WorldWideScience

Sample records for educational delivery strategies

  1. Effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education: a systematic review and practice guideline recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Audrey Jusko; Cosby, Roxanne; Boyko, Susan; Hatton-Bauer, Jane; Turnbull, Gale

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education (PE). A systematic review was conducted and reviews with or without meta-analyses, which examined teaching strategies and methods of delivery for PE, were included. Teaching strategies identified are traditional lectures, discussions, simulated games, computer technology, written material, audiovisual sources, verbal recall, demonstration, and role playing. Methods of delivery focused on how to deliver the teaching strategies. Teaching strategies that increased knowledge, decreased anxiety, and increased satisfaction included computer technology, audio and videotapes, written materials, and demonstrations. Various teaching strategies used in combination were similarly successful. Moreover, structured-, culturally appropriate- and patient-specific teachings were found to be better than ad hoc teaching or generalized teaching. Findings provide guidance for establishing provincial standards for the delivery of PE. Recommendations concerning the efficacy of the teaching strategies and delivery methods are provided.

  2. Evaluation strategies for midwifery education linked to digital media and distance delivery technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Judith T; Ingle, Henry T

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the teaching and learning process for health professionals is the acquisition of a fundamental core of knowledge, the demonstration of critical thinking ability, and the demonstration of competency in the performance of clinical skills. Teaching and learning in distance education programs require that the administration, teachers, and students be creative in developing evaluation strategies that can be adapted to the challenges of the cyberspace on-line educational environment. Evaluation standards for distance education programs recently have been delineated by federal agencies, private organizations, and academic accreditation associations. These standards are linked to principles of sound education practice that promote program quality, high levels of student-faculty interaction, and support effective teaching and learning in the distance education context. A growing body of evidence supports the conclusion that technology-enhanced teaching is equivalent in effectiveness compared with traditional methods when student-learning outcomes are the focus of measurement. An allied body of literature offers model approaches that can be useful to educators who must also conduct the evaluation of clinical skills, provide feedback, and promote socialization to the nurse-midwifery/midwifery role for students being educated in whole or in part through instruction delivered at a distance.

  3. Information needs, preferred educational messages and channel of delivery, and opinion on strategies to promote organ donation: a multicultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, L P

    2010-10-01

    This study assessed the information needs, preferred educational messages and channels of delivery, as well as opinions on strategies to promote organ donation. It aimed to provide insight into a culturally sensitive public education campaign to encourage organ donation in diverse ethnic communities in Asia, namely the Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 17 focus group discussions with 105 participants were conducted between September and December 2008. The participants were members of the general public aged 18 to 60 years, who were recruited through convenient sampling in the Klang Valley area of Malaysia. Across ethnic groups, there was a general concern about the mistreatment of the deceased's body in the organ procurement process. The Chinese and Indian participants wanted assurance that the body would be treated with respect and care. The Muslims wanted assurance that the handling of a Muslim's body would follow the rules and regulations of the Islamic faith. The most important information requested by the Muslim participants was whether cadaveric donation is permissible in Islam. A lack of national public education and promotion of organ donation was noted. All the three ethnic groups, especially the Malays, required community and religious leaders for support, encouragement and involvement, as sociocultural influences play a significant role in the willingness to donate organs. The pronounced ethnic differences in information needs suggest that culturally sensitive public educational messages are required. Organ donation and transplantation organisations should work closely with community and religious organisations to address the sociocultural barriers identified.

  4. Redefining continuing education delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, K H

    1997-01-01

    Just as technology is transforming the delivery of education, the Internet and advanced telecommunication applications are changing the "face" of CE and the connotation of "lifelong learning." As late as the mid-1980s, a discussion of computer applications in nursing CE focused on the "timely" transition to microcomputers as tools for the enhancement of managerial tasks for increased productivity. Even as recently as 1990, there seemed to be "time" for those providers who were "slower to adopt innovation" to "catch up." Now, the CE provider who does not integrate the microcomputer and advanced telecommunications as an integral component of their delivery modalities may be outsourced rapidly by an educational or commercial competitive unit that is able to utilize the communication medium, mergers and partnerships, enterprise, and individual lifestyle and learning patterns that will epitomize the CE unit of the 21st century. As with the "re-engineering" of nursing education, the "re-engineered" delivery modalities of evolving CE entity might now best be conceptualized on a continuum from the traditional mode that time and place dependent to a mode of synchronous and asynchronous data and advanced telecommunication. Delivery methods will need to be selected according to the target populations, content, and situation. The health-care educational provider may discover, as in other industries, that a combination of distance and residential offerings will be the most successful medium for the delivery of CE to the progressively more "information and technologically savvy" lifelong learner of the 21st century. In addressing the dramatic effects of the information technology era on the refocused multimedia/interactive delivery method for student education, educators amply quoted Bob Dylan's phrase of the 1960s, "The times, they are a-changing." And so, we see that the times are also changing at an astronomical rate for the health-care educational provider as well as the

  5. Biology Education Delivery for Attaining Health-specific Millennium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biology Education Delivery for Attaining Health-specific Millennium ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... This study investigated the strategies for ensuring effective delivery of Biology Education at the secondary school level ...

  6. Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reena Aggarwal,1,2 Tim Swanwick2 1Women's Health, Whittington Health, London, UK; 2Health Education England, North Central and East London, London, UK Abstract: Achieving high quality health care against a background of continual change, increasing demand, and shrinking financial resource is a major challenge. However, there is significant international evidence that when clinicians use their voices and values to engage with system delivery, operational efficiency and care outcomes are improved. In the UK National Health Service, the traditional divide between doctors and managers is being bridged, as clinical leadership is now foregrounded as an important organizational priority. There are 60,000 doctors in postgraduate training (junior doctors in the UK who provide the majority of front-line patient care and form an "operating core" of most health care organizations. This group of doctors is therefore seen as an important resource in initiating, championing, and delivering improvement in the quality of patient care. This paper provides a brief overview of leadership theories and constructs that have been used to develop a raft of interventions to develop leadership capability among junior doctors. We explore some of the approaches used, including competency frameworks, talent management, shared learning, clinical fellowships, and quality improvement. A new paradigm is identified as necessary to make a difference at a local level, which moves learning and leadership away from developing "leaders", to a more inclusive model of developing relationships between individuals within organizations. This shifts the emphasis from the development of a "heroic" individual leader to a more distributed model, where organizations are "leader-ful" and not just "well led" and leadership is centered on a shared vision owned by whole teams working on the frontline. Keywords: National Health Service, junior doctors, quality improvement, management, health care

  7. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Wei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the application of aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy in clinics, brain tumors are still a difficult health challenge due to their fast development and poor prognosis. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery systems, which increase drug accumulation in the tumor region and reduce toxicity in normal brain and peripheral tissue, are a promising new approach to brain tumor treatments. Since brain tumors exhibit many distinctive characteristics relative to tumors growing in peripheral tissues, potential targets based on continuously changing vascular characteristics and the microenvironment can be utilized to facilitate effective brain tumor-targeted drug delivery. In this review, we briefly describe the physiological characteristics of brain tumors, including blood–brain/brain tumor barriers, the tumor microenvironment, and tumor stem cells. We also review targeted delivery strategies and introduce a systematic targeted drug delivery strategy to overcome the challenges.

  8. Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Reena; Swanwick, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Achieving high quality health care against a background of continual change, increasing demand, and shrinking financial resource is a major challenge. However, there is significant international evidence that when clinicians use their voices and values to engage with system delivery, operational efficiency and care outcomes are improved. In the UK National Health Service, the traditional divide between doctors and managers is being bridged, as clinical leadership is now foregrounded as an important organizational priority. There are 60,000 doctors in postgraduate training (junior doctors) in the UK who provide the majority of front-line patient care and form an "operating core" of most health care organizations. This group of doctors is therefore seen as an important resource in initiating, championing, and delivering improvement in the quality of patient care. This paper provides a brief overview of leadership theories and constructs that have been used to develop a raft of interventions to develop leadership capability among junior doctors. We explore some of the approaches used, including competency frameworks, talent management, shared learning, clinical fellowships, and quality improvement. A new paradigm is identified as necessary to make a difference at a local level, which moves learning and leadership away from developing "leaders", to a more inclusive model of developing relationships between individuals within organizations. This shifts the emphasis from the development of a "heroic" individual leader to a more distributed model, where organizations are "leader-ful" and not just "well led" and leadership is centered on a shared vision owned by whole teams working on the frontline.

  9. Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Reena; Swanwick, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Achieving high quality health care against a background of continual change, increasing demand, and shrinking financial resource is a major challenge. However, there is significant international evidence that when clinicians use their voices and values to engage with system delivery, operational efficiency and care outcomes are improved. In the UK National Health Service, the traditional divide between doctors and managers is being bridged, as clinical leadership is now foregrounded as an important organizational priority. There are 60,000 doctors in postgraduate training (junior doctors) in the UK who provide the majority of front-line patient care and form an “operating core” of most health care organizations. This group of doctors is therefore seen as an important resource in initiating, championing, and delivering improvement in the quality of patient care. This paper provides a brief overview of leadership theories and constructs that have been used to develop a raft of interventions to develop leadership capability among junior doctors. We explore some of the approaches used, including competency frameworks, talent management, shared learning, clinical fellowships, and quality improvement. A new paradigm is identified as necessary to make a difference at a local level, which moves learning and leadership away from developing “leaders”, to a more inclusive model of developing relationships between individuals within organizations. This shifts the emphasis from the development of a “heroic” individual leader to a more distributed model, where organizations are “leader-ful” and not just “well led” and leadership is centered on a shared vision owned by whole teams working on the frontline. PMID:29355184

  10. E-learning strategies of higer education institutions : an exploraty study into the influence of environmental contingencies on strategic choices of higher education institutions with respect to integrating e-learning in their education delivery and support processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boezerooy, P.

    2006-01-01

    Looking back at the main research question of this thesis ¿how do higher education institutions differ in their strategic choices with respect to integrating e- Learning into their educational delivery processes and how can these differences be explained?¿ the results of this study showed that

  11. Permeation enhancer strategies in transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwah, Harneet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Today, ∼74% of drugs are taken orally and are not found to be as effective as desired. To improve such characteristics, transdermal drug delivery was brought to existence. This delivery system is capable of transporting the drug or macromolecules painlessly through skin into the blood circulation at fixed rate. Topical administration of therapeutic agents offers many advantages over conventional oral and invasive techniques of drug delivery. Several important advantages of transdermal drug delivery are prevention from hepatic first pass metabolism, enhancement of therapeutic efficiency and maintenance of steady plasma level of the drug. Human skin surface, as a site of drug application for both local and systemic effects, is the most eligible candidate available. New controlled transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) technologies (electrically-based, structure-based and velocity-based) have been developed and commercialized for the transdermal delivery of troublesome drugs. This review article covers most of the new active transport technologies involved in enhancing the transdermal permeation via effective drug delivery system.

  12. Towards effective extension delivery approach and strategies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards effective extension delivery approach and strategies for food security poverty ... Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1 (2010) > ... groups, promotion of best practices and environment friendly initiatives among others were recommended.

  13. Nonviral Delivery Systems For Cancer Gene Therapy: Strategies And Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Dongyoon; Le, Quoc-Viet; Park, Gyu Thae; Kwon, Taekhyun; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2018-01-19

    Gene therapy has been receiving widespread attention due to its unique advantage in regulating the expression of specific target genes. In the field of cancer gene therapy, modulation of gene expression has been shown to decrease oncogenic factors in cancer cells or increase immune responses against cancer. Due to the macromolecular size and highly negative physicochemical features of plasmid DNA, efficient delivery systems are an essential ingredient for successful gene therapy. To date, a variety of nanostructures and materials have been studied as nonviral gene delivery systems. In this review, we will cover nonviral delivery strategies for cancer gene therapy, with a focus on target cancer genes and delivery materials. Moreover, we will address current challenges and perspectives for nonviral delivery-based cancer gene therapeutics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Competitive Strategy in Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews strategic variables available to those planning continuing education marketing programs. Discusses generic competitive strategies: (1) overall cost leadership, (2) differentiation, and (3) specialization. Mentions several potential problems. (CH)

  15. Novel drug delivery strategies for porphyrins and porphyrin precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, D. I. J.; Donnelly, R. F.

    2009-06-01

    superficial lesions, such as actinic keratosis. In addition, photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is attracting increasing interest for the treatment of infection. However, delivery strategies for topical PDT and PACT are still based on application of rather simplistic cream and solution formulations, with little consideration given to thermodynamics, targeting or the physicochemical properties of the active agent. Purpose-designed dosage forms for topical delivery of aminolevulinic acid or its esters include creams containing penetration enhancers and/or iron chelators, pressure sensitive patches and bioadhesive patches. Such systems aim to enhance drug delivery across the stratum corneum and keratinised debris overlying neoplastic lesions and improve subsequent protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) production. The alternative to using porphyrin precursors is the use of pre-formed photosensitisers. However, owing to their relatively high molecular weights, conventional topical application is not appropriate. Innovative strategies, such as the use of needle-free injections and microneedle arrays, bypass the stratum corneum, enabling rapid and targeted delivery not only porphyrin precursors but also pre-formed photosensitisers. This presentation will review drug delivery work published to date in the fields of PDT and PACT. In addition, the benefits of employing the latest advances in pharmaceutical technology will be highlighted.

  16. Design and Development of an MPH Program for Distance Education Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Steven R. Hawks

    2008-01-01

    The Master-s of Public Health (MPH) degree is growing in popularity among a number of higher education institutions throughout the world as a distance education graduate program. This paper offers an overview of program design and development strategies that promote successful distance delivery of MPH programs. Design and development challenges are discussed in terms of type of distance delivery, accreditation, student demand, faculty development, user needs, course conte...

  17. [The development of novel tumor targeting delivery strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui-le; Jiang, Xin-guo

    2016-02-01

    Tumor is one of the most serious threats for human being. Although many anti-tumor drugs are approved for clinical use, the treatment outcome is still modest because of the poor tumor targeting efficiency and low accumulation in tumor. Therefore, it is important to deliver anti-tumor drug into tumor efficiently, elevate drug concentration in tumor tissues and reduce the drug distribution in normal tissues. And it has been one of the most attractive directions of pharmaceutical academy and industry. Many kinds of strategies, especially various nanoparticulated drug delivery systems, have been developed to address the critical points of complex tumor microenvironment, which are partially or mostly satisfied for tumor treatment. In this paper, we carefully reviewed the novel targeting delivery strategies developed in recent years. The most powerful method is passive targeting delivery based on the enhanced permeability and retention(EPR) effect, and most commercial nanomedicines are based on the EPR effect. However, the high permeability and retention require different particle sizes, thus several kinds of size-changeable nanoparticles are developed, such as size reducible particles and assemble particles, to satisfy the controversial requirement for particle size and enhance both tumor retention and penetration. Surface charge reversible nanoparticles also shows a high efficiency because the anionic charge in blood circulation and normal organs decrease the unintended internalization. The charge can change into positive in tumor microenvironment, facilitating drug uptake by tumor cells. Additionally, tumor microenvironment responsive drug release is important to decrease drug side effect, and many strategies are developed, such as p H sensitive release and enzyme sensitive release. Except the responsive nanoparticles, shaping tumor microenvironment could attenuate the barriers in drug delivery, for example, decreasing tumor collagen intensity and normalizing tumor

  18. Exploring educational disparities in risk of preterm delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Gry; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Mortensen, Laust

    2015-01-01

    data. METHODS: The study included data from 12 European cohorts from Denmark, England, France, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Italy, Portugal, and Spain. The cohorts included between 2434 and 99 655 pregnancies. The association between maternal education and preterm delivery (22-36 completed weeks...... characteristics. Nevertheless, there were similar educational differences in risk of preterm delivery in 8 of the 12 cohorts with slope index of inequality varying between 2.2 [95% CI 1.1, 3.3] and 4.0 [95% CI 1.4, 6.6] excess preterm deliveries per 100 singleton deliveries among the educationally most......BACKGROUND: An association between education and preterm delivery has been observed in populations across Europe, but differences in methodology limit comparability. We performed a direct cross-cohort comparison of educational disparities in preterm delivery based on individual-level birth cohort...

  19. Strategies in Development and Delivery of Nanotechnology Based Cosmetic Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Usama; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Khan, Ahmed Abdullah; Akhtar, Juber; Singh, Satya Prakash; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2018-03-26

    The science of formulation involving cosmetic ingredients has always been a challenge since the release of active components greatly depends upon the carrier system involved and the selectivity of skin barrier. The principle obstacle of the skin resides in the epidermis and it's hard for many active components to cross it. The formulation related factors like size of particles, viscosity and lipophilicity of the components also play an important role in permeation of the dermal composition. Though widely used; conventional creams and gels still struggle in terms of success. This work focuses on nano based formulation strategies for successful delivery of cosmetic agents. Novel strategies like nanoemulsion, nanogels, liposomes, aquasomes, niosomes, dendrimers and fullerenes have paved way for successful delivery of dermal formulations to desire depths in the skin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Overcoming the Challenges of siRNA Delivery: Nanoparticle Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajari, Neda; Mansoori, Behzad; Davudian, Sadaf; Mohammadi, Ali; Baradaran, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Despite therapeutics based on siRNA have an immense potential for the treatment of incurable diseases such as cancers. However, the in vivo utilization of siRNA and also the delivery of this agent to the target site is one of the most controversial challenges. The helpful assistance by nanoparticles can improve stable delivery and also enhance efficacy. More nanoparticle-based siRNA therapeutics is expected to become available in the near future. The search strategy followed the guidelines of the Centre of Reviews and Dissemination. The studies were identified from seven databases (Scopus, Web of Science, Academic Search Premiere, CINAHL, Medline Ovid, Eric and Cochrane Library). Studies was selected based on titles, abstracts and full texts. One hundred twenty nine papers were included in the review. These papers defined hurdles in RNAi delivery and also strategies to overcome these hurdles. This review discussed the existing hurdles for systemic administration of siRNA as therapeutic agents and highlights the various strategies to overcome these hurdles, including lipid-based nanoparticles and polymeric nanoparticles, and we also briefly reviewed chemical modification. Delivery of siRNA to the target site is the biggest challenge for its application in the clinic. The findings of this review confirmed by encapsulation siRNA in the nanoparticles can overcome these challenges. The rapid progress in nanotechnology has enabled the development of effective nanoparticles as the carrier for siRNA delivery. However, our data about siRNA-based therapeutics and also nanomedicine are still limited. More clinical data needs to be completely understood in the benefits and drawbacks of siRNA-based therapeutics. Prospective studies must pay attention to the in vivo safety profiles of the different delivery systems, including uninvited immune system stimulation and cytotoxicity. In essence, the development of nontoxic, biocompatible, and biodegradable delivery systems for

  1. Drug Delivery to CNS: Challenges and Opportunities with Emphasis on Biomaterials Based Drug Delivery Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambhla, Ekta; Shah, Viral; Baviskar, Kalpesh

    2016-01-01

    The current epoch has witnessed a lifestyle impregnated with stress, which is a major cause of several neurological disorders. High morbidity and mortality rate due to neurological diseases and disorders have generated a huge social impact. Despite voluminous research, patients suffering from fatal and/or debilitating CNS diseases such as brain tumors, HIV, encephalopathy, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, Parkinson's, migraine and multiple sclerosis outnumbered those suffering from systemic cancer or heart diseases. The brain being a highly sensitive neuronal organ, has evolved with vasculature barriers, which regulates the efflux and influx of substances to CNS. Treatment of CNS diseases/disorders is challenging because of physiologic, metabolic and biochemical obstacles created by these barriers which comprise mainly of BBB and BCFB. The inability of achieving therapeutically active concentration has become the bottleneck level difficulty, hampering the therapeutic efficiency of several promising drug candidates for CNS related disorders. Parallel maturation of an effective CNS drug delivery strategy with CNS drug discovery is the need of the hour. Recently, the focus of the pharmaceutical community has aggravated in the direction of developing novel and more efficient drug delivery systems, giving the potential of more effective and safer CNS therapies. The present review outlines several hurdles in drug delivery to the CNS along with ideal physicochemical properties desired in drug substance/formulation for CNS delivery. The review also focuses on different conventional and novel strategies for drug delivery to the CNS. The article also assesses and emphasizes on possible benefits of biomaterial based formulations for drug delivery to the CNS.

  2. Health education: concepts and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, T

    1996-03-01

    Physicians have a responsibility to educate people about their health as well as to treat them. In fact, achievement of "Health for All" requires that people become educated about immunization, nutrition, family planning, and environmental sanitation. The goal of health education is to change behavior by changing attitudes. Health education encourages self-reliance and motivates people to make their own health-related decisions. In order to reach patients, physicians must bridge the social gap created by the gulf between technical priorities and what is really possible for people to achieve. The process of health education moves from the sender to the message to the channel to the receivers to the effects. Appropriate methods can be used for individual or group communication and methods can focus on information provision and/or behavior change. Participatory methods are effective in changing behavior and include group analysis of a situation, group dialogue, persuasion, and educational games. An effective strategy for individual instruction is woman-to-woman or child-to-child communication, which depends upon the identification of "key" women and children. Development of a community-based health education strategy relies on community participation and the involvement of influential members of the community. After a message has been transmitted, innovators will begin the new practice, early adopters will follow, and slow adopters will wait and watch. The innovators and early adopters can help reduce resistance to the innovation. While it is a slow process, health education can improve attitudes and behavior.

  3. Exploring Different Strategies for Efficient Delivery of Colorectal Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the world. Currently available chemotherapy of CRC usually delivers the drug to both normal as well as cancerous tissues, thus leading to numerous undesirable effects. Much emphasis is being laid on the development of effective drug delivery systems for achieving selective delivery of the active moiety at the anticipated site of action with minimized unwanted side effects. Researchers have employed various techniques (dependent on pH, time, pressure and/or bacteria for targeting drugs directly to the colonic region. On the other hand, systemic drug delivery strategies to specific molecular targets (such as FGFR, EGFR, CD44, EpCAM, CA IX, PPARγ and COX-2 overexpressed by cancerous cells have also been shown to be effective. This review aims to put forth an overview of drug delivery technologies that have been, and may be developed, for the treatment of CRC.

  4. Oral insulin delivery: existing barriers and current counter-strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedawy, Ahmed; Martinez, Jorge; Al-Salami, Hani; Dass, Crispin R

    2018-02-01

    The chronic and progressive nature of diabetes is usually associated with micro- and macrovascular complications where failure of pancreatic β-cell function and a general condition of hyperglycaemia is created. One possible factor is failure of the patient to comply with and adhere to the prescribed insulin due to the inconvenient administration route. This review summarizes the rationale for oral insulin administration, existing barriers and some counter-strategies trialled. Oral insulin mimics the physiology of endogenous insulin secreted by pancreas. Following the intestinal absorption of oral insulin, it reaches the liver at high concentration via the portal vein. Oral insulin on the other hand has the potential to protect pancreatic β-cells from autoimmune destruction. Structural modification, targeting a particular tissue/receptor, and the use of innovative pharmaceutical formulations such as nanoparticles represent strategies introduced to improve oral insulin bioavailability. They showed promising results in overcoming the hurdles facing oral insulin delivery, although delivery is far from ideal. The use of advanced pharmaceutical technologies and further research in particulate carrier system delivery predominantly nanoparticle utilization would offer useful tools in delivering insulin via the oral route which in turn would potentially improve diabetic patient compliance to insulin and the overall management of diabetes. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Development of strategies to reduce cesarean delivery rates in iran 2012-2014: A mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the change in population policy from birth control toward encouraging birth and population growth in Iran, repeated cesarean deliveries as a main reason of cesarean section are associated with more potential adverse consequences. The aim of this research was to explore effective strategies to reduce cesarean delivery rates in Iran. Methods: A mixed methodological study was designed and implemented. First, using a qualitative approach, concepts and influencing factors of increased cesarean delivery were explored. Based on the findings of this phase of the study, a questionnaire including the proposed strategies to reduce cesarean delivery was developed. Then in a quantitative phase, the questionnaire was assessed by key informants from across the country and evaluated to obtain more effective strategies to reduce cesarean delivery. Ten participants in the qualitative study included policy makers from the Ministry of Health, obstetricians, midwives and anthropologists. In the next step, 141 participants from private and public hospitals, insurance experts, Academic Associations of Midwifery, and policy makers in Maternity Health Affairs of Ministry of Health were invited to assess and provide feedback on the strategies that work to reduce cesarean deliveries. Results: Qualitative data analysis showed four concept related to increased cesarean delivery rates including; "standardization", "education", "amending regulations", and "performance supervision". Effective strategies extracted from qualitative data were rated by participants then, using ACCEPT derived from A as attainability, C as costing, C as complication, E as effectiveness, P as popularity, and T as timing table 19 strategies were detected as priorities. Conclusions: Although developing effective strategies to reduce cesarean delivery rates is complex process because of the multi-factorial nature of increased cesarean deliveries, in this study we have achieved

  6. Five focus strategies to organize health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltokorpi, Antti; Linna, Miika; Malmström, Tomi; Torkki, Paulus; Lillrank, Paul Martin

    2016-01-01

    The focused factory is one of the concepts that decision-makers have adopted for improving health care delivery. However, disorganized definitions of focus have led to findings that cannot be utilized systematically. The purpose of this paper is to discuss strategic options to focus health care operations. First the literature on focus in health care is reviewed revealing conceptual challenges. Second, a definition of focus in terms of demand and requisite variety is defined, and the mechanisms of focus are explicated. A classification of five focus strategies that follow the original idea to reduce variety in products and markets is presented. Finally, the paper examines managerial possibilities linked to the focus strategies. The paper proposes a framework of five customer-oriented focus strategies which aim at reducing variety in different characteristics of care pathways: population; urgency and severity; illnesses and symptoms; care practices and processes; and care outcomes. Empirical research is needed to evaluate the costs and benefits of the five strategies and about system-level effects of focused units on competition and coordination. Focus is an enabling condition that needs to be exploited using specific demand and supply management practices. It is essential to understand how focus mechanisms differ between strategies, and to select focus that fits with organization's strategy and key performance indicators. Compared to previous more resource-oriented approaches, this study provides theoretically solid and practically relevant customer-oriented framework for focusing in health care.

  7. Engineering Design Education: Effect of Mode of Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Kinda Khalaf; Shadi Balawi; George W. Hitt; Mohammad A.M. Siddiqi

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the gradual transformation from traditional teaching to student-centered, pure problem-based-learning (PBL) in engineering design education. Three different PBL-based modes of delivery with various degrees of modulation or freedom were used in conjunction with the prescriptive design cycle. The aim is to study the effect of the mode of delivery (PBL at various degrees of integration) on engineering design education and design thinking skills, specifically on the developme...

  8. STRATEGIES AND PROSPECTS OF NASAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Gannu Praveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The recent advancement of nasal drug delivery systems has increased enormously and is gaining significant importance. Intranasal therapy has been an accepted form of treatment in the Ayurvedic system of Indian Medicine. The non-invasive delivery of nasal drug delivery systems made to exploit for the development of successful treatment. The advantages, disadvantages, mechanism of action and application of nasal drug delivery system in local delivery, systematic delivery, nasal vaccines and CNS...

  9. Toolbox of teaching strategies in nurse education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-hui Xu

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of teaching strategies that instructors can use to improve student learning. It is of great importance to select appropriate teaching strategies in nurse education to make the training more appealing and more effective. In this article, ten teaching strategies will be introduced to help instructors learn how to involve the teaching strategy in the nurse education. If using these strategies well, students are more likely to memorize the information associated with the lesson. Selection of teaching strategies appropriately is of great importance for nurse educators to deliver high-quality education.

  10. Faculty and Administrative Strategies for the Effective Implementation of Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milheim, William

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of distance education focuses on strategies for administrators and faculty to use to support the appropriate use of this educational format. Considers some of the advantages and disadvantages of distance education, financial support for the development and delivery of distance education courses, and needed faculty training. (Author/LRW)

  11. Formulation and delivery strategies of ibuprofen: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Jake; Afrose, Afrina; Islam, Nazrul

    2018-02-01

    Ibuprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is mostly administered orally and topically to relieve acute pain and fever. Due to its mode of action this drug may be useful in the treatment regimens of other, more chronic conditions, like cystic fibrosis. This drug is poorly soluble in aqueous media and thus the rate of dissolution from the currently available solid dosage forms is limited. This leads to poor bioavailability at high doses after oral administration, thereby increasing the risk of unwanted adverse effects. The poor solubility is a problem for developing injectable solution dosage forms. Because of its poor skin permeability, it is difficult to obtain an effective therapeutic concentration from topical preparations. This review aims to give a brief insight into the status of ibuprofen dosage forms and their limitations, particle/crystallization technologies for improving formulation strategies as well as suggesting its incorporation into the pulmonary drug delivery systems for achieving better therapeutic action at low dose.

  12. Online Instruction: An Alternative Delivery System for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronkovich, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In an increasingly technological society, delivery systems for professional development and higher education have greatly expanded. Video conferencing and web-based alternatives provide opportunities to extend the college campus far beyond the boundaries traditionally considered feasible. Adult learners have found the convenience of web-based…

  13. Seventeen Years of Delivery of Open and Distance Education by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventeen Years of Delivery of Open and Distance Education by The Open University of Tanzania (OUT) in East Africa and Beyond. ... This has necessitated the abandonment of the old annual confidential review forms used by most east African universities. The paper ends by highlighting the main prospects and ...

  14. The Impact of Water Shortages on Educational Delivery in Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of the study was to investigate the impact of water shortages on educational delivery in selected schools in Harare East District. The population included school heads, teachers and pupils all drawn from selected schools of Harare East District. The sample consisted of five school heads, fifty teachers and one ...

  15. Supervision and Quality Assurance Strategies in Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unique firstlady

    that an important division of the ministry of education must be empowered and ... regarded as the instrument for development and integration, hence concerted .... involves lesson plans, delivery methods, classroom organization and control .... Supervisory climate according to Adewumi and Ajayi (2001) is the interaction ...

  16. Formulation Strategies and Particle Engineering Technologies for Pulmonary Delivery of Biopharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cun, Dongmei; Wan, Feng; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-01-01

    . In this review we discussed the formulation strategies and particle engineering technologies to improve the efficiency of pulmonary delivery of biopharmaceutical, with a focus on systemic therapy of pharmaceutical proteins/peptides and local delivery of siRNA via the lung administration....

  17. Developing Strategies for Networked Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peregoy, Richard; Kroder, Stanley

    2000-01-01

    Assesses the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of the distance learning approach to education, and discusses how one institution, the University of Dallas Graduate School of Management, has developed a progressively expanding networked distance education program. Includes quotes from three students that suggest the quality of…

  18. Biotechnology Education: A Multiple Instructional Strategies Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Trey; Wells, John; White, Karissa

    2002-01-01

    Provides a rationale for inclusion of biotechnology in technology education. Describes an instructional strategy that uses behaviorist, cognitive, and constructivist learning theories in two activities involving photobioreactors and bovine somatotropin (growth hormone). (Contains 39 references.) (SK)

  19. Creating marketing strategies for higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Białoń

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a thesis that the primary premise of creating marketing strategies for higher education institution is a three-dimensional notion of marketing. The first dimension lies in the theoretical notions of the essence of marketing, including the transactional marketing (1.0, relationship marketing (2.0 and spiritual marketing (3.0. The second dimension is formed by methods of marketing research and accurate notions of marketing, while the third are channels of marketing information. Harmonizing these three dimensions is a precondition for effective marketing. Among other conditions for effective strategies there are: aligning goals of the chosen strategy with the mission of higher education institution, correct choice of targeted segments of the market and of marketing tools. The article also gives a sample classification of marketing strategies based on these criteria, with emphasis on the fact, that every higher education institution employs its own strategy.

  20. Strategies for Fostering Creativity Among Business Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings of the study reveal that the respondents agreed that the 20 creativity skill-items are needed by business education graduates. Furthermore, the study also show a no significant difference between the mean rating of opinion of male and female business educators on the strategies for fostering creativity among ...

  1. Supervision and Quality Assurance Strategies in Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the need for quality assurance and quality control strategies in improving the effectiveness of educational provision and teacher performance in schools. Governments all over the word in an attempt to educate and develop their citizens spend huge amount of money on teachers and schools but in most ...

  2. Modeling Strategies for Enhancing Educational Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, William K.; Bain, Olga

    2017-01-01

    With the strengthening of the global economy, contemporary societies have come to view the educational achievements of their young people as a major component of national competiveness. But there are substantial variations in the strategies employed by different nations. To maximize educational achievements, some nations believe that the provision…

  3. WTO and Lifelong Education Strategies for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-guo; Zheng, Yu

    2006-01-01

    After China's entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO), teachers have been confronted with many opportunities and challenges. Lifelong education strategies are problems we should take into account carefully. This article expounds the objective demands, ideas, content, measures and functions of lifelong education.

  4. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined.

  5. Vitamin A supplementation in Tanzania: the impact of a change in programmatic delivery strategy on coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekar Meera

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient delivery strategies for health interventions are essential for high and sustainable coverage. We report impact of a change in programmatic delivery strategy from routine delivery through the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI+ approach to twice-yearly mass distribution campaigns on coverage of vitamin A supplementation in Tanzania Methods We investigated disparities in age, sex, socio-economic status, nutritional status and maternal education within vitamin A coverage in children between 1 and 2 years of age from two independent household level child health surveys conducted (1 during a continuous universal targeting scheme based on routine EPI contacts for children aged 9, 15 and 21 months (1999; and (2 three years later after the introduction of twice-yearly vitamin A supplementation campaigns for children aged 6 months to 5 years, a 6-monthly universal targeting scheme (2002. A representative cluster sample of approximately 2,400 rural households was obtained from Rufiji, Morogoro Rural, Kilombero and Ulanga districts. A modular questionnaire about the health of all children under the age of five was administered to consenting heads of households and caretakers of children. Information on the use of child health interventions including vitamin A was asked. Results Coverage of vitamin A supplementation among 1–2 year old children increased from 13% [95% CI 10–18%] in 1999 to 76% [95%CI 72–81%] in 2002. In 2002 knowledge of two or more child health danger signs was negatively associated with vitamin A supplementation coverage (80% versus 70% (p = 0.04. Nevertheless, we did not find any disparities in coverage of vitamin A by district, gender, socio-economic status and DPT vaccinations. Conclusion Change in programmatic delivery of vitamin A supplementation was associated with a major improvement in coverage in Tanzania that was been sustained by repeated campaigns for at least three years. There is a

  6. Care delivery and self management strategies for children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bradley, Peter M; Lindsay, Bruce

    2015-12-23

    Epilepsy care for children has been criticised for its lack of impact. Various service models and strategies have been developed in response to perceived inadequacies in care provision for children and their families. To compare the effectiveness of any specialised or dedicated intervention for the care of children with epilepsy and their families to the effectiveness of usual care. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (9 December 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2013,Issue 11), MEDLINE (1946 to June week 2, 2013), EMBASE (1988 to week 25, 2013), PsycINFO (1887 to 11 December 2013) and CINAHL Plus (1937 to 11 December 2013). In addition, we contacted experts in the field to seek information on unpublished and ongoing studies, checked the websites of epilepsy organisations and checked the reference lists of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled or matched trials, cohort studies or other prospective studies with a control group (controlled before-and-after studies), or time series studies. Each review author independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed the quality of included studies. We included five interventions reported in seven study reports (of which only four studies of three interventions were designed as RCTs) in this review. They reported on different education and counselling programmes for children, children and parents, teenagers and parents, or children, adolescents and their parents. Each programme showed some benefits for the well-being of children with epilepsy, but each study had methodological flaws (e.g. in one of the studies designed as an RCT, randomisation failed) and no single programme was independently evaluated by more than one study. While each of the programmes in this review showed some benefit to children with epilepsy, their impacts were extremely variable. No programme showed benefits across the full

  7. Librarian instruction-delivery modality preferences for professional continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Valerie A; Bose, Arpita; Boehmer, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    Attending professional continuing education (CE) is an important component of librarianship. This research study identified librarians' preferences in delivery modalities of instruction for professional CE. The study also identified influential factors associated with attending CE classes. Five instruction-delivery modalities and six influential factors were identified for inclusion in an online survey. The survey completed by members of the American Library Association (ALA), Special Libraries Association (SLA), and Medical Library Association (MLA) provided the data for analysis of librarian preferences and influential factors. The majority of respondents were MLA members, followed by ALA and SLA members. Librarians from all three library associations preferred the face-to-face instructional modality. The most influential factor associated with the decision to attend a professional CE class was cost. All five instruction-delivery modalities present useful structures for imparting professional CE. As librarians' experience with different modalities increases and as technology improves, preferences in instruction delivery may shift. But at present, face-to-face remains the most preferred modality. Based on the results of this study, cost was the most influential factor associated with attending a CE class. This may change as additional influential factors are identified and analyzed in future studies.

  8. Pricing: A Normative Strategy in the Delivery of Human Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Stephen T.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a normative strategy toward pricing human services, which will allow providers to develop pricing strategies within the context of organizational missions, goals, and values. Pricing is an effective tool for distributing resources and improving efficiency, and can be used as a tool for encouraging desired patterns of service utilization.…

  9. BUSINESS AND EDUCATION: INNOVATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Yurasov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is written by postgraduate students of the Sociological Department of the Lomonosov Moscow State University on the results of a general discussion of the possibilities of innovative development through the prism of related fields of knowledge. It reflects the urgency of studying the processes taking place in various institutions of society and causing innovative development. The publication discusses the features of the functioning and interaction between the social institutions of business and education in the context of innovative processes occurring in Russia (low conversion fundamental knowledge in innovation, the inability of young people to engage in science, the specialists outflow from the country, maintaining a balance between traditions and innovations in education, closure of complex industries, and others. The analysis of existing theories and examples of successful interaction between education and business organized to obtain innovative developments are presented (MSU Science Park and others.The data on innovative business models implemented in the countries of the world (Russia, China, Singapore, the United States and the features of their implementation (the possibility of start-up visas, the problems of protecting the rights of entrepreneurs and investors, the time of launching the project and the idea before production, empirical data on the outflow of specialists From Russia, which is considered as one of the consequences of the lack of innovative production in Russia. The authors proposed the possible directions of the organization of education and innovative business, based on the successful experience of foreign countries. The article considers marketing mechanisms as a way of communication between education, business and government institutions in the creation and implementation of innovative developments in Russia, the peculiarities of marketing in the innovative context, in particular, the key role of

  10. Multidisciplinary perspectives for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases: hydrogels for protein delivery and cell-based drug delivery as therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carmen; Albani, Diego; Gloria, Antonio; Tunesi, Marta; Batelli, Sara; Russo, Teresa; Forloni, Gianluigi; Ambrosio, Luigi; Cigada, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    This review presents two intriguing multidisciplinary strategies that might make the difference in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The first proposed strategy is based on the controlled delivery of recombinant proteins known to play a key role in these neurodegenerative disorders that are released in situ by optimized polymer-based systems. The second strategy is the use of engineered cells, encapsulated and delivered in situ by suitable polymer-based systems, that act as drug reservoirs and allow the delivery of selected molecules to be used in the treatment of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In both these scenarios, the design and development of optimized polymer-based drug delivery and cell housing systems for central nervous system applications represent a key requirement. Materials science provides suitable hydrogel-based tools to be optimized together with suitably designed recombinant proteins or drug delivering-cells that, once in situ, can provide an effective treatment for these neurodegenerative disorders. In this scenario, only interdisciplinary research that fully integrates biology, biochemistry, medicine and materials science can provide a springboard for the development of suitable therapeutic tools, not only for the treatment of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases but also, prospectively, for a wide range of severe neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. The delivery of medical services in a retail shopping mall: a strategy for growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, K R

    1989-01-01

    The successful medical practice of the future will continually search for growth strategies. This writer believes the location of a primary care medical clinic in a retail shopping mall, with a full menu of primary services, is one strategy for growth. It is an effective method of health care delivery to a community.

  12. Food intake rate and delivery strategy in aquaculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In aquaculture, it is important to estimate in advance how much food cultured animals would take. The rate of food consumption by cultured animals to available food amount is defined as the food intake rate (FIR) in this paper. To some extents, FIR reflects the quality of food, the health of cultured animals and the delivery efficiency. In practice, it is difficult to estimate in advance the accurate quantity of food that cultured animal needs. Usually, food is provided more than the need by animals, causing excess food that may pollute water and environment. Our experiments in past years show that FIR at 80% is recommended.

  13. Polymersome-based drug-delivery strategies for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anajafi, Tayebeh; Mallik, Sanku

    2015-01-01

    Polymersomes are stable vesicles prepared from amphiphilic polymers and are more stable compared with liposomes. Although these nanovesicles have many attractive properties for in vitro/in vivo applications, liposome-based drug delivery systems are still prevalent in the market. In order to expedite the translational potential and to provide medically valuable formulations, the polymersomes need to be biocompatible and biodegradable. In this review, recent developments for biocompatible and biodegradable polymersomes, including the design of intelligent, targeted, and stimuli-responsive vesicles are summarized.

  14. Innovative Simulation Strategies in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Aebersold

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of simulation in the undergraduate nursing curriculum is gaining popularity and is becoming a foundation of many nursing programs. The purpose of this paper is to highlight a new simulation teaching strategy, virtual reality (VR simulation, which capitalizes on the technological skills of the new generation student. This small-scale pilot study focused on improving interpersonal skills in senior level nursing students using VR simulation. In this study, a repeated-measure design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of VR simulation on improving student’s performance over a series of two VR scenarios. Using the Emergency Medicine Crisis Resource Management (EMCRM tool, student performance was evaluated. Overall, the total EMCRM score improved but not significantly. The subscale areas of communication (P=.047, 95% CI:−1.06,−.007 and professional behavior (P=.003, 95% CI:−1.12,−.303 did show a significant improvement between the two scenario exposures. Findings from this study show the potential for virtual reality simulations to have an impact on nursing student performance.

  15. The Strategies of Modeling in Biology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Julia; Passmore, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Modeling, like inquiry more generally, is not a single method, but rather a complex suite of strategies. Philosophers of biology, citing the diverse aims, interests, and disciplinary cultures of biologists, argue that modeling is best understood in the context of its epistemic aims and cognitive payoffs. In the science education literature,…

  16. Educators' Perceptions on Bullying Prevention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Corene

    2017-01-01

    I report on an investigation into a group of Free State educators' recognition of bullying, their reactions to incidences of bullying, and their perceptions of the effectiveness of a number of bullying prevention strategies. The research instrument was a synthesis of the Delaware Research Questionnaire and questions based on findings from previous…

  17. 20 CFR 669.310 - What are the basic components of an NFJP service delivery strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... include: (a) A customer-centered case management approach; (b) The provision of workforce investment... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the basic components of an NFJP service delivery strategy? 669.310 Section 669.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING...

  18. Educational Cognitive Technologies as Human Adaptation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Nesterova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Modernity is characterized by profound changes in all spheres of human life caused by the global transformations on macro and micro levels of social reality. These changes allow us to speak about the present as the era of civilizational transition in the mode of uncertainty. Therefore, this situation demands qualitative transformations of human adaptive strategies and educational technologies accordingly. The dominant role in the dynamics of pedagogics and andragogy’s landscape belongs to transformative learning. The transformative learning theory is considered as the relevant approach to education of the individual, which is able to become an autonomous communicative actor of the social complexity. The article considers the cognitive technologies of social cohesion development and perspectives of their implementation in the educational dimension. In addition to implementing the principles of inclusion, equity in education, an important factor for improving social cohesion, stability and unity of society is the development of cognitive educational technologies. The key factors and foundations for the cognitive educational technologies are transversal competencies. They create the conditions for civil, public dialogue, non-violent type of communication. These “21st century skills” are extremely important for better human adaptation. One of the aspects and roots of social adaptation is social cohesion. Mutual determinations and connections between social cohesion development and transversal competences have been shown. The perspective direction of further researches is to find a methodological base for the further development of cognitive education technologies and platform for realization of innovative services for educational programs. New educational paradigm offers the concept of human adaptation as cognitive effectiveness and how to reach it through educational technologies. The article includes topics of creative thinking, teambuilding

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Systems Thinking Education Strategy for Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fura, Louise A; Wisser, Kathleen Z

    Nurse educators are charged to develop and evaluate curricula on systems thinking to prepare future nurses to provide safe nursing care. The goal of this pilot study was to design and evaluate a four-hour educational strategy that prepares future professional nurses to use systems thinking approaches in the delivery of safe patient care. This study exposed prelicensure baccalaureate nursing students to systems thinking principles, which included didactic and experiential activities. A descriptive design was used to determine the effect of an on-campus educational strategy. A paired samples t-test revealed statistical significance from pretest to posttest.

  20. Creating marketing strategies for higher education institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Lidia Białoń

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a thesis that the primary premise of creating marketing strategies for higher education institution is a three-dimensional notion of marketing. The first dimension lies in the theoretical notions of the essence of marketing, including the transactional marketing (1.0), relationship marketing (2.0) and spiritual marketing (3.0). The second dimension is formed by methods of marketing research and accurate notions of marketing, while the third are channels of marketing infor...

  1. Balancing Instructional Techniques and Delivery Formats in Capstone Business Strategy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstete, Jeffrey W.; Beutell, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contend that collegiate programs should carefully plan their capstone courses in light of the educational mission, pedagogical content knowledge, instructional techniques and delivery formats. Design/methodology/approach: This is a concept paper with elements of theory building from the case of business…

  2. Non-viral Nucleic Acid Delivery Strategies to the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James-Kevin Tan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With an increased prevalence and understanding of central nervous system injuries and neurological disorders, nucleic acid therapies are gaining promise as a way to regenerate lost neurons or halt disease progression. While more viral vectors have been used clinically as tools for gene delivery, non-viral vectors are gaining interest due to lower safety concerns and the ability to deliver all types of nucleic acids. Nevertheless, there are still a number of barriers to nucleic acid delivery. In this focused review, we explore the in vivo challenges hindering non-viral nucleic acid delivery to the central nervous system and the strategies and vehicles used to overcome them. Advantages and disadvantages of different routes of administration including: systemic injection, cerebrospinal fluid injection, intraparenchymal injection, and peripheral administration are discussed. Non-viral vehicles and treatment strategies that have overcome delivery barriers and demonstrated in vivo gene transfer to the central nervous system are presented. These approaches can be used as guidelines in developing synthetic gene delivery vectors for central nervous system applications and will ultimately bring non-viral vectors closer to clinical application.

