WorldWideScience

Sample records for education improvement act

  1. Acts of Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Wujastyk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In Sanskrit medical literature, rasāyana is defined as one of eight subject areas of medicine. The proclaimed aim of rasāyana therapies is to preserve or promote health and well-being, but also to prolong life, to halt degeneration caused by aging, to rejuvenate and to improve cognitive function. The term “rasāyana” describes the therapies that together constitute this branch of medicine; the methodology and regimen of treatment; and the medicinal substances and formulations used in these therapies. In Indian alchemical literature, the Sanskrit term “rasāyana” is predominantly used to describe the final stages of alchemical operations, i.e.  all that is involved in the taking of elixirs for attaining a state of spiritual liberation in a living body. Rasāyana in this sense describes a series of related processes, including the preparation of the elixir; the preparation of the practitioner; the intake of the elixir and finally, the process of transformation the practitioner undergoes after intake of the elixir. In my paper, I present examples of rasāyana sections from a selection of medical and alchemical treatises to explore their connections and divergences. I also discuss how the connections between medical and alchemical rasāyana sections reflect the development of iatrochemistry in alchemical literature.

  2. Continuous Improvement in the Public School Context: Understanding How Educators Respond to Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichnor-Wagner, Ariel; Wachen, John; Cannata, Marisa; Cohen-Vogel, Lora

    2017-01-01

    The last 5 years have witnessed growing support amongst government institutions and educational foundations for applying continuous improvement research (CIR) in school settings. CIR responds to the challenge of implementing effective educational innovations at scale by working with practitioners in local contexts to understand "what works,…

  3. Continuous Improvement in the Public School Context: Understanding Educator Responses to Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichnor-Wagner, Ariel; Wachen, John; Cannata, Marisa; Cohen-Vogel, Lora

    2017-01-01

    The last 5 years have witnessed growing support amongst government institutions and educational foundations for applying continuous improvement research (CIR) in school settings. CIR responds to the challenge of implementing effective educational innovations at scale by working with practitioners in local contexts to understand ''what works, for…

  4. The Education Act (Ontario) 1980: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ontario has provided special education legislation through the Education Amendment Act, 1980. Issues related to teacher preparation for special education and program planning and implementation are reviewed. (DF)

  5. Title I--improving the academic achievement of the disadvantaged; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)--assistance to states for the education of children with disabilities. Final regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-09

    The Secretary amends the regulations governing programs administered under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) (referred to in these regulations as the Title I program) and the regulations governing programs under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (referred to in these regulations as the IDEA program). These regulations provide States with additional flexibility regarding State, local educational agency (LEA), and school accountability for the achievement of a small group of students with disabilities whose progress is such that, even after receiving appropriate instruction, including special education and related services designed to address the students' individual needs, the students' individualized education program (IEP) teams (IEP Teams) are reasonably certain that the students will not achieve grade-level proficiency within the year covered by the students' IEPs.

  6. ACTS for distance education in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalu, A.; Ventre, G.

    1995-08-01

    The need for electrical energy supply in the rural communities of developing countries has been well documented. Equally well known is the potential for photovoltaic in cost effectively meeting this need. A major impediment to fulfilling the need is the lack of indigenous personnel with a knowledgeof photovoltaic systems, and the associated infrastructure required to implement project. Various delivery schemes for providing the needed training to developing countries personnel have been investigated. Various train methods and programs that have been employed to remedy the problem have had significant drawbacks in terms of cost, consistency, impact, reach, and sustainability. The hypothesis to be tested in this project posits that satellite-based distance education using ACTS technologies can overcome these impediments. The purpose of the project is to investigate the applicability of the ACTS satellite in providing distance education in photovoltaic systems to developing countries and rural communities. An evaluation of the cost effectiveness of using ACTS unique technologies to overcome identified problems shall be done. The limitations of ACTS in surmounting distance education problems in developing countries shall be investigated. This project will, furthermore, provide training to Savannah State College faculty in photovoltaic (PV) systems and in distance education configurations and models. It will also produce training materials adequate for use in PV training programs via distance education. Savannah State College will, as a consequence become well equipped to play a leading role in the training of minority populations in photovoltaic systems and other renewables through its Center for Advanced Water Technology and Energy Systems. This communication provides the project outline including the specific issues that will be investigated during the project. Also presented i the project design which covers the participations of the various components of a network

  7. Statement of Dr. Marilyn L. Miller, Immediate Past President, American Association of School Librarians, a Division of the American Library Association, before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and Humanities, Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee on Reauthorization of Chapter 2, Education Consolidation and Improvement Act, July 16, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marilyn L.

    1988-01-01

    This statement in support of Education Consolidation Improvement Act reauthorization discusses six topics related to school libraries: (1) purpose of school libraries; (2) research supporting need for school libraries; (3) current status; (4) funding realities; (5) deteriorating book collections; and (6) impact of federal aid. An American Library…

  8. Need-Based Educational Aid Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-44)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Congress, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Need-Based Educational Aid Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-44) was put in place to improve and reauthorize provisions relating to the application of the antitrust laws to the award of need-based educational aid. The contents for this Act is as follows: (1) Short Title; and (2) Extension Relating to the Application of the Antitrust Laws to the…

  9. Automated Discovery of Speech Act Categories in Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Vasile; Moldovan, Cristian; Niraula, Nobal; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we address the important task of automated discovery of speech act categories in dialogue-based, multi-party educational games. Speech acts are important in dialogue-based educational systems because they help infer the student speaker's intentions (the task of speech act classification) which in turn is crucial to providing adequate…

  10. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act: An Overview. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) authorizes several programs to support and improve the education of children with disabilities. The grants to States, preschool, and infants and toddlers programs are formula grant programs that fund special education services. The discretionary grant programs fund research, demonstrations,…

  11. Technology, Education and Copyright Harmonization Act Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Marc S.

    2017-01-01

    Educational institutions continually work to balance between providing students with access to data and protecting copyright owner's exclusive rights. The Copyright Act of 1976, effective in 1978, provided exemptions for live and distance education. As digital technology grew in capability, its capabilities were incorporated in distance education,…

  12. Improving physics education in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendee, William R

    2007-08-01

    Concern is growing that the physics education of radiologists is flawed and that without knowledge of physics principles and applications, mastery of the technology of medical imaging is impaired. Furthermore, it is proposed that a mastery of imaging technology is necessary to perfect the clinical acumen of radiologists and to preserve the quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness of imaging procedures. These issues were the focus of a multiorganizational educational summit on physics education of radiologists held in January 2006 in Atlanta. Recommendations for improving the physics education and knowledge of radiologists that evolved from this summit are presented here, together with progress made to date on their fulfillment.

  13. Using Iterative Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycles to Improve Teaching Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth J

    2018-01-15

    Most students entering nursing programs today are members of Generation Y or the Millennial generation, and they learn differently than previous generations. Nurse educators must consider implementing innovative teaching strategies that appeal to the newest generation of learners. The Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle is a framework that can be helpful when planning, assessing, and continually improving teaching pedagogy. This article describes the use of iterative Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles to implement a change in teaching pedagogy.

  14. Construction Safety, Health and Education Improvement Act of 1989. Hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, First Session on S. 930 To Establish a Clear and Comprehensive Prohibition of Discrimination on the Basis of Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This document reports the oral and written testimony of senators and representatives, administration officials, union officials, contractors' associations, engineers' associations, and construction and consulting companies concerning S. 930, a provision of the Construction Safety, Health and Education Improvement Act of 1989. This provision would…

  15. Curricular improvements for entrepreneurial education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilache Simona

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Our paper aims at investigating the most adequate methods for developing effective educational tools in entrepreneurial education. Entrepreneurship education should take place during the entire life of an entrepreneur, but the basic knowledge and skills related to this field are acquired starting from the elementary school, and improved during all the educational levels. Through entrepreneurship education, policymakers aim to prepare young people for succeeding on the entrepreneurial path. However, there are few scientific papers that aimed at discussing the available educational tools in Romania which play a role in forming entrepreneurs. Starting from the identified educational needs of young Romanian people under 35, including entrepreneurs and students, which were surveyed based on a questionnaire, we advance several key improvement areas for Romanian business curricula, and suggest critical paths to obtain desired results. The recommendations that we deliver through this paper are based on respondents’ opinions regarding their preference for certain aspects related to educational tools used in entrepreneurial education: learning materials used in universities in order to create an entrepreneurial mindset, the use of learning materials outside of the university curricula, and entrepreneurial skills that should be developed during school. A comparative perspective, examining curricular specificities in most entrepreneurial cultures of Europe, based on information obtained from Entrepreneurship Eurobarometer and Doing Business Indicators, is also included in our study. The main limitations, which arise from the subjective perspective of young entrepreneurs, as well as from the reduced sample volume, are thus corrected. The conclusions of our analysis provide a valuable starting point for educational policies promoting entrepreneurial skills enhancement in the Romanian business students’ population.

  16. Study on safety educations against individual causal factors of unsafe acts and specification of target trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Ayako; Takeda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Many accidents and incidents are caused by unsafe acts. It is important to reduce these unsafe acts for preventing the accidents. The countermeasures for each causal factor behind unsafe acts are needed, however, comparing with improvement of facilities, workers-oriented measures such as safety educations are not sufficient. Then the purposes of this study are as follows: 1) to investigate the individual factors which have great impact of unsafe acts and the existing safety educations which aim to mitigate the impact of these factors, 2) to specify the target trainees to perform these safety educations. To identify common factors that affect unsafe act significantly, a web survey was conducted to 500 workers who have regularly carried out accident prediction training (i.e. Kiken-Yochi training). They were asked the situation which they were apt to act unsafely by free description. As the result, the following three main factors were extracted: impatience, overconfidence, and bothersome. Also, it was found that there were few existing safety educations which aim to mitigate the impact of these factors except for overconfidence. To specify the target trainees to perform safety educations which aim to mitigate the impact of these three factors, another web survey was conducted to 200 personnel in charge of safety at the workplace. They were asked the features of workers who tended to act unsafely by age group. The relationship between the factor that need to mitigate and the trainee who need to receive the education were clarified from the survey. (author)

  17. Six Acts of Miscognition: Implications for Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavin, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Employing Lacanian theory as a necessary supplement to contemporary approaches in art education, this article provides a critique and response to art education discourse around "cognition." This response unfolds in six acts: (1) Unknown knowledge, (2) Unmeant knowledge, (3) Missing metaphors, (4) Stupidity, (5) Symptoms and sinthomes, and (6)…

  18. Needed: Reincarnation of National Defense Education Act of 1958

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary M.; Miller, James R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the historical and current response of the United States to threats to its world leadership in scientific endeavors, with particular attention to the National Defense Education Act of 1958. The current status of the United States in mathematics, science, and engineering education is reviewed with respect to K-12 student…

  19. Comprehensive Smoking Prevention Education Act of 1981. Hearing before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session, on S. 1929 to Amend the Public Health Service Act and the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act to Increase the Availability to the American Public of Information on the Health Consequences of Smoking and Thereby Improve Informed Choice, and for Other Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

    This report of the second hearing on the Smoking Prevention Education Act focuses on advertising practices of the tobacco industry; the first hearing dealt with health related issues. The report includes testimony of three panels of witnesses who discussed the effectiveness of European programs in cigarette labeling and consumer education, the…

  20. 76 FR 41246 - Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, Pesticide Registration Improvement Act Process Improvement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Committee, Pesticide Registration Improvement Act Process Improvement Workgroup; Notice of Public Meeting...) Process Improvement Work Group. EPA plans to meet its ESA consultation obligations through the pesticide... a pesticide during the registration review process. This meeting of the PRIA Process Improvement...

  1. Acting and Teacher Education: Being Model for Identity Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Sinan Özmen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study follows three pre-service teachers during three academic semesters in which they took an acting course for teachers and participated in practicum with a special focus on rehearsing and developing their teacher identities. In order to create the necessary context for them, an acting course for pre-service teacher education was designed in parallel with a model which is based on an influential acting theory. This model, namely the BEING (Believe, Experiment, Invent, Navigate, Generate, was also designed by the researcher. The incentive behind designing a model grounded on acting literature was that the relevant literature does not provide trainers with a universal model which can be referred as a manual for running and monitoring acting courses for teachers. In this case study, this model was also tested in terms of its applicability and functionality in practice. Based on analyses of audio taped interviews, session journals and reflections, the five stages of the BEING Model was found to be highly applicable and functional in terms of reflecting the natural development process of teacher identity development. Pre-service teachers displayed a significant development in communication skills and professional identities. Therefore, the BEING model provides a perspective and a philosophy of benefiting from acting literature for teacher educators with little or no knowledge on acting and theatre

  2. Acting and Teacher Education: Being Model for Identity Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Sinan Özmen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study follows three pre-service teachers during three academic semesters in which they took an acting course for teachers and participated in practicum with a special focus on rehearsing and developing their teacher identities. In order to create the necessary context for them, an acting course for pre-service teacher education was designed in parallel with a model which is based on an influential acting theory. This model, namely the BEING (Believe, Experiment, Invent, Navigate, Generate, was also designed by the researcher. The incentive behind designing a model grounded on acting literature was that the relevant literature does not provide trainers with a universal model which can be referred as a manual for running and monitoring acting courses for teachers. In this case study, this model was also tested in terms of its applicability and functionality in practice. Based on analyses of audio taped interviews, session journals and reflections, the five stages of the BEING Model was found to be highly applicable and functional in terms of reflecting the natural development process of teacher identity development. Pre-service teachers displayed a significant development in communication skills and professional identities. Therefore, the BEING model provides a perspective and a philosophy of benefiting from acting literature for teacher educators with little or no knowledge on acting and theatre.

  3. Implementing Nunavut Education Act: Compulsory School Attendance Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwarteng, E. Fredua

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of Nunavut compulsory school attendance policy as part of the Nunavut Education Act (2002). Using a bottom-up approach to policy implementation in the literature and the author's six years teaching experience in Nunavut, the paper argues that the compulsory school attendance policy may not achieve its…

  4. An Application of the Equal Pay Act to Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Debra H.

    1981-01-01

    The applicability of legal principles governing equal pay and sex discrimination in university settings is discussed. The most objective mechanism that a university can utilize to achieve compliance with the Equal Pay Act would be implementation of a salary system that relies on experience, formal education, and time in grade. (MLW)

  5. Implications of the Employment Equity Act for the higher education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is argued that these crucial challenges B specialized higher education legislation and policy developments, the "pool" issue, funding and rationalization, universities as a unique workplace, and the individual legacies of universities B define the space in which the Employment Equity Act may be interpreted in the higher ...

  6. The Education Act and Excluded Children. Policy Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Rachel

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the negative assumptions and outcomes of provisions in Britain's Education Act of 1997 dealing with expulsion of students. Presents some statistics on excluded children; discusses likely outcomes such as increased delinquency, parent-school acrimony, and disparity in schools. Describes the role of teachers' unions in drafting the bill…

  7. Educating Tomorrow's Science Teachers: STEM ACT Conference Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternheim, Morton M.; Feldman, Allan; Berger, Joseph B.; Zhao, Yijie

    2008-01-01

    This document reports on the findings of an NSF-funded conference (STEM ACT) on the alternative certification of science teachers. The conference explored the issues that have arisen in science education as a result of the proliferation of alternative certification programs in the United States, and to identify the research that needs to be done…

  8. Solutions to Improve Educational Management Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezan Jahanian; Masoomeh Motahari

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, enhancing the quality in educational systems of different countries has gained especial importance and stand. Improving utilizing and increasing the quality in our country’s educational system is felt too. One of the utilizing factors in education system is to improve the educational management quality.In this article, effective factors in educational management quality and one of its improving solutions, thorough management quality, is analyzed.

  9. Comprehensive Smoking Prevention Education Act of 1981. Hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session, on S. 1929 to Amend the Public Health Service Act and the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act to Increase the Availability to the Americna Public of Information on the Health Consequences of Smoking and Thereby Improve Informed Choice, and for Other Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    These proceedings detail the first of two hearings on the Comprehensive Smoking Prevention Education Act of 1981. This report of the first hearing focuses on health related issues. The report presents testimony from representatives of the administration, from a panel of scientists, and from representatives of the American Cancer Society, American…

  10. Improving completion rates in adult education through social responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Mariager-Anderson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Dropout is a serious problem within education. This article reports on an intervention project, titled “New Roles for the Teacher—Increased Completion Rates Through Social Responsibility,” which sought to reduce nonattendance and dropout rates in the Danish adult educational system by improving...... of reducing drop-out rates. As a consequence, the teachers acted more consistently and purposefully to prevent dropout, and a positive effect of the intervention on drop-out rates was documented....

  11. 75 FR 66363 - School Improvement Grants; American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA); Title I of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ... behavioral supports or taking steps to eliminate bullying and student harassment; or (D) Expanding the school... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION [Docket ID ED-2009-OESE-0010] RIN 1810-AB06 School Improvement Grants... Act of 1965, as Amended (ESEA) ACTION: Final requirements for School Improvement Grants authorized...

  12. The Use of Technology to Improve Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepo, Kaori

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The primary purpose of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is to ensure free appropriate public education for individuals with disabilities in the least restrictive environment. The statute also mandates student's access and services for students' access to devices and technology as part of the individual education…

  13. Education for Liberal Democracy: Fred Clarke and the 1944 Education Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Hsiao-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    Fred Clarke (1880-1952), an English educationist, emerged as a leading figure with his liberal approach alongside such key figures as R. H. Tawney and Cyril Norwood in the reform leading to the 1944 Education Act. Many of his reform proposals, which were provided by the new Act, reflected his ideals of liberal democracy. Nevertheless, his…

  14. Curricular Critique of an Environmental Education Policy Framework: Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D. Karrow

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The following paper is a curricular critique of an environmental education policy framework called Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow (2009. It is founded upon: (a an examination of the conventional argument for integrated curriculum models and its relevance to K-12 environmental education; and (b utilization of a typology of integrated curriculum models to analyze an environmental education policy framework within the jurisdiction of Ontario, Canada. In conclusion, Ontario’s environmental education policy framework tends toward an integrated curriculum model referred to as ‘selective infusion.’  The implications for integrated curricular practice are identified, with recommendations for improving the policy framework from an integrated curricular perspective.     Key Words: environmental education, integrated curriculum, curriculum critique, education policy.

  15. Education Reform: Ten Years after the Massachusetts Education Reform Act of 1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Driscoll, Joseph B. Berger, Ronald K. Hambleton, Lisa A. Keller, Robert W. Maloy, David Hart, Paul Oh, Victoria Getis, Susan Bowles, Francis L. Gougeon, Kathryn A. McDermott, Andrew Churchill

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In June 1993, Governor William Weld signed into law the Massachusetts Education Reform Act (MERA. MERA greatly increased the state role both in funding public education and in guiding the local educational process. The state’s role changed to incorporate setting curriculum frameworks and holding schools accountable for student performance. Because MERA was designed to be a systemic reform of education, all of the various state activities and policies needed to fit together into a coherent whole based on state educational standards.

  16. Improvement of Educational Equity & Teacher Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J. Rodríguez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Educational improvement for equity and professional teacher development are crucial issues concerning the essential right all students have of a good education. Firstly the article proposes a contextual reflection on improvement, some considerations related to well known traditions in the field and particularly the social justice and its relationships and implication for educational politics, curriculum, teaching, teacher and community. Secondly, it claims for the coherence of teacher professional development to educational equity. Different analysis and proposals are outlined related to policies and tasks the public administration should undertake and some dimensions of teacher education are considered attending educational equity criteria. Professional learning communities are described and valued as a hypothetical framework in order to improve equity and teacher education relationships.

  17. Bilingual Education Act: Background and Reauthorization Issues. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    The Bilingual Education Act (BEA) title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), is the federal program intended to help children who are limited English proficient (LEP) learn English. BEA activities focus on transitional bilingual education; developmental bilingual education; special alternative instruction (such as English as…

  18. July 2011 Memorandum: Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations Under the Clean Water Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and the Environmental Justice Executive Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memorandum: Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations Under the Clean Water Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and the Environmental Justice Executive Order, July 21, 2011

  19. Continuous Improvement in Action: Educators' Evidence Use for School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Marisa; Redding, Christopher; Rubin, Mollie

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the article is the process educators use to interpret data to turn it into usable knowledge (Honig & Coburn, 2008) while engaging in a continuous improvement process. The authors examine the types of evidence educators draw upon, its perceived relevance, and the social context in which the evidence is examined. Evidence includes…

  20. Recovery Act - Sustainable Transportation: Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caille, Gary

    2013-12-13

    The collective goals of this effort include: 1) reach all facets of this society with education regarding electric vehicles (EV) and plug–in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), 2) prepare a workforce to service these advanced vehicles, 3) create web–based learning at an unparalleled level, 4) educate secondary school students to prepare for their future and 5) train the next generation of professional engineers regarding electric vehicles. The Team provided an integrated approach combining secondary schools, community colleges, four–year colleges and community outreach to provide a consistent message (Figure 1). Colorado State University Ventures (CSUV), as the prime contractor, plays a key program management and co–ordination role. CSUV is an affiliate of Colorado State University (CSU) and is a separate 501(c)(3) company. The Team consists of CSUV acting as the prime contractor subcontracted to Arapahoe Community College (ACC), CSU, Motion Reality Inc. (MRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Ricardo. Collaborators are Douglas County Educational Foundation/School District and Gooru (www.goorulearning.org), a nonprofit web–based learning resource and Google spin–off.

  1. 77 FR 58111 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Office of Postsecondary Education; Higher Education Act (HEA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ...; Higher Education Act (HEA) Title II Report Cards on State Teacher Credentialing and Preparation SUMMARY: The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 (HEOA) calls for annual reports from states and institutions of higher education (IHEs) on the quality of teacher preparation and state teacher certification...

  2. Teaching Students with Disabilities: A Review of Music Education Research as It Relates to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sara K.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores trends in research since the 1975 passage of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (now known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), notes gaps in the literature, and offers suggestions for future directions music education researchers could take in exploring the needs and experiences of music teachers…

  3. Towards new educational potentialities: Review and commentary of the Preliminary draft Act on higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madžar Ljubomir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Higher Education Act is a long-awaited legal act. A number of uncompleted attempts to prepare it have been undertaken in the course of the last three years. So far without success. Having been and still being a matter of highest social priority, the renewed effort to create and subsequently to enact this act is welcome as a worthwhile and a highly productive endeavor. Welcome also are the main innovations offered by this act, particularly its conspicuous consistency with the Bologna Declaration and other internationally launched and accepted documents. The draft act follows the international documents tracing down the paths of the future development of the educational systems of the European countries and providing for their mutual compatibility. A number of other positive contributions of the draft act are singled out, such as introducing clear and rigorous criteria and procedures for accreditation and quality control, introducing a wide coverage of arts and sciences as a precondition for an institution of higher education to qualify as a university, flexibility in the regime of studying including the domestic and international mobility of the students and requirement for the schools of higher education to have large cores of permanently employed teaching staff. A much larger part of the paper is, however, devoted to critical commentaries. To begin with, the draft is produced without any participation of the private universities, which is seen as a form of discrimination. The organizational pattern of a university is laid out with insufficient clarity and the status of departments (faculties is particularly short of precision and even contradictory. The draft seems to be laden with the old bias towards excessive and potentially disastrous centralization, drastically reducing the decision making capacity of the system. The treatment of the property of the departments (faculties is found inconsistent and legally unfounded. Inconsistency is

  4. Improving science education for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijck, van M.W.; Roth, W.-M.

    2007-01-01

    In recent issues of noteworthy journals, natural scientists have argued for the improvement of science education [1–4]. Such pleas reflect the growing awareness that high-quality science education is required not only for sustaining a lively scientific community that is able to address global

  5. 34 CFR 460.1 - What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sufficient basic education to enable them to benefit from job training and retraining programs and obtain and... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? 460.1 Section 460.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF...

  6. The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) for Children With Special Educational Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Paul H; Okamoto, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    The pediatric health care provider has a critical role in supporting the health and well-being of children and adolescents in all settings, including early intervention (EI), preschool, and school environments. It is estimated that 15% of children in the United States have a disability. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act entitles every affected child in the United States from infancy to young adulthood to a free appropriate public education through EI and special education services. These services bolster development and learning of children with various disabilities. This clinical report provides the pediatric health care provider with a summary of key components of the most recent version of this law. Guidance is also provided to ensure that every child in need receives the EI and special education services to which he or she is entitled. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. 76 FR 58840 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act; Refuge Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act; Refuge Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: To meet the requirements of the Central Valley Project Improvement Act of 1992 (CVPIA) and subsequent...

  8. Theoretical framework of community education improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaúl Brizuela Castillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper explains the connection between the approach selected for the analysis and development of community education and the contradictions manifested in its theoretical and practical comprehension. As a result, a comprehensive model for community education, describing the theoretical and methodological framework to improve community education, is devised. This framework is based on a conscious organizing of educative influences applied to the regular task of the community under the coordinate action of social institutions and organization that promote the transformational action of the neighborhood assuming a protagonist role in the improvement of the quality of live and morals related to the socialism updating process. The comprehensive model was proved experimentally at District 59 of San Miguel town; the transformation of the community was scientifically registered together with the information gather by means of observation and interviewing. The findings proved the pertinence and feasibility of the proposed model.

  9. Education of the Deaf Act: Background and Reauthorization Issues. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    This summary of the Education of the Deaf Act (Public Law 99-371) discusses the special institutions funded under the act and other issues related to the Act's reauthorization. The National Technical Institute for the Deaf (Rochester, New York) and Gallaudet University (District of Columbia) provide postsecondary training for deaf individuals.…

  10. Reclaiming Self-Determination from the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the way the term "self-determination" is used in the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975. Its main thesis is that the Act does not in fact offer tribal governments self-determination, but instead reaffirms old power configurations that go back to the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934.…

  11. 78 FR 29652 - Institutional Eligibility Under the Higher Education Act of 1965, as Amended; Delay of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 600 RIN 1840-AD02 Institutional Eligibility Under the Higher Education Act of 1965, as Amended; Delay of Implementation Date AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Final regulations; delay of implementation date. SUMMARY: This document...

  12. Does Expert Advice Improve Educational Choice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lex Borghans

    Full Text Available This paper reports evidence that an individual meeting with a study counselor at high school significantly improves the quality of choice of tertiary educational field, as self-assessed 18 months after graduation from college. To address endogeneity, we explore the variation in study counseling practices between schools as an instrumental variable (IV. Following careful scrutiny of the validity of the IV, our results indicate a significant and positive influence of study counseling on the quality of educational choice, foremost among males and those with low educated parents. The overall result is stable across a number of robustness checks.

  13. Divided by Loyalty: The Debate Regarding Loyalty Provisions in the National Defense Education Act of 1958

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Brent D.

    2016-01-01

    The National Defense Education Act (NDEA) of 1958 was the first federal investment in low-interest student loans and became a precedent for expansion of student loans in the Higher Education Act of 1965. In its controversial loyalty provisions, the NDEA required loan recipients to affirm loyalty to the U.S. government. Between 1958 and 1962,…

  14. How to improve medical education website design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Stephen D; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Levine, David

    2010-04-21

    The Internet provides a means of disseminating medical education curricula, allowing institutions to share educational resources. Much of what is published online is poorly planned, does not meet learners' needs, or is out of date. Applying principles of curriculum development, adult learning theory and educational website design may result in improved online educational resources. Key steps in developing and implementing an education website include: 1) Follow established principles of curriculum development; 2) Perform a needs assessment and repeat the needs assessment regularly after curriculum implementation; 3) Include in the needs assessment targeted learners, educators, institutions, and society; 4) Use principles of adult learning and behavioral theory when developing content and website function; 5) Design the website and curriculum to demonstrate educational effectiveness at an individual and programmatic level; 6) Include a mechanism for sustaining website operations and updating content over a long period of time. Interactive, online education programs are effective for medical training, but require planning, implementation, and maintenance that follow established principles of curriculum development, adult learning, and behavioral theory.

  15. Improving Academic Writing in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Background: At a specialist nursing education in intensive care, located at a University college in Sweden, there was a desire among the faculty to develop their ability to support specialist nursing students in their academic development, as well as in their academic writing, to improve the overall quality of the master theses. A quality…

  16. Recovery Act--Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trucks, Daimler [Daimler Trucks North America Llc, Portland, OR (United States)

    2015-07-26

    Daimler Trucks North America completed a five year, $79.6M project to develop and demonstrate a concept vehicle with at least 50% freight efficiency improvement over a weighted average of several drive cycles relative to a 2009 best-in-class baseline vehicle. DTNA chose a very fuel efficient baseline vehicle, the 2009 Freightliner Cascadia with a DD15 engine, yet successfully demonstrated a 115% freight efficiency improvement. DTNA learned a great deal about the various technologies that were incorporated into Super Truck and those that, through down-selection, were discarded. Some of the technologies competed with each other for efficiency, and notably some of the technologies complemented each other. For example, we found that Super Truck’s improved aerodynamic drag resulted in improved fuel savings from eCoast, relative to a similar vehicle with worse aerodynamic drag. However, some technologies were in direct competition with each other, namely the predictive technologies which use GPS and 3D digital maps to efficiently manage the vehicles kinetic energy through controls and software, versus hybrid which is a much costlier technology that essentially targets the same inefficiency. Furthermore, the benefits of a comprehensive, integrated powertrain/vehicle approach was proven, in which vast improvements in vehicle efficiency (e.g. lower aero drag and driveline losses) enabled engine strategies such as downrating and downspeeding. The joint engine and vehicle developments proved to be a multiplier-effect which resulted in large freight efficiency improvements. Although a large number of technologies made the selection process and were used on the Super Truck demonstrator vehicle, some of the technologies proved not feasible for series production.

  17. End-of-Year 2010-11 Progress Report to the Legislature: Implementation and Impact of the Workforce Investment Act, Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Title II: Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) provides funding for states and territories to provide instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult Basic Education (ABE), and Adult Secondary Education (ASE) to adults in need of these literacy services. California State Budget Act…

  18. Improving Teacher Education through Action Research. Routledge Research in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ming-Fai, Ed.; Grossman, David L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a dearth of studies on teacher educators using action research to improve their own practice. This book is the first systematic study of a group of teachers examining and enhancing their own practice through the inquiry process of action research. This book presents a broad overview of a variety of methodologies that can be used to…

  19. 77 FR 33240 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... Project water conservation best management practices that shall ``develop criteria for evaluating the... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The...

  20. 78 FR 21414 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are available for review... establish and administer an office on Central Valley Project water conservation best management practices...

  1. 75 FR 69698 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Criteria for Developing Refuge Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Criteria for Developing Refuge Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The ``Criteria for Developing Refuge Water Management Plans'' (Refuge...

  2. 75 FR 70020 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... office on Central Valley Project water conservation best management practices that shall ``* * * develop... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior ACTION: Notice of Availability. SUMMARY: The...

  3. 76 FR 12756 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... office on Central Valley Project water conservation best management practices that shall ``* * * develop... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The...

  4. 76 FR 54251 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... and administer an office on Central Valley Project water conservation best management practices that... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The...

  5. 77 FR 64544 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... Central Valley Project water conservation best management practices that shall ``develop criteria for... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The...

  6. 75 FR 38538 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... to establish and administer an office on Central Valley Project water conservation best management... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The...

  7. 75 FR 15453 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Westlands Water District Drainage Repayment Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Westlands Water District Drainage Repayment Contract AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Repayment Contract. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Reclamation will be initiating negotiations with the...

  8. How to Do Things with Words: Speech Acts in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparatou, Renia

    2018-01-01

    Originating from philosophy and science, many different ideas have made their way into educational policies. Educational policies often take such ideas completely out of context, and enforce them as general norms to every aspect of education; even opposing ideals make their way into school's curricula, teaching techniques, assignments, and…

  9. Widening Participation in Higher Education: A Play in Five Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Policies and programs to address higher education disadvantage reveal four distinct approaches, each revealing certain assumptions about the nature of educational disadvantage. These are: creating mass higher education systems; redistributing or allocating certain places to disadvantaged students; changing the cultural practices of institutions;…

  10. Acting and Reacting: Youth's Behavior in Corrupt Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabic-El-Rayess, Amra

    2014-01-01

    With its broader employability to the issues of underperformance that may emerge in educational systems internationally, this empirical study redefines and expands Albert Hirschman's theory of voice, exit, and loyalty within higher education. The article formulates a new education-embedded theoretical framework that explains reactionary behaviors…

  11. Shaping Up? Three Acts of Education Studies as Textual Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Julian; Walker, Stephen; Kendall, Alex

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of dominant educational discourses through textual critique and argues that such an approach enables education studies to preserve an important distinction from teacher training. The texts deconstructed here are specific to English education, but the discourses at work have international relevance as the rhetorics of…

  12. Harvesting Social Change: A Peace Education Program in Three Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Colette N.

    2012-01-01

    This article narrates the story of how a peace education program, over the course of a year, shifts from a more traditional form of peace education as conflict resolution skill building to a critical form of peace education. The path of this journey was neither straight nor direct; rather it meandered through an iteration of itself that actually…

  13. Frameworks for improvement: clinical audit, the plan-do-study-act cycle and significant event audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Steve; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2013-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles about quality improvement tools and techniques. We explore common frameworks for improvement, including the model for improvement and its application to clinical audit, plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles and significant event analysis (SEA), examining the similarities and differences between these and providing examples of each.

  14. Chemical Education Research: Improving Chemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley Herron, J.; Nurrenbern, Susan C.

    1999-10-01

    Chemical education research is the systematic investigation of learning grounded in a theoretical foundation that focuses on understanding and improving learning of chemistry. This article reviews many activities, changes, and accomplishments that have taken place in this area of scholarly activity despite its relatively recent emergence as a research area. The article describes how the two predominant broad perspectives of learning, behaviorism and constructivism, have shaped and influenced chemical education research design, analysis, and interpretation during the 1900s. Selected research studies illustrate the range of research design strategies and results that have contributed to an increased understanding of learning in chemistry. The article also provides a perspective of current and continuing challenges that researchers in this area face as they strive to bridge the gap between chemistry and education - disciplines with differing theoretical bases and research paradigms.

  15. State Implementation and Perceptions of Title I School Improvement Grants under the Recovery Act: One Year Later. Online Appendix--State Responses to Open-Ended Questions about the ARRA SIG Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2012

    2012-01-01

    To learn more about states' experiences with implementing school improvement grants (SIGs) funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Center on Education Policy (CEP) administered a survey to state Title I directors. (Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act provides federal funds to schools in low-income…

  16. Using Data to Improve Educational Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthijs Koopmans

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Review of the book “Action Research in the Classroom: Helping Teachers Assess and Improve their Work” by Sr. Mary Ann Jacobs and Bruce S. Cooper There are many ways in which research can contribute to the improvement of educational practice, and action research is one of them. Action research bridges the gap that typically separates research from practice by having practitioners conduct specific projects to address their own questions and improve their effectiveness based on the answers they obtain. One of the advantages of this type of research is that results are often immediately accessible and have actionable implications. Thus, action research is a good tool for making improvements to the field based on evidence.

  17. 20 CFR 627.220 - Coordination with programs under title IV of the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant program. 627.220 Section 627.220 Employees' Benefits... of the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant program. (a) Coordination. Financial assistance programs under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA) (the Pell Grant program, the...

  18. The Cost of Acting "Girly": Gender Stereotypes and Educational Choices

    OpenAIRE

    Favara, Marta

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at horizontal sex segregation in education as a factor contributing to gender segregation in the labor market. Economic theories fail to explain why women with the same years of schooling and educational attainment as men are under-represented in many technical degrees, which typically lead to better paid occupations. Following Akerlof and Kranton (2000), I research whether gender identity affects boys' and girls' educational choices and when the gendered pattern appears firs...

  19. Kant and education. Reflections regarding the act of teaching.

    OpenAIRE

    William Fernando Hernández Buitrago,

    2013-01-01

    This article is a reflection on Kant 's work and its implications for education. At first there is a distinction between subjectivism and subjectivity to explain what the dogmatism of reality. The conception of the educational as an exercise from which should enable the understanding of reality and the adequacy of maximum objective laws allows , in youth , training in autonomy. This leads to the idea that the student must become the architects of their training process . Educating is, in this...

  20. ReACT!: An Interactive Educational Tool for AI Planning for Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogmus, Zeynep; Erdem, Esra; Patogulu, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents ReAct!, an interactive educational tool for artificial intelligence (AI) planning for robotics. ReAct! enables students to describe robots' actions and change in dynamic domains without first having to know about the syntactic and semantic details of the underlying formalism, and to solve planning problems using…

  1. Elusive Sex Acts: Pleasure and Politics in Norwegian Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Stine H. Bang

    2012-01-01

    While there is little political opposition towards sex education as such in Norway, recent attempts at reforming the subject reveal underlying heteronormative presumptions that seem resistant to reform. While a focus on homosexuality is included in the national curriculum at all levels of compulsory education, the sexual practices involved in…

  2. 16 CFR 1500.88 - Exemptions from lead limits under section 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act for certain electronic devices. 1500.88 Section... from lead limits under section 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act for certain electronic devices. (a) The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) provides for specific lead limits...

  3. Illinois State Plan: Adult Education and Family Literacy. Under Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Community College Board, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document contains Illinois' State Plan for Adult Education and Family Literacy under Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 for July 1, 1999, through June 30, 2015. The plan is comprised of the following sections: (1) Eligible agency certifications and assurances; (2) Description of the steps to ensure direct and equitable access;…

  4. Institutions of Higher Education Under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Standards Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Wage and Hour Div.

    The Fair Labor Standards Act contains provisions and standards concerning minimum wages, equal pay, maximum hours and overtime pay, recordkeeping, and child labor. These basic requirements apply to employees engaged in interstate commerce or in the production of goods for interstate commerce and also to employees in certain enterprises that are so…

  5. The Equal Pay Act: Higher Education and the Court's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Paul S.; Swanson, Austin D.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of the Equal Pay Act of 1963 for college and university employees are reviewed through an examination of trends in court decisions and legal treatment of the issues. It is concluded that case law has been evolutionary, with concepts of "equal,""work," and others not altered drastically by the courts in recent years.…

  6. Health Education Specialists' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Jessica; Hanson, Carl L; Magnusson, Brianna; Neiger, Brad

    2016-03-01

    The changing landscape of health care as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) may provide new opportunities for health education specialists (HES). The purpose of this study was to survey HES in the United States on their knowledge and attitudes of the ACA and assess their perceptions of job growth under the law. A random sample of 220 (36% response rate) certified HES completed a 53-item cross sectional survey administered online through Qualtrics. Findings were compared to public opinion on health care reform. HES are highly favorable of the law (70%) compared to the general public (23%). A total of 85% of respondents were able to list a provision of the ACA, and most (81%) thought the ACA would be successful at increasing insured Americans. Over half (64.6%) believe job opportunities will increase. Those who viewed the law favorably were significantly more likely to score better on a knowledge scale related to the ACA. HES understand publicized provisions but are uncertain about common myths and specific provisions related to Title IV, "Prevention of Chronic Disease and Improving Public Health." Directed and continuing education to HES regarding the ACA is warranted. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  7. Kant and education. Reflections regarding the act of teaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Fernando Hernández Buitrago,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a reflection on Kant 's work and its implications for education. At first there is a distinction between subjectivism and subjectivity to explain what the dogmatism of reality. The conception of the educational as an exercise from which should enable the understanding of reality and the adequacy of maximum objective laws allows , in youth , training in autonomy. This leads to the idea that the student must become the architects of their training process . Educating is, in this sense , constantly and relentlessly assume our human condition as a " to be " , but mostly as a "must " . When we fulfill requirements , we mark our behaviors and actions that have nothing to do with the ends we seek . So the adoption of attitudes and doctrines with assimilation not make unrelated indoctrination and education as a process of manipulation instruction and dehumanize humans.

