explain the behavior of the paramagnetic susceptibility, χp, and electronic transport as affected by the Fermi energy EF. It is found that the increase in χp with the concentration of Te is primarily the result of the smaller energy for breaking Te bonds. In addition, attached rings play an important role in determining the effect of temperature on χp. At x<~0.5, the concentrations of both free and attached rings becomes small at high T because of the high concentration of bond defects.

  3. Single molecule force measurements delineate salt, pH and surface effects on biopolymer adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirzer, T; Geisler, M; Hugel, T; Scheibel, T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we probe the influence of surface properties, pH and salt on the adhesion of recombinant spider silk proteins onto solid substrates with single molecule force spectroscopy. A single engineered spider silk protein (monomeric C 16 or dimeric (QAQ) 8 NR3) is covalently bound with one end to an AFM tip, which assures long-time measurements for hours with one and the same protein. The tip with the protein is brought into contact with various substrates at various buffer conditions and then retracted to desorb the protein. We observe a linear dependence of the adhesion force on the concentration of three selected salts (NaCl, NaH 2 PO 4 and NaI) and a Hofmeister series both for anions and cations. As expected, the more hydrophobic C 16 shows a higher adhesion force than (QAQ) 8 NR3, and the adhesion force rises with the hydrophobicity of the substrate. Unexpected is the magnitude of the dependences—we never observe a change of more than 30%, suggesting a surprisingly well-regulated balance between dispersive forces, water-structure-induced forces as well as co-solute-induced forces in biopolymer adhesion

  4. Single molecule force measurements delineate salt, pH and surface effects on biopolymer adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzer, T.; Geisler, M.; Scheibel, T.; Hugel, T.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we probe the influence of surface properties, pH and salt on the adhesion of recombinant spider silk proteins onto solid substrates with single molecule force spectroscopy. A single engineered spider silk protein (monomeric C16 or dimeric (QAQ)8NR3) is covalently bound with one end to an AFM tip, which assures long-time measurements for hours with one and the same protein. The tip with the protein is brought into contact with various substrates at various buffer conditions and then retracted to desorb the protein. We observe a linear dependence of the adhesion force on the concentration of three selected salts (NaCl, NaH2PO4 and NaI) and a Hofmeister series both for anions and cations. As expected, the more hydrophobic C16 shows a higher adhesion force than (QAQ)8NR3, and the adhesion force rises with the hydrophobicity of the substrate. Unexpected is the magnitude of the dependences—we never observe a change of more than 30%, suggesting a surprisingly well-regulated balance between dispersive forces, water-structure-induced forces as well as co-solute-induced forces in biopolymer adhesion.

  5. Electronic coupling effects and charge transfer between organic molecules and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forker, Roman

    2010-07-01

    We employ a variant of optical absorption spectroscopy, namely in situ differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), for an analysis of the structure-properties relations of thin epitaxial organic films. Clear correlations between the spectra and the differently intense coupling to the respective substrates are found. While rather broad and almost structureless spectra are obtained for a quaterrylene (QT) monolayer on Au(111), the spectral shape resembles that of isolated molecules when QT is grown on graphite. We even achieve an efficient electronic decoupling from the subjacent Au(111) by inserting an atomically thin organic spacer layer consisting of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) with a noticeably dissimilar electronic behavior. These observations are further consolidated by a systematic variation of the metal substrate (Au, Ag, and Al), ranging from inert to rather reactive. For this purpose, 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) is chosen to ensure comparability of the molecular film structures on the different metals, and also because its electronic alignment on various metal surfaces has previously been studied with great intensity. We present evidence for ionized PTCDA at several interfaces and propose the charge transfer to be related to the electronic level alignment governed by interface dipole formation on the respective metals. (orig.)

  6. Metabolomic applications in radiation biodosimetry: exploring radiation effects through small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fornace, Albert J; Laiakis, Evagelia C

    2017-10-01

    Exposure of the general population to ionizing radiation has increased in the past decades, primarily due to long distance travel and medical procedures. On the other hand, accidental exposures, nuclear accidents, and elevated threats of terrorism with the potential detonation of a radiological dispersal device or improvised nuclear device in a major city, all have led to increased needs for rapid biodosimetry and assessment of exposure to different radiation qualities and scenarios. Metabolomics, the qualitative and quantitative assessment of small molecules in a given biological specimen, has emerged as a promising technology to allow for rapid determination of an individual's exposure level and metabolic phenotype. Advancements in mass spectrometry techniques have led to untargeted (discovery phase, global assessment) and targeted (quantitative phase) methods not only to identify biomarkers of radiation exposure, but also to assess general perturbations of metabolism with potential long-term consequences, such as cancer, cardiovascular, and pulmonary disease. Metabolomics of radiation exposure has provided a highly informative snapshot of metabolic dysregulation. Biomarkers in easily accessible biofluids and biospecimens (urine, blood, saliva, sebum, fecal material) from mouse, rat, and minipig models, to non-human primates and humans have provided the basis for determination of a radiation signature to assess the need for medical intervention. Here we provide a comprehensive description of the current status of radiation metabolomic studies for the purpose of rapid high-throughput radiation biodosimetry in easily accessible biofluids and discuss future directions of radiation metabolomics research.

  7. MCT1-mediated transport of a toxic molecule is an effective strategy for targeting glycolytic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsoy, Kivanc; Wang, Tim; Possemato, Richard; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Koch, Catherine E.; Chen, Walter W.; Hutchins, Amanda W.; Gultekin, Yetis; Peterson, Tim R.; Carette, Jan E.; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.; Clish, Clary B.; Sabatini, David M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY There is increasing evidence that oncogenic transformation modifies the metabolic program of cells. A common alteration is the upregulation of glycolysis, and efforts to target glycolytic enzymes for anti-cancer therapy are underway. Here, we performed a genome-wide haploid genetic screen to identify resistance mechanisms to 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a drug candidate that inhibits glycolysis in a poorly understood fashion. We identified the SLC16A1 gene product, MCT1, as the main determinant of 3-BrPA sensitivity. MCT1 is necessary and sufficient for 3-BrPA uptake by cancer cells. Additionally, MCT1 mRNA levels are the best predictor of 3-BrPA sensitivity and are most elevated in glycolytic cancer cells. Lastly, forced MCT1 expression in 3-BrPA resistant cancer cells sensitizes tumor xenografts to 3-BrPA treatment in vivo. Our results identify a potential biomarker for 3-BrPA sensitivity and provide proof of concept that the selectivity of cancer-expressed transporters can be exploited for delivering toxic molecules to tumors. PMID:23202129

  8. Self-assembled gold nanoparticles modified ITO electrodes: The monolayer binder molecule effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballarin, Barbara; Cassani, Maria Cristina; Scavetta, Erika; Tonelli, Domenica [Dipartimento di Chimica Fisica ed Inorganica, Universita di Bologna, V.le Risorgimento 4, 40136 Bologna, INSTM, UdR Bologna (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    The fabrication of gold attached organosilane-coated indium tin oxide Au{sub NPs}-MPTMS/ITO and Au{sub NPs}-APTES/ITO electrodes [MPTMS 3-(mercaptopropyl)-trimethoxysilane, APTES = 3-(aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane, ITO = indium tin oxide] was carried out making use of a well-known two-step procedure and the role played by the -SH and -NH{sub 2} functional groups in the two electrodes has been examined and compared using different techniques. Information about particle coverage and inter-particle spacing has been obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) whereas, bulk surface properties have been probed with UV-vis spectroscopy, CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The catalytic activity of the two electrodes has been evaluated studying the electrooxidation of methanol in alkaline conditions. The results obtained show that the NH{sub 2} functionality in the APTES binder molecule favours the formation of isle-like Au nanoparticle aggregates that lead to both a higher electron transfer and electrocatalytic activity. (author)

  9. Reprogramming towards totipotency is greatly facilitated by synergistic effects of small molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Miyamoto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Animal cloning has been achieved in many species by transplanting differentiated cell nuclei to unfertilized oocytes. However, the low efficiencies of cloning have remained an unresolved issue. Here we find that the combination of two small molecules, trichostatin A (TSA and vitamin C (VC, under culture condition with bovine serum albumin deionized by ion-exchange resins, dramatically improves the cloning efficiency in mice and 15% of cloned embryos develop to term by means of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. The improvement was not observed by adding the non-treated, rather than deionized, bovine serum. RNA-seq analyses of SCNT embryos at the two-cell stage revealed that the treatment with TSA and VC resulted in the upregulated expression of previously identified reprogramming-resistant genes. Moreover, the expression of early-embryo-specific retroelements was upregulated by the TSA and VC treatment. The enhanced gene expression was relevant to the VC-mediated reduction of histone H3 lysine 9 methylation in SCNT embryos. Our study thus shows a simply applicable method to greatly improve mouse cloning efficiency, and furthers our understanding of how somatic nuclei acquire totipotency.

  10. Phonon-assisted Kondo effect in single-molecule quantum dots coupled to ferromagnetic leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hui; Wen Tingdun; Liang, J.-Q.; Sun, Q.F.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the infinite-U Anderson model spin-polarized transport through the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) system of single-molecule quantum dot is investigated under the interplay of strong electron correlation and electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling. The spectral density and the nonlinear differential conductance are studied using the extended non-equilibrium Green's function method through calculating the dot-level splitting self-consistently. The results exhibit that a serial of peaks emerge on the two sides of the main Kondo peak for the antiparallel magnetic configuration of electrodes, while for the parallel case both the main and phonon-assisted satellite Kondo peaks all split up into two asymmetric peaks even at zero-bias. Correspondingly, the nonlinear differential conductance displays a set of satellite-peaks around the Kondo-peak in the presence of the e-ph interaction. Furthermore, extra maxima and minima appear in the TMR curve. The TMR alternates between the positive and the negative values along with the variation of bias voltage

  11. Effect of nontronite smectite clay on the chemical evolution of several organic molecules under simulated martian surface ultraviolet radiation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Olivier; Jaber, Maguy; Stalport, Fabien; Nowak, Sophie; Georgelin, Thomas; Lambert, Jean-François; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice

    2015-03-01

    Most of the phyllosilicates detected at the surface of Mars today are probably remnants of ancient environments that sustained long-term bodies of liquid water at the surface or subsurface and were possibly favorable for the emergence of life. Consequently, phyllosilicates have become the main mineral target in the search for organics on Mars. But are phyllosilicates efficient at preserving organic molecules under current environmental conditions at the surface of Mars? We monitored the qualitative and quantitative evolutions of glycine, urea, and adenine in interaction with the Fe(3+)-smectite clay nontronite, one of the most abundant phyllosilicates present at the surface of Mars, under simulated martian surface ultraviolet light (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K), and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) in a laboratory simulation setup. We tested organic-rich samples that were representative of the evaporation of a small, warm pond of liquid water containing a high concentration of organics. For each molecule, we observed how the nontronite influences its quantum efficiency of photodecomposition and the nature of its solid evolution products. The results reveal a pronounced photoprotective effect of nontronite on the evolution of glycine and adenine; their efficiencies of photodecomposition were reduced by a factor of 5 when mixed at a concentration of 2.6 × 10(-2) mol of molecules per gram of nontronite. Moreover, when the amount of nontronite in the sample of glycine was increased by a factor of 2, the gain of photoprotection was multiplied by a factor of 5. This indicates that the photoprotection provided by the nontronite is not a purely mechanical shielding effect but is also due to stabilizing interactions. No new evolution product was firmly identified, but the results obtained with urea suggest a particular reactivity in the presence of nontronite, leading to an increase of its dissociation rate.

  12. [The Hospital Information System of the Brazilian National Unified Health System: a preliminary evaluation of performance in monitoring RhD hemolytic disease of the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Gustavo; Reichenheim, Michael Eduardo; Coeli, Claudia Medina

    2008-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the adequacy of the Hospital Information System of the National Unified Health System (SIH-SUS) in identifying cases of RhD hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) at the Fernandes Figueira Institute (IFF/FIOCRUZ) from 1998 to 2003. Neonatal records, data from the Medical Archives, and AIH (Hospital Admissions Authorization Form) data consolidated in the SIH-SUS were analyzed. Cases were identified according to the following fields: principal diagnosis, secondary diagnosis, and procedure performed. During the period studied, 194 cases of HDN were diagnosed. The Medical Archives registered 148 newborns with HDN, however only 147 AIHs were issued and 145 consolidated in the SIH-SUS. Among these 145 cases, 84 cited HDN as the principal diagnosis, while secondary diagnosis identified 38 additional cases and the procedures performed failed to identify any further cases. Thus, the SIH-SUS identified only 122 (62.9%) of the 194 cases of HDN treated at the IFF/FIOCRUZ. Although it is necessary to evaluate other units, the SIH-SUS does not appear to be reliable for monitoring HDN. Additional studies are essential for employing secondary administrative data in the context of epidemiological surveillance.

  13. Effects of 31 FDA approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors on isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Salminen, Alec; Yang, Xi; Luo, Yong; Wu, Qiangen; White, Matthew; Greenhaw, James; Ren, Lijun; Bryant, Matthew; Salminen, William; Papoian, Thomas; Mattes, William; Shi, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    The FDA has approved 31 small-molecule kinase inhibitors (KIs) for human use as of November 2016, with six having black box warnings for hepatotoxicity (BBW-H) in product labeling. The precise mechanisms and risk factors for KI-induced hepatotoxicity are poorly understood. Here, the 31 KIs were tested in isolated rat liver mitochondria, an in vitro system recently proposed to be a useful tool to predict drug-induced hepatotoxicity in humans. The KIs were incubated with mitochondria or submitochondrial particles at concentrations ranging from therapeutic maximal blood concentrations (Cmax) levels to 100-fold Cmax levels. Ten endpoints were measured, including oxygen consumption rate, inner membrane potential, cytochrome c release, swelling, reactive oxygen species, and individual respiratory chain complex (I-V) activities. Of the 31 KIs examined only three including sorafenib, regorafenib and pazopanib, all of which are hepatotoxic, caused significant mitochondrial toxicity at concentrations equal to the Cmax, indicating that mitochondrial toxicity likely contributes to the pathogenesis of hepatotoxicity associated with these KIs. At concentrations equal to 100-fold Cmax, 18 KIs were found to be toxic to mitochondria, and among six KIs with BBW-H, mitochondrial injury was induced by regorafenib, lapatinib, idelalisib, and pazopanib, but not ponatinib, or sunitinib. Mitochondrial liability at 100-fold Cmax had a positive predictive power (PPV) of 72% and negative predictive power (NPV) of 33% in predicting human KI hepatotoxicity as defined by product labeling, with the sensitivity and specificity being 62% and 44%, respectively. Similar predictive power was obtained using the criterion of Cmax ≥1.1 µM or daily dose ≥100 mg. Mitochondrial liability at 1-2.5-fold Cmax showed a 100% PPV and specificity, though the NPV and sensitivity were 32% and 14%, respectively. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into KI hepatotoxicity and indicate that

  14. The effect of spatial confinement on the noble-gas HArF molecule: structure and electric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozłowska, Justyna; Bartkowiak, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The structure and electrical properties of HArF in spatial confinement are analyzed. • Orbital compression leads to decrease of bond lengths in the HArF molecule. • Spatial restriction causes a drop of the molecular (hyper)polarizabilities. • Spatial confinement reduces the electron correlation contribution to μ, α and β. - Abstract: A systematic study on the dipole moment and (hyper)polarizabilities of argon fluorohydride under spatial restriction was performed. Detailed analysis of the confinement induced changes in the structure of HArF is also presented. In order to render the influence of chemical compression on the properties in question a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential, mimicking a cylindrical confinement, was applied. Through the comparison of the results obtained for HArF with those of HF the effect of Ar insertion on the above properties was discussed. A hierarchy of ab initio methods including HF, MP2, CCSD and CCSD(T), has been employed to investigate the effect of orbital compression on the electron correlation contribution to the studied electric properties. It was observed that the external confining potential modifies the electronic contributions to the dipole moment and (hyper)polarizabilities of HArF. In particular, the first hyperpolarizability of HArF is remarkably smaller than that of the unconfined HArF molecule

  15. The effect of spatial confinement on the noble-gas HArF molecule: structure and electric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozłowska, Justyna; Bartkowiak, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.bartkowiak@pwr.edu.pl

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The structure and electrical properties of HArF in spatial confinement are analyzed. • Orbital compression leads to decrease of bond lengths in the HArF molecule. • Spatial restriction causes a drop of the molecular (hyper)polarizabilities. • Spatial confinement reduces the electron correlation contribution to μ, α and β. - Abstract: A systematic study on the dipole moment and (hyper)polarizabilities of argon fluorohydride under spatial restriction was performed. Detailed analysis of the confinement induced changes in the structure of HArF is also presented. In order to render the influence of chemical compression on the properties in question a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential, mimicking a cylindrical confinement, was applied. Through the comparison of the results obtained for HArF with those of HF the effect of Ar insertion on the above properties was discussed. A hierarchy of ab initio methods including HF, MP2, CCSD and CCSD(T), has been employed to investigate the effect of orbital compression on the electron correlation contribution to the studied electric properties. It was observed that the external confining potential modifies the electronic contributions to the dipole moment and (hyper)polarizabilities of HArF. In particular, the first hyperpolarizability of HArF is remarkably smaller than that of the unconfined HArF molecule.

  16. Hydrogen/deuterium isotope effects in water and aqueous solutions of organic molecules and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, David L.; Fu, Ling; Bermejo, F. Javier; Fernandez-Alonso, Felix; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydrogen/deuterium substitution has significant effects in hydrogenous materials. ► The effects can involve structure, phase behavior and protein stability. ► The effects must be kept in mind in the interpretation of scattering experiments. ► The effects may be mitigated by an appropriate choice of experimental conditions. - Abstract: It is pointed out that hydrogen/deuterium substitution, frequently used in neutron scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of hydrogenous samples, can have significant effects on structure, phase behavior and protein stability. The effects must be kept in mind in the interpretation of such experiments. In suitable cases, these effects can be mitigated by an appropriate choice of experimental conditions

  17. Effects of the molecule-electrode interface on the low-bias conductance of Cu-H2-Cu single-molecule junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Shen, Ziyong; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2016-07-28

    The atomic structure and electronic transport properties of a single hydrogen molecule connected to both symmetric and asymmetric Cu electrodes are investigated by using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with the density functional theory. Our calculations show that in symmetric Cu-H2-Cu junctions, the low-bias conductance drops rapidly upon stretching, while asymmetric ones present a low-bias conductance spanning the 0.2-0.3 G0 interval for a wide range of electrode separations. This is in good agreement with experiments on Cu atomic contacts in a hydrogen environment. Furthermore, the distribution of the calculated vibrational energies of the two hydrogen atoms in the asymmetric Cu-H2-Cu junction is also consistent with experiments. These findings provide clear evidence for the formation of asymmetric Cu-H2-Cu molecular junctions in breaking Cu atomic contacts in the presence of hydrogen and are also helpful for the design of molecular devices with Cu electrodes.

  18. Effects of adatom and gas molecule adsorption on the physical properties of tellurene: a first principles investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Hua; Wang, Da Wei; Yang, Ai Jun; Koratkar, Nikhil; Chu, Ji Feng; Lv, Pin Lei; Rong, Ming Zhe

    2018-02-07

    Tellurene is a new member of the two-dimensional (2D) materials' family, whose existence has been recently confirmed by first principles calculation and experimental work. Tellurene is also the first 2D mono-elemental material of group-VI predicted by scientists, and investigations of its basic properties are still in their infancy. In this study, we use first principles calculation based on density functional theory to investigate the adsorption of nineteen typical adatoms (Li, Na, K, Ca, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Au, Pd, Pt, B, N, O, Si, Cl, and Al), and five typical gas molecules (H 2 , O 2 , H 2 O, NO 2 , and NH 3 ) on α-phase as well as β-phase tellurene sheets. Our calculations shows that most adatoms are chemisorbed on tellurene sheets with large adsorption energies. Moreover, some of the adatoms are observed to give rise to distinct structural deformations and even local reconstructions. We report that a variety of electronic states are induced by the adatoms, which implies that different electronic structures can be engineered by the adsorption of adatoms. In fact, n-type doping, p-type doping, half-metal, and spin-gapless semiconductor features can be acquired by doping adatoms on tellurene sheets. Our calculations also show that the five gas molecules are all physisorbed on tellurene sheets, and no splitting behaviors are observed. Therefore, the adsorption of the five gas molecules has a weak effect on the electronic properties of tellurene. To conclude, our results indicate that adatom engineering may be used to greatly expand the potential applications of 2D tellurene.

  19. Ab Initio Optimized Effective Potentials for Real Molecules in Optical Cavities: Photon Contributions to the Molecular Ground State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a simple scheme to efficiently compute photon exchange-correlation contributions due to the coupling to transversal photons as formulated in the newly developed quantum-electrodynamical density-functional theory (QEDFT).1−5 Our construction employs the optimized-effective potential (OEP) approach by means of the Sternheimer equation to avoid the explicit calculation of unoccupied states. We demonstrate the efficiency of the scheme by applying it to an exactly solvable GaAs quantum ring model system, a single azulene molecule, and chains of sodium dimers, all located in optical cavities and described in full real space. While the first example is a two-dimensional system and allows to benchmark the employed approximations, the latter two examples demonstrate that the correlated electron-photon interaction appreciably distorts the ground-state electronic structure of a real molecule. By using this scheme, we not only construct typical electronic observables, such as the electronic ground-state density, but also illustrate how photon observables, such as the photon number, and mixed electron-photon observables, for example, electron–photon correlation functions, become accessible in a density-functional theory (DFT) framework. This work constitutes the first three-dimensional ab initio calculation within the new QEDFT formalism and thus opens up a new computational route for the ab initio study of correlated electron–photon systems in quantum cavities. PMID:29594185

  20. Effects of autoionizing states on two-photon double ionization of the H2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus; Koesterke, Lars; Schneider, Barry I

    2014-01-01

    We report angle-resolved and angle-integrated cross sections for two-photon double-ionization of H by a strong laser pulse. The effect of doubly excited states on the predicted cross sections is addressed.

  1. The Effect of Turmeric Decoctum to the Angiogenic Molecules Expression on Chicken Embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Zahariah, Sultanah; Winarsih, Sri; Baktiyani, Siti Candra Windu; Rahardjo, Bambang; Kalsum, Umi

    2017-01-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is widely used as herbal medicine, not an exception by pregnant women. Turmeric consumption by expectant mothers requires standard dose, because of its antiangiogenic effect could be harmful on placentation process and embryonic development. This experiment was undertaken to determine the effect of different concentrations of turmeric decoctum to the expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and Angiopoietin 1 (Ang-1) on the 48-hours-old ch...

  2. Theoretical Study of the Effects of Di-Muonic Molecules on Muon-Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Pyramid of the Sun," Revista Méxicana de Física, vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 54-59, 2003. [19] V. Grabski, A. Morales, R. Reche and O. Orozco, "Feasibility...34 Inclusion of Explicit Electron- Proton Correlation in the Nuclear-Electronic Orbital Approach Using Gaussian-Type Geminal Functions," Journal of...energy levels calculated without including nuclear volume effects looks almost identical on this scale. Inclusion of nuclear volume effects in the

  3. Effects on the structure of monolayer and submonolayer fluid nitrogen films by the corrugation in the holding potential of nitrogen molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2001-01-01

    of interactions were indicated by the comparison of the calculated and measured isosteric heats of adsorption in fluid films of nitrogen molecules on graphite. The melting temperatures were lowered by 7K and a region of liquid-gas coexistence was observed for films on the smooth graphite surface indicating......The effects of corrugation in the holding potential of nitrogen molecules on the structure of fluid monolayer and submonolayer films of the molecules on a solid substrate was studied using molecular dynamics simulation. Including McLachlan mediation of the intermolecular potential in a model...

  4. Effects of anisodamine on the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 in experimental infusion phlebitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Xiang; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Qiu-Shi; Pan, Xue; Zhao, Qing-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Infusion phlebitis is the most common side effect of clinical intravenous drug therapy and several clinical studies have demonstrated that anisodamine can effectively prevent the occurrence of infusion phlebitis. This study was designed to investigate effects of anisodamine on the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in a rabbit model of infusion phlebitis and to analyze the mechanisms of anisodamine effect on the prevention and treatment of experimental infusion phlebitis. Twenty-four specific pathogen-free male Japanese white rabbits were randomly assigned to the control group, the model group, the magnesium sulfate group and the anisodamine group. The rabbit model of infusion phlebitis, induced by intravenous administration, was established and expressions of VEGF and ICAM-1 were determined and contrasted with the control group treated with normal saline. We evaluated expression by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay. Pathohistological changes of the model group were observed, such as loss of venous endothelial cells, inflammatory cell infiltration, edema and thrombus. The magnesium sulfate group and the anisodamine group showed significant protective effects on vascular congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, proliferation, swelling of endothelium and perivascular hemorrhage. The model group showed the highest expressions of VEGF and ICAM-1 of the four groups (P 0.05). Anisodamine alleviates inflammatory damage by significantly reducing the expressions of VEGF and ICAM-1, and shows significant protective effects in an animal model of infusion phlebitis.

  5. QED Effects in Molecules: Test on Rotational Quantum States of H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salumbides, E. J.; Dickenson, G. D.; Ivanov, T. I.; Ubachs, W.

    2011-07-01

    Quantum electrodynamic effects have been systematically tested in the progression of rotational quantum states in the XΣg+1, v=0 vibronic ground state of molecular hydrogen. High-precision Doppler-free spectroscopy of the EFΣg+1-XΣg+1 (0,0) band was performed with 0.005cm-1 accuracy on rotationally hot H2 (with rotational quantum states J up to 16). QED and relativistic contributions to rotational level energies as high as 0.13cm-1 are extracted, and are in perfect agreement with recent calculations of QED and high-order relativistic effects for the H2 ground state.

  6. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  7. Electron structure of molecules with very heavy atoms using effective core potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitzer, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Topics covered include effective potential, Hamiltonian for valence-electron motion, molecular calculations, spin-spin coupling, L-S coupling, numerical results of molecular calculations, and results of configuration-interaction Slater-orbital calculations in L-S coupling

  8. Laser Raman spectroscopy of the effect of solvent on the low-frequency oscillations of organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, N. N.; Chikishev, A. Yu.; Dolgovskii, V. I.; Lebedenko, S. I.

    2007-09-01

    The effect of solvent on low-frequency oscillations is studied using an example of the 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TCE) and 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane (TBE) molecules, which exhibit torsional oscillations in the terahertz range. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and carbon tetrachloride (CTC) are used as solvents. It is demonstrated that a decrease in the concentration of the substance under study in the TBE/CTC, TCE/DMSO, and TCE/CTC mixtures leads to a frequency shift of the low-frequency oscillation. The shift is not observed in the TBE/DMSO mixture but a decrease in the TBE concentration causes significant broadening of the low-frequency line.

  9. Effect of base-pair inhomogeneities on charge transport along the DNA molecule, mediated by twist and radial polarons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmero, F; Archilla, J F R; Hennig, D; Romero, F R

    2004-01-01

    Some recent results for a three-dimensional, semi-classical, tight-binding model for DNA show that there are two types of polarons, namely radial and twist polarons, which can transport charge along the DNA molecule. However, the existence of two types of base pairs in real DNA makes it crucial to find out if charge transport also exists in DNA chains with different base pairs. In this paper, we address this problem in its simple case, a homogeneous chain except for a single different base pair, which we call a base-pair inhomogeneity, and its effect on charge transport. Radial polarons experience either reflection or trapping. However, twist polarons are good candidates for charge transport along real DNA. This transport is also very robust with respect to weak parametric and diagonal disorder

  10. Van der Waals interaction between a molecule and a spherical cavity in a metal: Nonlocality and anisotropy effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labani, B.; Boustimi, M.; Baudon, J.

    1997-01-01

    The electric response field of a small spherical metallic cavity to a molecule characterized by fluctuating dipolar and quadrupolar moments is built from spherical tensor theory. The electric susceptibility of the field gradient between the two points inside the metallic cavity is formulated by a general expression of the van der Waals energy between the two partners. The induction contribution is introduced by using the field gradient susceptibilities of the cavity at zero frequency. In order to illustrate the nonlocal effects as well as the importance of the curvature of the metallic cavity on the magnitude of the physisorption energy, we present numerical results for typical systems (HF, HCl on Ag, Al, and Cu). copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  11. Effect of Batroxobin on Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule in Temporal Infarction Rats and Spatial Learning and Memory Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of Batroxobin expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in left temporal ischemic rats with spatial memory disorder was investigated by means of Morri's water maze and immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that the mean reaction time and distance of temporal ischemic rats for searching a goal were significantly longer than those of sham-operated rats and at the same time NCAM expression of left temporal ischemic region was significantly increased. However, the mean reaction time and distance of Batroxobin-treated rats were shorter and they used normal strategies more often and earlier than those of ischemic rats. The number of NCAM immune reactive cells of Batroxobin-treated rats was more than that of ischemic group. In conclusion, Batroxobin can improve spatial memory disorder of temporal ischemic rats and the regulation of the expression of NCAM is probably related to the neuroprotective mechanism.