  3. A biomimetic growth factor delivery strategy for enhanced regeneration of iliac crest defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilgor Huri, Pinar; Huri, Gazi; Yasar, Umit; Dikmen, Nurten; Ucar, Yurdanur; Hasirci, Nesrin; Hasirci, Vasif

    2013-01-01

    The importance of provision of growth factors in the engineering of tissues has long been shown to control the behavior of the cells within the construct and several approaches were applied toward this end. In nature, more than one type of growth factor is known to be effective during the healing of tissue defects and their peak concentrations are not always simultaneous. One of the most recent strategies includes the delivery of a combination of growth factors with the dose and timing to mimic the natural regeneration cascade. The sequential delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins BMP-2 and BMP-7 which are early and late appearing factors during bone regeneration, respectively, was shown in vitro to enhance osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, the aim was to study the effectiveness of this delivery strategy in a rabbit iliac crest model. 3D plotted poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds were loaded with BMP carrying nanoparticles to achieve: (a) single BMP-2 or BMP-7 delivery, and (b) their combined delivery in a simultaneous or (c) sequential (biomimetic) fashion. After eight weeks of implantation, computed tomography and biomechanical tests showed better mineralized matrix formation and bone-implant union strength at the defect site in the case of sequential delivery compared to single or simultaneous delivery modes. Bone mineral density (BMD) and push-out stress were: 33.65±2.25 g cm −3 and 14.5±2.28 MPa, respectively, and almost 2.5 fold higher in comparison to those without growth factors (BMD: 14.14±1.21 g cm −3 ; PS: 6.59±0.65 MPa). This study, therefore, supports those obtained in vitro and emphasizes the importance of mimicking the natural timing of bioavailability of osteogenic factors in improving the regeneration of critical-sized bone defects. (paper)

  4. Practical strategies for nursing education program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Making the Invisible Visible: A Model for Delivery Systems in Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Jennifer L.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Platt, R. Eric; Rachal, John R.; Gammill, Deidra M.

    2007-01-01

    Delivery systems are not well defined in adult education. Therefore, this article reviews the multiple components that overlap to affect the adult learner and uses them to create a model for a comprehensive delivery system in adult education with these individual components as sub-systems that are interrelated and inter-locked. These components…

  6. Exploring educational disparities in risk of preterm delivery: a comparative study of 12 European birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulsen, Gry; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Mortensen, Laust; Barros, Henrique; Cordier, Sylvaine; Correia, Sofia; Danileviciute, Asta; van Eijsden, Manon; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Gehring, Ulrike; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Hafkamp-de Groen, Esther; Henriksen, Tine Brink; Jensen, Morten Søndergaard; Larrañaga, Isabel; Magnus, Per; Pickett, Kate; Raat, Hein; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Rouget, Florence; Rusconi, Franca; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Uphoff, Eleonora P; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; Wijga, Alet H; Vrijheid, Martine; Osler, Merete; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    BACKGROUND: An association between education and preterm delivery has been observed in populations across Europe, but differences in methodology limit comparability. We performed a direct cross-cohort comparison of educational disparities in preterm delivery based on individual-level birth cohort

  7. Exploring educational disparities in risk of preterm delivery: a comparative study of 12 European birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulsen, Gry; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Mortensen, Laust; Barros, Henrique; Cordier, Sylvaine; Correia, Sofia; Danileviciute, Asta; van Eijsden, Manon; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Gehring, Ulrike; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Hafkamp-de Groen, Esther; Henriksen, Tine Brink; Jensen, Morten Søndergaard; Larrañaga, Isabel; Magnus, Per; Pickett, Kate; Raat, Hein; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Rouget, Florence; Rusconi, Franca; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Uphoff, Eleonora P.; Vrijkotte, Tanja G. M.; Wijga, Alet H.; Vrijheid, Martine; Osler, Merete; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2015-01-01

    An association between education and preterm delivery has been observed in populations across Europe, but differences in methodology limit comparability. We performed a direct cross-cohort comparison of educational disparities in preterm delivery based on individual-level birth cohort data. The

  8. A Prototype Educational Delivery System Using Water Quality Monitoring as a Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Richard B.

    This report describes the model educational delivery system used by Ulster County Community College in its water quality monitoring program. The educational delivery system described in the report encompasses the use of behavioral objectives as its foundation and builds upon this foundation to form a complete system whose outcomes can be measured,…

  9. Science of health care delivery milestones for undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havyer, Rachel D; Norby, Suzanne M; Leep Hunderfund, Andrea N; Starr, Stephanie R; Lang, Tara R; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P; Reed, Darcy A

    2017-08-25

    The changing healthcare landscape requires physicians to develop new knowledge and skills such as high-value care, systems improvement, population health, and team-based care, which together may be referred to as the Science of Health Care Delivery (SHCD). To engender public trust and confidence, educators must be able to meaningfully assess physicians' abilities in SHCD. We aimed to develop a novel set of SHCD milestones based on published Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) milestones that can be used by medical schools to assess medical students' competence in SHCD. We reviewed all ACGME milestones for 25 specialties available in September 2013. We used an iterative, qualitative process to group the ACGME milestones into SHCD content domains, from which SHCD milestones were derived. The SHCD milestones were categorized within the current ACGME core competencies and were also mapped to Association of American Medical Colleges' Entrustable Professional Activities (AAMC EPAs). Fifteen SHCD sub-competencies and corresponding milestones are provided, grouped within ACGME core competencies and mapped to multiple AAMC EPAs. This novel set of milestones, grounded within the existing ACGME competencies, defines fundamental expectations within SHCD that can be used and adapted by medical schools in the assessment of medical students in this emerging curricular area. These milestones provide a blueprint for SHCD content and assessment as ongoing revisions to milestones and curricula occur.

  10. Analysis of Cumulative Dose to Implanted Pacemaker According to Various IMRT Delivery Methods: Optimal Dose Delivery Versus Dose Reduction Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Hong, Se Mie [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Cancer patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker occasionally require radiotherapy. Pacemaker may be damaged or malfunction during radiotherapy due to ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Although radiotherapy should be planned to keep the dose to pacemaker as low as possible not to malfunction ideally, current radiation treatment planning (RTP) system does not accurately calculate deposited dose to adjacent field border or area beyond irradiated fields. In terms of beam delivery techniques using multiple intensity modulated fields, dosimetric effect of scattered radiation in high energy photon beams is required to be detailed analyzed based on measurement data. The aim of this study is to evaluate dose discrepancies of pacemaker in a RTP system as compared to measured doses. We also designed dose reduction strategy limited value of 2 Gy for radiation treatment patients with cardiac implanted pacemaker. Total accumulated dose of 145 cGy based on in-vivo dosimetry was satisfied with the recommendation criteria to prevent malfunction of pacemaker in SS technique. However, the 2 mm lead shielder enabled the scattered doses to reduce up to 60% and 40% in the patient and the phantom, respectively. The SS technique with the lead shielding could reduce the accumulated scattered doses less than 100 cGy. Calculated and measured doses were not greatly affected by the beam delivery techniques. In-vivo and measured doses on pacemaker position showed critical dose discrepancies reaching up to 4 times as compared to planned doses in RTP. The current SS technique could deliver lower scattered doses than recommendation criteria, but use of 2 mm lead shielder contributed to reduce scattered doses by 60%. The tertiary lead shielder can be useful to prevent malfunction or electrical damage of implanted pacemakers during radiotherapy. It is required to estimate more accurate scattered doses of the patient or medical device in RTP to design proper dose reduction strategy.

  11. Analysis of Cumulative Dose to Implanted Pacemaker According to Various IMRT Delivery Methods: Optimal Dose Delivery Versus Dose Reduction Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Hong, Se Mie

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker occasionally require radiotherapy. Pacemaker may be damaged or malfunction during radiotherapy due to ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Although radiotherapy should be planned to keep the dose to pacemaker as low as possible not to malfunction ideally, current radiation treatment planning (RTP) system does not accurately calculate deposited dose to adjacent field border or area beyond irradiated fields. In terms of beam delivery techniques using multiple intensity modulated fields, dosimetric effect of scattered radiation in high energy photon beams is required to be detailed analyzed based on measurement data. The aim of this study is to evaluate dose discrepancies of pacemaker in a RTP system as compared to measured doses. We also designed dose reduction strategy limited value of 2 Gy for radiation treatment patients with cardiac implanted pacemaker. Total accumulated dose of 145 cGy based on in-vivo dosimetry was satisfied with the recommendation criteria to prevent malfunction of pacemaker in SS technique. However, the 2 mm lead shielder enabled the scattered doses to reduce up to 60% and 40% in the patient and the phantom, respectively. The SS technique with the lead shielding could reduce the accumulated scattered doses less than 100 cGy. Calculated and measured doses were not greatly affected by the beam delivery techniques. In-vivo and measured doses on pacemaker position showed critical dose discrepancies reaching up to 4 times as compared to planned doses in RTP. The current SS technique could deliver lower scattered doses than recommendation criteria, but use of 2 mm lead shielder contributed to reduce scattered doses by 60%. The tertiary lead shielder can be useful to prevent malfunction or electrical damage of implanted pacemakers during radiotherapy. It is required to estimate more accurate scattered doses of the patient or medical device in RTP to design proper dose reduction strategy.

  12. Metacognition and Successful Learning Strategies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Railean, Elena, Ed.; Alev Elçi, Ed.; Elçi, Atilla, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    Metacognition plays an important role in numerous aspects of higher educational learning strategies. When properly integrated in the educational system, schools are better equipped to build more efficient and successful learning strategies for students in higher education. "Metacognition and Successful Learning Strategies in Higher…

  13. An annual employee education calendar as the capstone of educational assessment, planning, and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Paula G

    2005-01-01

    Staff development educators can better control their workload and provide a more comprehensive employee education program when the organization adopts a formal five-step process that culminates in the publication of an annual employee education calendar. This article describes the five steps of organization-wide learning needs assessment, resource allocation, priority setting, documentation of the educational plan, and calendar development, including elements and timelines. The annual calendar reflects involvement of staff throughout the facility in the identification, planning, and delivery of education programs. Its publication enhances staff and supervisors' awareness of learning opportunities. Its longer-range perspective assists managers and employees to better plan to meet learning needs and improves participation in staff development activities.

  14. Strategies to improve drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Albertus G; Gaillard, Pieter J

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), together with the blood-cerebrospinal-fluid barrier, protects and regulates the homeostasis of the brain. However, these barriers also limit the transport of small-molecule and, particularly, biopharmaceutical drugs such as proteins, genes and interference RNA to the brain, thereby limiting the treatment of many brain diseases. As a result, various drug delivery and targeting strategies are currently being developed to enhance the transport and distribution of drugs into the brain. In this review, we discuss briefly the biology and physiology of the BBB as the most important barrier for drug transport to the brain and, in more detail, the possibilities for delivering large-molecule drugs, particularly genes, by receptor-mediated nonviral drug delivery to the (human) brain. In addition, the systemic and intracellular pharmacokinetics of nonviral gene delivery, together with targeted brain imaging, are reviewed briefly.

  15. Advanced Therapeutic Strategies for Chronic Lung Disease Using Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Yhee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung diseases include a variety of obstinate and fatal diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cystic fibrosis (CF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, and lung cancers. Pharmacotherapy is important for the treatment of chronic lung diseases, and current progress in nanoparticles offers great potential as an advanced strategy for drug delivery. Based on their biophysical properties, nanoparticles have shown improved pharmacokinetics of therapeutics and controlled drug delivery, gaining great attention. Herein, we will review the nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for the treatment of chronic lung diseases. Various types of nanoparticles will be introduced, and recent innovative efforts to utilize the nanoparticles as novel drug carriers for the effective treatment of chronic lung diseases will also be discussed.

  16. Neuropathic Pain and Lung Delivery of Nanoparticulate Drugs: An Emerging Novel Therapeutic Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nazrul; Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic neurological disorder affecting millions of people around the world. The currently available pharmacologic agents for the treatment of neuropathic pain have limited efficacy and are associated with dose related unwanted adverse effects. Due to the limited access of drug molecules across blood-brain barrier, a small percentage of drug that is administered systematically, reaches the central nervous system in active form. These therapeutic agents also require daily treatment regimen that is inconvenient and potentially impact patient compliance. Application of nanoparticulate drugs for enhanced delivery system has been explored extensively in the last decades. Pulmonary delivery of nanomedicines for the management of various diseases has become an emerging treatment strategy that ensures the targeted delivery of drugs both for systemic and local effects with low dose and limited adverse effects. To the best of our knowledge, there are no inhaled drug products available on market for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The advantages of delivering therapeutics into deep lungs include non-invasive drug delivery, higher bioavailability with low dose, lower systemic toxicity, and potentially greater blood-brain barrier penetration. This review discusses and highlights the important issues on the application of emerging nanoparticulate lung delivery of drugs for the effective treatment of neuropathic pain. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. An effective strategy of magnetic stem cell delivery for spinal cord injury therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukmachev, Dmitry; Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Babic, Michal; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal channel showed a good correlation with the calculated distribution of magnetic forces exerted onto the transplanted cells. The results suggest that focused targeting and fast delivery of stem cells can be achieved using the proposed non-invasive magnetic system. With future implementation the proposed targeting and delivery strategy bears advantages for the treatment of disease requiring fast stem cell transplantation.Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal

  18. Systematic Assessment of Strategies for Lung-targeted Delivery of MicroRNA Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Kenny; Taha, Mohamad; Stewart, Duncan J.

    2018-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the use of synthetic miRNA mimics (or inhibitors) as potential therapeutic agents in pulmonary vascular disease; however, the optimal delivery method to achieve high efficiency, selective lung targeting has not been determined. Here, we sought to investigate the relative merits of different lung-targeted strategies for delivering miRNA mimics in rats. Methods: Tissue levels of a synthetic miRNA mimic, cel-miR-39-3p (0.5 nmol in 50 µL invivofectamine/PBS vehicle) were compared in male rats (n=3 rats/method) after delivery by commonly used lung-targeting strategies including intratracheal liquid instillation (IT-L), intratracheal aerosolization with (IT-AV) or without ventilator assistance (IT-A), intranasal liquid instillation (IN-L) and intranasal aerosolization (IN-A). Intravenous (IV; via jugular vein), intraperitoneal (IP) and subcutaneous (SC) delivery served as controls. Relative levels of cel-miR-39 were quantified by RT-qPCR. Results: At 2 h post delivery, IT-L showed the highest lung mimic level, which was significantly higher than levels achieved by all other methods (from ~10- to 10,000-fold, pMimic levels remained detectable in the lung 24 h after delivery, but were 10- to 100-fold lower. The intrapulmonary distribution of cel-miR-39 was comparable when delivered as either a liquid or aerosol, with evidence of mimic distribution to both the left and right lung lobes and penetration to distal regions. All lung-targeted strategies showed lung-selective mimic uptake, with mimic levels 10- to 100-fold lower in heart and 100- to 10,000-fold lower in liver, kidney and spleen. In contrast, IV, SC and IP routes showed comparable or higher mimic levels in non-pulmonary tissues. Conclusions: miRNA uptake in the lungs differed markedly by up to 4 orders of magnitude, demonstrating that the choice of delivery strategy could have a significant impact on potential therapeutic outcomes in preclinical investigations of miRNA-based drug

  19. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhise, Nupura S.

    Gene therapy involves the delivery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cells to override or replace a malfunctioning gene for treating debilitating genetic diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to its use as a therapeutic, it can also serve as a technology to enable regenerative medicine strategies. The central challenge of the gene therapy research arena is developing a safe and effective delivery agent. Since viral vectors have critical immunogenic and tumorogenic safety issues that limit their clinical use, recent efforts have focused on developing non-viral biomaterial based delivery vectors. Cationic polymers are an attractive class of gene delivery vectors due to their structural versatility, ease of synthesis, biodegradability, ability to self-complex into nanoparticles with negatively charged DNA, capacity to carry large cargo, cellular uptake and endosomal escape capacity. In this thesis, we hypothesized that developing a biomaterial library of poly(betaamino esters) (PBAE), a newer class of cationic polymers consisting of biodegradable ester groups, would allow investigating vector design parameters and formulating effective non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell engineering. Consequently, a high-throughput transfection assay was developed to screen the PBAE-based nanoparticles in hard to transfect fibroblast cell lines. To gain mechanistic insights into the nanoparticle formulation process, biophysical properties of the vectors were characterized in terms of molecular weight (MW), nanoparticle size, zeta potential and plasmid per particle count. We report a novel assay developed for quantifying the plasmid per nanoparticle count and studying its implications for co-delivery of multiple genes. The MW of the polymers ranged from 10 kDa to 100 kDa, nanoparticle size was about 150 run, zeta potential was about 30 mV in sodium acetate buffer (25 mM, pH 5) and 30 to 100

  20. Education and industry partnership: a case study of co-delivery - 16065

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, Tim; Francis, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    One of the essential elements for safe operation of a nuclear licensed site is the availability to the licensee in sufficient numbers of suitably qualified and experienced people to carry out and manage the operations and associated design work. In the last few years, there have been a number of reports to illustrate the recent and current problems of recruiting such people to work in the traditional locations for nuclear personnel in the North-West of England. Concern for the immediate future is exacerbated by a peculiar demographic of the people currently employed in positions demanding higher level skills. In response to the growing realization that there is an impending skills gap that needs to be filled, Sellafield Limited's Talent Management team (and latterly with support of the NDA) have been working with a number of education and training providers to put in place bespoke courses aimed at overcoming this shortage. In the absence of a steady stream of willing graduates from technical and management courses, the primary strategy has been to encourage life-long learning and up-skilling amongst its employees, targeting those who, for whatever reason upon leaving school, missed their opportunity to study and progress to train at a high level, but who possess that potential and have now developed a keenness to proceed with that study in later life. One Foundation Degree has been selected for development of a unique approach to higher education. The work of University of Central Lancashire and its West-Cumbrian education and training partners has featured as a case study in other media, but this paper reports on a fresh development within that work: co-delivery. Co-delivery relates to a partnership of educationalists and industrialists, with an emphasis on industrial numbers on the course development steering group. The means by which a significant proportion of the course is strongly workplace related are presented and the benefits and problems that this

  1. Waldorf School - the Strategy of Education of Mental Hygiene

    OpenAIRE

    HORÁKOVÁ, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the question, what is the strategy of mental hygiene education at the Waldorf school. The aim was to find out how mental hygiene at the Waldorf school is educated and then compare this strategy with the strategy of mental hygiene education at the school of traditional education system. Another aim of this study was to show whether the correct strategy of mental hygiene education in elementary schools has some influence on the development of the child. The research was m...

  2. Current challenges and emerging drug delivery strategies for the treatment of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Melissa B; Hill, Dane; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-10-01

    Psoriasis is a common skin disorder associated with physical, social, psychological and financial burden. Over the past two decades, advances in our understanding of pathogenesis and increased appreciation for the multifaceted burden of psoriasis has led to new treatment development and better patient outcomes. Yet, surveys demonstrate that many psoriasis patients are either undertreated or are dissatisfied with treatment. There are many barriers that need be overcome to optimize patient outcomes and satisfaction. This review covers the current challenges associated with each major psoriasis treatment strategy (topical, phototherapy, oral medications and biologics). It also reviews the challenges associated with the psychosocial aspects of the disease and how they affect treatment outcomes. Patient adherence, inconvenience, high costs, and drug toxicities are all discussed. Then, we review the emerging drug delivery strategies in topical, oral, and biologic therapy. By outlining current treatment challenges and emerging drug delivery strategies, we hope to highlight the deficits in psoriasis treatment and strategies for how to overcome them. Regardless of disease severity, clinicians should use a patient-centered approach. In all cases, we need to balance patients' psychosocial needs, treatment costs, convenience, and effectiveness with patients' preferences in order to optimize treatment outcomes.

  3. Nanotechnological strategies for nerve growth factor delivery: Therapeutic implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Célia; Rijo, Patrícia; Reis, Catarina Pinto

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with amyloid-β peptide misfolding and aggregation. Neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), can prevent neuronal damage and rescue the cholinergic neurons that undergo cell death in AD, reverse deposition of extracellular amyloid plaques and improve cognitive deficits. However, NGF administration is hampered by the poor pharmacokinetic profile of the therapeutic protein and its inability to cross the blood-brain barrier, which requires specialised drug delivery systems (DDS) for efficient NGF delivery to the brain. This review covers the main therapeutic approaches that have been developed for NGF delivery targeting the brain, from polymeric implants to gene and cell-based therapies, focusing on the role of nanoparticulate systems for the sustained release of NGF in the brain as a neuroprotective and disease-modifying approach toward AD. Lipid- and polymer-based delivery systems, magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots are specifically addressed as promising nanotechnological strategies to overcome the current limitations of NGF-based therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A non-covalent peptide-based strategy for ex vivo and in vivo oligonucleotide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombez, Laurence; Morris, May C; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The dramatic acceleration in identification of new nucleic acid-based therapeutic molecules such as short interfering RNA (siRNA) and peptide-nucleic acid (PNA) analogues has provided new perspectives for therapeutic targeting of specific genes responsible for pathological disorders. However, the poor cellular uptake of nucleic acids together with the low permeability of the cell membrane to negatively charged molecules remain major obstacles to their clinical development. Several non-viral strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of synthetic short oligonucleotides both in cultured cells and in vivo. Cell-penetrating peptides constitute very promising tools for non-invasive cellular import of oligonucleotides and analogs. We recently described a non-covalent strategy based on short amphiphatic peptides (MPG8/PEP3) that have been successfully applied ex vivo and in vivo for the delivery of therapeutic siRNA and PNA molecules. PEP3 and MPG8 form stable nanoparticles with PNA analogues and siRNA, respectively, and promote their efficient cellular uptake, independently of the endosomal pathway, into a wide variety of cell lines, including primary and suspension lines, without any associated cytotoxicity. This chapter describes easy-to-handle protocols for the use of MPG-8 or PEP-3-nanoparticle technologies for PNA and siRNA delivery into adherent and suspension cell lines as well as in vivo into cancer mouse models.

  5. Experiences of operational costs of HPV vaccine delivery strategies in Gavi-supported demonstration projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Taylor; Nanda, Shreya; Bloem, Paul; Griffiths, Ulla K.; Sidibe, Anissa; Hutubessy, Raymond C. W.

    2017-01-01

    From 2012 to 2016, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, provided support for countries to conduct small-scale demonstration projects for the introduction of the human papillomavirus vaccine, with the aim of determining which human papillomavirus vaccine delivery strategies might be effective and sustainable upon national scale-up. This study reports on the operational costs and cost determinants of different vaccination delivery strategies within these projects across twelve countries using a standardized micro-costing tool. The World Health Organization Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing Tool was used to collect costing data, which were then aggregated and analyzed to assess the costs and cost determinants of vaccination. Across the one-year demonstration projects, the average economic and financial costs per dose amounted to US$19.98 (standard deviation ±12.5) and US$8.74 (standard deviation ±5.8), respectively. The greatest activities representing the greatest share of financial costs were social mobilization at approximately 30% (range, 6–67%) and service delivery at about 25% (range, 3–46%). Districts implemented varying combinations of school-based, facility-based, or outreach delivery strategies and experienced wide variation in vaccine coverage, drop-out rates, and service delivery costs, including transportation costs and per diems. Size of target population, number of students per school, and average length of time to reach an outreach post influenced cost per dose. Although the operational costs from demonstration projects are much higher than those of other routine vaccine immunization programs, findings from our analysis suggest that HPV vaccination operational costs will decrease substantially for national introduction. Vaccination costs may be decreased further by annual vaccination, high initial investment in social mobilization, or introducing/strengthening school health programs. Our analysis shows that drivers of cost are dependent on

  6. Faculty Satisfaction with Distance Education: A Comparative Analysis on Effectiveness of Undergraduate Course Delivery Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Higher education faculty can and do teach courses delivered in a variety of ways. But, to date, little research has been done on the effectiveness of different delivery modes. This study sought to fill that void by comparing the effectiveness of three undergraduate course delivery modes: classroom, online, and video conference at a technical…

  7. Health Education Strategies for Coping with Academic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find out the significance of health education strategies for coping with academic stress. Comprehensive health education strategies for coping with academic stress can help students obtain the greatest benefits from education and become healthy and productive adults .One child out of four has an emotional, social,…

  8. Educational Strategies to Enhance Reflexivity Among Clinicians and Health Professional Students: A Scoping Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Landy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reflexivity involves the ability to understand how one's social locations and experiences of advantage or disadvantage have shaped the way one understands the world. The capacity for reflexivity is crucial because it informs clinical decisions, which can lead to improvements in service delivery and patient outcomes. In this article, we present a scoping study that explored educational strategies designed to enhance reflexivity among clinicians and/or health profession students. We reviewed articles and grey literature that address the question: What is known about strategies for enhancing reflexivity among clinicians and students in health professional training programs? We searched multiple databases using keywords including: reflexivity, reflective, allied health professionals, pedagogy, learning, and education. The search strategy was iterative and involved three reviews. Each abstract was independently reviewed by two team members. Sixty-eight texts met the inclusion criteria. There was great diversity among the educational strategies and among health professions. Commonalities across strategies were identified related to reflective writing, experiential learning, classroom-based activities, continuing education, and online learning. We also summarize the 19 texts that evaluated educational strategies to enhance reflexivity. Further research and education is urgently needed for more equitable and socially-just health care. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1603140

  9. Scholar garden: Educational strategy for life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Rodríguez Haros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available About five years ago, and worried about the erosion of knowledge related to the process of food production, access and safety, anagroenvironmental vegetable garden was established and named “Un pasito en grande” (A large baby step, where the use of agrochemicals (fertilizers, insecticides, herbicides, etc. are forbidden. Everything takes place with the participation of boys, girls, fathers and mothers of the Colegio Ateneo nursery school of Tezoyuca, State of Mexico. Childrens' participation has helpedspread the word about the experience and little by little, the strategy has spread to other educational spaces. The school garden has become a space to raise ecological and environmental awareness that is strengthened with daily activities and specific activities that are implemented. The school garden is based on a series of philosophical principles that help reflect upon our learning-doing; in methodological terms, its implementation is based on ethics and on the principles of permaculture.

  10. The introduction of multi-modal education: a strategy in process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    modal approach to delivery has been accepted that includes WebCT as a platform of delivery that complements F2F classroom instruction. At institutional level, the introduction of new technologies for delivery of education forces institutional ...

  11. Computer Networking Strategies for Building Collaboration among Science Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Ronald

    The development and dissemination of science materials can be associated with technical delivery systems such as the Unified Network for Informatics in Teacher Education (UNITE). The UNITE project was designed to investigate ways for using computer networking to improve communications and collaboration among university schools of education and…

  12. the role of mass media in the delivery of adult education for national

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in the promotion of adult education delivery for national development in our society. Medium as ... that affects the well-being of all citizens within any given ... those decisions for themselves. ..... if the commonest is given free, ability to purchase.

  13. The health maintenance organization strategy: a corporate takeover of health services delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, J W

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a political economic framework for viewing the social organization of the delivery of health care servies and predicting a qualitatively different institutional configuration involving the health maintenance organization. The principal forces impacting American capitalism today are leading to a fundamental restructuring for increased social efficiency of the entire social welfare sector, including the health services industry. The method to achieve this restructuring involves health policy directed at raising the contribution to the social surplus from the delivery of health care services and eventual corporate domination. The health maintenance organization conceptualization is examined with suggestions as to how the HMO strategy promoted by the state leads to this corporate takeover. The mechanism and extent of the present corporate involvement are examined and implications of health services as a social control mechanism are presented.

  14. Delivery of viral vectors to tumor cells: extracellular transport, systemic distribution, and strategies for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yuan, Fan

    2006-01-01

    It is a challenge to deliver therapeutic genes to tumor cells using viral vectors because (i) the size of these vectors are close to or larger than the space between fibers in extracellular matrix and (ii) viral proteins are potentially toxic in normal tissues. In general, gene delivery is hindered by various physiological barriers to virus transport from the site of injection to the nucleus of tumor cells and is limited by normal tissue tolerance of toxicity determined by local concentrations of transgene products and viral proteins. To illustrate the obstacles encountered in the delivery and yet limit the scope of discussion, this review focuses only on extracellular transport in solid tumors and distribution of viral vectors in normal organs after they are injected intravenously or intratumorally. This review also discusses current strategies for improving intratumoral transport and specificity of viral vectors.

  15. Vocational technical and adult education: Status, trends and issues related to electronic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, D.

    1973-01-01

    Data are analyzed, and trends and issues are discussed to provide information useful to the systems designer who wishes to identify and assess the opportunities for large scale electronic delivery in vocational/technical and adult education. Issues connected with vocational/technical education are investigated, with emphasis on those issues in the current spotlight which are relevant to the possibilities of electronic delivery. The current role of media is examined in vocational/technical instruction.

  16. Strategies for improving chemotherapeutic delivery to solid tumors mediated by vascular permeability modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chaudhuri, Tista

    An essential mode of distribution of blood-borne chemotherapeutic agents within a solid tumor is via the micro-circulation. Poor tumor perfusion, because of a lack of functional vasculature or a lack of microvessels, as well as low tumor vascular permeability, can prevent adequate deposition of even low molecular-weight agents into the tumor. The modulation of tumor vascular function and density can provides numerous strategies for improving intratumor deposition of chemotherapeutic agents. Here we investigated strategies to improve drug delivery to two tumor types that share in common poor drug delivery, but differ in the underlying cause. First, in an angiogenesis-driven brain tumor model of Glioblastoma, the vascular permeability barrier, along with poorly-functional vasculature, hinders drug delivery. A strategy of nanoparticle-based tumor 'priming' to attack the vascular permeability barrier, employing sterically stabilized liposomal doxorubicin (SSL-DXR), was investigated. Functional and histological evaluation of tumor vasculature revealed that after an initial period of depressed vascular permeability and vascular pruning 3--4 days after SSL-DXR administration, vascular permeability and perfusion were restored and then elevated after 5--7 days. As a result of tumor priming, deposition of subsequently-administered nanoparticles was enhanced, and the efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ), if administered during the window of elevated permeability, was increased. The sequenced regimen resulted in a persistent reduction of the tumor proliferative index and a 40% suppression of tumor volume, compared to animals that received both agents simultaneously. Second, in a hypovascular, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma model, disruption of tumor-stromal communication via sonic hedgehog (sHH) signaling pathway inhibition mediated an indirect vascular proliferation and a more than 2-fold increase in intratumor nanoparticle deposition. Enhanced delivery of SSL-DXR in tumors pre

  17. Household coping strategies for delivery and related healthcare cost: findings from rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Mohammad Enamul; Dasgupta, Sushil Kanta; Naznin, Eva; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to measure the economic costs of maternal complication and to understand household coping strategies for financing maternal healthcare cost. A household survey of the 706 women with maternal complication, of whom 483 had normal delivery, was conducted to collect data at 6 weeks and 6 months post-partum. Data were collected on socio-economic information of the household, expenditure during delivery and post-partum, coping strategies adopted by households and other related information. Despite the high cost of health care associated with maternal complications, the majority of families were capable of protecting consumption on non-health items. Around one-third of households spent more than 20% of their annual household expenditure on maternal health care. Almost 50% were able to avoid catastrophic spending because of the coping strategies that they relied on. In general, households appeared resilient to short-term economic consequences of maternal health shocks, due to the availability of informal credit, donations from relatives and selling assets. While richer households fund a greater portion of the cost of maternal health care from income and savings, the poorer households with severe maternal complication resorted to borrowing from local moneylenders at high interest, which may leave them vulnerable to financial difficulties. Financial protection, especially for the poor, may benefit households against economic consequences of maternal complication. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Controlled Bioactive Molecules Delivery Strategies for Tendon and Ligament Tissue Engineering using Polymeric Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiong Teh, Thomas Kok; Hong Goh, James Cho; Toh, Siew Lok

    2015-01-01

    The interest in polymeric nanofibers has escalated over the past decade given its promise as tissue engineering scaffolds that can mimic the nanoscale structure of the native extracellular matrix. With functionalization of the polymeric nanofibers using bioactive molecules, localized signaling moieties can be established for the attached cells, to stimulate desired biological effects and direct cellular or tissue response. The inherently high surface area per unit mass of polymeric nanofibers can enhance cell adhesion, bioactive molecules loading and release efficiencies, and mass transfer properties. In this review article, the application of polymeric nanofibers for controlled bioactive molecules delivery will be discussed, with a focus on tendon and ligament tissue engineering. Various polymeric materials of different mechanical and degradation properties will be presented along with the nanofiber fabrication techniques explored. The bioactive molecules of interest for tendon and ligament tissue engineering, including growth factors and small molecules, will also be reviewed and compared in terms of their nanofiber incorporation strategies and release profiles. This article will also highlight and compare various innovative strategies to control the release of bioactive molecules spatiotemporally and explore an emerging tissue engineering strategy involving controlled multiple bioactive molecules sequential release. Finally, the review article concludes with challenges and future trends in the innovation and development of bioactive molecules delivery using polymeric nanofibers for tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

  19. NICU nurse educators: what evidence supports your teaching strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2013-01-01

    One of our roles as nurse educators is to teach best practices related to patient care. However, have you ever stopped to think about what evidence supports your teaching strategies? Just as our patients deserve care that is based on the best available evidence, our learners also deserve education that is based on evidence.1-3 With so many advances in knowledge, technology, and even life itself, it is interesting that education has changed very little over the past 100 years. A study among 946 nurse educators documented that most teach the way they were taught.4 In addition, even after learning new strategies, educators often continue teaching in the manner they are most comfortable. However, this trend is beginning to change. Nurse educators are becoming increasingly aware of and willing to try new and innovative teaching strategies. Educators are also seeking out evidence-based teaching strategies and are becoming more involved in nursing education research.

  20. iPhone application development strategies for efficient mobile design and delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Jim

    2011-01-01

    iPhone application development is explained here in an accessible treatment for the generalist Library and Information Science (LIS) practitioner. Future information-seeking practices by users will take place across a diverse array of ubiquitous computing devices. iPhone applications represent one of the most compelling new platforms for which to remediate and re-engineer library service. Strategies of efficient mobile design and delivery include adapting computing best practices of data independence and adhering to web standards as articulated by the W3C. These best practices apply across the

  1. The Social Media MBA Your Competitive Edge in Social Media Strategy Development and Delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Holloman, Christer

    2011-01-01

    It's a fact that companies so far have only scratched the surface of what can be achieved with social media. Whatever continent, industry, company size, current degree of social media adoption or your job title, the purpose of this book is to inspire you to see how you can raise the bar further to reap new rewards. It will give you the tools to make a difference to your organisation's social media strategy development and delivery going forward. In addition it will also give you more intellectual support and confidence to discuss social media on a higher level with peers, inspire colleagues or

  2. Educating the delivery of bad news in medicine: Preceptorship versus simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Andrew P; Adkins, Eric J; Knepel, Sheri; Boulger, Creagh; Miller, Jessica; Bahner, David P

    2011-07-01

    Simulation experiences have begun to replace traditional education models of teaching the skill of bad news delivery in medical education. The tiered apprenticeship model of medical education emphasizes experiential learning. Studies have described a lack of support in bad news delivery and inadequacy of training in this important clinical skill as well as poor familial comprehension and dissatisfaction on the part of physicians in training regarding the resident delivery of bad news. Many residency training programs lacked a formalized training curriculum in the delivery of bad news. Simulation teaching experiences may address these noted clinical deficits in the delivery of bad news to patients and their families. Unique experiences can be role-played with this educational technique to simulate perceived learner deficits. A variety of scenarios can be constructed within the framework of the simulation training method to address specific cultural and religious responses to bad news in the medical setting. Even potentially explosive and violent scenarios can be role-played in order to prepare physicians for these rare and difficult situations. While simulation experiences cannot supplant the model of positive, real-life clinical teaching in the delivery of bad news, simulation of clinical scenarios with scripting, self-reflection, and peer-to-peer feedback can be powerful educational tools. Simulation training can help to develop the skills needed to effectively and empathetically deliver bad news to patients and families in medical practice.

  3. Teachers' Improvisation of Instructional Materials for Nigerian Home Economics Curriculum Delivery: Challenges and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olibie, Eyiuche Ifeoma; Nwabunwanne, Chinyere; Ezenwanne, Dorothy Nkem

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to ascertain the challenges of improvising instructional materials by Home Economics teachers at the Upper Basic education level in Nigeria, and as a result identify strategies for enhancing improvisation. The study used survey research design based on two research questions. The sample was four hundred and thirty-one Home…

  4. A Study to Assess the Role of Educational Intervention in Improving the Delivery of Routine Immunization Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunization has been regarded as the most cost-effective intervention for child health promotion. Even after improvements, the developing countries are still struggling with low coverage rates, immunization failure, high rates of adverse events following immunization (AEFI etc. The present study was conducted to assess the role of educational intervention in improving immunization delivery services. Methodology: It was a pre-post intervention observational study carried out in immunization clinics of two tertiary care hospitals. The data from pre and post educational intervention assessment was compared and analyzed using SPSS 10.0. Results: At both clinics there was 40% and 45% increase in cleaning of the spoon used for administration of vitamin A. Post-intervention there was 40% increase in use of hub cutter at both the centres. After intervention, there was 30% and 35% increase in the delivery of four key messages by staff nurse. Conclusion: Unlike Doctors, the health staff is not motivated for regular touch with the theory part of their work field and continued knowledge up-gradation. This strategy of periodic re-orientation of the topic in the form of educational intervention may help in improving service delivery to the beneficiaries. Further research is required in this aspect.

  5. A dual-targeting strategy for enhanced drug delivery and synergistic therapy based on thermosensitive nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; You, Chaoqun; Gao, Zhiguo; Wu, Hongshuai; Sun, Baiwang; Zhu, Xiaoli; Chen, Renjie

    2018-08-01

    The functionalized nanoparticles have been widely studied and reported as carriers of drug transport recently. Furthermore, many groups have focused more on developing novel and efficient treatment methods, such as photodynamic therapy and photothermal therapy, since both therapies have shown inspiring potential in the application of antitumor. The mentioned treatments exhibited the superiority of cooperative manner and showed the ability to compensate for the adverse effects caused by conventional monotherapy in proposed strategies. In view of the above descriptions, we formulated a thermosensitive drug delivery system, which achieved the enhanced delivery of cisplatin and two photosensitizers (ICG and Ce6) by dual-targeting traction. Drawing on the thin film hydration method, cisplatin and photosensitizers were encapsulated inside nanoparticles. Meanwhile, the targeting peptide cRGD and targeting molecule folate can be modified on the surface of nanoparticles to realize the active identification of tumor cells. The measurements of dynamic light scattering showed that the prepared nanoparticles had an ideal dispersibility and uniform particle size of 102.6 nm. On the basis of the results observed from confocal laser scanning microscope, the modified nanoparticles were more efficient endocytosed by MCF-7 cells as a contrast to SGC-7901 cells. Photothermal conversion-triggered drug release and photo-therapies produced a significant apoptosis rate of 85.9% on MCF-7 cells. The distinguished results made it believed that the formulated delivery system had conducted great efforts and innovations for the realization of concise collaboration and provided a promising strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  6. Recent advances in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology--strategies for drug delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denora, Nunzio; Trapani, Adriana; Laquintana, Valentino; Lopedota, Angela; Trapani, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a mini-review of some recent approaches for the treatment of brain pathologies examining both medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology contributions. Medicinal chemistry-based strategies are essentially aimed at the chemical modification of low molecular weight drugs in order to increase their lipophilicity or the design of appropriate prodrugs, although this review will focus primarily on the use of prodrugs and not analog development. Recently, interest has been focused on the design and evaluation of prodrugs that are capable of exploiting one or more of the various endogenous transport systems at the level of the blood brain barrier (BBB). The technological strategies are essentially non-invasive methods of drug delivery to malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) and are based on the use of nanosystems (colloidal carriers) such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and dendrimers. The biodistribution of these nanocarriers can be manipulated by modifying their surface physico-chemical properties or by coating them with surfactants and polyethylene-glycols (PEGs). Liposomes, surfactant coated polymeric nanoparticles, and solid lipid nanoparticles are promising systems for delivery of drugs to tumors of the CNS. This mini-review discusses issues concerning the scope and limitations of both the medicinal chemistry and technological approaches. Based on the current findings, it can be concluded that crossing of the BBB and drug delivery to CNS is extremely complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach such as a close collaboration and common efforts among researchers of several scientific areas, particularly medicinal chemists, biologists and pharmaceutical technologists.

  7. Value-Based Delivery of Education: MOOCs as Messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfoil, David M.; Focht, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Value-based delivery of healthcare has been discussed in the literature for almost a decade. The concept focuses on the patient and defines value as the improvement of patient outcomes divided by healthcare costs. Further refinements, called the Triple Aim model, focus on improving patient outcomes, reducing treatment costs, and improving patient…

  8. Instructional Strategies to Support Creativity and Innovation in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seechaliao, Thapanee

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study focused on the instructional strategies that support creation of creative and innovative education. The sample for this study consisted of 11 experts in the field of instructional strategies that support innovation of education. Among them, five were specialists in design and development of teaching and learning, three…

  9. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use.

  10. Free Education for Open Learning: Open educational policies, strategies & access for all

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Invited Speech at the Moscow International Education Fair 2016, Moscow, Russian Federation, by Stracke, C. M. (2016, 15 April): "Free Education for Open Learning: Open educational policies, strategies & access for all"

  11. Sexuality Education Delivery in Australian Regional Secondary Schools: A Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme Chambers, Alana; Tomnay, Jane; Clune, Samantha; Roberts, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Background: Factors affecting the delivery of sexuality education to school students include government policy, school leadership and teacher confidence. Objective: The aim of this paper was to understand, from the perspective of regional education, health and welfare sector professionals, what is needed to support good sexual health for secondary…

  12. Effectiveness of an Alternative Delivery System for In-Service Vocational Teacher Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Donald L.; And Others

    The project was designed to provide vocational teacher educators in Colorado with an alternative delivery system for inservice vocational teacher education which would overcome barriers of distance (and difficult winter travel), expense, and low student density. A task force composed of staff members of the State Board for Community Colleges and…

  13. Education of the handicapped child: Status, trend, and issues related to electronic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, D.

    1973-01-01

    This study is part of a broader investigation of the role of large-scale educational telecommunications systems. Thus, data are analyzed and trends and issues discussed to provide information useful to the systems designer who wishes to identify and assess the opportunities for large-scale electronic delivery of education for the handicapped.

  14. European Strategies and Higher Education (CPP RPS 34/2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses EU-level developments in policy thinking in the area of higher education, training, and labour markets based on the analysis of a major large-scale strategy promoted by the European Commission in the 2000s: “Education and Training 2010” (ET 2010, launched in 2001, followed by a new strategy for the next decade, “Education and Training 2020”, ET 2020). The strategy shows major EU-level conceptualizations in the areas of education, training and labour market policies. The m...

  15. Magnetic resonance-guided regional gene delivery strategy using a tumor stroma-permeable nanocarrier for pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Qingbing Wang,1,2 Jianfeng Li,3 Sai An,3 Yi Chen,1 Chen Jiang,3 Xiaolin Wang1,2 1Department of Interventional Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 2Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, 3Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Gene therapy is a very promising technology for treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. However, its application has been limited by the abundant stromal response in the tumor microenvironment. The aim of this study was to prepare a dendrimer-based gene-free loading vector with high permeability in the tumor stroma and explore an imaging-guided local gene delivery strategy for PDAC to promote the efficiency of targeted gene delivery.Methods: The experimental protocol was approved by the animal ethics committee of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University. Third-generation dendrigraft poly-L-lysines was selected as the nanocarrier scaffold, which was modified by cell-penetrating peptides and gadolinium (Gd chelates. DNA plasmids were loaded with these nanocarriers via electrostatic interaction. The cellular uptake and loaded gene expression were examined in MIA PaCa-2 cell lines in vitro. Permeability of the nanoparticles in the tumor stroma and transfected gene distribution in vivo were studied using a magnetic resonance imaging-guided delivery strategy in an orthotopic nude mouse model of PDAC.Results: The nanocarriers were synthesized with a dendrigraft poly-L-lysine to polyethylene glycol to DTPA ratio of 1:3.4:8.3 and a mean diameter of 110.9±7.7 nm. The luciferases were strictly expressed in the tumor, and the luminescence intensity in mice treated by Gd-DPT/plasmid luciferase (1.04×104±9.75×102 p/s/cm2/sr was significantly (P<0.05 higher than in those treated with Gd-DTPA (9.56×102±6.15×10 p/s/cm2/sr and Gd-DP (5.75×103± 7.45×102 p/s/cm2/sr

  16. ICT enabled education and ICT driven e-learning strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper centres on ICT enabled education and ICT driven e-learning strategies: benefits and setbacks in Nigeria education system. It is in fact among the academic struggle to bring to the lime-light, the knowledge of ICT to scholars especially in the domain of education. The paper captured interesting discussion on the ...

  17. Pasundan Delivery Services (PT. Wahana Bumi Raya) Business Strategy Formulation and Implementation to Create Sustain Future Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Haryanto, Iman; Wandebori, Harimukti

    2012-01-01

    Pasundan Delivery Services (PDS) is the delivery services provider using motorcycle provide solutions for visitors and Bandung citizens to effective and efficient their valuable time, run its costumer order through smartphone and social media, lucrative demand leads PDS to formulate its strategy to reach more costumers among existing competitors to win the competition in and as the leader the future. Formulation of strategic management involving small team discussion group as the management o...

  18. Distance Education Quality Course Delivery Framework: A Formative Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Michael Raymond

    2013-01-01

    In the Fall 2010 semester, student enrollment in distance education courses increased in the United States to over 6.1 million students taking at least one distance course. Distance education allows institutions to meet increasing demands from the government and business sectors for more graduates in ways that face-to-face courses cannot meet with…

  19. Challenges in the delivery of adventure education: The case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This qualitative study explored the substantive issues and challenges faced by Physical Education teachers in delivering adventure education in the context of Botswana junior secondary schools. In the first stage of the study, 22 respondents completed a semi-structured questionnaire requesting information pertaining to the ...