  8. USE OF ICT TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zaporozhchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the main changes in the education system in recent years; reflectes the new educational opportunities for children with disabilities; identifies the possible ways of use of ICT to improve the quality of inclusive education.

  9. 77 FR 3455 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records-Migrant Education Bypass Program Student Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records--Migrant Education Bypass Program... (Privacy Act), the Department of Education (Department) publishes this notice of a new system of records... called a ``system of records.'' The Migrant Education Program (MEP) is authorized under Title I, Part C...

  10. Publishing activities improves undergraduate biology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle K

    2018-06-01

    To improve undergraduate biology education, there is an urgent need for biology instructors to publish their innovative active-learning instructional materials in peer-reviewed journals. To do this, instructors can measure student knowledge about a variety of biology concepts, iteratively design activities, explore student learning outcomes and publish the results. Creating a set of well-vetted activities, searchable through a journal interface, saves other instructors time and encourages the use of active-learning instructional practices. For authors, these publications offer new opportunities to collaborate and can provide evidence of a commitment to using active-learning instructional techniques in the classroom.

  11. Innovative Outcome Assessment in Graduate Business Education and Continuous Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Satya P.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The changed environment of global economy with painful austerity and restructuring measures causing severe economic dislocations in many diverse parts of the world have brought into focus the usefulness and value of management education in general and graduate management education in particular. The various accrediting bodies in America, Europe and Asia in recent years have shifted their emphasis to ensuring that learning outcomes of students in the program are tied to the goals and missions of the academic institution and meet the needs of the external partners of the academic enterprise that the students go on to serve. This has resulted in rapid advances in the field of innovative outcome assessment, and measurement of competency in performing higher order tasks as well as demonstration of traits related to successful transition into the business world and contribution to the success of the enterprise where the students are employed. The mere assessment/measurement of traits is not the end, but rather the first step in the cycle of continuous improvement in the tradition of the Plan-Do-Study-Act tradition of TQM. The goal is to identify shortcomings or opportunities for improvement via the assessment process and then to “close the loop” by introducing planned changes to improve system performance.

  12. The Every Student Succeeds Act: Strengthening the Focus on Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michelle D.; Winn, Kathleen M.; Reedy, Marcy A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This article offers (a) an overview of the attention federal policy has invested in educational leadership with a primary focus on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), (b) a summary of the critical role school leaders play in achieving the goals set forth within federal educational policy, and (c) examples of how states are using the…

  13. Improving Learner Handovers in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warm, Eric J; Englander, Robert; Pereira, Anne; Barach, Paul

    2017-07-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that the information included in the Medical Student Performance Evaluation fails to reliably predict medical students' future performance. This faulty transfer of information can lead to harm when poorly prepared students fail out of residency or, worse, are shuttled through the medical education system without an honest accounting of their performance. Such poor learner handovers likely arise from two root causes: (1) the absence of agreed-on outcomes of training and/or accepted assessments of those outcomes, and (2) the lack of standardized ways to communicate the results of those assessments. To improve the current learner handover situation, an authentic, shared mental model of competency is needed; high-quality tools to assess that competency must be developed and tested; and transparent, reliable, and safe ways to communicate this information must be created.To achieve these goals, the authors propose using a learner handover process modeled after a patient handover process. The CLASS model includes a description of the learner's Competency attainment, a summary of the Learner's performance, an Action list and statement of Situational awareness, and Synthesis by the receiving program. This model also includes coaching oriented towards improvement along the continuum of education and care. Just as studies have evaluated patient handover models using metrics that matter most to patients, studies must evaluate this learner handover model using metrics that matter most to providers, patients, and learners.

  14. [Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and improving chess performance in promising young chess-players].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Francisco J; Luciano, Carmen

    2009-08-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is shown to be effective in relatively distant fields from the so-called psychological disorders. One of these areas is sport performance improvement. The aim of the current study is to expand the application of brief ACT protocols to improve chess-players' performance. In a previous study, a brief protocol was applied to international-level adult chess-players that was effective. The current study aims to apply an equivalent brief ACT protocol, but in this case, applied in a group format to promising young chess-players. In addition, this brief protocol is compared to a non-intervention control condition. Results show that the ACT brief protocol improved the performance in 5 out of 7 participants, and that none of the chess-players in the control condition reached the established change criterion. The differences between the conditions in chess performance were statistically significant. The results are discussed, emphasizing the replicated impact of a brief ACT protocol on the improvement of chess-players' performance.

  15. Improving Quality Higher Education in Nigeria: The Roles of Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiyai, Romina Ifeoma

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the roles of stakeholders in improving quality of university education in Nigeria. Internal and external stakeholders are identified and the various roles they could play in improving the quality of university education are discussed. The paper contends that continuous and holistic improvement in university education system…

  16. Educational Psychologists' Report-Writing: Acts of Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Sunaina; Mercieca, Daniela; Mercieca, Duncan P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major tasks of educational psychologists is the writing of reports. Often, all involvement, assessment and intervention culminate in the production of a report. This paper explores critically the tensions involved in writing reports which are closed down in their conformity to requirements of different bodies, while looking for…

  17. The Educator's Guide to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Patricia A.

    This guide was written to acquaint educators with their legal responsibility in providing all individuals with disabilities--whether they be students, job applicants, employees, parents, or members of the community--with the same access and opportunities that are available to others. The guide explains legal requirements under the Americans with…

  18. The Politics of Elementary and Secondary Education Act Waivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrabel, Stephani L.; Saultz, Andrew; Polikoff, Morgan S.; McEachin, Andrew; Duque, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Executive leadership of the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) initiated a flexibility offering from No Child Left Behind. Our work explores specific design decisions made in these state-specific accountability systems as associated with state political environments, resources, and demographic characteristics. Our analysis, focused on 42 states…

  19. Air Force Personnel Can Improve Compliance With the Berry Amendment and Buy American Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    leather, furs,6 apparel , and shoes • FSG 84 – clothing , individual equipment and insignia • FSG 89 – subsistence (food) If these items are purchased...during the audit by completing Buy American Act training and amending standard operating procedures and internal processes to improve compliance with the...Force Personnel Can Improve Compliance With the Berry Amendment and the Buy American Act F E B R U A R Y 2 4 , 2 0 1 6 Report No. DODIG-2016-051

  20. A care improvement program acting as a powerful learning environment to support nursing students learning facilitation competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukema, Jan S; Harps-Timmerman, Annelies; Stoopendaal, Annemiek; Smits, Carolien H M

    2015-11-01

    Change management is an important area of training in undergraduate nursing education. Successful change management in healthcare aimed at improving practices requires facilitation skills that support teams in attaining the desired change. Developing facilitation skills in nursing students requires formal educational support. A Dutch Regional Care Improvement Program based on a nationwide format of change management in healthcare was designed to act as a Powerful Learning Environment for nursing students developing competencies in facilitating change. This article has two aims: to provide comprehensive insight into the program components and to describe students' learning experiences in developing their facilitation skills. This Dutch Regional Care Improvement Program considers three aspects of a Powerful Learning Environment: self-regulated learning; problem-based learning; and complex, realistic and challenging learning tasks. These three aspects were operationalised in five distinct areas of facilitation: increasing awareness of the need for change; leadership and project management; relationship building and communication; importance of the local context; and ongoing monitoring and evaluation. Over a period of 18 months, 42 nursing students, supported by trained lecturer-coaches, took part in nine improvement teams in our Regional Care Improvement Program, executing activities in all five areas of facilitation. Based on the students' experiences, we propose refinements to various components of this program, aimed at strengthenin the learning environment. There is a need for further detailed empirical research to study the impact this kind of learning environment has on students developing facilitation competencies in healthcare improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The educational orientation for modes of acting of students of the preschool race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirtha García-Pérez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The science like a professional institutionalized activity involves: Prolonged education, internalization of moral values, development of styles of thought and acting. From there his impact in the formation of the professional entrusted with offering the children of the babyhood according to the requests of the society, educational integral attention. It is observed in the educational reality than the behavior of the students of the race, not always you love one another with the social requirements presented to this professional in the making, that leads to the need of an educational orientation; With emphasis in the attention to the modes of professional acting of the students of the race bachelor's degree in Preschool Education, for his performance in the different spheres where they interact.

  2. Improved waste management services – Will the Act make a difference?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This document focuses on the improved waste management services and the Waste Act 59 of 2008. It provide in formation on the Integrated Waste Management Plans, technical capacity – infrastructure, the backlog in adequate service provision, the facts...

  3. 78 FR 63491 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are available for review: Westside... project contractors using best available cost-effective technology and best management practices.'' These...

  4. Naval Personnel Can Improve Compliance With the Berry Amendment and the Buy American Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-12

    Amendment. Introduction 2 │ DODIG-2015-161 • FSG 83—textiles, leather and furs,6 apparel , and shoes; • FSG 84— clothing , individual equipment and insignia...personnel amended standard operating procedures and internal processes to improve compliance with the Berry Amendment. NAWCAD-Lakehurst personnel...corrective action and amended standard operating procedures and internal processes to improve compliance with the Buy American Act. Additionally, NAWCAD

  5. Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments of 1990, P.L. 101-476: A Summary. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    This summary of the Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101-476, identifies how these Amendments extend and expand special education research, demonstration, and training programs of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). IDEA authorizes three state formula grant programs and several discretionary grant…

  6. Educational Marginalization: Examining Challenges and Possibilities for Improving Educational Outcomes in Northeastern Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okilwa, Nathern S. A.

    2015-01-01

    As a developing country in sub-Saharan Africa, Kenya has fared comparatively well in educating its young people. The new constitution of Kenya and various acts of parliament identify education as a fundamental human right and mandates the government to provide basic education for all. Consistent with the government's "Vision 2030," most…

  7. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert John Adams

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Robert John AdamsThe Health Observatory, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Campus, The University of Adelaide, Woodville, South Australia, AustraliaAbstract: A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual’s competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly

  8. Cell phone–based health education messaging improves health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SMS), provides new and innovative opportunities for disease prevention and health education. Objective: To explore the use of cell phone–based health education SMS to improve the health literacy of community residents in China. Methods: ...

  9. How States Can Promote Local Innovation, Options, and Problem-Solving in Public Education. Linking State and Local School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posamentier, Jordan; Lake, Robin; Hill, Paul

    2017-01-01

    State policy plays a critical role in determining whether and how well local education improvement strategies can be implemented. As states rework their education policies under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), state and local leaders need a way to assess their current policy environment and identify the changes needed to encourage local…

  10. Objectives, Evaluation, and the Improvement of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    2005-01-01

    For five years, from 1995 until 2000, a group of eight educators and researchers met twice annually in Syracuse, NY, for the purpose of revising Bloom's Taxonomy. Based in part on the structure of educational objectives, in part on advances in cognitive psychology, and in part on numerous other attempts to classify educational objectives that were…

  11. Continuing education for performance improvement: a creative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patti-Ann; Hardesty, Ilana; White, Julie L; Zisblatt, Lara

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to improve patient safety and health care outcomes, continuing medical education has begun to focus on performance improvement initiatives for physician practices. Boston University School of Medicine's (BUSM) Continuing Nursing Education Accredited Provider Unit has begun a creative project to award nursing contact hours for nurses' participation in performance improvement activities. This column highlights its initial efforts. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. EDUCATIONAL POLICIES AND INITIATIVES FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia, CAIA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available According to Gartner estimates, due to increased variety, speed and data volume, by 2015 there will be a global demand of 4.4 million professionals for real-time analysis of data from sources with different structures, but only one third of the demand will be met. The purpose of this research is to identify possible solutions for improved academic results in the IT domain, considering the time management policies, the content and the student motivations, as well as the business strategy tendencies. These proposals are targeted toward meeting the IT specialists demand. The research is composed of two parts: the first explores the Romanian IT labour market characteristics, while the second investigates the academic education policies that can help mitigate deficiencies and attain higher performance. The deficiencies are identified through a series of statistical research and analysis based on national level databases, adopting a quantitative approach. The policies proposed are supported by a flow model developed considering the students' activity, motivation, traits and results, measured and analysed quantitatively.

  13. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act: Reauthorization Overview. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    This report provides a review of programs authorized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and an overview of potential reauthorization issues, as the second session of the 103rd Congress considers revisions to these programs. The Infants and Toddlers Program (Part H of IDEA) provides formula grants to participating States…

  14. The Quality Teacher and Education Act in San Francisco: Lessons Learned. Policy Brief 09-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Heather J.

    2009-01-01

    This policy brief reviews the recent experience of the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) with the development and approval of Proposition A. Proposition A (also known as the Quality Teacher and Education Act, or QTEA) included a parcel tax mainly dedicated to increasing teachers' salaries, along with a variety of measures introducing…

  15. Education Issues Raised by S.744: The Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Garrett

    2014-01-01

    This brief report summarizes the requirements for undocumented immigrants set forth by the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act (S.744). Assuming that S.744 will move forward in Congress, the report also examines issues having to do with certain language, civics and government, and education/training provisions…

  16. Jump-Starting Educational Reform. Implementing British Columbia's Comprehensive School Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Paul

    An educational reform effort to implement a comprehensive school act in British Columbia (Canada) is analyzed with a focus on some sociotechnical and political aspects. An overview of the content, background, and implementation of the reform effort is followed by identification of seven contradictions inherent in the plan. Contradictions are as…

  17. Educational Malpractice: Breach of Statutory Duty and Affirmative Acts of Negligence by a School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    A cause of action for educational malpractice may well receive initial judicial recognition through successfully harmonizing allegations of breach of a statutory duty of care and acts of negligence of a type and magnitude that would distinguish a student-plaintiff's injuries from others for whose benefit the statutory duty was created. (Author)

  18. Improving Educational Outcomes by Providing Educational Services through Mobile Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2013-01-01

    The use of Computers, Networks, and Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and instructors with various online educational services. With the recent developments in M-learning and mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By providing the educational services using wireless and mobile technologies, the educational institutions can potentially bring great co...

  19. Postpartum Depression and the Affordable Care Act: Recommendations for Social Work Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Keefe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA mandates ongoing research on postpartum depression; however, very little research has been published in social work journals and in advanced-level textbooks on this topic. This article describes the problem of postpartum depression and argues that social work educators and researchers must pay greater attention to this issue in light of the ACA mandates, so that social workers can provide effective services to postpartum mothers and their children. The Council on Social Work Education’s recently published Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards are considered while making curriculum recommendations on postpartum depression for social work educators.

  20. Quality improvement in neurological surgery graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Scott L; McGirt, Matthew J; Asher, Anthony L; Selden, Nathan R

    2015-04-01

    There has been no formal, standardized curriculum for neurosurgical resident education in quality improvement. There are at least 2 reasons to integrate a formalized quality improvement curriculum into resident education: (1) increased emphasis on the relative quality and value (cost-effectiveness) of health care provided by individual physicians, and (2) quality improvement principles empower broader lifelong learning. An integrated quality improvement curriculum should comprise specific goals and milestones at each level of residency training. This article discusses the role and possible implementation of a national program for quality improvement in neurosurgical resident education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. "No Child Left Behind," the "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act" and Functional Curricula: A Conflict of Interest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.

    2009-01-01

    Is a functional curriculum aligned with the federal education policies of No Child Left Behind (2002) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 2004)? This article analyzes the alignment, or lack thereof, between this approach to educating secondary students with mild mental impairment and the two main federal education laws…

  2. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God...

  3. Action Research: Improving Schools and Empowering Educators. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertler, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Written for pre- and in-service educators, this "Third Edition" of Craig A. Mertler's "Action Research: Improving Schools and Empowering Educators" introduces the process of conducting one's own classroom- or school-based action research in conjunction with everyday instructional practices and activities. The text provides educators with the…

  4. A Research Focused on Improving Vocalisation Level on Violin Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasiz, Gökalp

    2018-01-01

    The research aimed to improve vocalisation levels of music teacher's candidates on performance works for violin education moving from difficulties faced by prospective teachers. At the same time, it was aimed to provide new perspectives to violin educators. Study group was composed of six 3rd grade students studying violin education in a State…

  5. Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education

    OpenAIRE

    Mooij, Ton; Smeets, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Mooij, T., & Smeets, E. (2011, 13-16 September). Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education. Presentation and discussion in a cross-network symposium of networks 16 and 12 at the ‘European Conference on Educational Research’ of the “European Educational Research Association” (EERA), Berlin, Germany.

  6. Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton; Smeets, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Mooij, T., & Smeets, E. (2011, 13-16 September). Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education. Presentation and discussion in a cross-network symposium of networks 16 and 12 at the ‘European Conference on Educational Research’ of the “European Educational Research

  7. School Improvement Grants: Selected States Generally Awarded Funds Only to Eligible Schools. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Final Audit Report. ED-OIG/A05L0002

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This final audit report covers the results of the review of five State educational agencies' monitoring plans and awarding processes for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and regular School Improvement Grants funds that the State educational agencies awarded for fiscal year 2009 (for use during school year 2010-2011). The objectives…

  8. Improving science, technology and mathematics education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF.MIREKU

    STM as a result of the different motivation and sensitization workshops (F(4,231) .... improve the teaching and learning of S&T using a more creative, ... Improve teaching and learning methods by using modern approaches like activity based.

  9. Improving Educational Outcomes by Providing Educational Services through Mobile Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Computers, Networks, and Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and instructors with various online educational services. With the recent developments in M-learning and mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By providing the educational services using wireless and mobile technologies, the educational institutions can potentially bring great convenience to those off-campus students who do not always have time to find Internet enabled computers to get the important educational information from their academic institutions. With the mobile or M-educational services, both the students and the instructors can access the services anytime and anywhere they want. This paper discusses those M-educational services that can be moved to the mobile platform and then presents the system prototype and architecture that integrate these services into the mobile technology platform. The paper will conclude with a description of the formative evaluation of the system prototype.

  10. From Learning Cultures to Educational Cultures: Values and Judgements in Educational Research and Educational Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesta, Gert

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines a new approach to the study of learning and the improvement of education. The approach consists of two elements: a theory of learning cultures and a cultural theory of learning. Learning cultures are different from learning contexts or learning environments in that they are to be understood as the social practices through…

  11. Education to Action: Improving Public Perception of Bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Hoffmaster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Public perception of bats has historically been largely negative with bats often portrayed as carriers of disease. Bats are commonly associated with vampire lore and thus elicit largely fearful reactions despite the fact that they are a vital and valuable part of the ecosystem. Bats provide a variety of essential services from pest control to plant pollination. Despite the benefits of bats to the environment and the economy, bats are suffering at the hands of humans. They are victims of turbines, human encroachment, pesticides, and, most recently, white nose syndrome. Because of their critical importance to the environment, humans should do what they can to help protect bats. We propose that humans will be more likely to do so if their perceptions and attitudes toward bats can be significantly improved. In a preliminary study we found some support for the idea that people can be educated about bats through bat oriented events and exhibits, and that this greater knowledge can inspire humans to act to save bats.

  12. Improving business IQ in medicine through mentorship and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Austin D

    2014-09-01

    Business intelligence in the field of medicine, particularly with physicians, has been an abstract concept at best with no objective metric. Furthermore, in many arenas, it was taboo for medical students, residents, and physicians to discuss the business and finances of their work for fear that it would interfere with their sacred duties as health care providers. There has been a substantial shift in this philosophy over the last few decades with the growth and evolution of the health care industry in the United States. In 2012, health care expenditures accounted for 17.2% of the United States Gross Domestic Product, averaging $8915 per person. The passage of the Affordable Care Act in March of 2010 sent a clear message to all that change is coming, and it is more important now than ever to have physician leaders whose skills and knowledge in business, management, and health care law rival their acumen within their medical practice. Students, residents, and fellows all express a desire to gain more business knowledge throughout their education and training, but many do not know where to begin or have access to programs that can further their knowledge. Whether you are an employed or private practice physician, academic or community based, improving your business intelligence will help you get a seat at the table where decisions are made and give you the skills to influence those decisions.

  13. Are Economic Development and Education Improvement Associated with Participation in Transnational Terrorism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbakidze, L; Jin, Y H

    2015-08-01

    Using transnational terrorism data from 1980 to 2000, this study empirically examines the relationships between frequency of participation in transnational terrorism acts and economic development and education improvement. We find an inverse U-shaped association between the frequency of various nationals acting as perpetrators in transnational terrorism acts and per capita income in their respective home countries. As per capita incomes increase from relatively low levels, frequencies of participation in transnational terrorism increase. However, at sufficiently higher levels of per capita income, further increase in per capita income is negatively associated with the rate of participation in transnational terrorism. Education improvement from elementary to secondary is positively correlated with frequency of participation in transnational terrorism events, whereas further improvement from secondary to tertiary level is negatively correlated with participation in transnational terrorism. We also find that citizens of countries with greater openness to international trade, lower degree of income inequality, greater economic freedom, larger proportion of population with tertiary education, and less religious prevalence participate in transnational terrorism events less frequently. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  14. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massy, William F.; Sullivan, Teresa A.; Mackie, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Higher education is a critical element of the American economy, because of both its benefits and its costs to individuals and taxpayers. Yet we know very little about the relationships between the things colleges and universities do and the resources they need to do them. Currently, shrinking public support and increasing tuition make it urgent…

  15. Improving Consumer Information for Higher Education Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, M. Craig

    2012-01-01

    It is a historically held principle of microeconomics that in the presence of better information, consumers make better decisions. This chapter focuses on information to guide consumers in making decisions about higher education. It examines the development and implementation of a one-stop career and college planning tool that leverages existing…

  16. Improving the Knowledge Base in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockler, Michael J.

    Education in the United States for most of the last 50 years has built its knowledge base on a single dominating foundation--behavioral psychology. This paper analyzes the history of behaviorism. Syntheses are presented of the theories of Ivan P. Pavlov, J. B. Watson, and B. F. Skinner, all of whom contributed to the body of works on behaviorism.…

  17. Harnessing Homophily to Improve Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Martha C.; Plate, Richard R.; Adams, Damian C.; Wojcik, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    The Cooperative Extension Service (Extension) in the United States is well positioned to educate the public, particularly farmers and foresters, about climate change and to encourage responsible adoption of adaptation and mitigation strategies. However, the climate change attitudes and perceptions of Extension professionals have limited…

  18. Education Policy as an Act of White Supremacy: Whiteness, Critical Race Theory and Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillborn, David

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents an empirical analysis of education policy in England that is informed by recent developments in US critical theory. In particular, I draw on 'whiteness studies' and the application of critical race theory (CRT). These perspectives offer a new and radical way of conceptualizing the role of racism in education. Although the US…

  19. Implementing and Sustaining School Improvement. The Informed Educator Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This "Informed Educator" examines research-proven strategies for implementing and sustaining school improvement by looking at the key elements of the process, enabling conditions for improvement, issues of school culture, and implementation. It also looks at school turnarounds and how to sustain school improvement once reforms are implemented.

  20. Improv(ing) the Academy: Applied Improvisation as a Strategy for Educational Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Jonathan P.; Hoffmann-Longtin, Krista

    2016-01-01

    Improvisational theater training (or "improv") is a strategy employed by many business leaders and educators to cultivate creativity and collaboration amid change. Drawing on improv principles such as "Yes, And…" and "Make your scene partners look good," we explore the ways in which educational developers might apply…

  1. Continuous Improvement in Education. Advancing Teaching--Improving Learning. White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sandra; Hironaka, Stephanie; Carver, Penny; Nordstrum, Lee

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, "continuous improvement" has become a popular catchphrase in the field of education. However, while continuous improvement has become commonplace and well-documented in other industries, such as healthcare and manufacturing, little is known about how this work has manifested itself in education. This white paper attempts…

  2. Continuous Improvement in Nursing Education through Total Quality Management (TQM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Wai Mun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM has generally been validated as a crucial revolution in the management field. Many academicians believe that the concept of TQM is applicable to academics and provides guiding principles towards improving education. Therefore, an increasing number of educational institutions such as schools, colleges and universities have started to embrace TQM philosophies to their curricula.Within the context of TQM, this paper would explore the concept of continuous improvement by using the Deming philosophy. Subsequently, this paper would elaborate on the application of TQM to bring about continuous improvement in the current education system.

  3. Improving Perceived Entrepreneurial Abilities through Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Tomas; Moberg, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    evaluated the influence of the program/course on entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE), attitudes to entrepreneurship and whether or not the students had started a company during their education. The result indicates that the entrepreneurship program was effective in enhancing ESE, attitudes......This study evaluates the impact of an entrepreneurship program. Two pre-test/post-test surveys were performed among students attending the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 classes. A third pre-post survey was sent to students enrolled in an innovation management course, who served as the control group. We...... to entrepreneurship and start up behavior, which was not observed in the control group. The paper concludes by pointing out some limitations of the study and discussing the possible influence of entrepreneurial education on ESE, attitudes to entrepreneurship and start up....

  4. INTERNATIONAL COMPARISONS IN THE IMPROVEMENT OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert David G.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Imperfections - such as inequality and inefficiency of learning - are perennial problems for education despite a diversity of foundations on which national systems are established, which range from the idealistic vision of fostering a utopian society to the utilitarian objective of producing skilled workers capable of engendering economic growth. Despite sharing many common conditions and fundamental values, educators rarely learn valuable lessons from the successes and failures of highly relevant initiatives in distant nations. This problem may be attributed to several factors, not the least of which includes the entrenchment of local traditions and ethnocentric assumptions, but surely the quality and relevance of international-comparative research - and the way its results are disseminated - are issues that must also be taken into careful consideration. What are the unique lessons to be learned from international comparisons, and what are the prospective risks for how such comparisons may be misinterpreted and misused in educational settings? How can international comparative research be made more relevant, with tangible applications that may be recognized and effectively used by school teachers? How can international comparative education meaningfully examine subjects beyond the reach of standardized testing, in such domains as the fostering of creativity, talent, and ethical sensibilities, for example? These themes will be presented through discussion of both research findings and anecdotes from the personal experience of working for universities on four continents. Specific topics will include the challenges of accounting for conceptual equivalency and representing cultural differences, sampling and generalizability, reconciling the diverging aims of economic, anthropological, sociological, and psychological research, as well as grappling with the ambivalent discourse of globalization, multiculturalism, post-colonialism, and other social

  5. A case law review of the individuals with disabilities education act for children with hearing loss or auditory processing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisman, Brian M; John, Andrew B

    2010-01-01

    In 1975, Congress passed the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (Public Law 94-142), and it has been revised and modified several times. At the time of this writing, this law was most recently amended by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (Pub. L. No. 108-446, 118 Stat. 2647, December 3, 2004), which took effect on July 1, 2005. Colloquially the law is still referred to as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Children with hearing loss or auditory processing disorder (APD) may qualify for services under IDEA. However, a review of the literature found no review of case law for such children. This article provides a comprehensive review of case law involving the IDEA and children with hearing loss or APD from the U.S. Supreme Court and U.S. courts of appeals. We conducted a systematic review of case law. A LexisNexis search for cases involving IDEA and children with hearing loss or APDs was conducted. For the purpose of the present case review, all appellate decisions (cases accepted by the U.S. courts of appeals or the U.S. Supreme Court) were included if they found that the child had hearing loss or APD, regardless of the reason for the appeal under IDEA. In the instance of multiple cases that involved the same two parties, these cases are summarized together to provide the legal context. Brief explanations of IDEA and the federal judicial process as it pertains to IDEA disputes are presented. Following these explanations, a chronological review of IDEA appellate cases concerning students with hearing loss or APD is provided. The IDEA cases reviewed focus on three main issues: placement of the child, methodology of teaching, and the provision of services. This case law review provides a helpful summary of higher court cases for educational audiologists and parents of children with hearing loss or APDs, as well as educators, individualized education program team members, school administrators, and legal

  6. Progress and Impact. A Report of Programs Funded for 1995-96 by the Comprehensive Health Education Act of 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jerry L.; Connell, Karen

    During the 1995-96 school year, the Colorado Department of Education supported Comprehensive Health Education Programs as authorized by the Comprehensive Health Education Act of 1990. This report summarizes the projects funded under that grant along with additional observations and recommendations regarding the operation of such grants. Grant…

  7. Does Education Reform Improve Job Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wenger, J

    2003-01-01

    .... Examining military personnel data, which is a highly detailed source of information for recent high school graduate's performance, we find that the quality of Navy recruits improved during the 1990...

  8. Educational status: improvement and problems. Population programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the levels of literacy and educational status in Tibet Autonomous Region. Data were obtained from the 1990 and earlier China Censuses. Traditional education among Tibetans was accessible only to lamas and a privileged few. The reasons were religious influence and an underdeveloped socioeconomic status. In 1990, illiteracy was 90.6% for the urban population (80.0% for males and 81.6% for females). Illiteracy was 91.4% in rural areas (81.6% for males and 98.1% for females). There were 2556 modern schools in 1990, with a total enrollment of 175,600 students. The percentage of well-educated Tibetan population was lower than that for any other ethnic groups living in Tibet. Illiteracy among persons aged 15 years and older declined from 74% in 1982, to 69% in 1990. Tibet Autonomous Region has the highest illiteracy rate in China. The absolute number of illiterates increased by 12.4% during 1982-90. Urban illiteracy also rose by 12%. In rural areas, the absolute number of illiterates increased by only 1.3%. Illiteracy in rural areas declined by 0.52%, to 88%, during 1982-90. In 1990, illiteracy among adolescents aged 10-14 years was 74.25% in rural areas, 36.26% in towns, and 28.60% in Lhasa city. More women are illiterate than men. Enrollment of school age children is low due to religious reasons and a need among herdsmen for help tending livestock.

  9. Influence of farmers educational level on comprehending, acting-upon and sharing of agro advisories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Chandre Gowda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although short messaging service (SMS through mobile phones has quickly gained popularity among most other sectors in India, its potential is not fully realised in the agriculture sector as a cost effective service to reach farmers and elicit desirable action. Despite the cost effectiveness, mobile messaging has remained a challenge in the farming sector in terms of its end use and action as far as extension systems are concerned. While there could be many influencing factors affecting the utility of mobile messages, this study assumed that educational level of farmers could be a major factor. A telephone survey was conducted to ascertain the influence of farmers’ education on the level of utilisation of mobile-based advisories. Farmers with higher education level showed better comprehension of advisories, acted-upon the advisories more promptly and shared the information with fellow farmers more often than those with lower education level. There was a significant association between comprehending, sharing and acting upon advisories. This has implications to achieve enhanced extension reach with higher efficiency in terms of cost and time.

  10. Big data in medical informatics: improving education through visual analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitsis, Christos; Nilsson, Gunnar; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    A continuous effort to improve healthcare education today is currently driven from the need to create competent health professionals able to meet healthcare demands. Limited research reporting how educational data manipulation can help in healthcare education improvement. The emerging research field of visual analytics has the advantage to combine big data analysis and manipulation techniques, information and knowledge representation, and human cognitive strength to perceive and recognise visual patterns. The aim of this study was therefore to explore novel ways of representing curriculum and educational data using visual analytics. Three approaches of visualization and representation of educational data were presented. Five competencies at undergraduate medical program level addressed in courses were identified to inaccurately correspond to higher education board competencies. Different visual representations seem to have a potential in impacting on the ability to perceive entities and connections in the curriculum data.

  11. IMPROVING MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS AT A HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya N. Fedyakova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: this paper deals with the foreign and domestic experience of creation and use of educational institution management automation systems. The problems of higher educational institutions management are essential in conditions of growing competition between educational institutions. Their complexity and timeliness defines multifunctional activity of higher educational institutions, diversity of funding sources, the variety of forms and types of educational, scientific, industrial and economic activities, the need for monitoring of the market of educational services and the labor market (including the need for employment of graduates, the necessity for adaptation to continuously changing economic conditions. Materials and Methods: system approach and method of comparison were used in analysing the current state of development and organisation of the automated information systems of higher education. These methods were also used to compare the qualitative characteristics of different technologies and methods of creation of the automated information systems. Results: the foreign and domestic educational institution management automation systems SIMS. net, Capita Education, SPRUT, Galaxy of Higher Educational Institution Management”, and “GSVedomosty” were analysed. Disadvantages of the functional module AIS – AWP pertaining to the University Rector of the higher educational institution were found. The improvement of higher educational institution AIS by implementing decision support systems for the management, made on the basis of the model of SaaS (software as a service is discussed. The author developed a model of automated score-rating system to assess the individual performance of students. Discussion and Conclusions: the author tackles the problems of higher educational institution AIS taking into account the specifics of the use of higher educational institution management information systems. They have a practical

  12. DIGITAL SIMULATIONS FOR IMPROVING EDUCATION: Learning Through Artificial Teaching Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Reviewed by Özlem OZAN

    2009-01-01

    DIGITAL SIMULATIONS FOR IMPROVING EDUCATION:Learning Through Artificial Teaching EnvironmentsGibson, David, Ed.D.; Information Science Reference, Hershey, PA,SBN-10: 1605663239, ISBN-13: 9781605663234, p.514 Jan 2009Reviewed byÖzlem OZANFaculty of Education, Eskişehir Osmangazi University,Eskisehir-TURKEYSimulations in education, both for children and adults,become popular with the development of computer technology, because they are fun and engaging and allow learners to internalize knowledg...

  13. Description of intensity of physical education in a structure educational educate and health-improvement-educate processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondar T.S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of intensity of physical education is presented in child's establishments of making healthy and rest and general educational establishments. Questioning of 183 students-practice and analysis of document of the Kharkov regional management is conducted on physical education and sport. It is set that health-improvement-educate process is directed on forming for children and young people of culture of health. It is marked that the result of pedagogical activity in establishments and establishments of education is physical, spiritual and social development of personality of children and young people. Witnessed, that process of physical education in out-of-town child's establishments of making healthy and rest almost in three times more intensive by comparison to general educational establishments and school summer camps. It contingently a presence for the children of plenty of spare time, by the use in practice of camps of non-standard facilities and forms of increase of motive activity of children, by the features of structure health-improvement-educate process.

  14. Implementing effective simulation-based education to improve ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Implementing effective simulation-based education to improve maternal ... by IDRC, including the contributions IDRC is making towards Canada's maternal child ... OECD's Development Co-Operation Report highlights critical role of data to ...

  15. 76 FR 16818 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Standard Criteria for Ag and Urban Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... Valley Project water conservation best management practices (BMPs) that shall develop Criteria for... project contractors using best available cost- effective technology and best management practices.'' The... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Standard...

  16. Profiles of Change: Lessons for Improving High School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This feature has told stories of high school physical educators who have refused to accept the status quo of high school physical education programs. They have identified problems, initiated innovations in their own classes, implemented changes beyond their classes, and moved toward institutionalizing improvements throughout their programs and…

  17. Improvement of educational quality in VET: Who is next?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venne, L. van de; Honingh, M.E.; Genugten, M.L. van; Bruijn, E. de; Billett, S.; Onstenk, J.

    2017-01-01

    Educational quality is a recurrent theme in the Dutch Vocational and Educational Training (VET) sector. Given the major transformations in school governance and the increased autonomy of schools and school boards, it is important to address whether schools and school boards are able to improve

  18. Improving Completion Rates in Adult Education through Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Mariager-Anderson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Dropout is a serious problem within education. This article reports on an intervention project, titled "New Roles for the Teacher--Increased Completion Rates Through Social Responsibility," which sought to reduce nonattendance and drop-out rates in the Danish adult educational system by improving teachers' competences. This goal was…

  19. Guiding and Modelling Quality Improvement in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the process of creating quality improvement in higher education institutions from the point of view of current organisational theory and social-science modelling techniques. The author considers the higher education institution as a functioning complex of rules, norms and other organisational features and reviews the social…

  20. Improving Teacher-Made Assessments in Technology and Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jesse W.; Moye, Johnny J.; Gareis, Christopher R.; Hylton, Sarah P.

    2018-01-01

    In the interest of learning how to effectively use the technological literacy standards and of adhering to education regulation, this article focuses on efforts to improve the professional teaching practices of Technology and Engineering Education (TEE) teachers by using the Gareis and Grant (2015) process with respect to "Standards for…

  1. Improving Alcohol/Drug Education in Illinois Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This paper lists guidelines approved by the Illinois State Board of Education for improving alcohol and drug education in the schools. Statistics point out the seriousness of alcohol and drug abuse in terms of human costs to the victim, his/her family, and associates, and the economic costs of health care, accident losses, crime, social programs,…

  2. The Case for Improving U.S. Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nager, Adams; Atkinson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing use of computers and software in every facet of our economy, not until recently has computer science education begun to gain traction in American school systems. The current focus on improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in the U.S. School system has disregarded differences within STEM…

  3. Quality Improvement in Virtual Higher Education: A Grounded Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdiuon, Rouhollah; Masoumi, Davoud; Farasatkhah, Maghsoud

    2017-01-01

    The article aims to explore the attributes of quality and quality improvement including the process and specific actions associated with these attributes--that contribute enhancing quality in Iranian Virtual Higher Education (VHE) institutions. A total of 16 interviews were conducted with experts and key actors in Iranian virtual higher education.…

  4. Patient Education May Improve Perioperative Safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, L.S.; Calsbeek, H; Wolff, André

    2016-01-01

    Importance: There is a growing interest in enabling ways for patients to participate in their own care to improve perioperative safety, but little is known about the effectiveness of interventions enhancing an active patient role. Objective: To evaluate the effect of patient participation on

  5. Education Improves Plagiarism Detection by Biology Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Emily A.

    2012-01-01

    Regrettably, the sciences are not untouched by the plagiarism affliction that threatens the integrity of budding professionals in classrooms around the world. My research, however, suggests that plagiarism training can improve students' recognition of plagiarism. I found that 148 undergraduate ecology students successfully identified plagiarized…

  6. Augmented Virtual Reality: How to Improve Education Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Utrilla Miguel, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students’ learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students’ knowledge acquisition. Stakeholders in the educational role of technology include students, faculty members, institutions, and manufacturers. While the benefits of suc...

