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Sample records for ecotoxicology iv survival

  1. Genetic ecotoxicology IV: survival and DNA strand breakage is dependent on genotype in radionuclide-exposed mosquitofish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, C.W. [Texas A and M University, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, College Station, TX 77843-2258 (United States); Elbl, T. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Shugart, L.R. [L.R. Shugart and Associates, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) were caged in situ in a radioactively-contaminated pond in order to determine if survival and amount of DNA strand breakage were dependent on genotype. Genotypes of fish were determined using the randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) technique, and DNA strand breakage was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. This study is a continuation of research undertaken at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which examined the effects of radionuclide contamination on the population genetic structure of mosquitofish. The previous research found 17 RAPD markers that were present at a higher frequency in contaminated than in reference populations ('contaminant-indicative bands'), and fish from contaminated sites which possessed these markers had higher fecundity and fewer strand breaks than fish which did not. One of the contaminated populations (Pond 3513) was colonized from one of the reference populations (Crystal Springs) in 1977. In the present study, fish were obtained from Crystal Springs and an additional reference site, and caged in Pond 3513. The percent survival and amount of DNA strand breakage were then determined for fish with and without the contaminant-indicative markers. When Crystal Springs fish were caged in Pond 3513, it was found that the genotypic distribution of the survivors was more similar to the native Pond 3513 population than to the Crystal Springs population. Furthermore, for nine of the contaminant-indicative markers, the percent survival was greater for fish which possessed these markers than for fish which did not. For five of these markers, fish which possessed them had higher DNA integrity (fewer strand breaks) than fish which did not. These data indicate that probability of survival and degree of DNA strand breakage in radionuclide-exposed mosquitofish are dependent on RAPD genotype, and are consistent with the hypothesis that the contaminant-indicative RAPD bands are markers of loci

  2. Survival data analyses in ecotoxicology: critical effect concentrations, methods and models. What should we use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forfait-Dubuc, Carole; Charles, Sandrine; Billoir, Elise; Delignette-Muller, Marie Laure

    2012-05-01

    In ecotoxicology, critical effect concentrations are the most common indicators to quantitatively assess risks for species exposed to contaminants. Three types of critical effect concentrations are classically used: lowest/ no observed effect concentration (LOEC/NOEC), LC( x) (x% lethal concentration) and NEC (no effect concentration). In this article, for each of these three types of critical effect concentration, we compared methods or models used for their estimation and proposed one as the most appropriate. We then compared these critical effect concentrations to each other. For that, we used nine survival data sets corresponding to D. magna exposition to nine different contaminants, for which the time-course of the response was monitored. Our results showed that: (i) LOEC/NOEC values at day 21 were method-dependent, and that the Cochran-Armitage test with a step-down procedure appeared to be the most protective for the environment; (ii) all tested concentration-response models we compared gave close values of LC50 at day 21, nevertheless the Weibull model had the lowest global mean deviance; (iii) a simple threshold NEC-model both concentration and time dependent more completely described whole data (i.e. all timepoints) and enabled a precise estimation of the NEC. We then compared the three critical effect concentrations and argued that the use of the NEC might be a good option for environmental risk assessment.

  3. Handbook of ecotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    1995-01-01

    The Handbook of Ecotoxicology offers 34 chapters with contributions from over 50 selected international experts. The book is divided into four major sections: I. Quantifying and Measuring Ecotoxicological Effects, II. Contaminant Sources and Effects, III. Case Histories and Ecosystem Surveys, and IV. Methods for Making Estimates and Predictability in Ecotoxicology. Concepts and methodology are presented for many types of aquatic and terrestrial ecotoxicity test protocols for both controlled and field assessments. Chapters are offered on such diverse topics as sediment and soil ecotoxicity, landscape indicators, biomonitoring, and use of current bioindicators. The roles of deforestation and global warming, pathogens and disease in ecotoxicology, abiotic factors, urban runoff, predictive ecotoxicology, population modeling, and restoration ecology are discussed. This book was designed to serve as a reference book for students entering the fields of ecotoxicology, aquatic toxicology, terrestrial wildlife toxicology, and other environmental sciences. Many portions of this handbook will serve as a convenient reference text for established investigators, resource managers, and those involved in risk assessment and risk management within regulatory agencies and the private sector.

  4. Ecotoxicological applications and significance of the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Awadhesh N

    2008-05-01

    Application of the single-cell gel electrophoresis or comet assay has revolutionized the field of genetic ecotoxicology or eco-genotoxicology. It is a rapid, sensitive and relatively inexpensive method providing the opportunity to study DNA damage (including oxidative damage), repair and cell death (apoptosis) in different cell types without prior knowledge of karyotype and cell turnover rate. The assay has, however, often attracted criticism for its lack of ecotoxicological relevance. In addition, in contrast to genetic toxicology where rapid technical progress has been made to improve cell- and tissue-specific adoption of the assay, only limited advancement has been made to transfer the methodologies to ecotoxicological studies. While reviewing the recent information available in the literature and underscoring the importance of induced genetic damage in natural species, the aims of this article are to (i) highlight and judiciously analyse the ecotoxicological relevance of the assay; (ii) attempt to correlate the comet response with other relevant biological responses or biomarkers; (iii) identify the technical challenges and various factors affecting its application in order to make it reliable, reproducible and robust; (iv) critically compare the technical developments in genetic toxicology and genetic ecotoxicology and (v) evaluate the future developments with respect to applications of the assay. It is suggested that while complementing other ecotoxicological parameters and further improving the methodologies, the comet assay will continue to play an important role in genetic ecotoxicology to determine induced genetic damage, which has significant consequences for short- and long-term survival of the natural or wild species. Information obtained through integrated studies using simultaneous applications of multiple biomarkers on different wild organisms could also provide an holistic dimension of toxicological impact of environmental contaminants for the

  5. Prediction of survival in patients with Stage IV kidney cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Mirilenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of treatment was evaluated and the predictors of adjusted survival (AS were identified in patients with disseminated kidney cancer treated at the Republican Research and Practical Center for Oncology and Medical Radiology in 1999 to 2011 (A.E. Okeanov, P.I. Moiseev, L.F. Levin. Malignant tumors in Belarus, 2001–2012. Edited by O.G. Sukonko. Seven factors (regional lymph node metastases; distant bone metastases; a high-grade tumor; sarcomatous tumor differentiation; hemoglobin levels of < 125 g/l in women and < 150 g/l in men; an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 40 mm/h; palliative surgery were found to have an independent, unfavorable impact on AS. A multidimensional model was built to define what risk group low (no more than 2 poor factors, moderate (3–4 poor factors, and high (more than 4 poor factors the patients with Stage IV kidney cancer belonged to. In these groups, the median survival was 34.7, 17.2, and 4.0 months and 3-year AS rates were 48.6, 24.6, and 3.2 %, respectively. 

  6. Association of systemic collagen type IV formation with survival among patients undergoing hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, Diana Julie; Karsdal, Morten A; Rasmussen, Lars M

    2013-01-01

    The 7S domain of collagen type IV (P4NP_7S) assessed in plasma represents systemic collagen type IV formation. The objective of the study was to investigate the association of systemic collagen type IV formation with survival among patients undergoing hemodialysis.......The 7S domain of collagen type IV (P4NP_7S) assessed in plasma represents systemic collagen type IV formation. The objective of the study was to investigate the association of systemic collagen type IV formation with survival among patients undergoing hemodialysis....

  7. Avoidance, biomass and survival response of soil dwelling (endogeic) earthworms to OECD artificial soil: potential implications for earthworm ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brami, C; Glover, A R; Butt, K R; Lowe, C N

    2017-05-01

    Soil dwelling earthworms are now adopted more widely in ecotoxicology, so it is vital to establish if standardised test parameters remain applicable. The main aim of this study was to determine the influence of OECD artificial soil on selected soil-dwelling, endogeic earthworm species. In an initial experiment, biomass change in mature Allolobophora chlorotica was recorded in Standard OECD Artificial Soil (AS) and also in Kettering Loam (KL). In a second experiment, avoidance behaviour was recorded in a linear gradient with varying proportions of AS and KL (100% AS, 75% AS + 25% KL, 50% KS + 50% KL, 25% AS + 75% KL, 100% KL) with either A. chlorotica or Octolasion cyaneum. Results showed a significant decrease in A. chlorotica biomass in AS relative to KL, and in the linear gradient, both earthworm species preferentially occupied sections containing higher proportions of KL over AS. Soil texture and specifically % composition and particle size of sand are proposed as key factors that influenced observed results. This research suggests that more suitable substrates are required for ecotoxicology tests with soil dwelling earthworms.

  8. Long-term survival in stage IV melanoma after repetitive surgical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Tsvetomir; Siegel, Robert; Bembenek, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Surgical therapy in patients with stage IV melanoma is controversial and always an individual decision. We report the case of a young melanoma patient, who underwent resection of 5 distant metastases from 4 different organ systems. Thereby, the patient achieved a stable state of disease and a good quality of life for up to now 67 months without any evidence for further tumor manifestations at present. A systemic chemo- or immunotherapy was never applied. In selected patients with stage IV melanoma, surgery alone can provide long-term survival with good quality of life. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Time trend analysis of primary tumor resection for stage IV colorectal cancer: less surgery, improved survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chung-Yuan; Bailey, Christina E; You, Y Nancy; Skibber, John M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Feig, Barry W; Chang, George J

    2015-03-01

    With the advent of effective modern chemotherapeutic and biologic agents, primary tumor resection for patients with stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) may not be routinely necessary. To evaluate the secular patterns of primary tumor resection use in stage IV CRC in the United States. A retrospective cohort study using data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results CRC registry. Demographic and clinical factors were compared for 64,157 patients diagnosed with stage IV colon or rectal cancer from January 1, 1988, through December 31, 2010, who had undergone primary tumor resection and those who had not. Rates of primary tumor resection and median relative survival were calculated for each year. Joinpoint regression analysis was used to determine when a significant change in trend in the primary tumor resection rate had occurred. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with primary tumor resection. Difference in primary tumor resection rates over time. Of the 64,157 patients with stage IV CRC, 43,273 (67.4%) had undergone primary tumor resection. The annual rate of primary tumor resection decreased from 74.5% in 1988 to 57.4% in 2010 (Ptrend toward fewer primary tumor resections was seen. Despite the decreasing primary tumor resection rate, patient survival rates improved. However, primary tumor resection may still be overused, and current treatment practices lag behind evidence-based treatment guidelines.

  10. Ecotoxicological effects of discharge of Nigerian petroleum refinery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-04-07

    Palaemoneles africanus) from the aquatic environment. ... water, sediment, or soil and evaluate the effect of conta- mination on the survival, growth, ... help define the ecotoxicological effects of environmental contaminants (USEPA ...

  11. Ecotoxicology: problems and approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levin, Simon A

    1989-01-01

    ... of xenobiotic and other chemicals to the environment. Of fundamental importance is that it depicts ecotoxicology from the ecosystem perspective, rather than simply looking at the effects of chemicals on individuals or populations...

  12. Nanomaterials in ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck James; Krogh, Paul Henning; Lead, Jamie M

    2008-01-01

    In ecotoxicology, a problem exists of quantifying real exposure and corresponding effects, especially in complex environments such as the soil. Hence, for a given total soil concentration to which the organism is exposed, the effect level depends on the available fraction and the chemical status ...... ion activity models (FlAM) and biotic ligand models (BLM). Quantification and characterization of actual exposure is also of concern for nanomaterial and nanoparticle (NP) terrestrial ecotoxicology...

  13. Survival Analysis of 1,742 Patients with Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Hong PENG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective At present non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still the leading cause of death induced by cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors of advanced NSCLC. Methods Total 1,742 cases of stage IV NSCLC data from Jan 4, 2000 to Dec 25, 2008 in Shanghai Chest Hospital were collected, confirmed by pathological examinations. Analysis was made to observe the impact of treatment on prognosis in gender, age, smoking history, pathology, classification, clinical TNM stage. Survival rate, survival difference were evaluated by Kaplan-Meire method and Logrank test respectively. The prognosis were analyzed by Cox multivariate regression. Results The median survival time of 1,742 patients was 10.0 months (9.5 months-10.5 months. One, two, three, four, and five-year survival rates were 44%, 22%, 13%, 9%, 6% respectively. The median survivals of single or multiple metastasis were 11 months vs 7 months (P < 0.001. Survival time were different in metastasic organs, with the median survival time as follows: lung for about 12 months (11.0 months-12.9 months, bone for 9 months (8.3 months-9.6 months, brain for 8 months (6.8 months-9.1 months, liver, adrenal gland, distannt lymph node metastasis for 5 months (3.8 months-6.1 months, and subcutaneous for 3 months (1.7 months-4.3 months. The median survival times of adenocarcinoma (n=1,086, 62% and squamous cell carcinoma cases (n=305, 17.5% were 12 months vs 8 months (P < 0.001. The median survival time of chemotherapy and best supportive care were 11 months vs 6 months (P < 0.001; the median survival times of with and without radiotherapy were 11 months vs 9 months (P=0.017. Conclusion Gender, age, gross type, pathological type, clinical T stage, N stage, numbers of metastatic organ, smoking history, treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer were independent prognostic factors.

  14. Driver Mutations Determine Survival in Smokers and Never Smokers with Stage IIIB/IV Lung Adenocarcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Paul K.; Johnson, Melissa L.; D’Angelo, Sandra P.; Sima, Camelia S.; Ang, Daphne; Dogan, Snjezana; Miller, Vincent A.; Ladanyi, Marc; Kris, Mark G.; Riely, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) never smokers lived 50% longer than former/current smokers. This observation persisted after adjusting for age, performance status, and gender. We hypothesized that smoking-dependent differences in the distribution of driver mutations might explain differences in prognosis between these subgroups. Methods We reviewed 293 never smokers and 382 former/current smokers with lung adenocarcinoma who underwent testing for EGFR and KRAS mutations and rearrangements in ALK between 2009 and 2010. Clinical outcomes and patient characteristics were collected. Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Group comparison was performed with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards methods. Results While the overall incidence of these mutations was nearly identical (55% never smokers vs. 57% current/former smokers, p=0.48), there were significant differences in the distribution of mutations between these groups: EGFR mutations- 37% never smokers vs. 14% former/current smokers (pnever smokers vs. 43% former/current smokers (pnever smokers vs. 2% former/current smokers (pnever smokers and former/current smokers, prognosis differed significantly by genotype. Patients harboring KRAS mutations demonstrated the poorest survival. Smoking status, however, had no influence on survival within each genotype. Conclusion Never smokers and former/current smokers with lung adenocarcinomas are not homogeneous subgroups. Each is made up of individuals whose tumors have a unique distribution of driver mutations which are associated with different prognoses, irrespective of smoking history. PMID:22605530

  15. The effect of distant metastases sites on survival in de novo stage-IV breast cancer: A SEER database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, San-Gang; Li, Hui; Tang, Li-Ying; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Li, Feng-Yan; Chen, Yong-Xiong; He, Zhen-Yu

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effect of distant metastases sites on survival in patients with de novo stage-IV breast cancer. From 2010 to 2013, patients with a diagnosis of de novo stage-IV breast cancer were identified using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to analyze the effect of distant metastases sites on breast cancer-specific survival and overall survival. A total of 7575 patients were identified. The most common metastatic sites were bone, followed by lung, liver, and brain. Patients with hormone receptor+/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- and hormone receptor+/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+ status were more prone to bone metastases. Lung and brain metastases were common in hormone receptor-/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+ and hormone receptor-/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- subtypes, and patients with hormone receptor+/ human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+ and hormone receptor-/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+ subtypes were more prone to liver metastases. Patients with liver and brain metastases had unfavorable prognosis for breast cancer-specific survival and overall survival, whereas bone and lung metastases had no effect on patient survival in multivariate analyses. The hormone receptor-/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- subtype conferred a significantly poorer outcome in terms of breast cancer-specific survival and overall survival. hormone receptor+/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+ disease was associated with the best prognosis in terms of breast cancer-specific survival and overall survival. Patients with liver and brain metastases were more likely to experience poor prognosis for breast cancer-specific survival and overall survival by various breast cancer subtypes. Distant metastases sites have differential impact on clinical outcomes in stage-IV breast cancer. Follow-up screening for brain and

  16. New perspectives in ecotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Simon A.; Kimball, Kenneth D.; McDowell, William H.; Kimball, Sarah F.