  20. Learning Style, Culture and Delivery Mode in Online Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speece, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to customer needs is a key component of competitiveness in any service industry. In online HE (higher education), which is increasingly worldwide, this adaptation must include consideration of learning styles. Most research shows that learning style has little impact on learning outcomes in online education. Nevertheless, students with…

  1. Measuring Nurse Educators' Willingness to Adopt Inclusive Teaching Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, Janet A

    The purpose of the study was to examine the characteristics and relationships of nurse educators' teaching practices, knowledge, support, and willingness to adopt inclusive teaching strategies (WillAdITS). Adopting more inclusive teaching strategies based on universal design for instruction is an innovative way for educators to reach today's diverse student body. However, the pedagogy has not diffused into nursing education. Descriptive statistics and hierarchical multiple regression were used for analyzing data from 311 nurse educators in prelicensure and RN to BSN programs. The model explained 44.8 percent of the variance in WillAdITS. The best indicators for this pedagogy were knowledge of universal design for instruction, social system support for inclusive teaching strategies, multiple instructional formats, and years of teaching. Knowing factors influencing the adoption of inclusive teaching strategies can inform schools of nursing of areas needing further development in the preparation of novice to experienced educators to teach diverse learners.

  2. Implementation Strategies for Educational Intranet Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herson, Katie; Sosabowski, Michael; Lloyd, Andrew; Flowers, Stephen; Paine, Cameron; Newton, Becci

    2000-01-01

    Describes two alternative strategies for intranet implementation based on experiences at the University of Brighton (United Kingdom). Highlights include differing degrees of staff and student utilization; barriers to success; a unified strategy for effective intranet implementation; and how to manage organizational resistance to change.…

  3. BRAZILIAN EDUCATION AND SURVIVAL STRATEGIES OF CAPITALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Almeida Sales de Melo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In discussing the theme Imperialism, Crisis and education, the essay points out aspects of our historical totality in relation to recent crises through which it passed capitalism, and its relationship to changes in Brazilian educational policies. Education remains at the heart of development projects, as a producer of knowledge, as well as guiding the processes of social conformation. They also discussed the aftermath of the crisis: the rise of social inequality and the increase of labor exploitation. Make clear our project of society and education, as resistance movements to the survival of capitalism is a necessity in building movements of counter-hegemony.

  4. The Educator Market: Military Recruiting Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lancaster, Anita

    2002-01-01

    .... Eight strategic imperatives, with objectives and tactics, were provided as a blueprint for prioritizing work with educators, The strategic imperatives highlight the importance of continued efforts...

  5. Enhancing Quality in Educational Practice and Instructional Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    instructions to students in technical and vocational education (TVE) programs. ... in Nigeria perceive their traditional methods of instruction as obsolete with ..... Even so, skills necessary to adapt to the modern technology should be taught.

  6. DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY OF PARTNERSHIP OF HIGHER EDUCATION, SCIENCE AND BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mazur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the cooperation of higher education, science and business is analysed. A conflict of civilizations wave development in the confrontation of two forces: the "factory of Education" and force change is disclosed. European and Ukrainian higher education quality estimation is analysed. The effect of unsynchronization in time is educed between the necessities of business and possibilities of education and science. Reasons of bribery are exposed at higher school. The development strategy of partnership of higher education, science and business is proposed.

  7. Blue Ocean Strategy for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragança, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    In today's higher education world we see a shift in teaching and educational trends that are slowly materializing due to the advent of new technologies, new academic frameworks and the need to adapt to society's incremental advancements. The implementation of reforms, however, did not have the desired outcome since those were applied to an…

  8. Workload Management Strategies for Online Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Tena B.; Wilkinson, Kelly; Hemby, K. Virginia; McCannon, Melinda; Wiedmaier, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    With increased use of online education, both students and instructors are adapting to the online environment. Online educators must adjust to the change in responsibilities required to teach online, as it is quite intensive during the designing, teaching, and revising stages. The purpose of this study is to examine and update workload management…

  9. Strategies in Values Education: Horse or Cart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes briefly the growing emphasis in Australia on values education as evidenced by the Australian Government's National Framework for Values Education in Australian Schools (2005), and the responses of the respective States and Territories. Arguing that the major approaches to the teaching of values (the trait approach often…

  10. Effective Educational Strategies for Desegregated Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is based on a review of research and other commentary about educational policies in desegrated schools. It identifies four general conditions likely to affect educational quality and suggests 12 policies and practices concerning school and classroom organization, human relations activities, and school staff. (PP)

  11. A Topic-Driven Modular Approach to Engineering Education Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruba Akram Amarin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The interactive technical electronic book, TechEBook, currently under development at the University of Central Florida, provides a useful tool for engineers and scientists through unique features compared to the most used traditional electrical circuit textbooks available in the market. TechEBook has comprised the two worlds of classical circuit books and an interactive operating platform that can be run on mobile devices, laptops and desktops utilizing Java Virtual Machine operator. The TechEBook provides an interactive applets screen that holds many modules, in which each had a specific application in the self learning process. In this paper the main goals and objectives behind the MeLearning concept will be identified. The paper will describe the differences between the traditional curriculum delivery and the MeLearning concept in details accompanied by the main tools used and a description of the different modules features.

  12. Community strategies of women in educational management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This article focuses on the communication strategies of women principals in ... and the implications for the workplace outlined by means of a literature review. ... the constraints of traditional culture regarding communication and coping ...

  13. Strategies for Implementing Human Rights Education in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strategies for Implementing Human Rights Education in Nigeria. ... the social and emotional development of the child and by introducing democratic values. It helps learners to develop attitudes of solidarity across issues and nations. Human ...

  14. Strategies for Ensuring Quality in the Business Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strategies for Ensuring Quality in the Business Education Programme of Tertiary Institutions in ... The survey method was employed. One research question guided the study while two null hypotheses were tested at 0.05 degree of significance.

  15. COMMUNICATION STRATEGY FOR A PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT DEPARTMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiana Pop

    2013-01-01

    Communication strategy of physical education and sports departments in an institution of higher education is, ultimately, a form of adaptation to new and changing environmental conditions (legal, political, internal organization and financial) in which they operate. Developing a communication strategy is an approach that is based on the research group aims to be influenced and on the effort to build a message, an image and emotional state to determine a change in perception, attitude and beha...

  16. DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES OF THE EDUCATIONAL STRATEGY OF THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena I. Lokshyna

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the analysis of the evolution of the educational strategy of EU in the process of its development aimed at the economic stability and security in the region. The author distinguishes key stages of the EU strategy development in the educational area and its present-day concept underlying the importance of correspondence to the requirements of economy and society.

  17. Sex Education, A Way Forward towards Biology Curriculum Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the need for the inclusion of sex education in the secondary school biology curriculum in Anambra State since the noninclusion was viewed as an inadequacy in the biology curriculum. The study was a survey design. Three research questions and one null hypothesis were formulated to guide the study.

  18. Digital television in the delivery of multimedia education content.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ntlatlapa, N

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Broadband access has not reached all corners of South Africa, and yet the need to deliver multimedia education content to all schools in the country remains the same. Low-cost, appropriate technologies would enable schools in areas that would have...

  19. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H. Baker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX, which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon, pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX, or alternatively, through the use of polymer

  20. Medical Education and Health Care Delivery: A Call to Better Align Goals and Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, David P; Hemmer, Paul A; Durning, Steven J

    2018-03-01

    The transformation of the U.S. health care system is under way, driven by the needs of an aging population, rising health care spending, and the availability of health information. However, the speed and effectiveness of the transformation of health care delivery will depend, in large part, upon engagement of the health professions community and changes in clinicians' practice behaviors. Current efforts to influence practice behaviors emphasize changes in the health payment system with incentives to move from fee-for-service to alternative payment models.The authors describe the potential of medical education to augment payment incentives to make changes in clinical practice and the importance of aligning the purpose and goals of medical education with those of the health care delivery system. The authors discuss how curricular and assessment changes and faculty development can align medical education with the transformative trends in the health care delivery system. They also explain how the theory of situated cognition offers a shared conceptual framework that could help address the misalignment of education and clinical care. They provide examples of how quality improvement, health care innovation, population care management, and payment alignment could create bridges for joining health care delivery and medical education to meet the health care reform goals of a high-performing health care delivery system while controlling health care spending. Finally, the authors illustrate how current payment incentives such as bundled payments, value-based purchasing, and population-based payments can work synergistically with medical education to provide high-value care.

  1. Drug delivery strategies and systems for HIV/AIDS pre-exposure prophylaxis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Antoinette G; Zhang, Xiaoping; Ganapathi, Usha; Szekely, Zoltan; Flexner, Charles W; Owen, Andrew; Sinko, Patrick J

    2015-12-10

    The year 2016 will mark an important milestone - the 35th anniversary of the first reported cases of HIV/AIDS. Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) including Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) drug regimens is widely considered to be one of the greatest achievements in therapeutic drug research having transformed HIV infection into a chronically managed disease. Unfortunately, the lack of widespread preventive measures and the inability to eradicate HIV from infected cells highlight the significant challenges remaining today. Moving forward there are at least three high priority goals for anti-HIV drug delivery (DD) research: (1) to prevent new HIV infections from occurring, (2) to facilitate a functional cure, i.e., when HIV is present but the body controls it without drugs and (3) to eradicate established infection. Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) represents a significant step forward in preventing the establishment of chronic HIV infection. However, the ultimate success of PrEP will depend on achieving sustained antiretroviral (ARV) tissue concentrations and will require strict patient adherence to the regimen. While first generation long acting/extended release (LA/ER) DD Systems (DDS) currently in development show considerable promise, significant DD treatment and prevention challenges persist. First, there is a critical need to improve cell specificity through targeting in order to selectively achieve efficacious drug concentrations in HIV reservoir sites to control/eradicate HIV as well as mitigate systemic side effects. In addition, approaches for reducing cellular efflux and metabolism of ARV drugs to prolong effective concentrations in target cells need to be developed. Finally, given the current understanding of HIV pathogenesis, next generation anti-HIV DDS need to address selective DD to the gut mucosa and lymph nodes. The current review focuses on the DDS technologies, critical challenges, opportunities, strategies, and approaches by which novel

  2. Formulation of Higher Education Institutional Strategy Using Operational Research Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Ashraf; Read, Martin; Gladstone-Millar, Charlotte; Tonge, Richard; Smith, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a framework is proposed for the formulation of a higher education institutional (HEI) strategy. This work provides a practical example, through a case study, to demonstrate how the proposed framework can be applied to the issue of formulation of HEI strategy. The proposed hybrid model is based on two operational research…

  3. Coping by Copying? Higher Education Institutions' Student Recruitment Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolich, Nicoline; Brandt, Synnove; Hovdhaugen, Elisabeth; Aamodt, Per Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Growing national and international competition for students puts pressure on higher education institutions (HEIs) to develop marketing and student recruitment strategies; these are also driven by financial stress caused by performance-based funding mechanisms. In this paper we explore Norwegian HEIs' student recruitment strategies. What type of…

  4. Customized Content Delivery for Graduate Management Education: Application to Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Owen P., Jr.; Ko, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Globalization is bringing about a radical "rethink" regarding the delivery of graduate management education. Today, many students entering a residential MBA program do not possess an undergraduate degree in business. As a result, many business schools are increasingly turning to the Internet to provide "customized" instructional content to ensure…

  5. A Culture-Based Model for Strategic Implementation of Virtual Education Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Janice; Thongprasert, Nalinee

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the critical success factors for implementing Virtual Education Delivery (VED) in Thailand, and to identify ways to facilitate such adoption and lead to effective outcomes. The study incorporated an analysis of three specific factors related to Thai culture: high power distance "Bhun Khun", uncertainty…

  6. Forest Landowner Education Interests and Delivery Preferences: A Retrospective Look at Survey Results and Actual Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobrist, Kevin W.; Rozance, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    This article presents survey data on education interests and delivery preferences of small forest landowners in Washington and compares it to actual program participation over 6 years. The survey was conducted in late 2007 to guide development and implementation of a Extension forestry program. The survey found broad interest across many topics…

  7. Influence and Challenges of the Capitation Grant on Education Delivery in Basic Schools in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajibo, Edison; Tamanja, Emmanuel M. J.

    2017-01-01

    In Ghana, some children do not attend school, because their parents are unable to afford levies and fees charged by schools. This led to the introduction of the Capitation Grant Scheme in 2005. This study investigates the influence of the Capitation Grant Scheme on education delivery in basic schools in Ghana, through a close study of the Ga West…

  8. Financial Management and Relationship Skills Education: Gauging Consumer Interest and Delivery Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futris, Ted G.; Nielsen, Robert B.; Barton, Allen W.

    2011-01-01

    The study reported here explored level of interest and preferred delivery method of Extension programming related to financial management and relationship skills education. These two subjects comprise areas of Extension that often receive less recognition but appear as pertinent issues in the lives of many individuals. Using a diverse sample of…

  9. Multi-Scale Validation of a Nanodiamond Drug Delivery System and Multi-Scale Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Michelle Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation has two primary concerns: (i) evaluating the uncertainty and prediction capabilities of a nanodiamond drug delivery model using Bayesian calibration and bias correction, and (ii) determining conceptual difficulties of multi-scale analysis from an engineering education perspective. A Bayesian uncertainty quantification scheme…

  10. Approaches to nontraditional delivery of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaviya, B.K.

    1991-01-01

    At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the faculty of the nuclear engineering and engineering physics department have, over the years, been involved in a variety of such approaches in response to the changing needs of nuclear industry personnel. A number of different types of short course and workshop programs have been developed and implemented both on and off campus in such areas as basic nuclear technology, reactor design computer codes and applications, nuclear power plant design and maintenance, reactor operations, health physics, modern developments in boiling heat transfer and two-phase flow, and probabilistic risk assessment. Customized coursed tailored to meet the particular needs of personnel in specialized areas can also be offered on specific industrial site locations, generally resulting in substantial savings of time as well as costs associated with tuition, travel, lodging. The Rensselaer Satellite Video Program (RSVP) brings the latest technological aids to the nontraditional delivery of courses and provides the facilities and opportunities for off-campus students and professional personnel to participate in regular academic programs and courses without leaving their industrial sites

  11. Delivery of gentamicin from resorbable polymeric carriers as anti-infective strategy for implant-associated osteomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Boo, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of gentamicin loaded resorbable polymeric carriers as anti-infective strategy for implant-associated osteomyelitis and their in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Local delivery of antibiotics has several advantages in the case of trauma to the bone and surrounding

  12. A Study on Developing Learning Strategies in Violin Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afacan, Senol; Cilden, Seyda

    2018-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of developing a valid and reliable learning strategies scale for students receiving violin education in Departments of Music at Fine Arts High Schools. The scale was applied to 391 violin students receiving education in the 11th and 12th grades in Departments of Music at Fine Arts High Schools in the…

  13. Strategies for Integrating Peace Education into Social Studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings also identified co-curricular and instructional strategies for use in teaching the identified peace education concepts. It was recommended that the identified peace education concepts could be added to the Social Studies curriculum and the thematic approach should be used in restructuring the Social Studies ...

  14. Strategies for Success in Financial Education. PDP 2009-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberger, Robin G.; Paulson, Anna L.

    2009-01-01

    The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago will host a conference, Financial Literacy, Financial Education, and the Federal Reserve: Strategies for Success, on September 11, 2009. This article reviews some of the financial education activities throughout the Federal Reserve System. The topics these initiatives cover include financial skill building,…

  15. Exemplars and Nudges: Combining Two Strategies for Moral Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, Bart; Thomas, Alan; Archer, Alfred; van de Ven, Niels

    This article defends the use of narratives about morally exemplary individuals in moral education and appraises the role that ‘nudge’ strategies can play in combination with such an appeal to exemplars. It presents a general conception of the aims of moral education and explains how the proposed

  16. Corporate real estate strategies for future higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronald Beckers; Driessen Jasper

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to explore the alignment of Corporate Real Estate (CRE) strategies of Dutch Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS) with the developments in higher education. Methodology/approach – The paper first illustrates the key developments in higher education learning and

  17. Educations of Vision - relational strategies in visual culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Helene

    2004-01-01

    redescriptions? employs poststructuralist and feminist thinking about visual culture in an attempt to explore alternative understandings of visual education. In the final part ?Educations of vision in late modernity? socialization and self creation are proposed as two different, but supplementary, educational......The article is divided into three parts. Through examples from twentieth century Scandinavian visual arts education the first part ?Epistemological inquiries? discusses how the historical and social construction of dominant modern strategies of vision has occurred. The second part ?Experimentalist...... functions which contemporary visual education inspired by epistemological and experimentalist approaches should aim to fulfill....

  18. Self-management toolkit and delivery strategy for end-of-life pain: the mixed-methods feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael I; Mulvey, Matthew R; Campling, Natasha; Latter, Sue; Richardson, Alison; Bekker, Hilary; Blenkinsopp, Alison; Carder, Paul; Closs, Jose; Farrin, Amanda; Flemming, Kate; Gallagher, Jean; Meads, David; Morley, Stephen; O'Dwyer, John; Wright-Hughes, Alexandra; Hartley, Suzanne

    2017-12-01

    Pain affects most people approaching the end of life and can be severe for some. Opioid analgesia is effective, but evidence is needed about how best to support patients in managing these medicines. To develop a self-management support toolkit (SMST) and delivery strategy and to test the feasibility of evaluating this intervention in a future definitive trial. Phase I - evidence synthesis and qualitative interviews with patients and carers. Phase II - qualitative semistructured focus groups and interviews with patients, carers and specialist palliative care health professionals. Phase III - multicentre mixed-methods single-arm pre-post observational feasibility study. Phase I - six patients and carers. Phase II - 15 patients, four carers and 19 professionals. Phase III - 19 patients recruited to intervention that experienced pain, living at home and were treated with strong opioid analgesia. Process evaluation interviews with 13 patients, seven carers and 11 study nurses. Self-Management of Analgesia and Related Treatments at the end of life (SMART) intervention comprising a SMST and a four-step educational delivery approach by clinical nurse specialists in palliative care over 6 weeks. Recruitment rate, treatment fidelity, treatment acceptability, patient-reported outcomes (such as scores on the Brief Pain Inventory, Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease Scale, Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale, EuroQol-5 Dimensions, Satisfaction with Information about Medicines Scale, and feasibility of collecting data on health-care resource use for economic evaluation). Phase I - key themes on supported self-management were identified from evidence synthesis and qualitative interviews. Phase II - the SMST was developed and refined. The delivery approach was nested within a nurse-patient consultation. Phase III - intervention was delivered to 17 (89%) patients, follow-up data at 6 weeks were available on 15 patients. Overall, the intervention was viewed as acceptable and

  19. Incubating a Space Strategy: The Role of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Instruction in broad ranging subjects was given to “round out complete education as an Air Corps officer, especially where he will have close...development of space education ; and the internal connections within the military remain strong at ACSC, while the external connections, especially to...INCUBATING A SPACE STRATEGY: THE ROLE OF EDUCATION BY ELISABETH K. WHITE A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE FACULTY OF

  20. Implementation of Brazil's "family health strategy": factors associated with community health workers', nurses', and physicians' delivery of drug use services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Anya Y; Pinto, Rogério M; Rahman, Rahbel; da Fonseca, Aline

    2015-05-01

    Brazil's "family health strategy" (ESF), provides primary care, mostly to individuals in impoverished communities through teams of physicians, nurses, and community health workers (CHWs). ESF workers are called upon to offer drug use services (e.g., referrals, counseling) as drug use represents an urgent public health crisis. New federal initiatives are being implemented to build capacity in this workforce to deliver drug use services, yet little is known about whether ESF workers are providing drug use services already. Guided by social cognitive theory, this study examines factors associated with ESF workers' provision of drug use services. Cross-sectional surveys were collected from 262 ESF workers (168 CHWs, 62 nurses, and 32 physicians) in Mesquita, Rio de Janeiro State and Santa Luzia, Minas Gerais State. provision of drug-use services. capacity to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP), resource constraints, peer support, knowledge of EBP, and job title. Logistic regression was used to determine relative influence of each predictor upon the outcome. Thirty-nine percent reported providing drug use services. Younger workers, CHWs, workers with knowledge about EBP and workers that report peer support were more likely to offer drug use services. Workers that reported resource constraints and more capacity to implement EBP were less likely to offer drug use services. ESF workers require education in locating, assessing and evaluating the latest research. Mentorship from physicians and peer support through team meetings may enhance workers' delivery of drug use services, across professional disciplines. Educational initiatives aimed at ESF teams should consider these factors as potentially enhancing implementation of drug use services. Building ESF workers' capacity to collaborate across disciplines and to gain access to tools for providing assessment and treatment of drug use issues may improve uptake of new initiatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  1. INTERNAL MARKETING STRATEGY IN A HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aléssio Bessa Sarquis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Internal marketing comprises the set of strategies to enable internally compliance of the organization's marketing promises. This study examines the use of internal marketing strategies in a higher education institution in the process of implementing a new educational model. This is one case study with qualitative and exploratory approach. The data collection techniques used were interviews and document analysis, interpreted through content analysis. The results show that the most commonly used strategies are: implementation of employee training programs; development of materials / guidance handouts; creating web blog; and the application of internal research. The testimonies indicate that the internal marketing strategies contributed to the implementation of new educational model, but there is dissatisfaction among managers with the internal marketing program of the institution.

  2. STRATEGI PEMBERDAYAAN EKONOMI KOMUNITAS WARIA MELALUI LIFE SKILL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rr. Indah Mustikawati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Strategi Pemberdayaan Ekonomi Komunitas Waria Melalui Life Skill Education. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui penurunan jumlah waria yang “turun ke jalan” yang berprofesi sebagai Pekerja Seks Komersial melalui life skill education dan pengaruhnya terhadap jumlah pendapatan yang diterima waria dari sumber yang “halal”, serta penurunan kemiskinan komunitas waria di Kotamadya Yogyakarta. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode Research and Development dengan empat tahapan, yaitu studi pendahuluan pengembangan, penyusunan desain, uji coba model, dan evaluasi hasil pengembangan model life skill education. Keempat tahapan tersebut dilakukan untuk menemukan model yang sesuai untuk strategi pemberdayaan ekonomi bagi komunitas waria. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa semua waria menginginkan untuk memiliki kompetensi tambahan yang dapat digunakan untuk merintis usaha sesuai dengan peminatan mereka, dan menambah penghasilan mereka, dan sebagai bekal di hari tua.   Kata Kunci: Strategi Pemberdayaan Ekonomi, Pengentasan kemiskinan, Waria   Abstract: Economy Empowerment Strategy Trough Life skill Education as Poverty Reduction of Transgender Community. Aims of this research are to determine reduction number of transgender working as prostitute through life skill education and the impact of that reduction on their halal income, to examine poverty reduction among transgender communities in Yogyakarta. This study uses four-steps of research and development approach, namely preliminary study development, design preparation, model test, life skill education model evaluations. The results show that all of the transgender involved in this study yearn for having additional skill to set new business up to increase their income.   Keywords: economic empowerment strategy, poverty eradication, transgender

  3. Higher Education Institutions: A Strategy towards Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarejos, Fabricio; Frota, Mauricio Nogueira; Gustavson, Laura Morten

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to guide higher education institutions (HEIs) in accomplishing sustainability goals while strengthening their associated systems and processes. Pursuing this goal, this study proposes a conceptual framework for modeling the HEI organizational environment; a set of strategic sustainability actions to drive…

  4. Repositioning teacher education: Strategy for equipping the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The past decade has seen globalization and emerging technologies fundamentally transforming every society (developing and developed alike) by creating a knowledge economy that influences the way people live and interact with one another. Obviously, the teacher is quite conversant with the processes of education, ...

  5. Bullying Prevention Strategies in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    2017-01-01

    Bullying is a serious problem that affects the young children's well being. Early childhood educators find it difficult to manage bullying in the classroom. Preschool is the first environment outside of the home setting where children encounter difficulties when they socially interact with their peers. Based on the principles of protecting and…

  6. Community strategies of women in educational management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    sponsibilities, a lack of self-confidence and public exposure and the absence of a ..... Men in authoritative positions also tend to use raised voices, displays .... herself as the “mother of the school” and is very well educated within her community.

  7. Sharing Special Education Strategies in Rural Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamberger, Cynthia T.

    2014-01-01

    As a former special education teacher at the elementary, middle and high school levels, many unique and complex learning situations were encountered. The author, who was a junior faculty member on her initial trip to Kenya, experienced a very challenging, yet rewarding, learning opportunity with teachers gathered in a community located in rural…

  8. Strategies for Evaluating Complex Environmental Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, V.

    2011-12-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of environmental education programs has been difficult to establish for many reasons. Chief among them are the lack of clear program objectives and an inability to conceptualize how environmental education programs work. Both can lead to evaluations that make claims that are difficult to substantiate, such as significant changes in student achievement levels or behavioral changes based on acquisition of knowledge. Many of these challenges can be addressed by establishing the program theory and developing a logic model. However, claims of impact on larger societal outcomes are difficult to attribute solely to program activities. Contribution analysis may offer a promising method for addressing this challenge. Rather than attempt to definitively and causally link a program's activities to desired results, contribution analysis seeks to provide plausible evidence that can reduce uncertainty regarding the 'difference' a program is making to observed outcomes. It sets out to verify the theory of change behind a program and, at the same time, takes into consideration other influencing factors. Contribution analysis is useful in situations where the program is not experimental-there is little or no scope for varying how the program is implemented-and the program has been funded on the basis of a theory of change. In this paper, the author reviews the feasibility of using contribution analysis as a way of evaluating the impact of the GLOBE program, an environmental science and education program. Initially conceptualized by Al Gore in 1995, the program's implementation model is based on worldwide environmental monitoring by students and scientists around the globe. This paper will make a significant and timely contribution to the field of evaluation, and specifically environmental education evaluation by examining the usefulness of this analysis for developing evidence to assess the impact of environmental education programs.

  9. Delivery strategies of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Zhang, Li; Liu, Hao; Cheng, Kun

    2017-11-28

    The CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing system is a part of the adaptive immune system in archaea and bacteria to defend against invasive nucleic acids from phages and plasmids. The single guide RNA (sgRNA) of the system recognizes its target sequence in the genome, and the Cas9 nuclease of the system acts as a pair of scissors to cleave the double strands of DNA. Since its discovery, CRISPR-Cas9 has become the most robust platform for genome engineering in eukaryotic cells. Recently, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has triggered enormous interest in therapeutic applications. CRISPR-Cas9 can be applied to correct disease-causing gene mutations or engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy. The first clinical trial using the CRISPR-Cas9 technology was conducted in 2016. Despite the great promise of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology, several challenges remain to be tackled before its successful applications for human patients. The greatest challenge is the safe and efficient delivery of the CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing system to target cells in human body. In this review, we will introduce the molecular mechanism and different strategies to edit genes using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We will then highlight the current systems that have been developed to deliver CRISPR-Cas9 in vitro and in vivo for various therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Philanthropy and Education: Strategies for Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Anheier, Helmut K.; Thumler, Ekkehard; Bögelein, Nicole; Beller , Annelie

    2014-01-01

    The reform of public schools is high on the public agenda in Europe as well as North America. Philanthropic foundations play an increasingly important role in attempts to enhance the performance of the system. However, the degree to which their ambitious aspirations are actually realized is often very low. This book addresses the question of how philanthropic actors can make a more effective, beneficial and responsible contribution to the field of public education. It develops an innovative m...

  11. Special Educational Strategies for Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Loukidou, Vassiliki Ioannidi, Athena Kalokerinou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acting emotionally has been the explicit target for many service professions. However, in the case of nursing, the concept of emotional labour remains implicit and elaborated only when the adverse effects of emotional labour have already occurred. Since nursing work involves the effective management of emotions, it is an imperative to openly incorporate “emotional labour” in the nursing curricula. The rationale that underlies such proposition is that by preparing students for the emotional aspects of their future work, we equip them with techniques that will minimise the exhausting effects of emotional labour, we define more accurately their roles and hence teach them how to provide better services. Though the focus of this paper is on nursing education and practice, the concepts that are addressed can be applied in many professions, including sports management. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the importance of education for the preparation of students for the emotional aspects of nursing work and to propose a special educational framework that places the emphasis on the emotional/ social skills that nursing students shoulddevelop during training and which will help them in managing their emotions and hence limit the effects of emotional labour.

  12. Self-assembled amphiphilic core-shell nanocarriers in line with the modern strategies for brain delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elezaby, Reham S; Gad, Heba A; Metwally, Abdelkader A; Geneidi, Ahmed S; Awad, Gehanne A

    2017-09-10

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) represent increasing social and economic problems all over the world which makes the effective transport of drugs to the brain a crucial need. In the last decade, many strategies were introduced to deliver drugs to the brain trying to overcome the challenge of the blood brain barrier (BBB) using both invasive and non-invasive methods. Non-invasive strategy represented in the application of nanocarriers became very common. One of the most hopeful nanoscopic carriers for brain delivery is core-shell nanocarriers or polymeric micelles (PMs). They are more advantageous than other nanocarriers. They offer small size, ease of preparation, ease of sterilization and the possibility of surface modification with various ligands. Hence, the aim of this review is to discuss modern strategies for brain delivery, micelles as a successful delivery system for the brain and how micelles could be modified to act as "magic bullets" for brain delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro and in vivo effects of PDGF-BB delivery strategies on tendon healing: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Evrova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To promote and support tendon healing, one viable strategy is the use or administration of growth factors at the wound/rupture site. Platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB, together with other growth factors, is secreted by platelets after injury. PDGF-BB promotes mitogenesis and angiogenesis, which could accelerate tendon healing. Therefore, in vitro studies with PDGF-BB have been performed to determine its effect on tenocytes and tenoblasts. Moreover, accurate and sophisticated drug delivery devices, aiming for a sustained release of PDGF-BB, have been developed, either by using heparin-binding and fibrin-based matrices or different electrospinning techniques. In this review, the structure and composition, as well as the healing process of tendons, are described. Part A deals with in vitro studies. They focus on the multiple effects evoked by PDGF-BB on the cellular level. Moreover, they address strategies for the sustained delivery of PDGF-BB. Part B focuses on animal models used to test different delivery strategies for PDGF-BB, in the context of tendon reconstruction. These studies showed that dosage and timing of PDGF-BB application are the most important factors for deciding which delivery device should be applied for a specific tendon laceration.

  14. Improving drug delivery strategies for lymphatic filariasis elimination in urban areas in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana-Kwadwo Biritwum

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF advocates for the treatment of entire endemic communities, in order to achieve its elimination targets. LF is predominantly a rural disease, and achieving the required treatment coverage in these areas is much easier compared to urban areas that are more complex. In Ghana, parts of the Greater Accra Region with Accra as the capital city are also endemic for LF. Mass Drug Administration (MDA in Accra started in 2006. However, after four years of treatment, the coverage has always been far below the 65% epidemiologic coverage for interrupting transmission. As such, there was a need to identify the reasons for poor treatment coverage and design specific strategies to improve the delivery of MDA. This study therefore set out to identify the opportunities and barriers for implementing MDA in urban settings, and to develop appropriate strategies for MDA in these settings. An experimental, exploratory study was undertaken in three districts in the Greater Accra region. The study identified various types of non-rural settings, the social structures, stakeholders and resources that could be employed for MDA. Qualitative assessment such as in-depth interviews (IDIs and focus group discussions (FGDs with community leaders, community members, health providers, NGOs and other stakeholders in the community was undertaken. The study was carried out in three phases: pre-intervention, intervention and post-intervention phases, to assess the profile of the urban areas and identify reasons for poor treatment coverage using both qualitative and quantitative research methods. The outcomes from the study revealed that, knowledge, attitudes and practices of community members to MDA improved slightly from the pre-intervention phase to the post-intervention phase, in the districts where the interventions were readily implemented by health workers. Many factors such as adequate leadership, funding, planning and

  15. Smartphone Delivery of Mobile HIV Risk Reduction Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karran A. Phillips

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to develop and deploy a video-based smartphone-delivered mobile HIV Risk Reduction (mHIVRR intervention to individuals in an addiction treatment clinic. We developed 3 video modules that consisted of a 10-minute HIVRR video, 11 acceptability questions, and 3 knowledge questions and deployed them as a secondary study within a larger study of ecological momentary and geographical momentary assessments. All 24 individuals who remained in the main study long enough completed the mHIVRR secondary study. All 3 videos met our a priori criteria for acceptability “as is” in the population: they achieved median scores of ≤2.5 on a 5-point Likert scale; ≤20% of the individuals gave them the most negative rating on the scale; a majority of the individuals stated that they would not prefer other formats over video-based smartphone-delivered one (all P<0.05. Additionally, all of our video modules met our a priori criteria for feasibility: ≤20% of data were missing due to participant noncompliance and ≤20% were missing due to technical failure. We concluded that video-based mHIVRR education delivered via smartphone is acceptable, feasible and may increase HIV/STD risk reduction knowledge. Future studies, with pre-intervention assessments of knowledge and random assignment, are needed to confirm these findings.

  16. Adapting to a Changing Colorado River: Making Future Water Deliveries More Reliable Through Robust Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, D.; Bloom, E.; Fischbach, J. R.; Knopman, D.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and water management agencies representing the seven Colorado River Basin States initiated the Colorado River Basin Study in January 2010 to evaluate the resiliency of the Colorado River system over the next 50 years and compare different options for ensuring successful management of the river's resources. RAND was asked to join this Basin Study Team in January 2012 to help develop an analytic approach to identify key vulnerabilities in managing the Colorado River basin over the coming decades and to evaluate different options that could reduce this vulnerability. Using a quantitative approach for planning under uncertainty called Robust Decision Making (RDM), the RAND team assisted the Basin Study by: identifying future vulnerable conditions that could lead to imbalances that could cause the basin to be unable to meet its water delivery objectives; developing a computer-based tool to define 'portfolios' of management options reflecting different strategies for reducing basin imbalances; evaluating these portfolios across thousands of future scenarios to determine how much they could improve basin outcomes; and analyzing the results from the system simulations to identify key tradeoffs among the portfolios. This talk will describe RAND's contribution to the Basin Study, focusing on the methodologies used to to identify vulnerabilities for Upper Basin and Lower Basin water supply reliability and to compare portfolios of options. Several key findings emerged from the study. Future Streamflow and Climate Conditions Are Key: - Vulnerable conditions arise in a majority of scenarios where streamflows are lower than historical averages and where drought conditions persist for eight years or more. - Depending where the shortages occur, problems will arise for delivery obligations for the upper river basin and the lower river basin. The lower river basin is vulnerable to a broader range of plausible future conditions. Additional Investments in

  17. Influence of Students’ Feedback on the Quality of Adult Higher Distance Education Service Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akpovire ODUARAN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of a program’s compliance with service delivery and features necessary for the attainment of the programs educational objectives, student outcomes and continuous improvement is an important element in program accreditation and continuous improvement process. The study reported in this paper investigated the possible effects of students’ feedback on the improvement of adult higher education distance learning service quality in a South African rural-based university. The study interrogated the service provision factors that seemingly helped in improving the delivery of the program. Such information are vital for planning, good governance, policy formulation, monitoring and evaluation, and for decision-making. The study used a quantitative descriptive statistics analysis of data generated ranging from 2013-2014. It comprised of overall student satisfaction as the dependent variable and the explanatory variables were given by program management, facilitation, assessment, learner support, systems, resources, program outcomes and subject matter. Analytical results were obtained from the Mann Whitney Test. The population consisted of students enrolled in the Advanced Certificate in Education (ACE program by distance mode. The 313 respondents sampled were randomly selected from a total population of 916 students. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results revealed that service qualities linked to effective management, facilitation, academic support and subject matter delivery were the main qualities that the students recommended for the improvement of the program. It is therefore recommended that adult higher education programs must have a documented systematically utilized and effective process involving program service delivery constituencies like assessment, academic support and resources provided, for the periodic review of the program educational objectives to ensure that the program remains consistent

  18. The development of the Older Person's Nurse Fellowship: Education concept to delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Corina; Hayes, Nicky; Zahran, Zainab; Norton, Christine; Lee, Geraldine; Fitzpatrick, Joanne M; Crawford, Mary; Tee, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Preparing the nursing workforce to meet the challenges of an ageing population is a priority for many countries. The development of an Older Person's Nurse Fellowship (OPNF) programme for senior clinical nurses is an important innovation. This article describes the philosophical development, delivery and early evaluation of the OPNF. In 2014, Health Education England funded 24 senior clinical nurses to participate in the OPNF. The Fellowship was designed to build clinical leadership and innovation capability and develop a network of nurses to influence local and national strategy for older people's care. The Fellows selected were drawn from mental health (n=4), community/primary care (n=9) and acute care (n=11). The twelve month programme consisted of two Masters-level modules, delivered through study days and e-learning. The first cohort (n=12) commenced the course in November 2014 with a module designed to enhance clinical knowledge and skills. Evaluation data were collected from the first cohort using anonymous surveys (n=11) and focus group interviews (n=9). Descriptive statistics are presented for the quantitative data and common themes are described in the qualitative data. The overall satisfaction with the clinical module was high with a median score of 18/20 (range 17-20). Topics such as comprehensive geriatric assessment, frailty, pharmacology and cognitive assessment were regarded as highly relevant and most likely to result in a change to clinical practice. In the focus group interviews students discussed their learning experience in terms of: module specificity, peer-to-peer learning and using the OPNF as leverage for change. The OPNF is a timely innovation and a positive commitment to developing an academic pathway for senior nurses. It marks an important step in the future development of the older person's nursing workforce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Medical utilization of kiosks in the delivery of patient education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvonne Chan, Yu-Feng; Nagurka, Roxanne; Bentley, Suzanne; Ordonez, Edgardo; Sproule, William

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of kiosks has previously been shown to be effective for collecting information, delivering educational modules, and providing access to health information. We discuss a review of current literature for the utilization of kiosks for the delivery of patient education. The criteria for inclusion in this literature review were: (1) study discusses the utilization of kiosks for patient health education; (2) study discusses the use of touch screens for patient health information; (3) published in English. Our review includes searches via MEDLINE databases and Google Scholar for the years 1996-2014. Overall, 167 articles were screened for final eligibility, and after discarding duplicates and non-eligible studies with abstract. Full-text review of 28 articles was included in the final analysis. The review of available literature demonstrates the effectiveness of touch screen kiosks to educate patients and to improve healthcare, both at a performance and cost advantage over other modes of patient education.

  20. Assessing Baccalaureate Advertising Education Outcome Utilizing Marketing Education Curriculum Development Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganahl, Dennis J.; Ganahl, Richard J., III

    The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the mission and scope of professional/baccalaureate advertising education with Marketing Education curriculum and instruction strategies to enhance advertising students' outcome. Sixty-five colleges and universities with advertising education departments, sequences, or areas of emphasis…

  1. Strategies of Raising the Quality of Higher Education and Attaining Equality of Educational Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskiy, Igor V.; Agapova, Elena N.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research is to develop the policy and strategy recommendations to increase the quality of higher education in Russian Federation. The study examines the significance of equal educational opportunities and the influence of this factor on the educational systems of developing countries. Transformational processes in the domain of…

  2. Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Assisted Vaginal Delivery Home For Patients Search FAQs Assisted Vaginal ... Vaginal Delivery FAQ192, February 2016 PDF Format Assisted Vaginal Delivery Labor, Delivery, and Postpartum Care What is ...

  3. Inhaled Micro/Nanoparticulate Anticancer Drug Formulations: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery Strategy for Lung Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nazrul; Richard, Derek

    2018-05-24

    Local delivery of drug to the target organ via inhalation offers enormous benefits in the management of many diseases. Lung cancer is the most common of all cancers and it is the leading cause of death worldwide. Currently available treatment systems (intravenous or oral drug delivery) are not efficient in accumulating the delivered drug into the target tumor cells and are usually associated with various systemic and dose-related adverse effects. The pulmonary drug delivery technology would enable preferential accumulation of drug within the cancer cell and thus be superior to intravenous and oral delivery in reducing cancer cell proliferation and minimising the systemic adverse effects. Site-specific drug delivery via inhalation for the treatment of lung cancer is both feasible and efficient. The inhaled drug delivery system is non-invasive, produces high bioavailability at low dose and avoids first pass metabolism of the delivered drug. Various anticancer drugs including chemotherapeutics, proteins and genes have been investigated for inhalation in lung cancers with significant outcomes. Pulmonary delivery of drugs from dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation is stable and has high patient compliance. Herein, we report the potential of pulmonary drug delivery from dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations inhibiting lung cancer cell proliferation at very low dose with reduced unwanted adverse effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Impact of alternative reimbursement strategies in the new cooperative medical scheme on caesarean delivery rates: a mixed-method study in rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Kun

    2012-07-01

    CD and vaginal deliveries did not have a significant effect on controlling the rising CD rate in the study countries. Conclusion NCMS reimbursement strategies adopted in the study counties of China did not have a significant effect on the selection of CD for baby deliveries. The rapid rise of the CD rates of rural China has remained a serious issue. Other effective measures, such as health education to increase awareness of mothers' knowledge, and improving training of health staff in evidence-based delivery care, maybe could do more to promote rational baby delivery in rural China.

  5. Strategies for active learning in online continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Janet M

    2005-01-01

    Online continuing education and staff development is on the rise as the benefits of access, convenience, and quality learning are continuing to take shape. Strategies to enhance learning call for learner participation that is self-directed and independent, thus changing the educator's role from expert to coach and facilitator. Good planning of active learning strategies promotes optimal learning whether the learning content is presented in a course or a just-in-time short module. Active learning strategies can be used to enhance online learning during all phases of the teaching-learning process and can accommodate a variety of learning styles. Feedback from peers, educators, and technology greatly influences learner satisfaction and must be harnessed to provide effective learning experiences. Outcomes of active learning can be assessed online and implemented conveniently and successfully from the initiation of the course or module planning to the end of the evaluation process. Online learning has become accessible and convenient and allows the educator to track learner participation. The future of online education will continue to grow, and using active learning strategies will ensure that quality learning will occur, appealing to a wide variety of learning needs.

  6. Microencapsulation of protein drugs for drug delivery: strategy, preparation, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guanghui

    2014-11-10

    Bio-degradable poly(lactide) (PLA)/poly(lactide-glycolide) (PLGA) and chitosan microspheres (or microcapsules) have important applications in Drug Delivery Systems (DDS) of protein/peptide drugs. By encapsulating protein/peptide drugs in the microspheres, the serum drug concentration can be maintained at a higher constant value for a prolonged time, or injection formulation can be changed to orally or mucosally administered formulation. PLA/PLGA and chitosan are most often used in injection formulation and oral formulation. However, in the preparation and applications of PLA/PLGA and chitosan microspheres containing protein/peptide drugs, the problems of broad size distribution and poor reproducibility of microspheres, and deactivation of protein during the preparation, storage and release, are still big challenges. In this article, the techniques for control of the diameter of microspheres and microcapsules will be introduced at first, then the strategies about how to maintain the bioactivity of protein drugs during preparation and drug release will be reviewed and developed in our research group. The membrane emulsification techniques including direct membrane emulsification and rapid membrane emulsification processes were developed to prepare uniform-sized microspheres, the diameter of microspheres can be controlled from submicron to 100μm by these two processes, and the reproducibility of products can be guaranteed. Furthermore, compared with conventional stirring method, the big advantages of membrane emulsification process were that the uniform microspheres with much higher encapsulation efficiency can be obtained, and the release behavior can be adjusted by selecting microsphere size. Mild membrane emulsification condition also can prevent the deactivation of proteins, which frequently occurred under high shear force in mechanical stirring, sonification, and homogenization methods. The strategies for maintaining the bioactivity of protein drug were

  7. Spiritual Nursing Care Education An Integrated Strategy for Teaching Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donna M; Hand, Mikel

    The failure of nursing schools to integrate spiritual nursing care education into the curriculum has contributed to a lack in nurses' spiritual care ability. Developing, integrating, and testing a Spiritual Care Nursing Education strategy in an Associates of Science nursing program significantly increased the perceived spiritual care competence of student nurses. Utilizing a faculty team to develop learning activities to address critical spiritual care attributes offers a method to integrate spiritual nursing care content throughout the curriculum in ASN and BSN programs.

  8. Web site as a strategy in the education for sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Teresa Dávila Sanabria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the theoretical and methodological aspects in creating learning environments through the design and the implementation of a website to support research processes conducted in the school vegetable garden are presented. The methodological design was framed in the participatory action research with education and teaching strategies based on the use of information and communication technology (ICT, generating along with children and parents, learning environments that are constitute as tools in teaching education for sustainability.

  9. Examining leadership as a strategy to enhance health care service delivery in regional hospitals in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Sagaren; Gerwel Proches, Cecile N; Kader, Abdulla

    2018-01-01

    Background Four public hospitals in South Africa, which render both specialized and nonspecialized services to thousands of patients, were examined to determine the impact of leadership on health care service delivery. These hospitals were inundated by various problems that were impacting negatively on health care service delivery. Purpose This research study aimed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the challenges, complexities and constraints facing public health care in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) and to examine leadership as a strategy to enhance healthcare service delivery with a particular focus on four regional hospitals in the KZN Province. Methods The mixed-method research approach was utilized. Purposive sampling and stratified random sampling were employed in the research setting, and in-depth, semistructured interviews and questionnaires were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using the Nvivo computer software package for in-depth interviews and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software for the quantitative analysis. Results The research findings showed that the current leadership framework adopted by the health care leaders in regional hospitals in KZN is weak and is contributing to poor health care service delivery. Conclusion This study, therefore, aimed to address the current challenges and weaknesses that are impacting negatively on health care service delivery in regional hospitals in the KZN Province and made recommendations for improvement. PMID:29535529

  10. Short-peptide-based molecular hydrogels: novel gelation strategies and applications for tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaimin; Yang, Zhimou

    2012-08-01

    Molecular hydrogels hold big potential for tissue engineering and controlled drug delivery. Our lab focuses on short-peptide-based molecular hydrogels formed by biocompatible methods and their applications in tissue engineering (especially, 3D cell culture) and controlled drug delivery. This feature article firstly describes our recent progresses of the development of novel methods to form hydrogels, including the strategy of disulfide bond reduction and assistance with specific protein-peptide interactions. We then introduce the applications of our hydrogels in fields of controlled stem cell differentiation, cell culture, surface modifications of polyester materials by molecular self-assembly, and anti-degradation of recombinant complex proteins. A novel molecular hydrogel system of hydrophobic compounds that are only formed by hydrolysis processes was also included in this article. The hydrogels of hydrophobic compounds, especially those of hydrophobic therapeutic agents, may be developed into a carrier-free delivery system for long term delivery of therapeutic agents. With the efforts in this field, we believe that molecular hydrogels formed by short peptides and hydrophobic therapeutic agents can be practically applied for 3D cell culture and long term drug delivery in near future, respectively.