  7. Pursuing Improvement in Clinical Reasoning: The Integrated Clinical Education Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, Mary Ann

    2018-01-01

    The link between clinical education and development of clinical reasoning is not well supported by one theoretical perspective. Learning to reason during clinical education may be best achieved in a supportive sociocultural context of nursing practice that maximizes reasoning opportunities and facilitates discourse and meaningful feedback. Prelicensure clinical education seldom incorporates these critical components and thus may fail to directly promote clinical reasoning skill. Theoretical frameworks supporting the development of clinical reasoning during clinical education were evaluated. Analysis of strengths and gaps in each framework's support of clinical reasoning development was conducted. Commensurability of philosophical underpinnings was confirmed, and complex relationships among key concepts were elucidated. Six key concepts and three tenets comprise an explanatory predictive theory-the integrated clinical education theory (ICET). ICET provides critical theoretical support for inquiry and action to promote clinical education that improves development of clinical reasoning skill. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(1):7-13.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. A Plan-Do-Study-Act Approach to Improving Bowel Preparation Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Audrey H; Mahoney, Elaine M; Jacobson, Brian C

    Up to 20% of patients presenting for colonoscopy have inadequate bowel cleanliness. In this study, the Plan-Do-Study-Act quality improvement process was used to improve bowel cleanliness among outpatients undergoing screening colonoscopy at Boston Medical Center. Rates of inadequate bowel cleanliness were assessed at baseline (April 2010 to September 2012), during several rapid-cycle experiments (October 2012 to September 2013), and through an observation phase (October 2013 to September 2015). The baseline rate of inadequate cleanliness was 9% with a target of 5%. Gap analysis identified 3 areas amenable to specific interventions: contacting patients, commitment to the procedure, and complexity and variation in instructions. Rates of inadequate cleanliness decreased to 4% at the end of the last intervention, but began rising for new reasons. Standardizing instructions and the use of navigators improved preparation quality. Bowel cleanliness is the end result of a multistep process with areas for improvement at many levels. Long-term monitoring is required to ensure ongoing success.

  9. Public Law 94-142, Education for All Handicapped Children Act: Some Plain Talk Pursuant to the Role of Institutions of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Greg

    The presentation addresses the implications of P.L. 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, for institutions of higher education that are concerned with special education personnel preparation. After a review of literature, the supply and demand situation as it pertains to teachers of exceptional children is discussed and quality…

  10. 78 FR 29748 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Education and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA)) to individuals convicted of drug trafficking or... drug trafficking or possession of a controlled substance who have been denied Federal benefits by..., which was originally enacted as section 5301 of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, and which was amended...

  11. Educator Effectiveness Research Alliance: Using Research and Data to Understand and Improve Educator Preparation and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southwest, 2018

    2018-01-01

    Research shows that teachers affect student learning more than any other factor. The Educator Effectiveness Research Alliance, a collaborative partnership of educators, policymakers, and researchers, seeks to improve educator quality through research and analytic technical support. Initially focused on Texas, the alliance has expanded to include…

  12. Financing Secondary Education in Kenya: Exploring Strategic Management Approach for Improving Quality of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itegi, Florence M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the influence of strategic planning in improving the quality of education. The quality of education is directly linked to the effort expended in making arrangements or preparations of educational objectives and determining the requisite resources to facilitate the training, instruction or study that leads to the…

  13. Combining clinical microsystems and an experiential quality improvement curriculum to improve residency education in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tess, Anjala V; Yang, Julius J; Smith, C Christopher; Fawcett, Caitlin M; Bates, Carol K; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2009-03-01

    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's internal medicine residency program was admitted to the new Education Innovation Project accreditation pathway of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education to begin in July 2006. The authors restructured the inpatient medical service to create clinical microsystems in which residents practice throughout residency. Program leadership then mandated an active curriculum in quality improvement based in those microsystems. To provide the experience to every graduating resident, a core faculty in patient safety was trained in the basics of quality improvement. The authors hypothesized that such changes would increase the number of residents participating in quality improvement projects, improve house officer engagement in quality improvement work, enhance the culture of safety the residents perceive in their training environment, improve work flow on the general medicine ward rotations, and improve the overall educational experience for the residents on ward rotations.The authors describe the first 18 months of the intervention (July 2006 to January 2008). The authors assessed attitudes and the educational experience with surveys and evaluation forms. After the intervention, the authors documented residents' participation in projects that overlapped with hospital priorities. More residents reported roles in designing and implementing quality improvement changes. Residents also noted greater satisfaction with the quality of care they deliver. Fewer residents agreed or strongly agreed that the new admitting system interfered with communication. Ongoing residency program assessment showed an improved perception of workload, and educational ratings of rotations improved. The changes required few resources and can be transported to other settings.

  14. IMPROVEMENT OF QUALITY ASSURANCE SYSTEM ACTIVITIES OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Sultalieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the article is the improvement of quality assessment system of higher education institutions in the aspect of management. The problems of quality improvement are revealed and classified. The analysis of criteria assessment sets used to define the efficiency of higher education institutions activity is carried out. The components of quality of higher education institutions activity are specified. The structural model of quality assessment system of higher education institutions activity is offered. The analysis of macro environment of a university based on the method of strategic management is carried out, i.e. PEST analysis. As a result of the research a new model of macro criteria model of quality assessment system of higher education institutions, characterizing quality management as an approach to university efficiency is offered, moreover, this system can define the level of its competitiveness in the aspect of quality management. 

  15. Improvement of the public administration system of higher educational establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Vyacheslavovich Romin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During research found that state regulation of higher education establishments activity is a special branch of the state, during which its authorities with the help of planning, organizing, monitoring is carried out the current regulation of the activities of higher education establishments, provide organization (integrationof the total interaction of students and teachers. Proposed to allocate the financial strategy of higher educational establishments as a major in strategic management of the higher education system. In this regard, it argued that the integration capacity of the university to the regional reproductive system will optimize government funding of higher educational establishments. Also, it helps to determine the main directions of further economic and financial development of the higher education system, prioritizing the development of already existing educational and training facilities in different regions of the state, the provision of appropriate state support for higher education establishments, which training necessary specialists for the state’s economy. The improvement the public administration system of a high school should be carried out through the formation of a coordination mechanism for higher education establishments. The introduction of this mechanism will provide an opportunity to identify the main activities of the higher education establishments adapt to the operating conditions of the region, based on the trends in the development of higher education, and to provide the basic needs of the labor market in the relevant specialists.

  16. Internal Resources to Improve the Quality of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana V. Zak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the situation in the Russian higher education system. The factors affecting the improvement of the quality of higher education are analyzed. The emphasis is on mass universities. The main obstacles to improving the quality of education in these institutions are the Institute of collective reputation and the high costs of the struggle for improving the quality of education.The necessity of focusing on the actuation of the internal resources to improve the quality associated with the change in the educational process: giving students the right to choose the timing exams and training period at university. The implementation of the proposed measures will reduce the opportunity costs associated with quality improvement activities. The proposed change in the organization of the learning process opens the possibility to estimate the activity of universities in terms of medium-term implementation of educational programs. The use of this indicator will not only combine the two different targets of universities, but also to minimize the costs of opportunistic behavior of teachers and management.

  17. End-of-Year 2009-10 Progress Report to the California Legislature: Implementation and Impact of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Title II: Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) provide funding for states and territories to provide instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult Basic Education (ABE), and Adult Secondary Education (ASE) to adults in need of these literacy services. California State Budget Act…

  18. The balancing act between the constitutional right to strike and the constitutional right to education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H J (Jaco Deacon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available While the South African Constitution enshrines both children's right to a basic education and teachers' right to strike, conflict between these two often occurs when the way in which teachers' unions conduct strike actions detracts from learners' education. This article identifies the parties affected by industrial action in the school context, and then proceeds to examine educators' right to strike as defined by the provisions of the Labour Relations Act. The unique implications of picketing in the education environment are then discussed, covering relevant questions such as where pickets may be held, the issue of picketing rules as well as unprotected pickets. Even though we are faced with a qualified right to strike as opposed to an unqualified right to education, the South African reality seems to be that striking teachers are handled with kid gloves. It is therefore concluded that the vast range of existing laws regulating protest action should be applied more effectively. One of the most important aspects should be the picketing rules, which should clearly determine whether picketing in fact contributes to resolution of the dispute, and how learners' interests and rights may best be actualised.

  19. Augmented Virtual Reality: How to Improve Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students' learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students' knowledge acquisition.…

  20. Streamline and Improve the Targeting of Education Tax Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for College Access & Success, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This one-page document presents The Institute for College Access & Success' (TICAS') recommendations for ways to improve the targeting of higher education tax benefits. The TICAS white paper, "Aligning the Means and the Ends: How to Improve Federal Student Aid and Increase College Access and Success," recommends almost entirely…

  1. Changing academic culture to improve undergraduate STEM education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchman, Erica L

    2014-12-01

    Improving undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education requires faculty with the skills, resources, and time to create active learning environments that foster student engagement. Current faculty hiring, promotion, and tenure practices at many universities do not measure, reward, nor encourage faculty pursuit of these skills. A cultural change is needed to foster improvement. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Integrating Planning, Assessment, and Improvement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Based on Penn State's popular "Innovation Insights" series, this book brings together in one handy reference nearly a decade of tried and true insights into continuous quality improvements in higher education. Their five-step model for integrating planning, assessment, and improvement moves plans off the shelf and into the weekly and daily…

  3. Building High-Performing and Improving Education Systems: Teachers. Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Liz

    2013-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that teachers have the most effect on pupil outcomes (closely followed by the quality of leadership). The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) concluded that: (1) teachers were central to school improvement; (2) in order to improve the quality and fairness of education, teachers had to be…

  4. The Keys to Effective Schools: Educational Reform as Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Working in tandem with the powerful National Education Association's KEYS initiative (Keys to Excellence in Your Schools), this second edition focuses on how to change a school's organizational structure and culture to improve the quality of teaching and learning. Each chapter, revised and updated to address continuous improvement and narrowing…

  5. Online Education Improves Dementia Knowledge: Evidence From an International Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annear, Michael J

    2018-03-01

    Dementia education disseminated through massive open online courses (MOOCs) has the potential to improve knowledge and care provision among health professionals and lay people. The potential learning effects of a dementia MOOC were assessed using a reliable and valid measure with international volunteers ( N = 3,649) who completed the measure before and after online education. Evaluation of learning effects suggests that the MOOC significantly increased dementia knowledge by at least 17% across six cohorts. Knowledge was improved by the MOOC in three ways: it significantly improved overall understanding of dementia for diverse cohorts; it reduced knowledge disparity within occupational and lay cohorts; and it reduced knowledge disparity across occupational and lay cohorts. The capacity of a dementia MOOC to significantly improve knowledge and reach a wide audience may lead to population-level improvements in understanding about dementia. This may foster improvements in treatment and quality of care for people with dementia.

  6. Educational Intervention Improves Compliance With AAN Guidelines for Return Epilepsy Visits: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gary R; Filloux, Francis M; Kerr, Lynne M

    2016-10-01

    In 2011, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) released guidelines for return seizure visits detailing 8 points that should be addressed during such visits. These guidelines are designed to improve routine follow-up care for epilepsy patients. The authors performed a quality improvement project aimed at increasing compliance with these guidelines after educating providers about them. The authors performed a chart review before and after an intervention which included: education regarding the guidelines, providing materials to remind providers of the guidelines, and templates to facilitate compliance. The authors reviewed charts at 2 and 6 months after the intervention. Significant improvement in documentation of 4 of the 8 measures was observed after this educational intervention. This suggests that simple educational interventions may help providers change practice and can improve compliance with new guidelines while requiring minimal time and resources to implement. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Towards Effective Educational Politics through Improving the Performance Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuuli Reisberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Educational field is impelled to increase performance and quality, financial discipline, strategic behaviour and its goals in order to enhance “effectiveness”. As a result the incorporation of private sector management practices into the educational field is taking place. But it is important to notice that a proliferation of private managerial practices into the educational field goes along with a conflict-laden and contradictory process. Education provides an important area of implementation for techniques of performance evaluation aimed at improving the performance of public services. One of the most common conceptual frameworks in measuring organisational performance takes the form of a production function where the educational institution is seen as analogous to a company transforming inputs into outputs and outcomes through a production process. But the problems and the vagueness in determining educational system’s inputs, outputs and outcomes cause difficulties in making political decisions and that is why clear policy prescriptions have been difficult to derive. The purpose of this article is to create a discussion whether performance measurement should be a part of decision-making in educational politics. The authors debate about incorporating private sector management practices into the educational field. The debate is based on the example of evaluating the social impact in the educational field and the performance of teachers’ work in the educational system. The article consists of three parts. Firstly, the theoretical background of the performance measurement in educational field is discussed. Secondly, the important criteria for performance measurement design and political issues are argued. Thirdly, the evaluated shortcomings in Estonian educational organisations, which restrict them to be effective, are brought out. Relieving some of these shortcomings could be in authority of Estonian educational politics.

  8. 76 FR 68766 - Draft Blueprint for Prescriber Education for Long-Acting/Extended-Release Opioid Class-Wide Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0771] Draft Blueprint for Prescriber Education for Long-Acting/ Extended-Release Opioid Class-Wide Risk... announcing the availability of a draft document entitled ``Blueprint for Prescriber Education for the Long...

  9. Improving STEM Undergraduate Education with Efficient Learning Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godsk, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    The project investigates the potential of Learning Design for efficiently improving STEM undergraduate education with technology. In order to investigate this potential, the project consists of two main studies at Aarhus University: a study of the perspectives of the main stakeholders on Learning...... Design uptake. The project concludes that it is possible to improve STEM undergraduate education with Learning Design for technology-enhanced learning efficiently and that Efficient Learning Design provides a useful concept for qualifying educational decisions....... provided by technology-enhanced learning based on Learning Design, and in particular students’ learning was of a high common interest. However, only the educators were directly interested in Learning Design and its support for design, reuse in their practice and to inform pedagogy. A holistic concept...

  10. Partnering with diabetes educators to improve patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Burke SD; Sherr D; Lipman RD

    2014-01-01

    Sandra D Burke,1,2 Dawn Sherr,3 Ruth D Lipman3 1American Association of Diabetes Educators, Chicago, IL, USA; 2University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Urbana, IL, USA; 3Science and Practice, American Association of Diabetes Educators, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Diabetes is a chronic, progressive disease that affects millions worldwide. The paradigm of diabetes management has shifted to focus on empowering the person with diabetes to manage the disease successfully and to improv...

  11. Medical simulation-based education improves medicos' clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Liu, Qiaoyu; Wang, Hai

    2013-03-01

    Clinical skill is an essential part of clinical medicine and plays quite an important role in bridging medicos and physicians. Due to the realities in China, traditional medical education is facing many challenges. There are few opportunities for students to practice their clinical skills and their dexterities are generally at a low level. Medical simulation-based education is a new teaching modality and helps to improve medicos' clinical skills to a large degree. Medical simulation-based education has many significant advantages and will be further developed and applied.

  12. Augmented-Virtual Reality: How to improve education systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernandez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students’ learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students’ knowledge acquisition. Stakeholders in the educational role of technology include students, faculty members, institutions, and manufacturers. While the benefits of such technologies are still under investigation, the technology landscape offers opportunities to enhance face-to-face and online teaching, including contributions in the understanding of abstract concepts and training in real environments and situations. Barriers to technology use involve limited adoption of augmented and virtual reality technologies, and, more directly, necessary training of teachers in using such technologies within meaningful educational contexts. The author proposes a six-step methodology to aid adoption of these technologies as basic elements within the regular education: training teachers; developing conceptual prototypes; teamwork involving the teacher, a technical programmer, and an educational architect; and producing the experience, which then provides results in the subsequent two phases wherein teachers are trained to apply augmented- and virtual-reality solutions within their teaching methodology using an available subject-specific experience and then finally implementing the use of the experience in a regular subject with students. The essay concludes with discussion of the business opportunities facing virtual reality in face-to-face education as well as augmented and virtual reality in online education.

  13. Introduction: Educative innovation and teaching improvement: path and some ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Miralles Martínez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Educative innovation has to be the main field of research on Education. Research on education has to be coalesced with innovation in order to prevent the division between scientific research and teaching. Therefore, both have to be conceived at the same time taking into account teaching and its challenges during the research processInnovation consists in a process of planning and improvement. Innovation implies a change in school practices: to design and built them. However, changes are difficult to set and need time. Furthermore, schools' organization is difficult to change because its complexity and its resistance to change.The aim of this paper is to set out the main issues on innovation on education. How to think education and innovation to learn how to do something new on education? We suggest building a collective project with the engagement of the school’s staff. Furthermore, we recommend to create working groups and that their results on innovation will be disseminate to the rest of the teachers; as well as, to involve all teachers in building a working atmosphere based on experiences’ exchanges and collaboration among peers. We do suggest that those teachers, which innovate in their classrooms, should be promoted to new positions and be encouraged. Therefore, teaching improvement and a better education could be reaching.

  14. A study on the improvement of the legal system concerning Korean Atomic Energy Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Il Un; Jung, Jong Hak; Kim, Jae Ho; Moon, Jong Wook; Kim, In Sub [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    Cause-effect analysis, adjustment, and generalization of the current atomic energy act are contents of this research. These are to be based on the legal theory. Analysis of the current atomic energy act from the viewpoint of constitutional law and administrative law. Review of the other domestic legal systems which have similar problems as the atomic energy act has. Inquiry about the operation of nuclear legal systems of foreign nations.

  15. A study on the improvement of the legal system concerning Korean Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Il Un; Jung, Jong Hak; Kim, Jae Ho; Moon, Jong Wook; Kim, In Sub

    1998-03-01

    Cause-effect analysis, adjustment, and generalization of the current atomic energy act are contents of this research. These are to be based on the legal theory. Analysis of the current atomic energy act from the viewpoint of constitutional law and administrative law. Review of the other domestic legal systems which have similar problems as the atomic energy act has. Inquiry about the operation of nuclear legal systems of foreign nations

  16. A Soft Systems Methodology Perspective on Data Warehousing Education Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    R. Goede; E. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how the soft systems methodology can be used to improve the delivery of a module in data warehousing for fourth year information technology students. Graduates in information technology needs to have academic skills but also needs to have good practical skills to meet the skills requirements of the information technology industry. In developing and improving current data warehousing education modules one has to find a balance in meeting the expectations of ...

  17. Sociological refigurations of patient safety; ontologies of improvement and 'acting with' quality collaboratives in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiderent-Jerak, Teun; Strating, Mathilde; Nieboer, Anna; Bal, Roland

    2009-12-01

    The increasing focus on patient safety in the field of health policy is accompanied by research programs that articulate the role of the social sciences as one of contributing to enhancing safety in healthcare. Through these programs, new approaches to studying safety are facing a narrow definition of 'usefulness' in which researchers are to discover the factors that support or hamper the implementation of existing policy agendas. This is unfortunate since such claims for useful involvement in predefined policy agendas may undo one of the strongest assets of good social science research: the capacity to complexify the taken-for-granted conceptualizations of the object of study. As an alternative to this definition of 'usefulness', this article proposes a focus on multiple ontologies in the making when studying patient safety. Through such a focus, the role of social scientists becomes the involvement in refiguring the problem space of patient safety, the relations between research subjects and objects, and the existing policy agendas. This role gives medical sociologists the opportunity to focus on the question of which practices of 'effective care' are being enacted through different approaches for dealing with patient safety and what their consequences are for the care practices under study. In order to explore these questions, this article draws on empirical material from an ongoing evaluation of a large quality improvement collaborative for the care sectors in the Netherlands. It addresses how issues like 'effectiveness' and 'client participation' are at present articulated in this collaborative and shows that alternative figurations of these notions dissolve many 'implementation problems' presently experienced. Further it analyzes how such a focus of medical sociology on multiple ontologies engenders new potential for exploring particular spaces for 'acting with' quality improvement agents.

  18. Preoperative patient education: can we improve satisfaction and reduce anxiety?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Ortiz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients' knowledge deficits concerning anesthesia and the anesthesiologist's role in their care may contribute to anxiety. The objective of this study was to develop anesthesia patient education materials that would help improve patient's satisfaction regarding their knowledge of the perioperative process and decrease anxiety in a community hospital with a large Spanish-speaking population. METHODS: A survey (Survey A in English and Spanish was administered to all adult anesthesiology preoperative clinic patients during a 4-week period. The data were analyzed and then a patient education handout was developed in both English and Spanish to assist with our patients' major concerns. A second survey (Survey B was administered that was completed after the education handout had been put into use at the clinic. The survey asked for basic demographic information and included questions on satisfaction with regard to understanding of anesthesia as well as worries regarding surgery and pain. RESULTS: In the patients who received the handout, statistically significant improvement was found in the questions that asked about satisfaction with regard to understanding of type of anesthesia, options for pain control, what patients are supposed to do on the day of surgery, and the amount of information given with regard to anesthetic plan. There was no difference in anxiety related to surgery in patients who received the educational handout compared to those patients who did not. CONCLUSIONS: Patient education handouts improved patient's satisfaction regarding their knowledge of the perioperative process but did not reduce anxiety related to surgery.

  19. The Study to Improve Tsunami Preparedness Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Mayumi; Tanırcan, Gülüm; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki; Puskulcu, Seyhun; Kumamoto, Kunihiko

    2016-04-01

    more knowledge on tsunami, tsunami class was provided by BU/DPEU using tsunami booklet and videos. The class was evaluated by before/after class tests and the result showed improvement on students' knowledge. The result showed the necessity to integrate tsunami education materials in school disaster education curriculum.

  20. Improving Schools, Improving School Health Education, Improving Public Health: The Role of SOPHE Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The reciprocal relationship between health and education has garnered increased attention among public health professionals. The evidence is clear that the level of an individual's education is related to health outcomes in adulthood and that healthier children are more likely to be academically successful than those with health issues. Unpacking…

  1. Educational Statistics and School Improvement. Statistics and the Federal Role in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D.

    This paper focuses on how educational statistics might better serve the quest for educational improvement in elementary and secondary schools. A model for conceptualizing the sources and processes of school productivity is presented. The Learning Productivity Model suggests that school outcomes are the consequence of the interaction of five…

  2. IMPROVEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL COGNITIVE ACTIVITY STUDENTS IN THE PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION ON THE BASIS OF VISUALIZATION TECHNOLOGY OF EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliya A. Kolmakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to consider the problem of improving the quality of education in the professional educational organizations.Methods. The scientific and pedagogical analyses of the concepts forming a terminological field of a problem are used. The system, competence-based and personal approaches are used for development of models of cognitive visualization. Questioning of students was carried out to establish the level of development of their informative activity.Results. The constituent parts of the modern educational process and the need to create specific conditions for its implementation are identified and described. The author gives a generalized characteristic of visualization technology of educational information. The application of cognitive visualization models using information and communication technologies are proved. The results showing the evolution of motivational indicators of students’ activity before and after application of LSM and the «Metaplan» in the educational process are presented.Scientific novelty. The pedagogical conditions that allow using information and communication technologies as means of the trainees’ educational informative activity improvement in the professional educational organization are defined. Features of the directed application of methods of cognitive visualization of educational information, both for improvement of educational cognitive activity, and for formation of professional competences of students by profession «A chef, a confectioner» are noted.Practical importance. Use of methods of cognitive visualization in educational process on the example of studying of Chemistry and Biology in the professional educational organization is considered in details. The teaching package providing application of methods of cognitive visualization of educational information for the purpose of improvement of educational cognitive activity of students in the professional educational organization

  3. Process Improvement Education with Professionals in the Addiction Treatment Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvermacher, Alice

    2006-01-01

    Continuing education is being provided to professionals in the addiction treatment field to help them develop skills in process improvement and better meet the needs and requests they encounter. Access and retention of individuals seeking addiction treatment have been two of the greatest challenges addiction treatment professionals face.…

  4. Applying Systems Thinking to Improve Special Education in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    This report was written at the request of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute and the Educational Service Center of Central Ohio, to inform the discussion of state-level policy makers and other stakeholders on how to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services provided to Ohio's students with special needs. It is critical for Ohio to find…

  5. Improvement of Clinical Skills through Pharmaceutical Education and Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Professors and teaching staff in the field of pharmaceutical sciences should devote themselves to staying abreast of relevant education and research. Similarly those in clinical pharmacies should contribute to the advancement of pharmaceutical research and the development of next generation pharmacists and pharmaceuticals. It is thought that those who work in clinical pharmacies should improve their own skills and expertise in problem-finding and -solving, i.e., "clinical skills". They should be keen to learn new standard treatments based on the latest drug information, and should try to be in a position where collecting clinical information is readily possible. In the case of pharmacists in hospitals and pharmacies, they are able to aim at improving their clinical skills simply through performing their pharmaceutical duties. On the other hand, when a pharmaceutical educator aims to improve clinical skills at a level comparable to those of clinical pharmacists, it is necessary to devote or set aside considerable time for pharmacist duties, in addition to teaching, which may result in a shortage of time for hands-on clinical practice and/or in a decline in the quality of education and research. This could be a nightmare for teaching staff in clinical pharmacy who aim to take part in such activities. Nonetheless, I believe that teaching staff in the clinical pharmacy area could improve his/her clinical skills through actively engaging in education and research. In this review, I would like to introduce topics on such possibilities from my own experiences.

  6. A 30-Minute Physical Education Program Improves Students' Executive Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesch, Sabine; Walk, Laura; Spitzer, Manfred; Kammer, Thomas; Lainburg, Alyona; Heim, Rudiger; Hille, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity is not only beneficial to physical health but also to cognitive functions. In particular, executive functions that are closely related to learning achievement can be improved by acute and recurring physical activity. We examined the effects of a single 30-min physical education program in contrast to a 5-min movement break on…

  7. Marketing Educational Improvements via International Partnerships under Brain Drain Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Weslynne; Wagman, Liad

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamics in an educational partnership between a university and a developing region. We examine how the university achieves its goals to improve and advertise its offerings while recruiting a cohort of students from the developing region and maintaining a sustainable relationship with the region and its students. We show that mutually…

  8. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine if a physician education programme and a structured consultation schedule would improve the quality of diabetes patient care in a diabetes clinic. Setting. Two tertiary care diabetes clinics at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. Study design. Quasi-experimental controlled before-and-after study. Methods.

  9. Understanding Leadership Paradigms for Improvement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flumerfelt, Shannon; Banachowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This research article is based on the Baldrige National Quality Program Education Criteria for Performance Excellence's conceptualization of improvement as a dual cycle/three element initiative of examining and bettering inputs, processes, and outputs as driven by measurement, analysis and knowledge management work. This study isolates a…

  10. Improving Science Education through Accountability Relationships in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; Wallace, John

    1997-01-01

    Presents a contrast between bureaucratic and professional models of accountability and their impact on the science education enterprise. Topics include improving performance, climate of trust, principles and consequences, demonstrating acceptance of responsibilities, and feedback. Concludes that it is necessary to develop the skills and processes…

  11. improving education programme at pmtct sites in liberia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    among the HIV positive mother under 6 months, in order to improve nutritional education program at PMTCT sites level. A total of 90 ... practice among the HIV positive mothers of child under 6 months in terms of nutrition and infant feeding. Keywords: .... the replacement feeding is the sustainability of this. Even though they ...

  12. Using Physical Education to Improve Literacy Skills in Struggling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachob, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Literacy skills are an essential part of academic performance. When physical educators collaborate with classroom teachers to address these skills, student engagement in the learning process can greatly improve. This article begins by reviewing the growing issues surrounding student literacy and its impact on academic performance. The discussion…

  13. Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project - Replacement of Current Mechanical Seal System with Rope Packing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Jessica D.

    2013-05-29

    On January 27, 2010 the City of North Little Rock, Arkansas received notification of the awarding of a Department of Energy (DOE) grant totaling $450,000 in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) under the Project Title: Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project – Automated Intake Clearing Equipment and Materials Management. The purpose of the grant was for improvements to be made at the City’s hydroelectric generating facility located on the Arkansas River. Improvements were to be made through the installation of an intake maintenance device (IMD) and the purchase of a large capacity wood grinder. The wood grinder was purchased in order to receive the tree limbs, tree trunks, and other organic debris that collects at the intake of the plant during high flow. The wood grinder eliminates the periodic burning of the waste material that is cleared from the intake and reduces any additional air pollution to the area. The resulting organic mulch has been made available to the public at no charge. Design discussion and planning began immediately and the wood grinder was purchased in July of 2010 and immediately put to work mulching debris that was gathered regularly from the intake of the facility. The mulch is currently available to the public for free. A large majority of the design process was spent in discussion with the Corps of Engineers to obtain approval for drawings, documents, and permits that were required in order to make changes to the structure of the powerhouse. In April of 2011, the City’s Project Engineer, who had overseen the application, resigned and left the City’s employ. A new Systems Mechanical Engineer was hired and tasked with overseeing the project. The transfer of responsibility led to a re-examination of the original assumptions and research upon which the grant proposal was based. At that point, the project went under review and a trip was booked for July 2011 to visit facilities that currently

  14. Recovery Act: States Could Provide More Information on Education Programs to Enhance the Public's Understanding of Fund Use. Report to the Republican Leader, U.S. Senate. GAO-10-807

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    2010-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provides $70.3 billion for three education programs--the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF), Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (Title I), and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The Act requires recipients to be accountable for how these funds…

  15. Using multifaceted education to improve management in acute viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murch, Hannah; Oakley, Juliette; Pierrepoint, Marcus; Powell, Colin

    2015-07-01

    To establish current bronchiolitis management across hospitals in Wales, improve compliance with national guidelines and standardise evidence-based clinical practice. A complete audit cycle with implementation of a multifaceted education bundle prior to the follow-up audit. Twelve acute paediatric departments between 1 November and 31 December in 2012 and 2013. All infants under 12 months with a clinical diagnosis of bronchiolitis. The first audit assessed management of bronchiolitis with reference to both the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) guidelines and local hospital guidelines. Following analysis and dissemination of these results, an education bundle was implemented nationwide, with completion of the audit cycle to assess change. Compliance with SIGN recommendations for investigation, treatment and discharge. Compliance with the education bundle requirements also assessed in 2013. Data were collected for 1599 infants. The education bundle was delivered in all hospitals. The level of severity, defined by oxygen saturations in air at presentation, length of stay and paediatric intensive care unit transfers, was equivalent for both years. Mean compliance percentage (95% CI) across Wales significantly improved between 2012 and 2013, with compliance with investigations increasing from 50% (46% to 53%) to 71% (68% to 74%), with management increasing from 65% (61% to 68%) to 74% (71% to 77%), and overall compliance improving from 38% (37% to 39%) to 59% (56% to 62%) in 2013. This audit demonstrated a significant improvement in compliance following implementation of our educational bundle. This has enabled improvement in standardised and evidence-based patient care across Wales. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. From classroom to online teaching: experiences in improving statistics education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Porter

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used reflective practitioner methodology to investigate how to improve the quality of statistical education. During the study, this methodology, curricula, pedagogical practices, assessment and a framework for learning to learn statistics were all developed as means of improving the quality of statistical education. Also documented was the move from being a classroom teacher of statistics to a teacher who is developing learning resources for online delivery to students. For a classroom teacher, flexible delivery has meant drawing on the sights, sounds, movement, quiet and live shows. By contrast, the online teacher feels the constraints of translating activity based programs to technologically based programs. As more students have chosen to rely on online materials rather than classroom activities, the focus of improving quality has been extended to the enrichment of online resources, so that the learning experience is not second to that of the classroom.

  17. 75 FR 13735 - Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)-Special Focus Competition: Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)-- Special Focus Competition: Program for North American Mobility in Higher Education ACTION: Extension; Notice... of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)--Special Focus Competition: Program for North American Mobility in...

  18. Improving continuing medical education by enhancing interactivity: lessons from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Seyed Aliakbar; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Jalil; Soltani Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran; Faghih, Zahra; Parikh, Sagar V; Shirazi, Mandana

    2016-04-01

    Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been considered as a lifelong commitment for doctors to provide the optimal care for patients. Despite a long history of creating CME programs, outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aims to clarify the barriers affecting effectiveness of the CME programs in Iran based on the experiences of general practitioners. Sixteen general practitioners were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews and field observations concerning experiences with CME. The study was performed using a qualitative content analysis method. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process in which the researchers moved from specific to general. The participants' experiences identified a number of barriers, particularly insufficient interaction with the instructors; additional problems included the teachers' use of an undifferentiated approach; unreal and abstract CME; and ignorance of the diverse reasons to participate in CME. Based on the study results, there are multiple barriers to effective implementation of CME in Iran. The key barriers include insufficient interaction between the trainees and providers, which must be considered by other stakeholders and program designers. Such interactions would facilitate improved program design, invite more specific tailoring of the education to the participants, allow for more effective educational methods and set the stage for outcome evaluation from the learners actually applying their new knowledge in practice. Replication of these findings with another sample would improve confidence in these recommendations, but these findings are broadly consistent with findings in the educational literature on improving the efficacy of CME.

  19. Health-Improving Potential of Dancing Exercises in Physical Education of Students of Higher Educational Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. М. Кравчук

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to determine the health-improving potential of dancing exercises used in physical education of female students of higher educational institutions.  Research methods: study and analysis of pedagogical, scientific and methodological literature on the subject matter of the research; observations, questionnaires, functional tests; statistical methods of data reduction. Conclusions. As part of the study, the use of dancing exercises in the physical education of female students of higher educational institutions proved contributing to a significant increase in the level of their physical health in general and improvement of some of its indicators, including strength and life indices, heart rate recovery time after 20 squats. Dancing exercises also boost spirits, improve health and activity of the female students, which the study proved statistically.

  20. Improving urban African Americans' blood pressure control through multi-level interventions in the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) study: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephraim, Patti L; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Roter, Debra L; Bone, Lee R; Wolff, Jennifer L; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; Levine, David M; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Cooper, Lisa A; Fitzpatrick, Stephanie J; Gudzune, Kimberly A; Albert, Michael C; Monroe, Dwyan; Simmons, Michelle; Hickman, Debra; Purnell, Leon; Fisher, Annette; Matens, Richard; Noronha, Gary J; Fagan, Peter J; Ramamurthi, Hema C; Ameling, Jessica M; Charlston, Jeanne; Sam, Tanyka S; Carson, Kathryn A; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Crews, Deidra C; Greer, Raquel C; Sneed, Valerie; Flynn, Sarah J; DePasquale, Nicole; Boulware, L Ebony

    2014-07-01

    Given their high rates of uncontrolled blood pressure, urban African Americans comprise a particularly vulnerable subgroup of persons with hypertension. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the important role of family and community support in improving patients' management of a variety of chronic illnesses. However, studies of multi-level interventions designed specifically to improve urban African American patients' blood pressure self-management by simultaneously leveraging patient, family, and community strengths are lacking. We report the protocol of the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) study, a randomized controlled trial designed to study the effectiveness of interventions that engage patient, family, and community-level resources to facilitate urban African American hypertensive patients' improved hypertension self-management and subsequent hypertension control. African American patients with uncontrolled hypertension receiving health care in an urban primary care clinic will be randomly assigned to receive 1) an educational intervention led by a community health worker alone, 2) the community health worker intervention plus a patient and family communication activation intervention, or 3) the community health worker intervention plus a problem-solving intervention. All participants enrolled in the study will receive and be trained to use a digital home blood pressure machine. The primary outcome of the randomized controlled trial will be patients' blood pressure control at 12months. Results from the ACT study will provide needed evidence on the effectiveness of comprehensive multi-level interventions to improve urban African American patients' hypertension control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Leadership lessons from military education for postgraduate medical curricular improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, Alice; Adamshick, Mark; Fanning, Ruth; Piro, Nancy

    2010-03-01

    quality medical education includes both teaching and learning of data-driven knowledge, and appropriate technical skills and tacit behaviours, such as effective communication and professional leadership. But these implicit behaviours are not readily adaptable to traditional medical curriculum models. This manuscript explores a medical leadership curriculum informed by military education. our paediatric anaesthesia residents expressed a strong desire for more leadership opportunity within the training programme. Upon exploration, current health care models for leadership training were limited to short didactic presentations or lengthy certificate programmes. We could not find an appropriate model for our 1-year fellowship. in collaboration with the US Naval Academy, we modified the 'Leadership Education and Development Program' curriculum to introduce daily and graduated leadership opportunities: starting with low-risk decision-making tasks and progressing to independent professional decision making and leadership. Each resident who opted into the programme had a 3-month role as team leader and spent 9 months as a team member. At the end of the first year of this curriculum both quantitative assessment and qualitative reflection from residents and faculty members noted significantly improved clinical and administrative decision making. The second-year residents' performance showed further improvement. medical education has long emphasised subject-matter knowledge as a prime focus. However, in competency-based medical education, new curriculum models are needed. Many helpful models can be found in other professional fields. Collaborations between professional educators benefit the students, who are learning these new skills, the medical educators, who work jointly with other professionals, and the original curriculum designer, who has an opportunity to reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of his or her model. Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  2. Improving the emergency response by education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The issue of communication between professionals and the wide public is discussed. It is concluded that we should encourage education about the understanding of risks and hazards. We must support education about our own subject and we should contribute to the development of the national curriculum. Above all we should try to help individual school teachers. We should try to provide a radiological protection input to courses on hazards and safety culture for undergraduates. We should try to improve the status of the profession and to ensure awareness of the profession in universities. We should see ourselves as partners with the media but we must learn interview technique. (P.A.)

  3. Diabetic foot workshop: Improving technical and educational skills for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaa, Maryam; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Shahbazi, Samimeh; Shayeganmehr, Zahra; Abooeirad, Maryam; Amini, Mohammad Reza; Adibi, Hossien; Mehrdad, Neda

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus as one of the most common metabolic disorders has some complications, one of the main ones is diabetic foot (DF). Appropriate care and education prevents 85% of diabetic foot amputations. An ideal management to prevent and treat diabetic foot necessitates a close collaboration between the health team members and the diabetic patient. Therefore, improving nurses' knowledge about DF care and advancement in the quality of care provided by the nurses could significantly improve diabetic foot prevention and management. Therefore, the aim of DF workshop was to improve technical and educational skills of the nurses to prevent and manage diabetic foot. Considering the vital role of the nurses in providing DF care, EMRI decided to conduct Diabetic foot workshop for them. The following five steps were designed for the 14 coordinating sessions in the workshop: Goals definition, deciding about attendees, location selection, creating agenda, and developing a follow-up plan. "Diabetic Foot Workshop for Nurses" provides appropriate training to DF nurses at the national level; and combining theory and practice in this workshop not only increases nurses' knowledge, but also improves their skills in the field of the diabetic foot. Providing education and care to patients by DF nurse specialists instead of general nurses could be an important output of this workshop, which may lead to DF prevention and amputation decrease in the long term.