    1984-09-01

    The task of regulating potentially harmful chemicals in the environment is presently hindered by the lack of appropriate concepts and methods for evaluating the effects of anthropogenic chemicals on ecosystems. Toxicity tests at the molecular and physiological levels have been used successfully as indicators of adverse effects on test organisms and have been extrapolated to humans to establish a basis for risk assessment. However, laboratory measurements of effects upon individuals do not translate readily into potential effects upon natural populations, in part because natural populations interact with other populations and with the physical environment. Even more difficult to assess are the deleterious impacts of anthropogenic chemicals on ecosystems, because of effects on species interactions, diversity, nutrient cycling, productivity, climatic changes, and other processes. Effects on ecosystems resulting from chemical stresses are outside the realm of classical toxicology, and an ecosystem-level perspective is essential for the consideration of such effects; but the science that deals with ecosystem-level effects, ecotoxicology, is still developing. This article synthesizes the topics discussed at a workshop on ecotoxicology held by the Ecosystems Research Center at Cornell University. Topics covered include: the regulatory framework in which ecotoxicological research must be applied; ecosystem modification of toxicant fate and transport; how ecosystem composition, structure, and function are influenced by chemicals; methods currently available for predicting the effects of chemicals at the ecosystem level; and recommendations on research needs to enhance the state of the science of ecotoxicology.

  17. Green technology meets ecotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Radošević

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By applying concept and principles of green chemistry into different technological processes, green technologies are developed. The environmental and economic benefits of “green” approach is achieved through several directions, such as the use of renewable raw materials, creation of economic efficiency, the use of alternative reaction conditions, as well as the application of non-conventional solvents. From the point view of green chemistry, alternative solvents, in order to be a “green“ substitution to hazardous organic solvents, should be: non-volatile, non-flammable, stabile, synthesized by an environmentally friendly procedure, nontoxic and biodegradable. The toxic impact of all newly synthesized chemicals, such as alternative solvents, could be determined by methods and techniques of ecotoxicology. Ecotoxicology, an interdisciplinary scientific field, can serve as a way of monitoring the greenness of the processes. In vivo and in vitro experiments are used to study the effects of chemicals on different levels of organizations, from molecules to communities and ecosystem. The usage of in vitro methods is encouraged by a scientific community and regulatory agencies as an alternative to in vivo studies in order to reduce the number of laboratory animals used in the toxicological studies. Therefore, in this paper we gave a brief overview on the usage of animal cell cultures within the field of green chemistry and technology.

  18. Lithium promotes DNA stability and survival of ischemic retinal neurocytes by upregulating DNA ligase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Nandan; Tian, Sijia; Li, Fan; Hu, Huan; Chen, Pei; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Lijun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zhao; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-11-17

    Neurons display genomic fragility and show fragmented DNA in pathological degeneration. A failure to repair DNA breaks may result in cell death or apoptosis. Lithium protects retinal neurocytes following nutrient deprivation or partial nerve crush, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Here we demonstrate that pretreatment with lithium protects retinal neurocytes from ischemia-induced damage and enhances light response in rat retina following ischemia-reperfusion injury. Moreover, we found that DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair is implicated in this process because in ischemic retinal neurocytes, lithium significantly reduces the number of γ-H2AX foci (well-characterized markers of DNA double-strand breaks in situ) and increases the DNA ligase IV expression level. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf-1) and phosphorylated cyclic AMP-response element binding protein-1 (P-CREB1) bind to ligase IV promoter to cause upregulation of ligase IV in neurocytes. The ischemic upregulation of Nrf-1 and lithium-induced increase of P-CREB1 cooperate to promote transcription of ligase IV. Short hairpin RNAs against Nrf-1 and CREB1 could significantly inhibit the increase in promoter activity and expression of ligase IV observed in the control oligos following lithium treatment in retinal neurocytes. More importantly, ischemic stimulation triggers the expression of ligase IV. Taken together, our results thus reveal a novel mechanism that lithium offers neuroprotection from ischemia-induced damage by enhancing DNA NHEJ repair.

  19. Handbook of ecotoxicology, second edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    2003-01-01

    Handbook of Ecotoxicology, Second Edition focuses on toxic substances and how they affect ecosystems worldwide. It presents methods for quantifying and measuring ecotoxicological effects in the field and in the lab, as well as methods for estimating, predicting, and modeling in ecotoxicology studies. Completely revised and updated with 18 new chapters, this second edition includes contributions from over 75 international experts. Also, a Technical Review Board reviewed all manuscripts for accuracy and currency. This authoritative work is the definitive reference for students, researchers, consultants, and other professionals in the environmental sciences, toxicology, chemistry, biology, and ecology - in academia, industry, and government.

  20. Treatment of base of tongue cancer, stage III and stage IV with primary surgery: survival and functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Khaled; Rieger, Jen; Harris, Jeffery R; Mlynarek, Alex; Williams, David; Islam, Tahera; Seikaly, Hadi

    2015-08-01

    This study examines functional outcome (speech and swallowing), survival, and disease control in patients receiving an intensified treatment regimen with primary aggressive surgery, and postoperative radiotherapy or postoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy, for previously untreated, resectable, stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue base. Sixty-six consecutive patients treated from June 1997 to June 2006 were followed prospectively through the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Surgery Reconstruction Clinic. Speech and swallowing data were gathered at four evaluation times during the first year. Speech assessment was conducted by PERCI, Nasometer, and C-AIDS and swallowing assessment by Modified barium swallow, Diet survey and G-tube. Also, the overall survival, disease-specific survival and loco regional control were measured. The average age of the patients was 56.8, 85 % male and 15 % female. All patients had primary surgical resection and 83 % received postoperative radiotherapy and 17 % chemoradiation therapy. Overall survival at 3 years was 80.3 % and 5 years 52.2 %. Disease-specific survival at 3 years was 86.7 % and 5 years was 77.5 %. Local control was 94 %. Distal metastasis and second primary were found to be 7.5 % each. Primary surgical treatment of advanced BOT cancer offers excellent functional outcome, local control and disease-specific survival.

  1. Survival Impact of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Masaoka Stage II to IV Thymomas: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yu Jin; Kim, Eunji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Jae, E-mail: khjae@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong-Gyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yan, Jinchun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalian Medical University, Liaoning (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Liu, Qin [The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Patel, Shilpen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival impact of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in stage II to IV thymomas, using systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods and Materials: A database search was conducted with EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Ovid from inception to August 2015. Thymic carcinomas were excluded, and studies comparing overall survival (OS) with and without PORT in thymomas were included. The hazard ratios (HRs) of OS were extracted, and a random-effects model was used in the pooled analysis. Results: Seven retrospective series with a total of 1724 patients were included and analyzed. Almost all of the patients underwent macroscopically complete resection, and thymoma histology was confirmed by the World Health Organization criteria. In the overall analysis of stage II to IV thymomas, OS was not altered with the receipt of PORT (HR 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58-1.08). Although PORT was not associated with survival difference in Masaoka stage II disease (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.83-2.55), improved OS was observed with the addition of PORT in the discrete pooled analysis of stage III to IV (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.40-0.99). Significant heterogeneity and publication bias were not found in the analyses. Conclusions: From the present meta-analysis of sole primary thymomas, we suggest the potential OS benefit of PORT in locally advanced tumors with macroscopically complete resection, but not in stage II disease. Further investigations with sufficient survival data are needed to establish detailed treatment indications.

  2. Ecotoxicology and ecosystems health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that traditional investigations are no longer sufficient either to assess the ecological characteristics of a resource or to better understand the dynamics of an ecosystem. Reliable experimental data to be used for further investigation as well as for environmental corrective action are obtained using the traditional quantitative and qualitative biological methods. In fact, environmental health is connected with well functioning global and local ecological cycles, that also assure renewable, good quality natural resources. There is, therefore, a keen need for new, adequate techniques based on biological parameters that will allow for a better understanding and protection of the environment. The use of biological indexes and indicators and toxicology tests have been also prescribed by a recent Italian law on water protection. Differences between toxicology, environmental toxicology and ecotoxicology, often used as equivalent terms, are also analyzed. Furthermore a new classification is proposed and mapping of ecobiotic and toxicologic data on studying waters in river basins.

  3. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent.

  4. Ethics in science: ecotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cairns Jr.

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Predictive ecotoxicology emphasizes the probable environmental outcome of exposure to toxics, rather than the mere appraisal of existing damage, and in so doing raises some complex but interesting ethical issues. Awareness of endocrine-disrupting chemicals is blurring the line between humankind and other life forms in toxicity testing by providing evidence that both humans and wildlife suffer adverse reproductive and developmental effect. There is a wide variety of chemicals that have been reported as potential endocrine disruptors. Finally, with the increasing loss of wildlife habitat, protecting the quality and ultimate fate of the remaining habitat from the effects of toxis substances becomes increasingly important to the moral quest for sustainable use of the planet.

  5. The long-term survival of stage IV gastric cancer patients with conversion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Takao; Matsuhashi, Nobuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Ohdan, Hideki

    2017-06-14

    A retrospective study was performed to clarify the role of conversion therapy (surgery with a prospect of R0 resection performed in initially unresectable metastatic cancer that responded to the chemotherapy) in stage IV gastric cancer (GC). We treated 259 stage IV GC patients with systemic chemotherapy at Gifu and Hiroshima University Hospitals between 2001-2013. Of these, 84 patients who were subsequently treated by surgery were classified into four categories according to our previously published classification of stage IV GC, and short- and long-term outcomes were analyzed. Surgery was performed in 84 patients, of which 7 were performed following the neoadjuvant chemotherapy, whereas the other 77 that excluded neoadjuvant chemotherapy cases were considered the conversion therapy. The postoperative mortality and morbidity were comparable with those reported clinical trials. The MSTs of the patients with/without surgery for each category were 28.3/5.8 months for category 1, 30.5/11.0 months for category 2, 31.0/18.5 months for category 3 and 24.7/10.0 months for category 4. The MST of the R0 resected patients (41.3 months) was far better than that of the R1-2 resected patients (21.2 months). The MSTs of the patients with R0/R1-2 resection were 56.2/16.3 months for category 2, 33.3/29.6 months for category 3 and 40.7/17.8 months for category 4. There were long-term survivors who underwent conversion therapy for stage IV GC. Adequate selection of stage IV GC patients for conversion therapy may be an important role for the surgical oncologist in the new era.

  6. The Expression of p-STAT3 in Stage IV Melanoma: Risk of CNS Metastasis and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Roland; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Schacherer, Christopher W.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a key molecular hub of tumorigenesis and immune suppression. The expression of phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) has been shown to be higher in melanoma metastasis to the central nervous system (CNS) relative to distant metastasis in the rest of the body (systemic). We sought to determine whether the increased expression of p-STAT3 in non-CNS systemic melanoma metastasis is associated with an increased risk of developing CNS metastasis and is a negative prognostic factor for overall survival time. Methods We retrospectively identified 299 patients with stage IV melanoma. In a tissue microarray of systemic non-CNS metastasis specimens from these patients, we used immunohistochemical analysis to measure the percentage of cells with p-STAT3 expression and Kaplan–Meier survival estimates to analyze the association of p-STAT3 expression with median survival time, time to first CNS metastasis, and development of CNS metastasis. Results Lung metastases exhibited the highest level of p-STAT3 expression while spleen lesions had the lowest. The p-STAT3 expression was not associated with an increased risk of developing CNS metastasis or time to CNS metastasis. However, p-STAT3 expression was a negative prognostic factor for overall survival time in patients that did not develop CNS metastasis. Conclusions Stage IV melanoma patients without CNS metastasis treated with p-STAT3 inhibitors in efficacy studies should be stratified based on tumor expression of p-STAT3; however since p-STAT3 expression is not associated with the risk of CNS disease, increased MRI surveillance of the brain is not likely necessary. PMID:22488042

  7. Transcriptomics in ecotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Beat B.; Madureira, Danielle J.; Pillai, Smitha

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of analytical tools for high-throughput screening of biomolecules has revolutionized the way in which toxicologists explore the impact of chemicals or other stressors on organisms. One of the most developed and routinely applied high-throughput analysis approaches is transcriptomics, also often referred to as gene expression profiling. The transcriptome represents all RNA molecules, including the messenger RNA (mRNA), which constitutes the building blocks for translating DNA into amino acids to form proteins. The entirety of mRNA is a mirror of the genes that are actively expressed in a cell or an organism at a given time. This in turn allows one to deduce how organisms respond to changes in the external environment. In this article we explore how transcriptomics is currently applied in ecotoxicology and highlight challenges and trends. Figure The transcriptome (RNA) is a mirror of the genes that are actively expressed in a cell or organism at a given time, providing information on how organisms respond to chemicals or other stressors in the environment PMID:20369230

  8. Survival and safety associated with aggressive surgery for stage III/IV epithelial ovarian cancer: A single institution observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Shinichi; Kato, Kazuyoshi; Nishikimi, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Ayumu; Shozu, Makio

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of aggressive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer at a non-high-volume center. We evaluated consecutive patients with stage III/IV ovarian, fallopian, and peritoneal cancer undergoing elective aggressive surgery from January 2008 to December 2012, which encompassed the first 5years after implementing an aggressive surgery protocol. After receiving appropriate training for 9months, a gynecological surgical team began performing multi-visceral resections. Primary debulking surgery was chosen when the team considered that optimal surgery was achievable on the initial laparotomy, otherwise interval debulking surgery was chosen (the protocol treatments). Analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat basis (full-set analysis), and outcomes were compared to those of patients who underwent standard surgery between 2000 and 2007. Of 106 consecutive patients studied, 87 (82%) underwent aggressive surgery per protocol and 19 were excluded. Serous carcinoma was the most common disease (78%), followed by clear cell carcinoma (7%), and 32% of the patients had stage IV disease. The respective median progression-free and overall survival rates increased from 14.6 and 38.1months before implementation, respectively, to 25.0 and 68.5months after implementation, respectively. Complete resection was achieved in 83 of the 106 patients (78%), and the surgical complexity score was high (>8) in 61 patients (58%); although there was no mortality within 12weeks of surgery, major complications occurred in 8 patients. We confirmed that outcomes improved after implementing aggressive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer, without causing a significant increase in mortality. Factors enhancing survival outcomes are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Digestate and Fugate – Fertilizers with Ecotoxicological Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Jančula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing number of decentralised biogas plants increases not only the amount of biogas produced, but also the production of digestate. Digestate and fugate are believed to be good fertilizers. However, there is often a tradeoff between other environmental impacts linked to agricultural production like eutrophication or ecotoxicity. Only limited ecotoxicological information is known about the effects of digestate or fugate on terrestrial fauna and flora. This is the first study comparing the survival and reproduction of collembolans as the representative soil fauna and the root growth and photosynthetic activity of Sinapis alba and Panicum miliaceum plants when exposed to digestate and fugate. Comparison of ecotoxicological results with chemical analysis of both digestate and fugate has led to the conclusions that application of digestate and fugate was beneficial neither for tested plants, nor for zooedaphon. Under practically used dosing both digestate and fugate can represent potential ecotoxicological problems, which can affect zooedaphon diversity and reproduction resulting in degradation of soil structure, reduction of microbial activity or water retention capacity of treated soils. That is why we do recommend at least simplified ecotoxicological testing of digestate as presented in this study. Ecotoxicity testing can support decision of direct application on soil, or mixing the digestate with other materials (like compost, manure, pond sediments, or biochar, what will help to utilize nutrients and consequently can prevent degradation of soil fertility.