  12. Nonadiabatic effects on surfaces: Kohn anomaly, electronic damping of adsorbate vibrations, and local heating of single molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, J

    2008-01-01

    Three aspects of electron-phonon coupling at metal surfaces are reviewed. One aspect is the Kohn effect, which describes an anomalous dispersion relation of surface phonons due to quasi-one-dimensional nesting of Fermi surface contours. The combination of electron energy loss spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy allows us to unambiguously characterize Kohn anomaly systems. A second aspect is the nonadiabatic damping of adsorbate vibrations. Characteristic spectroscopic line shapes of vibrational modes allow us to estimate the amount of energy transfer between the vibrational mode and electron-hole pairs. Case studies of a Kohn anomaly and nonadiabatic damping are provided by the hydrogen- and deuterium-covered Mo(110) surface. As a third aspect of interaction between electrons and phonons, local heating of a C 60 molecule adsorbed on Cu(100) and in contact with the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope is covered

  13. Metronomic Small Molecule Inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) Is Antiangiogenic and Potentiates the Antitumor Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitlin, Benjamin D.; Spalding, Aaron C.; Campos, Marcia S.; Ashimori, Naoki; Dong Zhihong; Wang Shaomeng; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Noer, Jacques E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of a metronomic (low-dose, high-frequency) small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) in combination with radiotherapy on microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. Methods and Materials: Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to ionizing radiation and/or TW-37 and colony formation, as well as capillary sprouting in three-dimensional collagen matrices, was evaluated. Xenografts vascularized with human blood vessels were engineered by cotransplantation of human squamous cell carcinoma cells (OSCC3) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells seeded in highly porous biodegradable scaffolds into the subcutaneous space of immunodeficient mice. Mice were treated with metronomic TW-37 and/or radiation, and tumor growth was evaluated. Results: Low-dose TW-37 sensitized primary endothelial cells to radiation-induced inhibition of colony formation. Low-dose TW-37 or radiation partially inhibited endothelial cell sprout formation, and in combination, these therapies abrogated new sprouting. Combination of metronomic TW-37 and low-dose radiation inhibited tumor growth and resulted in significant increase in time to failure compared with controls, whereas single agents did not. Notably, histopathologic analysis revealed that tumors treated with TW-37 (with or without radiation) are more differentiated and showed more cohesive invasive fronts, which is consistent with less aggressive phenotype. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that metronomic TW-37 potentiates the antitumor effects of radiotherapy and suggest that patients with head and neck cancer might benefit from the combination of small molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 and radiation therapy.

  14. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  15. The Therapeutic Effect of the Antitumor Drug 11beta and Related Molecules on Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    shown that two parent compounds, 11B-dichloro and 11B- dipropyl, are effective in preventing and delaying cyst growth in two different orthologous mouse...polycystic kidney disease (PKD). In collaboration with the Essigmann lab at MIT, we have shown that two parent compounds, 11B-dichloro and 11B-dipropyl, are...cultured at the permissible temperature (33 °C), then re-plated at 37 °C, in the absence of interferon gamma, conditions in which turn off the large T

  16. Large Converse Piezoelectric Effect Measured on a Single Molecule on a Metallic Surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Mutombo, Pingo; Švec, Martin; Šámal, Michal; Nejedlý, Jindřich; Císařová, I.; Vázquez, Héctor; Moro-Lagares, María; Berger, Jan; Vacek, Jaroslav; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo; Jelínek, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 3 (2018), s. 940-946 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087; GA ČR GA15-19672S; GA ČR GJ17-24210Y; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-08327S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : piezoelectric effect * nc AFM * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Organic chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  17. The effect of valproic acid and oxcarbazepine on the distribution of adhesion molecules in embryo implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürgen, Seren Gülşen; Erdoğan, Deniz; Coşkun, Zafer Kutay; Cansu, Ali

    2012-01-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of valproate (VPA) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) on embryo implantation in terms of extracellular matrix protein distribution. Thirty female rats (Wistar albino) were assigned to three groups of 10 animals each. Group 1 was administered two doses of saline solution, group 2, two doses of VPA at 300 mg/kg/day and group 3, two doses of OXC at 100 mg/kg/day, for a period of 3 months. Female rats with vaginal plugs mated with males for one night were placed into separate cages. Day of mating was taken as day 0, and implantation areas were obtained with rats being sacrificed on the morning of day 7. Immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopic protocols were then applied. At electron microscopic evaluation, extraembryonic endoderm and ectoderm layers could not be distinguished in semi-thin sections in the VPA group, while they were partially differentiated in the OXC group. At immunohistochemical staining, laminin was observed in the primary embryonic endoderm cell visceral and parietal layers, the uterine luminal epithelial cells and the secondary decidual zone in the control group. In the VPA group, it was weakly expressed in some embryo trophoectoderm cells and uterine luminal epithelial cells and moderately in some decidual cells. In the OXC group, it was moderately expressed in some trophoectoderm and decidual cells. Collagen IV was localized in the ectoplacental cone cells and secondary decidual zone and weak in the luminal epithelial cells in the control group. In the VPA and OXC groups, collagen IV was negative in all embryonic and maternal structures in the VPA and OXC groups. Vimentin was moderately expressed in the luminal epithelium and strongly expressed in the primary decidual zone and ectoplacental cone cells in the control group. In the VPA group, it was negative in the embryo trophoectoderm, decidual and uterine luminal epithelial cells, while in the OXC group it was moderately localized in the

  18. The effect of host relaxation and dynamics on guest molecule dynamics in H2/tetrahydrofuranhydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Vanessa K; Shoko, Elvis; Kearley, Gordon J

    2011-01-01

    We use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to obtain classically the effects of H2O cage motions on the potential-energy surface (PES) of encapsulated H2 in the H2/tetrahydrofuran-hydrate system. The significant differences between the PES for the H2 in rigid and flexible cages that we find will influence calculation of the quantum dynamics of the H2. Part of these differences arises from the relaxation of the H2O cage around the classical H2, with a second part arising from the coupling of both translational and rotational motions of H2 with the H20 cage. We find that isotopic substitution of 2H for 1H of the H2O cage affects the coupling, which has implications for experiments that require the use of 2H2O, including inelastic neutron scattering that uses 2H2O cages in order to focus on the H2 guest dynamics. Overall, this work emphasizes the importance of taking into account cage dynamics in any approach used to understand the dynamics of H2 guests in porous framework materials.

  19. Biological and Molecular Effects of Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors on Low-Passage Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Lange

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-passage cancer cell lines are versatile tools to study tumor cell biology. Here, we have employed four such cell lines, established from primary tumors of colorectal cancer (CRC patients, to evaluate effects of the small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI vemurafenib, trametinib, perifosine, and regorafenib in an in vitro setting. The mutant BRAF (V600E/V600K inhibitor vemurafenib, but also the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib efficiently inhibited DNA synthesis, signaling through ERK1/2 and expression of genes downstream of ERK1/2 in BRAF mutant cells only. In case of the AKT inhibitor perifosine, three cell lines showed a high or intermediate responsiveness to the drug while one cell line was resistant. The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib inhibited proliferation of all CRC lines with similar efficiency and independent of the presence or absence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 mutations. Regorafenib action was associated with broad-range inhibitory effects at the level of gene expression but not with a general inhibition of AKT or MEK/ERK signaling. In vemurafenib-sensitive cells, the antiproliferative effect of vemurafenib was enhanced by the other SMI. Together, our results provide insights into the determinants of SMI efficiencies in CRC cells and encourage the further use of low-passage CRC cell lines as preclinical models.

  20. Study of Auger effect in DNA when bound to molecules containing platinum. A possible application to hadrontherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, K.; Usami, N.; Sasaki, I.; Frohlich, H.; Le Sech, C. E-mail: lesech@lcam.u-psud.fr

    2003-01-01

    Complexes made of DNA and Cyclo-Pt bound to plasmid DNA, were placed in aqueous solution and irradiated with monochromatic X-rays in the range E=8.5-13 keV, including the resonant photoabsorption energy of the L{sub III} shell of the platinum atom. The number of single- and double-strand breaks (ssb and dsb) induced by irradiation on a supercoiled DNA plasmid was measured by the production of circular-nicked and linear forms. In order to disentangle the contribution of the direct effects imparted to ionization, and the indirect effects due to a free radical attack, experiments have been performed in the presence of a small concentration (64 mmol l{sup -1}) of hydroxyl free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). An enhancement of the number of ssb and dsb is observed when the plasmids contain the Pt intercalating molecules. Even when off-resonant X-rays are used, the strand break efficiency remains higher than expected based upon the absorption cross-section, as if the Pt bound to DNA is increasing the yield of strand breaks. A mechanism is suggested, involving photoelectrons generated from the ionization of water which efficiently ionize Pt atoms. This observation may provide an insight to understanding the effects of new radiotherapy protocols, associated chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin and ordinary radiotherapy for tumoral treatments.

  1. Influence of the effective mass of water molecule on thermal neutron scattering; Uticaj efektivne mase molekula vode na rasejanje termalnih neutrona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, M [Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Elektrotehnicki Fakultet

    1981-07-01

    The influence of the effective water molecule mass on the thermal neutron scattering on the nucleus of the hydrogen atom has been investigated. Besides the actual water molecule mass (M = 18) the investigations have been carried out with its two effective values (M1 = 16 and M2 = 20). The differential and total cross sections have been calculated for the incident thermal neutron energy E{sub o} = 1 eV. Investigation results show different prominence of the quantum effects and for M2 the appearance of peaks in the quasielastic scattering. (author)

  2. Hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal prolongada devido à associação entre síndrome de Gilbert e doença hemolítica por incompatibilidade RhD Persistent neonatal hyperbilirubinemia resulting from Gilbert's syndrome in association with RhD hemolytic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando P. Facchini

    2005-10-01

    production and a signifiant decrease in its excretion. DESCRIPTION: The third pregnancy of an RhD negative woman. Her first child was normal and delivered to term and did not receive Rhogam. The second pregnancy was problematic due to Rh isoimmunization. She delivered a child to term, who required three exchange transfusions, but died on the 8th day of life. The third child was delivered at term, ORh positive, direct Coombs positive and had stump bilirubin of 6.5 mg/dl and hematocrit at 44%. Five hours after birth the child was jaundiced. Phenobarbital and intensive phototherapy were introduced. Hyperbilirubinemia was soon controlled, but relapsed whenever phototherapy was discontinued. On the 10th day of life the child received a transfusion for significant anemia. As jaundice persisted to the 13th day, associated Gilbert syndrome was considered and DNA sequence analysis was requested. The test demonstrated a mutant homozygote genotype UDPT1A1[TA]7TAA. Phototherapy remained necessary until the 17th day of life and she was discharged from hospital the following day, after bilirubinemia had been controlled. She returned for follow-up and exhibited normal growth and neurological development. COMMENTS: This case demonstrates the significance of increased bilirubin production/decreased bilirubin excretion causing intense hyperbilirubinemias and, in the abnsence of vigorous treatment, kernicterus. The effectiveness of intense phototherapy has also been demonstrated, reducing the risks of more aggressive treatments such as exchange transfusion. It also provides evidence of the importance of bilirubinemia follow-up until complete resolution.

  3. Effect of the moment of inertia of an electron shell on the rotational g factor of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebane, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that electron currents induced by the rotation of a molecule make a contribution not only to the magnetic moment, but also to the angular momentum of a molecule and to its moment of inertia. An improved equation for the rotational g factor of a molecule, allowing for the contribution of electrons to the moment of inertia, is given. The B 1 summation + /sub u/ excited electronic state of the hydrogen molecule is used as an example to show that the electronic contribution to the moment of inertia amounts to 0.3 to 0.5% (for H 2 and D 2 molecules, respectively) of the value of the nuclear contribution, and its consideration in calculations of g factors is obligatory

  4. Changes in the dynamics of the cardiac troponin C molecule explain the effects of Ca2+-sensitizing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Charles M; Rayani, Kaveh; Singh, Gurpreet; Lotfalisalmasi, Bairam; Tieleman, D Peter; Tibbits, Glen F

    2017-07-14

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is the regulatory protein that initiates cardiac contraction in response to Ca 2+ TnC binding Ca 2+ initiates a cascade of protein-protein interactions that begins with the opening of the N-terminal domain of cTnC, followed by cTnC binding the troponin I switch peptide (TnI SW ). We have evaluated, through isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular-dynamics simulation, the effect of several clinically relevant mutations (A8V, L29Q, A31S, L48Q, Q50R, and C84Y) on the Ca 2+ affinity, structural dynamics, and calculated interaction strengths between cTnC and each of Ca 2+ and TnI SW Surprisingly the Ca 2+ affinity measured by isothermal titration calorimetry was only significantly affected by half of these mutations including L48Q, which had a 10-fold higher affinity than WT, and the Q50R and C84Y mutants, each of which had affinities 3-fold higher than wild type. This suggests that Ca 2+ affinity of the N-terminal domain of cTnC in isolation is insufficient to explain the pathogenicity of these mutations. Molecular-dynamics simulation was used to evaluate the effects of these mutations on Ca 2+ binding, structural dynamics, and TnI interaction independently. Many of the mutations had a pronounced effect on the balance between the open and closed conformations of the TnC molecule, which provides an indirect mechanism for their pathogenic properties. Our data demonstrate that the structural dynamics of the cTnC molecule are key in determining myofilament Ca 2+ sensitivity. Our data further suggest that modulation of the structural dynamics is the underlying molecular mechanism for many disease mutations that are far from the regulatory Ca 2+ -binding site of cTnC. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T V; Suleimanov, Yu V; Aquilanti, V; Krems, R V

    2009-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focuses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O 2 ( 3 Σ g - ) molecules at cold (∼0.1 K) and ultracold (∼10 -6 K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.1 T is found to be as large as 6.1x10 -11 cm -3 s -1 . The magnetic field dependence of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at ultracold temperatures is dominated by a manifold of Feshbach resonances with the density of ∼100 resonances per Tesla for collisions of molecules in the absolute ground state. This suggests that the scattering length of ultracold molecules in the absolute ground state can be effectively tuned in a very wide range of magnetic fields. Our calculations demonstrate that the number and properties of the magnetic Feshbach resonances are dramatically different for molecules in the absolute ground and excited spin states. The density of Feshbach resonances for molecule-molecule scattering in the low-field-seeking Zeeman state is reduced by a factor of 10.

  6. The Ia.2 Epitope Defines a Subset of Lipid Raft Resident MHC Class II Molecules Crucial to Effective Antigen Presentation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busman-Sahay, Kathleen; Sargent, Elizabeth; Harton, Jonathan A.; Drake, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established that binding of the 11-5.2 anti-I-Ak mAb, which recognizes the Ia.2 epitope on I-Ak class II molecules, elicits MHC class II signaling, whereas binding of two other anti-I-Ak mAb that recognize the Ia.17 epitope fail to elicit signaling. Using a biochemical approach, we establish that the Ia.2 epitope recognized by the widely used 11-5.2 mAb defines a subset of cell surface I-Ak molecules predominantly found within membrane lipid rafts. Functional studies demonstrate that the Ia.2 bearing subset of I-Ak class II molecules is critically necessary for effective B cell–T cell interactions especially at low antigen doses, a finding consistent with published studies on the role of raft-resident class II molecules in CD4 T cell activation. Interestingly, B cells expressing recombinant I-Ak class II molecules possessing a β chain-tethered HEL peptide lack the Ia.2 epitope and fail to partition into lipid rafts. Moreover, cells expressing Ia.2 negative tethered peptide-class II molecules are severely impaired in their ability to present both tethered peptide or peptide derived from exogenous antigen to CD4 T cells. These results establish the Ia.2 epitope as defining a lipid raft-resident MHC class II confomer vital to the initiation of MHC class II restricted B cell–T cell interactions. PMID:21543648

  7. Effect of the dynamic core-electron polarization of CO molecules on high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Cam-Tu; Hoang, Van-Hung; Tran, Lan-Phuong; Le, Van-Hoang

    2018-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the influence of dynamic core-electron polarization (DCeP) of CO molecules on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) within the single-active-electron (SAE) approximation. The effect of DCeP is shown to depend strongly on the molecular orientation angle θ . Particularly, compared to the calculations without DCeP, the inclusion of this effect gives rise to an enhancement of harmonic intensity at θ =0° when the electric field aligns along the O-C direction and to a suppression at θ =180° when the field heads in the opposite direction. Meanwhile, when the electric field is perpendicular to the molecular axis, the effect is almost insignificant. The phenomenon is thought to be linked to the ionization process. However, this picture is not completed yet. By solving the TDSE within the SAE approximation and conducting a classical simulation, we are able to obtain the ionization probability as well as the ionization rate and prove that HHG, in fact, receives a major contribution from electrons ionized at only a certain time interval, rather than throughout the whole pulse propagation. Including DCeP, the variation of the ionization rate in this interval highly correlates to that of the HHG intensity. To better demonstrate the origin of this manifestation, we also show the alternation DCeP makes on the effective potential that corresponds to the observed change in the ionization rate and consequently the HHG intensity. Our results confirm previous studies' observations and, more importantly, provide the missing physical explanation. With the role of DCeP now better understood for the entire range of the orientation angle, this effect can be handled more conveniently for calculating the HHG of other targets.

  8. Effect of high flux hemodialysis on plasma toxin molecule contents and body’s microinflammatory state in patients with uremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Nan We

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of high flux hemodialysis on plasma toxin molecule contents and body’s microinflammatory state in patients with uremia. Methods: A total of 96 cases of patients with uremia receiving inpatient dialysis in our hospital from June 2011 to March 2015 were selected as research subjects and randomly divided into observation group and control group, each group with 48 cases. Control group received low flux hemodialysis (LF-HD, observation group received high flux hemodialysis (HF-HD, and then levels of plasma renal function-related toxins, oxidative stress-related toxins, leptin, intact parathyroid hormone and asymmetric dimethylarginine as well as levels of microinflammatory state-related factors of two groups were compared. Results: Plasma BUN, Scr, UA and β2-MG levels of observation group after dialysis were significantly lower than those of control group; plasma MDA and Cor levels of observation group after dialysis were lower than those of control group, and levels of GSH and SOD were higher than those of control group; plasma Leptin, iPTH and ADMA levels of observation group after 1 time and 5 times of dialysis were significantly lower than those of control group; plasma hs-CRP, IL-6, TNF-α and ASAA levels of observation group after dialysis were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusion: High flux hemodialysis for patients with uremia can effectively eliminate related toxins in the body and reduce systemic microinflammatory state, and it has active clinical significance.

  9. Hard-hard coupling assisted anomalous magnetoresistance effect in amine-ended single-molecule magnetic junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.-H.; Lin, C.-J.; Chiang, K.-R.

    2017-06-01

    We proposed a single-molecule magnetic junction (SMMJ), composed of a dissociated amine-ended benzene sandwiched between two Co tip-like nanowires. To better simulate the break junction technique for real SMMJs, the first-principles calculation associated with the hard-hard coupling between a amine-linker and Co tip-atom is carried out for SMMJs with mechanical strain and under an external bias. We predict an anomalous magnetoresistance (MR) effect, including strain-induced sign reversal and bias-induced enhancement of the MR value, which is in sharp contrast to the normal MR effect in conventional magnetic tunnel junctions. The underlying mechanism is the interplay between four spin-polarized currents in parallel and anti-parallel magnetic configurations, originated from the pronounced spin-up transmission feature in the parallel case and spiky transmission peaks in other three spin-polarized channels. These intriguing findings may open a new arena in which magnetotransport and hard-hard coupling are closely coupled in SMMJs and can be dually controlled either via mechanical strain or by an external bias.

  10. [Effect of annealing temperature on the crystallization and spectroscopic response of a small-molecule semiconductor doped in polymer film].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Zhang, Xin-Ping; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2012-11-01

    The crystallization properties of the perylene (EPPTC) molecules doped in the solid film of the derivative of polyfluorene (F8BT) at different annealing temperatures, as well as the consequently induced spectroscopic response of the exciplex emission in the heterojunction structures, were studied in the present paper. Experimental results showed that the phase separation between the small and the polymer molecules in the blend film is enhanced with increasing the annealing temperature, which leads to the crystallization of the EPPTC molecules due to the strong pi-pi stacking. The size of the crystal phase increases with increasing the annealing temperature. However, this process weakens the mechanisms of the heterojunction configuration, thus, the total interfacial area between the small and the polymer molecules and the amount of exciplex are reduced significantly in the blend film. Meanwhile, the energy transfer from the polymer to the small molecules is also reduced. As a result, the emission from the exciplex becomes weaker with increasing the annealing temperature, whereas the stronger emission from the polymer molecules and from the crystal phase of the small molecules can be observed. These experimental results are very important for understanding and tailoring the organic heterojunction structures. Furthermore, this provides photophysics for improving the performance of photovoltaic or solar cell devices.

  11. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-01

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063 cm-1 (2438 cm-1) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the Osbnd H (Osbnd D) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124 cm-1 (2325 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature.

  12. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  13. Effect of 14-kDa and 47-kDa protein molecules of age garlic extract on peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmandi, Saeed; Hajimoradi, Monire; Ahmadabad, Hasan Namdar; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Roudbary, Maryam; Ghazanfari, Tooba

    2011-03-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum), traditionally being used as a spice worldwide, has different applications and is claimed to possess beneficial effects in several health ailments such as tumor and atherosclerosis. Garlic is also an immunomodulator and its different components are responsible for different properties. The present work aimed to assess the effect of protein fractions of garlic on peritoneal macrophages. 14-kDa and 47-kDa protein fractions of garlic were purified. Mice peritoneal macrophages were lavaged and cultured in a microtiter plate and exposed to different concentrations of garlic proteins. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the viability of macrophage. The amount of nitric oxide (NO) was detected in culture supernatants of macrophages by Griess reagent and furthermore, the cytotoxicity study of culture supernatants was carried out on WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cell line as tumor necrosis factor-α bioassay. MTT assay results for both 14-kDa and 47-kDa protein fractions of stimulated macrophages were not significant (P > 0.05). Both 14-kDa and 47-kDa fractions significantly suppressed production of NO from macrophages (P = 0.007 and P = 0.003, respectively). Cytotoxicity of macrophages' supernatant on WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cells was not affected by garlic protein fractions (P = 0.066 for 14-kDa and P = 0.085 for 47-kDa fractions). according to our finding, 14-kDa and 47-kDa fractions of aged garlic extract are able to suppress NO production from macrophages, which can be used as a biological advantage. These molecules had no cytotoxic effect on macrophages and do not increase tumoricidal property of macrophages.

  14. Effect of substrate thickness on ejection of phenylalanine molecules adsorbed on free-standing graphene bombarded by 10 keV C{sub 60}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golunski, M. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Krakow (Poland); Verkhoturov, S.V.; Verkhoturov, D.S.; Schweikert, E.A. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Postawa, Z., E-mail: zbigniew.postawa@uj.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Krakow (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Substrate thickness has a prominent effect on the molecular ejection mechanism. • Collisions with projectile atoms leads to molecular ejection at thin substrates. • Interactions with deforming graphene sheet ejects molecules from thicker substrates. • Probability of fragmentation process decreases with the graphene substrate thickness. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been employed to investigate the effect of substrate thickness on the ejection mechanism of phenylalanine molecules deposited on free-standing graphene. The system is bombarded from the graphene side by 10 keV C{sub 60} projectiles at normal incidence and the ejected particles are collected both in transmission and reflection directions. It has been found that the ejection mechanism depends on the substrate thickness. At thin substrates mostly organic fragments are ejected by direct collisions between projectile atoms and adsorbed molecules. At thicker substrates interaction between deforming topmost graphene sheet and adsorbed molecules becomes more important. As this process is gentle and directionally correlated, it leads predominantly to ejection of intact molecules. The implications of the results to a novel analytical approach in Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry based on ultrathin free-standing graphene substrates and a transmission geometry are discussed.

  15. Effect of finite Coulomb interaction on full counting statistics of electronic transport through single-molecule magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Haibin, E-mail: xhb98326110@163.co [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Nie, Y.-H., E-mail: nieyh@sxu.edu.c [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Li, Z.-J.; Liang, J.-Q. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2011-01-17

    We study the full counting statistics (FCS) in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) with finite Coulomb interaction U. For finite U the FCS, differing from U{yields}{infinity}, shows a symmetric gate-voltage-dependence when the coupling strengths with two electrodes are interchanged, which can be observed experimentally just by reversing the bias-voltage. Moreover, we find that the effect of finite U on shot noise depends on the internal level structure of the SMM and the coupling asymmetry of the SMM with two electrodes as well. When the coupling of the SMM with the incident-electrode is stronger than that with the outgoing-electrode, the super-Poissonian shot noise in the sequential tunneling regime appears under relatively small gate-voltage and relatively large finite U, and dose not for U{yields}{infinity}; while it occurs at relatively large gate-voltage for the opposite coupling case. The formation mechanism of super-Poissonian shot noise can be qualitatively attributed to the competition between fast and slow transport channels.

  16. Effect of finite Coulomb interaction on full counting statistics of electronic transport through single-molecule magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Haibin; Nie, Y.-H.; Li, Z.-J.; Liang, J.-Q.

    2011-01-01

    We study the full counting statistics (FCS) in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) with finite Coulomb interaction U. For finite U the FCS, differing from U→∞, shows a symmetric gate-voltage-dependence when the coupling strengths with two electrodes are interchanged, which can be observed experimentally just by reversing the bias-voltage. Moreover, we find that the effect of finite U on shot noise depends on the internal level structure of the SMM and the coupling asymmetry of the SMM with two electrodes as well. When the coupling of the SMM with the incident-electrode is stronger than that with the outgoing-electrode, the super-Poissonian shot noise in the sequential tunneling regime appears under relatively small gate-voltage and relatively large finite U, and dose not for U→∞; while it occurs at relatively large gate-voltage for the opposite coupling case. The formation mechanism of super-Poissonian shot noise can be qualitatively attributed to the competition between fast and slow transport channels.

  17. Effect of helicobacter pylori L-form infection on proliferation, apoptosis and invasion molecule expression in gastric cancer tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Helicobacter pylori L-form infection on proliferation, apoptosis and invasion molecule expression in gastric cancer tissue. Methods: The gastric cancer tissues surgically removed in our hospital between May 2013 and October 2016 were collected and divided into Hp negative, Hp-L negative and Hp-L positive according to the condition of helicobacter pylori infection. The proliferation, apoptosis and invasion gene expression were detected. Results: LOXL2, PCNA, CyclinD1, Rab1A, Bcl-2, Snail, N-cadherin, UHRF1 and AnnexinII mRNA expression in Hp-L-positive gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in Hp-L-negative and Hp-negative gastric cancer tissues while ING5, PTPN13, Beclin1 and Mst1 mRNA expression were significantly lower than those in Hp-L-negative and Hp-negative gastric cancer tissues; LOXL2, PCNA, CyclinD1, Rab1A, Bcl-2, ING5, PTPN13, Beclin1, Mst1, Snail, N-cadherin, UHRF1 and AnnexinII mRNA expression in Hp-L-negative gastric cancer tissues were not different from those in Hpnegative gastric cancer tissues. Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori L-form infection can influence the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion gene expression to promote cell proliferation and invasion, and inhibit cell apoptosis.

  18. Effect of Chain Conformation on the Single-Molecule Melting Force in Polymer Single Crystals: Steered Molecular Dynamics Simulations Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Wenke

    2017-02-28

    Understanding the relationship between polymer chain conformation as well as the chain composition within the single crystal and the mechanical properties of the corresponding single polymer chain will facilitate the rational design of high performance polymer materials. Here three model systems of polymer single crystals, namely poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), polyethylene (PE), and nylon-66 (PA66) have been chosen to study the effects of chain conformation, helical (PEO) versus planar zigzag conformation (PE, PA66), and chain composition (PE versus PA66) on the mechanical properties of a single polymer chain. To do that, steered molecular dynamics simulations were performed on those polymer single crystals by pulling individual polymer chains out of the crystals. Our results show that the patterns of force-extension curve as well as the chain moving mode are closely related to the conformation of the polymer chain in the single crystal. In addition, hydrogen bonds can enhance greatly the force required to stretch the polymer chain out of the single crystal. The dynamic breaking and reformation of multivalent hydrogen bonds have been observed for the first time in PA66 at the single molecule level.