  11. Examining leadership as a strategy to enhance health care service delivery in regional hospitals in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Sagaren; Gerwel Proches, Cecile N; Kader, Abdulla

    2018-01-01

    Four public hospitals in South Africa, which render both specialized and nonspecialized services to thousands of patients, were examined to determine the impact of leadership on health care service delivery. These hospitals were inundated by various problems that were impacting negatively on health care service delivery. This research study aimed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the challenges, complexities and constraints facing public health care in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) and to examine leadership as a strategy to enhance healthcare service delivery with a particular focus on four regional hospitals in the KZN Province. The mixed-method research approach was utilized. Purposive sampling and stratified random sampling were employed in the research setting, and in-depth, semistructured interviews and questionnaires were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using the Nvivo computer software package for in-depth interviews and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software for the quantitative analysis. The research findings showed that the current leadership framework adopted by the health care leaders in regional hospitals in KZN is weak and is contributing to poor health care service delivery. This study, therefore, aimed to address the current challenges and weaknesses that are impacting negatively on health care service delivery in regional hospitals in the KZN Province and made recommendations for improvement.

  12. Content, Delivery, and Effectiveness of Concussion Education for US College Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Baugh, Christine M; Daneshvar, Daniel H

    2016-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the proportion of US college coaches who receive annual concussion education from their institution and to describe the content and delivery modalities of this education. This study also tested the hypothesis that coaches receiving concussion education from their institution will have greater knowledge about concussions independent of other individual and institutional characteristics. Cross-sectional online survey. US college sport. College coaches in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I, II, and III (n = 1818). Self-reported receipt of education from institution, sex, sport coached, division of competition. Concussion identification and management knowledge. Two-thirds of coaches reported receiving informational materials about concussion from their institution. The content of the education most frequently referred to symptoms of a concussion and information about proper management of a concussion. Coaches who received educational materials from their institution were better able to identify symptoms and had more conservative responses to concussion management scenarios. Male coaches of male contact or collision teams less frequently endorsed safe or correct response as compared with female coaches of noncontact or collision teams. Not all US college coaches receive concussion education from their institution. Male Division I coaches of male contact/collision sport are a population for whom targeted educational outreach may be particularly valuable. Education for coaches, delivered by clinicians at many institutions, is an important component of ensuring that coaches are prepared to be informed partners in supporting concussion safety.

  13. Strategies of high-performing paramedic educational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Gregg S; Romero, Gabriel A; Fernandez, Antonio R; Studnek, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    To identify the specific educational strategies used by paramedic educational programs that have attained consistently high success rates on the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) examination. NREMT data from 2003-2007 were analyzed to identify consistently high-performing paramedic educational programs. Representatives from 12 programs that have maintained a 75% first-attempt pass rate for at least four of five years and had more than 20 graduates per year were invited to participate in a focus group. Using the nominal group technique (NGT), participants were asked to answer the following question: "What are specific strategies that lead to a successful paramedic educational program?" All 12 emergency medical services (EMS) educational programs meeting the eligibility requirements participated. After completing the seven-step NGT process, 12 strategies were identified as leading to a successful paramedic educational program: 1) achieve and maintain national accreditation; 2) maintain high-level entry requirements and prerequisites; 3) provide students with a clear idea of expectations for student success; 4) establish a philosophy and foster a culture that values continuous review and improvement; 5) create your own examinations, lesson plans, presentations, and course materials using multiple current references; 6) emphasize emergency medical technician (EMT)-Basic concepts throughout the class; 7) use frequent case-based classroom scenarios; 8) expose students to as many prehospital advanced life support (ALS) patient contacts as possible, preferably where they are in charge; 9) create and administer valid examinations that have been through a review process (such as qualitative analysis); 10) provide students with frequent detailed feedback regarding their performance (such as formal examination reviews); 11) incorporate critical thinking and problem solving into all testing; and 12) deploy predictive testing with analysis prior to

  14. Ensuring 3es and Responsiveness in the Delivery of Educational Services in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapia Moalam Abdulrachman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM is a public organization in the Philippines located in between the national government and the local governments. It performs unique functions quite distinct from other public organizations in the coun-try, as it performs both political and administrative functions. Using unobtrusive research design, as it relies on mostly secondary data, this paper analyzes the educational system in the region and proposes strategies in attaining administrative efficiency, economy, effectiveness and responsiveness. The paper starts with the introduction which consist of the background and statement of the problem. It is followed by a review of theoretical perspective and then by the research methodology. The fourth part portrays the findings of the study which include: DepEd ARMM resources; the management of DepEd ARMM, and the management outputs such as: net enrollment ratio, achievement rate and literacy rate. The fifth part of the paper deals with the analyses and conclusion. The paper concludes that in addition to certain structural innovation, inculcation of appropriate work ethics in accordance with the Ethi-cal Standards Act, the Anti-Corruption Law, the Civil Service Rules and Regulations as well as the Islamic Practices on Employment must be enshrined in the reform agenda. Finally, among other things that could facilitate the attainment of 3Es and R in the delivery of educational services is a strategy that requires the joint collaboration and teamwork between the civil society, non-government organizations and government organizations in the region.

  15. College Students' Perspectives, Goals, and Strategies in Sport Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinelnikov, Oleg A.; Hastie, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the perspective, goals, and strategies of students enrolled in collegiate physical education courses. Our aim was to determine the extent to which a model developed by Allen (1986) describing student-social systems in high schools would approximate those in a collegiate setting. Forty-six students from two elective volleyball classes…

  16. Comparison of Two Educational Strategies in Teaching Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup-Benham, Christine A.; And Others

    This study assessed the impact of two educational strategies: text only versus text plus small group discussion, among two groups of third-year internal medicine clerkship students in a preventive cardiology course. The course was a required, 12-week Internal Medical clerkship at the University of Texas Medical Branch. The first group reviewed…

  17. The role of educational strategies to reverse the inverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We also present a conceptual framework for developing best practice educational strategies to reverse the inverse performance spiral in academically isolated rural hospitals. Doctors felt that participation in relevant learning activities improved their competence, increased the levels of job satisfaction they experienced ...

  18. Teaching Strategies and Gender in Higher Education Instrumental Studios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Katie

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates instrumental music teaching strategies in higher education settings, in order to identify those employed and their frequency and context of use. An instrument- and gender-balanced sample of 24 lessons from five institutions was analysed using a researcher-designed observational instrument. The results reveal the…

  19. Between Tradition and Tourism: Educational Strategies of a Zapotec Artisan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Melanie G.

    2007-01-01

    This case study examines the teaching and learning strategies employed by a Zapotec weaver in Oaxaca, Mexico, to draw attention to the personal agency of indigenous artisans participating in the tourist economy, and to examine ways in which non-formal and informal education in skills and understandings related to art can function in the lives of…

  20. Globalisation: Old and New Normative Strategies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulby, David

    2012-01-01

    The recession has concealed from many commentators in the West the overwhelming economic force of the last decade, the inexorable rise of China. Commensurate with this has been the economic and political decline of Europe and especially of the European Union. The European normative strategy in education was always an unrealised ideal. But, if the…

  1. Service Strategies for Higher Educational Institutions Based on Student Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amit K.; Javalgi, Rajshekhar; Whipple, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, higher education institutions in the U.S. have faced increased competition and expenditures coupled with declines in financial support. Furthermore, they often have been forced to cater to the needs of an increasingly diverse group of students and must design service strategies based on the unique needs of each group. This…

  2. Targeting Millennials: Social Media Strategies within Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Whitney L.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quantitative survey method with an online questionnaire as the data collection tool, the author surveyed 189 social media managers working at American Higher Education institutions to identify forms of social media in use, along with the most popular strategies that colleges and universities use with Facebook.

  3. Students’ strategies for position-taking in transnational education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jin Hui

    2016-01-01

    The article illuminates the positions distributed and the strategies for position-taking which students pursue in order to transform or preserve their positions in a classroom with a transnational context where students have different national and international education experiences. Furthermore...

  4. Second Chance Education: Barriers, Supports and Engagement Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelsberg, Harry; Pignata, Silvia; Weckert, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    Second chance education programs are now a well-established presence in institutions seeking to provide access and equity pathways for socio-economically disadvantaged groups. This paper focusses on the strategies used to support positive engagement in second chance equity programs, drawing upon evaluation research data from four TAFE sponsored…

  5. Magnetic resonance-guided regional gene delivery strategy using a tumor stroma-permeable nanocarrier for pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaolin; Wang,Qingbing; Li,Jianfeng; An,Sai; Chen,Yi; Jiang,Chen

    2015-01-01

    Qingbing Wang,1,2 Jianfeng Li,3 Sai An,3 Yi Chen,1 Chen Jiang,3 Xiaolin Wang1,2 1Department of Interventional Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 2Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, 3Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Gene therapy is a very promising technology for treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarci...

  6. Realist synthesis of educational interventions to improve nutrition care competencies and delivery by doctors and other healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogre, Victor; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Stevens, Fred; Aryee, Paul; Cherry, Mary Gemma; Dornan, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine what, how, for whom, why, and in what circumstances educational interventions improve the delivery of nutrition care by doctors and other healthcare professionals work. Design Realist synthesis following a published protocol and reported following Realist and Meta-narrative Evidence Synthesis: Evolving Standards (RAMESES) guidelines. A multidisciplinary team searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, PsyINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Science Direct for published and unpublished (grey) literature. The team identified studies with varied designs; appraised their ability to answer the review question; identified relationships between contexts, mechanisms and outcomes (CMOs); and entered them into a spreadsheet configured for the purpose. The final synthesis identified commonalities across CMO configurations. Results Over half of the 46 studies from which we extracted data originated from the USA. Interventions that improved the delivery of nutrition care improved skills and attitudes rather than just knowledge; provided opportunities for superiors to model nutrition care; removed barriers to nutrition care in health systems; provided participants with local, practically relevant tools and messages; and incorporated non-traditional, innovative teaching strategies. Operating in contexts where student and qualified healthcare professionals provided nutrition care in developed and developing countries, these interventions yielded health outcomes by triggering a range of mechanisms, which included feeling competent, feeling confident and comfortable, having greater self-efficacy, being less inhibited by barriers in healthcare systems and feeling that nutrition care was accepted and recognised. Conclusions These findings show how important it is to move education for nutrition care beyond the simple acquisition of knowledge. They show how educational interventions embedded within systems of healthcare can improve

  7. Future Learning Strategy and ePortfolios in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dorninger

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid change of the information andknowledge Society does no stop at education:communication, teaching and learning are changing due todigital media. Therefore at Austrian schools a “FutureLearning”- strategy was started in October 2007, where newforms of learning are underlined by new media and socialsoftware. This strategy will be presented. An important partof the strategy is the introduction of electronic Portfolios forstudents. Portfolios could be powerful tools to realizeindividualisation in formal education. There are two maintypes, the process portfolio for learning, working andreflection and the application portfolio for assessmentpurposes and job application. It is now possible to collectformal and informal competences and skills-orientedknowledge for the later professional career.

  8. Mother’s Views about Efficacy of Prenatal Educational Classes to Prepare for Normal Vaginal Delivery, Postpartum and Breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ّSomayeh Bahrami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Prenatal educations focusing on physical, emotional and mental preparation for delivery, health promotion and improving lifestyle behaviors in families during the reproductive years. In this education, parents achieve data about physical, emotional and mental changes during pregnancy delivery and postpartum and overcome skills. Aim of this study was to determine Comments mothers about efficacy prenatal education classes to prepare for normal vaginal delivery, postpartum and breastfeeding in women referring to Dezful health Centers, 2015Materials and Methods: The descriptive study using quota sampling was performed. A total of 250 women consented to participant at study. A questionnaire was provided by content validity. It is reliability was confirmed by Test re-test. A questionnaire was used in 4 Part: demographics, knowledge toward mode of delivery and Comments mothers about efficacy prenatal education classes to prepare for normal vaginal delivery, postpartum and breastfeeding. Data using SPSS statistics software and analyzes were performed.Results: More women (54.2% were moderate knowledge level. The majority of patients believed that prenatal classes aided there in preparation for natural childbirth (93.6%, the postpartum period (75.6%, and preparation for lactation (100%Conclusion: The study showed that prenatal education has an important role on choosing the mode of delivery and preparing for vaginal delivery. So that approach this training and prenatal care to all pregnant women is recommended.

  9. Effects of Bifidobacterium Breve Feeding Strategy and Delivery Modes on Experimental Allergic Rhinitis Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-jun Ren

    Full Text Available Different delivery modes may affect the susceptibility to allergic diseases. It is still unknown whether early intervention with probiotics would counteract this effect.The effect of different delivery modes on immune status and nasal symptoms was investigated on established allergic rhinitis (AR mouse model. In addition, the immunoregulatory effects and mechanisms of different feeding manners with Bifidobacterium breve(B. breve were examined.Live lyophilized B. breve was orally administered to BALB/c mice born via vaginal delivery(VD or cesarean delivery (CD for 8 consecutive weeks, after which they were sensitized by ovalbumin(OVA to establish experimental AR. Nasal symptoms, serum immunoglobulins, cytokines, splenic percentages of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T(Treg cells and nasal eosinophil infiltration were evaluated.Compared with VD mice, mice delivered via CD demonstrated more serious nasal symptoms, higher concentrations of OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig E, more nasal eosinophils and lower percentages of splenic CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+Treg cells after establishing experimental AR. These parameters were reversed by administering B. breves hortly after birth. However, the effect of B. breve did not differ between different delivery modes.CD aggravates the nasal symptoms of AR mice compared to VD. This is the first report that oral administration of B. breve shortly after birth can significantly alleviate the symptoms of AR mice born via both deliveries, probably via activation of the regulatory capacity of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+Treg cells.

  10. Effects of Bifidobacterium Breve Feeding Strategy and Delivery Modes on Experimental Allergic Rhinitis Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian-jun; Yu, Zhao; Yang, Feng-Ling; Lv, Dan; Hung, Shi; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Ping; Liu, Shi-Xi; Zhang, Nan; Bachert, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Different delivery modes may affect the susceptibility to allergic diseases. It is still unknown whether early intervention with probiotics would counteract this effect. The effect of different delivery modes on immune status and nasal symptoms was investigated on established allergic rhinitis (AR) mouse model. In addition, the immunoregulatory effects and mechanisms of different feeding manners with Bifidobacterium breve(B. breve) were examined. Live lyophilized B. breve was orally administered to BALB/c mice born via vaginal delivery(VD) or cesarean delivery (CD) for 8 consecutive weeks, after which they were sensitized by ovalbumin(OVA) to establish experimental AR. Nasal symptoms, serum immunoglobulins, cytokines, splenic percentages of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T(Treg) cells and nasal eosinophil infiltration were evaluated. Compared with VD mice, mice delivered via CD demonstrated more serious nasal symptoms, higher concentrations of OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E, more nasal eosinophils and lower percentages of splenic CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Treg cells after establishing experimental AR. These parameters were reversed by administering B. breves hortly after birth. However, the effect of B. breve did not differ between different delivery modes. CD aggravates the nasal symptoms of AR mice compared to VD. This is the first report that oral administration of B. breve shortly after birth can significantly alleviate the symptoms of AR mice born via both deliveries, probably via activation of the regulatory capacity of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Treg cells.

  11. Stabilization challenges and formulation strategies associated with oral biologic drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Le, Vu; Lovalenti, Phillip M; Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M

    2015-10-01

    Delivery of proteins to mucosal tissues of GI tract typically utilize formulations which protect against proteolysis and target the mucosal tissues. Using case studies from literature and the authors' own work, the in-process stability and solid state storage stability of biopharmaceuticals formulated in delivery systems designed for oral delivery to the GI tract will be reviewed. Among the range of delivery systems, biodegradable polymer systems for protection and controlled release of proteins have been the most studied; hence these systems will be covered in greater depth. These delivery systems include polymeric biodegradable microspheres or nanospheres that contain proteins or vaccines, which are designed to reduce the number of administrations/inoculations and the total protein dose required to achieve the desired biological effect. Specifically, this review will include a landscape survey of the systems that have been studied, the manufacturing processes involved, stability through the manufacturing process, key pharmaceutical formulation parameters that impact stability of the encased proteins, and storage stability of the encapsulated proteins in these delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Disability inclusion in higher education in Uganda: Status and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emong, Paul; Eron, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Uganda has embraced inclusive education and evidently committed itself to bringing about disability inclusion at every level of education. Both legal and non-legal frameworks have been adopted and arguably are in line with the intent of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on education. The CRPD, in Article 24, requires states to attain a right to education for persons with disabilities without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunities at all levels of education. Despite Uganda's robust disability legal and policy framework on education, there is evidence of exclusion and discrimination of students with disabilities in the higher education institutions. The main objective of this article is to explore the status of disability inclusion in higher education and strategies for its realisation, using evidence from Emong's study, workshop proceedings where the authors facilitated and additional individual interviews with four students with disabilities by the authors. The results show that there are discrimination and exclusion tendencies in matters related to admissions, access to lectures, assessment and examinations, access to library services, halls of residence and other disability support services. The article recommends that institutional policies and guidelines on support services for students with disabilities and special needs in higher education be developed, data on students with disabilities collected to help planning, collaboration between Disabled Peoples Organisations (DPO's) strengthened to ensure disability inclusion and the establishment of disability support centres.

  13. Educational strategies for the prevention of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Paulo Machado

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: The main goal of this work was to produce a review of educational strategies to prevent diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Method: PubMed database was consulted using combined descriptors such as [Prevention], [Educational Activities], [Diabetes], [Hypertension], and [Obesity]. Data from randomized trials published between 2002 and 2014 were included in spreadsheets for analysis in duplicate by the reviewers. Results: A total of 8,908 articles were found, of which 1,539 were selected about diabetes mellitus (DM, n=369, arterial systemic hypertension (ASH, n=200, and obesity (OBES, n=970. The number of free full text articles available was 1,075 (DM = 276, ASH = 118 and OBES = 681. In most of these studies, demographic characteristics such as gender and age were randomized, and the population mainly composed by students, ethnic groups, family members, pregnant, health or education professionals, patients with chronic diseases (DM, ASH, OBES or other comorbidities. Group dynamics, physical activity practices, nutritional education, questionnaires, interviews, employment of new technologies, people training and workshops were the main intervention strategies used. Conclusion: The most efficient interventions occurred at community level, whenever the intervention was permanent or maintained for long periods, and relied on the continuous education of community health workers that had a constant interference inside the population covered. Many studies focused their actions in children and adolescents, especially on students, because they were more influenced by educational activities of prevention, and the knowledge acquired by them would spread more easily to their family and to society.

  14. "Academic Strategy: The Management Revolution in American Higher Education," by George Keller (1983) Can Strategy Work in Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Keller's book was one of the first works to suggest strategic approaches to the management of higher education institutions. His case study method proved popular with readers. However, the limitations of his approach to strategy grew more apparent over time, although many of his insights remain valid today.

  15. Complementary education for healthcare personnel: a strategy to increase hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The German healthcare system is facing ongoing radical change and development. The increasing tendency to urge hospitals and medical staff to work in a profit-oriented way constitute among other factors clear present and future challenges. Physicians and surgeons in particular increasingly complain of increasing stress attributed to measures aiming at cost reduction in hospitals. The highest priority must always be patient satisfaction and the delivery of good medical and human service. Problem description: The health care market in Germany has become an increasingly complex business with uncertain and unpredictable future events. Strategic planning has to enable hospitals to quickly and flexibly adapt strategies to changes in the environment that become essential to their success. The most important task is to develop a strategy that can be applied with success in all possible future scenarios. This is known as the core strategy. The core strategy for hospitals in Germany is complementary education of the medical staff as well as top management. Accordingly, courses, workshops or even part-time graduate or postgraduate education in business and economics are recommended for the medical staff. As far as non-medical hospital executives are concerned, there is no better way than to host them in a hospital department for a period of 6-12 months. This paves the way for understanding and accepting each others' opinion which increases hospital performance. Proper and complementary education of the medical staff as well as of non-medical top executives and managers of hospitals is recommended as the core strategy. This harmonizes both professional medical and managerial efforts with a synergy effect that allows soundly facing the increasingly challenging environment of the health care sector in general and in hospitals in particular.

  16. A facile nanoaggregation strategy for oral delivery of hydrophobic drugs by utilizing acid-base neutralization reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huabing; Wan Jiangling; Wang Yirui; Mou Dongsheng; Liu Hongbin; Xu Huibi; Yang Xiangliang

    2008-01-01

    Nanonization strategies have been used to enhance the oral availability of numerous drugs that are poorly soluble in water. Exploring a facile nanonization strategy with highly practical potential is an attractive focus. Here, we report a novel facile nanoaggregation strategy for constructing drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility by utilizing acid-base neutralization in aqueous solution, thus facilitating the exploration of nanonization in oral delivery for general applicability. We demonstrate that hydrophobic itraconazole dissolved in acid solution formed a growing core and aggregated into nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizers. The nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 279.3 nm and polydispersity index of 0.116, showed a higher dissolution rate when compared with the marketed formulation; the average dissolution was about 91.3%. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the nanoparticles had a rapid absorption and enhanced oral availability. The diet state also showed insignificant impact on the absorption of itraconazole from nanoparticles. This nanoaggregation strategy is a promising nanonization method with a facile process and avoidance of toxic organic solvents for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility and reveals a highly practical potential in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries

  17. A facile construction strategy of stable lipid nanoparticles for drug delivery using a hydrogel-thickened microemulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huabing; Xiao, Ling; Du, Danrong; Mou, Dongsheng; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel facile method for preparing stable nanoparticles with inner spherical solid spheres and an outer hydrogel matrix using a hot O/W hydrogel-thickened microemulsion with spontaneous stability. The nanoparticles with average diameters of about 30.0 nm and 100.0 nm were constructed by cooling the hot hydrogel-thickened microemulsion at different temperatures, respectively. We explained the application of these nanoparticles by actualizing the cutaneous delivery of drug-loaded nanoparticles. The in vitro skin permeation studies showed that the nanoparticles could significantly reduce the penetration of model drugs through skin and resulted in their dermal uptakes in skin. The sol-gel process of TEOS was furthermore used in the template of HTM to regulate the particle size of nanoparticles. The coating of silica on the surface of nanoparticles could regulate the penetration of drug into skin from dermal delivery to transdermal delivery. This strategy provides a facile method to produce nanoparticles with long-term stability and ease of manufacture, which might have a promising application in drug delivery.

  18. Variability of Cost and Time Delivery of Educational Buildings in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghimien, Douglas Omoregie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cost and time overrun in construction projects has become a reoccurring problem in construction industries around the world especially in developing countries. This situation is unhealthy for public educational buildings which are executed with limited government funds, and are in most cases time sensitive, as they need to cater for the influx of students into the institutions. This study therefore assessed the variability of cost and time delivery of educational buildings in Nigeria, using a study of selected educational buildings within the country. A pro forma was used to gather cost and time data on selected building projects, while structured questionnaire was used to harness information on the possible measures for reducing the variability from the construction participants that were involved in the delivery of these projects. Paired sample t-test, percentage, relative importance index, and Kruskal-Walis test were adopted for data analyses. The study reveals that there is a significant difference between the initial and final cost of delivering educational buildings, as an average of 4.87% deviation, with a sig. p-value of 0.000 was experienced on all assessed projects. For time delivery, there is also a significant difference between the initial estimated time and final time of construction as a whopping 130% averaged deviation with a sig. p-value of 0.000 was discovered. To remedy these problems, the study revealed that prompt payment for executed works, predicting market price fluctuation and inculcating it into the initial estimate, and owner’s involvement at the planning and design phase are some of the possible measures to be adopted.

  19. Connecting the dots: interprofessional health education and delivery system redesign at the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Stuart C; Chokshi, Dave A; Bowen, Judith L; Rugen, Kathryn Wirtz; Cox, Malcolm

    2014-08-01

    Health systems around the United States are embracing new models of primary care using interprofessional team-based approaches in pursuit of better patient outcomes, higher levels of satisfaction among patients and providers, and improved overall value. Less often discussed are the implications of new models of care for health professions education, including education for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other professions engaged in primary care. Described here is the interaction between care transformation and redesign of health professions education at the largest integrated delivery system in the United States: the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Challenges and lessons learned are discussed in the context of a demonstration initiative, the VA Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education. Five sites, involving VA medical centers and their academic affiliates in Boise, Cleveland, San Francisco, Seattle, and West Haven, introduced interprofessional primary care curricula for resident physicians and nurse practitioner students beginning in 2011. Implementation struggles largely revolved around the operational logistics and cultural disruption of integrating educational redesign for medicine and nursing and facilitating the interface between educational and clinical activities. To realize new models for interprofessional teaching, faculty, staff, and trainees must understand the histories, traditions, and program requirements across professions and experiment with new approaches to achieving a common goal. Key recommendations for redesign of health professions education revolve around strengthening the union between interprofessional learning, team-based practice, and high-value care.

  20. [Learning Portfolio: A New Strategy in Health Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Chen, Ching-Ju; Chang, Yu-Shan; Huang, Li-Chi

    2015-12-01

    Health education is the teaching by healthcare professionals of healthcare-related knowledge and skills to students in order that these students learn to help patients self-manage their disease and maintain health. This article introduces a new strategy in health education known as the learning portfolio and presents the theoretical basis and function of the learning portfolio and the current application of this approach in academic and health education. The learning portfolio is a learner-centric approach that collects evidence related to an individual's learning process systematically. This approach helps educators understand learner needs and conditions, while allowing the learner to observe his / her learning process in a manner that promotes self-reflection, continual inspection, and behavioral modification throughout the learning process. The results enhance the motivation of learners and strengthen their care confidence in accomplishing learning tasks.

  1. International trends and strategies in educational development at universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Wisdom

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article considers four areas of educational development work which may become more significant in the future. The range and quality of professional development for teaching in higher education has expanded in many countries, the investment in academic frameworks of outcomes, credits and standards has yet to be exploited, the research into student learning is both productive and challenging to existing structures, and the practice of educational development is becoming more extensive – for example, practitioners are now expected to contribute to institutional strategy as much as to provide support for individual lecturers. The article notes significant changes in assumptions about the relations between students, their teachers and their courses, the need for revised approaches to assessment, and the importance of the professional development of the program leader and team to support the modernization of higher education.

  2. Strategies for Controlled Delivery of Growth Factors and Cells for Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Tiffany N.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2012-01-01

    The controlled delivery of growth factors and cells within biomaterial carriers can enhance and accelerate functional bone formation. The carrier system can be designed with preprogrammed release kinetics to deliver bioactive molecules in a localized, spatiotemporal manner most similar to the natural wound healing process. The carrier can also act as an extracellular matrix-mimicking substrate for promoting osteoprogenitor cellular infiltration and proliferation for integrative tissue repair. This review discusses the role of various regenerative factors involved in bone healing and their appropriate combinations with different delivery systems for augmenting bone regeneration. The general requirements of protein, cell and gene therapy are described, with elaboration on how the selection of materials, configurations and processing affects growth factor and cell delivery and regenerative efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo applications for bone tissue engineering. PMID:22342771

  3. Open Learning for Smart Education: Open educational policies, strategies & access for all

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    keynote on Open Learning at the International IEEE EDUCON Conference 2016: I will speak about “Open Learning for Smart Education: Open educational policies, strategies and access for all”. This year EDUCON is taking place from 10th to 13th of April 2016 in Abu Dhabi. My questions of the keynote

  4. Impact of European Media Education Strategies on Russian Media Education Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaleva, Galina V.

    2015-01-01

    The article attempts to examine the impact of European media education theories and approaches on Russian media education evolution basing on a comparative analysis of Russian and European media literacy promotion strategies in the historical context. This influence resulted in the appearance and development of socio-cultural models of media…

  5. Education Strategies Through Simulation For Training In Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regimar Carla Machado

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and reflective study based on scientific literature and critical analysis of authors related to teaching strategies through simulation for training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Current teaching methodologies CPR involve realistic simulation strategies and simulations in virtual environments, but the first method provides the best results, allowing proactivity of individuals in their teaching-learning process and bringing them the experience of a life threatening situation. It is noteworthy that health professionals need to be able to assist a victim in cardiac arrest, but even  existing effective teaching methodologies to enable them in this subject, is not fully applicable in the Brazilian context of health education.

  6. From Molecular to Nanotechnology Strategies for Delivery of Neurotrophins: Emphasis on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géral, Claire; Angelova, Angelina; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases represent a major public health problem, but beneficial clinical treatment with neurotrophic factors has not been established yet. The therapeutic use of neurotrophins has been restrained by their instability and rapid degradation in biological medium. A variety of strategies has been proposed for the administration of these leading therapeutic candidates, which are essential for the development, survival and function of human neurons. In this review, we describe the existing approaches for delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is the most abundant neurotrophin in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Biomimetic peptides of BDNF have emerged as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders. Polymer-based carriers have provided sustained neurotrophin delivery, whereas lipid-based particles have contributed also to potentiation of the BDNF action. Nanotechnology offers new possibilities for the design of vehicles for neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Recent developments in nanoscale carriers for encapsulation and transport of BDNF are highlighted. PMID:24300402

  7. Assessment of Delirium in Intensive Care Unit Patients: Educational Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judith M; Van Aman, M Nancy; Schneiderhahn, Mary Elizabeth; Edelman, Robin; Ercole, Patrick M

    2017-05-01

    Delirium is an acute brain dysfunction associated with poor outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Critical care nurses play an important role in the prevention, detection, and management of delirium, but they must be able to accurately assess for it. The Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) instrument is a reliable and valid method to assess for delirium, but research reveals most nurses need practice to use it proficiently. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the success of a multimodal educational strategy (i.e., online learning module coupled with standardized patient simulation experience) on critical care nurses' knowledge and confidence to assess and manage delirium using the CAM-ICU. Participants (N = 34) showed a significant increase (p education. No statistical change in knowledge of delirium existed following the education. A multimodal educational strategy, which included simulation, significantly added confidence in critical care nurses' performance using the CAM-ICU. J Contin Nurs Educ. 2017;48(5):239-244. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Management Strategies in Basic Education and Participation of Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johel Furguerle-Rangel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the educational process it is necessary to use management paradigms and active participation of parents. The objective was to determine the use of management strategies by the director of basic education and participation of parents in the educational process. It is a descriptive, transversal and field study, whose instrument was a questionnaire of 26 closed-questions.   The sample comprised 16 directors, 52 teachers and 62 parents. For most managers and faculty the technique of brainstorming, involvement in decision-making, continues knowledge management and radical change are crucial in the educational process of children.   But mothers and fathers believe that managerial groups do not use strategies properly except for reengineering.   The mother and fathers are mainly involved in education management but not in the learning process. It is recommended the deepening of policy management training teaching force, through continuous training provided by the government and the promotion of family participation in the teaching-learning process of children.

  9. Strategies for service-learning assessment in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Sharlee

    2013-10-01

    A large body of literature exists on the instructional pedagogy known as service-learning. Service-learning is a teaching and learning approach characterized by the dental hygiene student's practical application of academic studies and occurs within a community setting, to the benefit of both the student and community. Dental hygiene educators use service-learning to enhance student knowledge and application of oral health curriculum. This manuscript reports on the importance of service-learning assessment to the National Dental Hygiene Research Agenda as well as the future of the profession of dental hygiene and the successful strategies in service-learning evaluation available for utilization by dental hygiene educators.

  10. Care delivery and self-management strategies for children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bradley, Peter M

    2018-03-01

    In response to criticism that epilepsy care for children has little impact, healthcare professionals and administrators have developed various service models and strategies to address perceived inadequacies. To assess the effects of any specialised or dedicated intervention for epilepsy versus usual care in children with epilepsy and in their families. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (27 September 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 9) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1946 to 27 September 2016), Embase (1974 to 27 September 2016), PsycINFO (1887 to 27 September 2016) and CINAHL Plus (1937 to 27 September 2016). In addition, we also searched clinical trials registries for ongoing or recently completed trials, contacted experts in the field to seek information on unpublished and ongoing studies, checked the websites of epilepsy organisations and checked the reference lists of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies or other prospective studies with a (matched or unmatched) control group (controlled before-and-after studies), or time series studies. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Our review included six interventions reported through seven studies (of which five studies were designed as RCTs). They reported on different education and counselling programmes for children and parents; teenagers and parents; or children, adolescents and their parents. Each programme showed some benefits for the well-being of children with epilepsy, but all had methodological flaws (e.g. in one of the studies designed as an RCT, randomisation failed), no single programme was independently evaluated with different study samples and no interventions were sufficiently homogeneous enough to be included in a meta-analysis,. While each of the programmes in this review showed some benefit to children with epilepsy, their impacts were extremely

  11. Insoluble drug delivery strategies: review of recent advances and business prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalepu, Sandeep; Nekkanti, Vijaykumar

    2015-01-01

    The emerging trends in the combinatorial chemistry and drug design have led to the development of drug candidates with greater lipophilicity, high molecular weight and poor water solubility. Majority of the failures in new drug development have been attributed to poor water solubility of the drug. Issues associated with poor solubility can lead to low bioavailability resulting in suboptimal drug delivery. About 40% of drugs with market approval and nearly 90% of molecules in the discovery pipeline are poorly water-soluble. With the advent of various insoluble drug delivery technologies, the challenge to formulate poorly water soluble drugs could be achieved. Numerous drugs associated with poor solubility and low bioavailabilities have been formulated into successful drug products. Several marketed drugs were reformulated to improve efficacy, safety and patient compliance. In order to gain marketing exclusivity and patent protection for such products, revitalization of poorly soluble drugs using insoluble drug delivery technologies have been successfully adopted by many pharmaceutical companies. This review covers the recent advances in the field of insoluble drug delivery and business prospects. PMID:26579474

  12. Insoluble drug delivery strategies: review of recent advances and business prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kalepu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The emerging trends in the combinatorial chemistry and drug design have led to the development of drug candidates with greater lipophilicity, high molecular weight and poor water solubility. Majority of the failures in new drug development have been attributed to poor water solubility of the drug. Issues associated with poor solubility can lead to low bioavailability resulting in suboptimal drug delivery. About 40% of drugs with market approval and nearly 90% of molecules in the discovery pipeline are poorly water-soluble. With the advent of various insoluble drug delivery technologies, the challenge to formulate poorly water soluble drugs could be achieved. Numerous drugs associated with poor solubility and low bioavailabilities have been formulated into successful drug products. Several marketed drugs were reformulated to improve efficacy, safety and patient compliance. In order to gain marketing exclusivity and patent protection for such products, revitalization of poorly soluble drugs using insoluble drug delivery technologies have been successfully adopted by many pharmaceutical companies. This review covers the recent advances in the field of insoluble drug delivery and business prospects.

  13. MSCs: Delivery Routes and Engraftment, Cell-Targeting Strategies, and Immune Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Kean

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are currently being widely investigated both in the lab and in clinical trials for multiple disease states. The differentiation, trophic, and immunomodulatory characteristics of MSCs contribute to their therapeutic effects. Another often overlooked factor related to efficacy is the degree of engraftment. When reported, engraftment is generally low and transient in nature. MSC delivery methods should be tailored to the lesion being treated, which may be local or systemic, and customized to the mechanism of action of the MSCs, which can also be local or systemic. Engraftment efficiency is enhanced by using intra-arterial delivery instead of intravenous delivery, thus avoiding the “first-pass” accumulation of MSCs in the lung. Several methodologies to target MSCs to specific organs are being developed. These cell targeting methodologies focus on the modification of cell surface molecules through chemical, genetic, and coating techniques to promote selective adherence to particular organs or tissues. Future improvements in targeting and delivery methodologies to improve engraftment are expected to improve therapeutic results, extend the duration of efficacy, and reduce the effective (MSC therapeutic dose.

  14. Integrated strategies to address emerging freight and delivery challenges in New York City : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report has three critical objectives. First, to highlight the changing nature of freight deliveries even as zoning policy for off-street loading has changed little over the last 65 years. Second, to consider policy and physical approaches to add...

  15. Drug delivery strategies for chemoprevention of UVB-induced skin cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagde, Arvind; Mondal, Arindam; Singh, Mandip

    2018-01-01

    Annually, more skin cancer cases are diagnosed than the collective incidence of the colon, lung, breast, and prostate cancer. Persistent contact with sunlight is a primary cause for all the skin malignancies. UVB radiation induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the skin which eventually leads to DNA damage and mutation. Various delivery approaches for the skin cancer treatment/prevention have been evolving and are directed toward improvements in terms of delivery modes, therapeutic agents, and site-specificity of therapeutics delivery. The effective chemoprevention activity achieved is based on the efficiency of the delivery system used and the amount of the therapeutic molecule deposited in the skin. In this article, we have discussed different studies performed specifically for the chemoprevention of UVB-induced skin cancer. Ultra-flexible nanocarriers, transethosomes nanocarriers, silica nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles, nanocapsule suspensions, microemulsion, nanoemulsion, and polymeric nanoparticles which have been used so far to deliver the desired drug molecule for preventing the UVB-induced skin cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. New Informatization Strategy in the Romanian Research and Educational System

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Ivan

    2006-01-01

    There are defined the objectives, the means, the principles and the directions that must be followed by a strategy for the education and research system in Romania. There are identified the system components and the stages that must be accomplished, in order to obtain an adequate behaviour that will allow all graduate persons to become an efficient actor in the information society and to help create the basis for the new society, the knowledge oriented society.

  17. New Informatization Strategy in the Romanian Research and Educational System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ivan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available There are defined the objectives, the means, the principles and the directions that must be followed by a strategy for the education and research system in Romania. There are identified the system components and the stages that must be accomplished, in order to obtain an adequate behaviour that will allow all graduate persons to become an efficient actor in the information society and to help create the basis for the new society, the knowledge oriented society.

  18. The influence of maternal health education on the place of delivery in conflict settings of Darfur, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Izzeldin F

    2015-01-01

    Armed conflict and socio-demographic characteristics of internally displaced persons (IDPs) are very important factors that influence the provision of reproductive health (RH) in humanitarian settings. Maternal health education plays a crucial role to overcome the barriers of RH care, reduce home births conducted by traditional birth attendants (TBAs), and improve increasing births in a health facility. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the association between the place of delivery and home visits for maternal health education and (2) describe the socio-demographic characteristics of women who gave birth during the last two years. A cross-sectional study among married women aged (15-49 years old) in IDP camps. All women were subjected to intensive maternal health education at their homes for 3 years prior to the survey. A sample of 640 women who gave birth during the last two years was randomly selected. Among all women investigated, 36.9 % (95 % CI: 33.1, 40.8) reported a home-based delivery, while 63.1 % (95 % CI: 59.2, 66.9) reported a facility-based delivery. Receiving visits for maternal health education at home was associated with an estimated 43.0 % reduction in odds of giving birth at home, compared to not receiving home visits (adjusted odds ratio [ aOR] 0.57; 95 % CI: 0.35, 0.93). The level of women's education and camp of residence were important predictors for home birth. Maternal health education at home was associated with a reduction in home-based delivery performed by TBAs in the conflict-affected setting of Darfur. Our study proposes that when facility-based delivery is made available in camp's clinics, and the targeted women educated at home to refrain from home-based delivery, they will choose to undergo facility-based delivery.

  19. Strategies for improving participation in diabetes education. A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Schäfer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent and can lead to serious complications and mortality. Patient education can help to avoid negative outcomes, but up to half of the patients do not participate. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' attitudes towards diabetes education in order to identify barriers to participation and develop strategies for better patient education. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study. Seven GP practices were purposively selected based on socio-demographic data of city districts in Hamburg, Germany. Study participants were selected by their GPs in order to increase participation. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 14 patients. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The sample size was determined by data saturation. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Categories were determined deductively and inductively. RESULTS: The interviews yielded four types of barriers: 1 Statements and behaviour of the attending physician influence the patients' decisions about diabetes education. 2 Both, a good state of health related to diabetes and physical/psychosocial comorbidity can be reasons for non-participation. 3 Manifold motivational factors were discussed. They ranged from giving low priority to diabetes to avoidance of implications of diabetes education as being confronted with illness narratives of others. 4 Barriers also include aspects of the patients' knowledge and activity. CONCLUSIONS: First, physicians should encourage patients to participate in diabetes education and argue that they can profit even if actual treatment and examination results are promising. Second, patients with other priorities, psychic comorbidity or functional limitations might profit more from continuous individualized education adapted to their specific situation instead of group education. Third, it might be justified that patients do not participate in diabetes education if

  20. Strategies for improving participation in diabetes education. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Pawels, Marc; Küver, Claudia; Pohontsch, Nadine Janis; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent and can lead to serious complications and mortality. Patient education can help to avoid negative outcomes, but up to half of the patients do not participate. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' attitudes towards diabetes education in order to identify barriers to participation and develop strategies for better patient education. We conducted a qualitative study. Seven GP practices were purposively selected based on socio-demographic data of city districts in Hamburg, Germany. Study participants were selected by their GPs in order to increase participation. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 14 patients. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The sample size was determined by data saturation. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Categories were determined deductively and inductively. The interviews yielded four types of barriers: 1) Statements and behaviour of the attending physician influence the patients' decisions about diabetes education. 2) Both, a good state of health related to diabetes and physical/psychosocial comorbidity can be reasons for non-participation. 3) Manifold motivational factors were discussed. They ranged from giving low priority to diabetes to avoidance of implications of diabetes education as being confronted with illness narratives of others. 4) Barriers also include aspects of the patients' knowledge and activity. First, physicians should encourage patients to participate in diabetes education and argue that they can profit even if actual treatment and examination results are promising. Second, patients with other priorities, psychic comorbidity or functional limitations might profit more from continuous individualized education adapted to their specific situation instead of group education. Third, it might be justified that patients do not participate in diabetes education if they have slightly increased blood sugar values only and no

  1. Comparison of two lecture delivery platforms in a hybrid distance education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, L Douglas; Byers, Katherine

    2009-08-28

    To compare students' preferences for and academic performance using 2 different distance education course content delivery platforms. A randomized, crossover research design was used to compare traditional video with a 4-panel platform among learners on multiple campuses within 1 college of pharmacy.(1) The outcomes were students' preferences for delivery platform and examination scores. Rasch analysis was used to assess unidimensionality and the difficulty of examination items. Hierarchical logistic and multiple regression models were used to assess students' preferences and academic performance. The logistic model predicting preference for the 4-panel or traditional platform was not significant, but African-Americans and Hispanics were more likely to prefer the 4-panel platform than Caucasian and Asian students. The delivery platform did not impact students' academic performance. Students who did well on the semester's previous 2 examinations scored higher on the questions related to schizophrenia. Students with higher Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) scores performed better on the bipolar questions than students who preferred the traditional video platform. The additional faculty time, effort, and cost invested in presenting the class material in a 4-panel platform, and the students' extra time and effort spent viewing the 4-panel platform did not produce a comparable benefit in student preference and performance.

  2. From STEM to STEAM: Strategies for Enhancing Engineering & Technology Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy M. Connor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets out to challenge the common pedagogies found in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education with a particular focus on engineering. The dominant engineering pedagogy remains “chalk and talk”; despite research evidence that demonstrates its ineffectiveness. Such pedagogical approaches do not embrace the possibilities provided by more student-centric approaches and more active learning. The paper argues that there is a potential confusion in engineering education around the role of active learning approaches, and that the adoption of these approaches may be limited as a result of this confusion, combined with a degree of disciplinary egocentrism. The paper presents examples of design, engineering and technology projects that demonstrate the effectiveness of adopting pedagogies and delivery methods more usually attributed to the liberal arts such as studio based learning. The paper concludes with some suggestions about how best to create a fertile environment from which inquiry based learning can emerge as well as a reflection on whether the only real limitation on cultivating such approaches is the disciplinary egocentrism of traditional engineering educators.

  3. The Rural Health Care Delivery System in the Dingxian Experiment: A Case Study of Educational Transfer in Republican China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wai-man; Lo, L. Nai-kwai

    1988-01-01

    Discusses dependency theory in comparative education studies. Examines U.S. educational transfer to China during the Republican period as it functioned through the public health delivery model of the Dingxian Experiment. Notes that resistance to dependency in this case could serve as a model for avoiding the technological misfitting of programs.…

  4. WebQuests: a new instructional strategy for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaie, Ulysses

    2007-01-01

    A WebQuest is a model or framework for designing effective Web-based instructional strategies featuring inquiry-oriented activities. It is an innovative approach to learning that is enhanced by the use of evolving instructional technology. WebQuests have invigorated the primary school (grades K through 12) educational sector around the globe, yet there is sparse evidence in the literature of WebQuests at the college and university levels. WebQuests are congruent with pedagogical approaches and cognitive activities commonly used in nursing education. They are simple to construct using a step-by-step approach, and nurse educators will find many related resources on the Internet to help them get started. Included in this article are a discussion of the critical attributes and main features of WebQuests, construction tips, recommended Web sites featuring essential resources, a discussion of WebQuest-related issues identified in the literature, and some suggestions for further research.

  5. Learning and coping strategies versus standard education in cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tayyari Dehbarez, Nasrin; Lynggaard, Vibeke; May, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Background Learning and coping education strategies (LC) was implemented to enhance patient attendance in the cardiac rehabilitation programme. This study assessed the cost-utility of LC compared to standard education (standard) as part of a rehabilitation programme for patients with ischemic heart...... disease and heart failure. Methods The study was conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial with 825 patients who were allocated to LC or standard rehabilitation and followed for 5 months. The LC approach was identical to the standard approach in terms of physical training and education...... to estimate the net benefit of the LC and to illustrate cost effectiveness acceptability curves. The statistical analysis was based on means and bootstrapped standard errors. Results An additional cost of DKK 6,043 (95 % CI −5,697; 17,783) and a QALY gain of 0.005 (95 % CI −0.001; 0.012) was estimated for LC...