  4. Atrial electrogram interpretation improves after an innovative education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Julie L; Currey, Judy; Considine, Julie

    2015-01-01

    To avoid adverse patient outcomes from inappropriate treatment, it is recommended that an atrial electrogram (AEG) be recorded whenever atrial arrhythmias develop in patients after cardiac surgery. However, AEGs are not commonly performed because nurses lack knowledge about differentiating atrial rhythms on AEGs. To investigate whether completing a novel online evidence-based education program on interpreting AEGs would improve critical care nurses' AEG interpretation. Specialized critical care nurses were taught about obtaining and interpreting atrial rhythms on AEGs using a 42-minute online mini-movie. AEG interpretation was assessed pre and two and eight weeks post-intervention. AEG interpretation increased two weeks post intervention and was retained at eight weeks. Some participants used this newly acquired knowledge to interpret arrhythmias that were not taught during the education program. Accurate interpretation of AEGs is an easy skill for specialized critical care nurses to learn via an online education program.

  5. Digital education reform for improving interaction between students and instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qiansong; Li, Yuanjie; Zheng, Lixin

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays it is difficult to attract undergraduate students' interesting to put sufficient time to learn major courses in China, which are too hard for them to quick grasp and fully understanding. Here we report a digital education reform for improving interactions between students and instructors, in which we transform the abstract, obscure and boring knowledge, such as physical, mathematical, electronic or optical concepts into direct and dynamic 3-D model and flash. Therefore, this method can convert theoretical concepts into easy understanding pictures. Our several years' experience shows that this education mode can make students' willing to think and practice, then it is helpful for attracting their learning interests. Most students benefit from this education mode which can greatly enhance their understanding abilities.

  6. Administrative Barriers to Improving Undergraduate Education. Accent on Improving College Teaching and Learning, 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genthon, Michele; Joscelyn, Mary K., Ed.

    Chief academic officers at 1,053 institutions of higher education across the United States were surveyed about the barriers to improving teaching and learning. Using factor analysis, responses were reduced to nine general problem areas. In order of importance from most important to least important, the problems identified were: financial support,…

  7. Nonformal Education in Improving Quality of Life of Underprivileged Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al Mamun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the role of Non-formal Primary Education (NFPE in improving the quality of the life of underprivileged children in Bangladesh considering their economic, health, environmental issues and life skills. It uses a mixed method approach of research where three NGOs which run NFPE programs were selected purposefully. Data were derived from six NGO officers, nine teachers, ninety students and eighteen guardians by using two sets of questionnaires for NGO officers and teachers, an interview schedule for guardians and 9 focus group discussions with the students. The findings show that there is no income generating program initiated by the organizations for the learners along with education. So, the scope of their income has reduced. But their daily life behavior and skills have improved. Besides, their awareness on health and environmental issues have increased. The findings lead to some recommendations which will give insights to policy makers and professionals engaged in this field.

  8. Cell phone-based health education messaging improves health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Runsen; Xiang, Yueying; Han, Tieguang; Yang, Guo-An; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    The ubiquity of cell phones, which allow for short message service (SMS), provides new and innovative opportunities for disease prevention and health education. To explore the use of cell phone-based health education SMS to improve the health literacy of community residents in China. A multi-stage random sampling method was used to select representative study communities and participants ≥ 18 years old. Intervention participants were sent health education SMSs once a week for 1 year and controls were sent conventional, basic health education measures. Health literacy levels of the residents before and after the intervention were evaluated between intervention and control groups. Public health literacy scores increased 1.5 points, from 61.8 to 63.3, after SMS intervention for 1 year (P<0.01); the increase was greater for males than females (2.01 vs. 1.03; P<0.01) and for Shenzhen local residents than non-permanent residents (2.56 vs. 1.14; P<0.01). The frequency of high health literacy scores was greater for the intervention than control group (22.03% to 30.93% vs. 22.07% to 20.82%). With health literacy as a cost-effective index, the cost-effectiveness per intervention was 0.54. SMS may be a useful tool for improving health literacy.

  9. ‘PUBLIC COMMUNICATION’ EDUCATION AND EXTENSION: civic skills to talk and act on polis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloiza Helena Matos e Nobre

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Academia has a triple mission: research, education, and extension. This paper deals with ‘public communication’ as a matter for education and extension. The idea is that there is no citizenship or democracy without the training on ‘public communication’ abilities. Only citizens who are able to speak and act at the public sphere can participate on the social life. Such abilities are twofold: parliamentary (how to speak and executive (how to act. The paper shows how is possible to effectively communicate through silent acts, as well as how ‘public communication’ can have a “dark side of the force”. Finally, it states that all ‘public communication’ should lead to peaceful living and social cohesion.   KEYWORDS: public communication; education; extension; training; civic skills.     RESUMO A Academia tem uma tripla missão: pesquisa, educação e extensão. Este artigo trata da "comunicação pública" como uma questão de educação e extensão. A ideia é que não há cidadania ou democracia sem um treinamento em habilidades de ‘comunicação pública'. Apenas os cidadãos que são capazes de falar e agir na esfera pública podem participar na vida social. Essas habilidades são de dois tipos: parlamentar (como falar e executivo (como agir. O artigo mostra como é possível comunicar de forma eficaz através de atos silenciosos, bem como a «comunicação pública» pode ter um "lado negro da força". Finalmente, afirma que toda "comunicação pública" deve levar a uma convivência pacífica e à coesão social.   PALAVRAS-CHAVE: comunicação pública; Educação; extensão; Treinamento; competências cívicas.     RESUMEN La academia tiene una triple misión: investigación, educación y extensión. Este trabajo se ocupa de la ‘comunicación pública’ como una cuestión de educación y extensión. La idea es que no hay democracia ni ciudadanía sin el entrenamiento en habilidades de ‘comunicación p

  10. The Educational Toolbox: Kick Start Your Educational Program in Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Medbery, Rachel L; Vandermeer, Thomas J; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2015-01-01

    To disseminate materials and learning from the proceedings of the Association of Program Directors 2014 Annual Meeting workshop on the integration of quality improvement (QI) education into the existing educational infrastructure. Modern surgical practice demands an understanding of QI methodology. Yet, today׳s surgeons are not formally educated in QI methodology. Therefore, it is hard to follow the historical mantra of "see one, do one, teach one" in the quality realm. Participants were given a brief introduction to QI approaches. A number of concrete examples of how to incorporate QI education into training programs were presented, followed by a small group session focused on the identification of barriers to incorporation. Participants were provided with a worksheet to help navigate the initial incorporation of QI education in 3 steps. Participants were representative of all types of training programs, with differing levels of existing QI integration. Barriers to QI education included lack of resident interest/buy-in, concerns over the availability of educational resources (i.e., limited time to devote to QI), and a limited QI knowledge among surgical educators. The 3 steps to kick starting the educational process included (1) choosing a specific method of QI education, (2) incorporation via barrier, infrastructure, and stakeholder identification, and (3) implementation and ongoing assessment. Recent changes in the delivery of surgical care along with the new accreditation system have necessitated the development of QI education programs for use in surgical education. To continue to make surgery safer and ensure optimal patient outcomes, surgical educators must teach each resident to adopt quality science methodology in a meaningful way. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Does the Flipped Classroom Improve Learning in Graduate Medical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Jeff; Jhun, Paul; Fung, Cha-Chi; Comes, James; Sawtelle, Stacy; Tabatabai, Ramin; Joseph, Daniel; Shoenberger, Jan; Chen, Esther; Fee, Christopher; Swadron, Stuart P

    2017-08-01

    The flipped classroom model for didactic education has recently gained popularity in medical education; however, there is a paucity of performance data showing its effectiveness for knowledge gain in graduate medical education. We assessed whether a flipped classroom module improves knowledge gain compared with a standard lecture. We conducted a randomized crossover study in 3 emergency medicine residency programs. Participants were randomized to receive a 50-minute lecture from an expert educator on one subject and a flipped classroom module on the other. The flipped classroom included a 20-minute at-home video and 30 minutes of in-class case discussion. The 2 subjects addressed were headache and acute low back pain. A pretest, immediate posttest, and 90-day retention test were given for each subject. Of 82 eligible residents, 73 completed both modules. For the low back pain module, mean test scores were not significantly different between the lecture and flipped classroom formats. For the headache module, there were significant differences in performance for a given test date between the flipped classroom and the lecture format. However, differences between groups were less than 1 of 10 examination items, making it difficult to assign educational importance to the differences. In this crossover study comparing a single flipped classroom module with a standard lecture, we found mixed statistical results for performance measured by multiple-choice questions. As the differences were small, the flipped classroom and lecture were essentially equivalent.

  12. Rural Districts Left Behind? Rural Districts and the Challenges of Administering the Elementary and Secondary Education Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yettick, Holly; Baker, Robin; Wickersham, Mary; Hupfeld, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to inform the upcoming and overdue reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) by exploring whether rural school districts face disadvantages as they attempt to follow the law's provisions and, if so, if the law's rural-specific section ameliorates these disadvantages. The research drew upon…

  13. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994. Report To Accompany S. 2104. 103D Congress, 2d Session, Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    This document contains the text of the "Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994" (S. 2104) along with related analysis. The bill establishes a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that provides them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and…

  14. Free Appropriate Public Education for Students with Disabilities: Requirements under Section 504 of the "Rehabilitation Act of 1973." Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Section 504 of the "Rehabilitation Act of 1973" protects the rights of individuals with disabilities in programs and activities that receive federal funds. The Section 504 regulation requires a school district to provide a "free appropriate public education" (FAPE) to each qualified person with a disability who is in the school…

  15. Cancer Pain Management Education Rectifies Patients' Misconceptions of Cancer Pain, Reduces Pain, and Improves Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Su-Jin; Keam, Bhumsuk; Hyun, Min Kyung; Ju Seo, Jeong; Uk Park, Keon; Oh, Sung Yong; Ahn, Jinseok; Lee, Ja Youn; Kim, JinShil

    2018-03-26

    More than half of the patients have reported improper management of breakthrough cancer pain. Empirical evidence is lacking concerning the effectiveness of cancer pain education on breakthrough pain control. This study aimed to examine the effects of individual pain education on pain control, use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain, quality of life outcomes, and rectification of patients' misconceptions regarding cancer pain. A quasi-experimental design was used. In total, 176 (102 inpatients and 74 outpatients) and 163 (93 inpatients and 70 outpatients) cancer patients completed questionnaires on pain intensity, quality of life, use of short-acting medication for breakthrough pain, and misconceptions about cancer pain and opioid use before and immediately and/or seven days after individual pain education. The mean age of the participants was 60.9 years (±11.2), and 56.3% were male. The most common cancers were lung cancer (17.0%), colon cancer (15.9%), and breast cancer (12.5%). The subjects' reasons for attrition were conditional deterioration, death, or voluntary withdrawal (N = 13, 7.4%). Following the education, there was a significant reduction in overall pain intensity over 24 hours (P < 0.001). The outpatients showed more use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain. Sleep quality change was most significantly associated with intervention; other quality of life aspects (e.g., general feelings and life enjoyment) also improved. Pain education also significantly reduced misconceptions regarding cancer pain management. The present educational intervention was effective in encouraging short-acting analgesic use for breakthrough pain, improving quality of life outcomes, and rectifying patients' misconceptions about analgesic use.

  16. Improving Business Communication in the Field of Management in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetka Peterlin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: The topic area of this research study is to improve the quality of business communication in education.Purpose: This article presents a framework of procedures to improve business communication in a public institution in the field of education and its aim is to involve all fields of management. The added value relates to the field of business communication inside and outside a public institution.The focus of this research is based on the administrative management of the institution in relation to business communication and quality management with an emphasis on preparing the documentation to comply with the quality management system ISO 9001:2008.Method: Interview.Results: All employees whose work is related to administrative management of the institution will be considered as indicators to improve the quality management, communication excellence and ethical principles and are going to be informed in written form. The results of this research study will be evaluated at least once a year. Thefindings indicate a willingness to engage employees to improve thecurrent state of business communication.Organization: The institute carries out business communication among all employees involved in the implementation of basic education activities within the institution but also externally. Employees are aware that the equality of business communication is the basis for communication both in the business world, the workplace, at home, and abroad.Society: To ensure users satisfaction of the education services provided by the public education institution, it is necessary to create a user-friendly environment in business communication, which is trusted by users. Business excellence, good communication, and values will convince society to look at the institution as competitive, devoted to ethical values and professional work.Originality: The research is based on personal experience within the workplace and is currently limited to one

  17. Improving science literacy and education through space life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeish, M. Y.; Moreno, N. P.; Tharp, B. Z.; Denton, J. J.; Jessup, G.; Clipper, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) encourages open involvement by scientists and the public at large in the Institute's activities. Through its Education and Public Outreach Program, the Institute is supporting national efforts to improve Kindergarten through grade twelve (K-12) and undergraduate education and to communicate knowledge generated by space life science research to lay audiences. Three academic institution Baylor College of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine and Texas A&M University are designing, producing, field-testing, and disseminating a comprehensive array of programs and products to achieve this goal. The objectives of the NSBRI Education and Public Outreach program are to: promote systemic change in elementary and secondary science education; attract undergraduate students--especially those from underrepresented groups--to careers in space life sciences, engineering and technology-based fields; increase scientific literacy; and to develop public and private sector partnerships that enhance and expand NSBRI efforts to reach students and families. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recovery Act: Billions of Dollars in Education Credits Appear to Be Erroneous. Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. Reference Number: 2011-41-083

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of the Treasury, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Education credits are available to help offset the costs of higher education for taxpayers, their spouses, and dependents who qualify as eligible students. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) amended the Hope Scholarship Tax Credit (Hope Credit) to provide for a refundable tax credit known as the American Opportunity…

  19. Self-Assessment Methods in the Higher Education Quality Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka SMUTNÁ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Organizational performance is maximized when it is based on the management and sharing of knowledge within a culture of continuous learning, innovation and improvement. The methodology embodies the principle of self-evaluation or self-assessment. The higher education institutions would learn from feedback by reviewing impact of strategies and actions, trends in results and by comparing through benchmarking. The focus of this paper is the implementation of EFQM excellence model in the higher education (HE sector. This paper describes the specific issues in implementing the model in HE institutions, with a particular focus on the choice of self-assessment methodology. The early signs are that EFQM excellence model self-assessment can help to produce a more customer-oriented culture in HE institutions, providing that the lessons learned from the wider public sector are put into practice.

  20. Online education improves pediatric residents' understanding of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Megan F; Blondin, Heather M; Youssef, Molly J; Tollefson, Megha M; Hill, Lauren F; Hanson, Janice L; Bruckner, Anna L

    2018-01-01

    Pediatricians manage skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis (AD) but report that their dermatologic training is inadequate. Online modules may enhance medical education when sufficient didactic or clinical teaching experiences are lacking. We assessed whether an online module about AD improved pediatric residents' knowledge and changed their clinical management of AD. Target and control cohorts of pediatric residents from two institutions were recruited. Target subjects took a 30-question test about AD early in their residency, reviewed the online module, and repeated the test 6 months and 1 year later. The control subjects, who had 1 year of clinical experience but had not reviewed the online module, also took the test. The mean percentage of correct answers was calculated and compared using two-sided, two-sample independent t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. For a subset of participants, clinical documentation from AD encounters was reviewed and 13 practice behaviors were compared using the Fisher exact test. Twenty-five subjects in the target cohort and 29 subjects in the control cohort completed the study. The target cohort improved from 18.0 ± 3.2 to 23.4 ± 3.4 correctly answered questions over 1 year (P online module about AD demonstrated statistically significant improvement in disease-specific knowledge over time and had statistically significantly higher scores than controls. Online dermatology education may effectively supplement traditional clinical teaching. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Improving collaborative learning in online software engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Colin J.; DeFranco, Joanna F.; Sangwan, Raghvinder S.

    2017-11-01

    Team projects are commonplace in software engineering education. They address a key educational objective, provide students critical experience relevant to their future careers, allow instructors to set problems of greater scale and complexity than could be tackled individually, and are a vehicle for socially constructed learning. While all student teams experience challenges, those in fully online programmes must also deal with remote working, asynchronous coordination, and computer-mediated communications all of which contribute to greater social distance between team members. We have developed a facilitation framework to aid team collaboration and have demonstrated its efficacy, in prior research, with respect to team performance and outcomes. Those studies indicated, however, that despite experiencing improved project outcomes, students working in effective software engineering teams did not experience significantly improved individual achievement. To address this deficiency we implemented theoretically grounded refinements to the collaboration model based upon peer-tutoring research. Our results indicate a modest, but statistically significant (p = .08), improvement in individual achievement using this refined model.

  2. Contextual Factors in Education: Improving Science and Mathematics Education for Minorities and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael, Ed.; Griffin, Peg, Ed.

    This book summarizes research on the various ways that students' cultural backgrounds and innate ways of learning affect academic achievement. It also offers descriptions and recommendations for improving science and mathematics education for minorities and women, based on successful programs, that take these differences into account. The focus is…

  3. Options to improve energy efficiency for educational building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, Mafruha

    The cost of energy is a major factor that must be considered for educational facility budget planning purpose. The analysis of energy related issues and options can be complex and requires significant time and detailed effort. One way to facilitate the inclusion of energy option planning in facility planning efforts is to utilize a tool that allows for quick appraisal of the facility energy profile. Once such an appraisal is accomplished, it is then possible to rank energy improvement options consistently with other facility needs and requirements. After an energy efficiency option has been determined to have meaningful value in comparison with other facility planning options, it is then possible to utilize the initial appraisal as the basis for an expanded consideration of additional facility and energy use detail using the same analytic system used for the initial appraisal. This thesis has developed a methodology and an associated analytic model to assist in these tasks and thereby improve the energy efficiency of educational facilities. A detailed energy efficiency and analysis tool is described that utilizes specific university building characteristics such as size, architecture, envelop, lighting, occupancy, thermal design which allows reducing the annual energy consumption. Improving the energy efficiency of various aspects of an educational building's energy performance can be complex and can require significant time and experience to make decisions. The approach developed in this thesis initially assesses the energy design for a university building. This initial appraisal is intended to assist administrators in assessing the potential value of energy efficiency options for their particular facility. Subsequently this scoping design can then be extended as another stage of the model by local facility or planning personnel to add more details and engineering aspects to the initial screening model. This approach can assist university planning efforts to

  4. 75 FR 2523 - Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; Arts in Education Model Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination Program; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for... Announcement I. Funding Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The Arts in Education Model Development and...

  5. Open Educational Resources as a Tool to Improve Language Education Effectiveness in the Russian Higher Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Sidorenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An attempt of Russian universities to move forward to the leading positions in the world rankings has resulted in some initiatives to enhance their activities on the market of education services. Under these conditions, foreign language proficiency is no longer a luxury and it is becoming an important tool to implement goals of university development. In this regard, new methods and techniques of foreign language teaching are highly demanded, which would significantly improve the language competency of both students and faculty members. A search for effective methods to enhance foreign language teaching makes analyze Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs open educational platforms and consider an opportunity for these platforms to be integrated into the existing system of foreign language teaching in Russian higher education institutions. Based on the research findings, the author concludes that it is irrational to use the resources as embedded components without significant adjustment to the conditions existing in the current higher education system.

  6. A clinical nurse specialist-led intervention to enhance medication adherence using the plan-do-check-act cycle for continuous self-improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Cynthia L

    2010-01-01

    A clinical nurse specialist-led intervention to improve medication adherence in chronically ill adults using renal transplant recipients as an exemplar population is proposed. Meta-analyses and systematic reviews of chronically ill and transplant patients indicate that patient-specific characteristics not only are poor and inconsistent predictors for medication nonadherence but also are not amenable to intervention. Adherence has not meaningfully improved, despite meta-analyses and systematic narrative reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) dealing with medication nonadherence in acutely and chronically ill persons and RCTs dealing with transplant patients. Interventions with a superior potential to enhance medication adherence must be developed. Use of a clinical nurse specialist-led continuous self-improvement intervention with adult renal transplant recipients is proposed. Continuous self-improvement focuses on improving personal systems thinking and behavior using the plan-do-check-act process. Electronic medication monitoring reports, one of several objective measures of medication adherence, are used by the clinician to provide patient feedback during the check process on medication-taking patterns. Continuous self-improvement as an intervention holds promise in supporting patient self-management and diminishing the blame that clinicians place on patients for medication nonadherence. Using an objective measure of medication adherence such as an electronic monitoring report fosters collaborative patient-clinician discussions of daily medication-taking patterns. Through collaboration, ideas for improving medication taking can be explored. Changes can be followed and evaluated for effectiveness through the continuous self-improvement process. Future studies should include RCTs comparing educational and/or behavioral interventions to improve medication adherence.

  7. Improving the working relationship between doctors and pharmacists: is inter-professional education the answer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Ruth M

    2012-05-01

    Despite their common history, there are many cultural, attitudinal and practical differences between the professions of medicine and pharmacy that ultimately influence patient care and health outcomes. While poor communication between doctors and pharmacists is a major cause of medical errors, it is clear that effective, deliberate doctor-pharmacist collaboration within certain clinical settings significantly improves patient care. This may be particularly true for those patients with chronic illnesses and\\/or requiring regular medication reviews. Moreover, in hospitals, clinical and antibiotic pharmacists are successfully influencing prescribing and infection control policy. Under the new Irish Pharmacy Act (2007), pharmacists are legally obliged to provide pharmaceutical care to their patients, thus fulfilling a more patient-centred role than their traditional \\'dispensing\\' one. However, meeting this obligation relies on the existence of good doctor-pharmacist working relationships, such that inter-disciplinary teamwork in monitoring patients becomes the norm in all healthcare settings. As discussed here, efforts to improve these relationships must focus on the strategic introduction of agreed changes in working practices between the two professions and on educational aspects of pharmaceutical care. For example, standardized education of doctors\\/medical students such that they learn to prescribe in an optimal manner and ongoing inter-professional education of doctors and pharmacists in therapeutics, are likely to be of paramount importance. Here, insights into the types of factors that help or hinder the improvement of these working relationships and the importance of education and agreed working practices in defining the separate but inter-dependent professions of pharmacy and medicine are reviewed and discussed.

  8. Improving the working relationship between doctors and pharmacists: is inter-professional education the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ruth M; Gallagher, Helen C

    2012-05-01

    Despite their common history, there are many cultural, attitudinal and practical differences between the professions of medicine and pharmacy that ultimately influence patient care and health outcomes. While poor communication between doctors and pharmacists is a major cause of medical errors, it is clear that effective, deliberate doctor-pharmacist collaboration within certain clinical settings significantly improves patient care. This may be particularly true for those patients with chronic illnesses and/or requiring regular medication reviews. Moreover, in hospitals, clinical and antibiotic pharmacists are successfully influencing prescribing and infection control policy. Under the new Irish Pharmacy Act (2007), pharmacists are legally obliged to provide pharmaceutical care to their patients, thus fulfilling a more patient-centred role than their traditional 'dispensing' one. However, meeting this obligation relies on the existence of good doctor-pharmacist working relationships, such that inter-disciplinary teamwork in monitoring patients becomes the norm in all healthcare settings. As discussed here, efforts to improve these relationships must focus on the strategic introduction of agreed changes in working practices between the two professions and on educational aspects of pharmaceutical care. For example, standardized education of doctors/medical students such that they learn to prescribe in an optimal manner and ongoing inter-professional education of doctors and pharmacists in therapeutics, are likely to be of paramount importance. Here, insights into the types of factors that help or hinder the improvement of these working relationships and the importance of education and agreed working practices in defining the separate but inter-dependent professions of pharmacy and medicine are reviewed and discussed.

  9. Sensitization of teachers to act in environmental education by means of art therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Stella Ribeiro Medeiros Neves

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Both Environmental Education (EE and Art Therapy strive to improve quality of life by making man more aware of his relationship with himself, with other living beings and with the environment. This paper reports on the application of the tools of art therapy as a strategy to raise awareness of municipal school teachers to work in EE with elementary school children. Therefore, five art therapeutic meetings were held, in which an integrated and inclusive reflection on the four nature elements were emphasized, i.e., water, earth, fire and air, with a well thought-out and incorporated content. At the conclusion of the art therapy and after extensive reflection on the relationship with EE, participants were open to experiencing new paradigms, and could thus rethink and reorganize the curriculum, in search of new alternatives for effective EE.

  10. Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belue, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    .... Unequal access to quality education leaves millions ill equipped for today's workplace. The "No Child Left Behind Act" is an effective point of departure, yet it too fails to adequately address the myriad issues affecting quality education...

  11. S. 1958: This Act may be cited as the Nuclear Facilities Occupational Safety Improvement Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, November 21, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    S. 1958 is a bill to amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to improve and enforce standards for employee health and safety at Department of Energy nuclear facilities, and for other purposes

  12. Application of Computational Intelligence to Improve Education in Smart Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffo, Fernando Henrique; de Barros, Rodolfo Miranda; Mendes, Leonardo de Souza

    2018-01-01

    According to UNESCO, education is a fundamental human right and every nation’s citizens should be granted universal access with equal quality to it. Because this goal is yet to be achieved in most countries, in particular in the developing and underdeveloped countries, it is extremely important to find more effective ways to improve education. This paper presents a model based on the application of computational intelligence (data mining and data science) that leads to the development of the student’s knowledge profile and that can help educators in their decision making for best orienting their students. This model also tries to establish key performance indicators to monitor objectives’ achievement within individual strategic planning assembled for each student. The model uses random forest for classification and prediction, graph description for data structure visualization and recommendation systems to present relevant information to stakeholders. The results presented were built based on the real dataset obtained from a Brazilian private k-9 (elementary school). The obtained results include correlations among key data, a model to predict student performance and recommendations that were generated for the stakeholders. PMID:29346288

  13. Application of Computational Intelligence to Improve Education in Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomede, Everton; Gaffo, Fernando Henrique; Briganó, Gabriel Ulian; de Barros, Rodolfo Miranda; Mendes, Leonardo de Souza

    2018-01-18

    According to UNESCO, education is a fundamental human right and every nation's citizens should be granted universal access with equal quality to it. Because this goal is yet to be achieved in most countries, in particular in the developing and underdeveloped countries, it is extremely important to find more effective ways to improve education. This paper presents a model based on the application of computational intelligence (data mining and data science) that leads to the development of the student's knowledge profile and that can help educators in their decision making for best orienting their students. This model also tries to establish key performance indicators to monitor objectives' achievement within individual strategic planning assembled for each student. The model uses random forest for classification and prediction, graph description for data structure visualization and recommendation systems to present relevant information to stakeholders. The results presented were built based on the real dataset obtained from a Brazilian private k-9 (elementary school). The obtained results include correlations among key data, a model to predict student performance and recommendations that were generated for the stakeholders.

  14. Application of Computational Intelligence to Improve Education in Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Gomede

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available According to UNESCO, education is a fundamental human right and every nation’s citizens should be granted universal access with equal quality to it. Because this goal is yet to be achieved in most countries, in particular in the developing and underdeveloped countries, it is extremely important to find more effective ways to improve education. This paper presents a model based on the application of computational intelligence (data mining and data science that leads to the development of the student’s knowledge profile and that can help educators in their decision making for best orienting their students. This model also tries to establish key performance indicators to monitor objectives’ achievement within individual strategic planning assembled for each student. The model uses random forest for classification and prediction, graph description for data structure visualization and recommendation systems to present relevant information to stakeholders. The results presented were built based on the real dataset obtained from a Brazilian private k-9 (elementary school. The obtained results include correlations among key data, a model to predict student performance and recommendations that were generated for the stakeholders.

  15. Leveraging the power of music to improve science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Gregory J.; McFadden, Tom; Fleming, Jean S.; Davis, Katie

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the impact of music videos with science-based lyrics on content knowledge and attitudes in a three-part experimental research study of over 1000 participants (mostly K-12 students). In Study A, 13 of 15 music videos were followed by statistically significant improvements on questions about material covered in the videos, while performance on 'bonus questions' not covered by the videos did not improve. Video-specific improvement was observed in both basic knowledge and genuine comprehension (levels 1 and 2 of Bloom's taxonomy, respectively) and after both lyrics-only and visually rich versions of some videos. In Study B, musical versions of additional science videos were not superior to non-musical ones in their immediate impact on content knowledge, though musical versions were significantly more enjoyable. In Study C, a non-musical video on fossils elicited greater immediate test improvement than the musical version ('Fossil Rock Anthem'); however, viewers of the music video enjoyed a modest advantage on a delayed post-test administered 28 days later. Music video viewers more frequently rated their video as 'fun', and seemed more likely to revisit and/or share the video. Our findings contribute to a broader dialogue on promising new pedagogical strategies in science education.

  16. Implications of Educational Attainment Trends for Labor Market Outcomes. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Well-educated workers have higher wages, higher wage growth, and lower unemployment rates than workers with lower levels of educational attainment. While earnings have traditionally grown with educational attainment, the gaps have become more pronounced in recent years. While returns to education have increased, this research shows that…

  17. Intercultural bilingual education in Nicaragua: Contextualisation for improving the quality of education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente Catter, Teresa

    2011-12-01

    For the past 35 years, various models of intercultural bilingual education (IBE) have been implemented in Latin American schools and adult education. While Spanish is the official language in Nicaragua, many indigenous languages, such as Miskito and Sumo-Mayangna, are also spoken - especially in the Atlantic coastal region. The Nicaraguan Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport recognises the need for a flexible curriculum that reflects individual local and regional linguistic and socio-cultural characteristics, through the use of mother tongue and second language learning. The contextualisation model applied in the Atlantic coastal region of Nicaragua is therefore based on the use of a languages strategy in preparing textbooks and basic technical materials with an IBE approach, as part of the process of improving the quality of education. Thus intercultural communication is enhanced, and the need to strengthen the systematic teaching of languages, differentiating between mother tongue, second language and foreign language, is recognised. As well as explaining the contextualisation process in detail, this article discusses the conceptual differences between intercultural bilingual education (IBE) and bilingual intercultural education (BIE). The paper concludes with several recommendations for the further development of BIE in Latin America.

  18. The Michigan Consumer Protection Act of 1976. Consumer Education Training Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsma, Charles

    This guide for secondary teachers is designed to identify and illustrate specified illegal practices identified in the Michigan Consumer Protection Act of 1976. The guide also explains procedures that a consumer or law-enforcement agency can take to enforce the provisions of this law. Since the act is a broad one, students learn not only about…

  19. A History of the Improvement of Internet Protocols Over Satellites Using ACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allman, Mark; Kruse, Hans; Ostermann, Shawn

    2000-01-01

    This paper outlines the main results of a number of ACTS experiments on the efficacy of using standard Internet protocols over long-delay satellite channels. These experiments have been jointly conducted by NASAs Glenn Research Center and Ohio University over the last six years. The focus of our investigations has been the impact of long-delay networks with non-zero bit-error rates on the performance of the suite of Internet protocols. In particular, we have focused on the most widely used transport protocol, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), as well as several application layer protocols. This paper presents our main results, as well as references to more verbose discussions of our experiments.

  20. Educational gaps and solutions for early-career nurse managers' education and participation in quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Maja; Kovner, Christine T; Brewer, Carol S; Fatehi, Farida; Jun, Jin

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine early-career frontline nurse managers' (FLNMs') reported educational preparedness and participation in quality improvement (QI). Frontline nurse managers are vitally important for leading QI. However, it is not well known if they have adequate knowledge and skills to lead this important function. We examined cross-sectional survey data from 42 FLNMs using descriptive statistics. About 30% of FLNMs reported being very prepared across 12 measured QI skills by schools or employers and 35% reported participating in a specific clinical effort to improve patient care on their unit more than once a month. More than 50% reported having good organizational support for QI, but only about 30% reported being rewarded for their contributions to QI. Our study highlights opportunities for development in QI for FLNMs and offers some solutions for nurse executives that can bridge the educational gaps.

  1. Working Together to Improve the Quality of Mathematics Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    Key words: Parents; mathematics education; perception; school climate; .... elementary school children, established that parents with higher college degrees ..... International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology,.

  2. Implementation of STEAM Education to Improve Mastery Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliawati, W.; Rusnayati, H.; Purwanto; Aristantia, G.

    2018-01-01

    Science Technology Engineering, Art, Mathematics (STEAM) is an integration of art into Science Technology Engineering, Mathematics (STEM). Connecting art to science makes learning more effective and innovative. This study aims to determine the increase in mastery of the concept of high school students after the application of STEAM education in learning with the theme of Water and Us. The research method used is one group Pretest-posttest design with students of class VII (n = 37) junior high school. The instrument used in the form of question of mastery of concepts in the form of multiple choices amounted to 20 questions and observation sheet of learning implementation. The results of the study show that there is an increase in conceptualization on the theme of Water and Us which is categorized as medium (=0, 46) after the application of the STEAM approach. The conclusion obtained that by applying STEAM approach in learning can improve the mastery of concept

  3. An educational intervention to improve hand hygiene compliance in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Hang Thi; Tran, Hang Thi Thuy; Tran, Hanh Thi My; Dinh, Anh Pham Phuong; Ngo, Ha Thanh; Theorell-Haglow, Jenny; Gordon, Christopher J

    2018-03-07

    Hand hygiene compliance is the basis of infection control programs. In developing countries models to improve hand hygiene compliance to reduce healthcare acquired infections are required. The aim of this study was to determine hand hygiene compliance following an educational program in an obstetric and gynecological hospital in Vietnam. Health care workers from neonatal intensive care, delivery suite and a surgical ward from Hung Vuong Hospital, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam undertook a 4-h educational program targeting hand hygiene. Compliance was monitored monthly for six months following the intervention. Hand hygiene knowledge was assessed at baseline and after six months of the study. There were 7124 opportunities over 370 hand hygiene recording sessions with 1531 opportunities at baseline and 1620 at 6 months following the intervention. Hand hygiene compliance increased significantly from baseline across all sites (43.6% [95% Confidence interval CI: 41.1-46.1] to 63% [95% CI: 60.6-65.3]; p hygiene compliance increased significantly after intervention (p hygiene compliance for an extended period of time. Hand hygiene knowledge increased during the intervention. This hand hygiene model could be used in developing countries were resources are limited.

  4. Teaching at the university and social and educational improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ibarrola-García

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Higher Education contributes not only to the formation of skills for the world of today and tomorrow, but also to the training of socially responsible future professionals with ethical principles, who are committed to working for peace, human rights and the values of democracy (UNESCO, 2009. This work emphasizes service-learning as a methodology to integrate academic learning, along with community service solidarity as a method of improving it. Firstly, the spread of service-learning in the context of a Spanish university is analyzed. It delves into the positive impact it has on students. The evidence found in the literature is described. Secondly, a service-learning experience carried out in the Degree of Education from the University of Navarrais described and evaluated. Perceptions of the learning outcomes achieved by the students involved are collected. These results suggest that the experience has led to a high level of acquisition of the contents of the subject and its related skills, with particular emphasis on the social component.

  5. 76 FR 76603 - Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ..., including Native language immersion programs, that encourage the learning and development of AI/AN children... Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1059c). Sec. 3. White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education. (a) Establishment. There is hereby established the White House Initiative on American Indian and...

  6. The No Child Left Behind and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Acts: The Uneven Impact of Partially Funded Federal Mandates on Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Donald F.

    2005-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is having a major impact on the education of deaf and hard of hearing children, and in many ways has taken on an importance far in excess of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which has been evolving since 1975. Congress has appropriated less money for both laws than their…

  7. USING E-COLLABORATION TO IMPROVE MANAGEMENT EDUCATION: THREE SCENARIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Noëlle Bessagnet

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential impact of collaborative technologies in improving management education. The first goal is to expose students to tools and practices that not only assist them with their current studies, but also serve to reinforce individual and team competencies that can facilitate their entry into the workforce. In their positions as future managers they will be expected to not only be familiar with common business practices but also to understand the implications of information technology for business; in this case with emphasis on tools and techniques that can help businesses flourish in the networked economy. With an ever-increasing recognition that e-learning tools are important for (re-training employees, these three scenarios offer examples of how business schools might expand the boundaries of e-collaboration to help their students. These experiments have been conducted in management programs. In the first two scenarios, students use collaborative platforms in some of their daily work. The third experiment is based on a student-centred design of a learning portal. Our experience reinforces a certain number of hypotheses influencing the impact of collaborative technologies in management education. To begin with, information systems are often flawed mirrors of the managerial system that they are designed to represent. Secondly, the potential value of collaborative technologies is strongly influenced by organizational contexts, both in and between the university and the business community. Thirdly, the effectiveness of collaborative technologies depends to a large degree upon the depth and coherence of learning objectives fixed for learning and work places. Finally, improving the effectiveness of collaborative technologies requires aligning the design of learning environments with the corporate cultures and visions we are trying to reproduce.

  8. Improving patient satisfaction through physician education, feedback, and incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banka, Gaurav; Edgington, Sarah; Kyulo, Namgyal; Padilla, Tony; Mosley, Virgie; Afsarmanesh, Nasim; Fonarow, Gregg C; Ong, Michael K

    2015-08-01

    Patient satisfaction has been associated with improved outcomes and become a focus of reimbursement. Evaluate an intervention to improve patient satisfaction. Nonrandomized, pre-post study that took place from 2011 to 2012. Large tertiary academic medical center. Internal medicine (IM) resident physicians, non-IM resident physicians, and adult patients of the resident physicians. IM resident physicians were provided with patient satisfaction education through a conference, real-time individualized patient satisfaction score feedback, monthly recognition, and incentives for high patient-satisfaction scores. Patient satisfaction on physician-related and overall satisfaction questions on the HCAHPS survey. We conducted a difference-in-differences regression analysis comparing IM and non-IM patient responses, adjusting for differences in patient characteristics. In our regression analysis, the percentage of patients who responded positively to all 3 physician-related Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) questions increased by 8.1% in the IM and 1.5% in the control cohorts (absolute difference 6.6%, P = 0.04). The percentage of patients who would definitely recommend this hospital to friends and family increased by 7.1% in the IM and 1.5% in the control cohorts (absolute difference 5.6%, P = 0.02). The national average for the HCAHPS outcomes studied improved by no more than 3.1%. This study was nonrandomized and was conducted at a single site. To our knowledge, this is the first intervention associated with a significant improvement in HCAHPS scores. This may serve as a model to increase patient satisfaction, hospital revenue, and train resident physicians. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  9. Acquisition of Speech Acts by Second Language Learners : Suggestion for future research on Japanese language education

    OpenAIRE

    畑佐, 由紀子

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines previous studies on the use and acquisition of speech acts by second language learners in order to identify issues that are yet to be investigated. The paper begins with a brief overview of the theoretical background for L2 speech act theory. Then, factors that affect native speakers’ choice of expressions are explained and the extent to which they are investigated in L2 pragmatic studies is considered. Thirdly, the strengths and weaknesses of methodology employed are disc...