  19. Effects of cryopreservation on excretory function, cellular adhesion molecules and vessel lumen formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guoping; Lai, Binbin; Hong, Huaxing; Lin, Peng; Chen, Weifu; Zhu, Zhong; Chen, Haixiao

    2017-07-01

    Cryopreservation is widely used in regenerative medicine for tissue preservation. In the present study, the effects of cryopreservation on excretory function, cellular adhesion molecules and vessel lumen formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated. After 0, 4, 8, 12 or 24 weeks of cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen, the HUVECs were thawed. The excretory functions markers (endothelin‑1, prostaglandin E1, von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide) of HUVECs were measured by ELISA assay. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in HUVECs was analyzed using flow cytometry. An angiogenesis assay was used to determine the angiogeneic capabilities of the thawed HUVECs. The results demonstrated that cryopreserved/thawed and recultivated HUVECs were unsuitable for tissue‑engineered microvascular construction. Specifically, the excretory function of the cells was significantly decreased in the post‑cryopreserved HUVECs at 24 weeks. In addition, the level of ICAM‑1 in HUVECs was significantly upregulated from the fourth week of cryopreservation. Furthermore, the tube‑like structure‑forming potential was weakened with increasing cryopreservation duration, and the numbers of lumen and the length of the pipeline were decreased in the thawed HUVECs, in a time‑dependent manner. In conclusion, the results of the present study revealed that prolonged cryopreservation may lead to HUVEC dysfunction and did not create stable cell lines for tissue‑engineered microvascular construction.

  20. Investigation on the of effect of self assembling molecules on the corrosion resistance of the 1050 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szurkalo, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    Surface treatments are widely used to increase the corrosion resistance of metallic materials. Specifically for aluminum and aluminum alloys, treatment with hexavalent chromium is one of the most used, due to its efficiency and ease of application. However, because of environmental restrictions and the high cost involved in the treatments of waste generated in this process, alternative methods for its replacement are necessary. In this context, this study investigated the effect of the surface treatment with self-assembling molecules (SAM) based on phosphonate compounds on the corrosion of the 1050 aluminum alloy. The conditions adopted for the SAM treatment were determined by conductivity and contact angle measurements, besides electrochemical experiments. Electrochemical techniques, specifically: measurement of the open circuit potential (OCP) variation with time, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curves were used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the 1050 aluminum alloy exposed to SAM treatment The experimental impedance diagrams were interpreted using equivalent electrical circuit models that simulate film that is formed on the alloy surface. The results of the samples treated with SAM were compared with those of samples either without any treatment or treated with chromatizing conversion coating with Cr(VI) and showed that the first treatment significantly increased the corrosion resistance of the aluminum alloy and approached that of chromatizing with Cr(VI) process. (author)

  1. Engineering of Porphyrin Molecules for Use as Effective Cathode Interfacial Modifiers in Organic Solar Cells of Enhanced Efficiency and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tountas, Marinos; Verykios, Apostolis; Polydorou, Ermioni; Kaltzoglou, Andreas; Soultati, Anastasia; Balis, Nikolaos; Angaridis, Panagiotis A; Papadakis, Michael; Nikolaou, Vasilis; Auras, Florian; Palilis, Leonidas C; Tsikritzis, Dimitris; Evangelou, Evangelos K; Gardelis, Spyros; Koutsoureli, Matroni; Papaioannou, George; Petsalakis, Ioannis D; Kennou, Stella; Davazoglou, Dimitris; Argitis, Panagiotis; Falaras, Polycarpos; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G; Vasilopoulou, Maria

    2018-06-06

    In the present work, we effectively modify the TiO 2 electron transport layer of organic solar cells with an inverted architecture using appropriately engineered porphyrin molecules. The results show that the optimized porphyrin modifier bearing two carboxylic acids as the anchoring groups and a triazine electron-withdrawing spacer significantly reduces the work function of TiO 2 , thereby reducing the electron extraction barrier. Moreover, the lower surface energy of the porphyrin-modified substrate results in better physical compatibility between the latter and the photoactive blend. Upon employing porphyrin-modified TiO 2 electron transport layers in PTB7:PC 71 BM-based organic solar cells we obtained an improved average power conversion efficiency up to 8.73%. Importantly, porphyrin modification significantly increased the lifetime of the devices, which retained 80% of their initial efficiency after 500 h of storage in the dark. Because of its simplicity and efficacy, this approach should give tantalizing glimpses and generate an impact into the potential of porphyrins to facilitate electron transfer in organic solar cells and related devices.

  2. Meat and Livestock Association Plenary Lecture 2005. Oocyte signalling molecules and their effects on reproduction in ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNatty, Kenneth P; Lawrence, Stephen; Groome, Nigel P; Meerasahib, Mohammed F; Hudson, Norma L; Whiting, Lynda; Heath, Derek A; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Sheep (Ovis aries) are a highly diverse species, with more than 900 different breeds that vary significantly in their physiological characteristics, including ovulation rate and fecundity. From examination of inherited patterns of ovulation rate, several breeds have been identified with point mutations in two growth factor genes that are expressed in oocytes. Currently, five different point mutations have been identified in the BMP15 (GDF9b) gene and one in GDF9. Animals heterozygous for the GDF9 and/or the BMP15 mutations have higher ovulation rates than their wild-type counterparts. In contrast, those homozygous for any of the aforementioned BMP15 or GDF9 mutations are sterile owing to arrested follicular development. In bovine and ovine ovaries, GDF9 was expressed exclusively in oocytes throughout follicular growth from the primordial stage of development, whereas in sheep BMP15 was expressed exclusively in oocytes from the primary stage: no data for the ontogeny of BMP15 expression are currently available for cattle. In vitro, ovine growth differentiation factor 9 (oGDF9) has no effect on (3)H-thymidine incorporation by either bovine or ovine granulosa cells, whereas ovine bone morphogenetic protein 15 (oBMP15) has modest (1.2- to 1.6-fold; P reproduction in mammals, including rodents, humans and ruminants. Moreover, in vivo manipulation of these oocyte signalling molecules provides new opportunities for the management of the fertility of ruminants.

  3. S-matrix analysis of vibrational and alignment effects in intense-field multiphoton ionization of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Requate, A

    2007-03-15

    Theoretical analysis of the vibrational excitation of small molecules during multiphoton ionization in intense laser fields of optical and infrared frequencies. Analysis of the alignment dependence of the electron impact ionization of diatomic molecules in the presence of an intense laser field as the final step in the process of Nonsequential Double Ionization. Quantum mechanical description using S-matrix theory in Strong Field Approximation (SFA), i.e. beyond perturbation theory. (orig.)

  4. S-matrix analysis of vibrational and alignment effects in intense-field multiphoton ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requate, A.

    2007-03-01

    Theoretical analysis of the vibrational excitation of small molecules during multiphoton ionization in intense laser fields of optical and infrared frequencies. Analysis of the alignment dependence of the electron impact ionization of diatomic molecules in the presence of an intense laser field as the final step in the process of Nonsequential Double Ionization. Quantum mechanical description using S-matrix theory in Strong Field Approximation (SFA), i.e. beyond perturbation theory. (orig.)

  5. Effect of irradiation on gene expression of rat liver adhesion molecules. In vivo and in vitro studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriconi, Federico; Malik, Ihtzaz; Ahmad, Ghayyor; Dudas, Joszef; Ramadori, Giuliano; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Vorwerk, Hilke; Hille, Andrea; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Christiansen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Migration of leukocytes into tissue is a key element of innate and adaptive immunity. An animal study showed that liver irradiation, in spite of induction of chemokine gene expression, does not lead to recruitment of leukocytes into the parenchyma. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression of adhesion molecules, which mediate leukocyte recruitment into organs, in irradiated rat liver in vivo and rat hepatocytes in vitro. Material and methods: Rat livers in vivo were irradiated selectively at 25 Gy. Isolated hepatocytes in vitro were irradiated at 8 Gy. RNA extracted within 48 h after irradiation in vivo and in vitro was analyzed by real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and Northern blot. Adhesion molecule concentration in serum was measured by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Cryostat sections of livers were used for immunohistology. Results: Significant radiation-induced increase of ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), JAM-1 (junctional adhesion molecule-1), β 1 -integrin, β 2 -integrin, E-cadherin, and P-selectin gene expression could be detected in vivo, while PECAM-1 (platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1) gene expression remained unchanged. In vitro, β 1 -integrin, JAM-1, and ICAM-2 showed a radiation-induced increased expression, whereas the levels of P-selectin, ICAM-1, PECAM-1, VCAM-1, Madcam-1 (mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1), β 2 -integrin, and E-cadherin were downregulated. However, incubation of irradiated hepatocytes with either tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-)α, interleukin-(IL-)1β, or IL-6 plus TNF-α led to an upregulation of P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Conclusion: The findings suggest that liver irradiation modulates gene expression of the main adhesion molecules in vivo and in cytokine-activated hepatocytes, with the exception of PECAM-1. This may be one reason for the lack of inflammation in the irradiated rat liver. (orig.)

  6. Spectroscopic calculation of the excited electronic states with spin orbit effect of the molecule NaCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleik, S.; Korek, M.; Allouche, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.The existence of new experimental data on the alkali dimers has stimulated theoretical approaches, necessary to provide predictions accurate enough to be useful for interpretation and evenly for guidance of experiments. With the aim of improving the accuracy of predictions we will perform a theoretical study of the electronic structure of the molecule NaCs using a method mainly in the way by which core-valence effects are taken into account. To investigate the electronic structure of NaCs we will use the package CIPSI (Configuration Interaction by Perturbation of a multiconfiguration wave function Selected Interactively) of the Laboratoire de Physique Quantique (Toulouse, France). The atoms Na and Cs will be treated through non-empirical effective one electron core potentials of Durand and Barthelat type. Molecular orbitals for NaCs will be derived from Self Consistent field Calculations (SCF) and full valence Configuration Interaction (IC) calculations. A core-core interaction more elaborated than the usual approximation 1/R will be taken into account as the sum of an exponential repulsive term plus a long range dispersion term approximated by the well known London formula. Potential energy calculations will be performed for different molecular states, for numerous values of the inter-nuclear distance R in a wide range. Spectroscopic constants have been derived for the bound states with regular shape. A ro vibrational study have been performed for the ground states with a calculation of the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. A calculation for the transition dipole moment and matrix elements have been done for the bound states

  7. Effect of 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone, a Small-Molecule TrkB Agonist, on Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andero, Raul; Heldt, Scott A.; Ye, Keqiang; Liu, Xia; Armario, Antonio; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite increasing awareness of the many important roles played by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activation of TrkB, a fuller understanding of this system and the use of potential TrkB-acting therapeutic agents has been limited by the lack of any identified small-molecule TrkB agonists that fully mimic the actions of BDNF at brain TrkB receptors in vivo. However, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) has recently been identified as a specific TrkB agonist that crosses the blood-brain barrier after oral or intra-peritoneal administration. The authors combined pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral approaches in a preclinical study examining the role of 7,8-DHF in modulating emotional memory in mice. Method The authors first examined the ability of systemic 7,8-DHF to activate TrkB receptors in the amygdala. They then examined the effects of systemic 7,8-DHF on acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear, using specific and well-characterized BDNF-dependent learning paradigms in several models using naive mice and mice with prior traumatic stress exposure. Results Amygdala TrkB receptors, which have previously been shown to be required for emotional learning, were activated by systemic 7,8-DHF (at 5 mg/kg i.p.). 7,8-DHF enhanced both the acquisition of fear and its extinction. It also appeared to rescue an extinction deficit in mice with a history of immobilization stress. Conclusions These data suggest that 7,8-DHF may be an excellent agent for use in understanding the effects of TrkB activation in learning and memory paradigms and may be attractive for use in reversing learning and extinction deficits associated with psychopathology. PMID:21123312

  8. Effect of doping of OH- and CN- on the liberation of I2 molecules in KI by gamma-irradiation, impurity concentration effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirke, A.K.; Pode, R.B.; Deshmukh, B.T.

    1996-01-01

    Photodecomposition of pure and doped KI powder (KI:KOH; KI:KCN; Impurity concentration, 100, 300, 500, 700 and 1000 ppm) to produce free I 2 molecules during gamma irradiation is studied with the help of absorption and IR measurements. Large number of I 2 molecules are formed in pure KI as compared to the doped samples. Hydroxide impurity increases the rate of liberation of I 2 molecules whereas the cyanide impurity decreases the rate of liberation of I 2 molecules. (Author)

  9. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on superoxide production and plasma intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and antibodies to oxidized LDL in chronic smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tits, van L.J.; Waart, de F.; Hak-Lemmers, H.L.M.; Heijst, P.; Graaf, de J.; Demacker, P.N.; Stalenhoef, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    Antioxidants have been postulated to exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is associated with raised plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and autoantibodies against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). It is not known whether antioxidants

  10. The effect of H- and J-aggregation on the photophysical and photovoltaic properties of small Thiophene–Pyridine–DPP molecules for bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Más-Montoya, M.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of organic semiconductors in optoelectronic devices depends on the functional properties of the individual molecules and their mutual orientations when they are in the solid state. The effect of H- and J-aggregation on the photophysical properties and photovoltaic behavior of four

  11. Additive and interaction effects at three amino acid positions in HLA-DQ and HLA-DR molecules drive type 1 diabetes risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Xinli; Deutsch, Aaron J; Lenz, Tobias L; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Han, Buhm; Chen, Wei-Min; Howson, Joanna M M; Todd, John A; de Bakker, Paul I W; Rich, Stephen S; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    Variation in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes accounts for one-half of the genetic risk in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Amino acid changes in the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ molecules mediate most of the risk, but extensive linkage disequilibrium complicates the localization of independent effects. Using

  12. Effect of conformational propensity of peptide antigens in their interaction with MHC class II molecules. Failure to document the importance of regular secondary structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Lamont, A; Buus, S

    1989-01-01

    the binding capacity, but no correlation was found between their effect and their alpha-helical, beta-sheet, or beta-turn conformational propensity as calculated by the Chou and Fasman algorithm. In summary, all the data presented herein suggest that, at least in the case of OVA 323-336 and IAd......, the propensity of the antigen molecule to form secondary structures such as alpha-helices, beta-sheets, or beta-turns does not correlate with its capacity to bind MHC molecules....

  13. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. A systematic investigation of differential effects of cell culture substrates on the extent of artifacts in single-molecule tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Zanetti-Domingues

    Full Text Available Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required.

  15. Effective inclusion of polarization effects in calculations of the oscillator strengths and transition energies in atoms and molecules using the equation-of-motion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, A.V.; Kol'tsova, N.Yu.

    1994-01-01

    Equations of motion were solved by a modified method in a quasi-particle representation of the density functional taking into account the most important polarization effects, including the so-called 2p-2h two-particle-two-hole interactions. Based on these calculations, spectroscopic data on energies and oscillator strengths of the helium atom (the test computation), carbon monoxide, nitrogen molecule, and ethylene are presented that refine some previously reported experimental and theoretical results. It is shown that in some cases the inclusion of polarization corrections introduced by 2p-2h effects is of basic importance because it provides up to ∼30% contribution to the energies and oscillator strengths. 23 refs., 5 tabs

  16. Effects of Chinese yellow wine on nitric oxide synthase and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expressions in rat vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Ji, Zheng; Chi, Jufang; Tang, Weiliang; Zhai, Xiaoya; Meng, Liping; Guo, Hangyuan

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine similarities in the effect of yellow wine as compared to statin and the possibility that yellow wine inhibits tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in cultured rat vascular endothelial cells (VECs). We isolated VECs, and cultivated and purified Sprague Dawley (SD) rat thoracic aortas in vitro. We selected the optimal wine concentration using clonogenic and MTT assays to measure cell survival. Next, we divided the cells into 9 groups: (1) control, (2) TNF-α, (3) TNF-α + rosuvastatin (10 μmol/L), (4) TNF-α + ethanol 0.5%, (5) TNF-α + yellow wine 0.5%, (6) TNF-α + ethanol 1.0%, (7) TNF-α + yellow wine 1.0%, (8) TNF-α + ethanol 1.5%, and (9) TNF-α + yellow wine 1.5% and they were given the corresponding treatment for 24 h. We determined NO production with nitrate reductase. We then measured eNOS activity, and detected eNOS, iNOS, and ICAM-1 protein levels by Western blotting. Compared with the TNF-α group, NO production, eNOS activity, and eNOS protein expression in the rosuvastatin, and yellow wine 1.0%, and 1.5% groups were significantly increased. Protein expression of iNOS and ICAM-1 in the rosuvastatin, yellow wine 1.0%, and 1.5% groups were significantly decreased. Compared with the rosuvastatin group, eNOS, iNOS, and ICAM-1 protein expression in the yellow wine (0.5% -1.5%) groups were significantly different. Treatment with yellow wine increased NO production, eNOS activity, and eNOS protein expression, which decreases iNOS and ICAM-1 protein expression. We conclude that yellow wine may have similar beneficial effects as rosuvastatin on the cardiovascular system. These effects may be attributed to their anti-atherosclerotic actions.

  17. [Controlling effect of bushen huatan compound on the insulin signal conducting molecule inside ovaries in polycystic ovary syndrome model rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chen; Cong, Jing; Chang, Hui

    2011-12-01

    To study the effects of Bushen Huatan Compound (BHC) on the glycolipid metabolism and the expressions of the insulin signal conducting molecules inside ovaries in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) model rats. Female Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected with 2.5 mg/kg testosterone propionate (Their female offspring were randomly divided into the medication group and the model group, 10 in each.) or neutral tea oil of the same dose (Ten female offspring was taken as the control group.) on the 16th day of pregnancy, once daily, for 3 successive days. BHC was given to rats in the medication group by gastrogavage, while equal volume of distilled water was given to rats in the model group and the control group by gastrogavage, both once daily for 20 successive days. The body weight and ovary weight were weighed to calculate the ratio of wet fat weight/body weight. The blood glucose levels were detected at 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 h using oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The serum concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG), fasting blood glucose (FBG), and insulin were detected to calculate homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The expressions of protein kinase B (AKT2), glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4), extracellular signal regulated kinase-1 (ERK1) protein, P-AKT2, P-GSK3beta, and P-ERK1 in ovaries were detected using Western blot. Compared with the control group, the ratio of wet fat weight/ body weight, the blood glucose levels at 0.5 and 2 h in OGTT, and HOMA-IR all obviously increased, and the HDL-C level obviously decreased in the model group (P < 0.05). Compared with the model group, the ratio of wet fat weight/body weight and the blood glucose levels at 2 h in OGTT obviously decreased, and the HDL-C level obviously increased in the medication group (P < 0.05). The expressions of AKT2, P-AKT2, GSK3beta, P-GSK3beta, GLUT4, and ERK1 in the ovary tissue were obviously

  18. Positron creation in superheavy quasi-molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, B.

    1976-01-01

    The review of positron creation in superheavy quasi-molecules includes spontaneous positron emission from superheavy atoms, supercritical quasi-molecules, background effects, and some implications of the new ground state. 66 references

  19. Size effects of solvent molecules on the phase behavior and effective interaction of colloidal systems with the bridging attraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xuewu; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    There has been much recent research interest towards understanding the phase behavior of colloidal systems interacting with a bridging attraction, where the small solvent particles and large solute colloidal particles can be reversibly associated with each other. These systems show interesting phase behavior compared to the more widely studied depletion attraction systems. Here, we use Baxter’s two-component sticky hard sphere model with a Percus–Yevick closure to solve the Ornstein–Zernike equation and study the size effect on colloidal systems with bridging attractions. The spinodal decomposition regions, percolation transition boundaries and binodal regions are systematically investigated as a function of the relative size of the small solvent and large solute particles as well as the attraction strength between the small and large particles. In the phase space determined by the concentrations of small and large particles, the spinodal and binodal regions form isolated islands. The locations and shapes of the spinodal and binodal regions sensitively depend on the relative size of the small and large particles and the attraction strength between them. The percolation region shrinks by decreasing the size ratio, while the binodal region slightly expands with the decrease of the size ratio. Our results are very important in understanding the phase behavior for a bridging attraction colloidal system, a model system that provides insight into oppositely charged colloidal systems, protein phase behavior, and colloidal gelation mechanisms. (paper)

  20. Size effects of solvent molecules on the phase behavior and effective interaction of colloidal systems with the bridging attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xuewu; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2016-11-16

    There has been much recent research interest towards understanding the phase behavior of colloidal systems interacting with a bridging attraction, where the small solvent particles and large solute colloidal particles can be reversibly associated with each other. These systems show interesting phase behavior compared to the more widely studied depletion attraction systems. Here, we use Baxter's two-component sticky hard sphere model with a Percus-Yevick closure to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation and study the size effect on colloidal systems with bridging attractions. The spinodal decomposition regions, percolation transition boundaries and binodal regions are systematically investigated as a function of the relative size of the small solvent and large solute particles as well as the attraction strength between the small and large particles. In the phase space determined by the concentrations of small and large particles, the spinodal and binodal regions form isolated islands. The locations and shapes of the spinodal and binodal regions sensitively depend on the relative size of the small and large particles and the attraction strength between them. The percolation region shrinks by decreasing the size ratio, while the binodal region slightly expands with the decrease of the size ratio. Our results are very important in understanding the phase behavior for a bridging attraction colloidal system, a model system that provides insight into oppositely charged colloidal systems, protein phase behavior, and colloidal gelation mechanisms.

  1. Effects of temperature and other experimental variables on single molecule vibrational spectroscopy with the scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauhon, L. J.; Ho, W.

    2001-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) was performed on single molecules with a variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope. The peak intensity, width, position, and line shape of single molecule vibrational spectra were studied as a function of temperature, modulation bias, bias polarity, and tip position for the (C--H,C--D) stretching vibration of acetylene (C 2 H 2 ,C 2 D 2 ) on Cu(001). The temperature broadening of vibrational peaks was found to be a consequence of Fermi smearing as in macroscopic IETS. The modulation broadening of vibrational peaks assumed the expected form for IETS. Extrapolation of the peak width to zero temperature and modulation suggested an intrinsic width of ∼4 meV due primarily to instrumental broadening. The inelastic tunneling cross section at negative bias was reduced by a factor of 1.7 for the C--H stretch mode. Low energy modes of other molecules did not show such a reduction. There was no evidence of a tip-induced Stark shift in the peak positions. The spatial variation of the inelastic signal was measured to determine the junction stability necessary for the acquisition of single molecule vibrational spectra

  2. To bend or not to bend – are heteroatom interactions within conjugated molecules effective in dictating conformation and planarity?

    KAUST Repository

    Conboy, Gary; Spencer, Howard J.; Angioni, Enrico; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L.; Findlay, Neil J.; Coles, Simon J.; Wilson, Claire; Pitak, Mateusz B.; Risko, Chad; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Skabara, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the roles of heteroatoms (mainly nitrogen, the halogens and the chalcogens) in dictating the conformation of linear conjugated molecules and polymers through non-covalent intramolecular interactions. Whilst hydrogen bonding is a competitive and sometimes more influential interaction, we provide unambiguous evidence that heteroatoms are able to determine the conformation of such materials with reasonable predictability.

  3. Quenching of excited uranyl ion during its photochemical reduction with triphenyl-phosphine : Part IV - effect of heterocyclic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, M.S.; Bhatia, P.V.K.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of heterocyclic compounds triggers off a competition between photophysical and photochemical annihilation of excited uranyl ion during its photochemical reduction with triphenylphosphine. This competition is used to measure Stern-Volmer constant using UV visible spectrophotometer for quenching the uranyl ion luminescence with a number of heterocyclic molecules viz., pyridine, thiophene bipyridyl, tetrahydrofuran and piperidine. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Effect of methylprednisolone on the oxidative burst activity, adhesion molecules and clinical outcome following open heart surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Christiansen, K; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine

    1997-01-01

    and the control group regarding the expression of adhesion molecules or the oxidative burst activity. In the steroid group the fluid gain during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was 683 ml (median) compared to 1488 ml in the control group. Steroids prevented hyperthermia in the postoperative period but did...

  5. To bend or not to bend – are heteroatom interactions within conjugated molecules effective in dictating conformation and planarity?

    KAUST Repository

    Conboy, Gary

    2016-04-26

    We consider the roles of heteroatoms (mainly nitrogen, the halogens and the chalcogens) in dictating the conformation of linear conjugated molecules and polymers through non-covalent intramolecular interactions. Whilst hydrogen bonding is a competitive and sometimes more influential interaction, we provide unambiguous evidence that heteroatoms are able to determine the conformation of such materials with reasonable predictability.

  6. Effect of water molecule distribution on the quantitative XRD analysis in the case of Na-montmorillonite exchanged Cu2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oueslati, W.; Meftah, M.; Ben Rhaiem, H.; Ben Haj Amara, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Several theoretical models are proposed to describe hydration process for Wyoming-montmorillonite clay exchanged Na + or Cu 2+ . They propose some theoretical distribution and disposition for water molecule in the inter-lamellar space in the case of homogeneous and inter-stratified hydration states. For example, Ben Brahim et al. (1983a) studied the interlayer structure (atomic positions of interlayer cations) and associated H 2 O molecules of Na-saturated montmorillonite and beidellite samples. Moore and Hower (1986) studied ordered structures composed of mono-hydrated and collapsed interlayers in montmorillonite, and Cuadros (1996) estimated the H 2 O content of smectite as a function of the interlayer cation. Using similar approach, Ferrage et al (2005b) proposed a discreet distribution of water molecule layer in the same z coordinate of the exchangeable cation with inhomogeneous distribution. This heterogeneity was attributed to the surface charge. The main objective of this study is to characterize the structural changes in the theoretical XRD profile, induced by different water molecule distribution, used to simulate experimental XRD patterns in the case of Na-montmorillonite exchanged Cu 2+ . This problem was achieved by quantitative XRD analysis using an indirect method based on the comparison of the experimental 001 reflections obtained from oriented films patterns with those calculated from structural models. The starting materials were Ca-montmorillonite originated from bentonites of Wyoming (USA). The XRD patterns were obtained by reflection setting with a D8 ADVANCE Bruker installation using Cu-Kα radiation and equipped with solid state detector. Intensities were measured at an interval of 2Θ 0.04 deg. and 40-50 s counting time per step. The diffracted intensity was calculated according to the matrix formalism detailed by Drits and Tchoubar, (1990). The fitting strategies was detailed by Ferrage et

  7. Lack of a synergistic effect of a non-viral ALS gene therapy based on BDNF and a TTC fusion molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is one of the most devastating neurodegenerative diseases. Neurotrophic factors have been widely tested to counteract neurodegenerative conditions, despite their unspecific neuronal access. The non-toxic C-terminal fragment of the tetanus toxin (TTC heavy chain has been studied not only as a carrier molecule to the CNS but also as a neuroprotective agent. Because the neurotrophic effects of BDNF have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, the question addressed in this work is whether a fusion molecule of BDNF-TTC may have a synergistic effect and enhance the neuroprotective properties of TTC alone in a mouse model of ALS. Methods Recombinant plasmid constructs (pCMV-TTC and pCMV-BDNF-TTC were injected into the quadriceps femoris and triceps brachialis muscles of SOD1G93A transgenic mice at 8 weeks of age. The hanging wire and rotarod tests were performed to assess motor coordination, strength and balance. Electrophysiological tests, morphological assays of spinal cord sections of L2 and L4 segments, and gene and protein expression analyses were performed. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis test was used for comparisons of survival. Multiple comparisons of data were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Treatment with the fusion-molecule BDNF-TTC and with TTC alone significantly delayed the onset of symptoms and functional deficits of SOD1G93A mice. Muscle innervation was partially preserved with these treatments, and the number of surviving motoneurons in L2 spinal cord segment was increased particularly by the fusion protein induction. Inhibition of pro-apoptotic protein targets (caspase-3 and Bax and significant phosphorylation of Akt and ERK were also found in the spinal cord of treated mice. Conclusions Significant improvements in behavioral and electrophysiological results, motoneuron survival and anti-apoptotic/survival-activated pathways were observed with

  8. Effect of hydration on the organo-noble gas molecule HKrCCH: role of krypton in the stabilization of hydrated HKrCCH complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Biswajit; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2015-11-11

    The effect of hydration on the fluorine free organo-noble gas compound HKrCCH and the role of krypton in the stabilization of the hydrated HKrCCH complexes have been investigated using the quantum chemical calculations on the HKrCCH-(H2O)n=1-6 clusters. Structure and energetics calculations show that water stabilizes HKrCCH through the π hydrogen bond in which the OH group of water interacts with the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C group of HKrCCH. A maximum of four water molecules can directly interact with the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C of HKrCCH and after that only inter-hydrogen bonding takes place between the water molecules indicating that the primary hydration shell contains four water molecules. Atom in molecule analysis depicts that π hydrogen bonded complexes of the hydrated HKrCCH are cyclic structures in which the OKr interaction cooperates in the formation of strong O-HC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C interaction. Structure, energetics and charge analysis clearly established that krypton plays an important role in the stabilization as well as the formation of the primary hydration shell of hydrated HKrCCH complexes.

  9. Probing force-induced unfolding intermediates of a single staphylococcal nuclease molecule and the effect of ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Murayama, Yoshihiro; Katano, Atsuto; Maki, Kosuke; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Sano, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation techniques have given experimental access to unfolding intermediates of proteins that are inaccessible in conventional experiments. A detailed characterization of the intermediates is a challenging problem that provides new possibilities for directly probing the energy landscape of proteins. We investigated single-molecule mechanical unfolding of a small globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), using atomic force microscopy. The unfolding trajectories of the protein displayed sub-molecular and stochastic behavior with typical lengths corresponding to the size of the unfolded substructures. Our results support the view that the single protein unfolds along multiple pathways as suggested in recent theoretical studies. Moreover, we found the drastic change, caused by the ligand and inhibitor bindings, in the mechanical unfolding dynamics

  10. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.kunduphy@gmail.com; Karmakar, S.N.