  6. [Implementing Inter-Professional Education (IPE): Challenges and Strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Lun; Hung, Chich-Hsiu

    2017-12-01

    Inter-professional practice (IPP), necessary in today's healthcare environment, should be guided and practiced through inter-professional education (IPE). Within the context of an effective IPE program, collaborative medical professionals must be cognizant of the demands of patients' integrated care, organize a collaborative inter-professional team, and achieve the objectives of patient-centered care. However, the many challenges of IPE include insufficient understanding of inter-professional care, occupational culture-related boundary issues, lack of a college education, and insufficient support from academic and medical institutions. This article suggests adopting effective strategies to promote inter-professional recognition, create a harmonious medical culture, eliminate barriers to education, and enhance support for academic and medical institutions. Inter-professional collaboration between academic and clinical institutions must provide resources and substantive professional training. Effectively implementing IPE and IPP is expected to elicit trust, respect, and efficient communication from team members.

  7. The delivery of distance education--is it time for doctoral programs in gerontology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Melinda; Martin, Peter; Doll, Gayle; Pearson-Scott, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of higher education in gerontology is changing; students are now able to receive an education solely online. Perhaps it is time to consider offering this option at the doctoral level. A needs assessment was conducted to assess whether a doctoral program in gerontology should be created in the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA) program. An online survey was sent to 247 students enrolled in the GPIDEA program and to students who had taken a GPIDEA course in gerontology but were not currently enrolled in the program. One hundred and twenty-three students began the survey, although only 120 students completed the survey. Findings indicated students are interested in a doctoral program in gerontology. Approximately 65% of students were interested in obtaining a PhD from a distance education program. However, an applied program focusing on community outreach and leadership was of most interest to students. Students were less interested in research-based programs or in research residency. Therefore, the development of distance education doctoral degree programs in gerontology may need to be created differently than "traditional" formats.

  8. Medical Utilization of Kiosks in the Delivery of Patient Education: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne Nagurka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The utilization of kiosks has previously been shown to be effective for collecting information, delivering educational modules, and providing access to health information. We discuss a review of current literature for the utilization of kiosks for the delivery of patient education. Methods: The criteria for inclusion in this literature review were: (1 study dis-cusses the utilization of kiosks for patient health education; (2 study discusses the use of touch screens for patient health information; (3 published in English. Our review includes searches via MEDLINE databases and Google Scholar for the years 1996-2014. Results: Overall, 167 articles were screened for final eligibility, and after discarding duplicates and non-eligible studies with abstract. Full-text review of 28 articles was included in the final analysis. Conclusion: The review of available literature demonstrates the effectiveness of touch screen kiosks to educate patients and to improve healthcare, both at a performance and cost advantage over other modes of patient education.

  9. Self-Micro Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems: a Strategy to Improve Oral Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K. Sharma

    Full Text Available Aim: Oral route has always been the favorite route of drug administration in many diseases and till today it is the first way investigated in the development of new dosage forms. The major problem in oral drug formulations is low and erratic bioavailability, which mainly results from poor aqueous solubility, thereby pose problems in their formulation. For the therapeutic delivery of lipophilic active moieties (BCS class II drugs, lipid based formulations are inviting increasing attention. Methods: To that aim, from the web sites of PubMed, HCAplus, Thomson, and Registry were used as the main sources to perform the search for the most significant research articles published on the subject. The information was then carefully analyzed, highlighting the most important results in the formulation and development of self-micro emulsifying drug delivery systems as well as its therapeutic activity. Results: Self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS has gained more attention due to enhanced oral bio-availability enabling reduction in dose, more consistent temporal profiles of drug absorption, selective targeting of drug(s toward specific absorption window in GIT, and protection of drug(s from the unreceptive environment in gut. Conclusions: This article gives a complete overview of SMEDDS as a promising approach to effectively deal with the problem of poorly soluble molecules.

  10. Controlled local drug delivery strategies from chitosan hydrogels for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elviri, Lisa; Bianchera, Annalisa; Bergonzi, Carlo; Bettini, Ruggero

    2017-07-01

    The main target of tissue engineering is the preparation and application of adequate materials for the design and production of scaffolds, that possess properties promoting cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. The use of natural polysaccharides, such as chitosan, to prepare hydrogels for wound healing and controlled drug delivery is a research topic of wide and increasing interest. Areas covered: This review presents the latest results and challenges in the preparation of chitosan and chitosan-based scaffold/hydrogel for wound healing applications. A detailed overview of their behavior in terms of controlled drug delivery, divided by drug categories, and efficacy was provided and critically discussed. Expert opinion: The need to establish and exploit the advantages of natural biomaterials in combination with active compounds is playing a pivotal role in the regenerative medicine fields. The challenges posed by the many variables affecting tissue repair and regeneration need to be standardized and adhere to recognized guidelines to improve the quality of evidence in the wound healing process. Currently, different methodologies are followed to prepare innovative scaffold formulations and structures. Innovative technologies such as 3D printing or bio-electrospray are promising to create chitosan-based scaffolds with finely controlled structures with customizable shape porosity and thickness. Chitosan scaffolds could be designed in combination with a variety of polysaccharides or active compounds with selected and reproducible spacial distribution, providing active wound dressing with highly tunable controlled drug delivery.

  11. Modern development strategies of the Russian education in the conditions of the information society

    OpenAIRE

    Boguslavskii Mikhail V.; Lelchitskii Igor D.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents current development strategies of the Russian education in the conditions of information society. Western-liberal and traditional-conservative strategies of modern Russian education development are substantively presented. The ways of harmonization of these strategies in the area of national education in the information age are characterized. Approaches to the implementation of historical and pedagogical expertise of modern development strategies of the Russian education ...

  12. Educational and evaluation strategies in the training of physician specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona-Flores, Verónica Alejandra; Campos-Navarro, Luz Arcelia; Arenas-Osuna, Jesús; Alcalá-Martínez, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Teaching strategies have been defined as procedures, means or resources that teachers used to promote meaningful learning. Identify teaching strategies and evaluation used by the professor with residents in tertiary hospitals health care. This is a cross-sectional study conducted with full, associate and assistant professors of various medical specialties. A questionnaire was applied to evaluate the strategies used by professors to teach and evaluate students. We included a sample of 90 professors in 35 medical specialties. The most frequent teaching activities were: organizing students to develop presentations on specific subjects, followed by asking questions on previously reviewed subjects, In terms of the strategies employed, the most frequent "always" option was applied to case analyses. The most frequent methods used for the evaluation of theoretical knowledge were: participation in class, topic presentation and exams. Teaching activities were primarily based on the presentation of specific topics by the residents. The most commonly used educational strategies were clinical case analyses followed by problem-based learning and the use of illustrations. Evaluation of the residents' performance in theory knowledge, hinged on class participation, presentation of assigned topics and exams. Copyright: © 2017 SecretarÍa de Salud

  13. Joint effect of education and age at childbirth on the risk of caesarean delivery: findings from Germany 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglioni, L; Schmiedeberg, C

    2018-02-01

    This article aims at assessing the joint effect of maternal age and education on the risk of having a caesarean delivery. As high maternal education is often associated with lower caesarean-birth rates, but high-educated women tend to postpone motherhood, these effects may offset each other in traditional analyses. Secondary analysis of the data from the German Family Panel pairfam. The interview-based data refer to 1020 births between 2008 and 2015. We analyse only reports from mothers and calculate logistic regression models. The caesarean delivery rate differs strongly between education levels, and low-educated women are at higher risk of having a caesarean delivery when controlling for parity and age. A positive age gradient is found, indicating a higher risk of caesarean section for older mothers. Without controlling for age, the association of education and caesarean section risk is weaker, i.e., effects of age and education partially level each other out. A model including an interaction term between age and education confirms this result. The risk of having a caesarean delivery does not differ between levels of education when maternal age is not taken into account. Lower maternal education and higher age are both positively associated with the risk of experiencing a caesarean section in Germany. However, as higher educated women tend to have their children later, effects of education and age weigh each other out. Preventive campaigns should target women with lower education and raise women's awareness on the risks associated with late motherhood. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An Overview of Vaccination Strategies and Antigen Delivery Systems for Streptococcus agalactiae Vaccines in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Paul, Joydeb; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-12-13

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging infectious disease adversely affecting Nile tilapia ( Niloticus oreochromis ) production in aquaculture. Research carried out in the last decade has focused on developing protective vaccines using different strategies, although no review has been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of these strategies. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of vaccination strategies and antigen delivery systems currently used for S. agalactiae vaccines in tilapia. Furthermore, as shown herein, current vaccine designs include the use of replicative antigen delivery systems, such as attenuated virulent strains, heterologous vectors and DNA vaccines, while non-replicative vaccines include the inactivated whole cell (IWC) and subunit vaccines encoding different S. agalactiae immunogenic proteins. Intraperitoneal vaccination is the most widely used immunization strategy, although immersion, spray and oral vaccines have also been tried with variable success. Vaccine efficacy is mostly evaluated by use of the intraperitoneal challenge model aimed at evaluating the relative percent survival (RPS) of vaccinated fish. The major limitation with this approach is that it lacks the ability to elucidate the mechanism of vaccine protection at portals of bacterial entry in mucosal organs and prevention of pathology in target organs. Despite this, indications are that the correlates of vaccine protection can be established based on antibody responses and antigen dose, although these parameters require optimization before they can become an integral part of routine vaccine production. Nevertheless, this review shows that different approaches can be used to produce protective vaccines against S. agalactiae in tilapia although there is a need to optimize the measures of vaccine efficacy.

  15. An Overview of Vaccination Strategies and Antigen Delivery Systems for Streptococcus agalactiae Vaccines in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Paul, Joydeb; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging infectious disease adversely affecting Nile tilapia (Niloticus oreochromis) production in aquaculture. Research carried out in the last decade has focused on developing protective vaccines using different strategies, although no review has been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of these strategies. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of vaccination strategies and antigen delivery systems currently used for S. agalactiae vaccines in tilapia. Furthermore, as shown herein, current vaccine designs include the use of replicative antigen delivery systems, such as attenuated virulent strains, heterologous vectors and DNA vaccines, while non-replicative vaccines include the inactivated whole cell (IWC) and subunit vaccines encoding different S. agalactiae immunogenic proteins. Intraperitoneal vaccination is the most widely used immunization strategy, although immersion, spray and oral vaccines have also been tried with variable success. Vaccine efficacy is mostly evaluated by use of the intraperitoneal challenge model aimed at evaluating the relative percent survival (RPS) of vaccinated fish. The major limitation with this approach is that it lacks the ability to elucidate the mechanism of vaccine protection at portals of bacterial entry in mucosal organs and prevention of pathology in target organs. Despite this, indications are that the correlates of vaccine protection can be established based on antibody responses and antigen dose, although these parameters require optimization before they can become an integral part of routine vaccine production. Nevertheless, this review shows that different approaches can be used to produce protective vaccines against S. agalactiae in tilapia although there is a need to optimize the measures of vaccine efficacy. PMID:27983591

  16. High content analysis platform for optimization of lipid mediated CRISPR-Cas9 delivery strategies in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyer, Benjamin; Carlson-Stevermer, Jared; Angenent-Mari, Nicolas; Khalil, Andrew; Harkness, Ty; Saha, Krishanu

    2016-04-01

    Non-viral gene-editing of human cells using the CRISPR-Cas9 system requires optimized delivery of multiple components. Both the Cas9 endonuclease and a single guide RNA, that defines the genomic target, need to be present and co-localized within the nucleus for efficient gene-editing to occur. This work describes a new high-throughput screening platform for the optimization of CRISPR-Cas9 delivery strategies. By exploiting high content image analysis and microcontact printed plates, multi-parametric gene-editing outcome data from hundreds to thousands of isolated cell populations can be screened simultaneously. Employing this platform, we systematically screened four commercially available cationic lipid transfection materials with a range of RNAs encoding the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Analysis of Cas9 expression and editing of a fluorescent mCherry reporter transgene within human embryonic kidney cells was monitored over several days after transfection. Design of experiments analysis enabled rigorous evaluation of delivery materials and RNA concentration conditions. The results of this analysis indicated that the concentration and identity of transfection material have significantly greater effect on gene-editing than ratio or total amount of RNA. Cell subpopulation analysis on microcontact printed plates, further revealed that low cell number and high Cas9 expression, 24h after CRISPR-Cas9 delivery, were strong predictors of gene-editing outcomes. These results suggest design principles for the development of materials and transfection strategies with lipid-based materials. This platform could be applied to rapidly optimize materials for gene-editing in a variety of cell/tissue types in order to advance genomic medicine, regenerative biology and drug discovery. CRISPR-Cas9 is a new gene-editing technology for "genome surgery" that is anticipated to treat genetic diseases. This technology uses multiple components of the Cas9 system to cut out disease-causing mutations

  17. Capitated payments to primary care providers and the delivery of patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, William S; King, Dana E; Richards, Chesley

    2013-01-01

    Patient education is a critical component of the patient-centered medical home and is a powerful and effective tool in chronic disease management. However, little is known about the effect of practice payment on rates of patient education during office encounters. For this study we took data from the 2009 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. This was a cross-sectional analysis of patient visits to primary care providers to determine whether practice payment in the form of capitated payments is associated within patient education being included more frequently during office visits compared with other payment methods. In a sample size of 9863 visits in which capitation status was available and the provider was the patient's primary care provider, the weighted percentages of visits including patient education were measured as a percentages of education (95% confidence intervals): 75% capitation, 74.0% (52.2-88.1). In an adjusted logistic model controlling for new patients (yes/no), number of chronic conditions, number of medications managed, number of previous visits within the year, and age and sex of the patients, the odds of receiving education were reported as odds ratios (95% confidence intervals): 75% capitation, 3.38 (1.23-9.30). Patients are more likely to receive education if their primary care providers receive primarily capitated payment. This association is generally important for health policymakers constructing payment strategies for patient populations who would most benefit from interventions that incorporate or depend on patient education, such as populations requiring management of chronic diseases.

  18. EDUCATIONAL ACTIONS TO PREVENT DENGUE: EXPERIENCES AND STRATEGIES WITH ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosamaria Rodrigues Garcia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Describe the activities performed on apublic specialized ambulatory care for dengue prevention among elderly. Case report: the epidemiological outlook of dengue is scaring being characterized as a public health problem. The elderly are most at risk for hospitalization and severe forms of the disease, thus health education activities are essential to improve awareness of the need to fight and prevent the disease. A Health Education project was created, evolving communication strategies to raise awareness on the issue. They were performed by a post graduate Gerontology group in activities such as interactive puppet show, myths and truths dynamic, informative folder, parody, posters, training seniors, caregivers and family members, internal and external health professionals, staff and residents of nearby long term care facilities. The materials were available in print and digital version. 2,500 elderly and 350 professionals were trained and encouraged to multiply the information and inspire adoption of preventive measures. The actions provided intergenerational interaction and empowerment of the elderly, whom trained, had the opportunity to exercise social participation and disseminate recommendations for other users. Conclusion: the project enabled the construction of knowledge through interactive educational activities that contributed to strengthen the individual and collective awareness, awareopinion leaderstothe importance of communication/education in the fight against dengue, which emphasized social responsibility in rescuing citizenship in a perspective thateach citizen is responsible for himself and for community. DESCRIPTORS: Dengue. Aged. Disease prevention. Health education.

  19. Bolstering cholesteryl ester hydrolysis in liver: A hepatocyte-targeting gene delivery strategy for potential alleviation of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongliang; Lancina, Michael G; Wang, Jing; Korzun, William J; Yang, Hu; Ghosh, Shobha

    2017-06-01

    Current atherosclerosis treatment strategies primarily focus on limiting further cholesteryl esters (CE) accumulation by reducing endogenous synthesis of cholesterol in the liver. No therapy is currently available to enhance the removal of CE, a crucial step to reduce the burden of the existing disease. Given the central role of hepatic cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) in the intrahepatic hydrolysis of CE and subsequent removal of the resulting free cholesterol (FC), in this work, we applied galactose-functionalized polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer generation 5 (Gal-G5) for hepatocyte-specific delivery of CEH expression vector. The data presented herein show the increased specific uptake of Gal-G5/CEH expression vector complexes (simply Gal-G5/CEH) by hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the upregulated CEH expression in the hepatocytes significantly enhanced the intracellular hydrolysis of high density lipoprotein-associated CE (HDL-CE) and subsequent conversion/secretion of hydrolyzed FC as bile acids (BA). The increased CEH expression in the liver significantly increased the flux of HDL-CE to biliary as well as fecal FC and BA. Meanwhile, Gal-G5 did not induce hepatic or renal toxicity. It was also not immunotoxic. Because of these encouraging pre-clinical testing results, using this safe and highly efficient hepatocyte-specific gene delivery platform to enhance the hepatic processes involved in cholesterol elimination is a promising strategy for the alleviation of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Collaborative testing as a learning strategy in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Sheryl S

    2010-01-01

    A primary goal of nursing education is to prepare nurses to work collaboratively as members of interprofessional health care teams on behalf of patients. Collaborative testing is a collaborative learning strategy used to foster knowledge development, critical thinking in decision making, and group processing skills. This study incorporated a quasi-experimental design with a comparison group to examine the effect of collaborative testing as a learning strategy on student learning and retention of course content as well as group process skills and student perceptions of their learning and anxiety. The setting was a baccalaureate nursing program; the sample consisted of two groups of senior students enrolled in Medical-Surgical Nursing II. Student learning, as measured by unit examination scores, was greater for students taking examinations collaboratively compared to individually. Retention of course content, as measured by final examination scores, was not greater for students taking examinations collaboratively compared to individually. Student perceptions were overwhelmingly positive, with students reporting increased learning as a result of the collaborative testing experiences. Despite the lack of data to support increased retention, collaborative testing may be a learning strategy worth implementing in nursing education. Students reported more positive interactions and collaboration with their peers, skills required by the professional nurse.

  1. Strategy of Media Education: Philosophical and Pedagogical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya Mikhailovna Nikolaeva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern requirements for educational activities have a binary nature. Thus, on the one hand, educational practice established in the form of a social institution is one of the most conservative areas of social space. On the other hand, comfortable adaptation of a person to the processes occurring in the modern world is impossible without taking into account the phenomena of digital nature. The article provides a philosophical and pedagogical strategy aimed at the development of critical and creative thinking skills and competent reasoning, which can act as a basis for media education. The paper shows that the community of researchers is an interactive form of lesson organization, which makes it possible to develop rationality and ethical-and-democratic behaviour and, thus, to promote information and media literacy among students. The article also presents theoretical justification of the strategy, as well as techniques and materials for its empirical assessment. These can help arrange a lesson according to the principle of research community, which will contribute to the development of both cognitive and ethical-and-social skills in students.

  2. Management of Educational Paradigms within the Framework of Contemporary Educational Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard IONESCU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Each major pedagogical orientation brings with it a set of certain potential actions, a potential that becomes reality at the level of invariably at the level of educational reality. Assuming a certain pedagogical educational paradigm is thus equivalent to the transposition into practice of a certain type of experimental research and promoting a particular way of conceiving and modeling of human nature. In a world characterized by contradicting realities, by turmoil, fast developing technologies, discussing and deciding on the most appropriate educational paradigms should be a core process in the attempt of conceiving the educational vision and objectives of tomorrow. The present paper aims at discussing the role of educational paradigms within the framework of contemporary educational strategies.

  3. The Strategy for Development of Educational Services and Educational Programs at the University of Warsaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnicki Maksym W.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The successful experience of the main educational and scientific institution of Poland – the University of Warsaw in formation and implementation of own strategy of development of educational services and educational programs under conditions of Polish membership in the European Union was researched. The model of the development system of the University of Warsaw has been built, based on its eleven main elements, reflecting the main strategic directions of development, which provide the basis for development of the University in the strategic perspective. The most important directions are described, which are pivotal and development-inclusive: concept of Open University; expansion of existing and creation of new training programs of an interdisciplinary nature; selection and education of scientific and pedagogical staff; training and practice of students; postgraduate education; launching of training programs in foreign languages, internationalization of education; paid tuition; scholarship programs of the University; promotion of outstanding didactic activities through the Foundation for didactic innovation; organizing the recruitment of candidates for training; quality of education. The scientific and practical results of this research will be useful for the top-level managers engaged in the development and implementation of strategies for higher education institutions and research universities in Ukraine.

  4. Students’ strategies for position-taking in transnational education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jin Hui

    2016-01-01

    as a field of struggle. The article discusses in depth how different student positions are led by the dispositions of having a certain nationality combined with international experiences/travel mobility. It will furthermore also discuss how the dispositions of national academic capital are related......The article illuminates the positions distributed and the strategies for position-taking which students pursue in order to transform or preserve their positions in a classroom with a transnational context where students have different national and international education experiences. Furthermore......, how their positions are related to their aspirations for the future will be elucidated. Based on interviews with Danish and Chinese students enrolled at a Sino-Danish university situated in Beijing, the article identifies four different navigation strategies for position-taking in such a classroom...

  5. Optimal intervention strategies for cholera outbreak by education and chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Toni

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the control of infectious diseases in the framework of optimal control approach. A case study on cholera control was studied by considering two control strategies, namely education and chlorination. We distinct the former control into one regarding person-to-person behaviour and another one concerning person-to-environment conduct. Model are divided into two interacted populations: human population which follows an SIR model and pathogen population. Pontryagin maximum principle was applied in deriving a set of differential equations which consists of dynamical and adjoin systems as optimality conditions. Then, the fourth order Runge-Kutta method was exploited to numerically solve the equation system. An illustrative example was provided to assess the effectiveness of the control strategies toward a set of control scenarios.

  6. Interviewing Ghanaian Educational Elites: Strategies for Access, Commitment, and Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope Pius Nudzor

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A review of the research methodology literature suggests that owing to the difficulty of gaining access to and obtaining commitments from elites, social scientists less frequently use them as research respondents, opting instead to investigate those over whom power is exercised. This article provides insights into some intricacies of elite interviewing. It recounts the experience of a novice researcher in his quest to gain access to and interview elite individuals within the Ghanaian educational system for his PhD thesis. In the process, the article sheds light on strategies and techniques (related to interviewee identification, scheduling, and researcher preparation for the interview, as well as rapport establishment with potential interviewees that are helpful as toolkits in ensuring that elite interview processes are not unduly derailed. The article argues that the strategies discussed are useful for circumventing formalised and “public relations” responses, which elites tend to communicate with the press and public.

  7. Nanoparticles for the delivery of therapeutic antibodies: Dogma or promising strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Flávia; Castro, Pedro; Fonte, Pedro; Kennedy, Patrick J; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Sarmento, Bruno

    2017-10-01

    Over the past two decades, therapeutic antibodies have demonstrated promising results in the treatment of a wide array of diseases. However, the application of antibody-based therapy implies multiple administrations and a high cost of antibody production, resulting in costly therapy. Another disadvantage inherent to antibody-based therapy is the limited stability of antibodies and the low level of tissue penetration. The use of nanoparticles as delivery systems for antibodies allows for a reduction in antibody dosing and may represent a suitable alternative to increase antibody stability Areas covered: We discuss different nanocarriers intended for the delivery of antibodies as well as the corresponding encapsulation methods. Recent developments in antibody nanoencapsulation, particularly the possible toxicity issues that may arise from entrapment of antibodies into nanocarriers, are also assessed. In addition, this review will discuss the alterations in antibody structure and bioactivity that occur with nanoencapsulation. Expert opinion: Nanocarriers can protect antibodies from degradation, ensuring superior bioavailability. Encapsulation of therapeutic antibodies may offer some advantages, including potential targeting, reduced immunogenicity and controlled release. Furthermore, antibody nanoencapsulation may aid in the incorporation of the antibodies into the cells, if intracellular components (e.g. intracellular enzymes, oncogenic proteins, transcription factors) are to be targeted.

  8. Mesoporous Silica and Organosilica Nanoparticles: Physical Chemistry, Biosafety, Delivery Strategies, and Biomedical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Croissant, Jonas G.

    2017-11-30

    Predetermining the physico-chemical properties, biosafety, and stimuli-responsiveness of nanomaterials in biological environments is essential for safe and effective biomedical applications. At the forefront of biomedical research, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles are increasingly investigated to predict their biological outcome by materials design. In this review, it is first chronicled that how the nanomaterial design of pure silica, partially hybridized organosilica, and fully hybridized organosilica (periodic mesoporous organosilicas) governs not only the physico-chemical properties but also the biosafety of the nanoparticles. The impact of the hybridization on the biocompatibility, protein corona, biodistribution, biodegradability, and clearance of the silica-based particles is described. Then, the influence of the surface engineering, the framework hybridization, as well as the morphology of the particles, on the ability to load and controllably deliver drugs under internal biological stimuli (e.g., pH, redox, enzymes) and external noninvasive stimuli (e.g., light, magnetic, ultrasound) are presented. To conclude, trends in the biomedical applications of silica and organosilica nanovectors are delineated, such as unconventional bioimaging techniques, large cargo delivery, combination therapy, gaseous molecule delivery, antimicrobial protection, and Alzheimer\\'s disease therapy.

  9. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle encapsulated tarenflurbil: A potential brain targeting strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntimadugu, Eameema; Dhommati, Raju; Jain, Anjali; Challa, Venu Gopala Swami; Shaheen, M; Khan, Wahid

    2016-09-20

    Poor brain penetration of tarenflurbil (TFB) was one of the major reasons for its failure in phase III clinical trials conducted on Alzheimer's patients. Thus there is a tremendous need of developing efficient delivery systems for TFB. This study was designed with the aim of improving drug delivery to brain through intranasally delivered nanocarriers. TFB was loaded into two different nanocarriers i.e., poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (TFB-NPs) and solid lipid nanoparticles (TFB-SLNs). Particle size of both the nanocarriers (targeting site. Pharmacokinetics suggested improved circulation behavior of nanoparticles and the absolute bioavailabilities followed this order: TFB-NPs (i.n.)>TFB-SLNs (i.n.)>TFB solution (i.n.)>TFB suspension (oral). Brain targeting efficiency was determined in terms of %drug targeting efficiency (%DTE) and drug transport percentage (DTP). The higher %DTE (287.24) and DTP (65.18) were observed for TFB-NPs followed by TFB-SLNs (%DTE: 183.15 and DTP: 45.41) among all other tested groups. These encouraging results proved that therapeutic concentrations of TFB could be transported directly to brain via olfactory pathway after intranasal administration of polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Emerging Trends On Drug Delivery Strategy of Momordica charantia against Diabetes and its Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thent, Zar Chi; Das, Srijit; Zaidun, Nurul Hannim

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus has increased drastically over the past few decades. This oxidant-antioxidant imbalance resulting in complication of diabetes mellitus includes macro- and microvascular complications. Resistance to conventional treatment and patient compliance has paved the way to the usage of effective natural products and supplements. Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) is widely consumed in many parts of Malaysia as a vegetable. Momordica charantia (MC) is mainly used in the management of diabetes mellitus. The present review discusses the literature concerning the antidiabetic and antioxidant properties of MC focusing on the complication of diabetes mellitus along with its mode of delivery. We found that among the whole part of MC, its fruit extract has been widely studied, therapeutically. The evidence based analysis of the beneficiary effects of MC on the different organs involved in diabetes complication is also highlighted. This review elucidated an essential understanding of MC based drug delivery system in both clinical and experimental studies and appraised the great potential of the protein based MC extract against diabetes mellitus. The review paper is believed to assist the researchers and medical personnel in treating diabetic associated complications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Educating science editors: is there a comprehensive strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Gorin, Sergey V; Kitas, George D

    2014-12-01

    The article considers available options to educate science editors in the fast-transforming digital environment. There is no single course or resource that can cover their constantly changing and diversifying educational needs. The involvement in research, writing, and reviewing is important for gaining editing skills, but that is not all. Membership in editorial associations and access to updated scholarly information in the field are mandatory for maintaining editorial credentials. Learned associations offer access to a few widely-recognized periodicals. There are also formal training courses covering issues in science writing and ethical editing, but no high-level evidence data exist to promote any of these. Networking with like-minded specialists within the global and regional editorial associations seems a useful strategy to upgrade editorial skills and resolve problems with the quality control and digitization of scholarly periodicals.

  12. Standards for Technological Literacy and STEM Education Delivery through Career and Technical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asunda, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    At a minimum, employers rely on career and technical education (CTE) and workforce training systems to supply workers able to perform in their jobs. In CTE classes that seek to integrate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) concepts, it falls to the instructors to design and sequence the learning experiences that will promote…

  13. [Construction and Application of Innovative Education Technology Strategies in Nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li-Fen; Huang, Hsiang-Ping; Ni, Lee-Fen; Tsai, Chia-Lan; Huang, Tsuey-Yuan

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of information and communication technologies has deeply impacted education reform, promoted the development of digital-learning models, and stimulated the development of diverse nursing education strategies in order to better fulfill needs and expand in new directions. The present paper introduces the intelligent-learning resources that are available for basic medical science education, problem-based learning, nursing scenario-based learning, objective structured clinical examinations, and other similar activities in the Department of Nursing at Chang Gung University of Science and Technology. The program is offered in two parts: specialized classroom facilities and cloud computing / mobile-learning. The latter includes high-fidelity simulation classrooms, online e-books, and virtual interactive simulation and augmented reality mobile-learning materials, which are provided through multimedia technology development, learning management systems, web-certificated examinations, and automated teaching and learning feedback mechanisms. It is expected that the teaching experiences that are shared in this article may be used as a reference for applying professional wisdom teaching models into nursing education.

  14. A novel therapeutic strategy for cartilage diseases based on lipid nanoparticle-RNAi delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Shaowei Wang,1 Xiaochun Wei,1 Xiaojuan Sun,1 Chongwei Chen,1 Jingming Zhou,2 Ge Zhang,3 Heng Wu,3 Baosheng Guo,3 Lei Wei1,2 1Department of Orthopaedics, The 2nd Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China; 2Department of Orthopaedics, Rhode Island Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong Background: Cartilage degeneration affects millions of people but preventing its degeneration is a big challenge. Although RNA interference (RNAi has been used in human trials via silencing specific genes, the cartilage RNAi has not been possible to date because the cartilage is an avascular and very dense tissue with very low permeability. Purpose: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a novel lipid nanoparticle (LNP-siRNA delivery system that can prevent cartilage degeneration by knocking down specific genes. Methods: LNP transfection efficiency was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh has been correlated with cartilage degeneration. The in vivo effects of LNP-Ihh siRNA complexes on cartilage degeneration were evaluated in a rat model of surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA. Results: In vitro, 100% of chondrocytes were transfected with siRNA in the LNP-siRNA group. In accordance with the cell culture results, red positive signals could be detected even in the deep layer of cartilage tissue cultures treated by LNP-beacon. In vivo data showed that LNP is specific for cartilage, since positive signals were detected by fluorescence molecular tomography and confocal microscopy in joint cartilage injected with LNP-beacon, but not on the surface of the synovium. In the rat model of OA, intraarticular injection of LNP-Ihh siRNA attenuated OA progression, and PCR results showed LNP-Ihh siRNA exerted a positive impact on anabolic metabolism and negative

  15. Cancer multidrug resistance: mechanisms involved and strategies for circumvention using a drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, Golam; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), the principal mechanism by which many cancers develop resistance to chemotherapy, is one of the major obstacles to the successful clinical treatment of various types of cancer. Several key regulators are responsible for mediating MDR, a process that renders chemotherapeutic drugs ineffective in the internal organelles of target cells. A nanoparticulate drug delivery system (DDS) is a potentially promising tool for circumventing such MDR, which can be achieved by targeting tumor cells themselves or tumor endothelial cells that support the survival of MDR cancer cells. The present article discusses key factors that are responsible for MDR in cancer cells, with a specific focus on the application of DDS to overcome MDR via the use of chemotherapy or macromolecules.

  16. Nanopreparations for mitochondria targeting drug delivery system: Current strategies and future prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjie Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are a novel and promising therapeutic target for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of a lot of human diseases such as cancer, metabolic diseases and neurodegenerative disease. Owing to the mitochondrial special bilayer structure and highly negative potential nature, therapeutic molecules have multiple difficulties in reaching mitochondria. To overcome multiple barriers for targeting mitochondria, the researchers developed various pharmaceutical preparations such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and inorganic nanoparticles modified by mitochondriotropic moieties like dequalinium (DQA, triphenylphosphonium (TPP, mitochondrial penetrating peptides (MPPs and mitochondrial protein import machinery that allow specific targeting. The targeted formulations exhibited enhanced pharmacological effect and better therapeutic effect than their untargeted counterpart both in vitro and in vivo. Nanocarriers may be used for bio-therapeutic delivery into specific mitochondria that possess a great potential treatment of mitochondria related diseases.

  17. A novel therapeutic strategy for cartilage diseases based on lipid nanoparticle-RNAi delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Wei, Xiaochun; Sun, Xiaojuan; Chen, Chongwei; Zhou, Jingming; Zhang, Ge; Wu, Heng; Guo, Baosheng

    2018-01-01

    Background Cartilage degeneration affects millions of people but preventing its degeneration is a big challenge. Although RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in human trials via silencing specific genes, the cartilage RNAi has not been possible to date because the cartilage is an avascular and very dense tissue with very low permeability. Purpose The objective of this study was to develop and validate a novel lipid nanoparticle (LNP)-siRNA delivery system that can prevent cartilage degeneration by knocking down specific genes. Methods LNP transfection efficiency was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) has been correlated with cartilage degeneration. The in vivo effects of LNP-Ihh siRNA complexes on cartilage degeneration were evaluated in a rat model of surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA). Results In vitro, 100% of chondrocytes were transfected with siRNA in the LNP-siRNA group. In accordance with the cell culture results, red positive signals could be detected even in the deep layer of cartilage tissue cultures treated by LNP-beacon. In vivo data showed that LNP is specific for cartilage, since positive signals were detected by fluorescence molecular tomography and confocal microscopy in joint cartilage injected with LNP-beacon, but not on the surface of the synovium. In the rat model of OA, intraarticular injection of LNP-Ihh siRNA attenuated OA progression, and PCR results showed LNP-Ihh siRNA exerted a positive impact on anabolic metabolism and negative impact on catabolic metabolism. Conclusion This study demonstrates that our LNP-RNAi delivery system has a significantly chondroprotective effect that attenuates cartilage degeneration and holds great promise as a powerful tool for treatment of cartilage diseases by knocking down specific genes. PMID:29440889

  18. A novel therapeutic strategy for cartilage diseases based on lipid nanoparticle-RNAi delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Wei, Xiaochun; Sun, Xiaojuan; Chen, Chongwei; Zhou, Jingming; Zhang, Ge; Wu, Heng; Guo, Baosheng; Wei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Cartilage degeneration affects millions of people but preventing its degeneration is a big challenge. Although RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in human trials via silencing specific genes, the cartilage RNAi has not been possible to date because the cartilage is an avascular and very dense tissue with very low permeability. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a novel lipid nanoparticle (LNP)-siRNA delivery system that can prevent cartilage degeneration by knocking down specific genes. LNP transfection efficiency was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. Indian Hedgehog ( Ihh ) has been correlated with cartilage degeneration. The in vivo effects of LNP-Ihh siRNA complexes on cartilage degeneration were evaluated in a rat model of surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA). In vitro, 100% of chondrocytes were transfected with siRNA in the LNP-siRNA group. In accordance with the cell culture results, red positive signals could be detected even in the deep layer of cartilage tissue cultures treated by LNP-beacon. In vivo data showed that LNP is specific for cartilage, since positive signals were detected by fluorescence molecular tomography and confocal microscopy in joint cartilage injected with LNP-beacon, but not on the surface of the synovium. In the rat model of OA, intraarticular injection of LNP-Ihh siRNA attenuated OA progression, and PCR results showed LNP-Ihh siRNA exerted a positive impact on anabolic metabolism and negative impact on catabolic metabolism. This study demonstrates that our LNP-RNAi delivery system has a significantly chondroprotective effect that attenuates cartilage degeneration and holds great promise as a powerful tool for treatment of cartilage diseases by knocking down specific genes.

  19. Decision-making strategies: ignored to the detriment of healthcare training and delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Chris; Brubaker, Kathryn A; Ellner, Andrew L

    2013-01-01

    Context : People do not always make health-related decisions which reflect their best interest - best interest being defined as the decision they would make if they carefully considered the options and fully understood the information available. A substantial literature has developed in behavioral economics and social psychology that seeks to elucidate the patterns in individual decision-making. While this is particularly relevant to healthcare, the insights from these fields have only been applied in a limited way. To address the health challenges of the twenty-first century, healthcare providers and healthcare systems designers need to more fully understand how individuals are making decisions. Methods : We provide an overview of the theories of behavioral economics and social psychology that relate to how individuals make health-related decisions. The concentration on health-related decisions leads to a focus on three topics: (1) mental shortcuts and motivated reasoning; (2) implications of time; and (3) implications of affect. The first topic is relevant because health-related decisions are often made in a hurry without a full appreciation of the implications and the deliberation they warrant. The second topic is included because the link between a decision and its health-related outcomes can involve a significant time lag. The final topic is included because health and affect are so often linked. Findings : The literature reviewed has implications for healthcare training and delivery. Selection for medical training must consider the skills necessary to understand and adapt to how patients make decisions. Training on the insights garnered from behavioral economics and social psychology would better prepare healthcare providers to effectively support their clients to lead healthy lives. Healthcare delivery should be structured to respond to the way in which decisions are made. Conclusions : These patterns in decision-making call into question basic assumptions

  20. Waste Feed Delivery Strategy for Tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLACKER, S.M.

    2000-04-13

    This engineering study establishes the detailed retrieval strategy, equipment requirements, and key parameters for preparing detailed process flowsheets; evaluates the technical and programmatic risks associated with processing, certifying, transferring, and delivering waste from Tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107 to BNFL; and provides a list of necessary follow-on actions so that program direction from ORP can be successfully implemented.

  1. Optimization of delivery strategies for cardiac cell therapy in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spoel, T.I.G.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac cell therapy has been proposed as an alternative treatment option for patients after acute myocardial infarction (MI). Irrespective of the chosen regenerative strategy, it is essential to deliver sufficient number of cells to the infarcted myocardium to become effective which is important

  2. Waste Feed Delivery Strategy for Tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLACKER, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    This engineering study establishes the detailed retrieval strategy, equipment requirements, and key parameters for preparing detailed process flowsheets; evaluates the technical and programmatic risks associated with processing, certifying, transferring, and delivering waste from Tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107 to BNFL; and provides a list of necessary follow-on actions so that program direction from ORP can be successfully implemented

  3. Impact of hybrid delivery of education on student academic performance and the student experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Heather Brennan; Nutter, Douglas A; Charneski, Lisa; Butko, Peter

    2009-11-12

    To compare student academic performance and the student experience in the first-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program between the main and newly opened satellite campuses of the University of Maryland. Student performance indicators including graded assessments, course averages, cumulative first-year grade point average (GPA), and introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) evaluations were analyzed retrospectively. Student experience indicators were obtained via an online survey instrument and included involvement in student organizations; time-budgeting practices; and stress levels and their perceived effect on performance. Graded assessments, course averages, GPA, and IPPE evaluations were indistinguishable between campuses. Students' time allocation was not different between campuses, except for time spent attending class and watching lecture videos. There was no difference between students' stress levels at each campus. The implementation of a satellite campus to expand pharmacy education yielded academic performance and student engagement comparable to those from traditional delivery methods.

  4. Volunteer Delivery of a Community-Based Strength Training Program: Comparison of Adopting and Nonadopting Extension Educator Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa T. Washburn

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Volunteer leaders are increasingly being utilized to deliver community strength training classes, but the factors affecting adoption of volunteer delivery approaches by educators or program managers have not been well explored. This study sought to identify these factors by comparing perspectives of adopting and nonadopting county Extension educators for a group strength training program delivered through county Cooperative Extension offices. Semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of adopting (n=6 and nonadopting (n=13 educators. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and coded using thematic content analysis. Review of codes related to adoption or nonadoption of volunteer delivery approaches produced common themes. Both groups acknowledged role differences between educators and volunteers and expressed concerns about maintaining program quality. Adopters expressed greater comfort with volunteer-led program approaches and understanding of the educator-volunteer role. Nonadopters were hesitant to request program participants serve as leaders but felt participants were capable. Both groups were motivated to offer the program for dual personal and community benefit, but nonadopters expressed reliance on the program to maintain physical activity habits and for social support. Findings can inform others seeking to adapt community programs for volunteer delivery or engage volunteers in existing program delivery.

  5. Strategy of Slovak Republic's government to use higher education as an investment into human capital

    OpenAIRE

    Smereková, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Bc. Erika Smereková Strategy of Slovak Republic's Government to use higher education as an investment in human capital Abstract The Master thesis on the topic "Strategy of Slovak Republic's government to use higher education as an investment in human capital" presents results to the following research question: To what extent is it a part of strategy of Slovak Republic's educational policy to use higher education as an investment in human capital? The thesis specifically focuses on the idea o...

  6. Results of implementation of a hospital-based strategy to reduce cesarean delivery among low-risk women in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Esther S; Bourgeault, Ivy L; Cameron, Carol; Graham, Ian D; Hutton, Eileen K

    2017-11-01

    To assess the cesarean delivery (CD) rate among low-risk pregnancies before and after implementation of a hospital-based program in Canada. A prospective before-and-after study was conducted to assess the effects of the CARE (CAesarean REduction) strategy, which was developed and implemented at Markham Stouffville Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, in 2010 to reduce CD among low-risk women. Hospital records were reviewed to identify changes in the proportions of CD performed during 12 months (April 2009-March 2010) before implementation of the CARE strategy versus 12 months after implementation (April 2012-March 2013) at Markham Stouffville Hospital and 36 hospitals of the same level in the same province. At the intervention hospital, 30.3% (964/3181) of women underwent CD in 2009-2010, compared with 26.4% (803/3045) in 2012-2013 (difference -3.9%, PImplementation of the CARE strategy reduced rates of CD among the target population. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  7. Recombinant Endolysins as Potential Therapeutics against Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Current Status of Research and Novel Delivery Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad Kashani, Hamed; Schmelcher, Mathias; Sabzalipoor, Hamed; Seyed Hosseini, Elahe; Moniri, Rezvan

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens of humans and animals, where it frequently colonizes skin and mucosal membranes. It is of major clinical importance as a nosocomial pathogen and causative agent of a wide array of diseases. Multidrug-resistant strains have become increasingly prevalent and represent a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. For this reason, novel strategies to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens are urgently needed. Bacteriophage-derived enzymes, so-called endolysins, and other peptidoglycan hydrolases with the ability to disrupt cell walls represent possible alternatives to conventional antibiotics. These lytic enzymes confer a high degree of host specificity and could potentially replace or be utilized in combination with antibiotics, with the aim to specifically treat infections caused by Gram-positive drug-resistant bacterial pathogens such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus . LysK is one of the best-characterized endolysins with activity against multiple staphylococcal species. Various approaches to further enhance the antibacterial efficacy and applicability of endolysins have been demonstrated. These approaches include the construction of recombinant endolysin derivatives and the development of novel delivery strategies for various applications, such as the production of endolysins in lactic acid bacteria and their conjugation to nanoparticles. These novel strategies are a major focus of this review. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. [Neurological disorders and the blood-brain barrier. Strategies and limitations for drug delivery to the brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Alazne; Álvarez, Antonia; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe

    2014-03-01

    The incidence in the central nervous system diseases has increased with a growing elderly population. Unfortunately, conventional treatments used to treat the mentioned diseases are frequently ineffective due to the presence of the blood brain barrier. To illustrate the blood-brain barrier properties that limit drug transport into the brain and the main strategies employed to treat neurologic disorders. The blood-brain barrier is mainly composed of a specialized microvascular endothelium and of glial cells. It constitutes a valuable tool to separate the central nervous system from the rest of the body. Nevertheless, it also represents an obstacle to the delivery of therapeutic drugs to the brain. To be effective, drugs must reach their target in the brain. On one hand, therapeutic agents could be designed to be able to cross the blood brain barrier. On the other hand, drug delivery systems could be employed to facilitate the therapeutic agents' entry into the central nervous system. In vivo models of neurological diseases, in addition to in vitro models of the blood brain barrier, have been widely employed for the evaluation of drugs utilized to treat central nervous system diseases.

  9. Strategies for academic leadership towards increasing productivity in higher education institutions; business education case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iordache-Platis Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Higher education institutions face a lot of challenges in the contemporary context. Labour market is s strict evaluator of the graduates’ competences and skills and thus, of the study programmes. An attractive university is a university with a large demand for studies, with many partners and projects, with a high visibility at national and international level, with a considerable research production. At present, the lack of resources characterizes the difficult situation for decision making process which is a real challenge for the academic leadership. On one hand, the competiton requires the need of continuous development and of differentiation strategy while on the other hand, insufficient financial, human, material, informational resources, including time as a specific restriction generate huge opportunities and threats for institutions. Possibilities of being efficient are to be explored. The aim of this paper is to explore possible strategies to increase productivity in higher education institutions. Main objectives of the study are the following: a. to define productivity in higher education institutions, on the basis of the academics’ perceptions, as well as of students’ perceptions; b. to provide a diagnosis of the current state of the prductivity in higher education institutions; c. to contribute to new clarifications on leadership strategies for increasing productivity in higher education institutions. Based on the literature review, the paper reveal proper answers to questions, such as: what is productivity, how is it measured, what is its impact, which are the increasing possibilities in business context. The study methodology is also based on a questionnaire dedicated to the two groups of respondents – academics and students. Their perceptions are then compared in order to reveal the common view. Main output of the research include: a. A new conceptual clarification for the productivity in higher education institutions; b. A

  10. Global oral health inequalities: task group--implementation and delivery of oral health strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheiham, A; Alexander, D; Cohen, L

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the shortcomings of present approaches to reduce oral diseases and inequalities, details the importance of social determinants, and links that to research needs and policies on implementation of strategies to reduce oral health inequalities. Inequalities in health...... their environment. There is a dearth of oral health research on social determinants that cause health-compromising behaviors and on risk factors common to some chronic diseases. The gap between what is known and implemented by other health disciplines and the dental fraternity needs addressing. To re-orient oral...... strategies tailored to determinants and needs of each group along the social gradient. Approaches focusing mainly on downstream lifestyle and behavioral factors have limited success in reducing health inequalities. They fail to address social determinants, for changing people's behaviors requires changing...