  10. QSARs in ecotoxicological risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roode, De D.; Hoekzema, C.C.; Vries-Buitenweg, de S.; Waart, van de B.; Hoeven, Van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The need for more ecotoxicological data encourages the use of QSARs because of the reduction of (animal) testing, time and cost. QSARs may however only be used if they prove to be reliable and accurate. In this paper, four QSARs were attempted to predict toxicity for 170 compounds from a broad

  11. Driver mutations determine survival in smokers and never-smokers with stage IIIB/IV lung adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Paul K; Johnson, Melissa L; D'Angelo, Sandra P; Sima, Camelia S; Ang, Daphne; Dogan, Snjezana; Miller, Vincent A; Ladanyi, Marc; Kris, Mark G; Riely, Gregory J

    2012-12-01

    The authors previously demonstrated that never-smokers with stage IIIB/IV nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lived 50% longer than former/current smokers. This observation persisted after adjusting for age, performance status, and sex. In this study, the authors hypothesized that smoking-dependent differences in the distribution of driver mutations may explain differences in prognosis between these subgroups. In total, 293 never-smokers and 382 former/current smokers with lung adenocarcinoma who underwent testing for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations and rearrangements in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) between 2009 and 2010 were investigated. Clinical outcomes and patient characteristics were collected. Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Group comparison was performed with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards methods. Although the overall incidence of these mutations was nearly identical (55% never-smokers vs 57% current/former smokers; P = .48), there were significant differences in the distribution of mutations between these groups for EGFR mutations (37% never-smokers vs 14% former/current smokers; P never-smokers vs 43% former/current smokers; P never-smokers vs 2% former/current smokers; P never-smokers and former/current smokers, the prognosis differed significantly by genotype. Patients who had KRAS mutations had the poorest survival. Smoking status, however, had no influence on survival within each genotype. Never-smokers and former/current smokers with lung adenocarcinomas were not homogeneous subgroups. Each was made up of individuals whose tumors had a unique distribution of driver mutations, which were associated with different prognoses, irrespective of smoking history. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  12. Cardiopulmonary Bypass has No Significant Impact on Survival in Patients Undergoing Nephrectomy and Level III-IV Inferior Vena Cava Thrombectomy: Multi-Institutional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hao G; Tilki, Derya; Dall'Era, Marc A; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Carballido, Joaquín A; Chandrasekar, Thenappan; Chromecki, Thomas; Ciancio, Gaetano; Daneshmand, Siamak; Gontero, Paolo; Gonzalez, Javier; Haferkamp, Axel; Hohenfellner, Markus; Huang, William C; Espinós, Estefania Linares; Mandel, Philipp; Martinez-Salamanca, Juan I; Master, Viraj A; McKiernan, James M; Montorsi, Francesco; Novara, Giacomo; Pahernik, Sascha; Palou, Juan; Pruthi, Raj S; Rodriguez-Faba, Oscar; Russo, Paul; Scherr, Douglas S; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Spahn, Martin; Terrone, Carlo; Vergho, Daniel; Wallen, Eric M; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Zigeuner, Richard; Libertino, John A; Evans, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    The impact of cardiopulmonary bypass in level III-IV tumor thrombectomy on surgical and oncologic outcomes is unknown. We determine the impact of cardiopulmonary bypass on overall and cancer specific survival, as well as surgical complication rates and immediate outcomes in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III-IV tumor thrombectomy with or without cardiopulmonary bypass. We retrospectively analyzed 362 patients with renal cell cancer and with level III or IV tumor thrombus from 1992 to 2012 at 22 U.S. and European centers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare overall and cancer specific survival between patients with and without cardiopulmonary bypass. Perioperative mortality and complication rates were assessed using logistic regression analyses. Median overall survival was 24.6 months in noncardiopulmonary bypass cases and 26.6 months in cardiopulmonary bypass cases. Overall survival and cancer specific survival did not differ significantly in both groups on univariate analysis or when adjusting for known risk factors. On multivariate analysis no significant differences were seen in hospital length of stay, Clavien 1-4 complication rate, intraoperative or 30-day mortality and cancer specific survival. Limitations include the retrospective nature of the study. In our multi-institutional analysis the use of cardiopulmonary bypass did not significantly impact cancer specific survival or overall survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III or IV tumor thrombectomy. Neither approach was independently associated with increased mortality on multivariate analysis. Greater surgical complications were not independently associated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has no significant impact on survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III-IV inferior vena cava thrombectomy; a multi-institutional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Era, Marc A.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Carballido, Joaquín A.; Chandrasekar, Thenappan; Chromecki, Thomas; Ciancio, Gaetano; Daneshmand, Siamak; Gontero, Paolo; Gonzalez, Javier; Haferkamp, Axel; Hohenfellner, Markus; Huang, William C.; Espinós, Estefania Linares; Mandel, Philipp; Martinez-Salamanca, Juan I.; Master, Viraj A.; McKiernan, James M.; Montorsi, Francesco; Novara, Giacomo; Pahernik, Sascha; Palou, Juan; Pruthi, Raj S.; Rodriguez-Faba, Oscar; Russo, Paul; Scherr, Douglas S.; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Spahn, Martin; Terrone, Carlo; Vergho, Daniel; Wallen, Eric M.; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Zigeuner, Richard; Libertino, John A.; Evans, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The impact of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) usage in level III-IV tumor thrombectomy on surgical and oncologic outcomes is unknown. We sought to determine the impact of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on overall and cancer specific survival, as well as surgical complication rates, and immediate outcomes in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III-IV tumor thrombectomy with or without CPB. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 362 patients with RCC and with level III or IV tumor thrombus from 1992 to 2012 in 22 US and European centers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare overall and cancer-specific survival between patients with and without CPB. Perioperative mortality and complications rates were assessed using logistic regression analyses. Results The median overall survival was 24.6 months in non-CPB patients and 26.6 months in CPB patients. Overall survival and cancer-specific survival (CSS) did not differ significantly in both groups, neither in univariate analysis nor when adjusting for known risk factors. In multivariate analysis, no significant differences were seen in hospital LOS, Clavien 1-4 complication rate, intraoperative or 30 day mortality, and CSS between both groups. Limitations include the retrospective nature of the study. Conclusions In our multi-institutional analysis, the use of cardiopulmonary bypass did not significantly impact cancer specific survival or overall survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III or IV tumor thrombectomy. Neither approach was independently associated with increased mortality in the multivariate analysis. Higher surgical complications were not independently associated with the use of CPB. PMID:25797392

  14. Epigenetics in an ecotoxicological context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Janssen, Colin R

    2014-04-01

    Epigenetics can play a role in interactions between chemicals and exposed species, between species and abiotic ecosystem components or between species of the same or another population in a community. Technological progress and advanced insights into epigenetic processes have led to the description of epigenetic features (mainly DNA methylation) in many ecologically relevant species: algae, plants, several invertebrates and fish. Epigenetic changes in plants, insects and cladocerans have been reported to be induced by various environmental stress factors including nutrition or water deficiency, grazing, light or temperature alterations, social environment, and dissolved organic matter concentrations. As regards chemicals, studies in rats and mice exposed to specific pesticides, hydrocarbons, dioxins, and endocrine disrupting chemicals demonstrated the induction of epigenetic changes, suggesting the need for further research with these substances in an ecotoxicological context. In fish and plants, exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons, metals, and soluble fractions of solid waste affected the epigenetic status. A novel concept in ecotoxicological epigenetics is the induction of transgenerational stress resistance upon chemical exposure, as demonstrated in rice exposed to metals. Evaluating epigenetics in ecotoxicological field studies is a second relatively new approach. A cryptic lineage of earthworms had developed arsenic tolerance in the field, concurrent with specific DNA methylation patterns. Flatfish caught in the framework of environmental monitoring had developed tumours, exhibiting specific DNA methylation patterns. Two main potential implications of epigenetics in an ecotoxicological context are (1) the possibility of transgenerationally inherited, chemical stress-induced epigenetic changes with associated phenotypes and (2) epigenetically induced adaptation to stress upon long-term chemical exposure. Key knowledge gaps are concerned with the causality of

  15. Ecotoxicology of Amphibians and Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    For many years, ecological research on amphibians and reptiles has lagged behind that of other vertebrates such as fishes, birds, and mammals, despite the known importance of these animals in their environments. The lack of study has been particularly acute in the he area of ecotoxicology where the number of published scientific papers is a fraction of that found for the other vertebrate classes. Recently, scientists have become aware of severe crises among amphibian populations, including unexplained and sudden extinctions, worldwide declines, and hideous malformations. In many of these instances, contaminants have been listed as probable contributors. Data on the effects of contaminants on reptiles are so depauperate that even the most elementary interpretations are difficult. This state-of-the-science review and synthesis of amphibian and reptile ecotoxicology demonstrates the inter-relationships among distribution, ecology, physiology, and contaminant exposure, and interprets these topics as they pertain to comparative toxicity, population declines, malformations, and risk assessment . In this way, the book identifies and serves as a basis for the most pressing research needs in the coming years. The editors have invited 27 other internationally respected experts to examine the state of existing data in specific areas, interpret it in light of current problems, and identify research gaps and needs. Through its emphasis on recent research, extensive reviews and synthesis, Ecotoxicology of Amphibians and Reptiles will remain a definitive reference work well into the new century.

  16. Long-term Survival and Clinical Benefit from Adoptive T-cell Transfer in Stage IV Melanoma Patients Is Determined by a Four-Parameter Tumor Immune Signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melief, Sara M; Visconti, Valeria V; Visser, Marten; van Diepen, Merel; Kapiteijn, Ellen H W; van den Berg, Joost H; Haanen, John B A G; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Oosting, Jan; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Verdegaal, Els M E

    2017-02-01

    The presence of tumor-infiltrating immune cells is associated with longer survival and a better response to immunotherapy in early-stage melanoma, but a comprehensive study of the in situ immune microenvironment in stage IV melanoma has not been performed. We investigated the combined influence of a series of immune factors on survival and response to adoptive cell transfer (ACT) in stage IV melanoma patients. Metastases of 73 stage IV melanoma patients, 17 of which were treated with ACT, were studied with respect to the number and functional phenotype of lymphocytes and myeloid cells as well as for expression of galectins-1, -3, and -9. Single factors associated with better survival were identified using Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses, and those factors were used for interaction analyses. The results were validated using The Cancer Genome Atlas database. We identified four parameters that were associated with a better survival: CD8(+) T cells, galectin-9(+) dendritic cells (DC)/DC-like macrophages, a high M1/M2 macrophage ratio, and the expression of galectin-3 by tumor cells. The presence of at least three of these parameters formed an independent positive prognostic factor for long-term survival. Patients displaying this four-parameter signature were found exclusively among patients responding to ACT and were the ones with sustained clinical benefit. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(2); 170-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Ecotoxicological effects of activated carbon addition to sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Suijkerbuijk, Martin P W; Schmitt, Heike; Sinnige, Theo L

    2009-08-01

    Activated carbon (AC) addition is a recently developed technique for the remediation of sediments and soils contaminated with hydrophobic organic chemicals. Laboratory and field experiments have demonstrated that the addition of 3-4% of AC can reduce aqueous concentrations and the bioaccumulation potential of contaminants. However, one aspect of the technique that has hardly received any attention is the possible occurrence of secondary, eco(toxico)logical effects, i.e., effects of AC addition on the health, behavior, and habitat quality of local organisms. In the present study, several ecotoxicological effects were investigated in AC-water and AC-enriched (0-25%) sediment systems. It was demonstrated that (i) powdered activated carbons can be toxic to aquatic invertebrates (Lumbriculus variegatus, Daphnia magna, and Corophium volutator) based on different mechanisms and preferably should be washed prior to application; (ii) Asellus aquaticus and Corophium volutator may physically avoid AC-enriched sediments; (iii) exposure of Lumbriculus variegatus to AC-enriched sediments lead to a time and dose-dependent reduction in the worms' lipid content, which was most probably caused by the observation that (iv) worm egestion rates decreased drastically upon AC addition, indicating that the presence of AC disturbed feeding behavior; and (v) there were no obvious effects on the microbiological community structure. All in all, these results suggest potential ecotoxicological effects of powdered AC addition and stress the need for a detailed further investigation of secondary effects of the technique, prior to any large-scale field application.

  18. Assessment of the influence of use on ecotoxicological characteristics of synthetic ester lubricants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxam, Gudrun; Hahn, Stefan; Dott, Wolfgang; Eisentraeger, Adolf

    2002-10-01

    Synthetic ester lubricants need optimisation about their technical and their ecotoxicological characteristics. To determine the ecotoxicological potential the required examinations can be based on the procedure for a risk assessment of chemicals. At present risk classification of lubricant oils is carried out with new oil fluids that are normally prepared before application in aqueous bioassays. In order to improve the ecotoxicological characteristics of some lubricant oils, the quality of the preparation method has been optimised. The resulting preparation protocol leads to aqueous extracts of the oil fluids that can be tested using biological assays. The extent of the changes of the chemical composition caused by the use as well as the ecotoxicological effects caused by additives have to be taken into consideration. For this reason various used lubricants are tested in addition to new oil fluids. In this work various lubricant samples were examined with standardised bacterial growth assays with Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida, luminescence inhibition assay with V. fischeri, survival assay with Daphnia magna and algal growth inhibition assay with Scenedesmus subspicatus. The chemical characterisation of the aqueous extracts included the determination of pH, conductivity, heavy metals, the content of dissolved organic carbon, inorganic anions and the content of phosphorus. The results emphasize the thesis that environmentally acceptable lubricants can undergo a change of their ecotoxicological potential during the use. Some of the substances that are normally added to base fluids in order to enhance the applicability of the oils may possess a high toxicological potential.

  19. Ecotoxicology a derivative of encyclopedia of ecology

    CERN Document Server

    Fath, Brian D

    2010-01-01

    The compilation of the articles in this derivative emphasizes ecological components and fundamental paradigms of ecotoxicology. The alphabetical listing of toxic substances and chemicals in Part B and C serves as a quick reference for professionals. Additionally, the international focus of Ecotoxicology and the range of toxins it covers will make it an indispensable resource to scientists. The password protected companion website will contain Estimation of Ecotoxicological Parameters (EEP) software developed by the author. EEP allows users to get ecotoxicological properties of chemicals in data bases or they can estimate them (there are only a few percentages in the data base). There are very specific estimation methods that only estimate for instance the properties for halogenated aromatic compounds or there are very general estimation methods. EEP covers the very general methods and is fast to use but gives in general estimation of higher uncertainty than the very specific methods.

  20. Decreased survival of glioma patients with astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme) associated with long-term use of mobile and cordless phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2014-10-16

    On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a "possible", human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997-2003 and 2007-2009 case-control studies. Use of wireless phones in the >20 years latency group (time since first use) yielded an increased hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.3 for glioma. For astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme; n = 926) mobile phone use yielded HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4-2.9 and cordless phone use HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.04-11 in the same latency category. The hazard ratio for astrocytoma grade IV increased statistically significant per year of latency for wireless phones, HR = 1.020, 95% CI = 1.007-1.033, but not per 100 h cumulative use, HR = 1.002, 95% CI = 0.999-1.005. HR was not statistically significant increased for other types of glioma. Due to the relationship with survival the classification of IARC is strengthened and RF-EMF should be regarded as human carcinogen requiring urgent revision of current exposure guidelines.