    2016-07-15

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  11. Microhydration effect on structural, energetic and light scattering properties of first branched interstellar molecule ( i-PrCN)

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Sumana; Routh, Swati; Krishnappa, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have focused on microsolvation of isopropyl cyanide (i-PrCN) as isopropyl cyanide has been recently detected in interstellar space and is of great importance from the astrochemical and bio-chemical point of view for its branching carbon chains. Such branches are needed for many molecules crucial to life, such as the amino acids that build proteins. The phenomenon of the formation of hydrogen bond affects structure, energetic and electric properties of microhydrated isopropyl ...

  12. Ab initio calculation of contact effects on electron transport through single molecules by the RTM/NEGF method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Kenji; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Using the recursion-transfer-matrix (RTM) method combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method, we study the electronic states and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of atomic-scale nanocontact systems. We find that non-linear behaviors appear in the I-V characteristics even without molecules between electrodes. Such non-linear behaviors emerge when the nanocontacts are not well constructed and the transport properties change from tunneling to ballistic regimes

  13. Vibrational relaxation dynamics of SD molecules in As2S3: Observation of an anomalous isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engholm, J.R.; Happek, U.; Rella, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the vibrational relaxation of molecular impurities in crystals and glasses mainly depends on the order of the decay process, with lower order processes leading to more rapid relaxation (a behavior that is known under the term open-quotes gap-lawclose quotes). Here we present measurements that contradict this assumption. Using high intensity psec pulses of the Stanford FEL we measured the relaxation rate of the SD vibrational stretch mode (at a frequency of 1800 cm) by applying a pump-probe technique. We find relaxation rates on the order of 2x10 9 sec -1 , which are a factor of 2 lower than those found for the isotope molecule SH (at a frequency of about 2500 cm - 1 ) in the same host 1 . We recall that the relaxation of the SD vibrational stretch mode is controlled by a lower order process as compared to the SH molecule, which is due to the smaller number of host vibrational quanta to match the energy of the stretch mode; a fact we have confirmed experimentally by temperature dependent relaxation measurements. Thus our remits are in marked contrast to the so-called open-quotes Gap-Lawclose quotes and emphasize the importance of the molecule - host coupling in the relaxation dynamics

  14. A novel lumazine synthase molecule from Brucella significantly promotes the immune-stimulation effects of antigenic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Z Q; Wang, J Y

    2015-10-27

    Brucella, an intracellular parasite that infects some livestock and humans, can damage or destroy the reproductive system of livestock. The syndrome is referred to as brucellosis and often occurs in pastoral areas; it is contagious from livestock to humans. In this study, the intact Brucella suis outer membrane protein 31 (omp31) gene was cloned, recombinantly expressed, and examined as a subunit vaccine candidate. The intact Brucella lumazine synthase (bls) gene was cloned and recombinantly expressed to study polymerization function in vitro. Non-reducing gel electrophoresis showed that rBs-BLS existed in different forms in vitro, including as a dimer and a pentamer. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay result showed that rOmp31 protein could induce production of an antibody in rabbits. However, the rOmp31-BLS fusion protein could elicit a much higher antibody titer in rabbits; this construct involved fusion of the Omp31 molecule with the BLS molecule. Our results indicate that Omp31 is involved in immune stimulation, while BLS has a polymerizing function based on rOmp31-BLS fusion protein immunogenicity. These data suggest that Omp31 is an ideal subunit vaccine candidate and that the BLS molecule is a favorable transport vector for antigenic proteins.

  15. The Comparative Study of the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Infrasound on Water Molecule Dissociation and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    ISTC Project No. #1592P The Comparative Study of The Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Infrasound on Water Molecule...performed under the agreement with the International Science and Technology Center ( ISTC ), Moscow. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704...dissociation and generation of reactive oxygen spaces. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ISTC Registration No: A-1592p 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  16. Effect of polysaccharide capsule of the microalgae Staurastrum iversenii var. americanum on diffusion of charged and uncharged molecules, using EPR technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire-Nordi, Cristina S.; Nascimento, Otaciro R.; Vieira, Armando A.H.; Nakaie, Clovis R.

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a mucilaginous envelope, sheath or capsule is usual in many desmids, but few data concerning its function are available. Previous studies of the transport function and permeation of molecules through the algae capsules were done using the algae Spondylosium panduriforme and Nephrocytium lunatum, the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) technique, and different spin labels. The results suggested that the capsule functions as a selective diffusion medium. In the present work charged and uncharged molecules (spin labels group A) and Staurastrum iversenii var. americanum (Desmids),whose alga presents a great mucilaginous capsule, were used. Charged nitroxide molecules similar to amino acids (spin labels group B) were also used allowing a better understanding of the electrostatic effect in the permeation process across the capsule. The role of the cell capsule in the solute diffusion was evaluated by determining the capsulated and decapsulated cell permeation times. The permeation times for all spin labels tested in the cells lacking capsules were always shorter than those containing this physical barrier. The decay times of spin labels group A observed for S. iversenii were compared to other studied algae. The results regarding the diffusion of charged spin labels group B suggested that the interaction of cell capsule occurs more strongly with negatively charged molecules than with positively charged ones. The results obtained in this work with spin labels group A confirm that the capsule is an essential structure for the cell, and that due to the polar interactions with the spin labels, it plays an important role in the selection of small molecules. Several parameters, mainly those of electrostatic nature, seem to control the permeation across the algal capsules of spin labels group B, showing that structures which are similar to amino acids could diffuse across the interior of the algal cell. (author)

  17. The effect of lidocaine on in vitro neutrophil and endothelial adhesion molecule expression induced by plasma obtained during tourniquet-induced ischaemia and reperfusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lan, W

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Changes in neutrophil and endothelial adhesion molecule expression occur during perioperative ischaemia and reperfusion (I\\/R) injury. We investigated the effects of lidocaine on neutrophil-independent changes in neutrophil and endothelial adhesion molecule expression associated with tourniquet-induced I\\/R. METHODS: Plasma was obtained from venous blood samples (tourniquet arm) taken before (baseline), during, 15 min, 2 and 24 h following tourniquet release in seven patients undergoing elective upper limb surgery with tourniquet application. Isolated neutrophils from healthy volunteers (n = 7) were pretreated in the presence or absence of lidocaine (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 mg mL(-1) for 1 h, and then incubated with I\\/R plasma for 2 h. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were pretreated in the presence or absence of lidocaine (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 mg mL(-1)) for 1 h, and then incubated with the plasma for 4 h. Adhesion molecule expression was estimated using flow cytometry. Data were analysed using ANOVA and post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls tests. RESULTS: I\\/R plasma (withdrawn 15 min following tourniquet release) increased isolated neutrophil CD11b (P = 0.03), CD18 (P = 0.01) and endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) (P = 0.008) expression compared to baseline. CD11b, CD18 and ICAM-1 expression on lidocaine (0.005 mg mL(-1)) treated neutrophils was similar to control. CD11b (P < 0.001), CD18 (P = 0.03) and ICAM-1 (P = 0.002) expression on lidocaine (0.05 mg mL(-1)) treated neutrophils and HUVECs was less than that on controls. CONCLUSION: Increased in vitro neutrophil and endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression on exposure to plasma obtained during the early reperfusion phase is diminished by lidocaine at greater than clinically relevant plasma concentrations.

  18. Short-term administration of small molecule phenamil induced a protracted osteogenic effect on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Kevin W-H; Kan, Ho Man; Laurencin, Cato T

    2016-06-01

    Sustained administration (21-day treatment) of the small molecule phenamil has been proposed as an alternative osteogenic factor when used in conjunction with a biodegradable scaffold for in vitro osteogenesis. While promising, the major issue associated with small molecules is non-specific cytotoxicity. The aim of this study was to minimize the side-effects from small-molecule drugs by reducing the frequency of administration. Toward this goal, we investigated whether a shorter phenamil treatment is sufficient to induce in vitro osteogenesis. We compared the effects of short-term (12 h) and continuous treatments of phenamil on osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteopontin (OPN) activity were used as markers for osteoblastic differentiation. Measurement of the calcium content of the extracellular matrix was used as the hallmark for in vitro bone formation after 21 days of culture. Our findings revealed that both short and continuous phenamil treatment triggers osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells on a biodegradable polymeric scaffold composed of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA) at the same time points. In addition, in order to fabricate a phenamil-loaded PLAGA scaffold, the small molecule phenamil was physically absorbed onto the surface of scaffolds and the bioactivity of the loaded scaffolds was evaluated. Furthermore, biochemical analysis indicated that short phenamil treatment of cells was accompanied by upregulation in protein expression of integrin α5, p125(FAK) and phosphorylation of CREB. These effects may contribute to the downstream signalling cascade necessary for osteogenesis, and such responses may account for our observed protracted osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The small-molecule TNF-alpha modulator, UTL-5g, reduces side effects induced by cisplatin and enhances the therapeutic effect of cisplatin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, JiaJiu; Chen, Ben; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Lee, An-Rong; Media, Joseph; Valeriote, Frederick A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated a small-molecule modulator of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), UTL-5g (also referred to as GBL-5g), as a potential chemoprotective agent against cisplatin-induced side effects including nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity. Pretreatment of UTL-5g i.p. in BDF1 mice reduced the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine induced by cisplatin treatment. The levels of both aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) in these animals were also reduced by UTL-5g. Pretreatment of UTL-5g did not significantly affect the number of white blood cells (WBC) under current experimental conditions, yet it markedly increased blood platelet counts by more than threefold. Therapeutic assessment in SCID mice inoculated with human HCT-15 tumor cells showed that UTL-5g did not attenuate the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin but increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. The LD50 of UTL-5g was determined to be > 2,000 mg/kg by an acute toxicity study. In summary, our studies showed that 1) UTL-5g significantly reduces nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity induced by cisplatin in mice, presumably by lowering the levels of TNF-alpha, 2) UTL-5g markedly increased blood platelet counts in mice and 3) UTL-5g treatment increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin against HCT-15 cells inoculated in SCID mice.

  20. Effect of the number of phenyl groups per molecule on the reactivity of hydroxyl or carboxyl group in hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Minoru; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Oguma, Shuichi

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen-exchange reactions in solid alcohols (or solid carboxylic acids) which contain phenyl group(s) in each molecule have been observed in a gas-solid system or liquid-solid system at 40 ≅ 80deg C. The data thus obtained have been analyzed by using the A''-McKay plot method, and 'the acidities based on kinetic logic' have been obtained for those compounds. From the acidities the following four characteristics have been determined. (1) The acidity increases with increases of temperature. (2) The reactivities of carboxylic acids are larger than those of alcohols at any temperature. (3) The effect of the number of phenyl groups on the reactivity of the functional group in the molecule in question is fairly large. (4) Acidity based on kinetic logic can be applied not only to gas-solid reactions, but also to liquid-solid reactions. (orig.)

  1. Effect of auditory feedback differs according to side of hemiparesis: a comparative pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bensmail Djamel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following stroke, patients frequently demonstrate loss of motor control and function and altered kinematic parameters of reaching movements. Feedback is an essential component of rehabilitation and auditory feedback of kinematic parameters may be a useful tool for rehabilitation of reaching movements at the impairment level. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 2 types of auditory feedback on the kinematics of reaching movements in hemiparetic stroke patients and to compare differences between patients with right (RHD and left hemisphere damage (LHD. Methods 10 healthy controls, 8 stroke patients with LHD and 8 with RHD were included. Patient groups had similar levels of upper limb function. Two types of auditory feedback (spatial and simple were developed and provided online during reaching movements to 9 targets in the workspace. Kinematics of the upper limb were recorded with an electromagnetic system. Kinematics were compared between groups (Mann Whitney test and the effect of auditory feedback on kinematics was tested within each patient group (Friedman test. Results In the patient groups, peak hand velocity was lower, the number of velocity peaks was higher and movements were more curved than in the healthy group. Despite having a similar clinical level, kinematics differed between LHD and RHD groups. Peak velocity was similar but LHD patients had fewer velocity peaks and less curved movements than RHD patients. The addition of auditory feedback improved the curvature index in patients with RHD and deteriorated peak velocity, the number of velocity peaks and curvature index in LHD patients. No difference between types of feedback was found in either patient group. Conclusion In stroke patients, side of lesion should be considered when examining arm reaching kinematics. Further studies are necessary to evaluate differences in responses to auditory feedback between patients with lesions in opposite

  2. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  3. Experimental decoherence in molecule interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackermueller, L.; Hornberger, K.; Stibor, A.; Zeilinger, A.; Arndt, M.; Kiesewetter, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We present three mechanisms of decoherence that occur quite naturally in matter wave interferometer with large molecules. One way molecules can lose coherence is through collision with background gas particles. We observe a loss of contrast with increasing background pressure for various types of gases. We can understand this phenomenon quantitatively with a new model for collisional decoherence which corrects older models by a factor of 2 π;. The second experiment studies the thermal emission of photons related to the high internal energy of the interfering molecules. When sufficiently many or sufficiently short photons are emitted inside the interferometer, the fringe contrast is lost. We can continuously vary the temperature of the molecules and compare the loss of contrast with a model based on decoherence theory. Again we find good quantitative agreement. A third mechanism that influences our interference pattern is dephasing due to vibrations of the interference gratings. By adding additional vibrations we study this effect in more detail. (author)

  4. Effect of genomic long-range correlations on DNA persistence length: from theory to single molecule experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukhtar, Julien; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Milani, Pascale; Audit, Benjamin; Vaillant, Cedric; Fontaine, Emeline; Mongelard, Fabien; Lavorel, Guillaume; St-Jean, Philippe; Bouvet, Philippe; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2010-04-22

    Sequence dependency of DNA intrinsic bending properties has been emphasized as a possible key ingredient to in vivo chromatin organization. We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) in air and liquid to image intrinsically straight (synthetic), uncorrelated (hepatitis C RNA virus) and persistent long-range correlated (human) DNA fragments in various ionic conditions such that the molecules freely equilibrate on the mica surface before being captured in a particular conformation. 2D thermodynamic equilibrium is experimentally verified by a detailed statistical analysis of the Gaussian nature of the DNA bend angle fluctuations. We show that the worm-like chain (WLC) model, commonly used to describe the average conformation of long semiflexible polymers, reproduces remarkably well the persistence length estimates for the first two molecules as consistently obtained from (i) mean square end-to-end distance measurement and (ii) mean projection of the end-to-end vector on the initial orientation. Whatever the operating conditions (air or liquid, concentration of metal cations Mg(2+) and/or Ni(2+)), the persistence length found for the uncorrelated viral DNA underestimates the value obtained for the straight DNA. We show that this systematic difference is the signature of the presence of an uncorrelated structural intrinsic disorder in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) DNA fragment that superimposes on local curvatures induced by thermal fluctuations and that only the entropic disorder depends upon experimental conditions. In contrast, the WLC model fails to describe the human DNA conformations. We use a mean-field extension of the WLC model to account for the presence of long-range correlations (LRC) in the intrinsic curvature disorder of human genomic DNA: the stronger the LRC, the smaller the persistence length. The comparison of AFM imaging of human DNA with LRC DNA simulations confirms that the rather small mean square end-to-end distance observed, particularly for G

  5. ESR of the triplet molecules CCO and CNN in rare-gas matrices; isotope and matrix effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.; Weltner, W. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    CCO and CNN, with isotopic substitution of 13 C, 18 O, and 15 N, were prepared by the reaction of C atoms with CO or N 2 and trapped in various matrices at 4 degreeK. ESR spectra of both 3 Σ molecules yielded hyperfine splittings, g values, and zero-field splittings. In solid neon, these parameters for C/sub alpha/C/sub beta/O, assuming g/sub parallel/=g/sube/, were g/sub perpendicular/=2.0029(4), D=0.7392(4) cm -1 , vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/(C/sub alpha/) vertical-bar = 57(3) MHz, vertical-barA/sub parallel/(C/sub alpha/) vertical-bar = 17(3) MHz, vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/(C/sub beta/) vertical-bar = 26(3) MHz, vertical-barA/sub parallel/(C/sub beta/) vertical-bar = 32(3) MHz. Similar but less extensive data were obtained for CN/sub alpha/N/sub beta/ where in solid neon, assuming g/sub parallel/ =g/sub perpendicular/=g/sube/, D = 1.1590(5) cm -1 , vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/( 14 N/sub alpha/) vertical-bar = 35(5), vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/( 14 N/sub beta/) vertical-bar = 19(5), and vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/( 13 C) vertical-bar = 50(5) MHz. D values for isotopic molecules 12 C 12 C 16 O, 13 C 12 C 18 O, etc., varied by small but significant amounts (up to about 0.001 cm -1 ) in Ne and in Ar matrices. These variations could be approximately accounted for by assuming torsional oscillation in the solid. This was supported by a temperature variation study. The observed decrease of D/sub gas/ = 0.772 cm -1 for C 2 O in matrices, particularly large in Kr and Xe, is attributed partially to motional averaging and partially to matrix perturbations of molecular electronic properties. Theory was applied to qualitatively account for the changes in spin--spin, D/sub SS/, and spin--orbit, D/sub SO/, contributions to the zfs of the molecule in the solids

  6. Photoluminescence of CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals expanded on silica glass substrates: Adsorption and desorption effects of polar molecules on nanocrystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masaru; Tsukamoto, Junpei; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Iwami, Noriya; Nishiura, Ken; Hagiwara, Izumi; Ando, Naohisa; Horiuchi, Hiromi; Tani, Toshiro

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated photoluminescence (PL) properties of CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals (NCs) in various kinds of gases at one atmospheric pressure. Increase of PL intensity with spectral shift is observed under 488 nm cw light irradiation in all cases. Especially, the PL intensity increases more than twice after 1200 s irradiation in nitrogen gases saturated with vapor of polar molecules, such as H 2 O and NH 3 . The increased PL intensity with the spectral shift mostly recovers to its previous values when the sample is evacuated under continuous light irradiation. These results indicate that photo-adsorption of the polar molecules onto NC surfaces provides some reversible restoring functions to the PL quenching defects or trap sites on or near the surfaces. The existence of the trap sites on NC surfaces is already widely introduced for describing e.g., blinking phenomena. Assuming part of these traps being charged, we propose the photo-induced effects can be understood as charge-compensated inactivation of the trap sites due to the adsorption of the polar molecules consistently

  7. Adsorption of a cationic dye molecule on polystyrene microspheres in colloids: effect of surface charge and composition probed by second harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrode, Heather M; Jen, Shih-Hui; Han, Jun; Yeh, An-Gong; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2005-03-17

    Nonlinear optical probe, second harmonic generation (SHG), of the adsorption of the dye molecule malachite green (MG), in cationic form at pH polystyrene microspheres in aqueous solution is used to study the effect of surface charge and composition on molecular adsorption. Three types of polystyrene microspheres with different surface composition are investigated: (1) a sulfate terminated, anionic surface, (2) a neutral surface without any functional group termination, and (3) an amine terminated, cationic surface. The cationic dye was found to adsorb at all three surfaces, regardless of surface charge. The adsorption free energies, DeltaG's, measured for the three surfaces are -12.67, -12.39, and -10.46 kcal/mol, respectively, with the trend as expected from the charge interactions. The adsorption density on the anionic surface, where attractive charge-charge interaction dominates, is determined by the surface negative charge density. The adsorption densities on the neutral and cationic surfaces are on the other hand higher, perhaps as a result of a balance between minimizing repulsive charge interaction and maximizing attractive molecule-substrate and intermolecular interactions. The relative strength of the SH intensity per molecule, in combination of a model calculation, reveals that the C(2) axis of the MG molecule is nearly perpendicular to the surface on the anionic surface and tilts away from the surface norm when the surface is neutral and further away when cationic. Changing the pH of the solution may alter the surface charge and subsequently affect the adsorption configuration and SH intensity.

  8. Muonic molecular formation under laser irradiation and in the clustered ion molecule (The effect of protonium additive on the muon catalyzed fusion cycle)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    The formation rate of the dtμ molecule is very sensitive to the differences in the vibrational rotational level between D 2 and [(dtμ)-d-2e/] molecules. The density effect of the normalized reaction rate has been studied by the resonance broadening due to collisional quenching. The surrounding molecules of the molecule forming dt/mu/ act as the third body which takes out the excess energy forming dt/mu/ from t/mu/, and the formation reaction occurs with the excitation of the vibrational state just below the threshold energy. By using the laser as the third body, the rate of resonance formation can be increased. In my last paper, the formation rate was calculated under high-intensity laser irradiation, using Vinitsky's model assuming that the laser interacts directly with the deuteron and modulates the interaction between t/mu/ and d/sub 2/ nuclei. However, the laser interacts more strongly with the electrons, because the interaction energy of the laser and the charged particle is proportional to the velocity of the particle's motion, and the velocity of the electron is a few thousand times greater than the velocity of the nuclei. This interaction with electrons was neglected in my last paper. In the present paper, the enhancement of the dt/mu/ formation rates by the strong laser irradiation is studied, taking into account the laser electron interaction; It was shown that the enhancement can be achieved by an intensity lower than the one described previously. 29 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin–cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)–cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. - Highlights: • Diabetic rats are more susceptible to cadmium nephrotoxicity. • Cadmium plays as a cumulative

  10. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin–cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan, E-mail: npashokkumar1@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)–cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. - Highlights: • Diabetic rats are more susceptible to cadmium nephrotoxicity. • Cadmium plays as a cumulative

  11. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin-cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)-cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of organic small-molecule hole injection materials on the performance of inverted organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zheng, Yifan; Zheng, Ding; Yu, Junsheng

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the influence of small-molecule organic hole injection materials on the performance of organic solar cells (OSCs) as the hole transport layer (HTL) with an architecture of ITO/ZnO/P3HT:PC71BM/HTL/Ag has been investigated. A significant enhancement on the performance of OSCs from 1.06% to 2.63% is obtained by using N, N‧-bis(1-naphthalenyl)-N, N‧-bis-phenyl-(1, 1‧-biphenyl)-4, 4‧-diamine (NPB) HTL. Through the resistance simulation and space-charge limited current analysis, we found that NPB HTL cannot merely improve the hole mobility of the device but also form the Ohmic contact between the active layer and anode. Besides, when we apply mix HTL by depositing the NPB on the surface of molybdenum oxide, the power conversion efficiency of OSC are able to be further improved to 2.96%.

  13. Nondipole effects in the angular distribution of photoelectrons from the C K shell of the CO molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, K.; Teramoto, T.; Adachi, J.; Yagishita, A.; Golovin, A. V.; Takahashi, M.; Watanabe, N.; Jahnke, T.; Weber, Th.; Schoeffler, M.; Schmidt, L.; Jagutzki, O.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R.; Osipov, T.; Prior, M. H.; Landers, A. L.; Semenov, S. K.; Cherepkov, N. A.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of a contribution of the nondipole terms in the angular distribution of photoelectrons from the C K shell of randomly oriented CO molecules are reported. In two sets of measurements, the angular distribution in the plane containing the photon polarization and the photon momentum vectors of linearly polarized radiation and the full three-dimensional photoelectron momentum distribution after absorption of circularly polarized light have been measured. Calculations have been performed in the relaxed core Hartree-Fock approximation with a fractional charge. Both theory and experiment show that the nondipole terms are very small in the photon energy region from the ionization threshold of the K shell up to about 70 eV above it

  14. The effect of metabolic regulation on microvascular permeability to small and large molecules in short-term juvenile diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Noer, Ivan; Deckert, Toke

    1976-01-01

    injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin; GFR was measured on the forearm by straingauge plethysmography and CDS for 51Cr-EDTA clearance; CFC was measured on the forearm by straingauge plethysmography and CDC, for 51Cr-EDTA was determined in the jyperaemic anterio tibial muscle by the local clearance......The microvascular permeability to small and large molecules was studied during good and poor metabolic regulation in ten short duration juvenile diabetics. The following variables were measured; daily urinary albumin and beta2-microglobulin-excretion rates, whole body transcapillary escape rate...... of albumin (TER), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), capillary filtration coefficient (CFC), and capillary diffusion capacity (CDC). The urinary albumin and beta2-microglobulin concentration were measured by sensitive radioimmunoassays; TER was detemined from the initial disappearance of intravenously...

  15. Multiorbital effects in strong-field ionization and dissociation of aligned polar molecules CH3I and CH3Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sizuo; Zhou, Shushan; Hu, Wenhui; Li, Xiaokai; Ma, Pan; Yu, Jiaqi; Zhu, Ruihan; Wang, Chuncheng; Liu, Fuchun; Yan, Bing; Liu, Aihua; Yang, Yujun; Guo, Fuming; Ding, Dajun

    2017-12-01

    Controlling the molecular axis offers additional ways to study molecular ionization and dissociation in strong laser fields. We measure the ionization and dissociation yields of aligned polar CH3X (X =I , Br) molecules in a linearly polarized femtosecond laser field. The current data show that maximum ionization occurs when the laser polarization is perpendicular to the molecular C -X axis, and dissociation prefers to occur at the laser polarization parallel to the C -X axis. The observed angular distributions suggest that the parent ions are generated by ionization from the HOMO. The angular distribution of fragment ions indicates that dissociation occurs mainly from an ionic excited state produced by ionization from the HOMO-1.

  16. Surface-supported Ag islands stabilized by a quantum size effect: Their interaction with small molecules relevant to ethylene epoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Dahai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    This dissertation focuses on how QSE-stabilized, surface-supported Ag nanoclusters will interact with ethylene or oxygen. Experiments are performed to determine whether the QSE-mediated Ag islands react differently toward adsorption of ethylene or oxygen, or whether the adsorption of these small molecules will affect the QSE-mediated stability of Ag islands. Studies of the interaction of oxygen with Ag/Si(111)-7×7 were previously reported, but these studies were performed at a low Ag coverage where 3D Ag islands were not formed. So the study of such a system at a higher Ag coverage will be a subject of this work. The interaction of ethylene with Ag/Si(111)-7×7, as well as the interaction of oxygen with Ag/NiAl(110) are also important parts of this study.

  17. Effect of methylprednisolone on the oxidative burst activity, adhesion molecules and clinical outcome following open heart surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Christiansen, K; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine

    1997-01-01

    Following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), activated granulocytes may be involved with ischaemia/ reperfusion injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether steroids could reduce the oxidative burst activity of granulocytes, the expression of adhesion molecules...... on granulocytes and improve clinical outcome. Sixteen patients undergoing open heart surgery participated in the study. Eight were randomized to receive methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg intravenously) at the start of anaesthesia while eight patients served as a control group. The oxidative burst was measured flow...... not improve the weaning from the ventilator or reduce the stay in the intensive-care unit. In conclusion, treatment with steroids prevented hyperthermia following open heart surgery with CPB and reduced capillary leak during ECC. Methylprednisolone, however, did not reduce the oxidative burst activity...

  18. Effect of α variation on a prospective experiment to detect variation of me/mp in diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloy, K.; Borschevsky, A.; Schwerdtfeger, P.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the influence of variation in the fine structure constant α on a promising experiment proposed by DeMille et al. to search for variation in the electron-to-proton mass ratio μ using diatomic molecules [DeMille et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 043202 (2008)]. The proposed experiment involves spectroscopically probing the splitting between two nearly degenerate vibrational levels supported by different electronic potentials. Here we demonstrate that this splitting may be equally or more sensitive to variation in α as to variation in μ. For the anticipated experimental precision, this implies that the α variation may not be negligible, as previously assumed, and further suggests that the method could serve as a competitive means to search for α variation as well.