  11. Directed antigen delivery as a vaccine strategy for an intracellular bacterial pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, H. G. Archie; Alberti-Segui, Christine; Montfort, Megan J.; Berkowitz, Nathan D.; Higgins, Darren E.

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a vaccine strategy for generating an attenuated strain of an intracellular bacterial pathogen that, after uptake by professional antigen-presenting cells, does not replicate intracellularly and is readily killed. However, after degradation of the vaccine strain within the phagolysosome, target antigens are released into the cytosol for endogenous processing and presentation for stimulation of CD8+ effector T cells. Applying this strategy to the model intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, we show that an intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain is cleared rapidly in normal and immunocompromised animals, yet antigen-specific CD8+ effector T cells are stimulated after immunization. Furthermore, animals immunized with the intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain are resistant to lethal challenge with a virulent WT strain of L. monocytogenes. These studies suggest a general strategy for developing safe and effective, attenuated intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strains for stimulation of protective immune responses against intracellular bacterial pathogens. CD8+ T cell | replication-deficient | Listeria monocytogenes

  12. Japanese manufacturers' cost-performance marketing strategy for the delivery of solar photovoltaic homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, M.

    2005-02-01

    Japanese manufacturers have been gaining a global reputation for their design approaches to industrialized housing, which is often equipped with PV systems. Homes are produced on a cost performance marketing strategy. In 2004, 13.7 per cent of the 1,160,083 houses built in Japan were pre-fabricated. The pre-fabricated housing industry has been given considerable government support. In response to growing demands for sustainable housing, the government has implemented promotional programs aiming to support the installations of photovoltaic systems. Details of various programs were presented, including: value-added production; housing sustainability; PV rooftop systems; and a mass custom design approach. It was concluded that the cost performance marketing strategy has a significant impact on production and design approaches. However, quality-oriented production may also result in successful commercialization of innovative housing. The Japanese marketing approach allows consumers to understand the added value of packaged innovations rather than the cost. It was suggested that this marketing strategy should be examined further, when considering approaches to innovative housing in other countries. 38 refs., 3 figs

  13. Japanese manufacturers' cost-performance marketing strategy for the delivery of solar photovoltaic homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, M.

    2005-02-01

    Japanese manufacturers have been gaining a global reputation for their design approaches to industrialized housing, which is often equipped with PV systems. Homes are produced on a cost performance marketing strategy. In 2004, 13.7 per cent of the 1,160,083 houses built in Japan were pre-fabricated. The pre-fabricated housing industry has been given considerable government support. In response to growing demands for sustainable housing, the government has implemented promotional programs aiming to support the installations of photovoltaic systems. Details of various programs were presented, including: value-added production; housing sustainability; PV rooftop systems; and a mass custom design approach. It was concluded that the cost performance marketing strategy has a significant impact on production and design approaches. However, quality-oriented production may also result in successful commercialization of innovative housing. The Japanese marketing approach allows consumers to understand the added value of packaged innovations rather than the cost. It was suggested that this marketing strategy should be examined further, when considering approaches to innovative housing in other countries. 38 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Transferrin-facilitated lipofection gene delivery strategy: characterization of the transfection complexes and intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshee, Nirmal; Bastola, Dhundy R; Cheng, Pi-Wan

    2002-11-01

    We previously showed that mixing transferrin with a cationic liposome prior to the addition of DNA, greatly enhanced the lipofection efficiency. Here, we report characterization of the transfection complexes in formulations prepared with transferrin, lipofectin, and DNA (pCMVlacZ) in various formulations. DNA in all the formulations that contain lipofectin was resistant to DNase I treatment. Transfection experiments performed in Panc 1 cells showed that the standard formulation, which was prepared by adding DNA to a mixture of transferrin and lipofectin, yielded highest transfection efficiency. There was no apparent difference in zeta potential among these formulations, but the most efficient formulation contained complexes with a mean diameter of three to four times that of liposome and the complexes in other gene delivery formulations. Transmission electron microscopic examination of the standard transfection complexes formulated using gold-labeled transferrin showed extended circular DNA decorated with transferrin as compared to extensively condensed DNA found in lipofectin-DNA complexes and heterogeneous structures in other formulations. By confocal microscopy, DNA and transferrin were found to colocalize at the perinuclear space and in the nucleus, suggesting cotransportation intracellularly, including nuclear transport. We propose that transferrin enhances the transfection efficiency of the standard lipofection formulation by preventing DNA condensation, and facilitating endocytosis and nuclear targeting.

  15. Preparation and characterization of docetaxel self-nanoemulsifying powders (SNEPs): A strategy for improved oral delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkavalli, Sharath; Eedara, Basanth Babu; Janga, Karthik Yadav; Velpula, Ashok; Jukanti, Raju; Bandari, Suresh [St. Peter' s Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Warangal (India)

    2016-03-15

    Liquid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (L-SNEDDS) of docetaxel were prepared using varying ratios of Capmul PG 8 NF (oil), Cremophor EL (surfactant) and Transcutol-P (co-surfactant). The optimized L-SNEDDS (L{sub 11}) was transformed into self-nanoemulsifying powder (SNEP) by physical adsorption on to Neusilin US2 and evaluated for dissolution behavior, in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo oral bioavailability. Optimized L-SNEDDS (L{sub 11}) composed of 50% of oil, 41.7% of surfactant and 8.3% co-surfactant produced stable emulsion with smaller globules (43±3 nm). In vitro dissolution studies showed the rapid drug release within 5min (95.42±1%) from SNEP{sub N}. In vitro cytotoxicity assessed by the MTT assay using MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines revealed that L-SNEDDS significantly reduced the IC{sub 50} value and was 2.3 times lower than the pure docetaxel. Further, the oral bioavailability studies in male Wistar rats showed higher C{sub max} values following treatment with SNEP{sub N} (0.98±0.13 μg/mL) and L-SNEDDS (1.09± 0.06 μg/mL) compared to pure docetaxel (0.37±0.04 μg/mL).

  16. Multiple-robot drug delivery strategy through coordinated teams of microswimmers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kei Cheang, U; Kim, Min Jun, E-mail: mkim@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Lee, Kyoungwoo [Department of Computer Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Julius, Anak Agung [Department of Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2014-08-25

    Untethered robotic microswimmers are very promising to significantly improve various types of minimally invasive surgeries by offering high accuracy at extremely small scales. A prime example is drug delivery, for which a large number of microswimmers is required to deliver sufficient dosages to target sites. For this reason, the controllability of groups of microswimmers is essential. In this paper, we demonstrate simultaneous control of multiple geometrically similar but magnetically different microswimmers using a single global rotating magnetic field. By exploiting the differences in their magnetic properties, we triggered different swimming behaviors from the microswimmers by controlling the frequency and the strength of the global field, for example, one swim and the other does not while exposed to the same control input. Our results show that the balance between the applied magnetic torque and the hydrodynamic torque can be exploited for simultaneous control of two microswimmers to swim in opposite directions, with different velocities, and with similar velocities. This work will serve to establish important concepts for future developments of control systems to manipulate multiple magnetically actuated microswimmers and a step towards using swarms of microswimmers as viable workforces for complex operations.

  17. Multiple-robot drug delivery strategy through coordinated teams of microswimmers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kei Cheang, U; Kim, Min Jun; Lee, Kyoungwoo; Julius, Anak Agung

    2014-01-01

    Untethered robotic microswimmers are very promising to significantly improve various types of minimally invasive surgeries by offering high accuracy at extremely small scales. A prime example is drug delivery, for which a large number of microswimmers is required to deliver sufficient dosages to target sites. For this reason, the controllability of groups of microswimmers is essential. In this paper, we demonstrate simultaneous control of multiple geometrically similar but magnetically different microswimmers using a single global rotating magnetic field. By exploiting the differences in their magnetic properties, we triggered different swimming behaviors from the microswimmers by controlling the frequency and the strength of the global field, for example, one swim and the other does not while exposed to the same control input. Our results show that the balance between the applied magnetic torque and the hydrodynamic torque can be exploited for simultaneous control of two microswimmers to swim in opposite directions, with different velocities, and with similar velocities. This work will serve to establish important concepts for future developments of control systems to manipulate multiple magnetically actuated microswimmers and a step towards using swarms of microswimmers as viable workforces for complex operations.

  18. Nanomedicine and drug delivery strategies for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takedatsu, Hidetoshi; Mitsuyama, Keiichi; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-10-28

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are two important categories of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Because the precise mechanisms of the inflammation and immune responses in IBD have not been fully elucidated, the treatment of IBD primarily aims to inhibit the pathogenic factors of the inflammatory cascade. Inconsistencies exist regarding the response and side effects of the drugs that are currently used to treat IBD. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nanomedicine might be advantageous for the treatment of intestinal inflammation because nano-sized molecules can effectively penetrate epithelial and inflammatory cells. We reviewed nanomedicine treatments, such as the use of small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, and anti-inflammatory molecules with delivery systems in experimental colitis models and clinical trials for IBD based on a systematic search. The efficacy and usefulness of the treatments reviewed in this manuscript have been demonstrated in experimental colitis models and clinical trials using various types of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine is expected to become a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of IBD.

  19. Optimizing delivery of recovery-oriented online self-management strategies for bipolar disorder: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitan, Nuwan D; Michalak, Erin E; Berk, Lesley; Berk, Michael; Murray, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Self-management is emerging as a viable alternative to difficult-to-access psychosocial treatments for bipolar disorder (BD), and has particular relevance to recovery-related goals around empowerment and personal meaning. This review examines data and theory on BD self-management from a recovery-oriented perspective, with a particular focus on optimizing low-intensity delivery of self-management tools via the web. A critical evaluation of various literatures was undertaken. Literatures on recovery, online platforms, and self-management in mental health and BD are reviewed. The literature suggests that the self-management approach aligns with the recovery framework. However, studies have identified a number of potential barriers to the utilization of self-management programs for BD and it has been suggested that utilizing an online environment may be an effective way to surmount many of these barriers. Online self-management programs for BD are rapidly developing, and in parallel the recovery perspective is becoming the dominant paradigm for mental health services worldwide, so research is urgently required to assess the efficacy and safety of optimization methods such as professional and/or peer support, tailoring and the development of 'online communities'. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Integrated Medical-Dental Delivery Systems: Models in a Changing Environment and Their Implications for Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judith A; Snyder, John J; Gesko, David S; Helgeson, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Models and systems of the dental care delivery system are changing. Solo practice is no longer the only alternative for graduating dentists. Over half of recent graduates are employees, and more than ever before, dentists are practicing in groups. This trend is expected to increase over the next 25 years. This article examines various models of dental care delivery, explains why it is important to practice in integrated medical-dental teams, and defines person-centered care, contrasting it with patient-centered care. Systems of care in which teams are currently practicing integrated oral health care delivery are described, along with speculation on the future of person-centered care and the team approach. Critical steps in the education of dental and other health care professionals and the development of clinical models of care in moving forward are considered. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  1. Coverage, adherence and costs of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in children employing different delivery strategies in Jasikan, Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Patouillard

    Full Text Available Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in children (IPTc involves the administration of a course of anti-malarial drugs at specified time intervals to children at risk of malaria regardless of whether or not they are known to be infected. IPTc provides a high level of protection against uncomplicated and severe malaria, with monthly sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine plus amodiaquine (SP&AQ and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine plus piperaquine being the most efficacious regimens. A key challenge is the identification of a cost-effective delivery strategy.A community randomized trial was undertaken in Jasikan district, Ghana to assess IPTc effectiveness and costs using SP&AQ delivered in three different ways. Twelve villages were randomly selected to receive IPTc from village health workers (VHWs or facility-based nurses working at health centres' outpatient departments (OPD or EPI outreach clinics. Children aged 3 to 59 months-old received one IPT course (three doses in May, June, September and October. Effectiveness was measured in terms of children covered and adherent to a course and delivery costs were calculated in financial and economic terms using an ingredient approach from the provider perspective.The economic cost per child receiving at least the first dose of all 4 courses was US$4.58 when IPTc was delivered by VHWs, US$4.93 by OPD nurses and US$ 5.65 by EPI nurses. The unit economic cost of receiving all 3 doses of all 4 courses was US$7.56 and US$8.51 when IPTc was delivered by VHWs or facility-based nurses respectively. The main cost driver for the VHW delivery was supervision, reflecting resources used for travelling to more remote communities rather than more intense supervision, and for OPD and EPI delivery, it was the opportunity cost of the time spent by nurses in dispensing IPTc.VHWs achieve higher IPTc coverage and adherence at lower costs than facility-based nurses in Jasikan district, Ghana.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00119132.

  2. TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY USING EDUCATIONAL GAMES AND GAMIFICATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Rafael de Oliveira Silva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biotechnology is a new bachelor degree in UFPA, and has been stablished with excellency in the state of Pará. However, there is the need to promote comprehension and learning in Biochemistry, as well as interdisciplinarity, that is an essential part of biotechnology. OBJECTIVES:  To increase learning and interdisciplinarity, educational games were used as tools. The students were instigated to develop educational games in different topics of energy metabolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The games were developed to be used in any teaching environment, since they were made with low-cost and accessible materials. This strategy was applied in three semesters in different Biochemistry classes, between 2012 and 2014. The best games in each class were used in following semesters. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Since the first semester, the failing rates dropped 15% compared to the previous semester, in which educational games were not used. An increase in learning (by observation could be noticed, including comprehension of metabolic pathways and their conections. Twenty games were developed in three semesters, and four of them are still being improved and used in other classes. The participant students answered a questionnaire, in which 47% defined the games as “Relaxing and Instigating”, 33% said the games “Accomplished their didactic and educational role” and 54% said they would recommend the use of these games as a reviewing activity. At the moment, another approach is being used to teach Biochemistry – Gamification, which uses elements found in games, as conflict, cooperation, rules and fun, to improve students’ motivation and engagement. CONCLUSION: As a partial result, there was greater in-class interest and engagement, better comprehension of the course content and the activities gave the students the opportunity to work in groups, to think critically about the themes and to develop opinions based on interdisciplinar and formal

  3. Developing Marketing Higher Education Strategies Based on Students’ Satisfaction Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Orîndaru

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The educational system worldwide is currently under the spotlight as it shows significant signs of an ongoing crisis in its search for resources, visibility in the crowded market and significance to the ever-changing society. Within this framework, higher education institutions (HEIs are taking significant actions for maintaining students as clients of their educational services. As competition on this market is becoming stronger, HEIs face difficulties in keeping students, leading them to a continuous evaluation of student satisfaction indicators. Beyond HEIs’ managers, researchers in marketing higher education have contributed to the development of a comprehensive literature where still very few have forwarded a longitudinal research model for student satisfaction evaluation despite the need for such approaches. Given this context, the current paper presents a first step towards a longitudinal study as it displays, in a compare and contrast vision, the results of two different quantitative research projects developed in the same student community, with the same objective, but conducted in two different years. Among the most significant results of this research refer to an important decline in students’ satisfaction with a significant increase in the number of students that have a neutral perception. This is highly expected to determine a major impact on university’s overall performance and, therefore, it constitutes a strong argument for determining underlying causes, and especially developing the appropriate marketing strategies to tackle with these issues. Based on this result and other similar research outcomes, strategic and tactic recommendations are granted in the final part of this paper.

  4. Educational strategies to reduce risk: a choice of social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica La Longa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study develops the critical reflections of the activities for information, training and education that have been conducted by a group of researchers of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia in recent years. In particular, from an epistemological point of view, our analysis involves: (i science outreach, the link between science and the world; (ii science teaching and its role in the contact between science and schools; and (iii risk education, seen as a process that can develop a culture of risk in relation to the territory in which we live. These issues are critically analyzed on the basis of experience gained since 1995. The educational methodologies tested in ‘peacetime’ (in the absence of seismic events with the EDURISK Project are compared with those experienced during an emergency in Abruzzo, Italy. Today, we increasingly refer to prevention as the primary strategy of defense against risk. However, very often the responsibility of prevention falls on others, such as the government, institutions and/or local authorities. The citizens then perceive themselves as powerless against the inevitability of natural events, and they refer to these ‘rulers’ for the implementation of effective prevention policies. So, as researchers, what are the most effective actions we can take to influence risk reduction and to motivate the choices of the people? Must the effectiveness of our interventions be based on scientific information or on specific training, or must it be reached through the development of values, actions and awareness? Must our interventions be oriented and developed to inform, to train or to educate?

  5. Comparison between Synchronous and Asynchronous Instructional Delivery Method of Training Programme on In-Service Physical Educators' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanouilidou, Kyriaki; Derri, Vassiliki; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Kyrgiridis, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the influences of a training programme's instructional delivery method (synchronous and asynchronous) on Greek in-service physical educators' cognitive understanding on student assessment. Forty nine participants were randomly divided into synchronous, asynchronous, and control group. The experimental groups…

  6. The Use of MOOCs in Transnational Higher Education for Accreditation of Prior Learning, Programme Delivery, and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annabi, Carrie Amani; Wilkins, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how, and the extent to which, massive open online courses (MOOCs) might be used in the accreditation of students' prior learning, in programme delivery at international branch campuses, and for lecturers' professional development (PD) in transnational higher education.…

  7. Structure, Content, Delivery, Service, and Outcomes: Quality e-Learning in higher education

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    Colla J. MacDonald

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the need for quality e-Learning experiences. We used the Demand-Driven Learning Model (MacDonald, Stodel, Farres, Breithaupt, and Gabriel, 2001 to evaluate an online Masters in Education course. Multiple data collection methods were used to understand the experiences of stakeholders in this case study: the learners, design team, and facilitators. We found that all five dimensions of the model (structure, content, delivery, service, and outcomes must work in concert to implement a quality e-Learning course. Key themes include evolving learner needs, the search for connection, becoming an able e-participant, valued interactions, social construction of content, integration of delivery partners, and mindful weighing of benefits and trade-offs. By sharing insights into what is needed to design and deliver an e-Learning experience, our findings add to the growing knowledge of online learning. Using this model to evaluate perceptions of quality by key stakeholders has led to insights and recommendations on the Demand Driven Learning Model itself which may be useful for researchers in this area and strengthen the model. Quality has been defined in terms of the design of the e-Learning experience, the contextualized experience of learners, and evidence of learning outcomes (Carr and Carr, 2000; Jung 2000; Salmon, 2000. Quality and design of e-Learning courses, however, are sometimes compromised in an “ . . . effort to simply get something up and running��� in response to pressing consumer demands (Dick, 1996, p. 59. Educators and researchers have voiced concern over the lack of rigorous evaluation studies of e-Learning programs (e.g., Arbaugh, 2000; Howell, Saba, Lindsay, and Williams, 2004; Lockyer, Patterson, and Harper, 1999; Robinson, 2001. McGorry (2003 adds, “although the number of courses being delivered via the Internet is increasing rapidly, our knowledge of what makes these courses effective learning experiences

  8. Pricing Strategies and Models for the Provision of Digitized Texts in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Rachel; Oppenheim, Charles; Rubbert, Iris

    2002-01-01

    Describes research into charging mechanisms for the delivery of digitized texts to higher education students in the United Kingdom and discusses the need for a satisfactory pricing model. Explains the HERON (Higher Education Resources On-Demand) and PELICAN (Pricing Experiment Library Information Cooperative Network) projects and considers…

  9. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for gene therapy: a “ménage à trois” among nucleic acids, materials, and the biological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzoli, Daniele; Candiani, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Gene delivery is the science of transferring genetic material into cells by means of a vector to alter cellular function or structure at a molecular level. In this context, a number of nucleic acid-based drugs have been proposed and experimented so far and, as they act on distinct steps along the gene transcription–translation pathway, specific delivery strategies are required to elicit the desired outcome. Cationic lipids and polymers, collectively known as non-viral delivery systems, have thus made their breakthrough in basic and medical research. Albeit they are promising alternatives to viral vectors, their therapeutic application is still rather limited as high transfection efficiencies are normally associated to adverse cytotoxic side effects. In this scenario, drawing inspiration from processes naturally occurring in vivo, major strides forward have been made in the development of more effective materials for gene delivery applications. Specifically, smart vectors sensitive to a variety of physiological stimuli such as cell enzymes, redox status, and pH are substantially changing the landscape of gene delivery by helping to overcome some of the systemic and intracellular barriers that viral vectors naturally evade. Herein, after summarizing the state-of-the-art information regarding the use of nucleic acids as drugs, we review the main bottlenecks still limiting the overall effectiveness of non-viral gene delivery systems. Finally, we provide a critical outline of emerging stimuli-responsive strategies and discuss challenges still existing on the road toward conceiving more efficient and safer multifunctional vectors.

  10. Plagiarism in the Context of Education and Evolving Detection Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Nurmashev, Bekaidar; Seksenbayev, Bakhytzhan; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Kitas, George D

    2017-08-01

    Plagiarism may take place in any scientific journals despite currently employed anti-plagiarism tools. The absence of widely acceptable definitions of research misconduct and reliance solely on similarity checks do not allow journal editors to prevent most complex cases of recycling of scientific information and wasteful, or 'predatory,' publishing. This article analyses Scopus-based publication activity and evidence on poor writing, lack of related training, emerging anti-plagiarism strategies, and new forms of massive wasting of resources by publishing largely recycled items, which evade the 'red flags' of similarity checks. In some non-Anglophone countries 'copy-and-paste' writing still plagues pre- and postgraduate education. Poor research management, absence of courses on publication ethics, and limited access to quality sources confound plagiarism as a cross-cultural and multidisciplinary phenomenon. Over the past decade, the advent of anti-plagiarism software checks has helped uncover elementary forms of textual recycling across journals. But such a tool alone proves inefficient for preventing complex forms of plagiarism. Recent mass retractions of plagiarized articles by reputable open-access journals point to critical deficiencies of current anti-plagiarism software that do not recognize manipulative paraphrasing and editing. Manipulative editing also finds its way to predatory journals, ignoring the adherence to publication ethics and accommodating nonsense plagiarized items. The evolving preventive strategies are increasingly relying on intelligent (semantic) digital technologies, comprehensively evaluating texts, keywords, graphics, and reference lists. It is the right time to enforce adherence to global editorial guidance and implement a comprehensive anti-plagiarism strategy by helping all stakeholders of scholarly communication. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  11. On the Way to the Best Strategy in Literacy Education: A Journey of Philosophical Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheu-Jey George

    2011-01-01

    The search for the best strategy in literacy education is a lingering phenomenon. From time to time one strategy is claimed to work best, only to be critically challenged and replaced by another. There is always debate about what the best strategy is. The belief that there is supposed to be only one best strategy is not consistent with the fact…

  12. Case series of feasibility considerations that impact operational delivery strategy in the highly competitive rheumatoid arthritis space in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Karen Wai,1 Lisa Marie Saldanha,1 Elvira Zenaida Lansang,1 Saumya Nayak,1 Anish Sule,2 Ken J Lee31Feasibility and Site Identification Asia, Quintiles East Asia Pte Ltd, Singapore; 2Feasibility and Site Identification India, Quintiles India, Mumbai, India; 3Site Services Asia, Quintiles East Asia Pte Ltd, SingaporeAbstract: The rheumatoid arthritis (RA clinical trial space is very competitive, and recruiting and retaining subjects is of critical importance. Feasibility studies are a central component of ensuring successful recruitment and retention. A feasibility study is an assessment of the practicality of a proposed study protocol, with the goal of understanding challenges and providing risk mitigation strategies leading to better subject enrolment and study start-up should the assessment be favorable. This paper presents findings from a retrospective case series of RA feasibilities, describing important parameters to consider in the highly competitive RA space in Asia. Key parameters identified and discussed are how decisions on clinical development strategy necessitate changes in the clinical operational delivery strategy, with focus on changes in inclusion and exclusion criteria and patient contribution load; how small the patient population becomes when the clinical trial needs to target the patient population that is refractory to standard therapy; regulatory timelines; and the competitive clinical trial landscape. Feasibility assessments are a snapshot in time exercise. Multiple parameters change over time, and, particularly in a space that has become competitive for subjects, one cannot rely on one static feasibility assessment to predict trial performance accurately. Continuous feasibility assessment will also provide insight into the resourcing needs on the part of the sponsor, contract research organization, and investigative site.Keywords: site selection, country selection, clinical operations, risk management, recruitment rates

  13. Understanding Effective Delivery of Patient and Family Education in Pediatric Oncology: A Systematic Review from the Children's Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Cheryl C.; Laing, Catherine M.; Herring, Ruth Anne; Tena, Nancy; Leonardelli, Adrianne; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna

    2016-01-01

    A diagnosis of childhood cancer is a life-changing event for the entire family. Parents must not only deal with the cancer diagnosis but also acquire new knowledge and skills to safely care for their child at home. Best practices for delivery of patient/family education after a new diagnosis of childhood cancer are currently unknown. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the existing body of evidence to determine the current state of knowledge regarding the delivery of education to newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients and families. Eighty-three articles regarding educational methods, content, influencing factors, and interventions for newly diagnosed pediatric patients with cancer or other chronic illnesses were systematically identified, summarized, and appraised according to the GRADE criteria. Based on the evidence, ten recommendations for practice were identified. These recommendations address delivery methods, content, influencing factors, and educational interventions for parents and siblings. Transferring these recommendations into practice may enhance the quality of education delivered by healthcare providers, and received by patients and families following a new diagnosis of childhood cancer. PMID:27450361

  14. Environmental education strategies for decentralized schools in the Colombian educative system: the Medellin experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunia S. Rentería

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental education is a condition to enable an attitudinal and aptitudinal generation of change, a condition that facilitates the balance between man and his surroundings. Environmental education needs the support of almost every discipline. In order to solve environmental problems, one must count on the active participation of a wide set of people and institutions. This article examines environmental education in Colombia focusing on the case of training programs, making emphasis on a case study that took place in Medellín, capital of the department of Antioquia. Results show there is a lack of clear conceptualization about the reasons and ultimate purposes concerning why environmental education is finally accomplished. That situation has conducted to the formulation of objectives and strategies that are too general to be properly fulfilled, and the implementation of detailed, and isolated actions.Lack of coordination between institutions and groups has resulted in duplicity of functions and efforts, which in turn result in a far from rational use of scarce resources. The conclusion is that environmental education in Colombia is still inefficient and must advance to higher levels, taking into account these three main perspectives: environmental, educative and pedagogic.

  15. Perceptions and Educational Strategies of Louisiana Agricultural Education Teachers When Working with Students with Special Needs

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    Kristin S. Stair

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A teacher’s willingness to accept inclusion has been identified as an indicator of the quality of experience that a student with special needs will have in the classroom The purpose of this exploratory study was twofold: (1 to describe the overall perceptions of working with students with special needs and (2 to determine how teachers in Louisiana are currently working with students with special needs.  A total of 152 teachers attended the Louisiana agricultural education teacher’s summer conference with 43% completing a three part survey instrument.  Data analysis indicated that teachers are confident in their ability to work with students with special needs and they agree that they can incorporate various areas of inclusion within their programs. However, they disagreed that they have received adequate in-service opportunities related to special education.  Regarding educational strategies, teachers in this study identified all of the given inclusion strategies as being used regularly in their programs with the exception of tutoring after school.  They also identified these educational practices as being highly effective within their programs. Due to the exploratory nature of this study, additional research is recommended to further investigate the in-service and training needs of teachers in Louisiana.

  16. Targeting Strategies for the Combination Treatment of Cancer Using Drug Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, Janel; Jadia, Rahul; Velpurisiva, Praveena; Gad, Aniket; Paliwal, Shailee; Rai, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells have characteristics of acquired and intrinsic resistances to chemotherapy treatment—due to the hostile tumor microenvironment—that create a significant challenge for effective therapeutic regimens. Multidrug resistance, collateral toxicity to normal cells, and detrimental systemic side effects present significant obstacles, necessitating alternative and safer treatment strategies. Traditional administration of chemotherapeutics has demonstrated minimal success due to the non-specificity of action, uptake and rapid clearance by the immune system, and subsequent metabolic alteration and poor tumor penetration. Nanomedicine can provide a more effective approach to targeting cancer by focusing on the vascular, tissue, and cellular characteristics that are unique to solid tumors. Targeted methods of treatment using nanoparticles can decrease the likelihood of resistant clonal populations of cancerous cells. Dual encapsulation of chemotherapeutic drug allows simultaneous targeting of more than one characteristic of the tumor. Several first-generation, non-targeted nanomedicines have received clinical approval starting with Doxil® in 1995. However, more than two decades later, second-generation or targeted nanomedicines have yet to be approved for treatment despite promising results in pre-clinical studies. This review highlights recent studies using targeted nanoparticles for cancer treatment focusing on approaches that target either the tumor vasculature (referred to as ‘vascular targeting’), the tumor microenvironment (‘tissue targeting’) or the individual cancer cells (‘cellular targeting’). Recent studies combining these different targeting methods are also discussed in this review. Finally, this review summarizes some of the reasons for the lack of clinical success in the field of targeted nanomedicines. PMID:29036899

  17. Targeting Strategies for the Combination Treatment of Cancer Using Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janel Kydd

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells have characteristics of acquired and intrinsic resistances to chemotherapy treatment—due to the hostile tumor microenvironment—that create a significant challenge for effective therapeutic regimens. Multidrug resistance, collateral toxicity to normal cells, and detrimental systemic side effects present significant obstacles, necessitating alternative and safer treatment strategies. Traditional administration of chemotherapeutics has demonstrated minimal success due to the non-specificity of action, uptake and rapid clearance by the immune system, and subsequent metabolic alteration and poor tumor penetration. Nanomedicine can provide a more effective approach to targeting cancer by focusing on the vascular, tissue, and cellular characteristics that are unique to solid tumors. Targeted methods of treatment using nanoparticles can decrease the likelihood of resistant clonal populations of cancerous cells. Dual encapsulation of chemotherapeutic drug allows simultaneous targeting of more than one characteristic of the tumor. Several first-generation, non-targeted nanomedicines have received clinical approval starting with Doxil® in 1995. However, more than two decades later, second-generation or targeted nanomedicines have yet to be approved for treatment despite promising results in pre-clinical studies. This review highlights recent studies using targeted nanoparticles for cancer treatment focusing on approaches that target either the tumor vasculature (referred to as ‘vascular targeting’, the tumor microenvironment (‘tissue targeting’ or the individual cancer cells (‘cellular targeting’. Recent studies combining these different targeting methods are also discussed in this review. Finally, this review summarizes some of the reasons for the lack of clinical success in the field of targeted nanomedicines.

  18. Strategy for Nuclear Technology Education at Uppsala University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterlund, M.; Hakansson, A.; Tengborn, E.

    2010-01-01

    After the TMI accident 1979, and later the Tjernobyl accident, the future of nuclear power was vividly debated in Sweden. The negative public opinion governed a number of political decisions that marked an ambition to out-phase nuclear power prior to 2010. Due to this, the student's interest in nuclear technology ceased and together with the fact that public funding to nuclear technology was withdrawn, academic research and education within the field were effectively dismounted. In the beginning of 1990 it became clear to the society that nuclear power could not easily be closed down and the issue of the future competence supply to the nuclear industry was initiated. In the mid-nineties the situation became acute due to the fact that personnel in the nuclear industry started to retire in an increasing pace necessitating measures to be taken in order to secure the future operation of the nuclear power plants. In the year 2000, the Swedish nuclear power plants, Westinghouse Electric Sweden and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority embarked a project together with the three major universities in the field, Uppsala University, The Royal Institute of Technology and Chalmers University of Technology. The aim of this project was to define a financial platform for reconstructing the Swedish research and education in nuclear technology. The project, named the Swedish Centre for Nuclear Technology (SKC), has during a decade been the major financier to nuclear technology research and education. Using funding from SKC, Uppsala University formulated a strategy along two tracks: 1) Instead of creating ambitious master programs in nuclear technology, the already existing engineering programs in a wide range of fields were utilized to expose as many students as possible to nuclear technology. 2) A program was initiated together with the nuclear industry aiming at educating newly employed personnel. The result is encouraging; starting from essentially zero, typically 100

  19. Differential use of learning strategies in first-year higher education: the impact of personality, academic motivation, and teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donche, Vincent; De Maeyer, Sven; Coertjens, Liesje; Van Daal, Tine; Van Petegem, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Although the evidence in support of the variability of students' learning strategies has expanded in recent years, less is known about the explanatory base of these individual differences in terms of the joint influences of personal and contextual characteristics. Previous studies have often investigated how student learning is associated with either personal or contextual factors. This study takes an integrative research perspective into account and examines the joint effects of personality, academic motivation, and teaching strategies on students' learning strategies in a same educational context in first-year higher education. In this study, 1,126 undergraduate students and 90 lecturers from eight professional bachelor programmes in a university college participated. Self-report measures were used to measure students' personality, academic motivation, and learning strategies. Students' processing and regulation strategies are mapped using the Inventory of Learning Styles. Key characteristics of more content-focused versus learning-focused teaching strategies were measured. Multivariate multi-level analysis was used to take the nested data structure and interrelatedness of learning strategies into account. Different personality traits (openness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism) and academic motivation (amotivation, autonomous, and controlled motivation) were found to be independently associated with student learning strategies. Besides these student characteristics, also teaching strategies were found to be directly associated with learning strategies. The study makes clear that the impact of teaching strategies on learning strategies in first-year higher education cannot be overlooked nor overinterpreted, due to the importance of students' personality and academic motivation which also partly explain why students learn the way they do. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  20. Strategies of Educational Planning. Proceedings of the Annual Conference on the Economics of Education (2nd, Tallahassee, Florida, July, 1968).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Richard H.P., Ed.

    Eight papers focus on strategies for educational planning. In "Policy Formulation and Policy Implementation Relationships in an Educational System," Donald Miller asserts that performance relationships can be explained in terms of an educational system and its environment. Arnold Reisman and Martin Taft present "A Systems Approach…

  1. An effective tumor-targeting strategy utilizing hypoxia-sensitive siRNA delivery system for improved anti-tumor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lin; Fan, Bo; Sun, Ping; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming; Gao, Zhonggao

    2016-10-15

    Hypoxia is a feature of most solid tumors, targeting hypoxia is considered as the best validated yet not extensively exploited strategy in cancer therapy. Here, we reported a novel tumor-targeting strategy using a hypoxia-sensitive siRNA delivery system. In the study, 2-nitroimidazole (NI), a hydrophobic component that can be converted to hydrophilic 2-aminoimidazole (AI) through bioreduction under hypoxic conditions, was conjugated to the alkylated polyethyleneimine (bPEI1.8k-C6) to form amphiphilic bPEI1.8k-C6-NI polycations. bPEI1.8k-C6-NI could self-assemble into micelle-like aggregations in aqueous, which contributed to the improved stability of the bPEI1.8k-C6-NI/siRNA polyplexes, resulted in increased cellular uptake. After being transported into the hypoxic tumor cells, the selective nitro-to-amino reduction would cause structural change and elicit a relatively loose structure to facilitate the siRNA dissociation in the cytoplasm, for enhanced gene silencing efficiency ultimately. Therefore, the conflict between the extracellular stability and the intracellular siRNA release ability of the polyplexes was solved by introducing the hypoxia-responsive unit. Consequently, the survivin-targeted siRNA loaded polyplexes shown remarkable anti-tumor effect not only in hypoxic cells, but also in tumor spheroids and tumor-bearing mice, indicating that the hypoxia-sensitive siRNA delivery system had great potential for tumor-targeted therapy. Hypoxia is one of the most remarkable features of most solid tumors, and targeting hypoxia is considered as the best validated strategy in cancer therapy. However, in the past decades, there were few reports about using this strategy in the drug delivery system, especially in siRNA delivery system. Therefore, we constructed a hypoxia-sensitive siRNA delivery system utilizing a hypoxia-responsive unit, 2-nitroimidazole, by which the unavoidable conflict between improved extracellular stability and promoted intracellular si

  2. Evaluation of gene delivery strategies to efficiently overexpress functional HLA-G on human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana S Boura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC constitutively express low levels of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G, which has been shown to contribute to their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of HLA-G on bone marrow-derived MSC would improve their immunomodulatory function, thus increasing their therapeutic potential. Therefore, we investigated which gene transfer system is best suited for delivering this molecule while maintaining its immunomodulatory effects. We performed a side-by-side comparison between three nonviral plasmid-based platforms (pmax-HLA-G1; MC-HLA-G1; pEP-HLA-G1 and a viral system (Lv-HLA-G1 using gene transfer parameters that yielded similar levels of HLA-G1-expressing MSC. Natural killer (NK cell–mediated lysis assays and T cell proliferation assays showed that MSC modified with the HLA-G1 expressing viral vector had significantly lower susceptibility to NK-lysis and significantly reduced T cell proliferation when compared to nonmodified cells or MSC modified with plasmid. We also show that, in plasmid-modified MSC, an increase in Toll-like receptor (TLR9 expression is the mechanism responsible for the abrogation of HLA-G1's immunomodulatory effect. Although MSC can be efficiently modified to overexpress HLA-G1 using viral and nonviral strategies, only viral-based delivery of HLA-G1 is suitable for improvement of MSC's immunomodulatory properties.

  3. Characterization of the pH and Temperature in the Rabbit, Pig, and Monkey Eye: Key Parameters for the Development of Long-Acting Delivery Ocular Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorget, Florence; Parenteau, Audrey; Carrier, Michel; Lambert, Daniel; Gueorguieva, Ana; Schuetz, Chris; Bantseev, Vlad; Thackaberry, Evan

    2016-09-06

    Many long-acting delivery strategies for ocular indications rely on pH- and/or temperature-driven release of the therapeutic agent and degradation of the drug carrier. Yet, these physiological parameters are poorly characterized in ocular animal models. These strategies aim at reducing the frequency of dosing, which is of particular interest for the treatment of chronic disorders affecting the posterior segment of the eye, such as macular degeneration that warrants monthly or every other month intravitreal injections. We used anesthetized white New Zealand rabbits, Yucatan mini pigs, and cynomolgus monkeys to characterize pH and temperature in several vitreous locations and the central aqueous location. We also established post mortem pH changes in the vitreous. Our data showed regional and species differences, which need to be factored into strategies for developing biodegradable long-acting delivery systems.

  4. Field Geophysics at SAGE: Strategies for Effective Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, L. W.; Baldridge, W. S.; Jiracek, G. R.; Biehler, S.; Ferguson, J. F.; Pellerin, L.; McPhee, D. K.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Hasterok, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) is a unique program of education and research in geophysical field methods for undergraduate and graduate students from any university and for professionals. The core program is held for 4 weeks each summer in New Mexico and for an additional week in the following academic year in San Diego for U.S. undergraduates supported by the NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. Since SAGE was initiated in 1983, 730 students have participated in the program. NSF REU funding for SAGE began in 1990 and 319 REU students have completed SAGE through 2011. The primary objectives of SAGE are to teach the major geophysical exploration methods (seismic, gravity, magnetics, electromagnetics); apply these methods to the solution of specific problems (environmental, archaeological, hydrologic, geologic structure and stratigraphy); gain experience in processing, modeling and interpretation of geophysical data; and integrate the geophysical models and interpretations with geology. Additional objectives of SAGE include conducting research on the Rio Grande rift of northern New Mexico, and providing information on geophysics careers and professional development experiences to SAGE participants. Successful education, field and research strategies that we have implemented over the years include: 1. learn by doing; 2. mix lecture/discussion, field work, data processing and analysis, modeling and interpretation, and presentation of results; 3. a two-tier team approach - method/technique oriented teams and interpretation/integration teams (where each team includes persons representing different methods), provides focus, in-depth study, opportunity for innovation, and promotes teamwork and a multi-disciplinary approach; 4. emphasis on presentations/reports - each team (and all team members) make presentation, each student completes a written report; 5. experiment design discussion - students help design field program and consider

  5. Quality Assurance Strategies of Higher Education in Iraq and Kurdistan: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaghed, Nabeel; Dezaye, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on two different strategies that have been implemented in Iraq to improve quality assurance in the higher education sector in Iraq. One strategy has been developed by the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research in Baghdad. It involved conducting a pilot study at the University of Babylon. This pilot included…

  6. An Art Museum in the Interest of Publicness: A Discussion of Educational Strategies at Tate Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Scheel, Boel

    2018-01-01

    Influenced by needs to legitimise large collections and the position as public institutions, art museums today are searching to develop rigorous public strategies in order to increase numbers of visitors and public impact. Education is part of those strategies, and the need to discuss art education in relation to publicness and criticality arises.…

  7. An active-learning strategies primer for achieving ability-based educational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Brenda L; Peeters, Michael J; Resman-Targoff, Beth H; Karr, Samantha; McBane, Sarah; Kelley, Kristi; Thomas, Tyan; Denetclaw, Tina H

    2011-11-10

    Active learning is an important component of pharmacy education. By engaging students in the learning process, they are better able to apply the knowledge they gain. This paper describes evidence supporting the use of active-learning strategies in pharmacy education and also offers strategies for implementing active learning in pharmacy curricula in the classroom and during pharmacy practice experiences.

  8. Management trajectories in the type 2 diabetes Integrated Delivery System project in Taiwan: accounting for behavioral therapy, nutrition education and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsing-Yi; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Liu, Wen-Ling; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Li, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Chih-Jen; Chang, Chwen-Tzuei; Fuh, Mao-Tsu; Yang, Hung-Jen; Tai, Tong-Yuan; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) assessment is basic to diabetes management. Little is done to describe the whole spectrum of the trajectory, its related temporal patterns of metabolic indices, and comorbidities. This was a longitudinal study. In the Diabetes Management through Integrated Delivery System project in Taiwan, enrollees had diabetes, but no major comorbidities. They were randomized into intensive or conventional education (health, diet and exercise) groups. HbA1c was classified by a groupbased trajectory model on the basis of repeated six-monthly measurements. We analyzed data from 1091 subjects who had at least two measurements on HbA1c. HbA1c exhibited three distinct ranges of low (42-53 mmol/mol), intermediate (64-75 mmol/mol) and high (97 mmol/mol), all of which persisted for 4.5 years regardless of receiving intensive education or not. Temporal changes and a time-group interaction were found for triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C. The high trajectory was associated with the major co-morbidities of retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, stroke, hypoglycemia, and ketoacidosis. Patients in the intensive education group (62.4%), which were equally distributed in the three trajectories, had significantly lower HbA1cs (-0.14%= -1.5 mmol/mol, p=0.026). The intermediate trajectory patients with intensive education had HbA1cs higher than the low trajectory patients with conventional education (β=0.189, p=0.033). Though not significant, a similar pattern was found for DM education in the high group (β=0.223, p=0.154). Novel strategies beyond current education and pharmacotherapeutic regimens are needed to lower HbA1c at least 11 mmol/mol for the high HbA1c group to minimize comorbidities.

  9. Active Learning Methods and Technology: Strategies for Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorey, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The demands in higher education are on the rise. Charged with teaching more content, increased class sizes and engaging students, educators face numerous challenges. In design education, educators are often torn between the teaching of technology and the teaching of theory. Learning the formal concepts of hierarchy, contrast and space provide the…

  10. Structure and strategies in children's educational television: the roles of program type and learning strategies in children's learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linebarger, Deborah L; Piotrowski, Jessica Taylor

    2010-01-01

    Educational TV has been consistently linked to children's learning. In this research, educational TV characteristics were identified, coded, and tested for their influence on children's program-specific comprehension and vocabulary outcomes. Study 1 details a content analysis of TV features including a program's macrostructure (i.e., narrative or expository) and learning strategies embedded in the macrostructure that support learning in print-based contexts. In Study 2, regression analyses were used to predict outcomes involving 71 second and third graders (average age=7.63 years). Strategies were categorized as organizing, rehearsing, elaborating, or affective in function. Outcomes were uniformly higher for narrative macrostructures. Strategies used in narratives predicted relatively homogenous relations across outcomes, whereas strategies in expositories predicted quite heterogeneous relations across outcomes. © 2010 The Authors. Child Development © 2010 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  11. Management of the nuclear knowledge and educational strategies in universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo M, C.

    2012-10-01

    An introduction is made to the topic of management of the nuclear knowledge and recommendations are presented for its implementation as a curricular subject in the universities and institutions that have post-graduate programs in the engineering and/or nuclear sciences area. The necessity of incorporating a wide variety of tools and innovative techniques of teaching (for example, simulators, didactic games in computer, e-learning) that assure that the learning will be given in an efficient and lasting way is projected. Some strategies are listed to attract the best students toward the academic programs in nuclear engineering or related. Given the great multidisciplinary of the personnel of a nuclear power station, and the other facilities of the fuel cycle, the importance is pointed out of providing the nuclear foundations to all the workers and directive with different formation to the nuclear area, in an attractive way so that they obtain and assimilate the nuclear foundations that will allow him to work efficiently and with all security. Finally, also an analysis is presented about the advantages that represent the education nets that integrate people or institutions in the national, regional or international ambit, which have been created to initiative of the IAEA, having as objective to share ideas, information, study programs, courses, software and resources in general that support the formation of human resources of very high quality, required by the nuclear facilities and the research centers on advanced technologies, as well as to implement programs of nuclear development to short, medium and long period in our country. (Author)

  12. Student-Centered Instruction and Academic Achievement: Linking Mechanisms of Educational Inequality to Schools’ Instructional Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran; Andersen, Simon Calmar

    2017-01-01

    educational inequality. We analyze whether the impact of student-centered instructional strategies on academic achievement differs for students with different socioeconomic backgrounds. Results suggest that a student-centered instructional strategy has a negative impact on academic achievement in general......, and for students with low parental education in particular. Our findings support the argument that the instructional strategy of schools is an important mechanism in generating educational inequality through the stratification of learning opportunities.......Research in the sociology of education argues that the educational system provides different learning opportunities for students with different socioeconomic backgrounds and that this circumstance makes the educational process an important institutional context for the reproduction of educational...

  13. ASIT--A Problem Solving Strategy for Education and Eco-Friendly Sustainable Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Steve

    2009-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the role teaching and learning experiences in technology education can contribute to Education for Sustainable Development. It appears, however, that in the Technology Education classroom little or no change has been achieved to the practice of designing and problem solving strategies oriented towards sustainable…

  14. Elementary Principals' Strategies for Managing the Educational Technology Refresh Process: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Increased uses of educational technology by students and teachers in recent years have compelled elementary principals to expand educational technology resources and replace educational technology resources at the end of it's service life. The purpose of this study was to investigate strategies and practices employed by elementary principals…

  15. Lecturers' Perception of Strategies for Enhancing Business Education Research in Tertiary Institutions in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, James

    2013-01-01

    Business education programme seems to have been faced with inadequate qualitative research in tertiary institution in Nigeria. The study therefore, assessed the strategies for enhancing Business Education research. Two research questions and six hypotheses guided the study. A 66 item questionnaire was administered to 164 colleges of education and…

  16. Enhancing Role-Play Activities with Pocket Camcorder Technology: Strategies for Counselor-Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Sara Meghan; Thanasiu, Page L.