  1. Does Type of Tumor Histology Impact Survival among Patients with Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with First-Line Doublet Chemotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Karen M.; Peltz, Gerson; Faries, Douglas E.; Lang, Kathleen; Nyambose, Joshua; Earle, Craig C.; Sugarman, Katherine P.; Taylor, Douglas C. A.; Thompson, David; Marciniak, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy regimens may have differential efficacy by histology in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We examined the impact of histology on survival of patients (N = 2,644) with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who received first-line cisplatin/carboplatin plus gemcitabine (C/C+G) and cisplatin/carboplatin plus a taxane (C/C+T) identified retrospectively in the SEER cancer registry (1997–2002). Patients with squamous and nonsquamous cell carcinoma survived 8.5 months and 8.1 months, respectively (P = .018). No statistically significant difference was observed in survival between C/C+G and C/C+T in both histologies. Adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics, the effect of treatment regimen on survival did not differ by histology (P for interaction = .257). There was no statistically significant difference in hazard of death by histology in both groups. These results contrast the predictive role of histology and improved survival outcomes observed for cisplatin-pemetrexed regimens in advanced nonsquamous NSCLC. PMID:22482053

  2. Does Type of Tumor Histology Impact Survival among Patients with Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with First-Line Doublet Chemotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Clements

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy regimens may have differential efficacy by histology in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We examined the impact of histology on survival of patients (N=2,644 with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who received first-line cisplatin/carboplatin plus gemcitabine (C/C+G and cisplatin/carboplatin plus a taxane (C/C+T identified retrospectively in the SEER cancer registry (1997–2002. Patients with squamous and nonsquamous cell carcinoma survived 8.5 months and 8.1 months, respectively (P=.018. No statistically significant difference was observed in survival between C/C+G and C/C+T in both histologies. Adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics, the effect of treatment regimen on survival did not differ by histology (P for interaction =.257. There was no statistically significant difference in hazard of death by histology in both groups. These results contrast the predictive role of histology and improved survival outcomes observed for cisplatin-pemetrexed regimens in advanced nonsquamous NSCLC.

  3. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  4. Ecotoxicologically based environmental risk limits for several volatile aliphatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong FMW de; Posthuma-Doodeman CJAM; Verbruggen EMJ; SEC

    2007-01-01

    This report describes ecotoxicological environmental risk limits derived for a number of volatile aliphatic hydrocarbons. On the basis of evaluated literature, the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) proposes ecotoxicological environmental risk limits for these compounds

  5. Aquatic ecotoxicology: advancing tools for dealing with emerging risks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amiard, J. C; Mouneyrac, Catherine; Amiard-Triquet, C

    2015-01-01

    "Aquatic Ecotoxicology: Advancing Tools for Dealing with Emerging Risks presents a thorough look at recent advances in aquatic ecotoxicology and their application in assessing the risk of well-known and emerging environmental contaminants...

  6. Marked improvements in survival of patients with stage II-IV rectal cancer in the Netherlands 1989-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.A.G.; van Steenbergen, L.N.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Rutten, H.J.; Marijnen, C.A.M.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; de Vries, E.; Siesling, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Background: Since the 1990s, treatment of patients with rectal cancer has changed in the Netherlands. Aim of this study was to describe these changes in treatment over time and to evaluate their effects on survival. Methods: All patients in the Netherlands Cancer Registry with invasive primary

  7. Development and validation of a radiomics nomogram for progression-free survival prediction in stage IV EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiangdian; Zang, Yali; Li, Weimin; Zhong, Wenzhao; Shi, Jingyun; Dong, Di; Fang, Mengjie; Liu, Zaiyi; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Accurately predict the risk of disease progression and benefit of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) therapy for stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with activing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations by current staging methods are challenge. We postulated that integrating a classifier consisted of multiple computed tomography (CT) phenotypic features, and other clinicopathological risk factors into a single model could improve risk stratification and prediction of progression-free survival (PFS) of EGFR TKIs for these patients. Patients confirmed as stage IV EGFR-mutant NSCLC received EGFR TKIs with no resection; pretreatment contrast enhanced CT performed at approximately 2 weeks before the treatment was enrolled. A six-CT-phenotypic-feature-based classifier constructed by the LASSO Cox regression model, and three clinicopathological factors: pathologic N category, performance status (PS) score, and intrapulmonary metastasis status were used to construct a nomogram in a training set of 115 patients. The prognostic and predictive accuracy of this nomogram was then subjected to an external independent validation of 107 patients. PFS between the training and independent validation set is no statistical difference by Mann-Whitney U test (P = 0.2670). PFS of the patients could be predicted with good consistency compared with the actual survival. C-index of the proposed individualized nomogram in the training set (0·707, 95%CI: 0·643, 0·771) and the independent validation set (0·715, 95%CI: 0·650, 0·780) showed the potential of clinical prognosis to predict PFS of stage IV EGFR-mutant NSCLC from EGFR TKIs. The individualized nomogram might facilitate patient counselling and individualise management of patients with this disease.

  8. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Sun-Hwi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus (HAP has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. Methods: The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD, and the other three showed progressive disease (PD. The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. Conclusion: HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  9. Decreased Survival of Glioma Patients with Astrocytoma Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme Associated with Long-Term Use of Mobile and Cordless Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Carlberg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a “possible”, human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997–2003 and 2007–2009 case-control studies. Use of wireless phones in the >20 years latency group (time since first use yielded an increased hazard ratio (HR = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.2–2.3 for glioma. For astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme; n = 926 mobile phone use yielded HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4–2.9 and cordless phone use HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.04–11 in the same latency category. The hazard ratio for astrocytoma grade IV increased statistically significant per year of latency for wireless phones, HR = 1.020, 95% CI = 1.007–1.033, but not per 100 h cumulative use, HR = 1.002, 95% CI = 0.999–1.005. HR was not statistically significant increased for other types of glioma. Due to the relationship with survival the classification of IARC is strengthened and RF-EMF should be regarded as human carcinogen requiring urgent revision of current exposure guidelines.

  10. Making sense of soil ecotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W. Nelson; Linder, Greg L.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    1995-01-01

    The toxicity of pesticides and environmental contaminants to soil organisms has been measured in studies on earthworms,1 soil arthropods,3-6 soil microorganisms,7 and other soil organisms.8 Toxicity data on earthworms produced in the pesticide registration procedure required by the OECD (Organization for economic cooperation and Development) will provide data on many additional chemicals.9 Deciding how to use the data generated is troublesome. In 1965, Edwards10 suggested that the effects of soil insecticides on soils may remain long after the pesticides have disappeared, and that it was clear that pesticides could drastically change the populations of soil organisms; Edwards noted, however, that the effects did not seem to be serious when compared with the benefits to crop production of using pesticides. Since 1965, many studies have been conducted on changes in soil ecosystems caused by environmental contaminants, but we still know little about what the toxicity to particular groups of soil organisms means to the functioning of the soil ecosystem. the problem was illustrated in discussions at the International Conference on Earthworm Ecotoxicology in Sheffield, England, in 1991. there was general agreement that earthworms ahould be taken into account when evaluating pesticides. However, it was unclear what level of reduction in earthworm populations would reduce soil quality or crop yeild. Because populations of earthworms naturally fluctuate greatly even in the absence of pesticides, and because some soils are fertile without any earthworms, it is difficult to equate their population decreases with damage to the soil ecosystem. Broadbent and Tomlin found that the insecticide carbofuran caused fluctuations in the populations of some microarthropods in a cornfield but, in comparing the effects to those of cultivation or adding compost, they concluded that it was unlikely that litter decomposition was significantly affected.3

  11. Towards a renewed research agenda in ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artigas, Joan; Arts, Gertie; Babut, Marc

    2012-01-01

    New concerns about biodiversity, ecosystem services and human health triggered several new regulations increasing the need for sound ecotoxicological risk assessment. The PEER network aims to share its view on the research issues that this challenges. PEER scientists call for an improved biologic......New concerns about biodiversity, ecosystem services and human health triggered several new regulations increasing the need for sound ecotoxicological risk assessment. The PEER network aims to share its view on the research issues that this challenges. PEER scientists call for an improved...

  12. The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, Daniel S., E-mail: daniel.higginson@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1

  13. Ecotoxicological effects of graphene-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, A.; Bosi, S.; Tenori, E.; Bidussi, M.; Alshatwi, A. A.; Tretiach, M.; Prato, M.; Syrgiannis, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene-based materials (GBMs) are currently under careful examination due to their potential impact on health and environment. Over the last few years, ecotoxicology has started to analyze all the potential issues related to GBMs and their possible consequences on living organisms. These topics are critically considered in this comprehensive review along with some considerations about future perspectives.

  14. Ecotoxicology and macroecology--time for integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beketov, Mikhail A; Liess, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in ecotoxicology, it has become clear that this discipline cannot answer its central questions, such as, "What are the effects of toxicants on biodiversity?" and "How the ecosystem functions and services are affected by the toxicants?". We argue that if such questions are to be answered, a paradigm shift is needed. The current bottom-up approach of ecotoxicology that implies the use of small-scale experiments to predict effects on the entire ecosystems and landscapes should be merged with a top-down macroecological approach that is directly focused on ecological effects at large spatial scales and consider ecological systems as integral entities. Analysis of the existing methods in ecotoxicology, ecology, and environmental chemistry shows that such integration is currently possible. Therefore, we conclude that to tackle the current pressing challenges, ecotoxicology has to progress using both the bottom-up and top-down approaches, similar to digging a tunnel from both ends at once. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost and Survival Analysis Before and After Implementation of Dana-Farber Clinical Pathways for Patients With Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, David M; Zhang, Yichen; Dalby, Carole; Nguyen, Tom; Nagle, Julia; Lydon, Christine A; Rabin, Michael S; McNiff, Kristen K; Fraile, Belen; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2017-04-01

    Increasing costs and medical complexity are significant challenges in modern oncology. We explored the use of clinical pathways to support clinical decision making and manage resources prospectively across our network. We created customized lung cancer pathways and partnered with a commercial vendor to provide a Web-based platform for real-time decision support and post-treatment data aggregation. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) Pathways for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were introduced in January 2014. We identified all DFCI patients who were diagnosed and treated for stage IV NSCLC in 2012 (before pathways) and 2014 (after pathways). Costs of care were determined for 1 year from the time of diagnosis. Pre- and postpathway cohorts included 160 and 210 patients with stage IV NSCLC, respectively. The prepathway group had more women but was otherwise similarly matched for demographic and tumor characteristics. The total 12-month cost of care (adjusted for age, sex, race, distance to DFCI, clinical trial enrollment, and EGFR and ALK status) demonstrated a $15,013 savings after the implementation of pathways ($67,050 before pathways v $52,037 after pathways). Antineoplastics were the largest source of cost savings. Clinical outcomes were not compromised, with similar median overall survival times (10.7 months before v 11.2 months after pathways; P = .08). After introduction of a clinical pathway in metastatic NSCLC, cost of care decreased significantly, with no compromise in survival. In an era where comparative outcomes analysis and value assessment are increasingly important, the implementation of clinical pathways may provide a means to coalesce and disseminate institutional expertise and track and learn from care decisions.

  16. Wheel Balanced Cancer Therapy for Longer Than 21 Days Can Have a Positive Effect on the Survival of Patients with Stage IV Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Joon Jeon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Correlations of the levels of the nonspecific inflammatory markers C-reactive protein (CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and of the coagulation marker fibrinogen with the treatment period of wheel balanced cancer therapy were determined. Methods: Electronic charts of stage IV cancer patients hospitalized from February 1, 2008, to November 30, 2013, were reviewed retrospectively. Patients whose laboratory follow-up tests included at least two data points for at least one marker were included. Patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy or having Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG levels exceeding 2 were excluded. Correlations of the markers with the length of treatment for treatment periods ≥ 21 and ≤ 20 days were determined by gender and whether or not surgery had been performed. Results: Analyses of the CRP and the ESR revealed a higher proportion of patients with stable marker levels than with increased or decreased levels. Also, only the ESR in female and the CRP in male groups had higher proportions of patients with stable marker levels than with increased or decreased levels. The ≥ 21 day group had a higher proportion of patients with stable CRP and ESR levels than the ≤ 20 day group. Only the ESR in female and the CRP in male groups had higher proportions of patients with stable marker levels in the ≥ 21 day than in the ≤ 20 day group. In addition, only the CRP in the surgery group and the ESR in the non-surgery group had higher proportions of patients with stable marker levels in the ≥ 21 day group than in the ≤ 20 day group. Conclusion: For stage IV cancer patients at hospitals that offer Korean medicine, more than 21 days of long-term wheel balanced cancer therapy (WBCT should help maintain the CRP and the ESR levels and should have a favorable effect on the survival rate.

  17. A plea for the use of copepods in freshwater ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkarni, Devdutt; Gergs, André; Hommen, Udo

    2013-01-01

    consequences concerning the vulnerability of such species to exposure with contaminants. We aimed to highlight the importance of copepods in ecology and to underline the need to include freshwater copepods in ecotoxicology. We carried out a literature search on copepods and Daphnia in ecology and ecotoxicology...... to compare the recognition given to these two taxa in these respective fields. We also conducted a detailed analysis of the literature on copepods and their current role in ecotoxicology to characterize the scale and depth of the studies and the ecotoxicological information therein. The literature...... on the ecology of copepods outweighed that in ecotoxicology when compared with daphnids. Copepods, like other zooplankton, were found to be sensitive to toxicants and important organisms in aquatic ecosystems. The few studies that were conducted on the ecotoxicology of copepods mainly focused on marine copepods...

  18. Comet assay in genetic ecotoxicology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotelle, S; Férard, J F

    1999-01-01

    The Comet assay, also called the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay or microgel electrophoresis (MGE) assay, primarily measures DNA strand breakage in single cells. Since the protocol was published by Singh et al. [1988], its use has increased in different topic areas: clinical applications, human monitoring, radiation biology, genetic toxicology, and genetic ecotoxicology. This study is a review of the investigations that have involved the alkaline version of the Comet assay in genetic ecotoxicology. It focuses mainly on the type of organisms (plants, worms, molluscs, fish, amphibians, and mammalians) but also on the type of cells that have been used for ecotoxicological studies. In the 23 papers published since 1993 and presented here, the original test procedure may have been slightly modified according to the cell type. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as in situ studies have been carried out in various environments (water, soil, and air). Although the Comet assay is able to detect genotoxic effects of chemical and physical agents, only chemical substances and environmental complex mixtures will be considered in this review. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Review of recent ecotoxicological studies on cladocerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, S S S; Nandini, S

    2006-01-01

    Cladocerans have been widely used as the bioassay organisms in evaluating the impact of different toxic substances. Literature survey during the last 10 years revealed that cladoceran ecotoxicological research has been in an exponential phase constituting nearly 10% of publications on this group. Many studies have considered typically planktonic taxa such as Daphnia magna, D. pulex, Moina macrocopa, M. micrura and Ceriodaphania dubia. Experimental data on toxicity tests, to a lesser extent, are also available for littoral-benthic genera such as Simocephalus, Macrothrix and Alona. Most toxicity tests are limited to the derivation of median lethal concentrations of various durations but mostly at 24 or 48 h. Studies related to the evaluation of changes in the life history variables of cladocerans as a result of sublethal exposure to toxic substances are not many, but gaining importance. The common toxic substances used in the cladoceran toxicity tests appear to be heavy metals, pesticides and a few natural toxins such as cyanotoxins. We review here the effect of different toxic substances on cladocerans based on both the field and the laboratory studies from an ecotoxicology point of view. Suggestions for the future cladoceran ecotoxicology are also commented on.

  20. The ecotoxicology and chemistry of manufactured nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Richard D; von der Kammer, Frank; Lead, Jamie R; Hassellöv, Martin; Owen, Richard; Crane, Mark

    2008-05-01

    The emerging literature on the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is summarised, then the fundamental physico-chemistry that governs particle behaviour is explained in an ecotoxicological context. Techniques for measuring nanoparticles in various biological and chemical matrices are also outlined. The emerging ecotoxicological literature shows toxic effects on fish and invertebrates, often at low mg l(-1) concentrations of nanoparticles. However, data on bacteria, plants, and terrestrial species are particularly lacking at present. Initial data suggest that at least some manufactured nanoparticles may interact with other contaminants, influencing their ecotoxicity. Particle behaviour is influenced by particle size, shape, surface charge, and the presence of other materials in the environment. Nanoparticles tend to aggregate in hard water and seawater, and are greatly influenced by the specific type of organic matter or other natural particles (colloids) present in freshwater. The state of dispersion will alter ecotoxicity, but many abiotic factors that influence this, such as pH, salinity, and the presence of organic matter remain to be systematically investigated as part of ecotoxicological studies. Concentrations of manufactured nanoparticles have rarely been measured in the environment to date. Various techniques are available to characterise nanoparticles for exposure and dosimetry, although each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages for the ecotoxicologist. We conclude with a consideration of implications for environmental risk assessment of manufactured nanoparticles.