  19. Trapping molecules in two and three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkse, PW.H.; Junglen, T.; Rieger, T.; Rangwala, S.A.; Windpassinger, P.; Rempe, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Cold molecules offer a new testing ground for quantum-physical effects in nature. For example, producing slow beams of large molecules could push experiments studying the boundary between quantum interference and classical particles up towards ever heavier particles. Moreover, cold molecules, in particular YbF, seem an attractive way to narrow down the constraints on the value of the electron dipole moment and finally, quantum information processing using chains of cold polar molecules or vibrational states in molecules have been proposed. All these proposals rely on advanced production and trapping techniques, most of which are still under development. Therefore, novel production and trapping techniques for cold molecules could offer new possibilities not found in previous methods. Electric traps hold promise for deep trap potentials for neutral molecules. Recently we have demonstrated two-dimensional trapping of polar molecules in a four-wire guide using electrostatic and electrodynamic trapping techniques. Filled from a thermal effusive source, such a guide will deliver a beam of slow molecules, which is an ideal source for interferometry experiments with large molecules, for instance. Here we report about the extension of this work to three-dimensional trapping. Polar molecules with a positive Stark shift can be trapped in the minimum of an electrostatic field. We have successfully tested a large volume electrostatic trap for ND3 molecules. A special feature of this trap is that it can be loaded continuously from an electrostatic guide, at a temperature of a few hundred mK. (author)

  20. The effect of micro-environment on luminescence of aequorin: the role of amino acids and explicit water molecules on spectroscopic properties of coelenteramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuo-Sheng; Zou, Lu-Yi; Min, Chun-Gang; Ren, Ai-Min

    2013-10-05

    Despite the fact that the luminescence reaction mechanism of aequorin has been intensively investigated, details in luminescence such as the effect of important amino acids residues and explicit water molecules on spectroscopic properties of coelenteramide remain unclear. In this work, the effect of amino acids residues His16, Tyr82, Trp86, Phe113, Trp129, Tyr132, explicit water molecules Wat505 and Wat405 on the spectral properties of CLM(-) has been studied by CAM-B3LYP, TD M06L and TD CAM-B3LYP methods in hydrophobic environment and aqueous solution. In hydrophobic environment, the amino acids or water molecules have no significant effect on the absorption. Tyr82 and Trp86 move close to CLM(-) changes the hydrogen bond network, and thus, the spectral properties is significantly affected by the hydrogen bonds between His16H(+)+Tyr82+Trp86 and CLM(-). Tyr82, Trp86 hydrogen bonding to CLM(-) upshifts the excited energy and helps emission spectra shift to blue region. Therefore, it is concluded that His16H(+)+Tyr82+Trp86 modify the emission spectra. The molecular electrostatic potential indicated that the greater electron density is located at the oxygen atom of 6-p-hydroxyphenyl group of CLM(-), and it facilitates the formation of hydrogen bond with His16H(+)+Tyr82+Trp86. It is a critical condition for the modification of emission spectra. It is expected to help to understand the interactions between emitter and amino acids in the micro environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effective charge model in the theory of infrared intensities and its application for study of charge di.stribution in the molecules of organometallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksanyan, V.T.; Samvelyan, S.Kh.

    1984-01-01

    General principles of plotting the parametric theory of IR spectrum intensities of polyatomic molecules are outlined. The development of the effective charges model in this theory is considered and the mathematical formalism of the first approximation of the method of effective atom charges is described in detail. The results of calculations of charges distribution in the Mo(CO) 6 , W(CO) 6 , Cp 2 V, Cp 2 Ru and others (Cp-cyclopentadiene), performed in the frame work of the outlined scheme are presented. It is shown that in the investigated carbonyles the effective charge on oxygen and metal atoms is negative, on carbon atom - positive. In dicyclopentavienyl complexes the effective charge on the metal atom is positive and is not over 0.6e; charge values on hydrogen and carbon atoms do not exceed, 0.10-0.15e. The notions of ''electrovalence'' of coordination bond and charge distribution in the case of metallocenes are not correlated

  2. Photoluminescence behaviors of single CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals: Adsorption effects of water molecules onto nanocrystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masaru; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Iwami, Noriya; Nishiura, Ken; Ando, Naohisa; Nishiyama, Akira; Horiuchi, Hiromi; Tani, Toshiro

    2007-01-01

    We report here the distinctive modifications of photoluminescence (PL) behaviors in single CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals depending on their environments. Long-time traces of PL intensity from single nanocrystals have been obtained in both vacuum and a wet nitrogen atmosphere. While all of the nanocrystals in both environments exhibit PL blinking behaviors, i.e. on-off intermittency of PL intensity, as usual, some of the nanocrystals in the wet nitrogen atmosphere show significant increase in duration time of on-events. As for the duration time of blinking off-events, it is for the moment associated with the occasional events of carrier capturing at trap sites on or near the nanocrystal surfaces. We propose a model in which adsorbed water molecules at the trap sites on the nanocrystal surfaces transform them under light irradiation, which eventually decreases the occurrence of the trapping events due to their inactivation. It in turn increases the PL on-times. In addition to the drastic modification of the blinking profile, we also found that in the PL time traces some kinds of undulated behaviors, i.e. continuous and rather low frequency fluctuation of PL intensity, appear during each on-event in vacuum while they disappear totally in the wet nitrogen atmosphere. These results are also described on the basis of the inactivation model of the trap sites introduced above

  3. Theoretical study of quantum molecular reaction dynamics and of the effects of intense laser radiation on a diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardi, P.S.

    1984-11-01

    Within the very broad field of molecular dynamics, we have concentrated on two simple yet important systems. The systems are simple enough so that they are adequately described with a single Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface and that the dynamics can be calculated accurately. They are important because they give insight into solving more complicated systems. First we discuss H + H 2 reactive scattering. We present an exact formalism for atom-diatom reactive scattering which avoids the problem of finding a coordinate system appropriate for both reactants and products. We present computational results for collinear H + H 2 reactive scattering which agree very well with previous calculations. We also present a coupled channel distorted wave Born approximation for atom-diatom reactive scattering which we show is a first order approximation to our exact formalism. We present coupled channel DWBA results for three dimensional H + H 2 reactive scattering. The second system is an isolated HF molecule in an intense laser field. Using classical trajectories and quantum dynamics, we look at energy absorbed and transition probabilities as a function of the laser pulse time and also averaged over the pulse time. Calculations are performed for both rotating and nonrotating HF. We examine one and two photon absorption about the fundamental frequency, multiphoton absorption, and overtone absorption. 127 references, 31 figures, 12 tables

  4. Theoretical study of quantum molecular reaction dynamics and of the effects of intense laser radiation on a diatomic molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dardi, P.S.

    1984-11-01

    Within the very broad field of molecular dynamics, we have concentrated on two simple yet important systems. The systems are simple enough so that they are adequately described with a single Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface and that the dynamics can be calculated accurately. They are important because they give insight into solving more complicated systems. First we discuss H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. We present an exact formalism for atom-diatom reactive scattering which avoids the problem of finding a coordinate system appropriate for both reactants and products. We present computational results for collinear H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering which agree very well with previous calculations. We also present a coupled channel distorted wave Born approximation for atom-diatom reactive scattering which we show is a first order approximation to our exact formalism. We present coupled channel DWBA results for three dimensional H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. The second system is an isolated HF molecule in an intense laser field. Using classical trajectories and quantum dynamics, we look at energy absorbed and transition probabilities as a function of the laser pulse time and also averaged over the pulse time. Calculations are performed for both rotating and nonrotating HF. We examine one and two photon absorption about the fundamental frequency, multiphoton absorption, and overtone absorption. 127 references, 31 figures, 12 tables.

  5. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  6. Effects of cyclopentane on CO2 hydrate formation and dissociation as a co-guest molecule for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jia-nan; Yang, Ming-jun; Liu, Yu; Wang, Da-yong; Song, Yong-chen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CP decreases CO 2 hydrate phase equilibrium pressure by forming CO 2 -CP hydrates. • The increase of CP can’t decrease hydrates phase equilibrium pressure unlimitedly. • Higher CP concentration lowers CO 2 hydrate gas uptake. • The optimal CP molar ratio is 0.01 based on hydrate phase equilibrium and gas uptake. - Abstract: Cyclopentane (CP) is considered to be a potential co-guest molecule in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) hydrate-based desalination. The experimental thermodynamic data of CO 2 -CP hydrates were measured for a salt solution, where CP was chosen as a hydrate promoter. Seven experimental cases (62 cycles) were studied with different molar ratios of CP/water (0, 0.0025, 0.005, 0.0075, 0.01, 0.02, and 0.03). Hydrate phase equilibrium data were generated using an isochoric method, and the hydrate saturations were calculated based on gas uptake. The results indicated that the increase in CP concentration significantly decreased the CO 2 hydrate equilibrium pressure to a certain limit; the hydrate saturation also decreased during this process. Also, it was determined that CP encouraged the formation of s-II double CO 2 -CP hydrates, which are different from s-I simple CO 2 hydrate. The CO 2 -CP guest provides a strengthened stability and moderate hydrate phase equilibrium conditions for hydrate-based desalination. The recommended optimal molar ratio of CP is 0.01 when the increase in equilibrium was more than 10 K, and the decrease in hydrate saturation was less than 2%.

  7. The effect of polymer size and charge of molecules on permeation through synovial membrane and accumulation in hyaline articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, B; Harms, M; Wöll, S; Weigandt, M; Windbergs, M; Lehr, C M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of joint related diseases often involves direct intra-articular injections. For rational development of novel delivery systems with extended residence time in the joint, detailed understanding of transport and retention phenomena within the joint is mandatory. This work presents a systematic study on the in vitro permeation, penetration and accumulation of model polymers with differing charges and molecular weights in bovine joint tissue. Permeation experiments with bovine synovial membrane were performed with PEG polymers (6-200 kDa) and methylene blue in customized diffusion chambers. For polyethylene glycol, 2-fold (PEG 6 kDa), 3-fold (PEG 10 kDa) and 13-fold (PEG 35 kDa) retention by the synovial membrane in reference to the small molecule methylene blue was demonstrated. No PEG 200 kDa was found in the acceptor in detectable amounts after 48 h. This showed the potential for a distinct extension of joint residence times by increasing molecular weights. In addition, experiments with bovine cartilage tissue were conducted. The ability for positively charged, high molecular weight chitosans and HEMA-Co-TMAP (HCT) polymers (up to 233 kDa) to distribute throughout the entire cartilage matrix was demonstrated. In contrast, a distribution into cartilage was not observed for neutral PEG polymers (6-200 kDa). Furthermore, the positive charge density of different compounds (chitosan, HEMA-Co-TMAP, methylene blue, MSC C1 (neutral NCE) and MSC D1 (positively charged NCE) was found to correlate with their accumulation in bovine cartilage tissue. In summary, the results offer pre-clinical in vitro data, indicating that the modification of molecular size and charge of a substance has the potential to decelerate its clearance through the synovial membrane and to promote accumulation inside the cartilage matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effect of Altering the Mechanical Loading Environment on the Expression of Bone Regenerating Molecules in Cases of Distraction Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M Alzahrani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis (DO is a surgical technique where gradual and controlled separation of two bony fragments following an osteotomy leads to the induction of new bone formation in the distracted gap. DO is used for limb lengthening, correction of bony deformities and the replacement of bone loss secondary to infection, trauma and tumors. Although DO gives satisfactory results in most cases, one major drawback of this technique is the prolonged period of time the external fixator has to be kept on until the newly formed bone consolidates thus leading to numerous complications. Numerous attempts at accelerating bone formation during DO have been reported. One specific approach is manipulation of the mechanical environment during DO by applying changes in the standard protocol of distraction. Attempts at changing this mechanical environment led to mixed results. Increasing the rate or applying acute distraction, led to poor bone formation in the distracted zone. On the other hand, the addition of compressive forces (such as weight bearing, alternating distraction with compression or by over-lengthening and then shortening has been reported to increase bone formation. It still remains unclear why these alterations may lead to changes in bone formation. While the cellular and molecular changes occurring during the standard DO protocol, specifically increased expression of transforming growth factor-β1, platelet derived growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and bone morphogenic proteins have been extensively investigated, the literature is sparse on the changes occurring when this protocol is altered. It is the purpose of this article to review the pertinent literature on the changes in the expression of various proteins and molecules as a result of changes in the mechanical loading technique in DO and try to define potential future research directions.

  9. Effect of preoperative oral S-1 combined with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy on malignant molecule expression in locally advanced unresectable gastric cancer tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of preoperative oral S-1 combined with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy on malignant molecule expression in locally advanced unresectable gastric cancer tissue. Methods: A total of 144 patients with locally advanced gastric cancer receiving surgical resection after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our hospital between May 2012 and August 2015 were selected and randomly divided into experimental group who received preoperative oral S-1 combined with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy and control group who received preoperative intravenous systemic chemotherapy. The levels of serum tumor markers were determined after chemotherapy, and the expression levels of tumor suppressor genes and cell cycle-related molecules in tumor tissue were determined after surgical resection. Results: After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the serum G-17, TK-1, CEA, CA19-9, CA12-5, CA72-4 and CK, CK-MB, ALT, AST levels of experimental group were significantly lower than those of control group; after surgical resection, the p16, p27, PTEN and TXNIP mRNA levels in tumor tissue of experimental group were significantly higher than those of control group while CyclinB2, CyclinD1, CyclinE, CDK1 and CDK2 mRNA levels were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusions: Preoperative oral S-1 combined with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy can more effectively kill gastric cancer cells, reduce tumor load, inhibit cell cycle and promote cell apoptosis.

  10. Effect of physisorbed molecules and an external external fields on the metallic Shockley surface state of Cu(111): A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Kristian; Einstein, T. L.; Hyldgaard, Per

    2012-02-01

    To manipulate the Cu(111) partially-filled Shockley surface state, we study its response to an external fieldootnotetextKB, TLE, PH; arXiv 1109:6706 E and physisorbed PAHs and quinone molecules. We use density-functional theory calculations with periodic-boundary conditions. The van der Waals density functional version vdW-DF2 accounts for the molecular adsorption. The issue that the Kohn-Sham wave functions couple to both sides of the Cu slab is handled with a decoupling scheme based on a rotation in Hilbert space. A convergence study reveals that to obtain a proper Shockley surface state, 6 Cu layers is sufficient, while 15 is optimal. We use 6 layers for the response to the molecules and 15 to external field. We find that the surface state displays isotropic dispersion (up to order k^6), free-electron like until the Fermi wave vector but with a significant quartic component beyond. The shift in band minimum and effective mass depend linearly on E, with a smaller fractional change in the latter. Charge transfer occurs beyond the outermost copper atoms, and most of the screening is due to bulk electrons. We find that the molecular physisorption increases the band minimum, with the effect the of a quinone being much stronger than the corresponding PAH.

  11. Density functional theory study of silodithiophene thiophenepyrrolopyrroledion-based small molecules: The effect of alkyl side chain length in electron donor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong Kyun; Yeo, Hak; Kwak, Kyung Won [Dept. of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Woon; Kim, Bong Soo [Photo-electronic Hybrids Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Koo [Dept. of Chemistry, Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Push–pull small molecules are promising electron-donor materials for organic solar cells. Thus, precise prediction of their electronic structures is of paramount importance to control the optical and electrical properties of the solar cells. Various types of alkyl chains are usually introduced to increase solubility and modify the morphology of the resulting molecular films. Here, using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT), we report the precise effect of increasing the length of the alkyl chain on the electronic structure of an electron donor molecule 6,60-((4,4-dialkyl-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]-dithiophene-2,6-diyl) bis(thiophene-5,2-diyl))bis(2,5-alkyl-3-(thiophen-2-yl) -2,5-dihydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione) (DTS1TDPP). Alkyl groups were attached to the bridging position (silicon atom) of the fused rings and nitrogen atom of the pyrrolopyrroledione groups. We demonstrate that the alkyl groups do not perturb the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels, π-delocalized backbone structure, and UV–Vis absorption spectrum when they are placed at the least steric effect positions.

  12. The effect of water molecules on the thiol collector interaction on the galena (PbS) and sphalerite (ZnS) surfaces: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Xianhao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Chen, Ye, E-mail: fby18@126.com [College of Resources and Metallurgy, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Chen, Jianhua, E-mail: jhchen@gxu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); College of Resources and Metallurgy, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Xu, Zhenghe; Liu, Qingxia [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4 (Canada); Du, Zheng [National Supercomputing Center in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Water adsorption has a greater effect on the electron distribution of ZnS surface than PbS surface. • Water adsorption decreases the reactivity of ZnS surface atoms but improves that of PbS. • Thiol collectors cannot interact with the hydrated ZnS surface. • The hydration has little influence on the interaction of thiol collectors with PbS surface. - Abstracts: In froth flotation the molecular interaction between reagents and mineral surfaces take place at the solid liquid interface. In this paper, the effect of water molecule on the three typical thiol collectors (xanthate, dithiocarbomate and dithiophosphate) interactions at the galena (PbS) and sphalerite (ZnS) surfaces has been studied adopting density functional theory (DFT). The results suggests that the presence of water molecule shows a greater influence on the electron distribution of ZnS surface than PbS surface, and reduce the reactivity of ZnS surface atoms but improves the reactivity of PbS surface atoms during the reaction with xanthate. Water adsorption could also reduce the covalent binding between Zn and S atoms but have little influence on Pb-S bond. In the presence of water, xanthate, dithiocarbomate (DTC) and dithiophosphate (DTP) could not adsorb on the sphalerite surface. And for galena (PbS) surface, the interaction of DTP is the strongest, then the DTC and the interaction of xanthate is the weakest. These results agree well with the flotation practice.

  13. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  14. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  15. Studying neuroprotective effect of Atorvastatin as a small molecule drug on high glucose-induced neurotoxicity in undifferentiated PC12 cells: role of NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayegan, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation has been considered the essential mechanism induced by hyperglycemia in various tissues. However, there is no comprehensive study on the role of NOXs in high glucose (HG)-induced toxic effect in neural tissues. Recently, a therapeutic strategy in oxidative related pathologies has been introduced by blocking the undesirable actions of NOX enzymes by small molecules. The protective roles of Statins in ameliorating oxidative stress by NOX inhibition have been shown in some tissues except neural. We hypothesized then, that different NOXs may have role in HG-induced neural cell injury. Furthermore, we postulate that Atorvastatin as a small molecule may modulate this NOXs activity to protect neural cells. Undifferentiated PC12 cells were treated with HG (140 mM/24 h) in the presence and absence of Atorvastatin (1 μM/96 h). The cell viability was measured by MTT assay and the gene and protein expressions profile of NOX (1-4) were determined by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Levels of ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also evaluated. Gene and protein expression levels of NOX (1-4) and consequently ROS and MDA levels were elevated in HG-treated PC12 cells. Atorvastatin could significantly decrease HG-induced NOXs, ROS and MDA elevation and improve impaired cell viability. It can be concluded that HG could elevate NOXs activity, ROS and MDA levels in neural tissues and Atorvastatin as a small molecule NOX inhibitor drug may prevent and delay diabetic complications, particularly neuropathy.

  16. Density functional theory study the effects of oxygen-containing functional groups on oxygen molecules and oxygen atoms adsorbed on carbonaceous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xuejun; Song, Wenwu; Shi, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to study the effects of different types of oxygen-containing functional groups on the adsorption of oxygen molecules and single active oxygen atoms on carbonaceous materials. During gasification or combustion reactions of carbonaceous materials, oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl(-OH), carbonyl(-CO), quinone(-O), and carboxyl(-COOH) are often present on the edge of graphite and can affect graphite's chemical properties. When oxygen-containing functional groups appear on a graphite surface, the oxygen molecules are strongly adsorbed onto the surface to form a four-member ring structure. At the same time, the O-O bond is greatly weakened and easily broken. The adsorption energy value indicates that the adsorption of oxygen molecules changes from physisorption to chemisorption for oxygen-containing functional groups on the edge of a graphite surface. In addition, our results indicate that the adsorption energy depends on the type of oxygen-containing functional group. When a single active oxygen atom is adsorbed on the bridge site of graphite, it gives rise to a stable epoxy structure. Epoxy can cause deformation of the graphite lattice due to the transition of graphite from sp2 to sp3 after the addition of an oxygen atom. For quinone group on the edge of graphite, oxygen atoms react with carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. Similarly, the single active oxygen atoms of carbonyl groups can interact with edge carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. The results show that oxygen-containing functional groups on graphite surfaces enhance the activity of graphite, which promotes adsorption on the graphite surface.

  17. Effect of hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia on serum pain mediators and placental hypoxia molecules after cesarean section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hui Yuan; Jian-Guo Xia; Xiao-Yang Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia on serum pain mediators and placental hypoxia molecules after cesarean section.Methods: 126 women accepting cesarean section in our hospital between May 2013 and December 2015 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into two groups, observation group of subjects received hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and control group of subjects accepted bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. 1, 3 and 5 d after delivery, serum was collected to determine the levels of pain mediators; the placenta tissue was collected to detect the levels of oxidative stress molecules and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecules.Results: 1, 3 and 5 d after delivery, serum substance P (SP),β-endorphin (β-EP), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), nitric oxide (NO) and norepinephrine (NE) levels of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group whileβ-EP levels were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05); reactive oxide species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), GRP78, ERdj1, CHOP and ASK1 levels in placenta tissue of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and vitamin C (VitC) levels were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05).Conclusions: Hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia can adjust the pain mediator secretion, relieve postoperative pain and inhibit oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  18. Effect of hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia on serum pain mediators and placental hypoxia molecules after cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hui Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia on serum pain mediators and placental hypoxia molecules after cesarean section. Methods: 126 women accepting cesarean section in our hospital between May 2013 and December 2015 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into two groups, observation group of subjects received hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and control group of subjects accepted bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. 1, 3 and 5 d after delivery, serum was collected to determine the levels of pain mediators; the placenta tissue was collected to detect the levels of oxidative stress molecules and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecules. Results: 1, 3 and 5 d after delivery, serum substance P (SP, β-endorphin (β-EP, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, nitric oxide (NO and norepinephrine (NE levels of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while β-EP levels were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05; reactive oxide species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, GRP78, ERdj1, CHOP and ASK1 levels in placenta tissue of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while glutathione peroxidase (GPx, catalase (CAT and vitamin C (VitC levels were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with bupivacaine combined spinal-epidural anesthesia can adjust the pain mediator secretion, relieve postoperative pain and inhibit oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  19. Wavelength and coherence effects on the growth mechanism of silicon nanopillars and their use in the modification of spontaneous lifetime emission of BODIPY dye molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acikgoz, Sabriye [Bogazici University, Department of Physics, Istanbul (Turkey); Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Karaman (Turkey); Bilen, Bukem; Saygili, Asli C.; Aktas, Gulen; Inci, Mehmet Naci [Bogazici University, Department of Physics, Istanbul (Turkey); Sanyal, Amitav [Bogazici University, Department of Chemistry, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Silicon nanopillars are grown by an electrochemical anodization of p-type silicon wafers at low current densities in a hydrofluoric acid solution. CW, white light, and various UV pulsed lasers are employed as illumination sources in sample preparation to study wavelength and coherence effects on the growth mechanism of the nanopillars. Coherence is observed to be the foundation of regularity in obtaining conical shapes. The pillar size is found to be almost linearly proportional to the employed illumination wavelength during their growth. BODIPY dye molecules are chemically attached to these silicon nanopillars and the radiative decay rates are investigated by means of a time-resolved fluorescence experiment. The decay rate of the dye molecules embedded in the vicinity of various size pillar tips is significantly affected due to different apex angles of the conical nature. It is demonstrated that the pillar size and the separation between pillars can be adjusted if one uses a coherent light source with an appropriate wavelength during the course of fabrication process. Since change in the decay rate is due to tips of the pillars only, separation of a few micrometers between pillar tips allows one to directly monitor a dye, which is embedded to the tip of a single nanopillar, via a confocal microscopic method for the spontaneous lifetime measurements, without having needed to any extra efforts for an in situ imaging process. It is observed that as the pillar size gets smaller, the inhibition in the spontaneous lifetime of BODIPY is more pronounced. In addition, a more regular pillar structure yields nonvarying decay rates of the dye molecules throughout the silicon sample. (orig.)

  20. Promoting effect of small molecules in cardiomyogenic and neurogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanabdali R

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ramin Khanabdali,1 Anbarieh Saadat,1 Maizatul Fazilah,1 Khairul Fidaa’ Khairul Bazli,1 Rida-e-Maria Qazi,2 Ramla Sana Khalid,2 Durriyyah Sharifah Hasan Adli,1 Soheil Zorofchian Moghadamtousi,1 Nadia Naeem,2 Irfan Khan,2 Asmat Salim,2 ShamsulAzlin Ahmad Shamsuddin,1 Gokula Mohan1 1Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Dr Panjwani Center for Molecular Medicine and Drug Research, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan Abstract: Small molecules, growth factors, and cytokines have been used to induce differentiation of stem cells into different lineages. Similarly, demethylating agents can trigger differentiation in adult stem cells. Here, we investigated the in vitro differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs into cardiomyocytes by a demethylating agent, zebularine, as well as neuronal-like cells by β-mercaptoethanol in a growth factor or cytokines-free media. Isolated bone marrow-derived MSCs cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology. These cells expressed positive markers for CD29, CD44, and CD117 and were negative for CD34 and CD45. After treatment with 1 µM zebularine for 24 hours, the MSCs formed myotube-like structures after 10 days in culture. Expression of cardiac-specific genes showed that treated MSCs expressed significantly higher levels of cardiac troponin-T, Nkx2.5, and GATA-4 compared with untreated cells. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that differentiated cells also expressed cardiac proteins, GATA-4, Nkx 2.5, and cardiac troponin-T. For neuronal differentiation, MSCs were treated with 1 and 10 mM β-mercaptoethanol overnight for 3 hours in complete and serum-free Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium, respectively. Following overnight treatment, neuron-like cells with axonal and dendritic-like projections originating from the

  1. Accurate dipole moment curve and non-adiabatic effects on the high resolution spectroscopic properties of the LiH molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Leonardo G.; Kirnosov, Nikita; Alijah, Alexander; Mohallem, José R.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-04-01

    A very accurate dipole moment curve (DMC) for the ground X1Σ+ electronic state of the 7LiH molecule is reported. It is calculated with the use of all-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian functions with shifted centers. The DMC - the most accurate to our knowledge - and the corresponding highly accurate potential energy curve are used to calculate the transition energies, the transition dipole moments, and the Einstein coefficients for the rovibrational transitions with ΔJ = - 1 and Δv ⩽ 5 . The importance of the non-adiabatic effects in determining these properties is evaluated using the model of a vibrational R-dependent effective reduced mass in the rovibrational calculations introduced earlier (Diniz et al., 2015). The results of the present calculations are used to assess the quality of the two complete linelists of 7LiH available in the literature.

  2. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  3. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  4. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Single molecule conductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis represents an excursion into the world of molecular electronics, i.e. the field of research trying to use individual (organic) molecules as electronic components; in this work various experimental methods have been explored to connect individual molecules to metallic contacts and

  6. Interactions between protein molecules and the virus removal membrane surface: Effects of immunoglobulin G adsorption and conformational changes on filter performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Ryo; Ito, Hidemi; Hirohara, Makoto; Chang, Ryongsok; Hongo-Hirasaki, Tomoko; Hayashi, Tomohiro

    2018-03-01

    Membrane fouling commonly occurs in all filter types during virus filtration in protein-based biopharmaceutical manufacturing. Mechanisms of decline in virus filter performance due to membrane fouling were investigated using a cellulose-based virus filter as a model membrane. Filter performance was critically dependent on solution conditions; specifically, ionic strength. To understand the interaction between immunoglobulin G (IgG) and cellulose, sensors coated with cellulose were fabricated for surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation measurements. The primary cause of flux decline appeared to be irreversible IgG adsorption on the surface of the virus filter membrane. In particular, post-adsorption conformational changes in the IgG molecules promoted further irreversible IgG adsorption, a finding that could not be adequately explained by DLVO theory. Analyses of adsorption and desorption and conformational changes in IgG molecules on cellulose surfaces mimicking cellulose-based virus removal membranes provide an effective approach for identifying ways of optimizing solution conditions to maximize virus filter performance. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 34:379-386, 2018. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. Effect of cationic molecules on the oxygen reduction reaction on fuel cell grade Pt/C (20 wt%) catalyst in potassium hydroxide (aq, 1 mol dm(-3)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ai Lien; Inglis, Kenneth K; Whelligan, Daniel K; Murphy, Sam; Varcoe, John R

    2015-05-14

    This study investigates the effect of 1 mmol dm(-3) concentrations of a selection of small cationic molecules on the performance of a fuel cell grade oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst (Johnson Matthey HiSPEC 3000, 20 mass% Pt/C) in aqueous KOH (1 mol dm(-3)). The cationic molecules studied include quaternary ammonium (including those based on bicyclic systems) and imidazolium types as well as a phosphonium example: these serve as fully solubilised models for the commonly encountered head-groups in alkaline anion-exchange membranes (AAEM) and anion-exchange ionomers (AEI) that are being developed for application in alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells (APEFCs), batteries and electrolysers. Both cyclic and hydrodynamic linear sweep rotating disk electrode voltammetry techniques were used. The resulting voltammograms and subsequently derived data (e.g. apparent electrochemical active surface areas, Tafel plots, and number of [reduction] electrons transferred per O2) were compared. The results show that the imidazolium examples produced the highest level of interference towards the ORR on the Pt/C catalyst under the experimental conditions used.

  8. Is the regulation of the electronic properties of organic molecules by polynuclear superhalogens more effective than that by mononuclear superhalogens? A high-level ab initio case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao-Miao; Li, Jin-Feng; Bai, Hongcun; Sun, Yin-Yin; Li, Jian-Li; Yin, Bing

    2015-08-21

    The regulation of the electronic properties of organic molecules induced by polynuclear superhalogens is theoretically explored here for sixteen composite structures. It is clearly indicated by the higher vertical electron detachment energy (VDE) that polynuclear superhalogens are more effective in regulating the electronic properties than mononuclear structures. However, this enhanced regulation is not only determined by superhalogens themselves but also related to the distribution of the extra electron of the final composites. The composites, in which the extra electron is mainly aggregated into the superhalogen moiety, will possess higher VDE values, as reported in the case of C1', 7.12 eV at the CCSD(T) level. This is probably due to the fact that, compared with organic molecules, superhalogens possess stronger attraction towards the extra electron and thus should lead to lower energies of the extra electrons and to higher VDE values eventually. Compared with CCSD(T), the Outer Valence Green's Function (OVGF) method fails completely for composite structures containing Cl atoms, while MP2 results are generally consistent in terms of the relative order of VDEs. Actually if the extra electron distribution of the systems could be approximated by the HOMO, the results at the OVGF level will be consistent with the CCSD(T) results. Conversely, the difference in VDEs between OVGF and CCSD(T) is significantly large. Besides superhalogen properties, the structures, relative stabilities and thermodynamic stabilities with respect to various fragmentation channels were also investigated for all the composite structures.