    2011-01-01

    Counselor-educators can benefit from specific guidelines and creative suggestions when implementing role-play and technology-related teaching strategies in counseling training programs. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to: (a) discuss the use of role-play and video recording in counselor education; (b) introduce counselor-educators to…

  17. Strategies Used to Teach Mathematics to Special Education Students from the Teachers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Desline A.

    2016-01-01

    The perspectives of special education teachers on the strategies used to teach mathematics to special education students were examined in this dissertation. Three central research questions that guided the study are: (a) What were New York special education teachers' opinions about the methods they use to teach mathematics to special education…

  18. Advancing Inclusive Mathematics Education: Strategies and Resources for Effective IEP Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Personal experiences promoting inclusive mathematics education for my own child have mostly been met with staunch resistance on the part of educators, and a resulting breakdown in collaborative efforts during individualized education program (IEP) meetings. However, I found that utilizing certain strategies and introducing innovative mathematics…

  19. K-12 Education Nonprofit Employees' Perceptions of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Tara Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the key reasons individuals who work in K-12 education nonprofit organizations enter the field of K-12 nonprofit education and their motivations for doing so. The purpose of this study was to find new strategies for recruiting and retaining K-12 education nonprofit employees by examining the obstacles that exist to…

  20. Disability inclusion in higher education in Uganda: Status and strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Emong; Lawrence Eron

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uganda has embraced inclusive education and evidently committed itself to bringing about disability inclusion at every level of education. Both legal and non-legal frameworks have been adopted and arguably are in line with the intent of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on education. The CRPD, in Article 24, requires states to attain a right to education for persons with disabilities without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunities at a...

  1. Foreign Scholars' Theoretical Approaches to Using Social Networks as Educational Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazyura, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Modern trends in development of information and communication technologies change many aspects in the process of education: from the role of participants to the forms and methods of knowledge delivery. ICTs make it possible to develop students' creative potential. The emergence of online social groups was an important event in the sphere of…

  2. Benchmarking as a Global Strategy for Improving Instruction in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Karen L.

    This paper explores the concept of benchmarking in institutional research, a comparative analysis methodology designed to help colleges and universities increase their educational quality and delivery systems. The primary purpose of benchmarking is to compare an institution to its competitors in order to improve the product (in this case…

  3. Looking for an international strategy for geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, Joop

    Geography education is under pressure in many countries in the world. Many publications in the field of geography education and a lot of papers presented at geography conferences focus on the problematic position of geography in primary and secondary education. However, describing the problem is

  4. Teaching strategies to elicit excellence in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfensberger, Marca; van der Rijst, Roeland M.

    2011-01-01

    Pedagogy for gifted and talented students in higher education is the main topic of this study. Teachers of educational programmes designed for talented or highly motivated students in higher education (here called honours programmes) are challenged to stimulate students to increase the quality of

  5. Education in the Lisbon Strategy: Assessment and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Luce

    2011-01-01

    Since its formal inception in 1976, EU cooperation in the field of education has known a number of major landmarks: the launch of the Erasmus programme in 1987, the inclusion of education for the first time in the Treaty (Maastricht, 1992) and, last but not least, the role given to education and training in the new EU 10-year economic and social…

  6. Promoting a Positive Image: Public Relations Strategies for Special Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Kathleen B.; Miller, April D.; Brennan, J. Patrick, II

    2000-01-01

    A positive public relations campaign specific to special education can stimulate teacher cooperation and principal support, improve community perceptions of special education students, and increase hiring of special education students by local businesses. A monthly calendar of suggested activities and guidelines for starting a public relations…

  7. Institutional Educational Technology Policy and Strategy Documents: An Inequality Gaze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniewicz, Laura; Rother, Kyle

    2018-01-01

    Issues of inequality in higher education have received considerable attention in recent decades, but the intersection of inequality and educational technology at an institutional level has received little attention. This study aims to provide a perspective on institutional educational technology policy informed by current understandings of…

  8. Strategies to reduce disparities in maternal morbidity and mortality: Patient and provider education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Joses; Moroz, Leslie

    2017-08-01

    A reduction in racial disparities in maternal morbidity and mortality requires effective education of both patients and providers. Although providers seem to recognize that disparities exist, there is a widespread need for improving our understanding differences in health care and outcomes and the factors that contribute to them. There are increasingly more educational materials available for the purpose of augmenting disparities education among patients and providers. However, it is important to incorporate contemporary learning methodologies and technologies to address our current knowledge deficit. Collaborative educational models with a multi-disciplinary approach to patient education will be essential. Ultimately, the comprehensive education of providers and patients will require efforts on the part of numerous stakeholders within patient care delivery models. Further investigation will be necessary to determine how best to disseminate this information to maximize the impact of patient and provider educations with the goal of eliminating disparities in maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Building Customer Relationships: A Model for Vocational Education and Training Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarratt, Denise G.; Murphy, Tom; Lowry, Diannah

    1997-01-01

    Review of the theory of relational marketing and interviews with training providers identified a training delivery model that includes elements of trust and commitment, investment by relationship partners, and knowledge exchange, supporting relationship longevity. (SK)

  10. Strategies for Implementing Postmodern Thinking for Improving Secondary Education in Public Education in the United States of America: National Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karen Dupre; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss strategies for the secondary, public school educators to implement postmodern thinking in the United States of America. Postmodernism is a set of strategic practices that erase limits or norms to abide by placed upon people in society. The time is now for educators to be recognizant of these changes.…

  11. National Strategies for Implementing Postmodern Thinking for Improving Secondary Education in Public Education in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karen Dupre; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss strategies for secondary, public school educators to implement postmodern thinking in the United States of America. Postmodernism is a set of strategic practices that erase limits or norms to abide by placed upon people in society. Jacobs and Kritsonis say the time is now for educators to be recognizant of…

  12. IT education strategy oriented to the alignment between business and information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Čičin-Šain

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the significance of IT education strategy oriented to the alignment between in - formation systems and business systems. We establish goals and develop concepts, and present a metho - dological frame of strategic IT education. We report the results of our research and investigate the way and intensity of the impact of strategic IT education on the factors influencing the alignment and linking between information systems and business strategies. From the point of view of our research, we have focused on factors that have an influence on the alignment between information systems and business strategies, and factors affecting organisational effectiveness. Factors influencing strategic IT education have also been systematized within the categories of busine - ss/information system alignment, and organisational effectiveness. Since strategic IT education has been recognized and organized in different concepts, we have included three concepts in our questionnaires: strategic IT education for managers, organisational learning and e-learning

  13. Conducting a Multisite Education Research Project: Strategies to Overcome the Barriers to Achieve the Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beischel, Kelly P; Hart, Julie; Turkelson, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    Multisite education research projects have many benefits as well as perceived barriers. In this article, we share our experiences with a multisite education research project and the barriers we overcame to reap the benefits. The outcome of our research resulted in increased rigor, role-modeling professional collaboration, and promotion of future multisite education studies. The strategies presented in this article will help alleviate perceived barriers and ameliorate the process of conducting multisite education research studies.

  14. Strategies of day care center educators in dealing crying babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Ebner Melchiori

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the views of day care center educators on how they act when babies cry, if they are able to identify the causes of crying and what are the subjection reasons that make them take action or not. Twenty-one caretakers were interviewed about each of the ninety babies, aged 4 to 24 months, under their care, using a semi-structured guide. The results show that overall the proportion of babies that do not cry significantly increases with age. However, crying for primary needs, in the view of the educators, tends to decrease as the average age increases, whilst crying for secondary needs tends to increase. Most of the time, the educators try to eliminate the needs that provoke crying, giving priority to the baby’s welfare. The article discusses the caretakers’ educative practices with data found in literature. Keywords: day care; educative practices; educators.

  15. Are Serious Games a Good Strategy for Pharmacy Education?

    OpenAIRE

    Cain, Jeff; Piascik, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is the use of game principles for the purposes of learning, skill acquisition, and training. Higher education is beginning to incorporate serious gaming into curricula, and health professions education is the most common area for serious game use. Advantages of serious gaming in pharmacy education include authentic, situated learning without risk of patient consequences, collaborative learning, ability to challenge students of all performance levels, high student motivation wit...

  16. Identifying Effective Strategies for Climate Change Education: The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) Partnership Audiences and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.; Feldman, A.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Gilbes, F.; Stone, D.; Plank, L.; Reynolds, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Many past educational initiatives focused on global climate change have foundered on public skepticism and disbelief. Some key reasons for these past failures can be drawn directly from recognized best practices in STEM education - specifically, the necessity to help learners connect new knowledge with their own experiences and perspectives, and the need to create linkages with issues or concerns that are both important for and relevant to the audiences to be educated. The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) partnership has sought to follow these tenets as guiding principles in identifying critical audiences and developing new strategies for educating the public living in the low-lying coastal areas of Florida and the Caribbean on the realities, risks, and adaptation and mitigation strategies for dealing with the regional impacts of global climate change. CACCE is currently focused on three key learner audiences: a) The formal education spectrum, targeting K-12 curricula through middle school marine science courses, and student and educator audiences through coursework and participatory research strategies engaging participants in a range of climate-related investigations. b) Informal science educators and outlets, in particular aquaria and nature centers, as an avenue toward K-12 teacher professional development as well as for public education. c) Regional planning, regulatory and business professionals focused on the built environment along the coasts, many of whom require continuing education to maintain licensing and/or other professional certifications. Our current activities are focused on bringing together an effective set of educational, public- and private-sector partners to target the varied needs of these audiences in Florida and the U.S. Caribbean, and tailoring an educational plan aimed at these stakeholder audiences that starts with the regionally and topically relevant impacts of climate change, and strategies for effective adaptation and

  17. An educational strategy for using physician assistant students to provide health promotion education to community adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Cathy C

    2012-01-01

    The "Competencies for the Physician Assistant Profession" identify core competencies that physician assistants (PAs) are expected to acquire and maintain throughout their career (see http://www.nccpa.net/pdfs/Definition%20of%20PA%20Competencies% 203.5%20for%20Publication.pdf). Two categories of competencies relate to patient care and interpersonal and communication skills and articulate the need for PAs to be effective communicators and patient educators. The value of a health education curriculum for the adolescent population has been recognized since the early 1900s. PA student-designed health promotion presentations aimed at the adolescent population are an innovative educational strategy involving students in community education. PA student-designed presentations based upon previously identified topics were presented in the community. Students presented topics including Smoking Cessation, The Effects of Drugs and Alcohol, Self-Esteem, and others to adolescents. Community audiences were varied and included alternative high schools and teens within the Department of Youth Corrections facilities. PA students created 17 portable presentations for community adolescents. Two hundred sixty-eight students gave presentations to more than 700 adolescents ranging from 11-22 years of age between the years 2005-2010. Eighty-two percent (646/791) of adolescent participants either strongly agreed or agreed that they learned at least one new piece of information from the presentations. Sixty percent (12/20) of community leaders requested that the PA students return to give additional health promotion presentations. Analysis of comments by PA students revealed that 98% of students found the experience beneficial. Students identified the experience as helping them better understand how to design presentations to meet the needs of their audience, feel more comfortable with adolescents, and gain confidence in communicating. Seventy-five percent stated they would continue to be

  18. Promoting Critical Thinking among Dental Hygiene Students: Strategies for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan D'Ambrisi, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Dental hygiene education has evolved over the years from dental hygiene professions who provide patient education on oral health care to assuming the responsibility for the assimilation of knowledge that requires judgment, decision making and critical thinking skills. Given that the dental hygiene professions has moved toward evidence-based,…

  19. State Strategies for Financing Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Laura Rasmussen; Klein, Steve; Elliott, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The "Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006" ("Perkins IV" or "Act") authorizes federal funding for career and technical education (CTE) and specifies a formula for distributing those funds. Allocations at the secondary level are based on the number of youths ages 5-17 who reside within a local…

  20. Burn Survivors' Perceptions regarding Relevant Sexual Education Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Yolan; Esmail, Shaniff

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the unique issues childhood burn survivors experience in relation to sex education and sexual development. Design/methodology/approach: Using a phenomenological approach, participants described their lived experiences with regards to sex education and the sexuality issues they encountered as child burn…

  1. Strategies to Foster Emotional Intelligence in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, Sudi Kate

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes five initiatives to foster emotional intelligence (EI) education throughout institutions of Christian higher education. Goleman (1995) identifies self-awareness, managing emotions, motivation, empathy, and social intelligence as the hallmark skills of emotional intelligence. The importance of mastering these skills and their…

  2. A Strategy To Infuse a Global Perspective into Consumer Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Sue L. T.; Bourbonniere, Katherine

    2002-01-01

    A four-phase plan for delivering consumer education from a global perspective involves teachers in gaining familiarity with (1) the conventional approach to consumer education; (2) the cultures of globalization, capitalism, and consumerism; (3) the global perspective; and (4) integration of the three to create a global curriculum. (Contains 50…

  3. Labour Market Strategies and Adult Education in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtner, Maurizio

    1991-01-01

    Challenges of a changing Europe for education and training are new technology and organizational patterns, youth unemployment, professional mobility, and migration. Developments in Italy that exemplify change include literacy for immigrants, work-related education for women, "Green Universities," and transferable skills. (SK)

  4. Inventing the Future: Options and Strategies for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdin, Joel L.; Nutter, Norma

    A brief overview of Alvin Toffler's "waves" explanation of history (agricultural, industrial, and post-industrial) introduces reflections on future educational practices. While the limitations of the typical American home once made it imperative that education occur in centralized places, societal changes, as well as the development of individual…

  5. Getting the Most Out of Journaling: Strategies for Outdoor Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Janet E.; O'Connell, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    Outdoor educators often ask students to write journals without training them in journal writing. A workshop in journal writing for university students in outdoor education courses covers how to write entries related to specific content areas; an understanding of Bloom's Taxonomy of Cognitive Thinking and how it applies to journal writing; and…

  6. Research and Support Strategies For Women's Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Samuel F.; And Others

    Inadequate support is presently offered for the study of certain important questions which have serious implications for educational policies affecting women. Priority should be given to the support of those areas of research and program development and evaluation that have the most critical implications for both the higher education of women and…

  7. An Afterschool Director's Educational Leadership Strategies: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs linked to schools provide opportunities to keep children safe and engage them in enrichment activities that can support their growth and development. Often, these programs are led by afterschool directors with a background in youth development and no experience or education in leading in educational environments. These…

  8. Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Counselor Education: Barriers and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher M.; Puig, Ana; Baggs, Adrienne; Wolf, Cheryl Pence

    2015-01-01

    Despite a professionally recognized need for training in religion/spirituality, literature indicates that religious and spirituality issues continue to be inconsistently addressed in counselor education. Ten experts were asked to identify potential barriers to integrating religion and spirituality into counselor education and indicate strategies…

  9. Helping Educators Grow: Strategies and Practices for Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago-Severson, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    How can we prepare practicing and aspiring education leaders for the complex, adaptive challenges they face? In "Helping Educators Grow," Eleanor Drago-Severson presents a new approach to leadership development. Too often, she argues, we teach leadership development the same way we teach world history: just the facts. Instead, we need to…

  10. Strategies for Research, Education, and Innovation, A University's Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob Steen

    2004-01-01

    Engineering (BYG•DTU) at The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) to this challenge are described: The Department has been reorganised and a new strategy has been adopted. The strategy was developed in collaboration with industry partners. The Strategy focuses on a) analysis and design of safe and economic......It is argued that the building and construction sector will maintain and even increase its economic and societal importance. In spite of this the private R&D effort in the sector is relatively modest, which in turn makes public research more important. The responds of the Department of Civil...

  11. Visual culture as a strategy of reflection in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2004-01-01

    Visual culture is an issue in the current research field of visual arts education. this article investigates how the emergence of the concept of visual culture comes about and how it is usable in an educational contekxt. From at system theory approach, the author investigates how the concept...... of visual culture articulates af phase of art and visual arts education. This phase makes it possible to reconsider the concept of aesthetics as a mode of cognition. Likewise, the phase reflexivly constitutes a viewing on visual phenomena. This viewing requires a reconsidering of the notions of what art...... education means and how visual culture can be performed as a special approach to all areas of education....

  12. Are Serious Games a Good Strategy for Pharmacy Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Piascik, Peggy

    2015-05-25

    Serious gaming is the use of game principles for the purposes of learning, skill acquisition, and training. Higher education is beginning to incorporate serious gaming into curricula, and health professions education is the most common area for serious game use. Advantages of serious gaming in pharmacy education include authentic, situated learning without risk of patient consequences, collaborative learning, ability to challenge students of all performance levels, high student motivation with increased time on task, immediate feedback, ability to learn from mistakes without becoming discouraged, and potential for behavior and attitude change. Development of quality games for pharmacy education requires content expertise as well as expertise in the science and design of gaming. When well done, serious gaming provides a valuable additional tool for pharmacy education.

  13. Strategies for structuring interdisciplinary education in Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvijovic, Marija; Höfer, Thomas; Aćimović, Jure

    2016-01-01

    function by employing experimental data, mathematical models and computational simulations. As Systems Biology is inherently multidisciplinary, education within this field meets numerous hurdles including departmental barriers, availability of all required expertise locally, appropriate teaching material...... and example curricula. As university education at the Bachelor’s level is traditionally built upon disciplinary degrees, we believe that the most effective way to implement education in Systems Biology would be at the Master’s level, as it offers a more flexible framework. Our team of experts and active...... performers of Systems Biology education suggest here (i) a definition of the skills that students should acquire within a Master’s programme in Systems Biology, (ii) a possible basic educational curriculum with flexibility to adjust to different application areas and local research strengths, (iii...

  14. Innovative vaccine delivery strategies in response to a cholera outbreak in the challenging context of Lake Chilwa. A rapid qualitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyerdahl, Leonard W; Ngwira, Bagrey; Demolis, Rachel; Nyirenda, Gabriel; Mwesawina, Maurice; Rafael, Florentina; Cavailler, Philippe; Bernard Le Gargasson, Jean; Mengel, Martin A; Gessner, Bradford D; Guillermet, Elise

    2017-11-07

    A reactive campaign using two doses of Shanchol Oral Cholera Vaccine (OCV) was implemented in 2016 in the Lake Chilwa Region (Malawi) targeting fish dependent communities. Three strategies for the second vaccine dose delivery (including delivery by a community leader and self-administration) were used to facilitate vaccine access. This assessment collected vaccine perceptions and opinions about the OCV campaign of 313 study participants, including: fishermen, fish traders, farmers, community leaders, and one health and one NGO officer. Socio-demographic surveys were conducted, In Depth Interviews and Focus Group Discussions were conducted before and during the campaign. Some fishermen perceived the traditional delivery strategy as reliable but less practical. Delivery by traditional leaders was acceptable for some participants while others worried about traditional leaders not being trained to deliver vaccines or beneficiaries taking doses on their own. A slight majority of beneficiaries considered the self-administration strategy practical while some beneficiaries worried about storing vials outside of the cold chain or losing vials. During the campaign, a majority of participants preferred receiving oral vaccines instead of injections given ease of intake and lack of pain. OCV was perceived as efficacious and safe. However, a lack of information on how sero-protection may be delayed and the degree of sero-protection led to loss of trust in vaccine potency among some participants who witnessed cholera cases among vaccinated individuals. OCV campaign implementation requires accompanying communication on protective levels, less than 100% vaccine efficacy, delays in onset of sero-protection, and out of cold chain storage. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. The use of information and communications technologies in the delivery of interprofessional education: A review of evaluation outcome levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon; Reid, Adam; Reis, Pamela; Doucet, Shelley; Price, Sheri; Alcock, Lindsay; Fitzgerald, Shari

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) in health and human services educational and clinical settings has proliferated internationally. The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the facilitation of interprofessional learning is also growing, yet reviews of the effectiveness of ICTs in the delivery of pre- and/or post-licensure IPE have been limited. The current study's purpose was to review the evaluation outcomes of IPE initiatives delivered using ICTs. Relevant electronic databases and journals from 1996 to 2013 were searched. Studies which evaluated the effectiveness of an IPE intervention using ICTs were included and analyzed using the Barr et al. modified Kirkpatrick educational outcomes typology. Fifty-five studies were identified and a majority reported evaluation findings at the level 1 (reaction/satisfaction). Analysis revealed that learners react favorably to the use of ICTs in the delivery of IPE, and ICT-mediated IPE can lead to positive attitudinal and knowledge change. A majority of the studies reported positive evaluation outcomes at the learner satisfaction level, with the use of web-based learning modalities. The limited number of studies at other levels of the outcomes typology and deficiencies in study designs indicate the need for more rigorous evaluation of outcomes in ICT-mediated IPE.

  16. Educational Justice Due to More Education? Requests for a Solution Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grümme, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Why does education fail to realize educational justice? Why does religious education not play a part in contributing to educational justice to some degree, as it is technically located in the logic of its handed down biblical message? On the one hand, education is socially testified as being at a crucial moment of educational justice, on the other…

  17. The relationships among usage of motivation, learning strategies, parents' educational level and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Sadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Current study examines the following question: What is the relationship among Turkish high school students’ motivation and learning strategies use in biology, their gender and parents’ educational level? The aim of this study is to specify the relationships among family environment variables (fathers’ and mothers’ education levels, students’ gender, time/study environmental management, cognitive learning strategies (rehearsal, elaboration, organization and critical thinking and students’ goal orientations (intrinsic and extrinsic goal orientations. The participants were 400 students in 9th and 10th grades in Anatolian high schools in Turkey. So, they were in urban high school students. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ was applied to measure motivational orientations and self-regulated learning strategies use of students. Moreover, a Structural Equation Modeling was used to investigate the relationships among family environment variables, students’ gender, time/study environmental management, cognitive learning strategies and students’ goal orientations by using the LISREL 8.72 program. The results of the study showed that parents’ education level was related to each of the following variables: rehearsal, elaboration, organization, critical thinking, time/study environmental management, intrinsic goal orientation and extrinsic goal orientation. Gender was related to rehearsal, elaboration, organization strategies, intrinsic goal orientation and extrinsic goal orientation. The results showed that students, whose parents have high education level, were also more likely to succeed in using cognitive learning strategies (rehearsal, elaboration, organization and critical thinking and planning the necessary time for learning and making use of time well. The present study revealed that parental education levels and gender should be taken into consideration as major predictors of time/study environmental

  18. Identifying Predictors of Student Satisfaction and Student Motivation in the Framework of Assuring Quality in the Delivery of Higher Education Services

    OpenAIRE

    Yulia Stukalina

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the quality of educational services provided by a university is a crucial aspect of the education managers’ strategy in the customer-driven education context, quality assurance in education being an essential issue to be promoted in European higher education institutions. Students’ evaluation of the educational services (that is consumer-oriented assessment) can be regarded as one of the most significant educational management tools used for stimulating quality enhancement in a univ...

  19. Strategies for Sustainable Business Models for Open Educational Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H.T de Langen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For several years, the importance of continuous education has been stressed by several governmental and non-governmental institutions (Janssen & Schuwer, 2012; Marshall & Casserly, 2006. Education is seen as important both for personal growth and empowerment for one’s personal wellbeing and for developing the professional capabilities needed in today’s society. In his 2011 State of the Union address President Obama put emphasis on the government’s ambitions to “out-innovate and out-educate” the rest of the world. Almost at the same time, at the Davos World Economic Forum (2011, the urgency of appropriate education was stressed, observing that the current lack of adequately educated people hinders prosperity and economic growth in the near future. The OECD is preparing a proposal to translate these intentions into a concrete policy.

  20. Sexuality and the Developmentally Handicapped: Health Education Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mary-Lou; Forchuk, Cheryl

    1987-01-01

    The article describes a sex education program for small groups of developmentally handicapped adolescents and young adults which includes information on and discussion of body parts, acceptable social behavior, assertiveness, birth control, and sexually transmitted diseases. (Author/JW)

  1. Coteaching in physical education: a strategy for inclusive practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Michelle A

    2011-04-01

    Qualitative research methods were used to explore the factors that informed general and adapted physical education teachers' coteaching practices within an inclusive high school physical education program. Two physical education teachers and one adapted physical education teacher were observed over a 16-week period. Interviews, field notes, and documents were collected and a constant comparative approach was used in the analysis that adopted a social model framework. Primary themes included community as the cornerstone for student learning, core values of trust and respect, and creating a natural support structure. Coteaching practices existed because of the shared values of teaching, learning, and the belief that all students should be included. Recommendations include shifting orientations within professional preparation programs to account for the social model of disability.

  2. Distance Education as a Women Empowerment Strategy in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga David OJO

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Women emancipation through empowerment all over the world is at its peak and Africans generally are not left out. It is an attempt to make sure that women’s voices are heard and are given their right places in the scheme of things. Nonetheless, the issue of educational attainment of women considering the low level of girls’ education in Africa is at a negative variance to attaining women position since certain educational attainments are required to function effectively in the various available organs; be it work place, group or committees of local or international standing. This paper therefore stresses the use of open and distance institution in Nigeria as an avenue to attain knowledge and education that would put women in a better stead toward achieving their aims and aspirations.

  3. Corporate real estate alignment strategies in dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theo van der Voordt; Ronald Beckers

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the management approaches concerned with the process of aligning Corporate Real Estate (CRE) with organizational goals on a strategic level and regarding day-to-day operating activities in higher education institutes.

  4. strategies for implementing human rights education in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human rights education is one of the new courses introduced into the school curriculum. It improves the ... tolerance, gender equality and friendship ... protecting the rights of the subjects. (Beitxer ... They also help to provide guidelines and.

  5. Humanities and Geriatric Education: a Strategy for Recruitment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Christopher; Martin, Ruth Elwood

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is a common subject in arts and literature as it is a universal experience. The use of the humanities in medical education may have a positive effect on trainees’ attitude to caring for seniors and on geriatrics as a career choice. This paper summarizes the role of humanities in medical education and provides some examples and thoughts on how humanities curriculum can be used in geriatric teaching. PMID:25825611

  6. Authentic Assessment and Pedagogical Strategies in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Yuen Fook; Gurnam Kaur Sidhu

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Researchers have noted that there is a mismatch between curriculum content and assessment practices in higher education. At the moment, the focus is still on the assessment of learning and not much on assessment for learning. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the implementation of authentic assessment in higher education in Malaysia. Approach: The study employed a qualitative research method and involved the use of instruments such as interviews, document analy...

  7. Simulation based medical education; teaching normal delivery on intermediate fidelity simulator to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nighat; Baig, Lubna; Shah, Nusrat; Hussain, Riffat; Aly, Syed Moyn

    2017-10-01

    To assess the effectiveness of medium fidelity simulator in teaching normal vaginal delivery to medical students. The quasi-experimental study was conducted at the professional development centre of the Jinnah Sindh Medical University, Karachi, from June to December 2015, and comprised medical students. Third-year medical students were included. They were divided into two groups. Group A was taught normal delivery through traditional PowerPoint and group B through simulator. The instruments used for assessing knowledge were pre-test and post-test, for skills of labour/delivery checklist of performance was used, and perception forms were filled to evaluate workshops/learning environment by students. Of the 76 participants, there were 36(47.4%) in group A and 40(52.6%) in group B. The overall mean age of the participants was 20.86±0.76 years in group B and 20.60±0.95 years in group A (p=0.19). The mean grade point average of the participants was 2.89±0.47 in group A and 2.87±0.48 in group B (p=0.81).Group B performed much better in skill of delivery having a mean score of 8.91±3.20compared to group A which had mean of 5.67±1.84 (pSimulation-based skill learning showed significantly better results.

  8. Peer education: a successful strategy with some constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, M

    1998-01-01

    The use of peer education programs to promote sexual health has been widely accepted because of the potential of such programs to be implemented in a cost-effective manner in various settings and because peers are considered more convincing than outsiders. In addition, the thousands of people who have received training to become peer educators constitute a new generation of social work and health professionals who are not embarrassed by sexuality. Problems encountered by peer health education programs include sustainability of volunteers and funding, difficulty in assessing the impact of a program (especially cost-effectiveness), and the lack of appropriate monitoring and evaluation indicators. Given the large turnover of peer educators and the resources needed to provide week-long residential training courses, new methods of training are needed that are less labor intensive and more cost effective. Another problem is that many facilitators of peer health education programs lack a background in health promotion, and sometimes peer education programs for similar audiences compete or send contradictory messages because of a lack of coordination.

  9. COMPETITIVE STRATEGY IN THE FIELD OF EDUCATIONAL POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri F. Shamrai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of market reforms in the Russian economy there has been a trend of weakening its educational potential. The problems of access to education and the possibility of payment have exacerbated. Delay in the development of innovative models and raw primitivization economy resulted in decrease of intelligence needs and the demand for qualified professionals. Further, there arose difficulties in connection with the transition to the so-called two-tier education system – «Bachelor – Master.»On the basis of the circumstances mentioned in the article, the improvement of the Russian educational system in the direction of democratization and individualization of the learning process, referring to giving students a choice between different educational systems and modules, and various ways to improve students’ weight (the development of corporate education, the provision of learning opportunities created in the Russian branches of Western universities, the organization of NSO on market principles, the creation of youth discussion clubs, innovative student enterprises, competitions on market principles, the establishment of universities’ student avenues of glory, etc.. 

  10. What do we do? Practices and learning strategies of medical education leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieff, Susan; Albert, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    Continuous changes in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education require faculty to assume a variety of new leadership roles. While numerous faculty development programmes have been developed, there is little evidence about the specific practices of medical education leaders or their learning strategies to help inform their design. This study aimed to explore what medical education leaders' actually do, their learning strategies and recommendations for faculty development. A total of 16 medical education leaders from a variety of contexts within the faculty of medicine of a large North American medical school participated in semi-structured interviews to explore the nature of their work and the learning strategies they employ. Using thematic analysis, interview transcripts were coded inductively and then clustered into emergent themes. Findings clustered into four key themes of practice: (1) intrapersonal (e.g., self-awareness), (2) interpersonal (e.g., fostering informal networks), (3) organizational (e.g., creating a shared vision) and (4) systemic (e.g. strategic navigation). Learning strategies employed included learning from experience and example, reflective practice, strategic mentoring or advanced training. Our findings illuminate a four-domain framework for understanding medical education leader practices and their learning preferences. While some of these findings are not unknown in the general leadership literature, our understanding of their application in medical education is unique. These practices and preferences have a potential utility for conceptualizing a coherent and relevant approach to the design of faculty development strategies for medical education leadership.

  11. An Examination of LGBTQ-Inclusive Strategies Used by Practicing Music Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Matthew L.; Spano, Fred P.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine LGBTQ-inclusive strategies used by practicing music educators in the United States. Participants (N = 300) in a nonprobabilistic sample completed a survey inquiring as to their comfort using LGBTQ-inclusive strategies in a school music class, their perceptions of barriers to LGBTQ inclusion, and whether…

  12. International Doctoral Students in Counselor Education: Coping Strategies in Supervision Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hongryun; Jang, Yoo Jin; Henfield, Malik S.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores 8 international doctoral students' perceptions of coping strategies used in supervision training in counselor education programs. Using human agency as a conceptual framework, the authors found 3 categories: (a) personal and professional self-directed strategies as personal agency, (b) support and care from mentors as proxy…

  13. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Feedback Strategies in Technology Education: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ruifang Hope; Strickland, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted feedback strategies that have been utilized by university students in a technology education curriculum. Specifically, the study examined the effectiveness of the computer-assisted feedback strategy "Knowledge of Response feedback" (KOR), and the "Knowledge of Correct Responses feedback"…

  14. Outcomes of a systematically designed strategy for the implementation of sex education in Dutch secondary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiefferink, C.H.; Poelman, J.; Linthorst, M.; Vanwesenbeeck, I.; Wijngaarden, J.C.M. van; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the effects of a systematically designed innovation strategy on teachers' implementation of a sex education curriculum and its related determinants. A quasi-experimental group design was used to assess the effectiveness of the innovation strategy. Teachers filled in

  15. Strategies for Promoting Autonomous Reading Motivation: A Multiple Case Study Research in Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Naeghel, Jessie; Van Keer, Hilde; Vanderlinde, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    It is important to reveal strategies which foster students' reading motivation in order to break through the declining trend in reading motivation throughout children's educational careers. Consequently, the present study advances an underexposed field in reading motivation research by studying and identifying the strategies of teachers excellent…

  16. Aligning corporate real estate with the corporate strategies of higher education institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, R; van der Voordt, Theo; Dewulf, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose
    The purpose of this paper is to explore how corporate real estate (CRE) managers of higher education institutions formulate their CRE strategies and CRE operating decisions to align CRE with the corporate strategies of these institutions.

    Design/methodology/approach
    An

  17. Aligning corporate real estate with the corporate strategies of higher education institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theo van der Voordt; Geert Dewulf; Ronald Beckers

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how corporate real estate (CRE) managers of higher education institutions formulate their CRE strategies and CRE operating decisions to align CRE with the corporate strategies of these institutions. Design/methodology/approach – An analytical

  18. Factors Associated with South Korean Early Childhood Educators' Observed Behavior Support Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Ha; Stormont, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This study was an exploratory study of 34 South Korean early childhood educators' strategies for addressing behavior problems in natural settings. Factors related to teachers' strategy implementation were also explored. Four specific teacher behaviors were observed: precorrection, behavioral-specific praise, redirection, and reprimand/punishment.…

  19. Building Bridges: Seeking Structure and Direction for Higher Education Motivated Learning Strategy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Luke K.

    2017-01-01

    Many of our current higher education (HE) learning strategy models intersect at important points. At the same time, these theories also often demonstrate important unique perspectives on student learning within HE. Currently, research with one learning strategy model rarely leads to developments in others, as each group of researchers works in…

  20. Teacher Perceptions and Behavioral Strategies for Students with Emotional Disturbance across Educational Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Chan; Weiss, Stacy L.; Cullinan, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined problem characteristics of students with emotional disturbance in 3 educational environments, the behavior management and intervention strategies their teachers used, and what relation exists between problem characteristics and intervention strategies. Teachers completed a behavior problems rating scale and they…

  1. Strategies for the Cooperation of Educational Institutions and Companies in Mechanical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Juha

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyse the strategic planning of the Centre for Mechanical Engineering, which is a joint venture of educational institutions and companies in Southwest Finland. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents the strategies of focus and cost efficiency and how the selected strategies can be adjusted…

  2. Educational research in Sweden: Reform strategies and research policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Inger

    1981-06-01

    Educational R & D in Sweden is to a large extent policy-oriented. It has been an integrated part of the Swedish educational reform system and has brought about a dialogue between politicians, administrators and researchers. Several circumstances have contributed to the `Swedish model'. One is the system with government-appointed committees in which researchers often play an active part. Another is that the Swedish educational system is highly centralized, with the National Board of Education (NBE) as the central authority, responsible for primary, secondary and adult education. A third — and a crucial one — is that, since 1962, the NBE has had increasing funds for educational R & D at its disposal. These funds account for the main part of the economic resources for R & D, along with resources allocated to research appointments at research departments of universities. Educational R & D, conducted primarily within the NBE funds, has recently been evaluated by a government-appointed committee. In its evaluations of the impact of educational R & D, the committee distinguished between the effects of R & D and the effect correlates. It concluded that the impact of R & D is more indirect than direct, more long-term than immediate. The effects are also more easily recognized at levels above the actual school situation. This finding could be interpreted as a consequence of the policy-orientation of educational R & D, which at the same time shows the difficulties in reaching the `school level' with research and development results. There are two general trends in Sweden, which will influence both research planning and research use. First, there is a trend towards the decentralization of decision-making and responsibility for the educational system. Secondly, there is a trend towards the `sectionalization' of the R & D system as a whole. This sectionalization will mean that research will to a great extent be planned to meet needs from different parts of society — labour

  3. STUDY ON THE MARKETING STRATEGY OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION (CASE COMPANY SAMK INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS)

    OpenAIRE

    Khanal, Ichha; khanal, Ichha

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of conducting this thesis was to study on the marketing strategy of an educational institution. The aim of this thesis was to study on current marketing strategy and suggest the case company with new and effective ideas for marketing. The theoretical part of this thesis hold three main elements with basic knowledge of marketing. Along with marketing mix, this thesis also covered segmentation as well as marketing strategy. For the time being, SWOT approach was utilized to...

  4. Teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena, Alodio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a system of teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational students. The modeling of teaching and learning strategies presented is the result of a research project carried out at the University of Camagüey; its results are being employed successfully. A full description of research methods, rationale, and each of the suggested strategies is provided.

  5. The Audiocast Diaries: Reflections on Radio and Podcasting for Delivery of Educational Soap Operas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    While studying Gender Issues in Distance Education at Athabasca University, the author has read about nomadic Fulbe women in Nigeria who learned by radio. She became inspired to explore the idea of serial drama as education. She began searching the Internet for ideas. She discovered a striking example of entertainment-education--an educational…

  6. The Educational Efficacy of Distinct Information Delivery Systems in Modified Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirnia, Andrew; Israel, Maya

    2010-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of many commercial video games, this popularity is not shared by educational video games. Modified video games, however, can bridge the gap in quality between commercial and education video games by embedding educational content into popular commercial video games. This study examined how different information…

  7. Uncovering Web search strategies in South African higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surika Civilcharran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of the enormous amount of information available on the Web and the fact that search engines are continuously evolving to enhance the search experience, students are nevertheless faced with the difficulty of effectively retrieving information. It is, therefore, imperative for the interaction between students and search tools to be understood and search strategies to be identified, in order to promote successful information retrieval. Objectives: This study identifies the Web search strategies used by postgraduate students and forms part of a wider study into information retrieval strategies used by postgraduate students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN, Pietermaritzburg campus, South Africa. Method: Largely underpinned by Thatcher’s cognitive search strategies, the mixed-methods approach was utilised for this study, in which questionnaires were employed in Phase 1 and structured interviews in Phase 2. This article reports and reflects on the findings of Phase 2, which focus on identifying the Web search strategies employed by postgraduate students. The Phase 1 results were reported in Civilcharran, Hughes and Maharaj (2015. Results: Findings reveal the Web search strategies used for academic information retrieval. In spite of easy access to the invisible Web and the advent of meta-search engines, the use of Web search engines still remains the preferred search tool. The UKZN online library databases and especially the UKZN online library, Online Public Access Catalogue system, are being underutilised. Conclusion: Being ranked in the top three percent of the world’s universities, UKZN is investing in search tools that are not being used to their full potential. This evidence suggests an urgent need for students to be trained in Web searching and to have a greater exposure to a variety of search tools. This article is intended to further contribute to the design of undergraduate training programmes in order to deal

  8. Educational Strategies of Minority Youth and the Social Constructions of Ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldenhawer, Bolette

    2014-01-01

    From observations of different minority groups in the nine countries participating in the EDUMIGROM research programme, this chapter explores minority students' views on their educational options and the role they attribute to schooling in their life. She distinguishes three types of educational ...... strategies of 'mobilization', 'instrumentation' and 'opposition' to schooling, which are unevenly distributed across the different countries and the different ethnic groups observed....

  9. Religious Education for the Disenfranchised: Fusing Multicultural Strategies into Catholic High School Religion Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Mary

    Although multicultural education is misunderstood by many and feared by some, it has been embraced by educators throughout the world as a necessary approach to preparing the next generation for the complexities of the 21st century. A study explored the work of three Catholic secondary religion teachers, who use multicultural strategies in their…

  10. Stress and Coping Strategies among Distance Education Students at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaah, Christopher Yaw; Essilfie, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the causes of stress and coping strategies adopted among distance education students at the College of Distance Education in the University of Cape Coast. A total of 332 diploma and post-diploma final year students in 2014/2015 academic year were selected from two study centers using random sampling procedure to…

  11. Dental Hygiene Entry-Level Program Administrators' Strategies for Overcoming Challenges of Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Bette A.

    2009-01-01

    The use of distance education by entry-level dental hygiene programs is increasing. The focus of this study was to determine the number of entry-level dental hygiene program administrators with experience developing and/or maintaining dental hygiene education by distance, the challenges encountered, and the strategies used to overcome the…

  12. Teaching Strategies and Practices that Promote a Culturally Sensitive Nursing Education: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Robin J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teaching strategies that promote a culturally sensitive nursing education and culturally sensitive nursing. The diversity of Americans has increased. Thus, the nursing student population and patient population have both become more diverse. Nursing education programs, therefore, need to know the best…

  13. Improv(ing) the Academy: Applied Improvisation as a Strategy for Educational Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Jonathan P.; Hoffmann-Longtin, Krista

    2016-01-01

    Improvisational theater training (or "improv") is a strategy employed by many business leaders and educators to cultivate creativity and collaboration amid change. Drawing on improv principles such as "Yes, And…" and "Make your scene partners look good," we explore the ways in which educational developers might apply…

  14. The Growth Trend in Learning Strategies during the Transition from Secondary to Higher Education in Flanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coertjens, Liesje; Donche, Vincent; De Maeyer, Sven; van Daal, Tine; Van Petegem, Peter

    2017-01-01

    As in many OECD countries, the first year in Flemish Higher Education is a major hurdle. Research on the experience of the transition period from secondary to higher education highlights the importance of the change in students' teaching/learning environment. Though this change is hypothesised to affect students' learning strategies, and hereby…

  15. Physical Education and Female Participation: A Case Study of Teachers' Perspectives and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brooke; Dionigi, Rylee A.; Litchfield, Chelsea

    2014-01-01

    We argue that gender issues in physical education (PE) remain in some schools, despite advances in PE research and curricula aimed at engaging females in PE. We interviewed five Australian PE teachers (1 male and 4 females) at a co-educational, regional high school about the factors affecting female participation in PE and the strategies they used…

  16. Multisectoral Strategies for Advancing Girls' Education: Principles and Practice. SAGE Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Howard

    This paper describes issues, experiences, and strategies used in developing successful multisectoral partnerships to advance girls' education, using Guinea and Morocco as examples. Chapter 1 introduces the issue, discussing barriers to girls' education and describing the multisectoral response to interrelated barriers. Chapter 2 defines the…

  17. Lebanon's 2011 ICT Education Reform Strategy and Action Plan: Curriculum Success or Abeyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, Ghada; Diab, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of Lebanon's Education Reform Strategy and Action Plan (LERSAP) set in 2011 as a form of the educational reform the curriculum underwent through focusing on promoting and employing the information communication technology (ICT) tools. The LERSAP was launched to equip teachers…

  18. Coding the Biodigital Child: The Biopolitics and Pedagogic Strategies of Educational Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Educational data science is an emerging transdisciplinary field formed from an amalgamation of data science and elements of biological, psychological and neuroscientific knowledge about learning, or learning science. This article conceptualises educational data science as a biopolitical strategy focused on the evaluation and management of the…

  19. An Analysis of Business Education Recruitment Strategies over the Past 25 Years: Then and Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review, analysis, and synthesis of recruitment strategies for business education from the flourishing 1970s to today's declining enrollments and program suspensions. A historical overview, continuing challenges, and best practices for business education recruitment are discussed. (Contains 1 table.)

  20. Educational Leaders' Doctoral Research That Informed Strategies to Steer Their Organizations towards Cultural Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taysum, Alison

    2016-01-01

    This research generates new knowledge about how 24 educational leaders in the USA and England used their doctoral research to build narrative capital to inform strategies to steer their organizations towards cultural alignment. Cultural alignment prevents forms of segregation rooted in nation-states' wider historiography of education segregation…

  1. (Non)Construction of the Teacher: An Inquiry into Ontario's Equity and Inclusive Education Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimi, Kevin; Cepin, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we perform a critical discourse analysis on the policy document Ontario's Equity and Inclusive Education Strategy (2009). We examine the three core priorities the policy outlines: improve student achievement, reduce achievement gap and increase public confidence in public education. This document is approached from the context of new…

  2. The Use of Humor as a Teaching Strategy in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukehart, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine the use of humor as a teaching strategy among a sample of nurse educators employed by community colleges and universities in Northern and Central California nursing programs. The study also identified the types of humor used, how humor is used in the classroom, and nurse educators' perceptions of…

  3. Expanding the Education Universe: A Fifty-State Strategy for Course Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    After twenty years of expanding school-choice options, state leaders, educators, and families have a new tool: course choice, a strategy for students to learn from unconventional providers that might range from top-tier universities or innovative community colleges to local employers, labs, or hospitals. In "Expanding the Education Universe:…

  4. Promoting Hong Kong's Higher Education to Asian Markets: Market Segmentations and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan C. K.; Yuen, Timothy W. W.; Yuen, Celeste Y. M.; Cheng, Yin Cheong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is threefold: to analyze the current conditions of higher education services offered in the three target markets; to conduct market segmentation analysis of these markets; and to recommend the most appropriate market entry strategies for Hong Kong's education service providers. Design/methodology/approach:…

  5. National Strategy for Promotion of Russian Universities in the World Market of Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushketova, Natalia; Bydanova, Elizaveta; Rouet, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The export of Russian educational services worldwide was not considered by the Russian Government as a full-fledged economic sector until recently. However, the situation has changed since the early 2000s, when in 2002, the Russian Government approved the national strategy for higher education promotion abroad and since then has been…

  6. Strategies of business education in job creation and self reliance for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the strategies in business education and its role in achieving self reliance, job creation and empowerment for sustainable development. Lecturers in the Business Education Department of Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki formed the study population. Data was collected using a suitable structured and ...

  7. Implementing Competency-Based Education: Challenges, Strategies, and a Decision-Making Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoo, Amie; Barrows, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The number of competency-based education (CBE) degree programs has increased rapidly over the past five years, yet there is little research on CBE program development. This study utilized conceptual models of higher education change and a qualitative methodology to analyze the strategies and challenges in implementing CBE business degree programs…

  8. Teaching Who You Are: Connecting Teachers' Civic Education Ideology to Instructional Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Ryan T.