  10. When Kids Act Out: A Comparison of Embodied Methods to Improve Children's Memory for a Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenhaus, Molly; Oakhill, Jane; Rusted, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, embodied cognition, the idea that sensorimotor processes facilitate higher cognitive processes, has proven useful for improving children's memory for a story. In order to compare the benefits of two embodiment techniques, active experiencing (AE) and indexing, for children's memory for a story, we compared the immediate…

  11. Using the "No Child Left Behind Act" To Improve Schools in Your State: A Tool Kit for Business Leaders. Information Resources for Business Leadership To Increase Student Achivement under the "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business Roundtable, Washington, DC.

    This tool kit is intended to help business leaders seize specific opportunities to partner with educators and political leaders in the next year to implement reforms called for by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which provides new accountability measures and resources to raise the achievement of students throughout the United States. The…

  12. H.R. 754: A Bill to make improvements in the Black Lung Benefits Act. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This bill proposes changes in the Black Lung Benefits Act with the intent of improving the existing legislation. Changes are proposed in sections of the act referring to: benefit overpayment; evidence; survivor benefits; responsible operator; attorney fees; administration; refilling; construction; and effective dates.

  13. A Proposed Educational Model to Improve the Operations of Knowledge-Exchange between MOE and Higher Education Institutions in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husni Ana,am Ali Salem

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to build a proposed educational model for improving knowledge-exchange processes between the Ministry of Education and Higher Education institutions in Jordan. The sample of the study consisted of (301 educational leaders: (158 academic staff members from the Faculty of Educational Sciences – University of Jordan – and the Faculty of Education in Yarmouk University; and (143 members from the center of Jordanian Ministry of Education for the academic year 2016/2017. To achieve the aims of the study, the researcher built a questionnaire, consisting of (88 items as tool for collecting data. The research tool was checked for its validity and reliability semantics. To analyze the data, means and standard deviation were used. The results of the study showed that the educational leaders rated the degree of practicing knowledge-exchange processes between Jordanian Ministry of Education and Higher Education institutions in Jordan as (moderate. Also, they rated the obstacles that face knowledge-exchange processes as (moderate. The study concluded with a proposed educational model for improving knowledge-exchange processes between the Ministry of Education and Higher Education institutions in Jordan, and recommended to be approved and applied in Jordan. Keywords: A Proposed educational model, Knowledge-exchange processes, Practicing degree, Obstacles, Jordanian Universities, Jordanian Ministry of Education

  14. California Adult Education End-of-Year Progress Report to the Legislature: Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title II. Program Year 2008. July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title II, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act provides funding for states and territories to provide instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult Basic Education (ABE), and Adult Secondary Education (ASE) to adults in need of these literacy services. California State Budget Act language…

  15. California Adult Education End-of-Year Progress Report to the Legislature: Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title II. Program Year 2009. July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title II, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act provides funding for states and territories to provide instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult Basic Education (ABE), and Adult Secondary Education (ASE) to adults in need of these literacy services. California State Budget Act language…

  16. Employment of Active Learning at HEIs in Bangladesh to Improve Education Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Faieza

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, education quality and quality assessment have received a great deal of attention at Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in Bangladesh. Most of the HEIs in Bangladesh face severe resource constraints and find it difficult to improve education quality by improving inputs, such as better infrastructure and modernized classroom…

  17. The Failure of Legalization in Education: Alternative Dispute Resolution and the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Steven S.

    1989-01-01

    A federal statute provided that parents may use the judicial process to challenge educators' decisions. Describes the intent of legalization; how reaction to an adversarial system led to the use of mediation in most states; and why this alternative model is not appropriate for resolving education questions. (MLF)

  18. GPE 2020: Improving Learning and Equity through Stronger Education Systems. Strategic Plan 2016-2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global Partnership for Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) addresses the most significant education challenges faced by developing countries through supporting governments to improve equity and learning by strengthening their education systems. GPE is a global fund and a partnership focused entirely on education in developing countries. The partnership has a…

  19. 75 FR 38510 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Personnel Development to Improve...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Personnel... word ``scholar'' in the Special Education Preservice Program Improvement Grants (84.325T) priority in....html . Dated: June 25, 2010. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative...

  20. Engineering Ethics Education on the Basis of Continuous Education to Improve Communication Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Kenji; Kajiwara, Toshinori

    The paper proposes the engineering ethics education method for students on the basis of continuous education to improve communication ability. First, through a debate, the students acquire the fundamental skills required to marshal their arguments, to construct the rebuttals and to summarize the debates. Secondly, the students study the fundamental techniques to make a presentation on technical subjects related to electrical engineering. Following these classes, in the lecture of engineering ethics, the students probe the cause of each accident and consider the better means for avoiding such an accident, each other. In most cases, the students can express right and commonsensical opinions from an ethical standpoint. However, they can hardly make judgments when the situations such as the human relations in the above accidents are set concretely. During the engineering ethics class, the students come to know that human relations behind the case make the ethical matters more complicated. Furthermore, they come to understand that facilitating daily communications with co-workers and/or bosses is very important in order to avoid the accidents. The recognition of the students is just the results of the continuous education through three years. It can be said that the engineering ethics education thus constructed makes the students raise such spontaneous awareness and their ethical qualities as engineers.

  1. The Myth of Free and Barrier-Free Access: India's Right to Education Act--Private Schooling Costs and Household Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prachi; Noronha, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We examine relative household costs and experiences of accessing private and government schooling under India's "Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009" in the early implementation phase. The Act deems that no child should incur any fee, charges, or expenses in accessing schooling. Private schools are mandated to…

  2. Maghemite Nanoparticles Acts as Nanozymes, Improving Growth and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmqvist, N. G. Martin; Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.; Svedlindh, Peter; Kessler, Vadim G.

    2017-12-01

    Yttrium doping-stabilized γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were studied for its potential to serve as a plant fertilizer and, through enzymatic activity, support drought stress management. Levels of both hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation, after drought, were reduced when γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were delivered by irrigation in a nutrient solution to Brassica napus plants grown in soil. Hydrogen peroxide was reduced from 151 to 83 μM g-1 compared to control, and the malondialdehyde formation was reduced from 36 to 26 mM g-1. Growth rate of leaves was enhanced from 33 to 50% growth compared to fully fertilized plants and SPAD-measurements of chlorophyll increased from 47 to 52 suggesting improved agronomic properties by use of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles as fertilizer as compared to chelated iron.

  3. "The Balancing Act"--Irish Part-Time Undergraduate Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmody, Merike; Fleming, Bairbre

    2009-01-01

    While the numbers of part-time students has increased in higher education in Ireland, little is known about these students or about how they balance their study and other commitments. Drawing on a larger study on Irish students' experiences in higher education, this article attempts to address this gap in research and reports on Irish part-time…

  4. 75 FR 7459 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Overview Information; Improving Literacy Through...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... information literacy, information retrieval, and critical-thinking skills of students; facilitating Internet... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Overview Information; Improving Literacy Through School Libraries Program Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal...

  5. Education Improves Public Health and Promotes Health Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Robert A; Truman, Benedict I

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a framework and empirical evidence to support the argument that educational programs and policies are crucial public health interventions. Concepts of education and health are developed and linked, and we review a wide range of empirical studies to clarify pathways of linkage and explore implications. Basic educational expertise and skills, including fundamental knowledge, reasoning ability, emotional self-regulation, and interactional abilities, are critical components of health. Moreover, education is a fundamental social determinant of health - an upstream cause of health. Programs that close gaps in educational outcomes between low-income or racial and ethnic minority populations and higher-income or majority populations are needed to promote health equity. Public health policy makers, health practitioners and educators, and departments of health and education can collaborate to implement educational programs and policies for which systematic evidence indicates clear public health benefits. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Occupational Safety and Health Act Handbook for Vocational and Technical Education Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashack, Willard F., Ed.

    The purpose of the handbook is to assist the school shop teacher in participating in voluntary compliance with the standards and regulations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The first major section deals with general shop safety and how the shop teacher can use the checklist to control possible safety violations in his shop. The…

  7. Improving physician-patient communication about cancer pain with a tailored education-coaching intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Richard L; Slee, Christina; Kalauokalani, Donna K; Dean, Dionne Evans; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kravitz, Richard L

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the effect of a theoretically grounded, tailored education-coaching intervention to help patients more effectively discuss their pain-related questions, concerns, and preferences with physicians. Grounded in social-cognitive and communication theory, a tailored education-coaching (TEC) intervention was developed to help patients learn pain management and communication skills. In a RCT, 148 cancer patients agreed to have their consultations audio-recorded and were assigned to the intervention or a control group. The recordings were used to code for patients' questions, acts of assertiveness, and expressed concerns and to rate the quality of physicians' communication. Patients in the TEC group discussed their pain concerns more than did patients in the control group. More active patients also had more baseline pain and interacted with physicians using participatory decision-making. Ratings of physicians' information about pain were higher when patients talked more about their pain concerns. The study demonstrates the efficacy of a theoretically grounded, coaching intervention to help cancer patients talk about pain control. Coaching interventions can be effective resources for helping cancer patients communicate about their pain concerns if they are theoretically grounded, can be integrated within clinical routines, and lead to improve health outcomes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Marketing & Distributive Education. Committed to the Improvement of Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This package consists of 34 transparency masters outlining the nature and scope of marketing and distributive education. Included in the set are transparency masters addressing the following themes: the interconnectedness of education, labor, and work; objectives of marketing and distributive education at both the secondary and postsecondary…

  9. In-Service Teacher Education: Some Suggestions for Improvement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper therefore examines teacher education, especially in-service teacher education and how it has been practised elsewhere. It is hoped that education policy makers will take note of some of the issues raised in this paper as the one day workshop which has hitherto been the most used strategy of in-service teacher ...

  10. Brief biopsychosocially informed education can improve insurance workers? back pain beliefs: Implications for improving claims management behaviours

    OpenAIRE

    Beales, Darren; Mitchell, Tim; Pole, Naomi; Weir, James

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biopsychosocially informed education is associated with improved back pain beliefs and positive changes in health care practitioners? practice behaviours. OBJECTIVE: Assess the effect of this type of education for insurance workers who are important non-clinical stakeholders in the rehabilitation of injured workers. METHODS: Insurance workers operating in the Western Australian workers? compensation system underwent two, 1.5 hour sessions of biopsychosocially informed education fo...

  11. The History and State of Neonatal Nursing Quality Improvement Practice and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Aniko; Dowling, Donna A; Dolansky, Mary A

    2018-03-01

    Quality improvement has evolved rapidly in neonatal nursing. This review outlines the history and current state of quality improvement practice and education in neonatal nursing. The future of neonatal nursing includes a stronger emphasis on quality improvement in advanced practice education that promotes doctoral projects that result in clinical improvements. A collective focus will ensure that neonatal nurses not only deliver evidence-based care, but also continually improve the care they deliver.

  12. Water transfer and major environmental provisions of the Central Valley Project Improvement Act: A preliminary economic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, John B.

    1994-06-01

    Increasing block water pricing, water transfer, and wildlife refuge water supply provisions of the Central Valley Project (CVP) Improvement Act are analyzed in terms of likely farmer response and economic efficiency of these provisions. Based on a simplified partial equilibrium analysis, we estimate small, but significant water conservation savings due to pricing reform, the potential for substantial water transfers to non-CVP customers in severe drought years when the water price exceeds 110 per acre foot (1 acre foot equals 1.234 × 103 m3) and positive net benefits for implementation of the wildlife refuge water supply provisions. The high threshold water price is partly a result of requiring farmers to pay full cost on transferred water plus a surcharge of 25 per acre foot if the water is transferred to a non-CVP user. The act also sets an important precedent for water pricing reform, water transfer provisions, and environmental surcharges on water users that may find their way to other Bureau of Reclamation projects.

  13. Precursor models construction at preschool education: an approach to improve scientific education in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SABRINA PATRICIA CANEDO- IBARRA

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore young children scientific precursor models construction and how the designed teaching strategy was successful for improving science learning at preschool in a social context. We describe how 6 years old children built a precursor model of flotation based on density. The exploratory study used a qualitative data collection and analysis following a pre-interview, instructional process and post-interview design. On analyzing children’s answers after the instructional period, we realized that several children were led to both the construction of a precursor model and a general qualitative upgrade in reasoning. We conclude that learning activities were effective and that the approach used in this study may help expand and improve teaching and learning of scientific concepts in preschool education

  14. The Main Directions of Improving the Management of the Higher Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terovanesov Mykhajlo R.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at determining the mechanisms of improving the management of the system of higher education in the context of the current regulatory support, which will be the means to solve the problem of inefficient functioning, lack of financing, and low quality of higher education. The factors, causing negative impact on development of the higher education system were analyzed, the most important of which are the lack of financing and the shortcomings of the legal support of the education sector. It has been determined that a shortage of funds and lack of communication between the education sphere and employers reduces the efficiency of management of the system of higher education. The legal support of the educational activities requires improvement due to the declarative nature of individual provisions on the management of the system of higher education. Consideration of the legal factor is necessary for regulating the decentralization of management in the education sphere, improvement of financing, perfection of the system of control of the education quality. Ways for decentralizing the management of the education sphere, increasing its effectiveness, and improving the economic status of higher education institutions, have been suggested. The scientific-practical recommendations have been formulated to attract potential consumers of educational services to reforming the higher education system and increasing its effectiveness.

  15. Managers versus students: new approach in improving capital structure education

    OpenAIRE

    Miglo, Anton

    2012-01-01

    According to Graham and Harvey (2001), an immense gap exists between capital structure theories and practice. By analyzing students’ perception of capital structure theories and the differences between their opinion and that of the current CEO’s and managers this paper argues that this can be partially explained by current educational practices. Educators mostly focus on one or maybe two most popular theories and students have much smaller knowledge about other theories. Secondly educational ...

  16. Determining the Role of Language and Culture in First Nations Schools: A Comparison of the First Nations Education Act with the Policy of the Assembly of First Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcom, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I explore the incongruence between the federal government's proposed First Nations Education Act and the approach of the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) regarding language and culture education. I also examine research concerning potential outcomes of their approaches to determine what would be most beneficial to learners.…

  17. School Library Resources, Textbooks, and Other Instructional Materials. Annual Report, Fiscal Year 1972. Title II Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Narrative reports submitted by individual State Departments of Education relating to the operation of their respective Title II Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) programs are synthesized in this document. Information is provided about six aspects of the programs: 1) state management of ESEA Title II programs; 2) program development; 3)…

  18. The road, the bridge, the square, the tower: the act of being a social educator today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Ciotti

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with an overview of the current cultural, social and ethical climate in which a social educator operates, Luigi Ciotti underlines the importance of healthy realism, accompanied with passion in order to face the difficulties and risks involved in social and educational work. He emphasised the importance of constantly renewing motivation and courage in order to continue to build hope when dealing with peoples needs. Concrete examples of real life experiences that have marked the life of Luigi Ciotti emerge from this from this discussion with Professoressa Spetltini reinforcing the idea of feeling of never arriving at a destination but always being ready to listen.

  19. Improving Collaborative Learning in Online Software Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Colin J.; DeFranco, Joanna F.; Sangwan, Raghvinder S.

    2017-01-01

    Team projects are commonplace in software engineering education. They address a key educational objective, provide students critical experience relevant to their future careers, allow instructors to set problems of greater scale and complexity than could be tackled individually, and are a vehicle for socially constructed learning. While all…

  20. Improving Publication: Advice for Busy Higher Education Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge for higher education academics is to research and publish when faced with substantial teaching responsibilities, higher student numbers, and higher output expectations. The focus of this piece is to encourage publication more generally by educators, and to build publication capacity, which academic developers can facilitate. The…

  1. Applying Constructivism to Improve Public Relations for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Educators are often hesitant to use techniques of public relations and marketing communication to attempt to alter undesirable understandings of the rationale and processes of education held by external constituencies. This paper shows that contemporary practice in public relations and marketing communication can be conceptualized as an…

  2. Design in Practice: Scenarios for Improving Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Lee; Chantelot, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing attention given to design in business, Design Thinking has had little impact on the quality of business school education. Building upon the foundations of long-standing critiques of management education and the potential for student-centric learning, the authors propose that the use of Design in Practice can significantly…

  3. Assessment of a Regional Transportation Education Alliance To Improve Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Beverly T.

    This report examines issues related to transportation education, with the objective of developing and packaging transportation-related materials for use in college and university transportation education programs. The study was conducted by the Southwest Region University Transportation Center (SWUTC) region, but it is expected that the results…

  4. A Revised Guide for Improving Teacher Education in Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phi Delta Kappa, Bloomington, IN. Commission of Education, Human Rights, and Responsibilities.

    This document serves as a guide for teacher education institutions and programs designed to prepare educators for meeting their responsibilities in the area of human rights and human relations. This second edition of the guide represents a substantial modification of the original guide, and includes many activities, experiences, and suggestions…

  5. Umuganda for improved health professions education in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This article describes several recent milestones in collaborative development of health professional education at the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, towards more socially accountable education. Methodology: Literature review and personal experiences from the authors were ...

  6. Quality improvement education to improve performance on ulcerative colitis quality measures and care processes aligned with National Quality Strategy priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Laurence; Moreo, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Studies on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have reported suboptimal approaches to patient care. In the United States, the findings have motivated leading gastroenterology organizations to call for initiatives that support clinicians in aligning their practices with quality measures for IBD and priorities of the National Quality Strategy (NQS). We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) education program on ulcerative colitis in which patient charts were audited for 30 gastroenterologists before (n = 300 charts) and after (n = 290 charts) they participated in QI-focused educational activities. Charts were audited for nine measures, selected for their alignment with four NQS priorities: making care safer, ensuring patient engagement, promoting communication, and promoting effective treatment practices. Four of the measures, including guideline-directed vaccinations and assessments of disease type and activity, were part of the CMS Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS). The other five measures involved counseling patients on various topics in ulcerative colitis management, documentation of side effects, assessment of adherence status, and simplification of dosing. The gastroenterologists also completed baseline and post-education surveys designed to assess qualitative outcomes. One of the educational interventions was a private audit feedback session conducted for each gastroenterologist. The sessions were designed to support participants in identifying measures reflecting suboptimal care quality and developing action plans for improvement. In continuous improvement cycles, follow-up interventions included QI tools and educational monographs. Across the nine chart variables, post-education improvements ranged from 0% to 48%, with a mean improvement of 15.9%. Survey findings revealed improvements in self-reported understanding of quality measures and intentions to apply them to practice, and lower rates of perceived significant barriers to high

  7. Servicemembers Civil Relief Act: Information on Mortgage Protections and Related Education Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    activities; legal assistance attorneys provide counseling; and a number of outreach media , such as publications and websites, are aimed at informing...to servicemembers. DOD and the Consumer Federation of America also conduct the Military Saves Campaign every year, a social marketing campaign to...theft, and insurance scams targeted at servicemembers and their families. DOD established its financial education partnerships by signing memorandums

  8. Locations of Racism in Education: A Speech Act Analysis of a Policy Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneback, Emma; Quennerstedt, Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how racism is located in an educational policy chain and identifies how its interpretation changes throughout the chain. A basic assumption is that the policy formation process can be seen as a chain in which international, national and local policies are "links"--separate entities yet joined. With Sweden as the…

  9. IMPROVING THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS BASED ON THE USE OF INFORMATION LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra B. Kriger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers with the development of effective educational process, using leaning management system. The analysis of the results of the use Blackboard Learning System for the organization of educational activities to the university students. Built process models of learning (ideal and real on the basis of their proposals on the improvement of the educational process. 

  10. Student Voices Speak Quality Assurance: Continual Improvement in Online Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secret, Mary; Bentley, Kia J.; Kadolph, Jessie C.

    2016-01-01

    As social work education expands instruction through the rise of distance education, educators seek new ways to improve quality in online courses. Quality assurance standards and student feedback offer valuable insights to ensure satisfying and effective online learning experiences. An examination of these two assessment approaches concurrently in…

  11. Reporting Data with "Over-the-Counter" Data Analysis Supports Improves Educators' Data Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jenny Grant

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of making data-informed decisions to improve learning rely on educators correctly interpreting given data. Many educators routinely misinterpret data, even at districts with proactive support for data use. The tool most educators use for data analyses, which is an information technology data system or its reports, typically reports…

  12. Contemporary Technologies to Improve the Quality of Education When Training Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibgatullina, Alfiya

    2015-01-01

    The article considers contemporary technologies to improve the quality of teachers' education (as exemplified by the training of foreign language teachers). The author presents analysis of the "quality of education" concept, proposes and analyzes the criteria for assessing the quality of education of future foreign language teachers.…

  13. Balanced Scorecard: A Strategy for the Quality Improvement of Islamic Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyasin, Mukhamd; Zamroni

    2017-01-01

    The main issue in improving the quality of Islamic Higher Education is to increase the competence and professionalism of teachers and education personnel to achieve its vision and mission in the middle of the complexity of the demands of society and the changing times. so that the quality of education and governance of Islamic Religion clean and…

  14. Improving the Status of Women in the Third World: A Challenge to Adult Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Elmer J.

    Adult educators face a challenge if they are to aid in the improvement of the status of women in the Third World. Women in developing countries, especially those in rural and poverty areas, are often restricted to second class educational and work opportunities. Adult educators could contribute to the reduction of such discrimination in the…

  15. Enhancing the Federal Government's Capacity to Support the Improvement of Education through Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the federal government's role in educational research and development, in particular, the capacity of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement. Considers how the federal government's capacity to support the development, dissemination, and implementation of education-related knowledge can be significantly enhanced by incremental…

  16. Improving Postsecondary STEM Education: Strategies for Successful Interdisciplinary Collaborations and Brokering Engagement with Education Research and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwma-Gearhart, Jana; Perry, Kristen H.; Presley, Jennifer B.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes factors that influence the success of collaborations involving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and Education faculty at research-focused universities who work toward postsecondary STEM education improvement. We provide insight into how interdisciplinary faculty may successfully collaborate given…

  17. Teachers' Perceptions of the Educational Platform--Is There a Connection between School Improvement and Regional Educational Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Lena; Dalin, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    This research examined teachers' attitudes in a school development project, The best regional educational system in the world which focuses on regional development and school improvement. The project was performed in counties in Mid Sweden, which have a lower educational level and school achievements and a competence escape compare with other…

  18. Strategies for improving participation in diabetes education. A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Schäfer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent and can lead to serious complications and mortality. Patient education can help to avoid negative outcomes, but up to half of the patients do not participate. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' attitudes towards diabetes education in order to identify barriers to participation and develop strategies for better patient education. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study. Seven GP practices were purposively selected based on socio-demographic data of city districts in Hamburg, Germany. Study participants were selected by their GPs in order to increase participation. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 14 patients. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The sample size was determined by data saturation. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Categories were determined deductively and inductively. RESULTS: The interviews yielded four types of barriers: 1 Statements and behaviour of the attending physician influence the patients' decisions about diabetes education. 2 Both, a good state of health related to diabetes and physical/psychosocial comorbidity can be reasons for non-participation. 3 Manifold motivational factors were discussed. They ranged from giving low priority to diabetes to avoidance of implications of diabetes education as being confronted with illness narratives of others. 4 Barriers also include aspects of the patients' knowledge and activity. CONCLUSIONS: First, physicians should encourage patients to participate in diabetes education and argue that they can profit even if actual treatment and examination results are promising. Second, patients with other priorities, psychic comorbidity or functional limitations might profit more from continuous individualized education adapted to their specific situation instead of group education. Third, it might be justified that patients do not participate in diabetes education if

  19. Strategies for improving participation in diabetes education. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Pawels, Marc; Küver, Claudia; Pohontsch, Nadine Janis; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent and can lead to serious complications and mortality. Patient education can help to avoid negative outcomes, but up to half of the patients do not participate. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' attitudes towards diabetes education in order to identify barriers to participation and develop strategies for better patient education. We conducted a qualitative study. Seven GP practices were purposively selected based on socio-demographic data of city districts in Hamburg, Germany. Study participants were selected by their GPs in order to increase participation. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 14 patients. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The sample size was determined by data saturation. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Categories were determined deductively and inductively. The interviews yielded four types of barriers: 1) Statements and behaviour of the attending physician influence the patients' decisions about diabetes education. 2) Both, a good state of health related to diabetes and physical/psychosocial comorbidity can be reasons for non-participation. 3) Manifold motivational factors were discussed. They ranged from giving low priority to diabetes to avoidance of implications of diabetes education as being confronted with illness narratives of others. 4) Barriers also include aspects of the patients' knowledge and activity. First, physicians should encourage patients to participate in diabetes education and argue that they can profit even if actual treatment and examination results are promising. Second, patients with other priorities, psychic comorbidity or functional limitations might profit more from continuous individualized education adapted to their specific situation instead of group education. Third, it might be justified that patients do not participate in diabetes education if they have slightly increased blood sugar values only and no

  20. Quality improvement "201": context-relevant quality improvement leadership training for the busy clinician-educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stille, Christopher J; Savageau, Judith A; McBride, Jeanne; Alper, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Development of quality improvement (QI) skills and leadership for busy clinician-educators in academic medical centers is increasingly necessary, although it is challenging given limited resources. In response, the authors developed the Quality Scholars program for primary care teaching faculty. They conducted a needs assessment, evaluated existing internal and national resources, and developed a 9-month, 20-session project-based curriculum that combines didactic and hands-on techniques with facilitated project discussion. They also conducted pre-post tests of knowledge and attitudes, and evaluations of each session, scholars' projects, and program sustainability and costs. In all, 10 scholars from all 3 generalist disciplines comprised the first class. A wide spectrum of previous experiences enhanced collaboration. QI knowledge increased slightly, and reported self-readiness to lead QI projects increased markedly. Protected time for project work and group discussion of QI topics was seen as essential. All 10 scholars completed projects and presented results. Institutional leadership agreed to sustain the program using institutional funds.

  1. Is Education Associated with Improvements in General Cognitive Ability, or in Specific Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Stuart J.; Bates, Timothy C.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that education influences cognitive development, but it is unclear what, precisely, is being improved. Here, we tested whether education is associated with cognitive test score improvements via domain-general effects on general cognitive ability ("g"), or via domain-specific effects on particular cognitive…

  2. Quality Function Deployment Application for Improving Quality of Education in Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnak, Muhittin; Ada, Nesrin; Kazancoglu, Yigit; Tayaksi, Cansu

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing competition between universities globally to attract students. At this point, to compete, it is imperative for the universities to improve the quality of education provided for their stakeholders, including students, parents, and employers. For improving the quality of education, first of all, the universities should make…

  3. The Teaching Gap: Best Ideas from the World's Teachers for Improving Education in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, James W.; Hiebert, James

    This book is an action plan for improving education in the U.S, focusing on the key role of teachers in this improvement. It offers a detailed comparison of the educational methods of Germany, Japan, and the United States. The analysis begins with an international study of mathematics teaching in the three countries that was conducted as part of…

  4. Direct-Acting Antivirals Improve Access to Care and Cure for Patients With HIV and Chronic HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Lauren F; Chan, Austin; Zheng, Jiayin; Chow, Shein-Chung; Wilder, Julius M; Muir, Andrew J; Naggie, Susanna

    2018-01-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAA) as curative therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection offer >95% sustained virologic response (SVR), including in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Despite improved safety and efficacy of HCV treatment, challenges remain, including drug-drug interactions between DAA and antiretroviral therapy (ART) and restrictions on access by payers. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all HIV/HCV co-infected and HCV mono-infected patients captured in care at our institution from 2011-2015, reflecting the DAA era, to determine treatment uptake and SVR, and to elucidate barriers to accessing DAA for co-infected patients. We identified 9290 patients with HCV mono-infection and 507 with HIV/HCV co-infection. Compared to mono-infected patients, co-infected patients were younger and more likely to be male and African-American. For both groups, treatment uptake improved from the DAA/pegylated interferon (PEGIFN)-ribavirin to IFN-free DAA era. One-third of co-infected patients in the IFN-free DAA era required ART switch and nearly all remained virologically suppressed after 6 months. We observed SVR >95% for most patient subgroups including those with co-infection, prior treatment-experience, and cirrhosis. Predictors of access to DAA for co-infected patients included Caucasian race, CD4 count ≥200 cells/mm 3 , HIV virologic suppression and cirrhosis. Time to approval of DAA was longest for patients insured by Medicaid, followed by private insurance and Medicare. DAA therapy has significantly improved access to HCV treatment and high SVR is independent of HIV status. However, in order to realize cure for all, barriers and disparities in access need to be urgently addressed.

  5. Improving Ethical Attitudes or Simply Teaching Ethical Codes? The Reality of Accounting Ethics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robyn Ann; O'Leary, Conor

    2015-01-01

    Ethical instruction is critical in accounting education. However, does accounting ethics teaching actually instil core ethical values or simply catalogue how students should act when confronted with typical accounting ethical dilemmas? This study extends current literature by distinguishing between moral/ethical and legal/ethical matters and then…

  6. An educational approach to improve outcomes in acute kidney injury (AKI): report of a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Baines, Richard; Westacott, Rachel; Selby, Nick; Carr, Susan

    2014-03-20

    To assess the impact of a quality improvement project that used a multifaceted educational intervention on how to improve clinician's knowledge, confidence and awareness of acute kidney injury (AKI). 2 large acute teaching hospitals in England, serving a combined population of over 1.5 million people. All secondary care clinicians working in the clinical areas were targeted, with a specific focus on clinicians working in acute admission areas. A multifaceted educational intervention consisting of traditional didactic lectures, case-based teaching in small groups and an interactive web-based learning resource. We assessed clinicians' knowledge of AKI and their self-reported clinical behaviour using an interactive questionnaire before and after the educational intervention. Secondary outcome measures included clinical audit of patient notes before and after the intervention. 26% of clinicians reported that they were aware of local AKI guidelines in the preintervention questionnaire compared to 64% in the follow-up questionnaire (χ²=60.2, pquality improvement project utilising a multifaceted educational intervention improved awareness of AKI as demonstrated by changes in the clinician's self-reported management of patients with AKI. Elements of the project have been sustained beyond the project period, and demonstrate the power of quality improvement projects to help initiate changes in practice. Our findings are limited by confounding factors and highlight the need to carry out formal randomised studies to determine the impact of educational initiatives in the clinical setting.

  7. Education Information Security: Improvements Made But Control Weaknesses Remain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of information system general controls in place to prevent unauthorized access, disclosure, and disruption to Education's primary accounting and payment system (i.e., EDCAPS...

  8. Contextualising Formal Education for Improved Relevance: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allowing formal education to take place outside of the school. • Necessitating a change in pedagogy to more learner-centred discovery methods. • Allowing ..... Switzerland: International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Barrett, A.

  9. Improving science, technology and mathematics education in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the impact of a World Bank Assisted Project “STEP-B” on ... of ICT, human resources and Educational Technology infrastructure in Post Basic ... technique based on gender, course, department, unit and job prescription.

  10. Can higher education improve the professional identity of CNNs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Sharon

    2010-12-01

    Community nursery nurses (CNNs) are an important part of the multidisciplinary team. This paper discusses how two students undertaking a foundation degree in early years experienced changes to their personal and professional identities. A 'life history' approach was used to understand and interpret their experiences in depth. Both students would not have entered higher education had it not been for the widening participation drive. The higher education experience had a positive influence on personal and professional identity for the learners. They underlined that the widening participation drive can enable those students from 'non-traditional backgrounds' to enter and benefit from higher education. However, changes to higher education funding and public sector cutbacks have raised grave concerns about the continued ability of CNNs and other early years practitioners to access such courses. This could have a negative effect on the continuing professional development and subsequent changing identities within this particular group.

  11. New governance in education and dynamics for improvement: pressure versus commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Bolívar

    2015-01-01

    The article defends the thesis that, in the second modernity, we are facing new post-bureaucratic ways of education governance to achieve improvements. The so-called "educational restructuring" assumes, in fact, a new "governance" of education, which includes - among others - deregulation, commercialization and introduction of management principles of business scope. Are analyzed two routes of developing to generate improvement: one that favors competition, using commercial image as regulatin...

  12. Family Education as an Element to Improve Quality of Life of Children with Special Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Kokle-Narbuta, Iveta

    2015-01-01

    The current research aims to analyse the importance of family education in improving life quality of children with special needs. Nowadays our society aim for sustainable development which means equal rights and possibilities for all the citizens but reality shows a different situation, especially it concerns children with special needs. Family education could be one of possible ways how to improve the quality of life. In the current article the author looks on family education as a solution ...

  13. Evil Act: Politics Domination in Higher Education Universities (Empirical Evidence from Pakistan)

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Syed Akif; Subhani, Muhammad Imtiaz; Osman, Ms. Amber

    2012-01-01

    The social interaction taking place in our society is politics. Essential to any governing bodies, institutions etc. this paper’s forte is to specifically assess the politics phenomenon in the academic institutions of higher education. The involvement of politics in the academic society i.e. staff, faculty and employer has been of interest to this study. Politics can be liberal and conservative depending on the individuals running and other perceiving it, which gives birth to the argumentati...

  14. First Nations, Metis, and Inuit Education: The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement Approach to Improve Indigenous Education in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Thelma M.; Pomahac, Guy; Striker, Evelyn Good; Tailfeathers, Johnel

    2011-01-01

    The education of minority students is of considerable interest within the literature. Ensuring that all children receive quality programming and that they successfully graduate from school is of concern for parents, educational stakeholders, and society alike. In Canada, the indigenous populations of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit (FNMI) students…

  15. Educating, Enrolling, And Engaging: The State Of Marketplace Consumer Assistance Under The Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Rachel; Schlesinger, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Programs created under the Affordable Care Act to connect consumers to health care coverage represent an unprecedented public-sector investment. State-level implementation of these programs has varied greatly, making it possible to learn from differences in strategy and performance. In this article we assess the current state of Marketplace enrollment assistance, synthesizing evidence from published evaluations (largely derived from grey literature) and analyses of data from nationwide surveys of assisters. Synthesis of this evidence suggests that assister programs play a vital role supporting consumers in the new Marketplaces, particularly when assisters maintain extended ongoing relationships with consumers; assisters come from and are situated within communities they serve; local programs are well coordinated; and postenrollment issues can be addressed. Stable funding commitments, year-round employment, and enriched training were identified as crucial long-run strategies for building a more professional assister workforce and stronger infrastructure. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  16. Long-term functional improvements in the 2-year treatment of schizophrenia outpatients with olanzapine long-acting injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascher-Svanum H

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Haya Ascher-Svanum,1 Diego Novick,2,3 Josep Maria Haro,4 Jordan Bertsch,4 David McDonnell,1 Holland Detke11Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 3Departament de Psiquiatria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain; 4Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en el Área de Salud Mental, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainBackground: Little is known about the long-term changes in the functioning of schizophrenia patients receiving maintenance therapy with olanzapine long-acting injection (LAI, and whether observed changes differ from those seen with oral olanzapine.Methods: This study describes changes in the levels of functioning among outpatients with schizophrenia treated with olanzapine-LAI compared with oral olanzapine over 2 years. This was a secondary analysis of data from a multicenter, randomized, open-label, 2-year study comparing the long-term treatment effectiveness of monthly olanzapine-LAI (405 mg/4 weeks; n=264 with daily oral olanzapine (10 mg/day; n=260. Levels of functioning were assessed with the Heinrichs–Carpenter Quality of Life Scale. Functional status was also classified as “good”, “moderate”, or “poor”, using a previous data-driven approach. Changes in functional levels were assessed with McNemar’s test and comparisons between olanzapine-LAI and oral olanzapine employed the Student’s t-test. Results: Over the 2-year study, the patients treated with olanzapine-LAI improved their level of functioning (per Quality of Life total score from 64.0–70.8 (P<0.001. Patients on oral ­olanzapine also increased their level of functioning from 62.1–70.1 (P<0.001. At baseline, 19.2% of the olanzapine-LAI-treated patients had a “good” level of functioning, which increased to 27.5% (P<0.05. The figures for oral olanzapine were 14.2% and 24.5%, respectively (P<0.001. Results did not significantly differ between

  17. Improving adherence with deferoxamine regimen in thalassemia major using education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Pouladfar

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subcutaneous deferoxamine is the first line for management of iron overload in thalassemia major. There is a wide deferoxamine adherence variation in patients with thalassemia major. In order to assess the effect of education on patients and their parents, a cognitive approach was used. Methods: In a randomized control trial, 78 consecutive patients with thalassemia major were randomly divided into educational (38 cases, 50% male and 50% female and control (40 cases, 65% male and 35% female groups. Oral and practical education sessions for deferoxamine injection were planned. Deferoxamine usage, pump function, side effects, knowledge levels of the patients and their parents, and ferritin serum levels were assessed before and after the trail. The knowledge was also evaluated promptly after educational sessions. Results: the mean age of experimental and control groups were 14.6 and 13.0 years, respectively. There was no significant difference in age, sex and weight (P>0.05 at the end of the study, there was no significant change in the level of knowledge in both groups however, the patients who used deferoxamine at least 5 times a week were increased in the experimental group (P0.001. Conclusion: A cognitive approach had relatively significant effect on deferoxamine adherence. However, educational sessions had not dramatic change in knowledge levels of the patients and their parents, but oral and practical education produced a significant change in decreasing local side effects of subcutaneous deferoxamine in thalassemia major.

  18. Compulsory Education in Italian Middle School Music Departments and the Music Education Act : Textbooks Associated with the 1963 Program and Guide to Music Education

    OpenAIRE

    Onouchi, Ai

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the requirements for music education as part of general education in Italy through an assessment of the 1963 program, the music textbooks published by Ricordi during the implementation of that program, and the Guide to Music Education textbooks. I found that the textbooks focused on music theory, although the 1963 program emphasized practical training of students with a love of music. Further, the Guide to Music Education series was published specifically for use in...

  19. Compulsory Education in Italian Middle School Music Departments and the Music Education Act : Textbooks Associated with the 1963 Program and Guide to Music Education

    OpenAIRE

    大野内, 愛

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the requirements for music education as part of general education in Italy through an assessment of the 1963 program, the music textbooks published by Ricordi during the implementation of that program, and the Guide to Music Education textbooks. I found that the textbooks focused on music theory, although the 1963 program emphasized practical training of students with a love of music. Further, the Guide to Music Education series was published specifically for use in...