  9. Deciphering the perturbation effect of urea on the supramolecular host-guest interaction of biologically active hydrophobic molecule inside the nanocavity of cyclodextrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maity, Banibrata; Chatterjee, Aninda; Ahmed, Sayeed Ashique; Seth, Debabrata, E-mail: debabrata@iitp.ac.in

    2017-03-15

    The present work articulates the supramolecular interaction and the formation of host-guest complex between the biologically active hydrophobic coumarin derivative and cyclodextrins by using several spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic techniques. All the studies clearly revealed that in presence of cyclodextrins (CDs), coumarin forms 1:1 stoichiometric complex. From all the study, we have found that with gradual increasing the cavity diameter of the hosts, the binding efficiency of the complexes gradually increases. The small population of the non emissive twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state of coumarin molecule turns into highly emissive in presence of γ-CD owing to its greater cavity diameter. The emissive TICT band is not found in β-CD complex due to its comparative small hydrophilic exterior and less polar environment. The present finding also interpret the perturbation effect of urea on host-guest complexes. In the presence of urea, the TICT emissive band of γ-CD is completely diminished. From, {sup 1}H NMR study it was observed that –NEt{sub 2} moiety of 7-DCCAE molecule is deeply buried inside the hydrophobic cavity of the CDs and forms host-guest complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurement also indicates the formation of 1:1 host-guest complexes.

  10. Suppressive effects of anti-allergic agent suplatast tosilate (IPD-1151T on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on mouse splenocytes in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatsugu Kurokawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of IPD-1151T on the expression of costimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80 and CD86, were investigated in vivo using mice with allergic disorders. BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with two doses of dinitrophenylated ovalbumin (DNP-OVA at 1-week intervals. These mice then were treated intraperitoneally with 100μg/kg of IPD1151T once a day for 14 days, starting 7 days after the first immunization. On day 21, some mice were challenged intraperitoneally with DNP-OVA and the other mice were not challenged. All mice were autopsied on day 22 and assayed for immunoglobulin E, interleuken (IL-4 and IL-5 productions following DNP-OVA immunization. The intraperitoneal treatment with IPD-1151T strongly suppressed immunoglobulin E contents in serum, which were enhanced by DNA-OVA immunization. IPD-1151T also caused a decrease in both IL-4 and IL-5 levels in splenic lymphocytes. We next examined the influence of IPD1151T on co-stimulatory molecule expression on splenic lymphocytes. IPD-1151T caused suppression of CD40 and CD86 expression; however, the treatments did not affect CD80 expression.

  11. A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radioactive substances from molecules to populations in wildlife species - A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radionuclides from molecules to populations in wildlife species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, Frederic; Parisot, Florian; Plaire, Delphine; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier- Laplace, Jacqueline [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul- Lez-Durance, 13115 (France)

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how toxic contaminants affect wildlife species at various levels of biological organisation (sub-cellular, histological, physiological, organism, population levels) is a major research goal in both ecotoxicology and radioecology. A mechanistic understanding of the links between the different observed perturbations is necessary to predict consequences for survival, growth and reproduction which are critical for population dynamics. However, time scales at which such links are established in the laboratory are rarely relevant for natural populations. With a small size and short life cycle, the cladoceran micro-crustacean Daphnia magna is a particularly suitable biological model for studying effects of radioactive contaminants over several generations. Multi-generational exposures are much more representative of the environmental context of field populations for which contaminations can last for durations which largely exceed individual longevity and involve exposure of many successive generations. Over the last decade, multi-generational investigations of toxic effects were conducted under controlled conditions in D. magna exposed to various radionuclides including depleted uranium, americium-241 and cesium-137, representing respectively a dominantly chemo-toxic metal, an alpha internal contamination and a gamma external radiation. Results showed in all cases that toxic effects on physiology and life history (survival, body size, fecundity) increased in severity across generations. These observations demonstrated that measured effects in one generation might not be representative of toxicity in the following offspring generations, and ultimately of the population response. Reduction in somatic growth and reproduction induced by uranium were analysed using the mechanistic modelling approach known as DEBtox (model of dynamic energy budget applied to toxicology). Modelling results suggested that uranium primarily affects assimilation. This metabolic mode

  12. Molecules in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, research related to molecules in stars has rapidly expanded because of progress in related fields. For this reason, it is almost impossible to cover all the topics related to molecules in stars. Thus, here the authors focus their attention on molecules in the atmospheres of cool stars and do not cover in any detail topics related to circumstellar molecules originating from expanding envelopes located far from the stellar surface. However, the authors do discuss molecules in quasi-static circumstellar envelopes (a recently discovered new component of circumstellar envelopes) located near the stellar surface, since molecular lines originating from such envelopes show little velocity shift relative to photospheric lines, and hence they directly affect the interpretation and analysis of stellar spectra

  13. The small molecule survivin inhibitor YM155 may be an effective treatment modality for colon cancer through increasing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wan Lu, E-mail: lvvlchina@msn.cn [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Ra, E-mail: mira1125@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Mee-Yon, E-mail: meeyon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Genomic Cohort, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-04

    Survivin has a known beneficial role in the survival of both cancer cells and normal cells. Therapies targeting survivin have been proposed as an alternative treatment modality for various tumors; however, finding the proper indication for this toxic therapy is critical for reducing unavoidable side effects. We recently observed that high survivin expression in CD133{sup +} cells is related to chemoresistance in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. However, the effect of survivin-targeted therapy on CD133{sup +} colon cancer is unknown. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD133 and survivin expression in colon cancer biology in vitro and comparatively analyzed the anticancer effects of survivin inhibitor on CD133{sup +} cells (ctrl-siRNA group) and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced CD133{sup −} cells (CD133-siRNA group) obtained from a single colon cancer cell line. CD133 knockdown via siRNA transfection did not change the tumorigenicity of cells, although in vitro survivin expression levels in CD133{sup +} cells were higher than those in siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells. The transfection procedure seemed to induce survivin expression. Notably, a significant number of CD133{sup −} cells (33.8%) was found in the cell colonies of the CD133-siRNA group. In the cell proliferation assay after treatment, YM155 and a combination of YM155 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) proved to be far more effective than 5-FU alone. A significantly increased level of apoptosis was observed with increasing doses of YM155 in all groups. However, significant differences in therapeutic effect and apoptosis among the mock, ctrl-siRNA, and CD133-siRNA groups were not detected. Survivin inhibitor is an effective treatment modality for colon cancer; however, the role of CD133 and the use of survivin expression as a biomarker for this targeted therapy must be verified.

  14. The small molecule survivin inhibitor YM155 may be an effective treatment modality for colon cancer through increasing apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wan Lu; Lee, Mi-Ra; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2016-01-01

    Survivin has a known beneficial role in the survival of both cancer cells and normal cells. Therapies targeting survivin have been proposed as an alternative treatment modality for various tumors; however, finding the proper indication for this toxic therapy is critical for reducing unavoidable side effects. We recently observed that high survivin expression in CD133"+ cells is related to chemoresistance in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. However, the effect of survivin-targeted therapy on CD133"+ colon cancer is unknown. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD133 and survivin expression in colon cancer biology in vitro and comparatively analyzed the anticancer effects of survivin inhibitor on CD133"+ cells (ctrl-siRNA group) and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced CD133"− cells (CD133-siRNA group) obtained from a single colon cancer cell line. CD133 knockdown via siRNA transfection did not change the tumorigenicity of cells, although in vitro survivin expression levels in CD133"+ cells were higher than those in siRNA-induced CD133"− cells. The transfection procedure seemed to induce survivin expression. Notably, a significant number of CD133"− cells (33.8%) was found in the cell colonies of the CD133-siRNA group. In the cell proliferation assay after treatment, YM155 and a combination of YM155 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) proved to be far more effective than 5-FU alone. A significantly increased level of apoptosis was observed with increasing doses of YM155 in all groups. However, significant differences in therapeutic effect and apoptosis among the mock, ctrl-siRNA, and CD133-siRNA groups were not detected. Survivin inhibitor is an effective treatment modality for colon cancer; however, the role of CD133 and the use of survivin expression as a biomarker for this targeted therapy must be verified.

  15. Effect of perfluorohexane on the expression of cellular adhesion molecules and surfactant protein A in human mesothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haufe, Dirk; Dahmen, Klaus G; Tiebel, Oliver; Hübler, Matthias; Koch, Thea

    2011-08-01

    The intraperitoneal instillation of perfluorocarbons augmented systemic oxygenation and was protective in mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion and experimental lung injury. To study biocompatibility and potential anti-inflammatory effects of intraperitoneal perfluorocarbons, we evaluated the influence of perfluorohexane and/or inflammatory stimuli on human mesothelial cells in vitro. Perfluorohexane exposure neither impaired cell viability nor induced cellular activation. TNFα enhanced ICAM-1 expression, which was not attenuated by simultaneous perfluorohexane treatment. Concentration of intracellular surfactant protein A tended to be higher in perfluorohexane treated cells compared to controls. Our in vitro data add further evidence that intraperitoneal perfluorocarbon application is feasible without adverse local effects.

  16. Vasorelaxant activity of extracts obtained from Apium graveolens:Possible source for vasorelaxant molecules isolation with potential antihypertensive effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vergara-Galicia Jorge; Jimenez-Ramirez Luis ngel; Tun-Suarez Adrin; Aguirre-Crespo Francisco; Salazar-Gmez Anuar; Estrada-Soto Samuel; Sierra-Ovando ngel; Hernandez-Nuez Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the vasorelaxant effect of organic extracts from Apium graveolens (A. graveolens) which is a part of a group of plants subjected to pharmacological and phytochemical study with the purpose of offering it as an ideal source for obtaining lead compounds for designing new therapeutic agents with potential vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects. Methods:An ex vivo method was employed to assess the vasorelaxant activity. This consisted of using rat aortic rings with and without endothelium precontracted with norepinephrine. Results:All extracts caused concentration-dependent relaxation in precontracted aortic rings with and without endothelium;the most active extracts were Dichloromethane and Ethyl Acetate extracts from A. graveolens. These results suggested that secondary metabolites responsible for the vasorelaxant activity belong to a group of compounds of medium polarity. Also, our evidence showed that effect induced by dichloromethane and ethyl acetate extracts from A. graveolens is mediated probably by calcium antagonism. Conclusions: A. graveolens represents an ideal source for obtaining lead compounds for designing new therapeutic agents with potential vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects.

  17. Effect of the physicochemical parameters of benzimidazole molecules on their retention by a nonpolar sorbent from an aqueous acetonitrile solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafigulin, R. V.; Safonova, I. A.; Bulanova, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of the structure of benzimidazoles on their chromatographic retention on octadecyl silica gel from an aqueous acetonitrile eluent was studied. One- and many-parameter correlation equations were obtained by linear regression analysis, and their prognostic potential in determining the retention factors of benzimidazoles under study was analyzed.

  18. Effects of Synthetic Neural Adhesion Molecule Mimetic Peptides and Related Proteins on the Cardiomyogenic Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruodan Xu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Pluripotent stem cells differentiating into cardiomyocyte-like cells in an appropriate cellular environment have attracted significant attention, given the potential use of such cells for regenerative medicine. However, the precise mechanisms of lineage specification of pluripotent stem cells are still largely to be explored. Identifying the role of various small synthetic peptides involved in cardiomyogenesis may provide new insights into pathways promoting cardiomyogenesis. Methods: In the present study, using a transgenic murine embryonic stem (ES cell lineage expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the control of α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC promoter (pαMHC-EGFP, we investigated the cardiomyogenic effects of 7 synthetic peptides (Betrofin3, FGLs, FGLL, hNgf_C2, EnkaminE, Plannexin and C3 on cardiac differentiation. The expression of several cardiac-specific markers was determined by RT-PCR whereas the structural and functional properties of derived cardiomyocytes were examined by immunofluorescence and electrophysiology, respectively. Results: The results revealed that Betrofin3, an agonist of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF peptide exerted the most striking pro-cardiomyogenic effect on ES cells. We found that BDNF receptor, TrkB expression was up-regulated during differentiation. Treatment of differentiating cells with Betrofin3 between days 3 and 5 enhanced the expression of cardiac-specific markers and improved cardiomyocyte differentiation and functionality as revealed by genes regulation, flow cytometry and patch clamp analysis. Thus Betrofin3 may exert its cardiomyogenic effects on ES cells via TrkB receptor. Conclusion: Taken together, the results suggest that Betrofin3 modulates BDNF signaling with positive cardiomyogenic effect in stage and dose-dependent manner providing an effective strategy to increase ES cell-based generation of cardiomyocytes and offer a novel therapeutic approach to

  19. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  20. Studies on Multifunctional Effect of All-Trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA on Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and Its Regulatory Molecules in Human Breast Cancer Cells (MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindita Dutta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vitamin A derivative all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA is considered as a potent chemotherapeutic drug for its capability of regulating cell growth and differentiation. We studied the effect of ATRA on MMP-2 in MCF-7, human breast cancer cells, and the probable signaling pathways which are affected by ATRA on regulating pro-MMP-2 activity and expression. Methods. Gelatin zymography, RT-PCR, ELISA, Western blot, Immunoprecipitation, and Cell adhesion assay are used. Results. Gelatin zymography showed that ATRA caused a dose-dependent inhibition of pro-MMP-2 activity. ATRA treatment downregulates the expression of MT1-MMP, EMMPRIN, FAK, NF-kB, and p-ERK. However, expression of E-cadherin, RAR, and CRABP increased upon ATRA treatment. Binding of cells to extra cellular matrix (ECM protein fibronectin reduced significantly after ATRA treatment. Conclusions. The experimental findings clearly showed the inhibition of MMP-2 activity upon ATRA treatment. This inhibitory effect of ATRA on MMP-2 activity in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 may result due to its inhibitory effect on MT1-MMP, EMMPRIN, and upregulation of TIMP-2. This study is focused on the effect of ATRA on MMP, MMP-integrin-E-cadherin interrelationship, and also the effect of the drug on different signaling molecules which may involve in the progression of malignant tumor development.

  1. Dissociation in small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The study of molecular dissociation processes is one of the most interesting areas of modern spectroscopy owing to the challenges presented bt even the simplest of diatomic molecules. This paper reviews the commonly used descriptions of molecular dissociation processes for diatomic molecules, the selection rules for predissociation, and a few of the principles to be remembered when one is forced to speculate about dissociation mechanisms in a new molecule. Some of these points will be illustrated by the example of dissociative ionization in O 2

  2. Time-dependent analysis of tunneling effect in the formation of ultracold molecules via photo-association of laser-cooled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatasescu, M.; Masnou-Seeuws, F.

    2002-01-01

    The paper contains a time-dependent investigation of the tunneling effect observed in the photo-association spectrum of Cs 2 and attributed to the 0 g - (6s,6p 3/2 ) double well. When by photo-association of two cold cesium atoms a vibrational level of the outer well is populated, tunneling is an efficient mechanism for transferring the population to the inner well (R 0 ), where spontaneous emission may lead to formation of cold molecules in low vibrational levels of the a 3 Σ u + (6s,6s) electronic state. This tunneling effect is analyzed by wave packets propagation, first considering the double well potential alone, and following a packet made by a superposition of states initially located at large distances. Characteristic times for the vibration dynamics, corresponding to a beating phenomenon between the two wells, to partial 'revival' at large distances, and to maxima in the population localized in the inner well are reported and discussed. Second, we simulate the two-channels a 3 Σ u + (6s,6s) → 0 g - (6s,6p 3/2 ) photo-association at detuning around 2.9 cm -1 : the inner well can be populated either by the excitation of a vibrational level of the external well (resonant excitation), or by tuning the photo-association laser at the energy of the inner well level which displays tunneling (''off-resonance excitation''). In the first case the photo-association is efficient, while the tunneling probability is small; in the second, the tunneling probability is large, so that despite the poor efficiency of the photo-association process, more population can be transferred to the inner well. This second choice is shown to be very sensitive to the laser intensity, which could be used to control the population of the inner well and hence the formation of ultracold molecules in low vibrational levels. (authors)

  3. Effects of sub-lethal high-pressure homogenization treatment on the outermost cellular structures and the volatile-molecule profiles of two strains of probiotic lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanelli, Giulia; Vernocchi, Pamela; Patrignani, Francesca; Del Chierico, Federica; Putignani, Lorenza; Vinderola, Gabriel; Reinheimer, Jorge A; Gardini, Fausto; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Applying sub-lethal levels of high-pressure homogenization (HPH) to lactic acid bacteria has been proposed as a method of enhancing some of their functional properties. Because the principal targets of HPH are the cell-surface structures, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of sub-lethal HPH treatment on the outermost cellular structures and the proteomic profiles of two known probiotic bacterial strains. Moreover, the effect of HPH treatment on the metabolism of probiotic cells within a dairy product during its refrigerated storage was investigated using SPME-GC-MS. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the microstructural changes in the outermost cellular structures due to HPH treatment. These alterations may be involved in the changes in some of the technological and functional properties of the strains that were observed after pressure treatment. Moreover, the proteomic profiles of the probiotic strains treated with HPH and incubated at 37°C for various periods showed different peptide patterns compared with those of the untreated cells. In addition, there were differences in the peaks that were observed in the low-mass spectral region (2000-3000 Da) of the spectral profiles of the control and treated samples. Due to pressure treatment, the volatile-molecule profiles of buttermilk inoculated with treated or control cells and stored at 4°C for 30 days exhibited overall changes in the aroma profile and in the production of molecules that improved its sensory profile, although the two different species imparted specific fingerprints to the product. The results of this study will contribute to understanding the changes that occur in the outermost cellular structures and the metabolism of LAB in response to HPH treatment. The findings of this investigation may contribute to elucidating the relationships between these changes and the alterations of the technological and functional properties of LAB induced by pressure treatment.

  4. Effects of Latanoprost and Bimatoprost on the Expression of Molecules Relevant to Ocular Inflow and Outflow Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Li

    Full Text Available The intraocular pressure (IOP-lowering and side effects in response to different prostaglandin F2α analogues can be variable, but, the underlying basis for this difference remains unknown. This study investigated the differential changes of cellular proteins relevant to IOP-lowering effects of latanoprost and bimatoprost.The human T lymphoblast (MOLT-3 cell line and immortalized human trabecular meshwork (iHTM cells were studied by quantitative PCR and by immunofluorescence after treatment with either latanoprost or bimatoprost. New Zealand white rabbit eyes were treated topically with each agent and, following euthanasia, anterior segment tissues were studied with immunostaining.In cultured MOLT-3 cells, mRNA expression of both c-fos and matrix metalloproteinase 9 increased significantly in response to each agent. In addition, there was little change in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-3 mRNA, but a significant decrease in TIMP-4. Fibronectin mRNA in MOLT-3 cells was down-regulated with bimatoprost, but was up-regulated with latanoprost. Immunofluorescence analysis of iHTM cells showed that intracellular fibronectin was significantly decreased by bimatoprost, but was increased by latanoprost. Both latanoprost and bimatoprost increased mRNA expression of NF-кB p65 and decreased that of IкBα. Aquaporin-1 mRNA expression was significantly down-regulated by bimatoprost. Immunostaining also revealed a significant decrease of aquaporin-1 in the ciliary epithelium of New Zealand white rabbits after bimatoprost treatment.Similarities in protein expression produced by latanoprost and bimatoprost in vitro may be relevant to the mechanism for their IOP-lowering effects in vivo. Differences in fibronectin expression and in aquaporin-1 expression in response to each agent may contribute to variability in the IOP-lowering efficacy in some studies.

  5. The effect of small-molecule inhibition of MAPKAPK2 on cell ageing phenotypes of fibroblasts from human Werner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Terence

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroblasts derived from the progeroid Werner syndrome (WS show reduced replicative lifespan and a “stressed” morphology, both phenotypes being alleviated by using the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. Because p38 is a major hub for the control of stress-signalling pathways we were interested in examining the possible role for downstream kinases in order to refine our understanding of the role of p38 signalling in regulation of WS cell growth. To this end we treated WS and normal fibroblasts with MK2 inhibitors to determine whether MK2 inhibition would affect either the growth or morphology of WS cells. The first inhibitor, 7,8-dihydroxy-2,4-diamino-3-cyanobenzopyranopyridine (inhibitor 2, resulted in inhibition of WS cell growth and had no effect on morphology, effects that occurred below the level needed to inhibit MK2 and thus suggestive of inhibitor toxicity. The second inhibitor, 2-(2-quinolin-3-ylpyridin-4-yl-1,5,6,7-tetrahydro-4H-pyrrolo-[3,2-c]pyridin-4-one (CMPD16, resulted in a significant extension of WS fibroblast replicative capacity compared to normal cells. In addition, CMPD16 reverted the WS cellular morphology to that seen in normal dermal fibroblasts. These data suggest that MK2 activity plays a substantial role in proliferation control in WS cells. CMPD16 was not as effective in cellular lifespan extension as SB203580, however, suggesting that, although MK2 is a downstream kinase involved in cell cycle arrest, other p38 targets may play a role. Alternatively, as CMPD16 is toxic to cell growth at levels just above those that extend lifespan, it is possible that the therapeutic window is too small. However, as CMPD16 does show significant effects in WS fibroblasts, this acts as proof-of-principle for the efforts to design and synthesise improved MK2 inhibitors. As MK2 is involved in inflammatory processes and inflammation plays a major role in WS phenotypes, these data suggest MK2 as a potential therapeutic target

  6. O efeito de Coriolis: de pêndulos a moléculas The Coriolis effect: from pendulums to molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emílio Borges

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coriolis force is an effect which arises in rotating reference frames such as the Earth. This force influences large oceanic motions, atmospheric inertial circles, horizontal and vertical deviations in moving bodies. The Foucault's pendulum is another special case about the Coriolis force influence on macroscopic processes. This pendulum is an example of how experimental sciences can be essential for philosophical and social changes, since it was crucial to prove the Earth's rotation. The Coriolis force has an important role also at microscopic level; it couples vibrational and rotational molecular motions and this fact has consequences in spectroscopic and energetic molecular processes. These points are discussed in this paper.

  7. Competing quantum effects in the free energy profiles and diffusion rates of hydrogen and deuterium molecules through clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendagorta, Joseph R; Powers, Anna; Hele, Timothy J H; Marsalek, Ondrej; Bačić, Zlatko; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2016-11-30

    Clathrate hydrates hold considerable promise as safe and economical materials for hydrogen storage. Here we present a quantum mechanical study of H 2 and D 2 diffusion through a hexagonal face shared by two large cages of clathrate hydrates over a wide range of temperatures. Path integral molecular dynamics simulations are used to compute the free-energy profiles for the diffusion of H 2 and D 2 as a function of temperature. Ring polymer molecular dynamics rate theory, incorporating both exact quantum statistics and approximate quantum dynamical effects, is utilized in the calculations of the H 2 and D 2 diffusion rates in a broad temperature interval. We find that the shape of the quantum free-energy profiles and their height relative to the classical free energy barriers at a given temperature, as well as the rate of diffusion, are strongly affected by competing quantum effects: above 25 K, zero-point energy (ZPE) perpendicular to the reaction path for diffusion between cavities decreases the quantum rate compared to the classical rate, whereas at lower temperatures tunneling outcompetes the ZPE and as a result the quantum rate is greater than the classical rate.

  8. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  9. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  10. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolved as a new line of thinking wherein a single molecule or perhaps a collection .... In photonic communication processes, laser light has to be modulated and .... The author wishes to thank G Rajaram for a critical reading of the manuscript.

  11. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    overall absorption spectrum of a molecule is a superposition of many such sharp lines .... dilute solution of the enzyme and the substrate over few drops of silicone oil placed ..... Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM): Development.

  12. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  13. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Keywords. Adamantane; diamondoid systems; plastic crystals. ... Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News. © 2017 Indian ...

  14. Ascorbic Acid-Induced Cardiac Differentiation of Murine Pluripotent Stem Cells: Transcriptional Profiling and Effect of a Small Molecule Synergist of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Ivanyuk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reproducible and efficient differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs to cardiomyocytes (CMs is essential for their use in regenerative medicine, drug testing and disease modeling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of some previously reported cardiogenic substances on cardiac differentiation of mouse PSCs. Methods: Differentiation was performed by embryoid body (EB-based method using three different murine PSC lines. The differentiation efficiency was monitored by RT-qPCR, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, and the effect mechanistically evaluated by transcriptome analysis of treated EBs. Results: Among the five tested compounds (ascorbic acid, dorsomorphin, cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, cardiogenol C, cyclosporin A only ascorbic acid (AA exerted a strong and reproducible cardiogenic effect in CGR8 cells which was less consistent in other two PSC lines. AA induced only minor changes in transcriptome of CGR8 cells after administration during the initial two days of differentiation. Cardiospecific genes and transcripts involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis and hematopoiesis were up-regulated on day 5 but not on days 2 or 3 of differentiation. The cardiac differentiation efficiency was improved when QS11, a small-molecule synergist of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, was added to cultures after AA-treatment. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that only minor transcriptional changes are sufficient for enhancement of cardiogenesis of murine PSCs by AA and that AA and QS11 exhibit synergistic effects and enhance the efficiency of CM differentiation of murine PSCs.

  15. On the effect of nuclear bridge modes on donor-acceptor electronic coupling in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Daly; Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Speiser, Shammai; Peskin, Uri

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of intra-molecular electronic coupling in a symmetric DBA (donor-bridge-acceptor) complex, in which a donor electronic site is coupled to an acceptor site by way of intervening orbitals of a molecular bridge unit. In the off-resonant (deep tunneling) regime of electronic transport, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (MO's) of the DBA system are split into distinguishable donor/acceptor and bridge orbitals. The effect of geometrical changes at the bridge on the donor/acceptor electronic energy manifold is studied for local stretching and bending modes. It is demonstrated that the energy splitting in the manifold of donor/acceptor unoccupied MOs changes in response to such changes, as assumed in simple McConnell-type models. Limitations of the simple models are revealed where the electronic charging of the bridge orbitals correlates with increasing donor/acceptor orbital energy splitting only for stretching but not for bending bridge modes.

  16. Hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P., Jones, C.

    1993-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the initial two composite molecule/semiconductor devices will be reported. Consequently, light sensors based on dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor microbridges will be discussed. Moreover, molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena will be illustrated also for the first time

  17. Studies of extractant molecules in solution and at liquid-liquid interfaces: structural and mechanistic aspects of synergy effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baaden, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations reported herein provide new important insights into cation recognition and complexation in solution as well as liquid-liquid extraction, with a particular focus on the microscopic events taking place at the interface between two immiscible liquids. Preliminary studies concerned the representation of the trivalent rare earth cations La 3+ , Eu 3+ and Yb 3+ in force field simulations, probing structural and energetic features on an experimentally characterized model system based on substituted pyridine dicarboxamide ligands. Complexation of such cations by a novel calixarene derivative was investigated showing unexpected features, such as the position of the cation in the complex. Independent experimental studies published subsequently support these findings. Another part of the work is related to industrial liquid-liquid extraction systems using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as co-solvent, extractant, surfactant and synergist. We investigate 1) concentration effects simulating up to 60 TBP at a water/chloroform interface, 2) acidity using a neutral and ionic model of HNO 3 and 3) synergistic aspects of mixed TBP/calixarene extraction systems. These simulations provide the first microscopic insights into such issues. We finally addressed the topic of solute transfer across the water/chloroform interface. The potential of mean force for such a process has been calculated by both standard methods and novel approaches [fr

  18. The Cytotoxic Effect of Small and Large Molecules of PMF Fraction Extracted from Camel Urine on Cancer Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Khorshid, Faten

    2015-01-10

    Aim of the work: Animal urine, including that of camels, has long been used for the therapeutic management of human ailments. In this study, we sought to characterize the cytotoxic properties of newly derived purified fractions from previously described camel urine extract (PMF) on various cancer cell lines. Methodology: Two new size dissimilar fractions of PMF (large and small) were obtained by fractionalizing PMF using 3kD and 50kD membrane filters. A SRB cytotoxicity assay of the PMF fractions was performed on cancer cell lines (A549, HCT116, HepG2, MCF-7, U251 and Hela) as well as normal cell lines (human fibroblast cell line and Vero). Results: This study showed that the newly derived and more purified fraction of PMF (new PMF) possesses effective and selective anti-cancer properties against several types of cancer cell lines. Conclusion: This study, as well as previous ones, suggests that camel urine extracts (old and new PMF) may provide newer therapeutic alternatives to clinically manage cancer patients. However, further studies are needed to verify these positive preliminary results.