  1. An active site aromatic triad in Escherichia coli DNA Pol IV coordinates cell survival and mutagenesis in different DNA damaging agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Benson

    Full Text Available DinB (DNA Pol IV is a translesion (TLS DNA polymerase, which inserts a nucleotide opposite an otherwise replication-stalling N(2-dG lesion in vitro, and confers resistance to nitrofurazone (NFZ, a compound that forms these lesions in vivo. DinB is also known to be part of the cellular response to alkylation DNA damage. Yet it is not known if DinB active site residues, in addition to aminoacids involved in DNA synthesis, are critical in alkylation lesion bypass. It is also unclear which active site aminoacids, if any, might modulate DinB's bypass fidelity of distinct lesions. Here we report that along with the classical catalytic residues, an active site "aromatic triad", namely residues F12, F13, and Y79, is critical for cell survival in the presence of the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS. Strains expressing dinB alleles with single point mutations in the aromatic triad survive poorly in MMS. Remarkably, these strains show fewer MMS- than NFZ-induced mutants, suggesting that the aromatic triad, in addition to its role in TLS, modulates DinB's accuracy in bypassing distinct lesions. The high bypass fidelity of prevalent alkylation lesions is evident even when the DinB active site performs error-prone NFZ-induced lesion bypass. The analyses carried out with the active site aromatic triad suggest that the DinB active site residues are poised to proficiently bypass distinctive DNA lesions, yet they are also malleable so that the accuracy of the bypass is lesion-dependent.

  2. Palliative resection of the primary tumor is associated with improved overall survival in incurable stage IV colorectal cancer: A nationwide population-based propensity-score adjusted study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam-Boer, J. 't; Geest, L.G. van der; Verhoef, C.; Elferink, M.E.; Koopman, M.; Wilt, J.H.W. de

    2016-01-01

    As the value of palliative primary tumor resection in stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) is still under debate, the purpose of this population-based study was to investigate if palliative primary tumor resection as the initial treatment after diagnosis was associated with improved overall survival.

  3. Palliative resection of the primary tumor is associated with improved overall survival in incurable stage IV colorectal cancer : A nationwide population-based propensity-score adjusted study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Lam-Boer, Jorine; Van der Geest, Lydia G; Verhoef, Cees; Elferink, Marloes E; Koopman, Miriam; de Wilt, Johannes H

    2016-01-01

    As the value of palliative primary tumor resection in stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) is still under debate, the purpose of this population-based study was to investigate if palliative primary tumor resection as the initial treatment after diagnosis was associated with improved overall survival.

  4. Eco-toxicological risk and impact of pesticides on important parasitoids of cabbage butterflies in cruciferous ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firake, D M; Thubru, D P; Behere, G T

    2017-02-01

    Eco-toxicological risk and impact of pesticides was estimated on three important parasitoids of butterflies viz., Hyposoter ebeninus, Cotesia glomerata and Pteromalus puparum. Four commonly used pesticides were evaluated using standard protocol (of IOBC/WPRS-group). In laboratory tests, the survival of the female wasps decreased significantly on fresh contact and ingestion of deltamethrin, spinosad and azadirachtin; whereas Bacillus thuringiensis var kurstaki (Btk) was found harmless pesticide. Under semi-field conditions, parasitoid mortality decreased significantly on fresh contact with the pesticides. Although, at 72 h after treatment, spinosad and deltamethrin were found harmful (Class-IV) and azadirachtin was moderately harmful (Class-III), whereas Btk was harmless (Class-I). Furthermore, 15-day-old residues of pesticides (except deltamethrin) were harmless to all parasitoid species under semi-field conditions. Notably, adult emergence and pupal duration in pesticide-treated cocoons were not significantly affected; however, their survival decreased after emergence except in Btk. The contact and oral toxicity trends of the pesticides were almost similar for three species of parasitoid females and pupae; however little variability was observed in toxicity to the host caterpillars parasitized by H. ebeninus (HCPHE) and C. glomerata (HCPCG). In semi-field tests, fresh residues of all the pesticides were harmful to HCPHE and HCPCG. However, action of Btk was slightly delayed and toxicity was rather low for HCPCG. In 15-day-old residues, deltamethrin and azadirachtin were slightly harmful to the parasitized caterpillars, whereas those of Btk and spinosad were harmless. Since, Btk appeared to be safe for parasitoids; it could be used for managing cabbage butterflies in brassicaceous crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmental chemistry and ecotoxicology: in greater demand than ever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheringer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Environmental chemistry and ecotoxicology have been losing support, resources, and recognition at universities for many years. What are the possible causes of this process? A first problem may be that the need for research and teaching in environmental chemistry and ecotoxicology is no longer seen because chemical pollution problems are considered as largely solved. Second, environmental chemistry and ecotoxicology may be seen as fields dominated by routine work and where there are not many interesting research questions left. A third part of the problem may be that other environmental impacts such as climate change are given higher priority than chemical pollution problems. Here, several cases are presented that illustrate the great demand for innovative research and teaching in environmental chemistry and ecotoxicology. It is crucial that environmental chemistry and ecotoxicology are rooted in academic science and are provided with sufficient equipment, resources, and prospects for development.

  6. A plea for the use of copepods in freshwater ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Devdutt; Gergs, André; Hommen, Udo; Ratte, Hans Toni; Preuss, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Standard species used in ecological risk assessment are chosen based on their sensitivity to various toxicants and the ease of rearing them for laboratory experiments. However, this mostly overlooks the fact that species in the field that may employ variable life-history strategies, which may have consequences concerning the vulnerability of such species to exposure with contaminants. We aimed to highlight the importance of copepods in ecology and to underline the need to include freshwater copepods in ecotoxicology. We carried out a literature search on copepods and Daphnia in ecology and ecotoxicology to compare the recognition given to these two taxa in these respective fields. We also conducted a detailed analysis of the literature on copepods and their current role in ecotoxicology to characterize the scale and depth of the studies and the ecotoxicological information therein. The literature on the ecology of copepods outweighed that in ecotoxicology when compared with daphnids. Copepods, like other zooplankton, were found to be sensitive to toxicants and important organisms in aquatic ecosystems. The few studies that were conducted on the ecotoxicology of copepods mainly focused on marine copepods. However, very little is known about the ecotoxicology of freshwater copepods. To enable a more realistic risk higher tier environmental risk assessment, we recommend considering freshwater copepods as part of the hazard assessment process. This could include the establishment of laboratory experiments to analyse the effects of toxicants on copepods and the development of individual-based models to extrapolate effects across species and scenarios.

  7. Soil ecotoxicology in Brazil is taking its course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niva, Cintia Carla; Niemeyer, Julia Carina; Júnior, Flávio Manoel Rodrigues Da Silva; Nunes, Maria Edna Tenório; De Sousa, Danilo Lourenço; Aragão, Clara Wandenkolck Silva; Sautter, Klaus Dieter; Espindola, Evaldo Gaeta; Sousa, José Paulo; Römbke, Jörg

    2016-06-01

    Soil ecotoxicology has been motivated by the increasing global awareness on environmental issues. Northern Hemisphere has been the main driver of this science branch; however, the number and quality of contributions from the Southern Hemisphere are increasing quickly. In this case study, Brazil is taken as an example of how soil ecotoxicology has developed over the last 30 years. It starts with a brief historical overview depicting the main events on soil ecotoxicology in the country. Following, an overview on the Brazilian legislation related to soil ecotoxicology is given, covering regulations with prospective focus, mainly on the registration of pesticides. Regulations with retrospective focus in contaminated areas are also given. Then, an outline of the actors in soil ecotoxicology and examples of prospective ecotoxicological studies performed with soil organisms and plants are given by stressor groups: pesticides, pharmaceuticals, metals, and residues. Experiences from retrospective studies, mainly looking at the assessment of industrial sites, are also covered. Emphasis is given on methodological aspects, pointing to needed actions, mainly regarding the different biotic and abiotic conditions of a tropical country. Finally, the last session discusses how soil ecotoxicology could be improved in methodological adaptations as well as legal requirements.

  8. Regulatory Work in International Fora for Assessing Terrestrial Ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke, H.

    1997-01-01

    NORD-UTTE er Nordisk koordineringsgrupp för utvekling av testmetoder inom toxicologi och ekotoxicology. The Nordic Co-ordination Group for the Development of Test Methods for Toxicology and Ecotoxicology......NORD-UTTE er Nordisk koordineringsgrupp för utvekling av testmetoder inom toxicologi och ekotoxicology. The Nordic Co-ordination Group for the Development of Test Methods for Toxicology and Ecotoxicology...

  9. [Research advances in eco-toxicological diagnosis of soil pollution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Teng, Hong-Hui; Ren, Bai-Xiang; Shi, Shu-Yun

    2014-09-01

    Soil eco-toxicology provides a theoretical basis for ecological risk assessment of contaminated soils and soil pollution control. Research on eco-toxicological effects and molecular mechanisms of toxic substances in soil environment is the central content of the soil eco-toxicology. Eco-toxicological diagnosis not only gathers all the information of soil pollution, but also provides the overall toxic effects of soil. Therefore, research on the eco-toxicological diagnosis of soil pollution has important theoretical and practical significance. Based on the research of eco-toxicological diagnosis of soil pollution, this paper introduced some common toxicological methods and indicators, with the advantages and disadvantages of various methods discussed. However, conventional biomarkers can only indicate the class of stress, but fail to explain the molecular mechanism of damage or response happened. Biomarkers and molecular diagnostic techniques, which are used to evaluate toxicity of contaminated soil, can explore deeply detoxification mechanisms of organisms under exogenous stress. In this paper, these biomarkers and techniques were introduced systematically, and the future research trends were prospected.

  10. Vitiligo-like depigmentation in patients with stage III-IV melanoma receiving immunotherapy and its association with survival : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teulings, Hansje Eva; Limpens, Jacqueline; Jansen, Sophia N.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Spuls, Phyllis I.; Luiten, Rosalie M.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Vitiligo-like depigmentation in patients with melanoma may be associated with more favorable clinical outcome. We conducted a systematic review of patients with stage III to IV melanoma treated with immunotherapy to determine the cumulative incidence of vitiligo-like depigmentation and the

  11. Ecotoxicology, ecophysiology, and mechanistic studies with rotifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Hans-U; Hagiwara, Atsushi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2011-01-17

    Invertebrates play an increasing role in assessing the impacts of environmental contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. Substantial efforts were made to identify suitable and environmentally relevant models for toxicity testing. Rotifers have a number of promising characteristics which make them candidates worth considering in such efforts. They are small, simple in their organization, genetically homozygous, easy to cultivate. Rotifers are further widely distributed and ecologically important in freshwaters, in estuaries and coast, and also play an important role in the transportation of aquatic pollutants across the food web. In the last decades there has been a substantial increase of contributions on rotifers, particularly in areas of their ecology, geophylogeny, genomics and their behavioral, physiological, biochemical and molecular responses, following exposure to environmental chemicals and other stressors. Gene expression analysis enables ecotoxicologists to study molecular mechanisms of toxicity. Rotifers also appear as useful tools in the risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and their metabolites that find their way into aquatic ecosystems because their sensitivity to some of these substances is higher than that of cladocerans and algae. In respect to endocrine disruptors, rotifers seem to be particularly sensitive to androgenic and anti-androgenic substances, whereas copepods and cladocerans are typically more affected by estrogens and juvenile hormone-like compounds. Generally, a combination of whole-animal bioassays and gene expression studies allow an understanding of toxicological mechanisms. The purpose of this review is to demarcate the potential of using rotifers as important invertebrate aquatic model organisms for ecophysiology, ecotoxicology and environmental genomics. This review does not claim to find reasons for a superior use of rotifers in these fields. But the different phylogenetic allocation of rotifers in the Platyzoa (formerly

  12. Ecotoxicological diagnosis of a sealed municipal landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, A J; Bartolomé, C; Pérez-Leblic, M I; Rodríguez, J; Alvarez, J; Pastor, J

    2012-03-01

    Assessing the environmental impact of a soil-topped landfill requires an accurate ecotoxicological diagnosis. This paper describes various diagnostic protocols for this purpose and their application to a real case: the urban solid waste (USW) municipal landfill of Getafe (Madrid, Spain). After their initial sealing with soil from the surroundings about 20 years ago, most USW landfills in the autonomous community of Madrid have continued to receive waste. This has hindered precise assessment of their impact on their environment and affected ecosystems. The procedure proposed here overcomes this problem by assessing the situation in edaphic, aquatic and ecological terms. The present study focused on the most influential soil variables (viz. salinity due largely to the presence of anions, and heavy metals and organic compounds). These variables were also determined in surface waters of the wetland most strongly affected by leachates running down landfill slopes. Determinations included the characterization of plant communities and microbial biodiversity. The study was supplemented with a bioassay under controlled conditions in pots containing soil contaminated with variable concentrations of Zn (as ZnCl(2)) intended to assess ecochemical actions in a population of Bromus rubens, which grows profusely in the landfill. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Systems biology: leading the revolution in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J

    2011-02-01

    The rapid development of new technologies such as transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics (Omics) are changing the way ecotoxicology is practiced. The data deluge has begun with genomes of over 65 different aquatic species that are currently being sequenced, and many times that number with at least some level of transcriptome sequencing. Integrating these top-down methodologies is an essential task in the field of systems biology. Systems biology is a biology-based interdisciplinary field that focuses on complex interactions in biological systems, with the intent to model and discover emergent properties of the system. Recent studies demonstrate that Omics technologies provide valuable insight into ecotoxicity, both in laboratory exposures with model organisms and with animals exposed in the field. However, these approaches require a context of the whole animal and population to be relevant. Powerful approaches using reverse engineering to determine interacting networks of genes, proteins, or biochemical reactions are uncovering unique responses to toxicants. Modeling efforts in aquatic animals are evolving to interrelate the interacting networks of a system and the flow of information linking these elements. Just as is happening in medicine, systems biology approaches that allow the integration of many different scales of interaction and information are already driving a revolution in understanding the impacts of pollutants on aquatic systems. © 2010 SETAC.

  14. Behavioural ecotoxicology, an "early warning" signal to assess environmental quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellou, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    In this review, the position of behavioural ecotoxicology within the available means to assess the status of marine environments is described as filling the gap for the needed "early warning" signals. A few examples of studies performed since the 1960s are discussed to highlight the sensitivity of these approaches in investigating the effects of chemicals, including priority pollutants and emerging contaminants, relative to conventional toxicity tests measuring survival. The advantage of the behavioural response is due to the integration of biochemical and physiological processes that reflect changes at higher levels of organisation with ecological relevance. Avoidance often represents a behavioural symptom easily detected in many animals exposed to contaminants and would be a useful test to explore more widely. This rapid response would reflect a defence mechanism protective against further exposure and the potential development of more pronounced deleterious effects, whilst in some cases, escape could lead to the relocation of a species with negative consequences. An investigation of the avoidance behaviour of mud shrimp, Corophium volutator, along with the chemical analyses of sediments and amphipods to assess the quality of harbour sediments is summarised. The body burden of the amphipods was 1,000 times lower than the one associated with narcosis, emphasizing the sensitivity of this endpoint. The application of this acute toxicity test is briefly compared to additional work that involved intertidal mussels collected in the field. Recent research undertaken with mud snails, Ilyanassa obsoleta, and harbour sediments confirmed the usefulness of the escape behaviour as an assessment tool. However, the limits of the state of knowledge regarding the fate of contaminants in species with the ability to metabolise contaminants is further discussed along with directions to be pursued to address questions arising from the reviewed literature.