  20. Improving Financial Literacy : case Study of Financial Education in Schools in Estonia

    OpenAIRE

    Rabtsinski, Deniss

    2010-01-01

    The thesis discusses the problem of low financial literacy levels that people have in today's world and how financial literacy levels can be improved through school education. It is identified that financial literacy is a complex problem requiring a complex solution (which is yet to be discovered). Financial education can only be part of this complex solution. Even so, financial education encounters similar problems as traditional education: the decay of knowledge and effective retention of l...

  1. Learner-centred medical education: Improved learning or increased stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle; Gibbs, Trevor J

    2009-12-01

    Globally, as medical education undergoes significant reform towards more "learner-centred" approaches, specific implications arise for medical educators and learners. Although this learner-centredness is grounded in educational theory, a point of discussion would be whether the application and practice of these new curricula alleviate or exacerbate student difficulties and levels of stress. This commentary will argue that while this reform in medical education is laudable, with positive implications for learning, medical educators may not have understood or perhaps not embraced "learner-centredness" in its entirety. During their training, medical students are expected to be "patient-centred". They are asked to apply a biopsychosocial model, which takes cognisance of all aspects of a patient's well-being. While many medical schools profess that their curricula reflect these principles, in reality, many may not always practice what they preach. Medical training all too often remains grounded in the biomedical model, with the cognitive domain overshadowing the psychosocial development and needs of learners. Entrusted by parents and society with the education and training of future healthcare professionals, medical education needs to move to a "learner-centred philosophy", in which the "whole" student is acknowledged. As undergraduate and post-graduate students increasingly apply their skills in an international arena, this learner-centredness should equally encapsulate the gender, cultural and religious diversity of both patients and students. Appropriate support structures, role models and faculty development are required to develop skills, attitudes and professional behaviour that will allow our graduates to become caring and sensitive healthcare providers.

  2. Effectiveness of Nutrition Education vs. Non-Nutrition Education Intervention in Improving Awareness Pertaining Iron Deficiency among Anemic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Hafzan; Wan Daud, Wan Nudri; Ahmad, Zulkifli

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to compare the effect between nutrition education intervention and non-nutrition education intervention on awareness regarding iron deficiency among schooling adolescents in Tanah Merah, one of rural district in Kelantan, Malaysia. This study which was started in year 2010 involved 280 respondents (223 girls, 57 boys, age: 16 yr) from schools in Tanah Merah. The selection criteria were based on hemoglobin level (Hb = 7 - 11.9 g/dL for girls; Hb = 7 - 12.9 g/dL for boys). They were divided into 2 groups. The first group received nutrition education package (Nutrition education, NE), whereas another group was entitled to receive non-nutrition education intervention (Non-Nutrition Education, NNE) (supplement only). Both interventions were implemented for 3 months. The changes in awareness among respondents of both groups were evaluated using multi-choices questionnaire. Nutrition education receiver group (NE) demonstrated improvement in awareness at post-intervention. No substantial improvement was demonstrated by the counterpart group (NNE). Multimedia nutrition education program conducted at school setting was in fact practical and effective in improving awareness on iron deficiency among anemic adolescents.

  3. Developing an intervention to prevent acute kidney injury: using the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) service improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Jo; Xu, Gang; Carr, Sue

    2015-03-01

    In the UK, recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines for acute kidney injury point to the need for interventions to help prevent this condition. Effective medicines management is of prime importance in reducing the risk of AKI. Part of this challenge is to increase patients' awareness of their medicines and the possible need to temporarily withhold certain medications when acutely unwell. The objectives were to use a service improvement approach (the Plan, Do, Study, Act cycle) to develop an intervention and to evaluate current delivery of acute kidney injury management and to test and generate new ideas relating to patients' needs. A postal feedback form sent to a random sample of over 200 patients with chronic kidney disease. The feedback form collected information on: what patients know about acute kidney injury and managing medicines; where patients get their information from; whether patients want more information and where from; and what patients feel about self-managing their medicines. Completed feedback forms were received from 113 participants. Of these, 92% said they had received no advice, 77% of respondents wanted more advice but only 17% said they would feel comfortable to stop their own medication without medical consent. The PDSA cycle offered a very useful framework to evaluate the current service delivery and to test and generate new ideas for the development of an AKI intervention. Our findings highlighted that the current service is limited and more robust research is needed. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  4. Brief biopsychosocially informed education can improve insurance workers' back pain beliefs: Implications for improving claims management behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Darren; Mitchell, Tim; Pole, Naomi; Weir, James

    2016-11-22

    Biopsychosocially informed education is associated with improved back pain beliefs and positive changes in health care practitioners' practice behaviours. Assess the effect of this type of education for insurance workers who are important non-clinical stakeholders in the rehabilitation of injured workers. Insurance workers operating in the Western Australian workers' compensation system underwent two, 1.5 hour sessions of biopsychosocially informed education focusing on understanding and identifying barriers to recovery of injured workers with musculoskeletal conditions. Back pain beliefs were assessed pre-education, immediately post-education and at three-month follow-up (n = 32). Self-reported and Injury Management Advisor-reported assessment of change in claims management behaviours were collected at the three-month follow-up. There were positive changes in the Health Care Providers' Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale (p = 0.009) and Back Beliefs Questionnaire (p = 0.049) immediately following the education that were sustained at three-month follow-up. Positive changes in claims management behaviours were supported by self-reported and Injury Management Advisor-reported data. This study provides preliminary support that a brief biopsychosocially informed education program can positively influence insurance workers' beliefs regarding back pain, with concurrent positive changes in claims management behaviours. Further research is required to ascertain if these changes result in improved claims management outcomes.

  5. Is the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act Really Beneficial to the Poorer Children in India? An Analysis with Special Reference to the Admission of Poorer Children in Public Unaided Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvalath, Reena

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed to examine whether the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act can achieve its major objective of ensuring education for all children in India. Indian parents like to enter their wards into private schools because they believe that the standard of education in the public schools is poor. The act strengthens this…

  6. 34 CFR 300.4 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 300.4 Section 300.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES... Definitions Used in This Part § 300.4 Act. Act means the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as...

  7. Taking an educational psychology course improves neuroscience literacy but does not reduce belief in neuromyths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Joo-Yun; Dubinsky, Janet M.

    2018-01-01

    Educators are increasingly interested in applying neuroscience findings to improve educational practice. However, their understanding of the brain often lags behind their enthusiasm for the brain. We propose that educational psychology can serve as a bridge between basic research in neuroscience and psychology on one hand and educational practice on the other. We evaluated whether taking an educational psychology course is associated with increased neuroscience literacy and reduced belief in neuromyths in a sample of South Korean pre-service teachers. The results showed that taking an educational psychology course was associated with the increased neuroscience literacy, but there was no impact on belief in neuromyths. We consider the implications of these and other findings of the study for redesigning educational psychology courses and textbooks for improving neuroscience literacy. PMID:29401508

  8. Taking an educational psychology course improves neuroscience literacy but does not reduce belief in neuromyths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Soo-Hyun; Cho, Joo-Yun; Dubinsky, Janet M; Varma, Sashank

    2018-01-01

    Educators are increasingly interested in applying neuroscience findings to improve educational practice. However, their understanding of the brain often lags behind their enthusiasm for the brain. We propose that educational psychology can serve as a bridge between basic research in neuroscience and psychology on one hand and educational practice on the other. We evaluated whether taking an educational psychology course is associated with increased neuroscience literacy and reduced belief in neuromyths in a sample of South Korean pre-service teachers. The results showed that taking an educational psychology course was associated with the increased neuroscience literacy, but there was no impact on belief in neuromyths. We consider the implications of these and other findings of the study for redesigning educational psychology courses and textbooks for improving neuroscience literacy.

  9. Taking an educational psychology course improves neuroscience literacy but does not reduce belief in neuromyths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Hyun Im

    Full Text Available Educators are increasingly interested in applying neuroscience findings to improve educational practice. However, their understanding of the brain often lags behind their enthusiasm for the brain. We propose that educational psychology can serve as a bridge between basic research in neuroscience and psychology on one hand and educational practice on the other. We evaluated whether taking an educational psychology course is associated with increased neuroscience literacy and reduced belief in neuromyths in a sample of South Korean pre-service teachers. The results showed that taking an educational psychology course was associated with the increased neuroscience literacy, but there was no impact on belief in neuromyths. We consider the implications of these and other findings of the study for redesigning educational psychology courses and textbooks for improving neuroscience literacy.

  10. Recovery Act - An Interdisciplinary Program for Education and Outreach in Transportation Electrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Carl [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Bohmann, Leonard [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Naber, Jeffrey [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Beard, John [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Passerello, Chris [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Worm, Jeremy [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Chen, Bo [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Allen, Jeffrey [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Weaver, Wayne [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Hackney, Stephen [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Keith, Jason [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Meldrum, Jay [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Mork, Bruce [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    2013-01-30

    1) How the project adds to the education of engineering students in the area of vehicle electrification: This project created and implemented a significant interdisciplinary curriculum in HEV engineering that includes courses focused on the major components (engines, battery cells, e-machines, and power electronics). The new curriculum, rather uniquely, features two new classes and two new labs that emphasize a vehicle level integration of a hybrid electric powertrain that parallels the vehicle development process used by the OEMs - commercial grade software is used to design a hybrid electric vehicle, hardware-in-the-loop testing is performed on each component until the entire powertrain is optimized, the calibration is flashed to a vehicle, ride-and-drives are executed including on board data acquisition. In addition, nine existing courses were modified by adding HEV material to the courses. 2) The educational effectiveness and economic feasibility of the new curriculum: The new courses are offered at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. They are listed across the college in mechanical, chemical, electrical, and materials science and engineering. They are offered both on campus and to distance learning students. Students across the college of engineering and at all degree levels are integrating these courses into their degree programs. Over the three year project the course enrollments on-campus has totaled 1,249. The distance learning enrollments has totaled 315. With such robust enrollments we absolutely expect that these courses will be in the curriculum for the long run. 3) How the project is otherwise of benefit to the public: One outcome of the project is the construction of the Michigan Tech Mobile Lab. Two complete HEV dynamometer test cells, and four work stations are installed in the 16.2 meter Mobile Laboratory and hauled by a class 8 truck. The Mobile Lab is used to teach the university courses. It is also used to deliver short courses to

  11. Patient perspectives about bariatric surgery unveil experiences, education, satisfaction, and recommendations for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groller, Karen D; Teel, Cynthia; Stegenga, Kristin H; El Chaar, Maher

    2018-02-17

    Following bariatric surgery, up to 35% of patients struggle with strict regimens and experience weight recidivism within 2 years [1-5]. Accredited weight management centers (WMC) must provide educational programs and support patients in lifestyle changes before and after surgery. Educational programs, however, may not be evidence-based or patient-centered and may vary in curriculum, approach, and educator type [6]. To obtain patient descriptions about the weight loss surgery (WLS) experience, including education, satisfaction, and recommendations for improvement. Participants were recruited from a university hospital-based WMC in Pennsylvania. This qualitative descriptive study used purposive sampling and inductive content analysis. A NEW ME-VERSION 2.0, encompassed themes from semistructured interviews with 11 participants (36% male). Theme 1: Programming and Tools, explained how individuals undergoing WLS found support through educational programming. Theme 2: Updates and Upgrades, identified issues surrounding quality of life and challenges before and after surgery. Theme 3: Lessons Learned and Future Considerations, identified satisfaction levels and recommendations for improving the WLS experience. Participants reported positive experiences, acknowledging educational programs and extensive WMC resources, yet also offered recommendations for improving educational programming. Patient narratives provided evidence about the WLS experience. Achievement of weight goals, adherence to rules, and improved health status contributed to perceptions of WLS success. Participants encouraged educators to identify expected outcomes of educational programming, monitor holistic transformations, foster peer support, and use technology in WMC programming. Results also validated the need for the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program's education requirement (standard 5.1). Future educational research could help develop best practices in WLS

  12. Improving Educational Outcomes for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christina; Kabler, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Recent statistics estimate that there are 783,000 children living in foster care in the United States. This vulnerable population is at risk for academic failure as well as internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems. Compared to their peers, foster youth face significant educational difficulties, including lower levels of academic…

  13. High-Leverage Leadership: Improving Outcomes in Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongon, Denis; Chapman, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Globalisation of world trade, international media, technological innovation and social change are creating opportunities and challenges that today's pupils will inherit and build on. A pupil's academic, technical and social capacity will define their success or failure. Therefore, educational outcomes and well-being for young people across…

  14. Improving Intercultural Education at Chinese Institutions from German Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lihe

    2015-01-01

    In this reflection paper, Lihe Huang describes his experience studying abroad in Germany as a visiting scholar. Through the well-designed introductory seminar and study tour arranged by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, which provided the grant for Huang's research on foreign languages teaching and intercultural education in Germany, he…

  15. Applying Diversity Management Concepts to Improve the Minority Educational Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntebi, Joy; Shcherbakova, Maria; Wooten, Lynn P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this conceptual article is to investigate existing diversity management paradigms and extend their implications toward the goal of increasing minority representation in management education. We suggest that the existing learning-and-effectiveness diversity management paradigm (Thomas & Ely, 1996, "Harvard Business…

  16. Enabling Process Improvement and Control in Higher Education Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Gary; Warwick, Jon; Kennedy, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of "managerialism" in the governance and direction of UK higher education (HE) institutions has been led by government demands for greater accountability in the quality and cost of universities. There is emerging anecdotal evidence indicating that the estimation performance of HE spreadsheets and regression models are poor.…

  17. Accreditation in the Netherlands: Does Accountability Improve Educational Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, Henk; Wijnen, Wynand

    2010-01-01

    This article traces the changes in quality assurance within the Dutch higher education system. It starts with a brief history of the development of the Dutch accreditation system, which is the latest step in a process that started with an external quality assurance system. This is followed by an extensive description of the present accreditation…

  18. Effectiveness, Improvement and Educational Change: A Distinctively Canadian Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Andy; Fink, Dean

    1998-01-01

    A distinctive Canadian school of thought on educational change is inclined to synthesize diverse bodies of work and integrate nonrational and emotional dimensions with rational and technically effective ones in a socially critical way. Highlights the Canadian perspective through discussions about complex systems, contexts of change, critical…

  19. Metacognition and Transfer: Keys to Improving Marketing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramocki, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    A primary purpose of marketing education is to prepare students to perform throughout their careers, and performance largely relies on transferability of knowledge. It has been demonstrated that training in metacognition, along with emphasis on transfer, does lead to increased probability that knowledge will be transferred into environments…

  20. Improving the Postsecondary Educational Attainment of Youth in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy

    2018-01-01

    This chapter examines what we know about the disparity in postsecondary educational attainment between youth in foster care and their non-foster care peers, the reasons for it, and the policies and programs that have been developed to address that disparity. It also discusses the unique role that community colleges can play in reducing this…

  1. Improving the Relationship between Continuing Education Leadership and Marketing Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Jim

    2009-01-01

    In this economy, college and university continuing education units will not automatically reap the benefits of returning adult learners as in past recessions: this economy caused a drastic reduction of resources available to the workforce and for personal revenue. As a result of decreased personal income and workforce training funding, competition…

  2. Winning the Future: Improving Education for the Latino Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The White House, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In his State of the Union, the President made it clear that the most important contest this country faces today is not between Democrats and Republicans, but with competitors around the world for the jobs and industries of our time. To win that contest and secure prosperity for all Americans, the nation must out-innovate, out-educate, and…

  3. Traditional and formal education: Means of improving grasscutter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study concludes that both traditional and non-formal education are important for the development and efficiency of grasscutter farming in Ogun Waterside Local Government Area of Ogun State. The following are the recommendations of the study: revision of the curriculum of formal schools to include items that inculcate ...

  4. Suggestions for Improving Ugandan Higher Education to Produce ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Every country invests in formal education to develop and empower its citizens with the capacity needed to practically work and transform their surrounding environmental resources into productive employment after graduation. The high and growing rate of graduate unemployment in Uganda suggests however, that most of ...

  5. Improving Sexuality Education: The Development of Teacher-Preparation Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Elissa M.; Goldfarb, Eva S.; Russell, Susan; Seabert, Denise; Wallen, Michele; Wilson, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Teaching sexuality education to support young people's sexual development and overall sexual health is both needed and supported. Data continue to highlight the high rates of teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, among young people in the United States as well as the…

  6. Workplace Financial Education Facilitates Improvement in Personal Financial Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawitz, Aimee D.; Cohart, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Based on the life-cycle theory of consumption, this quasi-experimental study of 995 employees examined changes in financial behaviors following employee-needs-driven workplace financial education. Repeated-measures ANOVA compared participants and non-participants on perceived financial wellness and savings ratios; main effects indicated that both…

  7. Using Data Mining Results to Improve Educational Video Game Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    This study uses information about in-game strategy use, identified through cluster analysis of actions in an educational video game, to make data-driven modifications to the game in order to reduce construct-irrelevant behavior. The examination of student strategies identified through cluster analysis indicated that (a) it was common for students…

  8. Education in patient-physician communication : How to improve effectiveness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouda, Jan C.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.

    Objective: Despite educational efforts expertise in communication as required by the CanMEDS competency framework is not achieved by medical students and residents. Several factors complicate the learning of professional communication. Methods: We adapted the reflective impulsive model of social

  9. Improving Financial Education and Awareness on Insurance and Private Pensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    With public pensions under pressure and private pensions exposed to risk, individuals face an increasing variety of financial risks, particularly those linked to their retirement. This book analyzes the level of risk awareness of consumers and highlights good practices governments might initiate to enhance consumers' awareness and education on…

  10. Understanding the History of Marketing Education to Improve Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, O. C.; Hair, Joe F., Jr.; Marshall, Greg W.; Tamilia, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a review of the history of marketing education. Some of the pioneers who developed concepts and pedagogical material used in teaching marketing are identified and some schools of thought are reviewed, namely, the commodity, institutional, and functional schools, as well as marketing management. During the early part of the…

  11. Improving Finance for Qatari Education Reform. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Galama, Titus; Constant, Louay; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Tanner, Jeffery C.; Goldman, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Qatar's education reform, which included implementation of a new finance system, appears to be providing schools with adequate funding but is still struggling with issues of transparency and swift policy shifts that have been difficult to accommodate. [For full report, "Developing a School Finance System for K-12 Reform in Qatar", see…

  12. Development research applied to improve motivation in distance education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Lya; Plomp, Tjeerd; Kuiper, Wilmad

    1999-01-01

    This study introduced motivational strategies in the student support system of a distance education program, offered by the University of London (England) and implemented by the International Extension College in Cambridge (England). The program prepares international students for a diploma or

  13. Improving Sustainable Living Education through the Use of Formative Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynveen, Brooklynn J.

    2017-01-01

    Experts agree that overconsumption is a major problem in Western culture today, particularly in the United States. Thus, it is important to promote sustainable behaviour among the general public. However, existing educational programming geared towards promoting such behaviour remains appealing largely to environmentally motivated audiences, as…

  14. ICT Integration in Education: Incorporation for Teaching & Learning Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavifekr, Simin; Razak, Ahmad Zabidi Abd; Ghani, Muhammad Faizal A.; Ran, Ng Yan; Meixi, Yao; Tengyue, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the rapid growth of ICT has become one of the most important topics discussed by the scholars in education. This is due to the capability of ICT in providing a dynamic and proactive teaching and learning environment. In line with the current digital era, teachers are required to integrate ICT in their daily teaching and…

  15. Qualified Pedagogical Reflection as a Way to Improve Mathematics Education

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichá, Marie; Hošpesová, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2006), s. 129-156 ISSN 1386-4416 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA406/05/2444 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : self-reflection * joint reflection * professional knowledge of teachers Subject RIV: AM - Education

  16. Improving education: just-in-time splinting video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Vincent; Cheng, Yu-Tsun; Liu, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Just-in-time training (JITT) is an emerging concept in medical procedural education, but with few studies to support its routine use. Providing a brief educational intervention in the form of a digital video immediately prior to patient care may be an effective method to reteach knowledge for procedural techniques learned previously. Paediatric resident physicians were taught to perform a volar splint in a small workshop setting. Subsequently, they were asked to demonstrate their splinting proficiency by performing a splint on another doctor. Proficiency was scored on a five-point assessment tool. After 2-12 months, participants were asked to demonstrate their splinting proficiency on one of the investigators, and were divided into the control group (no further instruction) and the intervention group, which viewed a 3-minute JITT digital video demonstrating the splinting technique prior to performing the procedure. Thirty subjects were enrolled between August 2012 and July 2013, and 29 of 30 completed the study. The retest splinting time was not significantly different, but if the JITT group included watching the video, the total time difference was statistically significant: 3.86 minutes (control) versus 7.07 minutes (JITT) (95% confidence interval: 2.20-3.90 minutes). The average assessment score difference was 1.87 points higher for the JITT group, which was a statistically significant difference (95% confidence interval: 1.00-3.00). Just-in-time training is an emerging concept in medical procedural education JITT seems to be an effective tool in medical education for reinforcing previously learned skills. JITT may offer other possibilities for enhancing medical education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Improving teamwork between students from two professional programmes in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisnert, L; Karlsson, M; Franklin, I; Lindh, L; Wretlind, K

    2012-02-01

    In Sweden, the National Board of Health and Welfare forecasts a decrease in dentists with 26% and an increase in dental hygienists with 47% until the year of 2023. This, together with changes in both epidemiology, especially of dental caries, and political priorities, calls for an effective and well-developed cooperation between dentists and dental hygienists in future dentistry. Hence, the aim of this project was to investigate whether highlighting teamwork during the undergraduate studies of dental students and dental hygiene students could improve the students' holistic view on patients as well as their knowledge of and insight into each other's future professions. Thirty-four dental students and 24 dental hygiene students participated in the study. At the beginning of their final year in undergraduate education, a questionnaire testing the level of knowledge of the dental hygienists' clinical competences was completed by both groups of students. In addition, activities intending to improve teamwork quality included the following: (i) a seminar with a dentist representing the Public Dental Health Services in Sweden, (ii) dental students as supervisors for dental hygiene students, (iii) planning and treatment for shared patients and (iv) students' presentations of the treatments and their outcomes at a final seminar. The project was ended by the students answering the above-mentioned questionnaire for the second time, followed by an evaluation of the different activities included in the study. The knowledge of dental hygienists' competences showed higher scores in almost all questions. Both groups of students considered the following aspects important: seminars with external participants, dental students acting as supervisors and planning and treating shared patients. By initiating and encouraging teamwork between dental students and dental hygiene students, it is possible to increase knowledge on dental hygienists' competence and also to develop and strengthen a

  18. Chemomobilization: Overview of an Educational Quality Improvement Project for Recipients of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Zandra R; Nurse, Rachelle; Fellman, Bryan; Brunelle, Nicole; Brassil, Kelly J

    2017-08-01

    In preparation for an autologous stem cell transplantation, patients undergo chemomobilization; however, a dearth of standardized, evidence-based patient education on chemomobilization exists in the literature and in practice.
. The purpose of this quality improvement educational initiative is to identify an 
evidence-based approach to appraise the educational needs of patients and their caregivers and to enhance chemomobilization education. 
. A review of the literature related to chemomobilization was conducted, as well as an informal survey of educational practices at five 
National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers. A 14-item survey was administered to 50 patients who underwent chemomobilization to assess their educational needs, experiences, and preferences. 
. Patients prefer written information to review. Receiving verbal education from reliable healthcare providers in a structured format may enhance effective comprehension and retention. Patients identified timing, process, side effects, and expectations about chemomobilization as the most important topics to include in education.

  19. [A blood glucose slide chart for improving diabetes patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potteau, Marie-Hélène

    2015-03-01

    A blood glucose slide chart has been developed in order to help patients with type 2 diabetes who do not speak French or who have comprehension difficulties. Combined with pictograms to help patients visualise the action they need to take depending on the recorded glucose level, it constitutes a therapeutic education tool which can be useful on a day-to-day basis both for patients as well as caregivers.

  20. Preoperative teaching and stoma marking in an inpatient population: a quality improvement process using a FOCUS-Plan-Do-Check-Act model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnicki, Katherine M

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative teaching and stoma marking are supported by research and included in clinical practice guidelines from the WOCN Society and others. Using a FOCUS-Plan-Do-Check-Act model of Total Quality Management, a multidisciplinary team was formed that developed a flow chart outlining the process of care for patients undergoing planned ostomy surgery that included an educational intervention that enabled staff nurses to perform preoperative stoma site marking and education. After 3 months, we found a statistically significant increase in the number of surgical patients who received these evidence-based interventions (14% vs 64%; χ = 9.32; P = .002).

  1. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes have been compiled and circulated to health care workers, but ... studied and attempted to improve the quality of diabetes care in primary care ..... project indicators in the Indian Health Service primary care setting. Diabetes Care ...

  2. Special Education and Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Dyslexia Special Education and Research Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Special Education Services The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act ( ...

  3. Meeting Overlapping Requirements of the Quality Management System and Act 304 at SINAGAMMA, ALURTRON and RAYMINTEX: An Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nik Arlina Nik Ali; Nurul Huda Mudri; Rohaizah Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Sinagama, Alurtron and Raymintex are three facilities at Nuclear Malaysia using high radiation sources to provide irradiation service to customers. These three facilities have to fulfill both the requirements of the MS ISO 9001:2008 standard and the legal requirements of Act 304. To fulfill the requirements of the applicable Act 304, scheduled radiation monitoring on personnel, work place and environment should be carried out. This paper will discuss the effectiveness of the management in fulfilling the requirements of ISO 9001 standard and Act 304 regarding the safety of workers and the environment. (author)

  4. THE PROJECT OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND METHODICAL MANAGEMENT AUTOMATIZATION IN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION AS A TERM OF EDUCATION PROCESS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анна Игоревна Яценко

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the practice of information technologies implementation in the educational process according to the condition of educational informatization. The actuality of main article concept is confirmed by the trend of widespread introduction of information technologies in education both from the state and from business. Taking into account the increased attention to acquiring of high results in the educational process, the information technology tools allows to significantly improve the quality of education. In this regard, the article provides examples of various information systems using in order to administer educational process, their advantages and disadvantages. In consequence, the author formulates the problem of lack of integrated information systems. However, the development of information technologies is oriented towards a worldwide network, which has an access to a vast audience of users. Educational institutions are involved in the electronic process supported by an electronic environment of the educational development. As a result of the issue study above and the modern trends review in the article the author suggests a project description of educational organization management optimization with the help of the integrated information system use on the Internet.

  5. Projects to Improve Air Quality at Ports – 2014 Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) Funding Opportunity - Closed Announcement FY 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    OTAQ is soliciting proposals that achieve reductions in diesel emissions produced by diesel engines and diesel emissions exposure, from fleets operating at marine and inland water ports under the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA).

  6. Projects to Improve Air Quality at Ports – 2013 Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) Funding Opportunity - Closed Announcement FY 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    OTAQ is soliciting proposals that achieve reductions in diesel emissions produced by diesel engines and diesel emissions exposure, from fleets operating at marine and inland water ports under the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA).

  7. Clean Water Act (CWA) Action Plan Implementation Priorities: Changes to Improve Water Quality, Increase Compliance and Expand Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Water Act (CWA) Action Plan Implementation Priorities describes the new approaches to revamp the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting, compliance and enforcement program.Issued May 11, 2011

  8. A New School for Brats: Improving the K-12 Education of Military Connected Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Schools: How Technology Can Transform Education (Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2012), ProQuest Ebook Central. 33 allowing the...Hack Education , April 25, 2015. http://hackeducation.com/2015/04/25/factory-model. West, Darrell M. Digital Schools: How Technology Can Transform ...BRATS: IMPROVING THE K–12 EDUCATION OF MILITARY-CONNECTED CHILDREN by Robert G. Stimis September 2017 Thesis Advisor: Rodrigo Nieto

  9. Improve the teaching quality by two-way education mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Teaching activities contain teaching and learning, and both teachers and students have to work hard to improve the quality of teaching. This essay introduced the basic conception of “two-way and five-ring” mode first, and expatiated on the structure of this mode. The author used her own experiences to combine the teaching mode with the real situation of military school, emphasized teaching itself and talked about some spe-cific plans. This will give a certain extend help in improving the quality of teaching in military school.

  10. QUALITY IMPROVEMENT MODEL OF NURSING EDUCATION IN MUHAMMADIYAH UNIVERSITIES TOWARD COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Aziz Alimul Hidayat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most of (90,6% nursing education quality in East Java was still low (BAN-PT, 2012. It was because the quality improvement process in nursing education generally was conducted partially (random performance improvement. The solution which might be done was through identifying proper quality improvement model in Nursing Education toward competitive advantage. Method: This research used survey to gain the data. The research sample was 16 Muhammadiyah Universities chosen using simple random sampling. The data were collected with questionnaires of 174 questions and documentation study. Data analysis used was Partial Least Square (PLS analysis technique. Result: Nursing education department profile in Muhammadiyah Universities in Indonesia showed of 10 years establishment, accredited B and the competition level in one city/regency was averagely more than three Universities becoming the competitors. Based on the quality improvement model analysis of nursing education toward competitive advantage on Muhammadiyah Universities, it was directly affected by the focus of learning and operasional process through human resources management improvement, on the other hand information system also directly affected on quality improvement, also affected quality process components; leadership, human resources, focus of learning and operational process. In improving human resources would be directly influenced with proper strategic planning. Strategic planning was directly influenced with leadership. Thus, in improving quality of nursing education, the leadership role of department, proper information system, and thehuman resources management improvement must be implemented.  Conclusion: Quality improvement model in nursing education was directly determined with learning and operational process through human resources management along with information system, strategic planning factors, and leadership. The research finding could be developed in quality

  11. A Collaborative Governance Approach to Improving Tertiary Education in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Kaye; Larry, Lisa; Baird, Jeanette; Kavanamur, David

    2018-01-01

    Tertiary education in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is in a critical state, as the sector struggles to address increased demand for student places with severely curtailed capacity. Recent thinking about improving public services in PNG has emphasized "whole of sector" or collaborative governance. Such an approach in tertiary education has the…

  12. Improving Service Quality in Technical Education: Use of Interpretive Structural Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Roma Mitra; Shankar, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the relevant enablers and barriers related to technical education. It seeks to critically analyze the relationship amongst them so that policy makers can focus on relevant parameters to improve the service quality of technical education. Design/methodology/approach: The present study employs the…

  13. Improving Special Education Teacher Retention: Implications from a Decade of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Bonnie S.

    2002-01-01

    A review of the research on the shortage of special education teachers and the role of attrition leads to eight recommendations to improve special educators' work environments and increase retention. Four of these recommendations are: hire certified teachers; use salaries and bonuses as incentives to remain; develop responsive induction programs…

  14. Practical Recommendations to Improve the Quality of Training and Methodical Support of Professional Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Valery V.; Grudtsina, Ludmila Yu.; Marchuk, Nikolay N.; Sangadgiev, Badma V.; Kudyashev, Nail K.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the transition to the knowledge society and new demands for training and methodical provision of professional pedagogical education. The purpose of this paper is to develop practical recommendations to improve the quality of training and methodical support of professional pedagogical education. The leading…

  15. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Jersey's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  16. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Hampshire's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  17. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Mexico's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  18. Education and the Economy: Boosting New York's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  19. Using Mobile Phones to Improve Educational Outcomes: An Analysis of Evidence from Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valk, John-Harmen; Rashid, Ahmed T.; Elder, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Despite improvements in educational indicators, such as enrolment, significant challenges remain with regard to the delivery of quality education in developing countries, particularly in rural and remote regions. In the attempt to find viable solutions to these challenges, much hope has been placed in new information and communication technologies…

  20. Improving Student Teachers' Knowledge-Base in Language Education through Critical Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulumba, Mathias Bwanika

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of the digital era is redefining education and the pedagogical processes in an unpredictable manner. In the midst of the increased availability of print and online resources, the twenty-first century language teacher educator expects her (or his) student teachers to be reading beings if they are to improve their knowledge-base in…

  1. Educational Information Quantization for Improving Content Quality in Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybanov, Alexander Aleksandrovich

    2014-01-01

    The article offers the educational information quantization method for improving content quality in Learning Management Systems. The paper considers questions concerning analysis of quality of quantized presentation of educational information, based on quantitative text parameters: average frequencies of parts of speech, used in the text; formal…

  2. The Role of Christian Educational Institutions in Improving Economic Self-Reliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Constance C.

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that Christian educational institutions in Africa can play a major role in improving economic self-reliance within the continent, if those who establish Christian universities there take time to plan the programs and activities in those institutions. Specifically, it argues that with proper planning of quality education--the…

  3. Effects on in-service education on improving science teaching in Swaziland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronkhorst, Robert; van den Akker, Jan

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of an evaluative and interpretive study into the potential of in-service education to improve science education in Swaziland. Short-term and long-term effects of an in-service intervention are evaluated in terms of changes in classroom processes. The teaching

  4. Quality Education Improvement: Yemen and the Problem of the "Brain Drain"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthanna, Abdulghani

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the problems that hinder improvement of the quality of education in Yemen, with a particular focus on higher education institutions. It discusses in particular the problem of the brain drain and why this phenomenon is occurring in Yemen. Semi-structured interviews with three professors at higher education…

  5. Leading Educational Change and Improvement at Scale: Some Inconvenient Truths about System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alma; Jones, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The challenges of securing educational change and transformation, at scale, remain considerable. While sustained progress has been made in some education systems (Fullan, 2009; Hargreaves & Shirley, 2009) generally, it remains the case that the pathway to large-scale, system improvement is far from easy or straightforward. While large-scale…

  6. Re-Culturing Educator Preparation Programs: A Collaborative Case Study of Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Jennifer; Dismuke, Sherry; Zenkert, A. J.; Loffer, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    Teacher educators at one institution of higher education collaborated to reculture systems for a focus on continuous improvement even within mounting accountability pressures. A framework of social network theory allowed for themes to develop around layered interactions of faculty, processes, and professional capital. Findings focused on people,…

  7. From Curricular Justice to Educational Improvement: What Is the Role of Schools' Self-Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Marta; Leite, Carlinda

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a study that aimed to understand the contributions of self-evaluation (SE) processes towards the development of curricular and social justice and educational improvement. The study focuses on data collected from the schools' external evaluation (SEE) process and from the TEIP programme (Educational Territories of Priority…

  8. Ideation Training via Innovation Education to Improve Students' Ethical Maturation and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Gisli

    2013-01-01

    This paper will represent the pedagogy of Innovation Education in Iceland that is a new school policy within the Icelandic school system. In Innovation Education (IE) students are trained to identify needs and problems in their environment and to find solutions: this is referred to as the process of ideation. The main aim is to improve their…

  9. Continuous Improvement in Online Education: Documenting Teaching Effectiveness in the Online Environment through Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Jennifer W.; Scott, Heather I.; Mixson-Brookshire, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Teaching observations are commonly used among educators to document and improve teaching effectiveness. Unfortunately, the necessary protocols and supporting infrastructure are not consistently available for faculty who teach online. This paper presents a brief literature review and reflective narratives of educators representing online education…

  10. Proactive educational reforms in South Korea: Schools for Improvement and multicultural education

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hye-Won

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This paper discusses the educational issues and societal changes that have led to proactive reforms in the education system of South Korea. Korean pupils achieve high academic levels, but there have been some criticisms relating to sociocultural issues. In addition, Korea is being transformed into a multicultural society. Here we consider two examples of Korea’s educational interventions, introduced in response to contextual demands and societal changes: firstly, the Schools for...

  11. Improving student-perceived benefit of academic advising within education of occupational and physical therapy in the United States: a quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Lisa J; Parish, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Academic advising is a key role for faculty in the educational process of health professionals; however, the best practice of effective academic advising for occupational and physical therapy students has not been identified in the current literature. The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to assess and improve the faculty/student advisor/advisee process within occupational and physical therapy programs within a school of allied health professions in the United States in 2015. A quality improvement initiative utilizing quantitative and qualitative information was gathered via survey focused on the assessment and improvement of an advisor/advisee process. The overall initiative utilized an adaptive iterative design incorporating the plan-do-study-act model which included a three-step process over a one year time frame utilizing 2 cohorts, the first with 80 students and the second with 88 students. Baseline data were gathered prior to initiating the new process. A pilot was conducted and assessed during the first semester of the occupational and physical therapy programs. Final information was gathered after one full academic year with final comparisons made to baseline. Defining an effective advisory program with an established framework led to improved awareness and participation by students and faculty. Early initiation of the process combined with increased frequency of interaction led to improved student satisfaction. Based on student perceptions, programmatic policies were initiated to promote advisory meetings early and often to establish a positive relationship. The policies focus on academic advising as one of proactivity in which the advisor serves as a portal which the student may access leading to a more successful academic experience.

  12. Improving student-perceived benefit of academic advising within education of occupational and physical therapy in the United States: a quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Barnes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Academic advising is a key role for faculty in the educational process of health professionals; however, the best practice of effective academic advising for occupational and physical therapy students has not been identified in the current literature. The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to assess and improve the faculty/student advisor/advisee process within occupational and physical therapy programs within a school of allied health professions in the United States in 2015. A quality improvement initiative utilizing quantitative and qualitative information was gathered via survey focused on the assessment and improvement of an advisor/advisee process. The overall initiative utilized an adaptive iterative design incorporating the plan-do-study-act model which included a three-step process over a one year time frame utilizing 2 cohorts, the first with 80 students and the second with 88 students. Baseline data were gathered prior to initiating the new process. A pilot was conducted and assessed during the first semester of the occupational and physical therapy programs. Final information was gathered after one full academic year with final comparisons made to baseline. Defining an effective advisory program with an established framework led to improved awareness and participation by students and faculty. Early initiation of the process combined with increased frequency of interaction led to improved student satisfaction. Based on student perceptions, programmatic policies were initiated to promote advisory meetings early and often to establish a positive relationship. The policies focus on academic advising as one of proactivity in which the advisor serves as a portal which the student may access leading to a more successful academic experience.