    2018-01-01

    This quantitative study uses survey data to test connections between 735 teachers' civic education ideology (CivID) and their self-reported instructional practices. Analysis demonstrates teachers' beliefs in relation to conservative, liberal, and critical civic education ideology as well as preference for instructional strategies, such as…

  9. Strategies for information management in education: Some international experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Bytheway

    2014-06-01

    Objectives: This article reports and analyses conversation with eight international educators in Europe, Canada, the United States, New Zealand and Australia. All are managing the impact of technology in different ways (reactive and pro-active, at different levels (pre-primary through to senior citizen, in different roles (teachers, administrators and senior managers and in different contexts (schools and universities. Method: Open-ended conversations with educators and educational administrators in developed countries were recorded, transcribed and analysed. The qualitative analysis of the content was done in the style of ‘open coding’ and ‘selective coding’ using a qualitative content analysis tool. Results: Whilst technology is still seen to drive much thinking, it is found that that success is not derived from the technology, but from a full and proper understanding of the needs and aspirations of those who are directly involved in educational processes, and by means of a managerial focus that properly recognises the context within which an institution exists. Conclusion: Whilst this result might be expected, the detailed analysis of the findings further reveals the need to manage investments in educational technologies at different levels and in different ways.

  10. 38 CFR 21.4505 - Check delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Check delivery. 21.4505...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4505 Check delivery. (a) General. Education... surviving spouse is enrolled for delivery by the educational institution. (b) Delivery and certification. (1...

  11. Implementation Strategies of Inclusive Education in Cypriot Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, Panayiotis; Hajisoteriou, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the implementation strategies used by the participant teachers in order to practice inclusion in their classrooms. To this end, we investigated the participant teachers' perceptions of their roles and the barriers faced in the implementation of inclusion. Interviews and observations were carried out with four teachers in…

  12. Implementing a Redesign Strategy: Lessons from Educational Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basom, Richard E., Jr.; Crandall, David P.

    The effective implementation of school redesign, based on a social systems approach, is discussed in this paper. A basic assumption is that the interdependence of system elements has implications for a complex change process. Seven barriers to redesign and five critical issues for successful redesign strategy are presented. Seven linear steps for…

  13. Undergraduate Climate Education: Motivations, Strategies, Successes, and Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Karin B.; Gold, Anne U.; Ledley, Tamara Shapiro; Sullivan, Susan Buhr; Manduca, Cathryn A.; Mogk, David W.; Wiese, Katryn

    2014-01-01

    Climate literacy is an essential component of a strategy to comprehend and confront the grand challenge of global climate change. However, scientific complexity, societal implications, and political associations make climate change a difficult but important topic to teach. In this paper we report on the results of a survey of undergraduate faculty…

  14. Lacrosse in the Physical Education Setting: Strategies for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagood, Susan Y.; Cathey, R. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article on the game of lacrosse focuses on offensive strategies used to help students become successful in game play. It describes lead-up activities students should know and perform, such as stick holding, cradling, scooping, catching, and the passing fundamentals of lacrosse. The progressions of tasks in this article were designed from…

  15. The incidence of technological stress among baccalaureate nurse educators using technology during course preparation and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mary S

    2009-01-01

    The concept of technology-related stress was first introduced in the 1980s when computers became more prevalent in the business and academic world. Nurse educators have been impacted by the rapid changes in technology in recent years. A review of the literature revealed no research studies that have been conducted to investigate the incidence of technological stress among nurse educators. The purpose of this descriptive-correlational study was to describe the technological stressors that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators experienced while teaching nursing theory courses. A researcher-developed questionnaire, the nurse educator technostress scale (NETS) was administered to a census sample of 311 baccalaureate nurse educators in Louisiana. Findings revealed that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators are experiencing technological stress. The variable, perceived administrative support for use of technology in the classroom, was a significant predictor in a regression model predicting Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators' technological stress (F=14.157, p<.001).

  16. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  17. Transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  18. Physico-Chemical Strategies to Enhance Stability and Drug Retention of Polymeric Micelles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Y.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Storm, Gerrit; Hennink, W.E.

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric micelles (PM) have been extensively used for tumor-targeted delivery of hydrophobic anti-cancer drugs. The lipophilic core of PM is naturally suitable for loading hydrophobic drugs and the hydrophilic shell endows them with colloidal stability and stealth properties. Decades of research on

  19. Fiscal Decentralization and Delivery of Public Services: Evidence from Education Sector in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf Abdur

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fiscal Decentralization is the devolution of fiscal assignments to lower governments for high growth and better delivery of public services. The current study covering the period from 1972 to 2009 is an attempt to find out the impacts of fiscal decentralization on public services deliveries in Pakistan. Public services are proxy by Gross enrollment at primary school level while fiscal decentralization by fiscal transfer and expenditure sides of devolution. Using time series data, it is found that the individual impacts of fiscal transfer are although insignificant but still support the theoretical proposition regarding fiscal decentralization and public services relationship while delegation of expenditure responsibilities helps in improving the gross enrollment at primary school level. Furthermore the study evident that complete delegation of fiscal responsibilities to lower governments enhance enrollment ratio in Pakistan.

  20. Effective Education and Communication Strategies to Promote Environmental Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaval, Lisa; Cornwell, James F. M.

    2017-01-01

    Communicators of climate science seek ways to better educate and motivate individuals to personally commit to sustainable, energy-saving activities. However, critical psychological and social barriers to conservation make this task challenging. Behavioural scientists are well aware of the difficulties that individuals and groups have in responding…

  1. LSD and the Student: Approaches to Educational Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Allan Y.

    There are three basic functions of the college relevant to the drug abuse problem: the therapeutic, the preventative, and the developmental. The first principle of psychedelic drug education may be termed the sympathetic attitude. It involves a thorough understanding of drugs on the part of the college administration, plus the ability to treat…

  2. Connecting Physical University Spaces with Research-Based Education Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnell, Brent

    2017-01-01

    This paper looks at the link between enhancing education and ensuring an innovative fit-for-purpose estate. It argues that a nuanced approach and joined-up dialogue is needed between university staff whose remit covers these areas. Drawing from fifteen semi-structured interviews with students and staff at a research-intensive university in London,…

  3. Educators' perceptions on bullying prevention strategies | de Wet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I rep ort on an inve stigatio n into a group of Free State educators' recognition of bullying, their reaction s to incidences of b ullying, and the ir perceptions of the effectiveness of a number o f bul lying prevention s trategies. The research instrument was a synthesis of the Delaware Research Questionnaire and questions ...

  4. Implementing Inclusive Education in Primary Schools in Bangladesh: Recommended Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmmed, Masud; Mullick, Jahirul

    2014-01-01

    Continued discrimination towards, and exclusion of, children with special needs, combined with the high dropout rate of students from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds, creates considerable pressure on the inclusive education (IE) reform initiatives of developing countries. To minimise the challenges to implementing IE reform policies…

  5. China's Strategy for the Internationalization of Higher Education: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, the internationalization of higher education in China has had considerable achievements, and has contributed to the current transformation of the Chinese system into one of the largest and arguably most promising ones in the world. Setting the Chinese experience in an international context, this article assesses the latest…

  6. strategies on perceived motivational climate in physical education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grounded in Achievement Goal Theory of Nicholls (1989), the aim of this study was to assess the development of four teaching interventions based on the TARGET areas of Ames (1992) and verify their effect on the perceived motivational climate at situational level in Physical Education (PE) classes. Participants were 580 ...

  7. National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Strategy 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Council, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Despite determined effort much more needs to be done to close the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education outcomes. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are the first Australians with the oldest continuing cultures in human history. Governments across Australia affirm the right of Aboriginal and Torres Islander people to…

  8. Financing Education for the Public Good: A New Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Walter W.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is suggested that depends on and measures how spending on higher and basic education is really an investment in the future, not consumption spending. This is a vital distinction because investment in human capital contributes heavily to growth and development, but also to higher state tax revenue and lower Medicaid, child care,…

  9. Interactive Education in Public Administration (2): Strategies for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Jonathan; Alford, John

    2015-01-01

    The previous article ("Interactive education in public administration (1): The role of teaching 'objects'") described the benefits of "moving from behind the lectern" to engage in interactive teaching in public policy and administration, and the central role of "objects" in that process. But teaching…

  10. Designing Pedagogic Strategies for Dialogic Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alyson

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the pedagogic value of dialogue to strengthen pre-service teachers' reflective practices and improve their knowledge about the power of talk for learning. Dialogic learning was introduced to a unit of study taken by a final-year cohort of students in an initial teacher education degree at an urban university in Australia.…

  11. Canada's International Education Strategy: Focus on Scholarships. CBIE Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Based on a survey of approximately 40 professionals involved in various disciplines associated with international education across Canada, this study examines Canada's (federal, provincial, and territorial government) offering of scholarships to international students. Focused at the university level, the study elaborates on relevant international…

  12. Corporate real estate alignment strategies in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theo van der Voordt; Ronald Beckers

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to explore the management approaches concerned with the process of aligning Corporate Real Estate (CRE) with organizational goals on a strategic level and regarding day-to-day operating activities in higher education institutes. Methodology/approach – The paper first

  13. Evaluation Strategies in Financial Education: Evaluation with Imperfect Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lauren; Dudensing, Rebekka; Granovsky, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    Program evaluation often suffers due to time constraints, imperfect instruments, incomplete data, and the need to report standardized metrics. This article about the evaluation process for the Wi$eUp financial education program showcases the difficulties inherent in evaluation and suggests best practices for assessing program effectiveness. We…

  14. Higher Education Lecturing and Humor: From Perspectives to Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Fuzhan; Mafakheri, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the issues surrounding the use of humor as an informal teaching method in higher education lecturing. The impact and usefulness of humor, from both a teacher's and a student's perspective, will be investigated. The aim is to classify the challenges and limitations of using humor in classrooms and to investigate and…

  15. Social Justice Praxis in Education: Towards Sustainable Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deventer, Idilette; van der Westhuizen, Philip C.; Potgieter, Ferdinand J.

    2015-01-01

    Social justice, defined as an impetus towards a socially just educational world, is based on the assumption that all people, irrespective of belief or societal position, are entitled to be treated according to the values of human rights, human dignity and equality. Diverging from the classical positivist approach in social science research that…

  16. Strategies to Improve Students’ Educational Achievement Motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdokht Taheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In view of the fact that motivation is linked directly to the learning process and educational achievement, this study endeavored to identify strategies to improve students’ educational achievement motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 368 students from Guilan University of Medical Sciences were selected using simple random sampling from 2013-2014. All of the Guilan University of Medical Sciences’ students met the general eligibility criteria except guest students. The questionnaire included five domains of economic, socio-cultural, educational, geo-regional, and personality factors in educational achievement motivation. Through using descriptive and inferential statistics (Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, the compiled data were analyzed at the significance level of 0.05. Results: Data analysis revealed that socio-cultural factors have the maximum score (64.14 ± 9.92 and geo-regional factors have the minimum score (19.01±3.63 on the participants’ educational achievement motivation. What is more, a significant difference was revealed between educational field and educational effective factors as well as educational level and educational effective factors (p<0.011, p<0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Given that the socio-cultural factors had the maximum score on the students’ educational achievement motivation, it is recommended that university officials take these factors into account, and attempt to plan to provide appropriate strategies to enhance their students’ motivation, specifically their educational achievement motivation.

  17. Human Rights Education: A Pedagogical and Didactic (Teaching Strategy Focused in a Controversial Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Magendzo-Kolstrein

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article, which can be envision as an essay, is to present a pedagogical-didactic strategy for human rights education focusing on the controversy. Advancements and setbacks faced by human rights education in Latin America are exposed in order to support this strategy. Therefore, it indicates that education has denied the conflict and explains the need for its inclusion under the idea of ‘controversial issue’. Additionally, the existence of conflicts in the interpretation, violation and/or respect for human rights is pointed out. The principal tensions that cross human rights are displayed. Based on the above, the need to support the existence of a human rights education focusing on the conflict and central components of its teaching strategy are described, and it ends by referring to its didactic approach and the role which should be assumed by faculty when teaching human rights including the conflict.

  18. Pharmacy education in India: strategies for a better future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jishnu, V; Gilhotra, Rm; Mishra, Dn

    2011-10-01

    In this world of specialization and globalization the pharmacy education in India is suffering from serious backdrops and flaws. There is an urgent need to initiate an academic exercise aimed at attaining revamping of curriculum, keeping in pace with current and emerging trends in the field of pharmacy. Unfortunately all these years, enough emphasis was not laid on strengthening the components of Community Pharmacy, Hospital and Clinical pharmacy, while designing curriculum at diploma and degree levels of teaching. The curriculum followed by almost all universities in India are no were up to the world standards and students are still getting the 20-30 yrs older compounding practical exposure in labs during the graduation level. The article emphasises the concept of innovation ecosystems and quality management. Application of TQM to the educational system improves the present situation. The counseling system which serves to be the gateway of the students for entry into the profession should be brought under the scanner. Introducing specializations at the graduation level will result in professional expertise and excellence. Education is a customer focused industry and every student should be capable of evaluating themselves for continuously improving their quality and professionalism. Teacher focused mastery learning should give away to student focused smart learning. An educational institution should provide the student with a stress-free atmosphere for learning and developing his intellectual capabilities. Every college should have a counseling centre to address the problems of students in their academic and personal life. An emphasis on the concept of quality teacher is included. Revival of the pharmacy education in India is the need of the hour which in turn will pave the way for the up gradation of the pharmacy profession in the country.

  19. Educational Justice Due to More Education? Requests for a Solution Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Grümme, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Why does education fail to realize educational justice? Why does religious education not play a part in contributing to educational justice to some degree, as it is technically located in the logic of its handed down biblical message? On the one hand, education is socially testified as being at a crucial moment of educational justice, on the other hand, it is not only political and institutional determinants that seem to be opposed to that. In class, there are moments that counteract the abol...

  20. Educational strategies for rural new graduate registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle-Simmons, Sara

    2013-03-01

    Rural health care facilities are geographically remote, tend to be small, and often possess limited resources. Although newly graduated registered nurses are important to the work force of many rural communities, maintaining a formal preceptorship/mentorship program within a rural hospital may prove difficult as a result of limited resources. Unfortunately, the new graduate may become overwhelmed by the many expectations for clinical practice and the facility can experience high turnover rates of new graduate hires. This article explores the unique traits of the rural hospital and the new graduate nurse as well as the pros and cons of a formal preceptorship program within a rural setting. Constructivist learning theory is used to develop practical teaching strategies that can be used by the preceptor and the new graduate. These strategies are inexpensive, yet effective, and are feasible for even the smallest of facilities. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Learning outcomes with visual thinking strategies in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Margaret; Hensel, Desiree; Decker, Kim A; Busby, Katie

    2017-04-01

    There is a need to develop innovative strategies that cultivate broad cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal skills in nursing curricula. The purpose of this project was to explore transferable skills students gained from Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS). This qualitative descriptive study was conducted with 55 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in an entry level healthy population course. The students participated in a 1h VTS session led by a trained facilitator. Data came from the group's written responses to a question about how they would use skills learned from VTS in caring for patients and in their nursing practice. Content analysis showed students perceived gaining observational, cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal skills from the VTS session. VTS is a unique teaching strategy that holds the potential to help nursing students develop a broad range of skills. Studies are needed on optimal exposure needed to develop observational, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills. Research is also needed on how skills gained in VTS translate to practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Research Notes ~ The Audiocast Diaries: Reflections on radio and podcasting for delivery of educational soap operas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Elliott

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available March 24, 2005: While studying Gender Issues in Distance Education at Athabasca University, I read about the nomadic Fulbe women in Nigeria who learned by radio. I could understand their concerns with uninspired educational radio programs that did “not take into consideration the rhythm of . . . [their] lives” (Usman, 2001, p. 98. There was one tiny reference to a drama series, but as a scriptwriter and a woman interested in the power of storytelling as education, I was intrigued. The idea of serial drama as education was planted in my mind...

  3. Improving health related quality of life among rural hypertensive patients through the integrative strategy of health services delivery: a quasi-experimental trial from Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yudong; Zhang, Liang; Sparring, Vibeke; Sandeep, Sandeep; Tang, Wenxi; Sun, Xiaowei; Feng, Da; Ye, Ting

    2016-08-23

    Integrative strategy of health services delivery has been proven to be effective in economically developed countries, where the healthcare systems have enough qualified primary care providers. However rural China lacks such providers to act as gatekeeper, besides, Chinese rural hypertensive patients are usually of old age, more likely to be exposed to health risk factors and they experience a greater socio-economic burden. All these Chinese rural setting specific features make the effectiveness of integrative strategy of health services in improving health related quality of life among Chinese rural hypertensive patients uncertain. In order to assess the impact of integrative strategy of health services delivery on health related quality of life among Chinese rural hypertensive patients, a two-year quasi-experimental trial was conducted in Chongqing, China. At baseline the sample enrolled 1006 hypertensive patients into intervention group and 420 hypertensive patients into control group. Physicians from village clinics, town hospitals and county hospitals worked collaboratively to deliver multidisciplinary health services for the intervention group, while physicians in the control group provided services without cooperation. The quality of life was studied by SF-36 Scale. Blood pressures were reported by town hospitals. The Difference-in-Differences model was used to estimate the differences in SF-36 score and blood pressure of both groups to assess the impact. The study showed that at baseline there was no statistical difference in SF-36 scores between both groups. While at follow-up the intervention group scored higher in overall SF-36, Role Physical, Body Pain, Social Functioning and Role Emotional than the control group. The Difference-in-Differences result demonstrated that there were statistical differences in SF-36 total score (p = 0.011), Role Physical (p = 0.027), Social Functioning (p = 0.000), Role Emotional (p = 0.002) between both

  4. [Strategy for educating senior dermatological residents in mycology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Sei, Yoshihiro; Hiruma, Masataro; Watanabe, Shinichi; Makimura, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    To improve the ability of dermatologists to diagnose cutaneous mycoses, we have proposed a list of the minimum mycological knowledge and skills required by senior residents of dermatology. The list includes ability to select the most appropriate sampling method, knowledge of the basic method of potassium hydroxide (KOH) examination and skill in performing fungal cultures and identifying the most prevalent fungal species isolated from skin lesions. It is not possible for the Japanese Society of Medical Mycology to train every senior resident directly, and it is difficult for them to acquire sufficient expertise independently. Consequently, training and advice given by instructors in residents' home institutes is essential. A project of an advanced course for instructors, who are in charge of educating senior residents in their own institute, may be possible. Therefore, we have proposed here a list for instructors of the knowledge and skills required to educate senior residents. Employing this list should realize improved skill in dermatologists.

  5. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Visual data mining for developing competitive strategies in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Ertek, Gürdal; Ertek, Gurdal

    2009-01-01

    Information visualization is the growing field of computer science that aims at visually mining data for knowledge discovery. In this paper, a data mining framework and a novel information visualization scheme is developed and applied to the domain of higher education. The presented framework consists of three main types of visual data analysis: Discovering general insights, carrying out competitive benchmarking, and planning for High School Relationship Management (HSRM). In this paper the f...

  7. A strategy for global environmental education at the university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.T.; Hayes, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's environment is a dynamic system that is affected both by natural phenomena and by human activity. The changes occurring in the global environment are bound to have serious consequences for all its inhabitants. Therefore, the world is rapidly becoming interdependent. Multidisciplinary scientific efforts must be directed toward understanding these global environmental changes. These efforts will require sufficient funds to attract scientists into global environmental research and to disseminate new knowledge to future scholars and to the general public alike. The federal government has a definite role to play in this effort and should allocate sufficient funds to initiate and sustain these programs. Unfortunately, such funds are not currently budgeted. The academic department, as the basic structural and functional unit of the American university system, is most appropriate to ensure environmental educational goals. The authors propose the establishment of a novel Department of Global Environment at every university. That department must be multidisciplinary in nature and must accumulate a critical mass of scholars from all relevant traditional disciplines in the arts and sciences to generate knowledge, to educate students, and to provide advisory services to policy makers. The study product of this department should receive a broad-based education and should emerge as an informed individual who possesses sufficient skills to achieve sustainable communities. That student should also be equipped to assume leadership and to formulate policy about global environmental issues. The investment in education may well be the only way to secure a future for humanity and for the natural world as we now know it

  8. Memory game as educative strategy for preventing enteroparasitosis: experience report

    OpenAIRE

    Emanuella Silva Joventino; Lydia Vieira Freitas; Raul Feitoza Rogério; Thaís Marques Lima; Levânia Maria Benevides Dias; Lorena Barbosa Ximenes

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of nursing students in education interaction with preschoolers’ caregivers as far as prevention of enteroparasitosis in preschoolers is concerned.This is a descriptive study, like a reporting experience. This activity counted with the participation of 09 caregivers, in the months of June and October 2006. The group had active participation in the experiment and the knowledge shared from a Giant Memory Game with pictures dealing with the...

  9. FAMILY EDUCATION IN MODERN LIFE-DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

    OpenAIRE

    I.I. Dorozhko

    2018-01-01

    The crisis of a family education in modern societies, which, according to its definition are the risk societies, is caused not only by lagging of its practice from the accelerated pace of modern societies modernization and changes in the organization of family life, but also by the decline of the culture of life development and pedagogical culture of wider population stratum. The changes taking place in modern families, hasty conclusions about the replacement of traditional family with its ne...

  10. An Education Strategy to Respond to Medicine Inequality in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrn, Stephen R; Ekeocha, Zita; Clase, Kari L

    2017-07-01

    People living in Africa face a heavy and wide-ranging burden of disease that takes an incalculable toll on social and economic development as well as shortening life expectancy (life expectancy in Tanzania is about 60 vs. about 80 in the United States and Europe. Further, the pharmaceutical market in developing countries is immature and may not support quality medicines. In many cases, a tender system is used, and medicines are bought by the government at the lowest price. In addition to access to medicines, a number of pharmaceutical sciences problems are apparent. The availability of infrastructure and especially standard instruments such as HPLC and X-ray diffraction is minimal. Additionally, there is an important need to increase access to advanced education for men and women in Africa, especially access to state-of-the-art scientific education. Utilizing the mandate of Nelson Mandela, Purdue's conceptual approach has been to utilize education to combat these problems. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Building Visual Artists’ Resilience Capabilities: Current Educator Strategies and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Maree Siddins

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Enrolments in higher education programs in the creative and performing arts are increasing in many countries. Yet graduates of these degrees, who enter the broad sector known as the creative industries, face particular challenges in terms of securing long-term and sustainable employment. In addition, creative and performing artists face a range of mental challenges, caused by such factors as: the solitary nature of much creative practice, critical feedback by audiences and gatekeepers, or the general pressures associated with maintaining artistic relevance or integrity. The concepts of resilience and professional wellbeing are therefore highly relevant to those who pursue a career in creative industries, and while there has been an emerging body of work in this area, to date it has focussed on the performing arts area (e.g. music, theatre. Hence, in order to expand knowledge relevant to resilience and artists, this paper sets out to explore the extent to which current educators in the Australian context specifically address these issues within higher visual arts curricula; specifically the areas of illustration, design, film and photography. This was achieved via interviews with seventeen current academics working in these areas. The findings propose that higher education providers of programs in the visual arts consider placing a stronger emphasis on the embedded development of resilience and professional wellbeing capacities.

  12. A Review of Special Education Services Delivery in the United States and Nigeria: Implications for Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Eskay; Onu, Victoria; Janeth, Igbo

    2012-01-01

    Both Nigeria and the United States represent developing and developed countries respectively, and special education policy between these two countries are different. Both countries have contributed to help learners with exceptionalities in their policies. These policies help in the formulation and implementation of special education programmes for…

  13. College-Based Personal Finance Education: Student Interest in Three Delivery Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Joseph; Cude, Brenda J.; Nielsen, Robert B.; Chatterjee, Swarn; Mimura, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    Using online survey responses from 509 undergraduate students, three financial education methods (on-campus financial counseling center, online financial management resources, and in-person educational workshops) were examined. Using a social constructionist framework, the analysis controlled for various demographic and financial factors. The…

  14. Accountability in Education: An Imperative for Service Delivery in Nigerian School Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Yunusa Dangara

    2016-01-01

    Schools and other educational institutions are established, maintained and sustained essentially to achieve certain assured objectives. The goals of such establishment cannot be easily achieved without putting in place certain mechanisms towards ensuring the success of implementation of its policies and programmes. In the education system, one of…

  15. What Might Online Delivery Teach Us about Blended Management Education? Prior Perspectives and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaugh, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Although the term has roots in the training and development literature, "blended learning" has only recently begun to be studied in management education. This article examines the literatures of blended and fully online management education to determine whether there are factors that may influence instructional effectiveness that are…

  16. The Strategy to Align Road Safety Education to the Further Education and Training Band Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Lianne; van Dijk, Gerda; Fourie, David

    2016-01-01

    Road safety education is a complex phenomenon which should be viewed holistically if taken into account the interconnectedness of education, infrastructure and enforcement. Effective road safety education is specifically important for learners in the Further Education and Training (FET) band, as they are active contributors to a community. The…

  17. SOLUBILITY AND BIOAVAILABILITY ENHANCEMENT STRATEGIES FOR EFFECTIVE DELIVERY OF POORLY WATER SOLUBLE DRUGS BY NANO FORMULATIONS AND SOLID DISPERSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Rayapolu Ranga Goud*, Gunnala Krishnaveni, Girija Prasad Patro

    2018-01-01

    For the ancient few years, there has been a substantial research done on diverse methodologies for poorly water soluble and lipophilic drugs. More in modern times voluminous molecules cannot be distributed due to low solubility. Now a day frequently, particulate vesicle systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microspheres, niosomes, pronisomes, ethosomes, and proliposomes have been used as drug carriers. Drug delivery designates the technique and methodology to conveying medications or drug...

  18. Strategies for Improving Learner Metacognition in Health Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Melissa S.; Castleberry, Ashley N.

    2017-01-01

    Metacognition is an essential skill in critical thinking and self-regulated, lifelong learning. It is important for learners to have skills in metacognition because they are used to monitor and regulate reasoning, comprehension, and problem-solving, which are fundamental components/outcomes of pharmacy curricula. Instructors can help learners develop metacognitive skills within the classroom and experiential setting by carefully designing learning activities within courses and the curriculum. These skills are developed through intentional questioning, modeling techniques, and reflection. This article discusses key background literature on metacognition and identifies specific methods and strategies to develop learners’ metacognitive skills in both the classroom and experiential settings. PMID:28630519

  19. Strategies for Improving Learner Metacognition in Health Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Melissa S; Castleberry, Ashley N; Persky, Adam M

    2017-05-01

    Metacognition is an essential skill in critical thinking and self-regulated, lifelong learning. It is important for learners to have skills in metacognition because they are used to monitor and regulate reasoning, comprehension, and problem-solving, which are fundamental components/outcomes of pharmacy curricula. Instructors can help learners develop metacognitive skills within the classroom and experiential setting by carefully designing learning activities within courses and the curriculum. These skills are developed through intentional questioning, modeling techniques, and reflection. This article discusses key background literature on metacognition and identifies specific methods and strategies to develop learners' metacognitive skills in both the classroom and experiential settings.

  20. Administrative Strategies of School Management Effectiveness, Buriram Office of Primary Educational Service Area 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanintipparat Prommaraj

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were 1 to study the current and the expected Conditions of school management effectiveness, Buriram Office of Primary Educational Service Area 4 and 2 to construct administrative strategies of such schools. Eighty of directors, board chairpersons, teachers and parents were sampled. The instruments for data collection were 5-level rating scale questionnaires with the IOC value between 0.60–1.00 and the reliability value of 0.88 and in-depth interview forms. Quantitative data were analyzed by computer and qualitative data were inductively analyzed. The findings were as follows: 1. The current conditions school management effectiveness, Buriram Office of Primary Educational Service Area 4 was moderate while the expected conditions was high. By means of expected condition can be listed from high to low were atmosphere and environment management, administration, learning management and participation. 2. Strategies for effective management of schools under the Office of Educational Service Area 4 consists of four elementary Bachelor’s strategy is the first strategic development, management efficiency. 2 learners develop strategies to meet educational standards. Strategy 3: create an atmosphere and environment conducive to development. Strategy 4 and the joint cooperation of network.

  1. Pieter Cullis: an outstanding lipid biophysicist, drug delivery scientist, educator, and entrepreneur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Leaf; Miao, Lei

    2016-11-01

    There are much said about Pieter Cullis in this special volume honoring him. He was the pioneer to study the role of hexagonal HII phase in membrane fusion and the one who applied this concept for the design of lipid nanoparticles. He was also the first to utilize remote loading techniques for the delivery of amphipathic bases. At the same time, he is a tremendous entrepreneur and an excellent mentor. He is, without doubt, an exceptional scientist and set us an excellent model to follow.

  2. Investigating the relationship between quality, format and delivery of feedback for written assignments in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sopina, Liza Elizaveta; McNeill, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Feedback can have a great impact on student learning. However, in order for it to be effective, feedback needs to be of high quality. Electronic marking has been one of the latest adaptations of technology in teaching and offers a new format of delivering feedback. There is little research...... improved speed and consistency of marking. There was no increase or decrease in satisfaction with the feedback received. Overall, electronic marking was found to be an acceptable method of delivery of feedback on written assignments by both students and markers. The findings of this study suggest...

  3. The University and the Community: Planning for an Alternative Form of Educational Service Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Wayne G.

    1980-01-01

    The planning process and marketing strategy adopted by a large urban postsecondary institution investigating the feasibility of developing a branch campus is described. Among the planning elements were a market analysis and citizen interest survey. (MSE)

  4. Genetics education for health professionals: strategies and outcomes from a national initiative in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndon, Peter A; Bennett, Catherine

    2008-04-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) National Genetics Education and Development Centre was established by the Department of Health in 2004 to help drive and co-ordinate genetics education for health professionals working outside specialist genetic services. This paper reviews the experiences and lessons learned to date. At the outset, it was clear that understanding the learning ethos, preferred delivery methods and attitudes towards genetics of different NHS healthcare groups was vital. We collected evidence by undertaking needs assessments with educators, practitioners and patients. We have determined the genetics knowledge, skills and attitudes which they said were needed and translated these into learning outcomes and workforce competences in a continuum of education. Beginning with core concepts introduced (and examined) pre-registration, the continuum continues with development of concepts post-registration as appropriate for role, leading to practical application and assessment of competences in the workplace. These are supported by a portfolio of resources which draw heavily on patient based scenarios to demonstrate to staff that genetics is relevant to their work, and to convince educators and policy makers that genetic education is likely to result in real clinical benefit. A long term educational policy, inclusive of learners, educationalists and their institutions must be evidence based, flexible and responsive to changes in workforce structure, provision of clinical services and conceptual and financial commitments to education. The engagement of national policy, regulatory and professional bodies is vital (www.geneticseducation.nhs.uk).

  5. Integrated systematic review on educational strategies that promote academic success and resilience in undergraduate indigenous students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, T; Creedy, D K; West, R

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous recommendations by governments, researchers, and education policymakers the recruitment, retention and success of undergraduate indigenous students in higher education is not commensurate of the wider student population. There is minimal evidence of valuing indigenous worldviews and perspectives in curricula, and effectiveness of educational strategies to strengthen indigenous student success rates in completing undergraduate studies. To conduct an integrative systematic review of educational strategies to promote academic success and resilience in undergraduate indigenous students. Major databases of Scopus, ProQuest, Informit and Web of Science were searched. Inclusion criteria were peer reviewed research articles from scholarly journals that referenced indigenous, aboriginal, First Nation or Māori students in undergraduate programs in higher education. The search was limited to English language and studies conducted from 1995 to 2014. The search yielded 156 research papers which reduced to 16 papers that met the inclusion criteria. The included papers were critiqued from a standpoint theory approach that reflects feminism, cultural respect, and humanism. Much of the literature describes issues, and provides qualitative analyses of experiences, but empirical evaluations of interventions are rare. There was a gap in current research evaluating strategies to improve indigenous student success and resilience. Key strategies for indigenous student success are multi-faceted, layered support, underpinned by the principles of respect, relationships, and responsibility. Implications for nursing and midwifery education, research and health care practice are outlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The process of end-of-life care delivery to the families of elderly patients according to the Family Health Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucía; Poles, Kátia; Baliza, Michelle Freire; dos Santos Ribeiro Silva, Mariana Cristina Lobato; dos Santos, Maiara Rodrigues; Bousso, Regina Szylit

    2013-02-01

    To understand the process of end-of-life care delivery to the families of elderly patients according to a Family Health Strategy (FHS) team, to identify the meanings the team attributes to the experience and to build a theoretical model. Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory were applied. Fourteen professionals working in an FHS located in a country town in the state of São Paulo were interviewed. Through comparative analysis, the core category overcoming challenges to assist the family and the elderly during the dying process was identified, and it was composed of the following sub-processes: Identifying situational problems, Planning a new care strategy, Managing the care and Evaluating the care process. the team faces difficulties to achieve better performance in attending to the biological and emotional needs of families, seeking to ensure dignity to the elderly at the end of their lives and expand access to healthcare.

  7. Action methods in the classroom: creative strategies for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dorcas E; Freed, Patricia E; Tadych, Rita A

    2006-01-01

    Nursing education recognizes the need for a framework of experiential learning that supports the development of professional roles. Action methods, originated by Jacob L. Moreno (1953), can be readily adapted to any nursing classroom to create the conditions under which students learn and practice professional nursing roles. While nurse faculty can learn to use action methods, they may not fully comprehend their theoretical underpinnings or may believe they are only used in therapy. This article explores Moreno's ideas related to psychodrama and sociodrama applied in classroom settings, and presents many examples and tips for classroom teachers who wish to incorporate action methods into their classes.

  8. Strategies of day care center educators in dealing crying babies

    OpenAIRE

    Lígia Ebner Melchiori; Zélia Maria Mendes Biasoli Alves

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the views of day care center educators on how they act when babies cry, if they are able to identify the causes of crying and what are the subjection reasons that make them take action or not. Twenty-one caretakers were interviewed about each of the ninety babies, aged 4 to 24 months, under their care, using a semi-structured guide. The results show that overall the proportion of babies that do not cry significantly increases with age. However, crying f...

  9. Early Childhood Educators' Meta-Cognitive Knowledge of Problem-Solving Strategies and Quality of Childcare Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Ha

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the impact of early childhood educators' meta-cognitive knowledge on the quality of their childcare curriculum implementation, and to gain insights regarding successful problem-solving strategies associated with early education and care. Early childhood educators' implementation of general problem-solving strategies in…

  10. A Cross-Cultural Study on Environmental Risk Perception and Educational Strategies: Implications for Environmental Education in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongxia; Fortner, Rosanne

    2010-01-01

    This cross-cultural study examined college students' environmental risk perception and their preference in terms of risk communication and educational strategies in China and the United States. The results indicated that the Chinese respondents were more concerned about environmental risk, and they perceived the environmental issues to be more…

  11. Education and dissemination strategies of photoactuation as a novel phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, E. M.; Wenn, D.; Ramos, I.; Esteve, J.; Mamojka, B.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2011-10-01

    In the current information age, scientists and educators are urged to disseminate scientific findings in a prompt manner for increased public acceptance, later on, in the market place. Customer acceptance of highly novel technologies is an education-driven effort that requires attention early-on during the stage of technology development. Prompt attention is particularly needed in technologies where nanoparticles are employed, such as those being developed within the Nano- Optical Mechanical Systems (NOMS) project. Another driving force to disseminate photoactuation is to generate interest and curiosity amongst the K-12 population that could eventually lead to increased enrollment of students in the physical sciences. In this paper, we present a work plan for the dissemination of photoactuation to society at large; from K-12 to the general public. The work plan will be designed in accordance with the logic model, following indications of the National Academy of Sciences, and will include a proposal for evaluating translational research following a process marker model.

  12. A novel respiratory motion compensation strategy combining gated beam delivery and mean target position concept - A compromise between small safety margins and long duty cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Kavanagh, Anthony; Webb, Steve; Brada, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel respiratory motion compensation strategy combining gated beam delivery with the mean target position (MTP) concept for pulmonary stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials and methods: Four motion compensation strategies were compared for 10 targets with motion amplitudes between 6 mm and 31 mm: the internal target volume concept (plan ITV ); the MTP concept where safety margins were adapted based on 4D dose accumulation (plan MTP ); gated beam delivery without margins for motion compensation (plan gated ); a novel approach combining gating and the MTP concept (plan gated and MTP ). Results: For 5/10 targets with an average motion amplitude of 9 mm, the differences in the mean lung dose (MLD) between plan gated and plan MTP were gated and MTP . Despite significantly shorter duty cycles, plan gated reduced the MLD by gated and MTP . The MLD was increased by 18% in plan MTP compared to that of plan gated and MTP . Conclusions: For pulmonary targets with motion amplitudes >10-15 mm, the combination of gating and the MTP concept allowed small safety margins with simultaneous long duty cycles.

  13. Technological Factors, User Characteristics and Didactic Strategies in Educational Virtual Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natsis, Antonios; Vrellis, Ioannis; Papachristos, Nikiforos

    2012-01-01

    Technological factors, user characteristics and didactic strategies do not function consistently across Educational Virtual Environments. This study investigates the impact of viewing condition and didactic strategy on attention allocation, suspension of disbelief, spatial presence, and learning...... outcomes in an Educational Virtual Environment concerning ancient Greek pottery. Our results show that the viewing condition does not affect attention allocation, suspension of disbelief, and spatial presence. Learning outcomes are better in the monoscopic viewing condition. Didactic strategy has an impact...... on suspension of disbelief and learning outcomes. Domain specific interest associates with higher level of attention allocation and spatial presence, while spatial presence is not related to learning outcomes. More research is needed in order to identify the role of each one of the above factors in Educational...

  14. Strategies for selecting effective patient nutrition education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Laura H

    2010-10-01

    Nutrition and diet therapy are at the center of health promotion activities and self-management of chronic diseases. To assist an individual in making informed decisions regarding his or her diet and increase adherence to dietary recommendations or treatments, healthcare professionals must select health information that is appropriate to the client's level of understanding. A systematic approach in the evaluation of patient education material, whether in print or on the World Wide Web, must focus on the information's content, literacy level, graphical displays, layout and typography, motivating principles, cultural relevance, and feasibility. Additional criteria should be evaluated when accessing Web sites and include source, site credibility, conflict of interest, disclaimer, disclosure, navigation, and interactivity information.

  15. Academic coordination at university: Strategies for high quality education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Mar Durán Bellonch

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Most lecturers and professors involved in teaching School Management and Education Management courses have been engaged in developing some innovative actions to improve the training quality that we offer to students in the Pedagogy degree at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. These actions are aimed at increasing co-ordination among the teaching staff when designing and implementing the course curricula. Co-ordination meetings, exchanges of teaching experiences, discussions about what, how and when to teach the different contents, in which courses and at what level, methodological issues pointed out through technical description cards or the elaboration of study cases to be solved have become the basis of relevant actions during the last academic years. This paper explains each one of them, and provides useful information about the theoretical background, the process carried out, some of the results obtained, the output and the tools created.

  16. The perceived influence of diversity factors on effective strategy implementation in a higher education institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Strydom

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Managing diversity is one of the major challenges in higher education institutions in South Africa. Additionally, effective strategy implementation is vital for an institution to be successful and sustainable. Questionnaires were distributed to the management of Walter Sisulu University, South Africa, to investigate the relationship between diversity factors and effective strategy implementation. The questionnaires interrogated the effect of the acculturation process, the degree of structural integration, the degree of informal integration, institutional bias and intergroup conflict, and how these factors influence strategy implementation. Structural equation modelling (SEM was employed as the statistical tool to confirm the hypothetical model. Results of this study revealed that there is no statistically significant relationship between diversity and strategy implementation at the institution, and imply that diversity among staff do not impact on the successful achievement of strategic objectives in the institution. The findings of the study are contrary to empirical evidence by other studies. Keywords: Education, Sociology, Political science, Psychology

  17. Strategy for chemotherapeutic delivery using a nanosized porous metal-organic framework with a central composite design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingpeng; Li, Xiuyan; Guan, Qingxia; Zhang, Chunjing; Xu, Ting; Dong, Yujing; Bai, Xinyu; Zhang, Weiping

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing drug delivery is an ongoing endeavor in pharmaceutics, especially when the efficacy of chemotherapy for cancer is concerned. In this study, we prepared and evaluated nanosized HKUST-1 (nanoHKUST-1), nanosized metal-organic drug delivery framework, loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for potential use in cancer treatment. NanoHKUST-1 was prepared by reacting copper (II) acetate [Cu(OAc) 2 ] and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (H 3 BTC) with benzoic acid (C 6 H 5 COOH) at room temperature (23.7°C±2.4°C). A central composite design was used to optimize 5-FU-loaded nanoHKUST-1. Contact time, ethanol concentration, and 5-FU:material ratios were the independent variables, and the entrapment efficiency of 5-FU was the response parameter measured. Powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nitrogen adsorption were used to determine the morphology of nanoHKUST-1. In addition, 5-FU release studies were conducted, and the in vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated. Entrapment efficiency and drug loading were 9.96% and 40.22%, respectively, while the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed a regular porous structure. The SEM and TEM images of the nanoHKUST-1 confirmed the presence of round particles (diameter: approximately 100 nm) and regular polygon arrays of mesoporous channels of approximately 2-5 nm. The half-maximal lethal concentration (LC 50 ) of the 5-FU-loaded nanoHKUST-1 was approximately 10 µg/mL. The results indicated that nanoHKUST-1 is a potential vector worth developing as a cancer chemotherapeutic drug delivery system.

  18. Telemedicine delivery of patient education in remote Ontario communities: feasibility of an Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC-led inflammatory arthritis education program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warmington K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Kelly Warmington,1 Carol Flewelling,2 Carol A Kennedy,3,4 Rachel Shupak,5 Angelo Papachristos,5 Caroline Jones,5 Denise Linton,3 Dorcas E Beaton,3,4,6–8 Sydney Lineker9 1Learning Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, 2Telemedicine Program, 3Musculoskeletal Health & Outcomes Research, St. Michael’s Hospital, 4Institute for Work & Health, 5Martin Family Centre for Arthritis Care & Research, St. Michael’s Hospital, 6Graduate Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, 7Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science, 8Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, 9The Arthritis Society (Ontario Division, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: Telemedicine-based approaches to health care service delivery improve access to care. It was recognized that adults with inflammatory arthritis (IA living in remote areas had limited access to patient education and could benefit from the 1-day Prescription for Education (RxEd program. The program was delivered by extended role practitioners with advanced training in arthritis care. Normally offered at one urban center, RxEd was adapted for videoconference delivery through two educator development workshops that addressed telemedicine and adult education best practices. This study explores the feasibility of and participant satisfaction with telemedicine delivery of the RxEd program in remote communities.Materials and methods: Participants included adults with IA attending the RxEd program at one of six rural sites. They completed post-course program evaluations and follow-up interviews. Educators provided post-course feedback to identify program improvements that were later implemented.Results: In total, 123 people (36 in-person and 87 remote, across 6 sites participated, attending one of three RxEd sessions. Remote participants were satisfied with the quality of the videoconference (% agree/strongly agree: could hear the presenter (92.9% and discussion

  19. Strategy for chemotherapeutic delivery using a nanosized porous metal-organic framework with a central composite design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li YP

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Yingpeng Li,1 Xiuyan Li,2 Qingxia Guan,2 Chunjing Zhang,2 Ting Xu,2 Yujing Dong,2 Xinyu Bai,2 Weiping Zhang3 1College of Pharmacy, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, 2College of Pharmacy, Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 3Pope John XXIII High School, Everett, MA, USA Background: Enhancing drug delivery is an ongoing endeavor in pharmaceutics, especially when the efficacy of chemotherapy for cancer is concerned. In this study, we prepared and evaluated nanosized HKUST-1 (nanoHKUST-1, nanosized metal-organic drug delivery framework, loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU for potential use in cancer treatment.Materials and methods: NanoHKUST-1 was prepared by reacting copper (II acetate [Cu(OAc2] and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3BTC with benzoic acid (C6H5COOH at room temperature (23.7°C±2.4°C. A central composite design was used to optimize 5-FU-loaded nanoHKUST-1. Contact time, ethanol concentration, and 5-FU:material ratios were the independent variables, and the entrapment efficiency of 5-FU was the response parameter measured. Powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and nitrogen adsorption were used to determine the morphology of nanoHKUST-1. In addition, 5-FU release studies were conducted, and the in vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated.Results: Entrapment efficiency and drug loading were 9.96% and 40.22%, respectively, while the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed a regular porous structure. The SEM and TEM images of the nanoHKUST-1 confirmed the presence of round particles (diameter: approximately 100 nm and regular polygon arrays of mesoporous channels of approximately 2–5 nm. The half-maximal lethal concentration (LC50 of the 5-FU-loaded nanoHKUST-1 was approximately 10 µg/mL.Conclusion: The results indicated that nanoHKUST-1 is a potential vector worth developing as a

  20. Best strategies for patient education about anticoagulation with warfarin: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sonal

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient education is an essential component in quality management of the anticoagulated patient. Because it is time consuming for clinicians and overwhelming for patients, education of the anticoagulated patient is often neglected. We surveyed the medical literature in order to identify the best patient education strategies. Methods Study Selection: Two reviewers independently searched the MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases (last search March 2007 using the terms "warfarin" or "anticoagulation", and "patient education". The initial search identified 206 citations, A total of 166 citations were excluded because patients were of pediatric age (4, the article was not related to patient education (48, did not contain original data or inadequate program description (141, was focused solely on patient self-testing (1, was a duplicate citation (3, the article was judged otherwise irrelevant (44, or no abstract was available (25. Data Extraction: Clinical setting, study design, group size, content source, time and personnel involved, educational strategy and domains, measures of knowledge retention. Results Data Synthesis: A total of 32 articles were ultimately used for data extraction. Thirteen articles adequately described features of the educational strategy. Five programs used a nurse or pharmacist, 4 used a physician, and 2 studies used other personnel/vehicles (lay educators (1, videotapes (1. The duration of the educational intervention ranged from 1 to 10 sessions. Patient group size most often averaged 3 to 5 patients but ranged from as low as 1 patient to as much as 11 patients. Although 12 articles offered information about education content, the wording and lack of detail in the description made it too difficult to accurately assign categories of education topics and to compare articles with one another. For the 17 articles that reported measures of patient knowledge, 5 of the 17 sites where the surveys were