  19. Thermal analysis studies of doping effects on the conformational motions of polymer chains in solid solutions with lasing molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeras, Ioannis M.; Pallikari, Fotini; Vassilikou-Dova, Aglaia; Neagu, Eugen R.

    2007-05-01

    The advancement of the solid-state dye laser performance largely depends on the systematic study of the dye-matrix interactions at the nanoscopic scale. The current work deals with blends of a comparatively inert dye host, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), with nonionic/apolar (substituted perylenes) and ionic/polar (rhodamine 6G, pyrromethene 567) dyes at ≈10-4 mol L-1 loading. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermally stimulated currents (TSC) were used to explore the relative strength of inter- and intramolecular guest-host interactions by monitoring blending-induced modifications of the high-temperature signals: the segmental relaxation, the space-charge relaxation, and the liquid-liquid transition. Both techniques revealed the antiplasticizing role of the oligomeric organics on the relaxation dynamics of polymer segments, evidenced by clear glass-transition temperature upshifts. It becomes apparent that this effect is independent of the size, polarity, and ionicity of the dopant, signifying a common mechanism underway. It is suggested that, at least for the dyes under investigation, the chromophores simply fill the voids within the matrix, imposing strong steric hindrances on the rearrangement of the long-range structure. A comparison between the present results and earlier low-temperature dielectric data reveals that the large-scale relaxation dynamics show stronger perturbations due to blending, in comparison to the localized rotational motion of the pendant groups. DSC provided estimates for the unconverted monomer percentages in the solid blends. These were also determined more accurately by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which additionally confirmed that the tacticity of the chains is not affected by the presence of the dye.

  20. Effects of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha and anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 antibodies on ischemia/reperfusion lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chi-Huei

    2006-10-31

    Inhibition of neutrophil activation and adherence to endothelium by antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1), respectively, might attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R). I/R was conducted in an isolated rat lung model. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody and/or anti-ICAM-1 antibody were added before ischemia or after reperfusion. Hemodynamic changes, lung weight gain (LWG), capillary filtration coefficients (Kfc), and pathologic changes were assessed to evaluate the severity of I/R. The LWG, Kfc, pathological changes and lung injury score of treatment groups with anti-TNF-alpha antibody treatment, either pre-ischemia or during reperfusion, were less than those observed in control groups. Similar findings were found in group treated with anti-ICAM-1 antibody or combination therapy during reperfusion. In contrast, pre-I/R treatment with anti-ICAM-1 antibody induced severe lung edema and failure to complete the experimental procedure. No additional therapeutic effect was found in combination therapy. We conclude that TNF-alpha and ICAM-1 play important roles in I/R. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody has therapeutic and preventive effects on I/R. However, combined therapy with anti-TNF-alpha antibody and anti-ICAM-1 antibody may have no additive effect and need further investigation.

  1. Gauge symmetry, chirality and parity effects in four-particle systems: Coulomb's law as a universal function for diatomic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooydonk, G

    2000-11-01

    Following recent work in search for a universal function (Van Hooydonk, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem., (1999), 1617), we test four symmetric +/- a(n)Rn potentials for reproducing molecular potential energy curves (PECs). Classical gauge symmetry for 1/R-potentials results in generic left right asymmetric PECs. A pair of symmetric perturbed Coulomb potentials is quantitatively in accordance with observed PECs. For a bond, a four-particle system, charge inversion (a parity effect, atom chirality) is the key to explain this shape generically. A parity adapted Hamiltonian reduces from ten to two terms and to a soluble Bohr-like formula, a Kratzer (1 - Re/R)2 potential. The result is similar to the combined action of spin and wave function symmetry upon the Hamiltonian in Heitler-London theory. Analytical perturbed Coulomb functions varying with (1 - Re/R) scale attractive and repulsive branches of PECs for 13 bonds H2, HF, LiH, KH, AuH, Li2, LiF, KLi, NaCs, Rb2, RbCs, Cs2 and I2 in a single straight line. The 400 turning points for 13 bonds are reproduced with a deviation of 0.007 A at both branches. For 230 points at the repulsive side, the deviation is 0.003 A. The perturbed electrostatic Coulomb law is a universal molecular function. Ab initio zero molecular parameter functions give PECs of acceptable quality, just using atomic ionisation energies. The function can be used as a model potential for inverting levels and gives a first principle's comparison of short- and long-range interactions, important for the study of cold atoms. Wave-packet dynamics, femto-chemistry applied to the crossing of covalent and ionic curves, can provide evidence for this theory. We anticipate this scale/shape invariant scheme applies to smaller scales in nuclear and high-energy particle physics. For larger gravitational scales (Newton 1/R potentials), problems with super-unification are discussed. Reactions between hydrogen and antihydrogen, feasible in the near future, will probably produce

  2. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom–molecule collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom–molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X 1 Σ + g ground state 85 Rb 2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom–molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85 Rb 2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 10 11 cm −3 . (paper)

  3. Spectroscopy and Chemistry of Cold Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Takamasa

    2012-06-01

    Molecules at low temperatures are expected to behave quite differently from those at high temperatures because pronounced quantum effects emerge from thermal averages. Even at 10 K, a significant enhancement of reaction cross section is expected due to tunneling and resonance effects. Chemistry at this temperature is very important in order to understand chemical reactions in interstellar molecular clouds. At temperatures lower than 1 K, collisions and intermolecular interactions become qualitatively different from those at high temperatures because of the large thermal de Broglie wavelength of molecules. Collisions at these temperatures must be treated as the interference of molecular matter waves, but not as hard sphere collisions. A Bose-Einstein condensate is a significant state of matter as a result of coherent matter wave interaction. Especially, dense para-H_2 molecules are predicted to become a condensate even around 1 K. A convenient method to investigate molecules around 1 K is to dope molecules in cold matrices. Among various matrices, quantum hosts such as solid para-H_2 and superfluid He nano-droplets have been proven to be an excellent host for high-resolution spectroscopy. Rovibrational motion of molecules in these quantum hosts is well quantized on account of the weak interactions and the softness of quantum environment. The linewidths of infrared spectra of molecules in the quantum hosts are extremely narrow compared with those in other matrices. The sharp linewidths allow us to resolve fine spectral structures originated in subtle interactions between guest and host molecules. In this talk, I will describe how the splitting and lineshape of high-resolution spectra of molecules in quantum hosts give us new information on the static and dynamical interactions of molecules in quantum medium. The topics include dynamical response of superfluid environment upon rotational excitation, and possible superfluid phase of para-H_2 clusters. I will also

  4. Electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, I.; Takayanagi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of collision processes plays an important research role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made by means of collision experiments. Based on theoretical, experimental, and computational studies, this volume presents an overview detailing the basic processes of electron-molecule collisions. The editors have collected papers-written by a group of international experts-that consider a diverse range of phenomena occurring in electronmolecule collisions. The volume discusses first the basic formulation for scattering problems and then gives an outline of the physics of electron-molecule collisions. The main topics covered are rotational transitions, vibrational transitions, dissociation of molecules in slow collisions, the electron-molecule collision as a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular electronic structures, and experimental and computational techniques for determining the cross sections. These well-referenced chapters are self-contained and can be read independently or consecutively. Authoritative and up-to-date, Electron-Molecule Collisions is a useful addition to the libraries of students and researchers in the fields of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and physical chemistry

  5. Vasorelaxing effects and inhibition of nitric oxide in macrophages by new iron-containing carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motterlini, Roberto; Sawle, Philip; Hammad, Jehad; Mann, Brian E; Johnson, Tony R; Green, Colin J; Foresti, Roberta

    2013-02-01

    Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) are a class of organometallo carbonyl complexes capable of delivering controlled quantities of CO gas to cells and tissues thus exerting a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. Here we report on the chemical synthesis, CO releasing properties, cytotoxicity profile and pharmacological activities of four novel structurally related iron-allyl carbonyls. The major difference among the new CO-RMs tested was that three compounds (CORM-307, CORM-308 and CORM-314) were soluble in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), whereas a fourth one (CORM-319) was rendered water-soluble by reacting the iron-carbonyl with hydrogen tetrafluoroborate. We found that despite the fact all compounds liberated CO, CO-RMs soluble in DMSO caused a more pronounced toxic effect both in vascular and inflammatory cells as well as in isolated vessels. More specifically, iron carbonyls soluble in DMSO released CO with a fast kinetic and displayed a marked cytotoxic effect in smooth muscle cells and RAW 247.6 macrophages despite exerting a rapid and pronounced vasorelaxation ex vivo. In contrast, CORM-319 that is soluble in water and liberated CO with a slower rate, preserved smooth muscle cell viability, relaxed aortic tissue and exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in macrophages challenged with endotoxin. These data suggest that iron carbonyls can be used as scaffolds for the design and synthesis of pharmacologically active CO-RMs and indicate that increasing water solubility and controlling the rate of CO release are important parameters for limiting their potential toxic effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An exploration of the effect and interaction mechanism of bisphenol A on waste sludge hydrolysis with multi-spectra, isothermal titration microcalorimetry and molecule docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Guangying; Zhang, Rui; Hao, Xiaoyan; Liu, Chunguang

    2017-07-05

    An increasing amount of bisphenol A (BPA) is being produced and used, then discharged into sewage treatment plants and accumulated in sludge or soil, when the sludge is used as fertilizer. Accumulation of BPA in sludge or soil causes poisoning to the enzyme, which affects the biological treatment of sludge and the circulation and conversion of materials in soil. In this research, effect of BPA on sludge hydrolysis is studied from the respect of concentration and components of soluble organic matter in sludge, using three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. In order to illuminate the interaction mechanism, toxic effect of BPA on α-Amylase (a model of hydrolase in sludge) is investigated with multi-spectra, isothermal titration microcalorimetry and molecule docking at the molecular level. Results show that the secondary structure of α-Amylase and the microenvironment of amino acid residue in α-Amylase are changed. The molecular docking study and ITC results show that hydrophobic bond and hydrogen bond exist in the interaction between BPA and α-Amylase. Based on the above analysis and enzyme activity assay, sludge hydrolysis is inhibited due to the denaturation of α-Amylase with BPA exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of the management of rh-negative pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplantie, Julie; Gonzales, Odilon Martinez; Bois, Antoine; Nshimyumukiza, Léon; Gekas, Jean; Bujold, Emmanuel; Morin, Valérie; Vallée, Maud; Giguère, Yves; Gagné, Christian; Rousseau, François; Reinharz, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the most cost-effective option to prevent alloimmunization against the Rh factor. A virtual population of Rh-negative pregnant women in Quebec was built to simulate the cost-effectiveness of preventing alloimmunization. The model considered four options: (1) systematic use of anti-D immunoglobulin; (2) fetal Rh(D) genotyping; (3) immunological determination of the father's Rh type; (4) mixed screening: immunological determination of the father's Rh type, followed if positive by fetal Rh(D) genotyping. Two outcomes were considered, in addition to the estimated costs: (1) the number of babies without hemolytic disease, and (2) the number of surviving infants. In a first pregnancy, two options emerged as the most cost-effective options: systematic prophylaxis and immunological Rh typing of the father, with overlapping confidence intervals between them. In a second pregnancy, the results were similar. In all cases (first or second pregnancy or a combination of the two) fetal genotyping was not found to be a cost-effective option. Routine prophylaxis and immunological Rh typing of the father are the most cost-effective options for the prevention of Rh alloimmunization. Considering that immunological typing of the father would probably not be carried out by the majority of clinicians, routine prophylaxis remains the preferred option. However, this could change if the cost of Rh(D) fetal genotyping fell below $140 per sample.

  9. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  10. Observing electron motion in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelkowski, S; Yudin, G L; Bandrauk, A D

    2006-01-01

    We study analytically the possibility for monitoring electron motion in a molecule using two ultrashort laser pulses. The first prepares a coherent superposition of two electronic molecular states whereas the second (attosecond pulse) photoionizes the molecule. We show that interesting information about electron dynamics can be obtained from measurement of the photoelectron spectra as a function of the time delay between two pulses. In particular, asymmetries in photoelectron angular distribution provide a simple signature of the electron motion within the initial time-dependent coherently coupled two molecular states. Both asymmetries and electron spectra show very strong two-centre interference patterns. We illustrate these effects using as an example a dissociating hydrogen molecular ion probed by the attosecond pulses

  11. Intersystem crossing in complex molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappalardo, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The general question of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing is addressed in the context of large organic molecules, i.e., ''complex'' molecules capable of self-relaxation in the absence of collisions. Examples of spectral properties of such molecules in the vapor phase are discussed, relying on extensive Russian literature in this area. Formal expressions for the relaxation rate in the electronic excited states are derived on the basis of the formalism of collision theory, and are applied to the specific case of intersystem crossing. The derivation of the ''energy-gap'' law for triplet-singlet conversion in aromatic hydrocarbons is briefly outlined. The steep rise of internal conversion rates as a function of excess excitation energy, and its competition with the intersystem crossing process, are reviewed for the case of naphthalene vapor. A general expression for the spin-orbit interaction Hamiltonian in molecular systems is outlined. Experimental observations on singlet-triplet conversion rates and the factors that can drastically affect such rates are discussed, with emphasis on the ''in- ternal'' and ''external'' heavy-atom effects. Basic relations of ESR spectroscopy and magnetophotoselection are reviewed. Technological implications of the singlet-triplet crossing in complex molecules are discussed in the context of chelate lasers, dye lasers and luminescent displays. Effects related to singlet-triplet crossing, and generally to excited-state energy-transfer in biological systems, are exemplified by the role of aromatic amino-acids in the phosphorescence of proteins, by some recent studies of energy-transfer in models of biomembranes, and by the clustering of triplet-energy donor-acceptor pairs in micelles

  12. Routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis in women who are Rh(D negative: meta-analyses adjusted for differences in study design and quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Turner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To estimate the effectiveness of routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis for preventing sensitisation in pregnant Rhesus negative women, and to explore whether this depends on the treatment regimen adopted. METHODS: Ten studies identified in a previous systematic literature search were included. Potential sources of bias were systematically identified using bias checklists, and their impact and uncertainty were quantified using expert opinion. Study results were adjusted for biases and combined, first in a random-effects meta-analysis and then in a random-effects meta-regression analysis. RESULTS: In a conventional meta-analysis, the pooled odds ratio for sensitisation was estimated as 0.25 (95% CI 0.18, 0.36, comparing routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis to control, with some heterogeneity (I²  =  19%. However, this naïve analysis ignores substantial differences in study quality and design. After adjusting for these, the pooled odds ratio for sensitisation was estimated as 0.31 (95% CI 0.17, 0.56, with no evidence of heterogeneity (I²  =  0%. A meta-regression analysis was performed, which used the data available from the ten anti-D prophylaxis studies to inform us about the relative effectiveness of three licensed treatments. This gave an 83% probability that a dose of 1250 IU at 28 and 34 weeks is most effective and a 76% probability that a single dose of 1500 IU at 28-30 weeks is least effective. CONCLUSION: There is strong evidence for the effectiveness of routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis for prevention of sensitisation, in support of the policy of offering routine prophylaxis to all non-sensitised pregnant Rhesus negative women. All three licensed dose regimens are expected to be effective.

  13. 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) a fast acting, promising, powerful, specific, and effective "small molecule" anti-cancer agent taken from labside to bedside: introduction to a special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Peter L

    2012-02-01

    Although the "Warburg effect", i.e., elevated glucose metabolism to lactic acid (glycolysis) even in the presence of oxygen, has been recognized as the most common biochemical phenotype of cancer for over 80 years, its biochemical and genetic basis remained unknown for over 50 years. Work focused on elucidating the underlying mechanism(s) of the "Warburg effect" commenced in the author's laboratory in 1969. By 1985 among the novel findings made two related most directly to the basis of the "Warburg effect", the first that the mitochondrial content of tumors exhibiting this phenotype is markedly decreased relative to the tissue of origin, and the second that such mitochondria have markedly elevated amounts of the enzyme hexokinase-2 (HK2) bound to their outer membrane. HK2 is the first of a number of enzymes in cancer cells involved in metabolizing the sugar glucose to lactic acid. At its mitochondrial location HK2 binds at/near the protein VDAC (voltage dependent anion channel), escapes inhibition by its product glucose-6-phosphate, and gains access to mitochondrial produced ATP. As shown by others, it also helps immortalize cancer cells, i.e., prevents cell death. Based on these studies, the author's laboratory commenced experiments to elucidate the gene basis for the overexpression of HK2 in cancer. These studies led to both the discovery of a unique HK2 promoter region markedly activated by both hypoxic conditions and moderately activated by several metabolites (e.g., glucose), Also discovered was the promoter's regulation by epigenetic events (i.e., methylation, demethylation). Finally, the author's laboratory turned to the most important objective. Could they selectively and completely destroy cancerous tumors in animals? This led to the discovery in an experiment conceived, designed, and conducted by Young Ko that the small molecule 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), the subject of this mini-review series, is an incredibly powerful and swift acting anticancer agent

  14. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  16. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structure and properties (includingreactivt'ty) - both static (independent of time) and ... Furthermore, since the energy of H2 + in the ground state must be lower than that of .... (Figure 2b); note also that dp is positive in parts of the antibinding regions behind the two ... But, now both the sizes and shapes of molecules enter into.

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  18. OMG: Open molecule generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peironcely, J.E.; Rojas-Chertó, M.; Fichera, D.; Reijmers, T.; Coulier, L.; Faulon, J.-L.; Hankemeier, T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical

  19. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material ... synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be catego- ... maintained stably per organic molecule, stabilization of a ..... rotating freely under an applied field because it is a magne-.

  20. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. The effect of clomethiazole on plasma concentrations of interleukin-6, -8, -1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and neutrophil adhesion molecule expression during experimental extracorporeal circulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, D

    2012-02-03

    Clomethiazole (CMZ), a neuroprotective drug, has antiinflammatory actions. We investigated the effects of CMZ administration on plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and neutrophil adhesion molecule expression during experimental extracorporeal circulation. Five healthy volunteers each donated 500 mL of blood, which was subsequently divided into equal portions. Identical extracorporeal circuits were simultaneously primed with donated blood (250 mL) and circulated for 2 h at 37 degrees C. CMZ was added to 1 of the circuits of each pair to achieve a total plasma concentration of 40 micro mol\\/L. Blood samples were withdrawn at (i) donation, (ii) immediately after addition of CMZ, and at (iii) 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after commencing circulation. Plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were less in the CMZ group compared with control after 60 min of circulation (2.2 [0.3] versus 3.2 [0.4], 14.9 [4.8] versus 21.9 [18.4], 63.3 [43.5] versus 132.2 [118.9] pg\\/mL, respectively, P < 0.05). After 120 min of circulation, neutrophils from CMZ-treated circuits showed significantly less CD18 expression compared with control (237.5 [97.4] versus 280.5 [111.5], P = 0.03). The addition of CMZ to experimental extracorporeal circuits decreases the inflammatory response. This effect may be of clinical benefit by decreasing inflammatory-mediated neurological injury during cardiopulmonary bypass. IMPLICATIONS: Enhancement of gamma-aminobutyric acid(A)-mediated effects by clomethiazole (CMZ) and associated neuroprotection has been established in animal models of cerebral ischemia. In an ex vivo study, we demonstrated antiinflammatory activity of CMZ in experimental extracorporeal circulation. This represents a potential neuroprotective mechanism of CMZ in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery.

  2. Deletion of the signalling molecule synthase ScbA has pleiotropic effects on secondary metabolite biosynthesis, morphological differentiation and primary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Alia, Davide; Eggle, D.; Nieselt, K.; Hu, W.-S.; Breitling, R.; Takano, E.

    2011-01-01

    Streptomycetes have high biotechnological relevance as producers of diverse metabolites widely used in medical and agricultural applications. The biosynthesis of these metabolites is controlled by signalling molecules, gamma-butyrolactones, that act as bacterial hormones. In Streptomyces coelicolor,

  3. Effect of preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the expression of malignant molecules in colon cancer tissue and the degree of trauma caused by radical operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Cheng Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the expression of malignant molecules in colon cancer tissue and the degree of trauma caused by radical operation. Methods: Patients who were diagnosed with colon cancer in Fengrun People’s Hospital between March 2014 and February 2017 were selected and randomly divided into the XELOX group who accepted XELOX neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with radical operation for colon cancer and the control group who accepted radical operation for colon cancer alone. Surgically removed colon cancer tissue was collected to test the expression of proliferation, apoptosis and invasion genes, and serum was collected to detect the contents of liver and kidney function indicators as well as inflammatory factors. Results: Rac1, PLD2, CHD1L, Snail, Vimentin and N-cadherin mRNA expression levels in surgically removed colon cancer lesions of XELOX group were significantly lower than those of control group while MS4A12 and ASPP2 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher than those of control group; serum ALT, AST, β2-MG, Cys-C, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sTM and sE-selectin contents were not significantly different between the two groups of patients 1 day and 3 days after surgery. Conclusion: Preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy can inhibit the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion gene expression in colon cancer tissues without increasing the trauma of operation.

  4. Exotic helium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, M.

    2007-12-01

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 P 0 ) molecule, or a 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  5. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  6. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peironcely Julio E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG, which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  7. Beneficial effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) on acute doxorubicin cardiotoxicity in mice: Role of oxidative stress and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, Hitesh; Pandya, Gaurav; Patel, Praful; Acharya, Aviseka; Jain, Mukul; Mehta, Anita A.

    2011-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DXR) has been used in variety of human malignancies for decades. Despite its efficacy in cancer, clinical usage is limited because of its cardiotoxicity, which has been associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CORMs) have been shown to reduce the oxidative damage and apoptosis. The present study investigated the effects of CORM-2, a fast CO-releaser, against DXR-induced cardiotoxicity in mice using biochemical, histopathological and gene expression approaches. CORM-2 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 10 days and terminated the study on day 11. DXR (20 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected before 72 h of termination. Mice treated with DXR showed cardiotoxicity as evidenced by elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), caspase-3 and decrease the level of total antioxidant status (TAS) in heart tissues. Pre- and post-treatment with CORM-2 (30 mg/kg, i.p.) elicited significant improvement in CK, LDH, MDA, caspase-3 and TAS levels. Histopathological studies showed that cardiac damage with DXR has been reversed with CORM-2 + DXR treatment. There was dramatic decrease in hematological count in DXR-treated mice, which has been improved with CORM-2. Furthermore, there was also elevation of mRNA expression of heme oxygenase-1, hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor and decrease in inducible-nitric oxide synthase expression upon treatment with CORM-2 that might be linked to cardioprotection. These data suggest that CORM-2 treatment provides cardioprotection against acute doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice and this effect may be attributed to CORM-2-mediated antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties.

  8. Discrete and continuum modeling of solvent effects in a twisted intramolecular charge transfer system: The 4-N,N-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN) molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Borges, Itamar

    2018-08-05

    The 4-N,N-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN) molecule is a prototypical system displaying twisted intramolecular (TICT) charge transfer effects. The ground and the first four electronic excited states (S 1 -S 4 ) in gas phase and upon solvation were studied. Charge transfer values as function of the torsion angle between the donor group (dimethylamine) and the acceptor moiety (benzonitrile) were explicitly computed. Potential energy curves were also obtained. The algebraic diagrammatic construction method at the second-order [ADC(2)] ab initio wave function was employed. Three solvents of increased polarities (benzene, DMSO and water) were investigated using discrete (average solvent electrostatic configuration - ASEC) and continuum (conductor-like screening model - COSMO) models. The results for the S 3 and S 4 excited states and the S 1 -S 4 charge transfer curves were not previously available in the literature. Electronic gas phase and solvent vertical spectra are in good agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. In the twisted (90°) geometry the optical oscillator strengths have negligible values even for the S 2 bright state. Potential energy curves show two distinct pairs of curves intersecting at decreasing angles or not crossing in the more polar solvents. Charge transfer and electric dipole values allowed the rationalization of these results. The former effects are mostly independent of the solvent model and polarity. Although COSMO and ASEC solvent models mostly lead to similar results, there is an important difference: some crossings of the excitation energy curves appear only in the ASEC solvation model, which has important implications to the photochemistry of DMABN. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Energy dependence of effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and photon interaction: Studies of some biological molecules in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, Z(PEA,eff), and for photon interaction, Z(PI,eff), have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for biological molecules, such as fatty acids (lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic......, linolenic, arachidonic, and arachidic acids), nucleotide bases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, uracil, and thymine), and carbohydrates (glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and starch). The Z(PEA, eff) and Z(PI, eff) values have been found to change with energy and composition of the biological molecules. The energy...

  10. Molecular Wring Resonances in Chain Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the eigenfrequency of collective twist excitations in chain molecules can be in the megahertz and gigahertz range. Accordingly, resonance states can be obtained at specific frequencies, and phenomena that involve structural properties can take place. Chain molecules can alter the...... their conformation and their ability to function, and a breaking of the chain can result. It is suggested that this phenomenon forms the basis for effects caused by the interaction of microwaves and biomolecules, e.g. microwave assisted hydrolysis of chain molecules....

  11. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  12. Superexcited states of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Takagi, Hidekazu.

    1990-01-01

    The report addresses the nature and major features of molecule's superexcited states, focusing on their involvement in dynamic processes. It also outlines the quantum defect theory which allows various processes involving these states to be treated in a unified way. The Rydberg state has close relation with an ionized state with a positive energy. The quantum defect theory interprets such relation. Specifically, the report first describes the quantum defect theory focusing on its basic principle. The multi-channel quantum defect theory is then outlined centering on how to describe a Rydberg-type superexcited state. Description of a dissociative double-electron excited state is also discussed. The quantum defect theory is based on the fact that the physics of the motion of a Rydberg electron vary with the region in the electron's coordinate space. Finally, various molecular processes that involve a superexcited state are addressed focusing on autoionization, photoionization, dissociative recombination and bonding ionization of diatomic molecules. (N.K.)

  13. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  14. Extensive spectroscopic calculations of the 21 Λ-S and 74 Ω states of the AsN molecule including the spin–orbit coupling effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hui; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2015-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 74 Ω states generated from the 21 Λ-S states of AsN molecule are studied for the first time for internuclear separations from 0.1 to 1.0 nm. Of these 21 Λ-S states, the X 1 Σ + , a′ 3 Σ + , 1 5 Σ + , 1 3 Δ, 1 3 Σ − , a 3 Π, 1 5 Π, 2 5 Σ + , 3 5 Σ + , 2 3 Δ, 2 3 Π, 3 3 Π, 3 5 Π, and A 1 Π states are found to be bound, and the 2 3 Σ + , 3 3 Σ + , 1 5 Σ − , 1 5 Δ, 2 5 Δ, 2 5 Π, and 1 7 Σ + states are found to be repulsive ones. The 3 3 Π state possesses the double well. The 2 5 Σ + , 3 5 Σ + , 3 5 Π, and 3 3 Π states possess the shallow well. The a′ 3 Σ + , 1 3 Σ − , 2 3 Π, 1 3 Δ, 1 5 Π, 2 5 Π, 3 5 Π, and 1 7 Σ + states are found to be the inverted ones with the spin–orbit coupling effect taken into account. The PECs are calculated using the CASSCF method, which is followed by the internally contracted MRCI approach with Davidson correction. Core–valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are included. The vibrational properties are evaluated for the 2 5 Σ + , 3 5 Σ + , and 3 5 Π states and the second well of the 3 3 Π state. The spin–orbit coupling effect is accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian. The PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated, and compared with available measurements and other theoretical results. The Franck–Condon factors and radiative lifetimes of the transitions from the a′ 3 Σ + 1 , a 3 Π 1 , A 1 Π 1 , 1 3 Δ 1 and a 3 Π 0− states to the X 1 Σ + 0+ state are calculated for several low vibrational levels, and some necessary discussion is performed. Analyses show that the spectroscopic parameters reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. - Highlights: • Effect of core–valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections is included. • PECs are extrapolated to the CBS limit for the 21 Λ-S states and

  15. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  16. Interstellar molecules and masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Q-Rieu; Guibert, J.