  15. Time trends in incidence rates and survival of newly diagnosed stage IV breast cancer by tumor histology: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meglio, Antonio; Freedman, Rachel A; Lin, Nancy U; Barry, William T; Metzger-Filho, Otto; Keating, Nancy L; King, Tari A; Sertoli, Mario Roberto; Boccardo, Francesco; Winer, Eric P; Vaz-Luis, Ines

    2016-06-01

    Few contemporary data are available that compare incidence and survival of metastatic breast cancer between ductal and lobular carcinomas. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-9 registries, we identified 10,639 patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer diagnosed from 1990 to 2011. Annual age-adjusted incidence rates and annual percent changes (APCs) were analyzed. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to investigate the impact of year of diagnosis and histology on overall survival. 9250 (86.9 %) patients had ductal and 1389 (13.1 %) had lobular carcinomas. Metastatic breast cancer incidence increased slightly over time for ductal (APC = +1.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = +1.0 to +2.4) and lobular carcinomas (APC = +3.0, 95 % CI = +1.8 to +4.3). Median overall survival was 22 months among the whole cohort. More recent year of diagnosis was associated with better overall survival only for patients with ductal carcinomas (interaction p value = 0.006), with an adjusted hazard ratio of death for every five-year increment in the date of diagnosis of 0.93 (95 % CI =  0.91-0.95) among ductal carcinomas, compared with 1.05 (95 % CI = 0.95-1.10) among lobular carcinomas. Overall survival was longer for lobular versus ductal carcinomas (28 versus 21 months, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio of death = 0.93, 95 % CI = 0.87-0.99), but the magnitude of this effect was attenuated among the cohort restricted to hormone receptor-positive tumors. In this population-based analysis, incidence rates of metastatic breast cancer at presentation increased slightly over time for both histologies, and particularly for lobular tumors. A modest improvement in metastatic breast cancer median overall survival was observed, but was apparently limited to ductal carcinomas.

  16. Decreased Survival of Glioma Patients with Astrocytoma Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme) Associated with Long-Term Use of Mobile and Cordless Phones

    OpenAIRE

    Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a “possible”, human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997–2003 and...

  17. Mercury and drought along the lower Carson River, Nevada: IV. Snowy egret post-fledging dispersal, timing of migration and survival, 2002–2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henny, Charles J.; Hill, Elwood F.; Grove, Robert A.; Chelgren, Nathan; Haggerty, Patricia K.

    2017-01-01

    This telemetry study is an extension of our 1997–2006 research on historical mercury contamination on snowy egrets (Egretta thula) up to ~ 20 days of age. Findings from initial studies at the mercury-contaminated Carson River colony at Lahontan Reservoir (LR) and a similar-sized reference (REF) colony on the Humboldt River included mercury-related physiological, biochemical, histopathological and reproductive effects up to ~20 days of age; with poor water years (2000–04), i.e., reduced prey availability, exacerbating effects. Herein, we compare timing of dispersal and migration at LR vs. REF, but the primary question now addressed is “whether survival of young mercury-exposed snowy egrets from LR would be further compromised beyond ~20 days of age? ” Based upon telemetry signals until 90–110 days of age (including dead bird counts and survival rate estimates), we conclude that mercury did not further compromise survival. Dead bird counts and survival rate estimates included time in the colony when fed by adults, plus the critical period when young dispersed from the colony to forage independently. The extended drought during this 3-year study was most critical in 2002 when production of ~20 d old egrets at LR was only 0.24 young/nest. In 2002, survival rates were low at both colonies and we documented the highest counts of dead egrets for both colonies. We suggest the losses in 2002 beyond 20 days of age were more a function of prey availability influenced by drought than exposure to mercury, especially at LR, because higher mercury concentrations, higher survival rates and fewer dead birds were documented at LR in 2003 when water conditions improved. Furthermore, total mercury (THg) in blood in 2003 was more than double 2002 (geometric mean, 3.39 vs 1.47 µg/g wet weight (ww). This higher THg exposure at LR in 2003 was associated with a redistribution of parent and post-dispersal feeding activities upstream (where there was higher mercury from historic

  18. Mercury and drought along the lower Carson River, Nevada: IV. Snowy egret post-fledging dispersal, timing of migration and survival, 2002-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henny, Charles J; Hill, Elwood F; Grove, Robert A; Chelgren, Nathan D; Haggerty, Patricia K

    2017-01-01

    This telemetry study is an extension of our 1997-2006 research on historical mercury contamination on snowy egrets (Egretta thula) up to ~ 20 days of age. Findings from initial studies at the mercury-contaminated Carson River colony at Lahontan Reservoir (LR) and a similar-sized reference (REF) colony on the Humboldt River included mercury-related physiological, biochemical, histopathological and reproductive effects up to ~20 days of age; with poor water years (2000-04), i.e., reduced prey availability, exacerbating effects. Herein, we compare timing of dispersal and migration at LR vs. REF, but the primary question now addressed is "whether survival of young mercury-exposed snowy egrets from LR would be further compromised beyond ~20 days of age? " Based upon telemetry signals until 90-110 days of age (including dead bird counts and survival rate estimates), we conclude that mercury did not further compromise survival. Dead bird counts and survival rate estimates included time in the colony when fed by adults, plus the critical period when young dispersed from the colony to forage independently. The extended drought during this 3-year study was most critical in 2002 when production of ~20d old egrets at LR was only 0.24 young/nest. In 2002, survival rates were low at both colonies and we documented the highest counts of dead egrets for both colonies. We suggest the losses in 2002 beyond 20 days of age were more a function of prey availability influenced by drought than exposure to mercury, especially at LR, because higher mercury concentrations, higher survival rates and fewer dead birds were documented at LR in 2003 when water conditions improved. Furthermore, total mercury (THg) in blood in 2003 was more than double 2002 (geometric mean, 3.39 vs 1.47µg/g wet weight (ww). This higher THg exposure at LR in 2003 was associated with a redistribution of parent and post-dispersal feeding activities upstream (where there was higher mercury from historic mining

  19. Ecotoxicological risks associated with tannery effluent wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Lubna; Ejaz, Sohail; Ashraf, Muhammad; Qureshi, Naureen Aziz; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Iltaf, Imran; Javeed, Aqeel

    2012-09-01

    The problem of water pollution acquires greater relevance in the context of a developing agrarian economy like Pakistan. Even though, the leather industry is a leading economic sector in Pakistan, there is an increasing environmental concern regarding tanneries because they produce large amounts of potentially toxic wastewater containing both trivalent and hexavalent chromium, which are equally hazardous for human population, aquaculture and agricultural activities in the area. Therefore, we defined the scope of the present study as to employ different bioassays to determine the eco-toxic potential of tannery effluent wastewater (TW) and its chromium based components, i.e., potassium dichromate (K(2)Cr(2)O(7)) and chromium sulfate Cr(2)(SO(4))(3). Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of TW was carried out to determine the concentration of chromium in TW and then equal concentrations of hexavalent (K(2)Cr(2)O(7)) and trivalent chromium Cr(2)(SO(4))(3) were obtained for this study. Cytotoxicity assay, artemia bioassay and phytotoxicity assay was utilized to investigate the eco-toxicological potential of different concentrations of TW, K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and Cr(2)(SO(4))(3). All the dilutions of TW, K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and Cr(2)(SO(4))(3) presented concentration dependent cytotoxic effects in these assays. The data clearly represents that among all three tested materials, different dilutions of K(2)Cr(2)O(7) caused significantly more damage (Pindustry that can obliterate ecosystem surrounding the tanneries. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    Asteroids are fascinating worlds. Considered the building blocks of our planets, many of the authors of this book have devoted their scientific careers to exploring them with the tools of our trade: ground- and spacebased observations, in situ space missions, and studies that run the gamut from theoretical modeling efforts to laboratory work. Like fossils for paleontologists, or DNA for geneticists, they allow us to construct a veritable time machine and provide us with tantalizing glimpses of the earliest nature of our solar system. By investigating them, we can probe what our home system was like before life or even the planets existed. The origin and evolution of life on our planet is also intertwined with asteroids in a different way. It is believed that impacts on the primordial Earth may have delivered the basic components for life, with biology favoring attributes that could more easily survive the aftermath of such energetic events. In this fashion, asteroids may have banished many probable avenues for life to relative obscurity. Similarly, they may have also prevented our biosphere from becoming more complex until more recent eras. The full tale of asteroid impacts on the history of our world, and how human life managed to emerge from myriad possibilities, has yet to be fully told. The hazard posed by asteroid impacts to our civilization is low but singular. The design of efficient mitigation strategies strongly relies on asteroid detection by our ground- and spacebased surveys as well as knowledge of their physical properties. A more positive motivation for asteroid discovery is that the proximity of some asteroids to Earth may allow future astronauts to harvest their water and rare mineral resources for use in exploration. A key goal of asteroid science is therefore to learn how humans and robotic probes can interact with asteroids (and extract their materials) in an efficient way. We expect that these adventures may be commonplace in the future

  1. Contributions on ecotoxicology. Proceedings; Beitraege zur Oekotoxikologie. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, A.; Brueggemann, R. [eds.

    1997-11-01

    Ecotoxicological effects can be defined in terms of changes in reaction patterns, processes, structures, and functions of ecosystems. At an all-day workshop at GSF on 10. November 1995 various working groups presented their reports on this subject. Taken together the contributions provide good coverage of the present state of knowledge on ecotoxicology. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Oekotoxikologische Wirkungen lassen sich als Aenderungen hinsichtlich auftretender Reaktionsmuster, Prozesse, Strukturen und Funktionen von Oekosystemen definieren. 1. Molekulare, noxenbezogene Ebene; 2. Zellebene; 3. Organismenebene; 4. Modellsysteme; 5. Systemebene; Oekotoxikologische Bewertung; Im Rahmen eines ganztaegigen Workshops am 10. November 1995 in der GSF wurden Berichte verschiedener Arbeitsgruppe allen Themenbereichen vorgestellt. (orig./SR)

  2. Acute and chronic sensitivity to copper of a promising ecotoxicological model species, the annual killifish Nothobranchius furzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Charlotte; Grégoir, Arnout F; Janssens, Lizanne; Pinceel, Tom; De Boeck, Gudrun; Brendonck, Luc

    2017-10-01

    Nothobranchius furzeri is a promising model for ecotoxicological research due to the species' short life cycle and the production of drought-resistant eggs. Although the species is an emerging vertebrate fish model for several fundamental as well as applied research domains, its potential for ecotoxicological research has not yet been tested. The aim of this study was to characterise the acute and chronic sensitivity of this species to copper as compared to other model organisms. Effects of both acute and chronic copper exposure were tested on survival, life history and physiological traits. We report a 24h-LC50 of 53.93µg Cu/L, which is situated within the sensitivity range of other model species such as Brook Trout, Fathead Minnow and Rainbow Trout. Moreover, in the full life cycle exposure, we show that an exposure concentration of 10.27µg/L did not cause acute adverse effects (96h), but did cause mortality after prolonged exposure (3-4 weeks). Also chronic, sublethal effects were observed, such as a reduction in growth rate, delayed maturation and postponed reproduction. Based on our results, we define the NOEC at 6.68µg Cu/L, making N. furzeri more sensitive to copper as compared to Brook Trout and Fathead Minnow. We found stimulatory effects on peak fecundity at subinhibitory levels of copper concentrations (hormesis). Finally, we found indications for detoxifying and copper-excreting mechanisms, demonstrating the ability of the fish to cope with this essential metal, even when exposed to stressful amounts. The successful application of current ecotoxicological protocols on N. furzeri and its sensitivity range comparable to that of other model organisms forms the basis to exploit this species in further ecotoxicological practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Circulating CD4+ T cells that produce IL4 or IL17 when stimulated by melan-A but not by NY-ESO-1 have negative impacts on survival of patients with stage IV melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelba, Henning; Weide, Benjamin; Martens, Alexander; Derhovanessian, Evelyna; Bailur, Jithendra Kini; Kyzirakos, Christina; Pflugfelder, Annette; Eigentler, Thomas K; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Maio, Michele; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; de Vries, Jolanda; Sucker, Antje; Schadendorf, Dirk; Büttner, Petra; Garbe, Claus; Pawelec, Graham

    2014-08-15

    We initially observed that the presence of circulating NY-ESO-1- and/or Melan-A-specific T cells in patients with stage IV melanoma was significantly associated with prolonged survival. Here, we report the ways in which the phenotypes and functions of these T cells differentially affect survival in patients preselected for NY-ESO-1 and/or Melan-A reactivity. We assayed functional antigen-reactive T cells recognizing NY-ESO-1 and/or Melan-A after in vitro stimulation using overlapping peptide pools. After restimulation, we assayed six cytokines simultaneously by intracellular cytokine staining. This allowed us to analyze the functional antigen response of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells at the single-cell level. We observed that NY-ESO-1 stimulated mainly CD4(+) T cells, whereas Melan-A more often stimulated CD8(+) T cells. NY-ESO-1 reactivity was not associated with an additional impact on survival, whether CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, or both types of T cells were responding. In contrast, recognition of Melan-A by CD4(+) T cells was associated with reduced survival in our cohort of patients preselected for NY-ESO-1 and/or Melan-A reactivity (that is, in patients with exceptionally long survival). We further observed a negative effect on survival in patients with CD4(+) T cells producing IL4 and IL17 upon Melan-A stimulation. Their prognosis was comparable to patients without any Melan-A reactivity. The nature and prognostic impact of specific T-cell responses is different according to targeted antigen. Independent from phenotype and functional aspects, NY-ESO-1 reactivity is associated with good prognosis. In terms of Melan-A, antigen-specific CD8(+) but not CD4(+) responses are associated with prolonged survival. Clin Cancer Res; 20(16); 4390-9. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Soil ecotoxicology: state of the art and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis A.M. van Gestel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Developments in soil ecotoxicology started with observations on pesticide effects on soil invertebrates in the 1960s. To support the risk assessment of chemicals, in the 1980s and 1990s development of toxicity tests was the main issue, including single species tests and also more realistic test systems like model ecosystems and field tests focusing on structural and functional endpoints. In the mean time, awareness grew about issues like bioavailability and routes of exposure, while biochemical endpoints (biomarkers were proposed as sensitive and potential early-warning tools. In recent years, interactions between different chemicals (mixture toxicity and between chemical and other stressors attracted scientific interest. With the development of molecular biology, omics tools are gaining increasing interest, while the ecological relevance of exposure and effects is translating into concepts like (chemical stress ecology, ecological vulnerability and trait-based approaches. This contribution addresses historical developments and focuses on current issues in soil ecotoxicology. It is concluded that soil ecotoxicological risk assessment would benefit from extending the available battery of toxicity tests by including e.g. isopods, by paying more attention to exposure, bioavailability and toxicokinetics, and by developing more insight into the ecology of soil organisms to support better understanding of exposure and long-term consequences of chemical exposure at the individual, population and community level. Ecotoxicogenomics tools may also be helpful in this, but will require considerable further research before they can be applied in the practice of soil ecotoxicological risk assessment.

  5. Ecotoxicological effects of discharge of Nigerian petroleum refinery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-04-07

    Apr 7, 2014 ... were examined. The ecotoxicological effects examined included acute toxicity tests on Nitrobacter sp., fresh water ... Key words: Toxic effects, petroleum refinery oily sludge, biological sentinels. INTRODUCTION ..... for the Examination of Water and Waste Water 20th Edition Published by American Public ...

  6. Investigation of the ecotoxicologic effect of pesticide industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-21

    Mar 21, 2011 ... Investigation of the ecotoxicologic effect of pesticide industry wastewater on the pancreas and liver of rats. Erkan Kalipci1* and Celalettin Özdemir2. 1Biology Education Department, Ahmet Kelesoglu Faculty of Education, Selcuk University, 42090-Meram Konya,. Turkey. 2Environmental Engineering ...