  13. Leveraging the Power of Music to Improve Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Gregory J.; McFadden, Tom; Fleming, Jean S.; Davis, Katie

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the impact of music videos with science-based lyrics on content knowledge and attitudes in a three-part experimental research study of over 1000 participants (mostly K-12 students). In Study A, 13 of 15 music videos were followed by statistically significant improvements on questions about material covered in the videos, while…

  14. Educational Technology Research Journals: Performance Improvement Quarterly, 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alisha Rasmussen; Francis, Jenifer; Harrison, J. Buckley; McPhillen, Ammon S.; West, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    This article is an analysis of "Performance Improvement Quarterly" (PIQ) for the years 2001-2010. The intent was to examine the article types used, the authors who contributed the most to the journal, the topics the journal most commonly focused on, and the citation frequency of the journal's articles. The analysis revealed that…

  15. Improving Paramedic Distance Education through Mobile Mixed Reality Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, James; Moore, Emma; Cowling, Michael

    2017-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the use of simulation in teaching is a key means of improving learning, skills, and outcomes, particularly for practical skills. In the health sciences, the use of high-fidelity task trainers has been shown to be ideal for reducing cognitive load and leading to enhanced learning outcomes. However, how do we make…

  16. Student Evaluations of Teaching: Improving Teaching Quality in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammonds, Frank; Mariano, Gina J.; Ammons, Gracie; Chambers, Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    Student evaluations of teaching (SET) are widely used in both North America and the UK as a means of documenting and improving teaching quality. This article discusses current research on SET administration and interpretation in both regions. Sections of the article are dedicated to various problems associated with SETs and how these may be…

  17. Using Linked Data to Drive Education and Training Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data Quality Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    To address key policy and programmatic questions and help improve student and system performance, states must work to link data across the early childhood, postsecondary and workforce (P-20/workforce) spectrum and share this information with appropriate stakeholders. This issue brief highlights current efforts in California, Florida, Indiana, and…

  18. Translational educational research: a necessity for effective health-care improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C; Issenberg, S Barry; Cohen, Elaine R; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Wayne, Diane B

    2012-11-01

    Medical education research contributes to translational science (TS) when its outcomes not only impact educational settings, but also downstream results, including better patient-care practices and improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has demonstrated its role in achieving such distal results. Effective TS also encompasses implementation science, the science of health-care delivery. Educational, clinical, quality, and safety goals can only be achieved by thematic, sustained, and cumulative research programs, not isolated studies. Components of an SBME TS research program include motivated learners, curriculum grounded in evidence-based learning theory, educational resources, evaluation of downstream results, a productive research team, rigorous research methods, research resources, and health-care system acceptance and implementation. National research priorities are served from translational educational research. National funding priorities should endorse the contribution and value of translational education research.

  19. Medicaid's Role in Financing Health Care for Children with Behavioral Health Care Needs in the Special Education System: Implications of the Deficit Reduction Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, David S.; Machefsky, Aliza; Rubin, David; Feudtner, Chris; Pita, Susmita; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recent changes to Medicaid policy may have unintended consequences in the education system. This study estimated the potential financial impact of the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) on school districts by calculating Medicaid-reimbursed behavioral health care expenditures for school-aged children in general and children in special…

  20. Part H of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) for Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families Annual Performance Report, Year IV (1990-1992).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Brian A.; And Others

    This report on the fourth year of Colorado's participation in Part H of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act describes major accomplishments in preparing for full implementation of Part H in Year 5. Accomplishments in the following areas are discussed: state definition of developmental delay, central directory, timetables for serving…

  1. Web Accessibility of the Higher Education Institute Websites Based on the World Wide Web Consortium and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Najma H.

    2014-01-01

    The problem observed in this study is the low level of compliance of higher education website accessibility with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The literature supports the non-compliance of websites with the federal policy in general. Studies were performed to analyze the accessibility of fifty-four sample web pages using automated…

  2. Benchmarking as an Instrument for Improvement of Quality Management in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narimantas Kazimieras Paliulis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Conditioned by globalisation and constant change, higher education institutions (HEIs are forced to pursue new instruments for quality assurance in higher education. States seem to pursue this aim by attempting to create an efficiently operating system of higher education that satisfies needs of diverse societal groups. Quality dimension is the most important element of efficient and effective higher education. From the perspective of a state, assessment and monitoring of quality are instruments for the management of processes of higher education. The article substantiates these statements using the evolution of the dimension of quality in the European and Lithuanian higher education in the course of the Bologna Process. The article also presents a benchmarking method and discusses its development and application tendencies in business organisations. Also, it looks at possibilities to apply this method in higher education. The main aim of this article is to explore benchmarking as an effective instrument for the improvement of performance quality in HEIs and complement the already implemented quality management systems. Another aim is to suggest this method to national agencies for quality assurance in higher education for monitoring and analysis of qualitative changes on the systematic level. The object of the article is the improvement of performance quality in HEIs. Benchmarking is proposed for the use in higher education on the institutional level as an instrument that complements presently introduced quality management systems in Lithuanian HEIs. This way, it will contribute to the formation of the culture of quality in higher education.

  3. Tipping Points and Balancing Acts: Grand Challenges and Synergistic Opportunities of Integrating Research and Education, Science and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, M. S.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The "Grand Challenges" to address Global Change identified by the International Council for Science (ICSU) and its partners through the Earth System Sustainability Initiative-improving forecasting, enhancing and integrating observation systems, confining and minimizing global environmental change, responding effectively to change, as well as innovating and evaluating these efforts-require an integrative approach that engages and inspires society in general and young people in particular. What are some of the effective strategies-and stumbling blocks-in being able to make Earth System science and related sustainability efforts relevant and practical to non-technical audiences? Recent climate education projects have pioneered new strategies toward linking and infusing research with education, science with solutions. For example, the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN), a National Science Digital Library Pathway funded by NSF, has approached this integral approach by "closing the loop" between climate and energy topics, identifying and annotating high quality online resources relating to the carbon cycle and related topics. The Inspiring Climate Education Excellence (ICEE) project, funded by NASA, offers professional development for teachers that infuses climate science with solutions as an emerging "best practice" while being sensitive to the emotional, psychological and political aspects of avoiding "gloom and doom" on one hand or advocating for particular policy solutions on another. Other examples includes NASA's climate website (http://climate.nasa.gov ), which serves as a robust, engaging portal for climate research and data, especially for educators. The recent PBS series Earth: The Operators' Manual and related book and website are other recent example of how climate science research, education and solutions can be incorporated in a way that is appealing and informative. The Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) has given assemblies in

  4. A theoretical framework for improving education in geriatric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreham, N C

    1983-01-01

    Alternative concepts of learning include a formal system in which part of the medical curriculum is designated as that for geriatric medicine; a non-formal system including conferences, lectures, broadcasts, available to both medical students and physicians; and thirdly, an informal system in which doctors learn medicine through their experience practising the profession. While the most emphasis in medical schools would seem to be on the formal system it is essential that medical educators (if they wish their students in later life to maintain high levels of self-initiated learning) must use all three strategies. The structure of a system of formal teaching for geriatric medicine is examined. An important objective is attitude change and it is in achieving this that geriatricians must be particularly involved in non-formal and informal systems.

  5. Information Security in Education: Are We Continually Improving?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Bialaszewski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper will shed light on the lack of the development of appropriate monitoring systems in the field of education. Test banks can be easily purchased. Smart phones can take and share pictures of exams. A video of an exam given through Blackboard can easily be made. A survey to determine the extent of cheating using technology was given to several university students. Evidence is provided that shows security is lacking as evidenced by the number of students who have made use of technological advances to cheat on exams. The findings and conclusion may serve as evidence for administrators and policy makers to re-assess efforts being made to increase security in online testing.

  6. Educate patients on billing policies to improve your bottom line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    In no other industry are the consumers of goods or services so unaware and uninvolved in the reimbursement for the goods or services received. The United States healthcare industry has created and allowed to perpetuate a "hands-off" compensation approach that has created a consumer mentality proving quite difficult to change. In this article, the author describes the origin of this outdated approach and suggests a restructured office and clear communication with patients as starting points to change this deep-rooted mind-set. He describes how an up-front approach to patients' financial responsibilities and proactive staff can help reduce miscommunication between provider, patient, and insurance carrier and improve your practice's cash flow. The author also suggests that the patient's financial burden will continue to increase and offers tips to maintain positive patient relationships, improve your accounts receivable management, and protect you financially.

  7. Improvements in a four factor formula recipe for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1995-05-01

    In introductory reactor physics courses the four-factor-formula and two-group theory is normally used to demonstrate to students in a quantitative way the physics of nuclear reactors. However, the agreement obtained between lattice calculations with such simple recipes and measurements is not very good. This is in particular the case for light water reactors. To improve this situation it has been investigated whether it is possible by relative simple modifications of such a recipe to obtain better agreement between theory and measurements. The results obtained from this investigation are presented in this paper. It is seen from the results that significant improvements in the agreement between measurements and theory have been obtained. This report was presented to the meeting on Reactor Physics Calculations in the Nordic Countries, Helsinki, May 8-9, 1995. (au)

  8. Improving the readability of online foot and ankle patient education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Evan D; Hyde, Zane; Florence, Mason N; McGwin, Gerald; Kirchner, John S; Ponce, Brent A

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown the need for improving the readability of many patient education materials to increase patient comprehension. This study's purpose was to determine the readability of foot and ankle patient education materials and to determine the extent readability can be improved. We hypothesized that the reading levels would be above the recommended guidelines and that decreasing the sentence length would also decrease the reading level of these patient educational materials. Patient education materials from online public sources were collected. The readability of these articles was assessed by a readability software program. The detailed instructions provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) were then used as a guideline for performing edits to help improve the readability of selected articles. The most quantitative guideline, lowering all sentences to less than 15 words, was chosen to show the effect of following the NIH recommendations. The reading levels of the sampled articles were above the sixth to seventh grade recommendations of the NIH. The MedlinePlus website, which is a part of the NIH website, had the lowest reading level (8.1). The articles edited had an average reduction of 1.41 grade levels, with the lowest reduction in the Medline articles of 0.65. Providing detailed instructions to the authors writing these patient education articles and implementing editing techniques based on previous recommendations could lead to an improvement in the readability of patient education materials. This study provides authors of patient education materials with simple editing techniques that will allow for the improvement in the readability of online patient educational materials. The improvement in readability will provide patients with more comprehendible education materials that can strengthen patient awareness of medical problems and treatments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Global Migration, Diversity, and Civic Education: Improving Policy and Practice. Multicultural Education Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, James A., Ed.; Suárez-Orozco, Marcelo, Ed.; Ben-Peretz, Miriam, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    Mass migration and globalization are creating new and deep challenges to education systems the world over. In this volume, some of the world's leading researchers in multicultural education and immigration discuss critical issues related to cultural sustainability, structural inclusion, and social cohesion. The authors consider how global…

  10. Improving resident engagement in quality improvement and patient safety initiatives at the bedside: the Advocate for Clinical Education (ACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Anneliese M; Best, Jennifer A; McIntyre, Lisa K; Ehrmantraut, Ross; Calver, Patty; Goss, J Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) and patient safety (PS) are essential competencies in residency training; however, the most effective means to engage physicians remains unclear. The authors surveyed all medicine and surgery physicians at their institution to describe QI/PS practices and concurrently implemented the Advocate for Clinical Education (ACE) program to determine if a physician-centered program in the context of educational structures and at the point of care improved performance. The ACE rounded with medicine and surgery teams and provided individual and team-level education and feedback targeting 4 domains: professionalism, infection control, interpreter use, and pain assessment. In a pilot, the ACE observed 2862 physician-patient interactions and 178 physicians. Self-reported compliance often was greater than the behaviors observed. Following ACE implementation, observed professionalism behaviors trended toward improvement; infection control also improved. Physicians were highly satisfied with the program. The ACE initiative is one coaching/feedback model for engaging residents in QI/PS that may warrant further study.

  11. Exploring the Uptake of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception in South Dakota Women and the Importance of Provider Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tess L; Briggs, Ashley; Hanson, Jessica D

    2017-11-01

    Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods, including the intrauterine device (IUD) and the birth control implant, are the most effective form of prescribed birth control for pregnancy prevention. However, uptake of this highly effective form of birth control is slow. The purpose of this study was to explore use of the LARC methods in South Dakota women prescribed contraception and the importance of the provider in promoting this type of contraception. This was a cross-sectional study of female patients who had been prescribed contraception at one of five locations in a South Dakota hospital system. Records were obtained through electronic health records for a six-month period. Descriptive analysis was performed using chi-square with counts and percentages. Logistic regression was used to determine differences in LARC prescriptions by patient age and provider title. A total of 2,174 individual patients were included in analysis. Of the 378 (17.4 percent) who were prescribed LARC methods, most (78.6 percent) were prescribed an IUD. Younger women (aged 11-19) were less likely to be prescribed LARCs compared to women aged 30-34. There were also significant differences in LARC prescriptions by provider type. Futhermore, we noted differences in LARC prescriptions for a provider who received a specific education and training on LARC from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. There are many important factors to consider by the patient when choosing the most appropriate contraceptive method, including safety, effectiveness, accessibility, and affordability. Provider education may play an important role in promoting LARC methods.

  12. Improving critical thinking and clinical reasoning with a continuing education course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Dina Monteiro; Pimenta, Cibele Mattos; Lunney, Margaret

    2009-03-01

    Continuing education courses related to critical thinking and clinical reasoning are needed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis. This study evaluated a 4-day, 16-hour continuing education course conducted in Brazil.Thirty-nine nurses completed a pretest and a posttest consisting of two written case studies designed to measure the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. There were significant differences in accuracy from pretest to posttest for case 1 (p = .008) and case 2 (p = .042) and overall (p = .001). Continuing education courses should be implemented to improve the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses.

  13. Science Teacher Education in Australia: Initiatives and Challenges to Improve the Quality of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treagust, David F.; Won, Mihye; Petersen, Jacinta; Wynne, Georgie

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we describe how teachers in the Australian school system are educated to teach science and the different qualifications that teachers need to enter the profession. The latest comparisons of Australian students in international science assessments have brought about various accountability measures to improve the quality of science teachers at all levels. We discuss the issues and implications of government initiatives in preservice and early career teacher education programs, such as the implementation of national science curriculum, the stricter entry requirements to teacher education programs, an alternative pathway to teaching and the measure of effectiveness of teacher education programs. The politicized discussion and initiatives to improve the quality of science teacher education in Australia are still unfolding as we write in 2014.

  14. Preemption and the obesity epidemic: state and local menu labeling laws and the nutrition labeling and education act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Lainie; Vernick, Jon S; Hodge, James G; Teret, Stephen P

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is widely recognized as a preventable cause of death and disease. Reducing obesity among adults and children has become a national health goal in the United States. As one approach to the obesity epidemic, public health practitioners and others have asserted the need to provide consumers with information about the foods they eat. Some state and local governments across the United States have introduced menu labeling bills and regulations that require restaurants to post information, such as calorie content, for foods offered on their menus or menu boards. A major dilemma is whether state and local menu labeling laws are preempted by the federal Nutrition Labeling and Education Act (NLEA). While few courts have addressed this issue, ongoing litigation in New York City provides an early glimpse of judicial interpretation in this area. This article explores these preemption issues, arguing that appropriately written and implemented menu labeling laws should not be preempted by the NLEA. We offer guidance for states and localities that wish to develop and implement menu labeling laws.

  15. Strategies to Improve Students’ Educational Achievement Motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdokht Taheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In view of the fact that motivation is linked directly to the learning process and educational achievement, this study endeavored to identify strategies to improve students’ educational achievement motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 368 students from Guilan University of Medical Sciences were selected using simple random sampling from 2013-2014. All of the Guilan University of Medical Sciences’ students met the general eligibility criteria except guest students. The questionnaire included five domains of economic, socio-cultural, educational, geo-regional, and personality factors in educational achievement motivation. Through using descriptive and inferential statistics (Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, the compiled data were analyzed at the significance level of 0.05. Results: Data analysis revealed that socio-cultural factors have the maximum score (64.14 ± 9.92 and geo-regional factors have the minimum score (19.01±3.63 on the participants’ educational achievement motivation. What is more, a significant difference was revealed between educational field and educational effective factors as well as educational level and educational effective factors (p<0.011, p<0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Given that the socio-cultural factors had the maximum score on the students’ educational achievement motivation, it is recommended that university officials take these factors into account, and attempt to plan to provide appropriate strategies to enhance their students’ motivation, specifically their educational achievement motivation.

  16. A glucocorticoid education group meeting: an effective strategy for improving self-management to prevent adrenal crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repping-Wuts, Han J W J; Stikkelbroeck, Nike M M L; Noordzij, Alida; Kerstens, Mies; Hermus, Ad R M M

    2013-07-01

    To assess self-management in patients receiving glucocorticoid replacement therapy for primary or secondary adrenal failure before and 6 months after a glucocorticoid education group meeting. All patients with primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency, treated at the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, were invited by their endocrinologist to participate in a 3-h glucocorticoid education group meeting, consisting of a lecture about the disease and glucocorticoid doses adjustments in case of stress, followed by an instruction on how to inject hydrocortisone i.m. Finally, all participants could practise the i.m. injection and discuss their experience with (imminent) adrenal crises with other patients and the health care providers. Two weeks before the meeting and 6 months after the meeting, patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire about how they would act in six different conditions (e.g. febrile illness or vomiting). Of the 405 patients who were invited, 246 patients (61%) participated. At baseline the response by the participants on the questionnaire was 100% (n=246) and at follow-up 74% (n=183). At follow-up, significantly more participants (P≤0.005) gave the correct answers to how to act in different situations (e.g. self-administration of a glucocorticoid injection and phone contact in case of vomiting/diarrhoea without fever). Moreover, the use of self-management tools, such as having a 'medicine passport (travel document with information about disease and medication) (P=0.007) or SOS medallion (P=0.0007)', increased. A glucocorticoid education group meeting for patients with adrenal failure seems helpful to improve self-management and proper use of stress-related glucocorticoid dose adjustment.

  17. Improving blood transfusion practice by regular education in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajwani, F H

    2012-07-01

    A cross-match to transfused unit ratio of less than 2.0 is frequently used to assess performance in many hospital blood banks. This brief report was initiated to evaluate the practice at a local hospital and to emphasize the importance of regular educational sessions to improve blood transfusion practice. Retrospective data on cross-match : transfused (C : T) ratio of all departments was collected and educational sessions were given to improve practice. Thereafter, a new set of data was collected and change in practice was assessed. Initial data showed total (C : T) ratio of 1.95. After medical staff education, analysis showed clinically significant improvement in blood utilization practice with a (C : T) ratio of 1.60. This brief report indicates the importance of regular physician education, the potential role of blood transfusion committee, and the need to implement clear guidelines for blood transfusion. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Improving surgical site infection prevention practices through a multifaceted educational intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-03-01

    As part of the National Clinical Programme on healthcare-associated infection prevention, a Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) working group developed a quality improvement tool for prevention of surgical site infection (SS). We aimed to validate the effectiveness of an educational campaign, which utilises this quality improvement tool to prevent SSI in a tertiary hospital. Prior to the SSI educational campaign, surgical patients were prospectively audited and details of antibiotic administration recorded. Prophylactic antibiotic administration recommendations were delivered via poster and educational presentations. Post-intervention, the audit was repeated. 50 patients were audited pre-intervention, 45 post-intervention. Post-intervention, prophylaxis within 60 minutes prior to incision increased from 54% to 68% (p = 0.266). Appropriate postoperative prescribing improved from 71% to 92% (p = 0.075). A multifaceted educational program may be effective in changing SSI prevention practices.

  19. THE PROFESSIONAL IMPROVEMENT OF THE PRESCHOOL EDUCATION FOR THE WORK WITH THE ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATIONSUSTAINABLE DEVOLOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Elena Pérez-Borroto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available At the present time the protection of the environment is of great value, and it becomes a priority, a necessity and an imperative to ensure economic, social development, health and survival of the human species on the planet. In Cuba there is the National Strategy on Environment, guiding document that not only conceptualizes holistically Environment, but also traces patterns of how to develop the Environmental Education for Sustainable Development, considering education, as the most viable alternative to achieve this purpose. Therefore it is required a professional education that is guidance counselor, who owns preparation and manifests a comprehensive education that allows to educate environmentally from the context in which they work, meeting the needs of learners, notes that are considered valid for professional Early Childhood Education. As was stated above, the importance of professional development as essential for the preparation of preschool educator pathway is clear, however educational practice has shown weaknesses in the knowledge, skills and attitudes that present the professional of this education to provide treatment to environmental Education in early childhood (known in Cuba as the stage of zero to six years old, so that the objective of the research was focused on determing the needs for improvement of professional Preschool for working with Environmental Education. The results presented were the initial phase of a research project implemented, validated and generalized in educational practice. To determine the needs of professional the "Technology for Training Needs Assessment", which sustained the implementation of research, such as applied methods: documentary analysis; observation, surveys and interviews and triangulation of sources to reveal the broader trends of overcoming Early Childhood Education professionals working with environmental education. The research process reaffirmed the importance of working with

  20. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  1. International Science Education: A Study of UNESCO Science Education Improvement Projects in Selected Anglophone Countries of Africa: Project Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichter, Richard

    1984-01-01

    Discusses some of the problems faced by technical advisors implementing projects for the improvement of science education in Africa and reasons for these problems. Problem areas considered include underdevelopment, underestimating the process, finances, personality conflict and motivation, and opposition from key groups. (A list of major UNESCO…

  2. Method Improving Reading Comprehension In Primary Education Program Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohana

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to determine the influence of reading comprehension skills of English for PGSD students through the application of SQ3R learning method. The type of this research is Pre-Experimental research because it is not yet a real experiment, there are external variables that influence the formation of a dependent variable, this is because there is no control variable and the sample is not chosen randomly. The research design is used is one-group pretest-post-test design involving one group that is an experimental group. In this design, the observation is done twice before and after the experiment. Observations made before the experiment (O1) are called pretests and the post-experimental observation (O2) is called posttest. The difference between O1 and O2 ie O2 - O1 is the effect of the treatment. The results showed that there was an improvement in reading comprehension skills of PGSD students in Class M.4.3 using SQ3R method, and better SQ3R enabling SQ3R to improve English comprehension skills.

  3. Prioritizing health disparities in medical education to improve care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosogba, Temitope; Betancourt, Joseph R.; Conyers, F. Garrett; Estapé, Estela S.; Francois, Fritz; Gard, Sabrina J.; Kaufman, Arthur; Lunn, Mitchell R.; Nivet, Marc A.; Oppenheim, Joel D.; Pomeroy, Claire; Yeung, Howa

    2015-01-01

    Despite yearly advances in life-saving and preventive medicine, as well as strategic approaches by governmental and social agencies and groups, significant disparities remain in health, health quality, and access to health care within the United States. The determinants of these disparities include baseline health status, race and ethnicity, culture, gender identity and expression, socioeconomic status, region or geography, sexual orientation, and age. In order to renew the commitment of the medical community to address health disparities, particularly at the medical school level, we must remind ourselves of the roles of doctors and medical schools as the gatekeepers and the value setters for medicine. Within those roles are responsibilities toward the social mission of working to eliminate health disparities. This effort will require partnerships with communities as well as with academic centers to actively develop and to implement diversity and inclusion strategies. Besides improving the diversity of trainees in the pipeline, access to health care can be improved, and awareness can be raised regarding population-based health inequalities. PMID:23659676

  4. Prioritizing health disparities in medical education to improve care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosogba, Temitope; Betancourt, Joseph R; Conyers, F Garrett; Estapé, Estela S; Francois, Fritz; Gard, Sabrina J; Kaufman, Arthur; Lunn, Mitchell R; Nivet, Marc A; Oppenheim, Joel D; Pomeroy, Claire; Yeung, Howa

    2013-05-01

    Despite yearly advances in life-saving and preventive medicine, as well as strategic approaches by governmental and social agencies and groups, significant disparities remain in health, health quality, and access to health care within the United States. The determinants of these disparities include baseline health status, race and ethnicity, culture, gender identity and expression, socioeconomic status, region or geography, sexual orientation, and age. In order to renew the commitment of the medical community to address health disparities, particularly at the medical school level, we must remind ourselves of the roles of doctors and medical schools as the gatekeepers and the value setters for medicine. Within those roles are responsibilities toward the social mission of working to eliminate health disparities. This effort will require partnerships with communities as well as with academic centers to actively develop and to implement diversity and inclusion strategies. Besides improving the diversity of trainees in the pipeline, access to health care can be improved, and awareness can be raised regarding population-based health inequalities. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Feasibility of motivational interviewing delivered by a glaucoma educator to improve medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Paul F; Bremer, Robert W; Ayala, A J; Kahook, Malik Y

    2010-10-05

    Adherence to glaucoma treatment is poor, potentially reducing therapeutic effects. A glaucoma educator was trained to use motivational interviewing (MI), a patient-centered counseling style, to improve adherence. This study was designed to evaluate whether MI was feasible in a busy ophthalmology practice. Feasibility was assessed using five criteria from the National Institutes of Health Behavior Change consortium: fidelity of intervention components to MI theory; success of the training process; delivery of MI-consistent interventions by the glaucoma educator; patient receipt of the intervention based on enrollment, attrition, and satisfaction; and patient enactment of changes in motivation and adherence over the course of the intervention. A treatment manual was designed by a multidisciplinary team with expertise in health psychology, public health, and ophthalmology. The glaucoma educator received 6 hours of training including role-play exercises, self-study, and individual supervision. His MI-related knowledge and skills increased following training, and he delivered exclusively MI-consistent interventions in 66% of patient encounters. 86% (12/14) of eligible patients agreed to be randomized into glaucoma educator support or a control condition. All 8 patients assigned to the glaucoma educator completed at least 2 of 6 planned contacts, and 50% (4/8) completed all 6 contacts. Patients assigned to the glaucoma educator improved over time in both motivation and adherence. The introduction of a glaucoma educator was feasible in a busy ophthalmology practice. Patients improved their adherence while participating in the glaucoma educator program, although this study was not designed to show a causal effect. The use of a glaucoma educator to improve glaucoma patients' medication adherence may be feasible at other ophthalmology clinics, and can be implemented with a standardized training approach. Pilot data show the intervention can be implemented with fidelity, is

  6. Creating Sustainable Education Projects in Roatán, Honduras through Continuous Process Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Arjan; Randolph, Adriane B.; Heil, Shelli

    2010-01-01

    The investigators worked together with permanent residents of Roatán, Honduras on sustainable initiatives to help improve the island's troubled educational programs. Our initiatives focused on increasing the number of students eligible and likely to attend a university. Using a methodology based in continuous process improvement, we developed…

  7. Reimagining Instructional Leadership and Organizational Conditions for Improvement: Applied Research Transforming Early Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchiano, Debra; Klein, Rebecca; Hawley, Marsha Shigeyo

    2016-01-01

    Despite concerted efforts to improve children's learning by improving classrooms, results have been lackluster. There is a growing understanding that a sole focus on teachers and classrooms is insufficient. Yet, the field has not systematically explored how to help early childhood education settings become organizations designed for powerful…

  8. The RISE Framework: Using Learning Analytics to Automatically Identify Open Educational Resources for Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Robert; Nyland, Rob; Wiley, David

    2017-01-01

    The RISE (Resource Inspection, Selection, and Enhancement) Framework is a framework supporting the continuous improvement of open educational resources (OER). The framework is an automated process that identifies learning resources that should be evaluated and either eliminated or improved. This is particularly useful in OER contexts where the…

  9. Medicaid’s Role in Financing Health Care for Children With Behavioral Health Care Needs in the Special Education System: Implications of the Deficit Reduction Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, David S.; Machefsky, Aliza; Rubin, David; Feudtner, Chris; Pita, Susmita; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent changes to Medicaid policy may have unintended consequences in the education system. This study estimated the potential financial impact of the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) on school districts by calculating Medicaid-reimbursed behavioral health care expenditures for school-aged children in general and children in special education in particular. METHODS Medicaid claims and special education records of youth ages 6 to 18 years in Philadelphia, PA, were merged for calendar year 2002. Behavioral health care volume, type, and expenditures were compared between Medicaid-enrolled children receiving and not receiving special education. RESULTS Significant overlap existed among the 126,533 children who were either Medicaid enrolled (114,257) or received special education (27,620). Medicaid-reimbursed behavioral health care was used by 21% of children receiving special education (37% of those Medicaid enrolled) and 15% of other Medicaid-enrolled children. Total expenditures were $197.8 million, 40% of which was spent on the 5728 children in special education and 60% of which was spent on 15,092 other children. CONCLUSIONS Medicaid-reimbursed behavioral health services disproportionately support special education students, with expenditures equivalent to 4% of Philadelphia’s $2 billion education budget. The results suggest that special education programs depend on Medicaid-reimbursed services, the financing of which the DRA may jeopardize. PMID:18808472

  10. Surgical resident education in patient safety: where can we improve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Luke R; Levy, Shauna M; Kellagher, Caroline M; Etchegaray, Jason M; Thomas, Eric J; Kao, Lillian S; Lally, Kevin P; Tsao, KuoJen

    2015-12-01

    Effective communication and patient safety practices are paramount in health care. Surgical residents play an integral role in the perioperative team, yet their perceptions of patient safety remain unclear. We hypothesized that surgical residents perceive the perioperative environment as more unsafe than their faculty and operating room staff despite completing a required safety curriculum. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, and perioperative nurses in a large academic children's hospital participated in multifaceted, physician-led workshops aimed at enhancing communication and safety culture over a 3-y period. All general surgery residents from the same academic center completed a hospital-based online safety curriculum only. All groups subsequently completed the psychometrically validated safety attitudes questionnaire to evaluate three domains: safety culture, teamwork, and speaking up. Results reflect the percent of respondents who slightly or strongly agreed. Chi-square analysis was performed. Sixty-three of 84 perioperative personnel (75%) and 48 of 52 surgical residents (92%) completed the safety attitudes questionnaire. A higher percentage of perioperative personnel perceived a safer environment than the surgical residents in all three domains, which was significantly higher for safety culture (68% versus 46%, P = 0.03). When stratified into two groups, junior residents (postgraduate years 1-2) and senior residents (postgraduate years 3-5) had lower scores for all three domains, but the differences were not statistically significant. Surgical residents' perceptions of perioperative safety remain suboptimal. With an enhanced safety curriculum, perioperative staff demonstrated higher perceptions of safety compared with residents who participated in an online-only curriculum. Optimal surgical education on patient safety remains unknown but should require a dedicated, systematic approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Using e-collaboration to improve management education: three scenarios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Schlenker

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential impact of collaborative technologies in improving managementeducation. The first goal is to expose students to tools and practices that not only assist themwith their current studies, but also serve to reinforce individual and team competencies that canfacilitate their entry into the workforce. In their positions as future managers they will beexpected to not only be familiar with common business practices but also to understand theimplications of information technology for business; in this case with emphasis on tools andtechniques that can help businesses flourish in the networked economy. With an ever-increasingrecognition that e-learning tools are important for (re-training employees, these three scenariosoffer examples of how business schools might expand the boundaries of e-collaboration to helptheir students. These experiments have been conducted in management programs. In the first twoscenarios, students use collaborative platforms in some of their daily work. The third experimentis based on a student-centred design of a learning portal. Our experience reinforces a certainnumber of hypotheses influencing the impact of collaborative technologies in managementeducation. To begin with, information systems are often flawed mirrors of the managerial systemthat they are designed to represent. Secondly, the potential value of collaborative technologies isstrongly influenced by organizational contexts, both in and between the university and thebusiness community. Thirdly, the effectiveness of collaborative technologies depends to a largedegree upon the depth and coherence of learning objectives fixed for learning and work places.Finally, improving the effectiveness of collaborative technologies requires aligning the design oflearning environments with the corporate cultures and visions we are trying to reproduce.

  12. Needle-free jet injection of rapid-acting insulin improves early postprandial glucose control in patients with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engwerda, E.E.; Tack, C.J.J.; Galan, B.E. de

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clamp studies have shown that the absorption and action of rapid-acting insulin are faster with injection by a jet injector than with administration by conventional pen. To determine whether these pharmacokinetic changes also exist in patients with diabetes and benefit postprandial

  13. The art and science of cancer education and evaluation: toward facilitating improved patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lenora; Ousley, Anita; Swarz, Jeffrey; Bingham, Raymond J; Erickson, J Bianca; Ellis, Steven; Moody, Terra

    2011-03-01

    Cancer education is a constantly evolving field, as science continues to advance both our understanding of cancer and its effects on patients, families, and communities. Moving discoveries to practice expeditiously is paramount to impacting cancer outcomes. The continuing education of cancer care professionals throughout their practice life is vital to facilitating the adoption of therapeutic innovations. Meanwhile, more general educational programs serve to keep cancer patients, their families, and the public informed of the latest findings in cancer research. The National Cancer Institute conducted an assessment of the current knowledge base for cancer education which involved two literature reviews, one of the general literature of the evaluation of medical and health education efforts, and the other of the preceding 5 years of the Journal of Cancer Education (JCE). These reviews explored a wide range of educational models and methodologies. In general, those that were most effective used multiple methodologies, interactive techniques, and multiple exposures over time. Less than one third of the articles in the JCE reported on a cancer education or communication product, and of these, only 70% had been evaluated for effectiveness. Recommendations to improve the evaluation of cancer education and the educational focus of the JCE are provided.

  14. Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    1 EDUCATION ABSTRACT United States schools are better than ever, but they are not assuring competitive advantage . Unequal access to quality...Development Network, Washington, DC Defense Logistics Agency, Corporate Planning (J-1), Ft Belvoir, VA International : Department for Education and...influencing all aspects of the US education system in an effort to improve student achievement, enhance national competitive advantage , and promote

  15. Do educational interventions improve nurses' clinical decision making and judgement? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carl; Stapley, Sally

    2011-07-01

    Despite the growing popularity of decision making in nursing curricula, the effectiveness of educational interventions to improve nursing judgement and decision making is unknown. We sought to synthesise and summarise the comparative evidence for educational interventions to improve nursing judgements and clinical decisions. A systematic review. Electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index, OpenSIGLE conference proceedings and hand searching nursing journals. Studies published since 1960, reporting any educational intervention that aimed to improve nurses' clinical judgements or decision making were included. Studies were assessed for relevance and quality. Data extracted included study design; educational setting; the nature of participants; whether the study was concerned with the clinical application of skills or the application of theory; the type of decision targeted by the intervention (e.g. diagnostic reasoning) and whether the evaluation of the intervention focused on efficacy or effectiveness. A narrative approach to study synthesis was used due to heterogeneity in interventions, study samples, outcomes and settings and incomplete reporting of effect sizes. From 5262 initial citations 24 studies were included in the review. A variety of educational approaches were reported. Study quality and content reporting was generally poor. Pedagogical theories were widely used but use of decision theory (with the exception of subjective expected utility theory implicit in decision analysis) was rare. The effectiveness and efficacy of interventions was mixed. Educational interventions to improve nurses' judgements and decisions are complex and the evidence from comparative studies does little to reduce the uncertainty about 'what works'. Nurse educators need to pay attention to decision, as well as pedagogical, theory in the design of interventions. Study design and

  16. Osteoporosis education improves osteoporosis knowledge and dietary calcium: comparison of a 4 week and a one-session education course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslett, Laura L; Lynch, Joan; Sullivan, Thomas R; McNeil, Julian D

    2011-08-01

    Education is ideal for osteoporosis because many risk factors are modifiable. However, the efficacy of shortened education courses compared to a standard 4 week course for improving osteoporosis knowledge and healthy behaviours is not known. This study aimed to assess whether education changed knowledge and healthy behaviours over 3 months of follow-up; and whether changes in these outcomes were different between participants receiving the different education courses. Adults aged ≥ 50 years presenting to Emergency with mild to moderate trauma fractures received either the Osteoporosis Prevention and Self-Management Course (OPSMC) (4 × 2.5 h) (n = 75) or a one-session course (1 × 2.5 h) (n = 71) in a non-randomised prospective study with single-blinded allocation. Participants completed questionnaires measuring osteoporosis knowledge, dietary calcium, physical activity, calcium and exercise self-efficacy, and osteoporosis medications at baseline and 3 months. Data were analysed using mixed models and GEE regression models. Osteoporosis knowledge and calcium from food (% of RDI) increased from baseline to 3 months in both groups (P osteoporosis medications increased between baseline and 3 months in the OPSMC group while decreasing in the one-session group (P = 0.039). There were no differences between the groups or over time in physical activity, calcium or exercise self-efficacy. Osteoporosis education (either the OPSMC or the one-session course) improved osteoporosis knowledge and calcium intake after 3 months. Participants attending the OPSMC maintained medication compliance. We were unable to determine other differences between the courses. This study confirms the value of osteoporosis education for improving osteoporosis knowledge. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Improving the Quality of Radiographs in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Utilizing Educational Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashish O; Rorke, Jeanne; Abubakar, Kabir

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to develop an educational tool to improve the radiograph quality, sustain this improvement overtime, and reduce the number of repeat radiographs. A three phase quality control study was conducted at a tertiary care NICU. A retrospective data collection (phase1) revealed suboptimal radiograph quality and led to an educational intervention and development of X-ray preparation checklist (primary intervention), followed by a prospective data collection for 4 months (phase 2). At the end of phase 2, interim analysis revealed a gradual decline in radiograph quality, which prompted a more comprehensive educational session with constructive feedback to the NICU staff (secondary intervention), followed by another data collection for 6 months (phase 3). There was a significant improvement in the quality of radiographs obtained after primary educational intervention (phase 2) compared with phase 1 (p quality declined but still remained significantly better than phase 1. Secondary intervention resulted in significant improvement in radiograph quality to > 95% in all domains of image quality. No radiographs were repeated in phase 3, compared with 5.8% (16/277) in phase 1. A structured, collaborated educational intervention successfully improves the radiograph quality and decreases the need for repeat radiographs and radiation exposure in the neonates. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. BENCHMARKING AS A TOOL FOR IMPROVING THE MANAGEMENT OF ORGANIZATIONS OF SECONDARY VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN THE CONTEXT OF EXECUTION OF THE STATE PROGRAM "DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATION IN MOSCOW"

    OpenAIRE

    Sosnitskiy K.M.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses some features of benchmarking and the possibility of its practical use in the system of professional education during the implementation of the state program "stolichnoe obrazovanie" in order to improve the efficiency of the educational organization

  19. Hemoaction game: an educational step to improve hemophilia children and nurses self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOOASHIN BEHESHTIPOOR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As hemophilia is a chronic bleeding disease and can interfere with daily performance of children, these children require continuous training to prevent bleeding and take timely action (1. Since children nurses play an important role in the education of involved children and their Selfefficacy and also due to today’s approach which is using educational computer games, the use of educational games in respect to teach hemophilia children how to have self-efficacy can be effective (2. Hemoaction game is a computerized educational game designed by the World Federation of Hemophilia to educate hemophilia disease and related procedures to the care of children with hemophilia. By the use of this game children with hemophilia (aged 8-12 and also nursing experts were educated how to increase self efficacy. Nursing School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences has used this game for the first time after its publishing, in the world (3. The results of the mentioned study demonstrates that after the Hemophilia disease and its related procedures were instructed to children with hemophilia and nursing experts in order to know how to increase patients’ self efficacy by modern approaches, self efficacy of hemophilia children and nurses were both improved. This educational method is a novel way to enhance both Hemophilia children and nursing staff, as major participants in routine and lifelong education process, self-efficacy. Due to nurses’ important role in improving children with hemophilia self-efficacy by different instructions and world leading educational approaches towards use of modern technology in education, using Hemoaction educational game, published by World Federation of Hemophilia and used by Nursing and Midwifery College of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for the first time, can fulfill hemophilia children needs of care.