    1978-01-01

    The study of dense and dark clouds, in which hydrogen is mostly in molecular form, became possible since the discovery of interstellar molecules, emitting in the centimeter and millimeter wavelengths. The molecular lines are generally not in local thermal equilibrium (LTE). Their intensity can often be explained by invoking a population inversion mechanism. Maser emission lines due to OH, H 2 O and SiO molecules are among the most intense molecular lines. The H 2 CO molecule, detected in absorption in front of the cold cosmic background radiation of 2.7 K, illustrates the inverse phenomenon, the antimaser absorption. For a radio transition of frequency v, the inversion rate Δn (relative population difference between the upper and lower level) as well as the maser gain can be determined from the radio observations. In the case of the OH lines in the 2 PIsub(3/2), J=3/2 state, the inversion rates approximately 1 to 2% derived from the observations, are comparable with those obtained in the laboratory. The determination of the excitation mechanisms of the masers, through the statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer equations, implies the knowledge of collisional and radiative transition probabilities. A pumping model, which can satisfactorily explain the radio observations of some interstellar OH clouds, will be discussed [fr

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Curcumol on Jak2-STAT Signal Pathway Molecules of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperplasia of synovial membrane in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a critical pathological foundation for inducing articular injury. The janus kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription (Jak-STAT pathway plays a critical role in synovial membrane proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF. To explore the anti-cell proliferation mechanism of curcumol, a pure monomer extracted from Chinese medical plant zedoary rhizome, the changes of Jak2-STAT1/3 signal pathway-related molecules in synoviocytes were observed in vitro. In this study, the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS in patients with RA were collected and cultured. The following parameters were measured: cell proliferation (WST-1 assay, cell cycles (fluorescence-activated cell sorting, FACS, STAT1 and STAT3 activities (electrophoretic mobility shift assay, EMSA, and the protein expressions of phosphorylated Jak2, STAT1, and STAT3 (Western blot. It was shown that curcumol could inhibit the RA-FLS proliferation and DNA synthesis induced by PDGF-BB in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. The transcription factors activities of STAT1 and STAT3 were obviously elevated after PDGF-BB stimulation (P<0.05. Super-shift experiments identified the STAT1 or STAT3 proteins in the complex. Furthermore, the different concentration curcumol could downregulate the DNA binding activities of STAT1 and STAT3 (P<0.05 and inhibit the phosphorylation of Jak2 while it had no effect on the protein expressions of STAT1 and STAT3. Positive correlations were found between changes of cell proliferation and DNA-binding activities of STAT1 and STAT3, respectively (P<0.01. In conclusion, curcumol might suppress the FLS proliferation and DNA synthesis induced by PDGF-BB through attenuating Jak2 phosphorylation, downregulating STAT1 and STAT3 DNA-binding activities, which could provide theoretical foundation for clinical treatment of RA.

  18. Effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines, AMP-activated protein kinase, and heat shock signal molecules in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Cheng, Jian-bo; Shi, Bao-lu; Yang, Hong-jian; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jia-qi

    2015-06-01

    Heat stress affects feed intake, milk production, and endocrine status in dairy cows. The temperature-humidity index (THI) is employed as an index to evaluate the degree of heat stress in dairy cows. However, it is difficult to ascertain whether THI is the most appropriate measurement of heat stress in dairy cows. This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and heat shock signal molecules (heat shock transcription factor (HSF) and heat shock proteins (HSP)) in dairy cows and to research biomarkers to be used for better understanding the meaning of THI as a bioclimatic index. To achieve these objectives, two experiments were performed. The first experiment: eighteen lactating Holstein dairy cows were used. The treatments were: heat stress (HS, THI average=81.7, n=9) and cooling (CL, THI average=53.4, n=9). Samples of HS were obtained on August 16, 2013, and samples of CL were collected on April 7, 2014 in natural conditions. The second experiment: HS treatment cows (n=9) from the first experiment were fed for 8 weeks from August 16, 2013 to October 12, 2013. Samples for moderate heat stress, mild heat stress, and no heat stress were obtained, respectively, according to the physical alterations of the THI. Results showed that heat stress significantly increased the serum adiponectin, AMPK, HSF, HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90 (Pdairy cows. When heat stress treatment lasted 8 weeks, a higher expression of HSF and HSP70 was observed under moderate heat stress. Serum HSF and HSP70 are sensitive and accurate in heat stress and they could be potential indicators of animal response to heat stress. We recommend serum HSF and HSP70 as meaningful biomarkers to supplement the THI and evaluate moderate heat stress in dairy cows in the future.

  19. Effect of nuclear factor kappa B on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression and neutrophil infiltration in lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao-Feng; Yao, Ji-Hong; Li, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Xue-Song; Feng, Bing-An; Yang, Chun-Ming; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the pathogenesis of lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and its effect on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and neutrophil infiltration. METHODS: Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided randomly into control, I/R and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) treatment groups, n = 8 in each. I/R group and PDTC treatment group received superior mysenteric artery (SMA) occluding for 1 h and reperfusion for 2 h. PDTC group was administrated with intraperitoneal injection of 2% 100 mg/kg PDTC 1 h before surgery. Lung histology and bronchia alveolus lung fluid (BALF) protein were assayed. Serum IL-6, lung malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) as well as the expression level of NF-κB and ICAM-1 were measured. RESULTS: Lung injury induced by intestinal I/R, was characterized by edema, hemorrhage and neutrophil infiltration as well as by the significant rising of BALF protein. Compared to control group, the levels of serum IL-6 and lung MDA and MPO increased significantly in I/R group (P = 0.001). Strong positive expression of NF-κB p65 and ICAM-1 was observed. After the administration of PDTC, the level of serum IL-6, lung MDA and MPO as well as NF-κB and ICAM-1 decreased significantly (P < 0.05) when compared to I/R group. CONCLUSION: The activation of NF-κB plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lung injury induced by intestinal I/R through upregulating the neutrophil infiltration and lung ICAM-1 expression. PDTC as an inhibitor of NF-κB can prevent lung injury induced by intestinal I/R through inhibiting the activity of NF-κB. PMID:16489637

  20. Small Molecule Acceptor and Polymer Donor Crystallinity and Aggregation Effects on Microstructure Templating: Understanding Photovoltaic Response in Fullerene-Free Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastham, Nicholas D.; Dudnik, Alexander S.; Aldrich, Thomas J.; Manley, Eric F.; Fauvell, Thomas J.; Hartnett, Patrick E.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Chen, Lin X.; Melkonyan, Ferdinand S.; Facchetti, Antonio; Chang, Robert P. H.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2017-05-10

    Perylenediimide (PDI) small molecule acceptor (SMA) crystallinity and donor polymer aggregation and crystallinity effects on bulk-heterojunction microstructure and polymer solar cell (PSC) performance are systematically investigated. Two highperformance polymers, semicrystalline poly[5-(2-hexyldodecyl)-4Hthieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6(5H)-dione-1,3-yl-alt-4,4''dodecyl-2,2':5',2''- terthiophene-5,5''-diyl] (PTPD3T or D1) and amorphous poly{4,8- bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene- 2,6-diyl-alt-(4-(2-ethylhexyl)-3-fluorothieno[3,4-b]thiophene-2-carboxylate-2,6-diyl) (PBDTT-FTTE or D2), are paired with three PDI-based SMAs (A1-A3) of differing crystallinity (A1 is the most, A3 is the least crystalline). The resulting PSC performance trends are strikingly different from those of typical fullerene-based PSCs and are highly material-dependent. The present trends reflect synergistic aggregation propensities between the SMA and polymer components. Importantly, the active layer morphology is templated by the PDI in some blends and by the polymer in others, with the latter largely governed by the polymer aggregation. Thus, PTPD3T templating capacity increases as self-aggregation increases (greater Mn), optimizing PSC performance with A2, while A3-based cells exhibit an inverse relationship between polymer aggregation and performance, which is dramatically different from fullerene-based PSCs. For PBDTT-FTTE, A2-based cells again deliver the highest PCEs of ~5%, but here both A2 and PBDTT-FTTE (medium Mn) template the morphology. Overall, the present results underscore the importance of nonfullerene acceptor aggregation for optimizing PSC performance and offer guidelines for pairing SMAs with acceptable donor polymers.

  1. Sandwich-type mixed tetrapyrrole rare-earth triple-decker compounds. Effect of the coordination geometry on the single-molecule-magnet nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Jinglan; Wang, Hailong; Sun, Wei; Cao, Wei; Tao, Jun; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2013-08-05

    Employment of the raise-by-one step method starting from M(TClPP)(acac) (acac = monoanion of acetylacetone) and [Pc(OPh)8]M'[Pc(OPh)8] led to the isolation and free modulation of the two rare-earth ions in the series of four mixed tetrapyrrole dysprosium sandwich complexes {(TClPP)M[Pc(OPh)8]M'[Pc(OPh)8]} [1-4; TClPP = dianion of meso-tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl)porphyrin; Pc(OPh)8 = dianion of 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octa(phenoxyl)phthalocyanine; M-M' = Dy-Dy, Y-Dy, Dy-Y, and Y-Y]. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals different octacoordination geometries for the two metal ions in terms of the twist angle (defined as the rotation angle of one coordination square away from the eclipsed conformation with the other) between the two neighboring tetrapyrrole rings for the three dysprosium-containing isostructural triple-decker compounds, with the metal ion locating between an inner phthalocyanine ligand and an outer porphyrin ligand with a twist angle of 9.64-9.90° and the one between two phthalocyanine ligands of 25.12-25.30°. Systematic and comparative studies over the magnetic properties reveal magnetic-field-induced single-molecule magnet (SMM), SMM, and non-SMM nature for 1-3, respectively, indicating the dominant effect of the coordination geometry of the spin carrier, instead of the f-f interaction, on the magnetic properties. The present result will be helpful for the future design and synthesis of tetrapyrrole lanthanide SMMs with sandwich molecular structures.

  2. Effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines, AMP-activated protein kinase, and heat shock signal molecules in dairy cows*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Cheng, Jian-bo; Shi, Bao-lu; Yang, Hong-jian; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jia-qi

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress affects feed intake, milk production, and endocrine status in dairy cows. The temperature-humidity index (THI) is employed as an index to evaluate the degree of heat stress in dairy cows. However, it is difficult to ascertain whether THI is the most appropriate measurement of heat stress in dairy cows. This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and heat shock signal molecules (heat shock transcription factor (HSF) and heat shock proteins (HSP)) in dairy cows and to research biomarkers to be used for better understanding the meaning of THI as a bioclimatic index. To achieve these objectives, two experiments were performed. The first experiment: eighteen lactating Holstein dairy cows were used. The treatments were: heat stress (HS, THI average=81.7, n=9) and cooling (CL, THI average=53.4, n=9). Samples of HS were obtained on August 16, 2013, and samples of CL were collected on April 7, 2014 in natural conditions. The second experiment: HS treatment cows (n=9) from the first experiment were fed for 8 weeks from August 16, 2013 to October 12, 2013. Samples for moderate heat stress, mild heat stress, and no heat stress were obtained, respectively, according to the physical alterations of the THI. Results showed that heat stress significantly increased the serum adiponectin, AMPK, HSF, HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90 (Pheat-stressed dairy cows. When heat stress treatment lasted 8 weeks, a higher expression of HSF and HSP70 was observed under moderate heat stress. Serum HSF and HSP70 are sensitive and accurate in heat stress and they could be potential indicators of animal response to heat stress. We recommend serum HSF and HSP70 as meaningful biomarkers to supplement the THI and evaluate moderate heat stress in dairy cows in the future. PMID:26055916

  3. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals the effects of different cooling temperatures on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within human skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, O.; Fukubayashi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of local cooling on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within muscle at different cooling temperatures. Materials and methods: Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted (DW) images of the leg (seven males) were obtained before and after 30 min cooling (0, 10, and 20 o C), and after a 30 min recovery period. Two types of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; ADC1, reflecting both water diffusion and perfusion within muscle, and ADC2, approximating the true water diffusion coefficient) of the ankle dorsiflexors were calculated from DW images. T2-weighted images were also obtained to calculate T2 values of the ankle dorsiflexors. The skin temperature was measured before, during, and after cooling. Results: Both ADC values significantly decreased after cooling under all cooling conditions; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (ADC1: -36% at 0 o C, -27.8% at 10 o C, and -22.6% at 20 o C; ADC2: -26% at 0 o C, -21.1% at 10 o C, and -14.6% at 20 o C). These significant decreases were maintained during the recovery period. Conversely, the T2 value showed no significant changes. Under all cooling conditions, skin temperature significantly decreased during cooling; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (-74.8% at 0 o C, -51.1% at 10 o C, and -26.8% at 20 o C). Decreased skin temperatures were not restored to pre-cooling values during the recovery period under any cooling conditions. Conclusion: Local cooling decreased the water diffusion and perfusion within muscle with decreased skin temperature; the rates of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used. These decreases were maintained for 30 min after cooling.

  4. Effect of choline on antioxidant defenses and gene expressions of Nrf2 signaling molecule in the spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Gang-Fu; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shu-Hong; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-06-01

    The present work evaluates the effects of various levels of dietary choline on antioxidant defenses and gene expressions of Nrf2 signaling molecule in spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). Fish were fed with six different experimental diets containing graded levels of choline at 165 (choline-deficient control), 310, 607, 896, 1167 and 1820 mg kg(-1) diet for 65 days. At the end of the feeding trail, fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila and mortalities were recorded over 17 days. Dietary choline significantly decreased malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents in spleen and head kidney. However, anti-superoxide anion and anti-hydroxyl radical activities in spleen and head kidney also decreased. Interestingly, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) in spleen, GPx activity in head kidney, and glutathione contents in spleen and head kidney were decreased with increase of dietary choline levels up to a certain point, whereas, activities of SOD, GST and GR in head kidney showed no significantly differences among groups. Similarly, expression levels of CuZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT, GPx1a, GPx1b and GR gene in spleen and head kidney were significantly lower in group with choline level of 607 mg kg(-1) diet than those in the choline-deficient group. The relative gene expressions of Nrf2 in head kidney and Keap1a in spleen and head kidney were decreased with increasing of dietary choline up to a certain point. However, the relative gene expression of Nrf2 in spleen were not significantly affected by dietary choline. In conclusion, dietary choline decreased the oxidant damage and regulated the antioxidant system in immune organs of juvenile Jian carp. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancement of charge transport properties of small molecule semiconductors by controlling fluorine substitution and effects on photovoltaic properties of organic solar cells and perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jae Hoon; Park, Sungmin; Heo, Jin Hyuck; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Yoon, Seongwon; Kang, Jinback; Im, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok; Kim, BongSoo; Ko, Min Jae; Chung, Dae Sung; Son, Hae Jung

    2016-11-01

    We prepared a series of small molecules based on 7,7'-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4 H -silolo[3,2- b :4,5- b ']dithiophene-2,6-diyl)bis(4-(5'-hexyl-[2,2'-bithiophene]-5-yl)benzo[ c ][1,2,5]thiadiazole) with different fluorine substitution patterns ( 0F-4F ). Depending on symmetricity and numbers of fluorine atoms incorporated in the benzo[ c ][1,2,5]thiadiazole unit, they show very different optical and morphological properties in a film. 2F and 4F , which featured symmetric and even-numbered fluorine substitution patterns, display improved molecular packing structures and higher crystalline properties in a film compared with 1F and 3F and thus, 2F achieved the highest OTFT mobility, which is followed by 4F . In the bulk heterojunction solar cell fabricated with PC 71 BM, 2F achieves the highest photovoltaic performance with an 8.14% efficiency and 0F shows the lowest efficiency of 1.28%. Moreover, the planar-type perovskite solar cell (PSC) prepared with 2F as a dopant-free hole transport material shows a high power conversion efficiency of 14.5% due to its high charge transporting properties, which were significantly improved compared with the corresponding PSC device obtained from 0F (8.5%). From the studies, it is demonstrated that low variation in the local dipole moment and the narrow distribution of 2F conformers make intermolecular interactions favorable, which may effectively drive crystal formations in the solid state and thus, higher charge transport properties compared with 1F and 3F .

  6. Preclinical evaluation of the imipridone family, analogs of clinical stage anti-cancer small molecule ONC201, reveals potent anti-cancer effects of ONC212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jessica; Kline, Christina Leah; Ralff, Marie D; Lev, Avital; Lulla, Amriti; Zhou, Lanlan; Olson, Gary L; Nallaganchu, Bhaskara Rao; Benes, Cyril H; Allen, Joshua E; Prabhu, Varun V; Stogniew, Martin; Oster, Wolfgang; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-10-02

    Anti-cancer small molecule ONC201 upregulates the integrated stress response (ISR) and acts as a dual inactivator of Akt/ERK, leading to TRAIL gene activation. ONC201 is under investigation in multiple clinical trials to treat patients with cancer. Given the unique imipridone core chemical structure of ONC201, we synthesized a series of analogs to identify additional compounds with distinct therapeutic properties. Several imipridones with a broad range of in vitro potencies were identified in an exploration of chemical derivatives. Based on in vitro potency in human cancer cell lines and lack of toxicity to normal human fibroblasts, imipridones ONC206 and ONC212 were prioritized for further study. Both analogs inhibited colony formation, and induced apoptosis and downstream signaling that involves the integrated stress response and Akt/ERK, similar to ONC201. Compared to ONC201, ONC206 demonstrated improved inhibition of cell migration while ONC212 exhibited rapid kinetics of activity. ONC212 was further tested in >1000 human cancer cell lines in vitro and evaluated for safety and anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. ONC212 exhibited broad-spectrum efficacy at nanomolar concentrations across solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Skin cancer emerged as a tumor type with improved efficacy relative to ONC201. Orally administered ONC212 displayed potent anti-tumor effects in vivo, a broad therapeutic window and a favorable PK profile. ONC212 was efficacious in vivo in BRAF V600E melanoma models that are less sensitive to ONC201. Based on these findings, ONC212 warrants further development as a drug candidate. It is clear that therapeutic utility extends beyond ONC201 to include additional imipridones.

  7. Specific Effects of Oxygen Molecule and Plasma on Thin-Film Growth of Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-(Ca)-Cu-O Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tamio; Horie, Munehiro; Hirate, Naoki; Itoh, Katsutoshi; Yamada, Satoshi; Tada, Masaki; Itoh, Ken-ichi; Sugiyama, Morihiro; Sano, Shinji; Watabe, Kinji

    1998-07-01

    Thin films of a-oriented YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO), Ca-doped c-oriented Bi2(Sr,Ca)2CuOx and nondoped c-oriented Bi2Sr2CuOx (Bi2201) were prepared at low temperatures by ion beam sputtering with supply of oxygen molecules or plasma. The plasma enhances crystal growth of the a-YBCO and Ca-doped Bi2201 phases. This can be interpreted in terms of their higher surface energies. The growth and quality of nondoped Bi2201 are improved with the supply of oxygen molecules. This particular result could be interpreted by the collision process between the oxygen molecules and the sputtered particles.

  8. In vitro effects of a small-molecule antagonist of the Tcf/ß-catenin complex on endometrial and endometriotic cells of patients with endometriosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Matsuzaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous studies suggested that aberrant activation of Wnt/ß-catenin signaling might be involved in the pathophysiology of endometriosis. We hypothesized that inhibition of Wnt/ß-catenin signaling might result in inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, and/or invasion of endometrial and endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells of patients with endometriosis. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a small-molecule antagonist of the Tcf/ß-catenin complex (PKF 115-584 on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of endometrial and endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells. METHODS: One hundred twenty-six patients (78 with and 48 without endometriosis with normal menstrual cycles were recruited. In vitro effects of PKF 115-584 on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and on the Tcf/ß-catenin target genes were evaluated in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells of patients with and without endometriosis, and in endometrial and endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells of the same patients. RESULTS: The inhibitory effects of PKF 115-584 on cell migration and invasion in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells of patients with endometriosis prepared from the menstrual phase were significantly higher than those of patients without endometriosis. Levels of total and active forms of MMP-9 were significantly higher in epithelial and stromal cells prepared from menstrual endometrium in patients with endometriosis compared to patients without endometriosis. Treatment with PKF 115-584 inhibited MMP-9 activity to undetectable levels in both menstrual endometrial epithelial and stromal cells of patients with endometriosis. The number of invasive cells was significantly higher in epithelial and stromal cells of endometriotic tissue compared with matched eutopic endometrium of the same patients. Treatment with PKF 115-584 decreased the number of invasive endometriotic epithelial cells by 73

  9. Xyloketal-derived small molecules show protective effect by decreasing mutant Huntingtin protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans model of Huntington’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng YX

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yixuan Zeng,1,2,* Wenyuan Guo,1,* Guangqing Xu,3 Qinmei Wang,4 Luyang Feng,1,2 Simei Long,1 Fengyin Liang,1 Yi Huang,1 Xilin Lu,1 Shichang Li,5 Jiebin Zhou,5 Jean-Marc Burgunder,6 Jiyan Pang,5 Zhong Pei1,2 1Department of Neurology, National Key Clinical Department and Key Discipline of Neurology, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Major Neurological Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 2Guangzhou Center, Chinese Huntington’s Disease Network, 3Department of Rehabilitation, The First Affiliated Hospital, 4Key laboratory on Assisted Circulation, Ministry of Health, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine of the First Affiliated Hospital, 5School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 6Swiss Huntington’s Disease Center, Department of Neurology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Huntington’s disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with chorea as the most prominent manifestation. The disease is caused by abnormal expansion of CAG codon repeats in the IT15 gene, which leads to the expression of a glutamine-rich protein named mutant Huntingtin (Htt. Because of its devastating disease burden and lack of valid treatment, development of more effective therapeutics for Huntington’s disease is urgently required. Xyloketal B, a natural product from mangrove fungus, has shown protective effects against toxicity in other neurodegenerative disease models such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. To identify potential neuroprotective molecules for Huntington’s disease, six derivatives of xyloketal B were screened in a Caenorhabditis elegans Huntington’s disease model; all six compounds showed a protective effect. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 1 could bind to residues GLN369 and GLN393 of the mutant Htt protein, forming a

  10. Tuning crystal polymorphs of a Π-extended tetrathiafulvalene-based cruciform molecule towards high-performance organic field-effect transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Linlin; Dong, Huanli; Li, Qingyuan

    2017-01-01

    It is a common phenomenon for organic semiconductors to crystallize in two or more polymorphs, leading to various molecular packings and different charge transport properties. Therefore, it is a crucial issue of tuning molecular crystal polymorphs (i.e., adjusting the same molecule with different......)-based cruciform molecule, named as IF-TTF. The charge carrier mobility of the α-phase IF-TTF crystals was more than one order of magnitude higher than that of β-phase crystals, suggesting the importance of reasonably tuning molecular packing in solid state for the improvement of charge transport in organic...... semiconductors...

  11. Quark chemistry: charmonium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rujula, A.; Jaffe, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidence for two quark-two antiquark hadrons is reviewed. Concentration is placed on predictions for S-wave ''charmonium molecules,'' built of a c anti c charmonium pair and a light quark-antiquark pair. Their spectrum and quantum numbers are predicted and an estimate of their decay couplings and their prediction in monochromatic pion decays from charmonium resonances produced in e + e - -annihilation is given. Some S-wave charmonium resonances should be detectable in these decays, but typical branching ratios are only at the 1% level. 19 references

  12. Effects of electron-withdrawing group and electron-donating core combinations on physical properties and photovoltaic performance in D-pi-A star-shaped small molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luponosov, Yuriy N.; Min, Jie; Solodukhin, Alexander N.; Kozlov, Oleg V.; Obrezkova, Marina A.; Peregudova, Svetlana M.; Ameri, Tayebeh; Chvalun, Sergei N.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Brabec, Christoph J.; Ponomarenko, Sergei A.

    The first representatives of star-shaped molecules having 3-alkylrhodanine (alkyl-Rh) electron-withdrawing groups, linked through bithiophene pi-spacer with electron-donating either triphenylamine (TPA) or tris(2-methoxyphenyl)amine (m-TPA) core were synthesized. The physical properties and

  13. Coherent Bichromatic Force Deflection of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Aldridge, Leland; Yu, Phelan; Eyler, Edward E.; Doyle, John M.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the effect of the coherent optical bichromatic force on a molecule, the polar free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). A dual-frequency retroreflected laser beam addressing the X˜2Σ+↔A˜2Π1 /2 electronic transition coherently imparts momentum onto a cryogenic beam of SrOH. This directional photon exchange creates a bichromatic force that transversely deflects the molecules. By adjusting the relative phase between the forward and counterpropagating laser beams we reverse the direction of the applied force. A momentum transfer of 70 ℏk is achieved with minimal loss of molecules to dark states. Modeling of the bichromatic force is performed via direct numerical solution of the time-dependent density matrix and is compared with experimental observations. Our results open the door to further coherent manipulation of molecular motion, including the efficient optical deceleration of diatomic and polyatomic molecules with complex level structures.

  14. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  15. Stochastic models for surface diffusion of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.shea@dal.ca; Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2014-07-28

    We derive a stochastic model for the surface diffusion of molecules, starting from the classical equations of motion for an N-atom molecule on a surface. The equation of motion becomes a generalized Langevin equation for the center of mass of the molecule, with a non-Markovian friction kernel. In the Markov approximation, a standard Langevin equation is recovered, and the effect of the molecular vibrations on the diffusion is seen to lead to an increase in the friction for center of mass motion. This effective friction has a simple form that depends on the curvature of the lowest energy diffusion path in the 3N-dimensional coordinate space. We also find that so long as the intramolecular forces are sufficiently strong, memory effects are usually not significant and the Markov approximation can be employed, resulting in a simple one-dimensional model that can account for the effect of the dynamics of the molecular vibrations on the diffusive motion.

  16. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  17. The Effects of Different Electron-Phonon Couplings on the Spectral and Transport Properties of Small Molecule Single-Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Antonio Perroni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spectral and transport properties of small molecule single-crystal organic semiconductors have been theoretically analyzed focusing on oligoacenes, in particular on the series from naphthalene to rubrene and pentacene, aiming to show that the inclusion of different electron-phonon couplings is of paramount importance to interpret accurately the properties of prototype organic semiconductors. While in the case of rubrene, the coupling between charge carriers and low frequency inter-molecular modes is sufficient for a satisfactory description of spectral and transport properties, the inclusion of electron coupling to both low-frequency inter-molecular and high-frequency intra-molecular vibrational modes is needed to account for the temperature dependence of transport properties in smaller oligoacenes. For rubrene, a very accurate analysis in the relevant experimental configuration has allowed for the clarification of the origin of the temperature-dependent mobility observed in these organic semiconductors. With increasing temperature, the chemical potential moves into the tail of the density of states corresponding to localized states, but this is not enough to drive the system into an insulating state. The mobility along different crystallographic directions has been calculated, including vertex corrections that give rise to a transport lifetime one order of magnitude smaller than the spectral lifetime of the states involved in the transport mechanism. The mobility always exhibits a power-law behavior as a function of temperature, in agreement with experiments in rubrene. In systems gated with polarizable dielectrics, the electron coupling to interface vibrational modes of the gate has to be included in addition to the intrinsic electron-phonon interaction. While the intrinsic bulk electron-phonon interaction affects the behavior of mobility in the coherent regime below room temperature, the coupling with interface modes is dominant for the

  18. Rhesus factor modulation of effects of smoking and age on psychomotor performance, intelligence, personality profile, and health in Czech soldiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Flegr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rhesus-positive and rhesus-negative persons differ in the presence-absence of highly immunogenic RhD protein on the erythrocyte membrane. This protein is a component of NH(3 or CO(2 pump whose physiological role is unknown. Several recent studies have shown that RhD positivity protects against effects of latent toxoplasmosis on motor performance and personality. It is not known, however, whether the RhD phenotype modifies exclusively the response of the body to toxoplasmosis or whether it also influences effects of other factors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present cohort study, we searched for the effects of age and smoking on performance, intelligence, personality and self-estimated health and wellness in about 3800 draftees. We found that the positive effect of age on performance and intelligence was stronger in RhD-positive soldiers, while the negative effect of smoking on performance and intelligence was of similar size regardless of the RhD phenotype. The effect of age on four Cattell's personality factors, i.e., dominance (E, radicalism (Q(1, self-sentiment integration (Q(3, and ergic tension (Q(4, and on Cloninger's factor reward dependency (RD was stronger for RhD-negative than RhD-positive subjects, while the effect of smoking on the number of viral and bacterial diseases was about three times stronger for RhD-negative than RhD-positive subjects. CONCLUSIONS: RhD phenotype modulates the influence not only of latent toxoplasmosis, but also of at least two other potentially detrimental factors, age and smoking, on human behavior and physiology. The negative effect of smoking on health (estimated on the basis of the self-rated number of common viral and bacterial diseases in the past year was much stronger in RhD-negative than RhD-positive subjects. It is critically needed to confirm the differences in health response to smoking between RhD-positive and RhD-negative subjects by objective medical examination in

  19. The effect of environmental factors on the electrical conductivity of a single oligo-DNA molecule measured using single-walled carbon nanotube nanoelectrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedala, Harindra; Roy, Somenath; Choi, Wonbong; Doud, Melissa; Mathee, Kalai; Hwang, Sookhyun; Jeon, Minhyon

    2008-01-01

    We present an electrical conductivity study on a double-stranded DNA molecule bridging a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) gap. The amine terminated DNA molecule was trapped between carboxyl functionalized SWNT electrodes by dielectrophoresis. The conductivity of DNA was measured while under the influence of various environmental factors, including salt concentration, counterion variation, pH and temperature. Typically, a current of tens of picoamperes at 1 V was observed at ambient conditions, with a decrease in conductance of about 33% in high vacuum conditions. The counterion variation was analyzed by changing the buffer from sodium acetate to tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane, which resulted in a two orders of magnitude increase in the conductivity of the DNA. A reversible shift in the current signal was observed for pH variation. An increase in conductivity of the DNA was also observed at high salt concentrations

  20. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.