  7. Recent Applications of DNA Microarray Technology to Toxicology and Ecotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression is a unique way of characterizing how cells and organisms adapt to changes in the external environment. The measurements of gene expression levels upon exposure to a chemical can be used both to provide information about the mechanism of action of the toxicant and to form a sort of “genetic signature” for the identification of toxic products. The development of high-quality, commercially available gene arrays has allowed this technology to become a standard tool in molecular toxicology. Several national and international initiatives have provided the proof-of-principle tests for the application of gene expression for the study of the toxicity of new and existing chemical compounds. In the last few years the field has progressed from evaluating the potential of the technology to illustrating the practical use of gene expression profiling in toxicology. The application of gene expression profiling to ecotoxicology is at an earlier stage, mainly because of the the many variables involved in analyzing the status of natural populations. Nevertheless, significant studies have been carried out on the response to environmental stressors both in model and in nonmodel organisms. It can be easily predicted that the development of stressor-specific signatures in gene expression profiling in ecotoxicology will have a major impact on the ecotoxicology field in the near future. International collaborations could play an important role in accelerating the application of genomic approaches in ecotoxicology. PMID:16393650

  8. Incorporating evolutionary insights to improve ecotoxicology for freshwater species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Steven P.; Richardson, Jonathan L.; Kunz, Bethany K.

    2017-01-01

    Ecotoxicological studies have provided extensive insights into the lethal and sublethal effects of environmental contaminants. These insights are critical for environmental regulatory frameworks, which rely on knowledge of toxicity for developing policies to manage contaminants. While varied approaches have been applied to ecotoxicological questions, perspectives related to the evolutionary history of focal species or populations have received little consideration. Here, we evaluate chloride toxicity from the perspectives of both macroevolution and contemporary evolution. First, by mapping chloride toxicity values derived from the literature onto a phylogeny of macroinvertebrates, fish, and amphibians, we tested whether macroevolutionary relationships across species and taxa are predictive of chloride tolerance. Next, we conducted chloride exposure tests for two amphibian species to assess whether potential contemporary evolutionary change associated with environmental chloride contamination influences chloride tolerance across local populations. We show that explicitly evaluating both macroevolution and contemporary evolution can provide important and even qualitatively different insights from those obtained via traditional ecotoxicological studies. While macroevolutionary perspectives can help forecast toxicological end points for species with untested sensitivities, contemporary evolutionary perspectives demonstrate the need to consider the environmental context of exposed populations when measuring toxicity. Accounting for divergence among populations of interest can provide more accurate and relevant information related to the sensitivity of populations that may be evolving in response to selection from contaminant exposure. Our data show that approaches accounting for and specifically examining variation among natural populations should become standard practice in ecotoxicology.

  9. Molecular ecotoxicology of nanosilver guided using in vitro prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Engelmann, Péter

    2012-01-01

    To study the molecular and cellular basis of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity, we here used a recently established in vitro model of earthworm coelomocytes in comparison to the conventional in vivo molecular ecotoxicology approach. Compared to the latter where the test organisms are exposed...

  10. How we can make ecotoxicology more valuable to environmental protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M L; Wolff, B A; Green, J W; Kivi, M; Panter, G H; Warne, M St J; Ågerstrand, M; Sumpter, J P

    2017-02-01

    There is increasing awareness that the value of peer-reviewed scientific literature is not consistent, resulting in a growing desire to improve the practice and reporting of studies. This is especially important in the field of ecotoxicology, where regulatory decisions can be partly based on data from the peer-reviewed literature, with wide-reaching implications for environmental protection. Our objective is to improve the reporting of ecotoxicology studies so that they can be appropriately utilized in a fair and transparent fashion, based on their reliability and relevance. We propose a series of nine reporting requirements, followed by a set of recommendations for adoption by the ecotoxicology community. These reporting requirements will provide clarity on the the test chemical, experimental design and conditions, chemical identification, test organisms, exposure confirmation, measurable endpoints, how data are presented, data availability and statistical analysis. Providing these specific details will allow for a fuller assessment of the reliability and relevance of the studies, including limitations. Recommendations for the implementation of these reporting requirements are provided herein for practitioners, journals, reviewers, regulators, stakeholders, funders, and professional societies. If applied, our recommendations will improve the quality of ecotoxicology studies and their value to environmental protection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Framework for Traits-based Assessment in Ecotoxicology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubach, M.N.; Ashauer, R.; Buchwalter, D.B.; Lange, de H.J.; Hamer, M.; Preuss, T.G.; Töpke, K.; Maund, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    A key challenge in ecotoxicology is to assess the potential risks of chemicals to the wide range of species in the environment on the basis of laboratory toxicity data derived from a limited number of species. These species are then assumed to be suitable surrogates for a wider class of related

  12. Soil ecotoxicology: state of the art and future directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Developments in soil ecotoxicology started with observations on pesticide effects on soil invertebrates in the 1960s. To support the risk assessment of chemicals, in the 1980s and 1990s development of toxicity tests was the main issue, including single species tests and also more realistic test

  13. Field validation of specific ecotoxicological tools for aquatic systems impacted with acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, I.; Goncalves, F.; Nogueira, A.; Soares, A.M.V.M.; Ribeiro, R. [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Coimbra (Portugal). Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra

    2000-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is characterised by very low pH and high heavy metal concentrations. Serious ecotoxicological effects, often leading to the complete disruption of the ecosystem, can be observed at the regions suffering this kind of contamination. Those effects can be caused either by low pH itself or by other contaminants that emerge with water acidification (mobilisation and increased solubility of heavy metals). The discrimination between the toxicity due to each of these two factors is not possible with the existing toxicity tests; the addition of chelating agents or serial dilution methods seriously alter the chemical and physical properties of the effluent. A toxicity test, based on the survival time of Ceriodaphnia dubia (Crustacea, Cladocera) neonates exposed to the unchanged effluent was developed and field validated, on an AMD contaminated site. 28 refs.

  14. Ephyra jellyfish as a new model for ecotoxicological bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faimali, M; Garaventa, F; Piazza, V; Costa, E; Greco, G; Mazzola, V; Beltrandi, M; Bongiovanni, E; Lavorano, S; Gnone, G

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was a preliminary investigation on the possibility of using the ephyra of Scyphozoan jellyfish Aurelia aurita (Linnaeus, 1758), the common moon jellyfish, as an innovative model organism in marine ecotoxicology. A series of sequential experiments have been carried out in laboratory in order to investigate the influence of different culturing and methodological parameters (temperature, photoperiod, ephyrae density and age) on behavioural end-points (% of Frequency of Pulsations) and standardize a testing protocol. After that, the organisms have been exposed to two well known reference toxic compounds (Cadmium Nitrate and SDS) in order to analyse the acute and behavioural responses during static exposure. Results of this work indicate that the proposed behavioural end-point, frequency of pulsations (Fp), is an easily measurable one and can be used coupled with an acute one (immobilization) and that ephyrae of jellyfish are very promising model organisms for ecotoxicological investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A test battery for the ecotoxicological evaluation of pentachlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, G; Jos, A; Hazen, M J; Molero, M L; del Peso, A; Salguero, M; Castillo, P D; Rodríguez-Vicente, M C; Repetto, M

    2001-01-01

    Experimental bioassays are currently used in ecotoxicology and environmental toxicology to provide information for risk assessment evaluation of new chemicals and to investigate their effects and mechanisms of action; in addition, ecotoxicological models are used for the detection, control and monitoring of the presence of pollutants in the environment. As a single bioassay will never provide a full picture of the quality of the environment, a representative, cost-effective and quantitative test battery should be developed. The effects of pentachlorophenol were studied using a battery of ecotoxicological model systems, including immobilization of Daphnia magna, bioluminiscence inhibition in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri, growth inhibition of the alga Chlorella vulgaris, and micronuclei induction in the plant Allium cepa. The inhibition of cell proliferation and MTT reduction were investigated in Vero cells. Neutral red uptake, cell growth, MTT reduction, lactate dehydrogenase leakage and activity were studied in the salmonid fish cell line RTG-2, derived from the gonad of rainbow trout. Pentachlorophenol was very toxic for all biota and cells. The system most sensitive to pentachlorophenol, was micronuclei induction in A. cepa, followed by D. magna immobilization, bioluminescence inhibition in V. fischeri bacteria at 60 min and cell proliferation inhibition of RTG-2 cells at 72 h. Inhibition of cell proliferation and MTT reduction on Vero monkey cells showed intermediate sensitivity.

  16. Endocrine Disruption and In Vitro Ecotoxicology: Recent Advances and Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Martin; Kienle, Cornelia; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Oehlmann, Jörg

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are man-made compounds interfering with hormone signaling. Omnipresent in the environment, they can cause adverse effects in a wide range of wildlife. Accordingly, Endocrine Disruption is one focal area of ecotoxicology. Because EDCs induce complex response patterns in vivo via a wide range of mechanisms of action, in vitro techniques have been developed to reduce and understand endocrine toxicity. In this review we revisit the evidence for endocrine disruption in diverse species and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Based on this, we examine the battery of in vitro bioassays currently in use in ecotoxicological research and discuss the following key questions. Why do we use in vitro techniques? What endpoints are we looking at? Which applications are we using in vitro bioassays for? How can we put in vitro data into a broader context? And finally, what is the practical relevance of in vitro data? In critically examining these questions, we review the current state-of-the-art of in vitro (eco)toxicology, highlight important limitations and challenges, and discuss emerging trends and future research needs.

  17. Proteins in ecotoxicology - how, why and why not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Marco F L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Correia, António C; Esteves, Ana C

    2010-02-01

    The growing interest in the application of proteomic technologies to solve toxicology issues and its relevance in ecotoxicology research has resulted in the emergence of "ecotoxicoproteomics". There is a general consensus that ecotoxicoproteomics is a powerful tool to spot early molecular events involved in toxicant responses, which are responsible for the adverse effects observed at higher levels of biological organization, thus contributing to elucidate the mode of action of stressors and to identify specific biomarkers. Ultimately, early-warning indicators can then be developed and deployed in "in situ" bioassays and in environmental risk assessment. The number of field experiments or laboratory trials using ecologically relevant test-species and involving proteomics has been, until recently, insufficient to allow a critical analysis of the real benefits of the application of this approach to ecotoxicology. This article intends to present an overview on the applications of proteomics in the context of ecotoxicology, focusing mainly on the prospective research to be done in invertebrates. Although these represent around 95% of all animal species and in spite of the key structural and functional roles they play in ecosystems, proteomic research in invertebrates is still in an incipient stage. We will review applications of ecotoxicoproteomics by evaluating the technical methods employed, the organisms and the contexts studied, the advances achieved until now and lastly the limitations yet to overcome will be discussed.

  18. Resilience in ecotoxicology: Toward a multiple equilibrium concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Schulz, Ralf; Schäfer, Ralf B; Allen, Craig R; Angeler, David G

    2017-10-01

    The term resilience describes stress-response patterns across scientific disciplines. In ecology, advances have been made to clearly define resilience based on underlying mechanistic assumptions. Engineering resilience (rebound) is used to describe the ability of organisms to recover from adverse conditions (disturbances), which is termed the rate of recovery. By contrast, the ecological resilience definition considers a systemic change, that is, when ecosystems reorganize into a new regime following disturbance. Under this new regime, structural and functional aspects change considerably relative to the previous regime, without recovery. In this context, resilience is an emergent property of complex systems. In the present study, we argue that both definitions and uses are appropriate in ecotoxicology, and although the differences are subtle, the implications and uses are profoundly different. We discuss resilience concepts in ecotoxicology, where the prevailing view of resilience is engineering resilience from chemical stress. Ecological resilience may also be useful for describing systemic ecological changes because of chemical stress. We present quantitative methods that allow ecotoxicologists and risk managers to assess whether an ecosystem faces an impending regime shift or whether it has already undergone such a shift. We contend that engineering and ecological resilience help to distinguish ecotoxicological responses to chemical stressors mechanistically and thus have implications for theory, policy, and application. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2574-2580. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  19. The abcEDCBA-Encoded ABC Transporter and the virB Operon-Encoded Type IV Secretion System of Brucella ovis Are Critical for Intracellular Trafficking and Survival in Ovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auricelio A Macedo

    Full Text Available Brucella ovis infection is associated with epididymitis, orchitis and infertility in rams. Most of the information available on B. ovis and host cell interaction has been generated using murine macrophages or epithelial cell lines, but the interaction between B. ovis and primary ovine macrophages has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the B. ovis abcEDCBA-encoded ABC transporter and the virB operon-encoded Type IV Secretion System (T4SS during intracellular survival of B. ovis in ovine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutant strains were unable to survive in the intracellular environment when compared to the WT B. ovis at 48 hours post infection (hpi. In addition, these mutant strains cannot exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, and their vacuoles do not acquire the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin, which takes place in the WT B. ovis containing vacuole. Higher levels of nitric oxide production were observed in macrophages infected with WT B. ovis at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains. Conversely, higher levels of reactive oxygen species were detected in macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the WT strain. Our results demonstrate that B. ovis is able to persist and multiply in ovine macrophages, while ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutations prevent intracellular multiplication, favor phagolysosome fusion, and impair maturation of the B. ovis vacuole towards an endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment.

  20. Available IMARES generated ecotoxicological data with relevance to petroleum related chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de P.; Klok, T.C.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides an overview of ecotoxicological tests of oil and oil-related chemicals performed by Imares. This meta-data overview was generated for the potential use of its underlying data in the ecotoxicological models in the SYMBIOSES model system.

  1. Geomicrobial ecotoxicology as a new subject in environmental sciences is proposed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ji-Dong; Wang, Yanxin

    2014-12-01

    Environmental sciences is an interdisciplinary subject and current development allows investigation of environmental issues from physical, chemical, geological, biological and toxicological approaches. Based on such development, geomicrobial ecotoxicology or microbial ecotoxicology is proposed to advance the information gathering on ecosystem processes and function because microorganisms are numerous and fundamental to the cycling of nutrients and energy flow.