  20. Education Isn’t Education: The Creativity Response or How to Improve the Learning Curve in Our Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Brunnhuber

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite rising expenditure and general enrolment rates on a global level, educational output is stagnating, if not declining. There is increasing empirical evidence that we need a completely different approach to enhancing the learning curve; this holds true for early childhood, primary education, secondary education and higher education. Most existing educational programs do not tap into the full creative potential of our minds and our brains and often lead to suboptimal outcomes both for the individual and for society as a whole. Findings in clinical psychology, neurobiology and social psychology are not sufficiently considered when setting up appropriate educational programs. It is not the cognitive part of the curriculum that makes a difference, but rather the non-cognitive features (including stress management, impulse control, self-regulation, emotional attachment etc. that improve creativity. A ‘six-pack’ of features, including exercise, nutrition, social contact, mindfulness-based practices, sleeping well, and multi-sensory learning, is introduced as part of a ‘creativity response’. They are simple, affordable, evidence-based and efficient strategies that can be implemented promptly without additional costs, increasing our learning curve.

  1. Just-in-Time Training: A Novel Approach to Quality Improvement Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Allison; Park, Nesha D; Smith, Denise; Tracy, Kelly; Reed, Danielle J W; Olsen, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Just-in-time training (JITT) is accepted in medical education as a training method for newer concepts or seldom-performed procedures. Providing JITT to a large nursing staff may be an effective method to teach quality improvement (QI) initiatives. We sought to determine if JITT could increase knowledge of a specific nutrition QI initiative. Members of the nutrition QI team interviewed staff using the Frontline Contextual Inquiry to assess knowledge regarding the specific QI project. The inquiry was completed pre- and post-JITT. A JITT educational cart was created, which allowed trainers to bring the educational information to the bedside for a short, small group educational session. The results demonstrated a marked improvement in the knowledge of the frontline staff regarding our Vermont Oxford Network involvement and the specifics of the nutrition QI project. Just-in-time training can be a valuable and effective method to disseminate QI principles to a large audience of staff members.

  2. Improving Broader Impacts through Researcher-Educator Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, K.; Warburton, J.; Larson, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    . Preliminary evaluation data from 45 teachers and their researchers indicate overwhelming satisfaction with their participation in PolarTREC. Researchers have expressed that both their research and the scientific process have benefited from the inclusion of a teacher on their team. The need to explain their research and “boil it down to the raw essence” helped the research teams see how their work fits into the bigger world picture, communicate outside their scientific discipline, and present their science effectively to diverse public audiences. Although researcher participation in programs like PolarTREC provides a clear and sometimes “easy” route to fulfilling broader impacts, many of the program activities and best practices are documented and can be applied by scientists to their research activities within any discipline or location. Well-tested practices, lessons learned, and preliminary evaluation results from the administration of PolarTREC will be shared widely so that broader impacts can be fulfilled, scientific research can be improved, and important polar science will be shared with diverse student and public audiences. For more information, contact ARCUS at: info@polartrec.com or 907-474-1600.

  3. A Practice Improvement Education Program Using a Mentored Approach to Improve Nursing Facility Depression Care-Preliminary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodosh, Joshua; Price, Rachel M; Cadogan, Mary P; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Osterweil, Dan; Czerwinski, Alfredo; Tan, Zaldy S; Merkin, Sharon S; Gans, Daphna; Frank, Janet C

    2015-11-01

    Depression is common in nursing facility residents. Depression data obtained using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) 3.0 offer opportunities for improving diagnostic accuracy and care quality. How best to integrate MDS 3.0 and other data into quality improvement (QI) activity is untested. The objective was to increase nursing home (NH) capability in using QI processes and to improve depression assessment and management through focused mentorship and team building. This was a 6-month intervention with five components: facilitated collection of MDS 3.0 nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and medication data for diagnostic interpretation; education and modeling on QI approaches, team building, and nonpharmacological depression care; mentored team meetings; educational webinars; and technical assistance. PHQ-9 and medication data were collected at baseline and 6 and 9 months. Progress was measured using team participation measures, attitude and care process self-appraisal, mentor assessments, and resident depression outcomes. Five NHs established interprofessional teams that included nursing (44.1%), social work (20.6%), physicians (8.8%), and other disciplines (26.5%). Members participated in 61% of eight offered educational meetings (three onsite mentored team meetings and five webinars). Competency self-ratings improved on four depression care measures (P = .05 to depression scores did not change while medication use declined, from 37.2% of residents at baseline to 31.0% at 9 months (P care processes, achieved medication reductions, and was well received. Application to other NH-prevalent syndromes is possible. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  4. Proposal of Instruction Process for Improvement of Language Activities in Technology Education Course

    OpenAIRE

    山本, 智広; 山本, 利一

    2012-01-01

    This study is a proposal of instruction process for improvement of language activities in the technology education course in the junior high school in Japan. In this study, two efforts were carried out for the technology concerning material and processing. The first effort was the extraction of the learning situations that develop abilities of thinking, judgment and expression through language activities peculiar to the technology education course. The second effort was the verification o...

  5. IMPROVING MEDICAL EDUCATION: SIMULATING CHANGES IN PATIENT ANATOMY USING DYNAMIC HAPTIC FEEDBACK

    OpenAIRE

    Yovanoff, Mary; Pepley, David; Mirkin, Katelin; Moore, Jason; Han, David; Miller, Scarlett

    2016-01-01

    Virtual simulation is an emerging field in medical education. Research suggests that simulation reduces complication rates and improves learning gains for medical residents. One benefit of simulators is their allowance for more realistic and dynamic patient anatomies. While potentially useful throughout medical education, few studies have explored the impact of dynamic haptic simulators on medical training. In light of this research void, this study was developed to examine how a Dynamic-Hapt...

  6. ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK AS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL FOR IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Yuliia M. Shepetko

    2011-01-01

    The urgency of the material stated in article, is caused by requirements for use of information and communication technologies for educational process, in particular the electronic textbook which can facilitate perception of the information, diversify work forms, interest by technical possibilities. The article aims to proof the necessity of  electronic textbooks use as effective tool for improving the quality of education. Use of the electronic textbook at training will effectively and posit...

  7. Formal hepatitis C education enhances HCV care coordination, expedites HCV treatment and improves antiviral response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubega, Samali; Agbim, Uchenna; Surjadi, Miranda; Mahoney, Megan; Khalili, Mandana

    2013-08-01

    Formal Hepatitis C virus (HCV) education improves HCV knowledge but the impact on treatment uptake and outcome is not well described. We aimed to evaluate the impact of formal HCV patient education on primary provider-specialist HCV comanagement and treatment. Primary care providers within the San Francisco safety-net health care system were surveyed and the records of HCV-infected patients before and after institution of a formal HCV education class by liver specialty (2006-2011) were reviewed retrospectively. Characteristics of 118 patients who received anti-HCV therapy were: mean age 51, 73% males and ~50% White and uninsured. The time to initiation of HCV treatment was shorter among those who received formal education (median 136 vs 284 days, P non-1 genotype (OR 6.17, 95% CI 2.3-12.7, P = 0.0003) and receipt of HCV education (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.1-7.9, P = 0.03) were associated with sustained virologic treatment response. Among 94 provider respondents (response rate = 38%), mean age was 42, 62% were White, and 63% female. Most providers agreed that the HCV education class increased patients' HCV knowledge (70%), interest in HCV treatment (52%), and provider-patient communication (56%). A positive provider attitude (Coef 1.5, 95% CI 0.1-2.9 percent, P = 0.039) was independently associated with referral rate to education class. Formal HCV education expedites HCV therapy and improves virologic response rates. As primary care provider attitude plays a significant role in referral to HCV education class, improving provider knowledge will likely enhance access to HCV specialty services in the vulnerable population. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Big Improvement in PISA 2009 Reading Achievements in Serbia: Improvement of the Quality of Education or Something Else?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragica Pavlović Babić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The PISA 2009 results in Serbia show a big improvement in reading literacy compared to 2006 – the average score is 41 points higher, which is equal to the effect of a whole year of schooling in OECD countries and represents the second highest improvement ever recorded in a PISA study. In the present paper, we discuss potential reasons for such a big improvement based on analysis of the PISA 2009 reading achievements in different countries, with a special focus on countries from the same region (Croatia, Slovenia, Montenegro, Bulgaria, Romania and Albania. The analysis shows that the largest part of the improvement was realised at lower achieving levels, suggesting that the dominant method of teaching in schools is a traditional method oriented towards the acquisition and reproduction of academic knowledge. Findings of data analysis support the conclusion that the improvement is mainly the result of certain contextual factors, such as higher student motivation and a high level of official support for the PISA study in Serbia, rather than representing a real improvement in the quality of education.

  9. Improving Student Outcomes in Higher Education: The Science of Targeted Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harackiewicz, Judith M; Priniski, Stacy J

    2018-01-04

    Many theoretically based interventions have been developed over the past two decades to improve educational outcomes in higher education. Based in social-psychological and motivation theories, well-crafted interventions have proven remarkably effective because they target specific educational problems and the processes that underlie them. In this review, we evaluate the current state of the literature on targeted interventions in higher education with an eye to emerging theoretical and conceptual questions about intervention science. We review three types of interventions, which focus on the value students perceive in academic tasks, their framing of academic challenges, and their personal values, respectively. We consider interventions that (a) target academic outcomes (e.g., grades, major or career plans, course taking, retention) in higher education, as well as the pipeline to college, and (b) have been evaluated in at least two studies. Finally, we discuss implications for intervention science moving forward.

  10. Improving Educator Development by Innovation in Teaching Activity via web 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadah Abdullah, Nurhanim; Aziz, Mohd Ismail Abd; Ismail, Affero; Hashim, Suhaizal

    2017-05-01

    Preparing insightful teaching and learning materials for a lesson does need the effort from the educators. Educators should make some research of suitable ways to improve their teaching and learning sessions. In this 21st century, technologies are widely used as tools for education. Even so, there are educators that willing to support and some who do not agree to change. The aim of this study is to develop an innovation teaching materials by applying web 2.0 tools. The intention is to broaden knowledge and in the same time getting response and feedback from people regarding the teaching and learning session materials produced with proper instruction. Action research was used to give a structured flow of this study. The outcome of this study was encouraging and the reflection of this study can help educators in improvising their teaching and learning sessions and materials using action research.

  11. Educational Leadership and Comprehensive Reform for Improving Equity and Access for All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Yavuz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Disparities in college access for underrepresented urban students are one of the most urgent educational problems of America’s education system. In response to growing national concern, this longitudinal study investigated how school leaders worked collaboratively with key stakeholders to implement research-supported student services in order to improve college access for underrepresented urban students. The quantitative investigation showed that when educational leaders and key stakeholders worked collaboratively to deliver comprehensive student services, urban students in a high-poverty school district experienced measurable benefits in terms of their college enrolment. This study may be of particular value to policymakers, school leaders, and educators concerned with the low college access rates of students in urban schools, as well as to those who are seeking to understand what works better to prepare urban students for post-secondary education.

  12. How to Improve the Quality of Teaching in the Course of Network Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Na

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper expounds the characteristics and advantages of modern distance education. On this basis, this paper puts forward the limitations and deficiencies of the current educational practice, and analyzes the reasons that affect the quality of education. On the basis of analyzing the reasons, solutions to the problems in the course of work are put forward according to working experience and practice. The realization of the virtual experiment will ease difficulties and pressures effectively, which the various modern distance education in colleges and universities generally faced in funds, venues and equipment and other aspects. So carrying out the virtual experimental teaching is timeless and beyond the constraint of space, and help to improve the quality of teaching. Therefore, the virtual experiment will become an inevitable trend in the practice teaching of modern distance education.

  13. Educational system based on the TAPP checklist improves the performance of novices: a multicenter randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Saseem; Kurashima, Yo; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Kawase, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoichi M; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2018-05-01

    Despite recent developments in surgical education, obstacles including inadequate budget, limited human resources, and a scarcity of time have limited its widespread adoption. To provide systematic training for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair, we had previously developed and validated a checklist to evaluate the recorded performance of transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair. We had also developed an educational system that included didactic materials based on the TAPP checklist and incorporated remote evaluation and feedback system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the educational impact of the TAPP education system on novice surgeons. Residents and surgeons from participating hospitals, who had performed 0 or 1 TAPP procedure, were randomly assigned to the intervention group (IG), who trained using this new educational tool, and the control group (CG), who trained using the conventional system. Their surgical videos were rated by blinded raters. All participants performed their first case prior to randomization. The primary outcome was improvement of TAPP checklist score from the first to the third case. Eighteen participants from 9 institutes were recruited for this study. Seven participants in the IG and 5 participants in the CG were included in the final analysis. The participants in the IG demonstrated significant improvement in their TAPP performance (p = 0.044) from their first case to their third case, whereas their counterparts in the CG failed to make any significant progress during the same period (p = 0.581). The new TAPP educational system was effective in improving the TAPP performance of novice surgeons.

  14. ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK AS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL FOR IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliia M. Shepetko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of the material stated in article, is caused by requirements for use of information and communication technologies for educational process, in particular the electronic textbook which can facilitate perception of the information, diversify work forms, interest by technical possibilities. The article aims to proof the necessity of  electronic textbooks use as effective tool for improving the quality of education. Use of the electronic textbook at training will effectively and positively affect process of preparation of students taking into account the means of organization of educational process, structure, methodological requirements. Application of the electronic textbook at training will promote the further development of informative motivation of students.

  15. Lay health educators within primary care practices to improve cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients: challenges in quality improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AK Lofters,1–4 M Vahabi,5 V Prakash,6 L Banerjee,7 P Bansal,8 S Goel,7,8 S Dunn1,2,9 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St Michael’s Hospital, 5Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, 6Screening Saves Lives Program, Canadian Cancer Society, Mississauga, 7Wise Elephant Family Health Team, Brampton, 8Mississauga Halton Central West Regional Cancer Program, Mississauga, 9Women’s College Research Institute, Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Cancer screening uptake is known to be low among South Asian residents of Ontario. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if lay health educators embedded within the practices of primary care providers could improve willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients taking a quality improvement approach.Materials and methods: Participating physicians selected quality improvement initiatives to use within their offices that they felt could increase willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake. They implemented initiatives, adapting as necessary, for six months.Results: Four primary care physicians participated in the study. All approximated that at least 60% of their patients were of South Asian ethnicity. All physicians chose to work with a preexisting lay health educator program geared toward South Asians. Health ambassadors spoke to patients in the office and telephoned patients. For all physicians, ~60% of South Asian patients who were overdue for cancer screening and who spoke directly to health ambassadors stated they were willing to be screened. One physician was able to track actual screening among contacted patients and found that screening uptake was relatively high: from 29.2% (colorectal cancer to 44.6% (breast cancer of patients came in for screening

  16. Readability of Patient Education Materials in Hand Surgery and Health Literacy Best Practices for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Kristie; Prince, Latrina Y; Schnaekel, Asa; Couch, Cory G; Stephenson, John M; Wyrick, Theresa O

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to update a portion of a 2008 study of patient education materials from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Web site with new readability results, to compare the results to health literacy best practices, and to make recommendations to the field for improvement. A sample of 77 patient education documents were downloaded from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Web site, handcare.org, and assessed for readability using 4 readability tools. Mean readability grade-level scores were derived. Best practices for plain language for written health materials were compiled from 3 government agency sources. The mean readability of the 77 patient education documents in the study was 9.3 grade level. This reading level is reduced from the previous study in 2008 in which the overall mean was 10.6; however, the current sample grade level still exceeds recommended readability according to best practices. Despite a small body of literature on the readability of patient education materials related to hand surgery and other orthopedic issues over the last 7 years, readability was not dramatically improved in our current sample. Using health literacy as a framework, improvements in hand surgery patient education may result in better understanding and better outcomes for patients seeing hand surgeons. Improved understanding of patient education materials related to hand surgery may improve preventable negative outcomes that are clinically significant as well as contribute to improved quality of life for patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Planning ability improves in a yogic education system compared to a modern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, R; Nagendra, H R; Bhat, G Ramachandra

    2008-07-01

    Planning skills play a key role in higher developmental processes. The Tower of London test not only measures planning skills, but also the ability to execute plans. Yoga practices aim to bring about higher development. Can a Yoga-based education system be shown to meet this challenge? This study was aimed at comparing a Modern Education System (MES) with the ancient Yoga-based system of education, the Gurukula Education System (GES), in developing planning skills. Forty-nine boys with ages ranging from 11 to 13 years were selected from each of two residential schools, one MES and the other GES, providing similar ambience and daily routines. The boys were matched for age and socio-economic status. The GES educational program is based around integrated yoga modules while the MES provides a conventional modern education program. Planning and executive abilities were assessed using the Tower of London test at the start and the end of an academic year. Within groups, the pre-post test differences were significant for both groups. However, the between-groups results showed improvement in the GES group compared to the MES group at a P education improve planning and execution skills in school boys, GES is more effective of the two systems.

  18. Implementation of Authentic Learning and Assessment through STEM Education Approach to Improve Students’ Metacognitive Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilman Anwari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The important aspects of improving metacognitive skills are knowledge, intelligence, experience, and practice. STEM education is considered to be one of the most influential approaches to encouraging students to be self-regulated learners. In STEM education lessons, students are provided many opportunities to develop their thinking skills (metacognitive skills, critical and creative thinking. The goals of this study were to identify the effects of STEM education in the improvement of metacognitive skills, and to investigate metacognitive activities in STEM education. The participants were middle school students in the third year. The research instrument was the Metacognitive Activities Inventory (MCAI, used to identify changes in metacognitive skills before and after the lessons. Furthermore, portfolios were used to record students’ learning processes and help them reflect on their thinking and the tasks. The results show no significant changes in metacognitive skills. However, STEM education engages students in metacognitive activities. Therefore, implementation of STEM education in the classroom provides opportunities to students for understanding the importance of the integration of different disciplines and its applications. In addition, STEM education can increase students’ interest in science lessons.

  19. Linking agriculture and nutrition education to improve infant and young child feeding: Lessons for future programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlhoff, Ellen; Wijesinha-Bettoni, Ramani; Westaway, Elizabeth; Jeremias, Theresa; Nordin, Stacia; Garz, Julia

    2017-10-01

    Agriculture and food systems play a central role in nutrition by supplying nutritious, healthy and affordable foods. When integrated with nutrition education for behaviour change, agricultural interventions that supply diverse affordable foods from all food groups have great scope for improving young child and family diets. In 2014, process reviews were conducted in Cambodia and Malawi of food security projects that provided agricultural support and community-based nutrition education on improved infant and young child feeding (IYCF). In both countries, household visits were carried out with mothers/caregivers, and interviews and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were conducted with purposively selected project stakeholders (53 in Cambodia, 170 in Malawi), including government staff from the agriculture and health sectors. Results highlight that adoption of improved IYCF practices was facilitated by participation in nutrition education and practical cooking sessions, and supportive family and community structures. Barriers faced by families and caregivers were identified, such as women's workload and lack of access to high quality foods, namely fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and animal source foods. Implementation challenges regarding coordination of cross-sectoral targeting strategies and capacities of extension services to sustain community-based IYCF nutrition education need to be addressed to improve programme effectiveness and impact. The project lessons from Cambodia and Malawi are useful for integrated agriculture-IYCF nutrition education programmes to help ensure better young child nutrition outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Expanding Educators' Contributions to Continuous Quality Improvement of American Board of Medical Specialties Maintenance of Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Lois Margaret; Pouwels, Mellie Villahermosa; Irons, Mira

    2016-01-01

    The American Board of Medical Specialties board certification has transformed into a career-long process of learning, assessment, and performance improvement through its Program for Maintenance of Certification (MOC). Medical educators across many medical professional organizations, specialty societies, and other institutions have played important roles in shaping MOC and tailoring its overarching framework to the needs of different specialties. This Commentary addresses potential barriers to engagement in work related to MOC for medical school (MS) and academic health center (AHC) educators and identifies reasons for, and ways to accomplish, greater involvement in this work. The authors present ways that medical and other health professions educators in these settings can contribute to the continuous improvement of the MOC program including developing educational and assessment activities, engaging in debate about MOC, linking MOC with institutional quality improvement activities, and pursuing MOC-related scholarship. MS- and AHC-based educators have much to offer this still-young and continually improving program, and their engagement is sought, necessary, and welcomed.

  1. A Safety and Health Guide for Vocational Educators. Incorporating Requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Relevant Pennsylvania Requirements with Particular Emphasis for Those Concerned with Cooperative Education and Work Study Programs. Volume 15. Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Ray

    Intended as a guide for vocational educators to incorporate the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (1970) and the requirements of various Pennsylvania safety and health regulations with their cooperative vocational programs, the first chapter of this document presents the legal implications of these safety and health…

  2. Improved staff procedure skills lead to improved managment skills: an observational study in an educational setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüter, Anders; Vikstrom, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Good staff procedure skills in a management group during incidents and disasters are believed to be a prerequisite for good management of the situation. However, this has not been demonstrated scientifically. Templates for evaluation results from performance indicators during simulation exercises have previously been tested. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the possibility that these indicators can be used as a tool for studying the relationship between good management skills and good staff procedure skills. Good and structured work (staff procedure skills) in a hospital management group during simulation exercises in disaster medicine is related to good and timely decisions (good management skills). Results from 29 consecutive simulation exercises in which staff procedure skills and management skills were evaluated using quantitative measurements were included. The statistical analysis method used was simple linear regression with staff procedure skills as the response variable and management skills as the predictor variable. An overall significant relationship was identified between staff procedure skills and management skills (p(2)0.05). This study suggests that there is a relationship between staff procedure skills and management skills in the educational setting used. Future studies are needed to demonstrate if this also can be observed during actual incidents.

  3. Students as Consumers: The Implications of the Consumer Protection Act for Higher Education Institutions in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Consumer Protection Act (CPA) lays the basis for the protection of consumer rights in South Africa and comprehensively sets out obligations for "suppliers". There have been differing views expressed as to whether a student should be seen as a consumer. It is clear, however, that this Act applies to HEIs. This article, firstly,…

  4. Combined didactic and scenario-based education improves the ability of intensive care unit staff to recognize delirium at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, John W; Marquis, Francois; Riker, Richard R; Robbins, Tracey; Garpestad, Erik; Fong, Jeffrey J; Didomenico, Dorothy; Skrobik, Yoanna

    2008-01-01

    While nurses play a key role in identifying delirium, several authors have noted variability in their ability to recognize delirium. We sought to measure the impact of a simple educational intervention on the ability of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses to clinically identify delirium and to use a standardized delirium scale correctly. Fifty ICU nurses from two different hospitals (university medical and community teaching) evaluated an ICU patient for pain, level of sedation and presence of delirium before and after an educational intervention. The same patient was concomitantly, but independently, evaluated by a validated judge (rho = 0.98) who acted as the reference standard in all cases. The education consisted of two script concordance case scenarios, a slide presentation regarding scale-based delirium assessment, and two further cases. Nurses' clinical recognition of delirium was poor in the before-education period as only 24% of nurses reported the presence or absence of delirium and only 16% were correct compared with the judge. After education, the number of nurses able to evaluate delirium using any scale (12% vs 82%, P judge-nurse agreement (Spearman rho) for the presence of delirium was relatively high for both the before-education period (r = 0.74, P = 0.262) and after-education period (r = 0.71, P < 0.0005), the low number of nurses evaluating delirium before education lead to statistical significance only after education. Education did not alter nurses' self-reported evaluation of delirium (before 76% vs after 100%, P = 0.125). A simple composite educational intervention incorporating script concordance theory improves the capacity for ICU nurses to screen for delirium nearly as well as experts. Self-reporting by nurses of completion of delirium screening may not constitute an adequate quality assurance process.

  5. Occupational Health and Safety ACT NO. 6331 and Status Assessment in this Perspective, the Role of ÇASGEM at Education and Research

    OpenAIRE

    Karaman, Esra

    2015-01-01

    In this study, basic knowledge of Occupational Health and Safety Act No. 6331 and in this regard legal rights and obligations of employers and employees was given. It was informed with this study health and safety problems originated from work, often experienced occupational accidents and occupational diseases and provided information about their causes. It was referred Labour and Social Security Training and Research Centre ( ÇASGEM ) 's missions and conducted education and research on ...

  6. Development of Mobile Educational Services Application to Improve Educational Outcomes using Android Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices have become instruments that allow new ways of interacting with institutional services. This paper describes the development of the Mobile Educational Services Application (MES app for the Android platform. This app allows access to mediated and self-access services, as well as databases, announcements, registration, events, book consultations, schedules, etc. The project provides Mobile and Web-based application tools (apps that allow online access for different users - students, instructors, and administrators. The app provides students with a user friendly, generic, web-based GUI to request educational services, to send text message inquiries, to add, drop, or defer courses, etc.. The app allows instructors to send or receive text messages to and from students using the mobile or web-based interface of the app. In addition to system monitoring, the app provides administrators an online tool to manage, add, update, and delete system information. This tool seeks to be one of the more useful economic apps that use Android technology for applications, using Tablets and mobile devices, for the use of students, instructors and administrators in accessing services in an educational institution.

  7. Oversight Hearing on the Reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965: Hilo, Hawaii. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (Hilo, HI, July 1, 1991).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education.

    In one of a series of hearings held in communities around the nation on the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965, the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education met to hear testimony from higher education professionals, business people, and students in the state of Hawaii. In particular the witnesses, grouped in seven panels, testified…

  8. 34 CFR 303.6 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 303.6 Section 303.6 Education Regulations of the..., Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.6 Act. As used in this part, Act means the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1400) ...

  9. Improving patient knowledge about sacral nerve stimulation using a patient based educational video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppson, Peter Clegg; Clark, Melissa A; Hampton, Brittany Star; Raker, Christina A; Sung, Vivian W

    2013-10-01

    We developed a patient based educational video to address the information needs of women considering sacral nerve stimulation for overactive bladder. Five semistructured focus groups were used to identify patient knowledge gaps, information needs, patient acceptable terminology and video content preferences for a patient based sacral nerve stimulation educational video. Each session was transcribed, independently coded by 2 coders and examined using an iterative method. A 16-minute educational video was created to address previously identified knowledge gaps and information needs using patient footage, 3-dimensional animation and peer reviewed literature. We developed a questionnaire to evaluate participant sacral nerve stimulation knowledge and therapy attitudes. We then performed a randomized trial to assess the effect of the educational video vs the manufacturer video on patient knowledge and attitudes using our questionnaire. We identified 10 patient important domains, including 1) anatomy, 2) expectations, 3) sacral nerve stimulation device efficacy, 4) surgical procedure, 5) surgical/device complications, 6) post-procedure recovery, 7) sacral nerve stimulation side effects, 8) postoperative restrictions, 9) device maintenance and 10) general sacral nerve stimulation information. A total of 40 women with overactive bladder were randomized to watch the educational (20) or manufacturer (20) video. Knowledge scores improved in each group but the educational video group had a greater score improvement (76.6 vs 24.2 points, p <0.0001). Women who watched the educational video reported more favorable attitudes and expectations about sacral nerve stimulation therapy. Women with overactive bladder considering sacral nerve stimulation therapy have specific information needs. The video that we developed to address these needs was associated with improved short-term patient knowledge. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  10. Can outcome-based continuing medical education improve performance of immigrant physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Orit Cohen; Ezra, Vered; Alperin, Mordechai; Nave, Rachel; Porat, Tamar; Golan, Avivit Cohen; Vinker, Shlomo; Karkabi, Khaled

    2011-01-01

    Immigrant physicians are a valued resource for physician workforces in many countries. Few studies have explored the education and training needs of immigrant physicians and ways to facilitate their integration into the health care system in which they work. Using an educational program developed for immigrant civilian physicians working in military primary care clinics at the Israel Defence Force, we illustrate how an outcome-based CME program can address practicing physicians' needs for military-specific primary care education and improve patient care. Following an extensive needs assessment, a 3-year curriculum was developed. The curriculum was delivered by a multidisciplinary educational team. Pre/post multiple-choice examinations, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE), and end-of-program evaluations were administered for curriculum evaluation. To evaluate change in learners' performance, data from the 2003 (before-program) and 2006 (after-program) work-based assessments were retrieved retrospectively. Change in the performance of program participants was compared with that of immigrant physicians who did not participate in the program. Out of 28 learners, 23 (82%) completed the program. Learners did significantly better in the annual post-tests compared with the pretests (p educators, facing the challenge of integrating immigrant physicians to fit their health care system, may consider adapting our approach. Copyright © 2011 The Alliance for Continuing Medical Education, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  11. H.R. 3521: Nuclear Facilities Occupational Safety Improvement Act of 1989. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, October 25, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Bill H.R.3521 was introduced in the House of Representatives of the United States on October 25, 1989. The purpose of this Act and the amendments made by this Act are to improve and enforce standards for employee health and safety at Department of Energy nuclear facilities. Congress finds that worker health and safety at Department of Energy nuclear facilities could be made substantially safer by applying standards developed by experts in the field of occupational health and safety. A section-by-section analysis makes up most of the report with emphasis on the following: application of OSHA to DOE nuclear facilities; cooperation with inspections and investigations; transfer and allocation of appropriations and personnel; worker training requirements; performance of NIOSH functions at DOE nuclear facilities; medical examinations of employees; and labor-management health and safety committees at DOE nuclear facilities

  12. Improving AIDS Care After Trauma (ImpACT): Pilot Outcomes of a Coping intervention Among HIV-Infected Women with Sexual Trauma in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Kathleen J; Mulawa, Marta I; Robertson, Corne; Watt, Melissa H; Ciya, Nonceba; Stein, Dan J; Cherenack, Emily M; Choi, Karmel W; Kombora, Matapelo; Joska, John A

    2018-03-01

    Improving AIDS Care after Trauma (ImpACT), a coping intervention for HIV-infected women with sexual abuse histories, was evaluated for feasibility and potential efficacy in a public clinic in Cape Town, South Africa. Sixty-four participants were enrolled prior to starting antiretroviral therapy (ART). After completing baseline assessments, participants were randomly assigned to standard of care (SoC: three adherence counseling sessions) or ImpACT (SoC plus four individual and three group sessions). Participants completed assessments at 3 months (after individual sessions) and 6 months post-baseline. In exploratory analysis of primary outcomes, ImpACT participants, compared to SoC, reported greater reductions in avoidance and arousal symptoms of PTSD and greater increases in ART adherence motivation at 3 months. Clinically significant decreases in overall PTSD symptoms were also demonstrated at 3 months. These effects continued as trends at the 6-month assessment, in addition to increases in social/spiritual coping. In analysis of secondary outcomes, high levels of non-adherence to ART and poor care engagement were evident at 6 months, with no differences between study arms. A trauma-focused, culturally-adapted individual intervention delivered by a non-specialist in the HIV care setting is feasible and acceptable. Preliminary findings suggest ImpACT has potential to reduce PTSD symptoms and increase ART adherence motivation, but a more intensive intervention may be needed to improve and maintain care engagement among this population. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02223390.

  13. Influential Factors for the Improvement of Peer Education in Adolescents: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Azizi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Peer education is an effective strategy for improving adolescents’ health. It focuses on the improvement of knowledge, attitudes and beliefs among adolescents with regards to different healthcare issues and empowers them to make informed decisions. This review study aimed to determine factors that promote peer education among adolescents. Evidence Acquisition In this narrative review, electronic databases including Google Scholar, Science Direct, PubMed (including Medline, Web of Science, Scientific Information Database, and Scopus were searched. Articles published between 1991 and 2016 were retrieved and undergone abstract and full-text appraisal. Lastly, 53 articles were selected and used to write this review. Results The factors influencing the promotion of peer education among adolescents were classified as follow: ‘characteristics of peer educators’: personal, skills and communication characteristics; ‘characteristics of the educational program’: theoretical foundations, program transparency, program sustainability, adolescents’ comprehensive participation, and evaluation and monitoring; and ‘structural characteristics of the educational program’: supportive structure, and financial-official structure. Conclusions Taking into account the importance of adolescence and issues surrounding this period, the important role of peer education in the promotion of adolescents’ health should be emphasized.

  14. Reasons for Divorce and Recollections of Premarital Intervention: Implications for Improving Relationship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Shelby B.; Rhoades, Galena K.; Stanley, Scott M.; Allen, Elizabeth S.; Markman, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    The study presents findings from interviews of 52 divorced individuals who received the Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program (PREP) while engaged to be married. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, the study sought to understand participant reasons for divorce (including identification of the “final straw”) in order to understand if the program covered these topics effectively. Participants also provided suggestions based on their premarital education experiences so as to improve future relationship education efforts. The most commonly reported major contributors to divorce were lack of commitment, infidelity, and conflict/arguing. The most common “final straw” reasons were infidelity, domestic violence, and substance use. More participants blamed their partners than blamed themselves for the divorce. Recommendations from participants for the improvement of premarital education included receiving relationship education before making a commitment to marry (when it would be easier to break-up), having support for implementing skills outside of the educational setting, and increasing content about the stages of typical marital development. These results provide new insights into the timing and content of premarital and relationship education. PMID:24818068

  15. Reasons for Divorce and Recollections of Premarital Intervention: Implications for Improving Relationship Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Shelby B; Rhoades, Galena K; Stanley, Scott M; Allen, Elizabeth S; Markman, Howard J

    2013-06-01

    The study presents findings from interviews of 52 divorced individuals who received the Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program (PREP) while engaged to be married. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, the study sought to understand participant reasons for divorce (including identification of the "final straw") in order to understand if the program covered these topics effectively. Participants also provided suggestions based on their premarital education experiences so as to improve future relationship education efforts. The most commonly reported major contributors to divorce were lack of commitment, infidelity, and conflict/arguing. The most common "final straw" reasons were infidelity, domestic violence, and substance use. More participants blamed their partners than blamed themselves for the divorce. Recommendations from participants for the improvement of premarital education included receiving relationship education before making a commitment to marry (when it would be easier to break-up), having support for implementing skills outside of the educational setting, and increasing content about the stages of typical marital development. These results provide new insights into the timing and content of premarital and relationship education.

  16. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit: Development and Evaluation of Novel Literacy and Culturally Sensitive Diabetes Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L

    2016-02-01

    Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a "superior" score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Integration of mobile technology in educational materials improves participation: creation of a novel smartphone application for resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Christiana M; Tan, Sanda A

    2015-01-01

    Traditional education consists of didactics and book learning. Recently, technology has been integrated into graduate medical education, primarily in the form of simulation. The primary aim of this study was to investigate if a novel smartphone application using technology to engage learners would improve participation in an educational activity when compared with a daily e-mail format and how this use translated to performance on standardized testing. The UF Surgery App (App), which is a smartphone application, was developed to deliver 2 questions from a general surgery educational database every weekday from October to February 2013. The App, developed for iOS, featured a notification alarm and a reminder icon to actively engage the learner. Learners who used the App responded to multiple-choice questions and were provided instantaneous feedback in the form of a correct answer with an explanation. The response rate and answers were collected prospectively and compared with the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination score. University of Florida, College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, a university teaching hospital. A total of 46 general surgical residents were enrolled in a university training program. Participation was voluntary. Overall, 26 of 46 (57%) residents participated. Of the users, 70% answered more than 20% of the questions, while 46% responded to more than 70% of questions. The percentage of correct answers on the App was positively correlated with standardized score (p = 0.005), percentage correct (p = 0.02), and percentile (p = 0.034) on the ABSITE examination. Technology can be used to actively engage residents. Deployment of this novel App improved participation over a daily question-answer e-mail format, and answers correlated with standardized test performance. The effect of the App on overall education is unclear, and a multi-institutional study has been initiated. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. All

  18. Radiation protection education and training in Switzerland: What can be improved?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, Swen-Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the amendment of the Swiss radiation protection regulations (StSV) the radiation protection education and training system is checked whether there is a need for improvement measures or the regulations have to be revised. Experiences, the comparison with other education and training systems and international developments were compiled and evaluated The responsible expert group with participants from authorities and instructors decided that no fundamental changes are necessary. In the contribution two items are discussed: The mandatory external consulting of licensees by acknowledged radiation protection experts - as required by the EU BSS (basic safety standards) with the definition of a radiation protection expert (RPE) - bears more disadvantages than advantages. On the other hand the improvement potential with respect to clearness and courtesy of requirements for radiation protection education and training in Switzerland were considered in the frame of WU-BSS revision.

  19. Simple educational intervention will improve the efficacy of routine antenatal iron supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Hemantha M; Premaratne, Samanthi P; Palihawadana, Thilina; Wijeratne, Sumeda

    2010-06-01

    Sri Lanka has a policy of free provision of iron supplements to pregnant women. However, iron deficiency anemia remains common in pregnancy. We tested the hypothesis that educating women regarding improving bioavailability could improve the efficacy of iron supplementation. The education focused on how best supplements could be taken and on how they should be stored. We carried out a study using a quasi-experimental design on a group of women attending for antenatal care at a suburban University Obstetric Unit in Sri Lanka. The control group had care free of charge including iron supplementation and antihelminthic therapy. In addition, the study group received an education in small groups regarding maximizing bioavailability of iron. Hemoglobin and iron status of the women were compared between the groups at recruitment and at 34 weeks of gestation. The two groups were equally matched in demographic data, and hemoglobin and iron status. There were significant differences between the two groups at 34 weeks in the hemoglobin levels, serum ferritin levels, anemia rates and the number with low ferritin (P tablets in ways that improved their bioavailability. A simple health education improved the efficacy of iron supplementation in this population. Such interventions should be an integral part of iron supplementation programs, especially in populations whose habits tend to reduce the bioavailability of iron.

  20. Towards the Improvement of the Student Experience of Assessment and Feedback in Construction Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lloyd; Fortune, Chris

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted across Higher Education that assessment practices have a link with learning and a key factor in this link is formative assessment. Formative assessment is generally defined as taking place during a module/programme with the express purpose of improving and enhancing student learning. It is important to understand how…