  2. Inhibition of microRNA-214-5p promotes cell survival and extracellular matrix formation by targeting collagen type IV alpha 1 in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q. S.; Meng, F. Y.; Zhao, Y. H.; Jin, C. L.; Tian, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to investigate the functional effects of microRNA (miR)-214-5p on osteoblastic cells, which might provide a potential role of miR-214-5p in bone fracture healing. Methods Blood samples were obtained from patients with hand fracture or intra-articular calcaneal fracture and from healthy controls (HCs). Expression of miR-214-5p was monitored by qRT-PCR at day 7, 14 and 21 post-surgery. Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were transfected with antisense oligonucleotides (ASO)-miR-214-5p, collagen type IV alpha 1 (COL4A1) vector or their controls; thereafter, cell viability, apoptotic rate, and the expression of collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1A1), type II collagen (COL-II), and type X collagen (COL-X) were determined. Luciferase reporter assay, qRT-PCR, and Western blot were performed to ascertain whether COL4A1 was a target of miR-214-5p. Results Plasma miR-214-5p was highly expressed in patients with bone fracture compared with HCs after fracture (p COL4A1 was a target of miR-214-5p, and was negatively regulated by miR-214-5p (p COL4A1 showed a similar impact on cell viability, apoptotic rate, and COL1A1, COL-II, and COL-X expressions inhibiting miR-214-5p (p COL4A1. Cite this article: Q. S. Li, F. Y. Meng, Y. H. Zhao, C. L. Jin, J. Tian, X. J. Yi. Inhibition of microRNA-214-5p promotes cell survival and extracellular matrix formation by targeting collagen type IV alpha 1 in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:464–471. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.68.BJR-2016-0208.R2 PMID:28784704

  3. Establishing mussel behavior as a biomarker in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jason T; Beggel, Sebastian; Auerswald, Karl; Stoeckle, Bernhard C; Geist, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Most freshwater mussel species of the Unionoida are endangered, presenting a conservation issue as they are keystone species providing essential services for aquatic ecosystems. As filter feeders with limited mobility, mussels are highly susceptible to water pollution. Despite their exposure risk, mussels are underrepresented in standard ecotoxicological methods. This study aimed to demonstrate that mussel behavioral response to a chemical stressor is a suitable biomarker for the advancement of ecotoxicology methods that aids mussel conservation. Modern software and Hall sensor technology enabled mussel filtration behavior to be monitored real-time at very high resolution. With this technology, we present our method using Anodonta anatina and record their response to de-icing salt pollution. The experiment involved an environmentally relevant 'pulse-exposure' design simulating three subsequent inflow events. Three sublethal endpoints were investigated, Filtration Activity, Transition Frequency (number of changes from opened to closed, or vice versa) and Avoidance Behavior. The mussels presented a high variation in filtration behavior, behaving asynchronously. At environmentally relevant de-icing salt exposure scenarios, A. anatina behavior patterns were significantly affected. Treated mussels' Filtration Activity decreased during periods of very high and long de-icing salt exposure (pecotoxicology studies. Avoidance Behavior proved to be a potentially suitable endpoint for calculating mussel behavior effect concentration. Therefore we recommend adult mussel behavior as a suitable biomarker for future ecotoxicological research. This method could be applied to other bivalve species and for physical and environmental stressors, such as particulate matter and temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Standardize or Diversify Experimental Conditions in Ecotoxicology? A Case Study on Herbicide Toxicity to Larvae of Two Anuran Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2017-11-01

    Despite a steeply increasing number of ecotoxicological studies on the effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms, studies assessing the adequacy and reliability of different experimental approaches have remained scarce. We scrutinized effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on larvae of two European anuran amphibians by estimating species-specific LC50 values, assessing how an additional stress factor may influence outcomes, and investigating whether replicate experiments yielded qualitatively the same results. We exposed Rana dalmatina and Bufo bufo tadpoles to two predator treatments (no predator vs. predator chemical cues) combined with varying herbicide concentrations, repeated the experiment with a subset of the experimental treatments and partly with slight modifications 1 week later and assessed survival. Our results indicated that the herbicide was moderately toxic to tadpoles. The presence of predator chemical cues did not affect the lethality of the herbicide in either species. The estimated sensitivity of R. dalmatina tadpoles varied considerably across experiments, whereas in case of B. bufo LC50 values remained very similar. Our results suggest that differences in the experimental setup may often have no influence on the measured effects of pesticides, whereas replicated experiments can deliver widely differing results in other cases, perhaps depending on the studied species, the population origin of the tested individuals, or the test conditions. This draws attention to the suggestion that strict standardization may not deliver widely applicable insights into the toxicity of contaminants and, instead, intentionally introducing variation into the design of ecotoxicological experiments and replicating entire experiments may prove highly beneficial.

  5. The use of diplopods in soil ecotoxicology - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Souza, Tatiana; Christofoletti, Cintya Aparecida; Bozzatto, Vlamir; Fontanetti, Carmem Silvia

    2014-05-01

    Diplopods play an important role in the dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems, actively participating in the decomposition of organic matter and soil aeration. They have gained increased attention from ecotoxicology research because they are continuously exposed to soil contaminants and biological effects of chemical stressors can be measurable at various levels of biological organization. This paper is the first review on the use of diplopods as soil bioindicators and compiles the effects of the different toxic chemical agents on these animals. Special emphasis is given on the interpretation of the effects of heavy metals and complex mixtures in target organs of diplopods. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ecotoxicological effects of carbon nanomaterials on algae, fungi and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Elena V; Ochoa-Olmos, Omar E; De la Mora-Estrada, León F

    2011-04-01

    The ecotoxicological effects of carbon nanomateriales (CNMs), namely fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, on algae, fungi and plants are analyzed. In different toxicity tests, both direct and indirect effects were found. The direct effects are determined by nanomaterial chemical composition and surface reactivity, which might catalyze redox reactions in contact with organic molecules and affect respiratory processes. Some indirect effects of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) are physical restraints or release of toxic ions. Accumulation of CNPs in photosynthetic organs provokes obstruction in stomata, foliar heating and alteration in physiological processes. The phytotoxicity studies of CNMs should be focused on determining phytotoxicity mechanisms, size distribution of CNPs in solution, uptake and translocation of nanoparticles by plants, on characterization of their physical and chemical properties in rhizosphere and on root surfaces. More studies on plants and algae, as a part of food chain, are needed to understand profoundly the toxicity and health risks of CNMs as ecotoxicological stressors. Correct and detailed physical and chemical characterization of CNMs is very important to establish the exposure conditions matching the realistic ones. Ecotoxicity experiments should include examinations of both short and long-term effects. One must take into account that real carbon nanomaterials are complex mixtures of carbon forms and metal residues of variable chemistry and particle size, and the toxicity reported may reflect these byproducts/residues/impurities rather than the primary material structure. One more recommendation is not only to focus on the inherent toxicity of nanoparticles, but also consider their possible interactions with existing environmental contaminants.

  7. Arsenic rich iron plaque on macrophyte roots - an ecotoxicological risk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, M.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain)], E-mail: mark.taggart@uclm.es; Mateo, R. [Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain); Charnock, J.M.; Bahrami, F. [Synchrotron Radiation Department, CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Green, A.J. [Department of Wetland Ecology, Estacion Biologica de Donana, CSIC, Pabellon del Peru, Avenida Maria Luisa s/n, 41013 Seville (Spain); Meharg, A.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Arsenic is known to accumulate with iron plaque on macrophyte roots. Three to four years after the Aznalcollar mine spill (Spain), residual arsenic contamination left in seasonal wetland habitats has been identified in this form by scanning electron microscopy. Total digestion has determined arsenic concentrations in thoroughly washed 'root + plaque' material in excess of 1000 mg kg{sup -1}, and further analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests arsenic exists as both arsenate and arsenite. Certain herbivorous species feed on rhizomes and bulbs of macrophytes in a wide range of global environments, and the ecotoxicological impact of consuming arsenic rich iron plaque associated with such food items remains to be quantified. Here, greylag geese which feed on Scirpus maritimus rhizome and bulb material in areas affected by the Aznalcollar spill are shown to have elevated levels of arsenic in their feces, which may originate from arsenic rich iron plaque. - Accumulation of metals with iron plaque on macrophyte roots in wetlands poses an ecotoxicological risk to certain herbivores.

  8. The use of soil mites in ecotoxicology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguier, Pierre; Manier, Nicolas; Owojori, Olugbenga John; Bauda, Pascale; Pandard, Pascal; Römbke, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mites, and especially soil-inhabiting ones, have been less studied than the other invertebrates used in bio-assays for the assessment of soil quality and the hazards of chemicals, although these organisms are included in the regulatory assessment scheme of pesticides. The recent advances in the development of test methods for soil mites groups have provided more information on their sensitivities towards chemicals, which needs to be presented for a more robust assessment of the current trends in soil mite ecotoxicology. Moreover, interestingly mite is the only taxa for which test methods were developed and standardized on predatory organisms. This review summarizes the different protocols for the assessment of chemicals using soil-inhabiting mites, including laboratory, semi-field and field studies. Among the data found in the literature, most of the chemicals assessed with mites were pesticides, while a few environmental samples were assessed with these organisms. Their sensitivities towards chemicals were then compared and discussed regarding other soil invertebrates. Finally, we conclude on the usefulness of soil mites in ecotoxicology, and provide future research trail in this area.

  9. Ecotoxicology is not normal: A comparison of statistical approaches for analysis of count and proportion data in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöcs, Eduard; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2015-09-01

    Ecotoxicologists often encounter count and proportion data that are rarely normally distributed. To meet the assumptions of the linear model, such data are usually transformed or non-parametric methods are used if the transformed data still violate the assumptions. Generalized linear models (GLMs) allow to directly model such data, without the need for transformation. Here, we compare the performance of two parametric methods, i.e., (1) the linear model (assuming normality of transformed data), (2) GLMs (assuming a Poisson, negative binomial, or binomially distributed response), and (3) non-parametric methods. We simulated typical data mimicking low replicated ecotoxicological experiments of two common data types (counts and proportions from counts). We compared the performance of the different methods in terms of statistical power and Type I error for detecting a general treatment effect and determining the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC). In addition, we outlined differences on a real-world mesocosm data set. For count data, we found that the quasi-Poisson model yielded the highest power. The negative binomial GLM resulted in increased Type I errors, which could be fixed using the parametric bootstrap. For proportions, binomial GLMs performed better than the linear model, except to determine LOEC at extremely low sample sizes. The compared non-parametric methods had generally lower power. We recommend that counts in one-factorial experiments should be analyzed using quasi-Poisson models and proportions from counts by binomial GLMs. These methods should become standard in ecotoxicology.

  10. Ecotoxicological effects of pig manure on Folsomia candida in subtropical Brazilian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Ana Paula; Baretta, Dilmar; Paiano, Diovani; Leston, Sara; Freitas, Andreia; Ramos, Fernando; Sousa, Jose Paulo; Klauberg-Filho, Osmar

    2016-08-15

    The effects of pig manure, from diets incorporating veterinary pharmaceuticals, on survival and reproduction of Folsomia candida were evaluated. Manures derived from the following diets: corn and soymeal (CS); 85% CS diet+15% wheat meal (TR); CS diet+100ppm doxycycline+50ppm colistin+2500ppm Zn oxide (CSa); TR diet+100ppm doxycycline+50ppm colistin+2500ppm Zn oxide (TRa). Manures were tested in two subtropical soils representative of southern (Oxisol and Entisol). Despite the antibiotics no significant differences were found between the four manures within each soil. However, strong differences were found on the toxicity between soils. In Oxisol, LC50 values were around 100m(3)ha(-1), and EC50 values around 80m(3)ha(-1). In Entisol these were much lower, with LC50 values oscillating around 20m(3)ha(-1) and EC50 values between 10-15m(3)ha(-1). The observed toxicity on both soils was attributed to excess of nitrogen, Cu and Zn in the highest doses. The strong difference between soils could be explained by soil properties, namely CEC, organic matter, and clay contents that were lower in Entisol, indicating a poor ability to retain contaminants increasing their availability in soil. Results suggest that the application of these residues should be regulated not only using a volume-based criterion, but should incorporate data on soil properties, complemented by an ecotoxicological assessment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Framework for traits-based assessment in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubach, Mascha N; Ashauer, Roman; Buchwalter, David B; De Lange, Hj; Hamer, Mick; Preuss, Thomas G; Töpke, Katrien; Maund, Stephen J

    2011-04-01

    A key challenge in ecotoxicology is to assess the potential risks of chemicals to the wide range of species in the environment on the basis of laboratory toxicity data derived from a limited number of species. These species are then assumed to be suitable surrogates for a wider class of related taxa. For example, Daphnia spp. are used as the indicator species for freshwater aquatic invertebrates. Extrapolation from these datasets to natural communities poses a challenge because the extent to which test species are representative of their various taxonomic groups is often largely unknown, and different taxonomic groups and chemicals are variously represented in the available datasets. Moreover, it has been recognized that physiological and ecological factors can each be powerful determinants of vulnerability to chemical stress, thus differentially influencing toxicant effects at the population and community level. Recently it was proposed that detailed study of species traits might eventually permit better understanding, and thus prediction, of the potential for adverse effects of chemicals to a wider range of organisms than those amenable for study in the laboratory. This line of inquiry stems in part from the ecology literature, in which species traits are being used for improved understanding of how communities are constructed, as well as how communities might respond to, and recover from, disturbance (see other articles in this issue). In the present work, we develop a framework for the application of traits-based assessment. The framework is based on the population vulnerability conceptual model of Van Straalen in which vulnerability is determined by traits that can be grouped into 3 major categories, i.e., external exposure, intrinsic sensitivity, and population sustainability. Within each of these major categories, we evaluate specific traits as well as how they could contribute to the assessment of the potential effects of a toxicant on an organism. We then

  12. Assessing the relevance of ecotoxicological studies for regulatory decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudén, Christina; Adams, Julie; Ågerstrand, Marlene; Brock, Theo Cm; Poulsen, Veronique; Schlekat, Christian E; Wheeler, James R; Henry, Tala R

    2017-07-01

    Regulatory policies in many parts of the world recognize either the utility of or the mandate that all available studies be considered in environmental or ecological hazard and risk assessment (ERA) of chemicals, including studies from the peer-reviewed literature. Consequently, a vast array of different studies and data types need to be considered. The first steps in the evaluation process involve determining whether the study is relevant to the ERA and sufficiently reliable. Relevance evaluation is typically performed using existing guidance but involves application of "expert judgment" by risk assessors. In the present paper, we review published guidance for relevance evaluation and, on the basis of the practical experience within the group of authors, we identify additional aspects and further develop already proposed aspects that should be considered when conducting a relevance assessment for ecotoxicological studies. From a regulatory point of view, the overarching key aspect of relevance concerns the ability to directly or indirectly use the study in ERA with the purpose of addressing specific protection goals and ultimately regulatory decision making. Because ERA schemes are based on the appropriate linking of exposure and effect estimates, important features of ecotoxicological studies relate to exposure relevance and biological relevance. Exposure relevance addresses the representativeness of the test substance, environmental exposure media, and exposure regime. Biological relevance deals with the environmental significance of the test organism and the endpoints selected, the ecological realism of the test conditions simulated in the study, as well as a mechanistic link of treatment-related effects for endpoints to the protection goal identified in the ERA. In addition, uncertainties associated with relevance should be considered in the assessment. A systematic and transparent assessment of relevance is needed for regulatory decision making. The relevance

  13. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF STRUCTURAL ALERTS (CHEMICAL FRAGMENTS IN (ECOTOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Lepailleur

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review describes the evolution of different algorithms dedicated to the automated discovery of chemical fragments associated to (ecotoxicological endpoints. These structural alerts correspond to one of the most interesting approach of in silico toxicology due to their direct link with specific toxicological mechanisms. A number of expert systems are already available but, since the first work in this field which considered a binomial distribution of chemical fragments between two datasets, new data miners were developed and applied with success in chemoinformatics. The frequency of a chemical fragment in a dataset is often at the core of the process for the definition of its toxicological relevance. However, recent progresses in data mining provide new insights into the automated discovery of new rules. Particularly, this review highlights the notion of Emerging Patterns that can capture contrasts between classes of data.

  14. [Environmental Behaviors and Ecotoxicology of the Emerging Contaminants Polyhalogenated Carbazoles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-de; Chen, Yan-qiu; Yuan, Dong-xing

    2016-04-15

    Polyhalogenated carbazoles (PHCs), with a complex chemical structure similar to polychlorinated dibenzofurans, are a class of emerging environmental organic contaminants. There are 135 congeners for PHCs with a pure halogenation. Most of PHCs are not man-made products. Although PHCs in the environment were firstly discovered in the 1980s, these emerging halogenated compounds were not seriously considered until recent years. Recently, more than 20 PHCs have been detected in sediment and soil samples. In addition, studies have shown that PHCs exhibited dioxin-like toxicity and were persistent and bioaccumulative. Therefore, it is very important to understand the distribution, origins and ecotoxicology of PHCs for a better assessment of their environmental risks. To date, research on the environmental behaviors of PHCs is relatively limited and warrants further investigations. In this review, the environmental distribution, source, analytical methods and toxicity of PHCs were summarized and future research needs were outlined.

  15. Peculiarities of ecotoxicological assessment nanoagrochemicals used in crop production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Makarenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studying the toxic effect of nanoagrochemicals on the processes of a plant's cell division, growth and development of plants at the early stages of ontogeny. It can be assume that the toxic effect of nanoagrochemicals depends on the size and structure of the nanoparticles, which are included in their composition: the toxic effect is stronger, the smaller the size of the nanoparticles is; nanocomposites of crystal structure are more toxic compared to nanocomposites of amorphous structure. Nanoagrochemicals ecotoxicological risk assessment should not be based only on the study of the dependence “dose-effect” on the level of the organism and population; it should include the research of the toxic process, starting from the level of the cell and its organelles.

  16. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Aquatic Genotoxicity Using the Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Comet assay is a novel biological analysis, which is a sensitive, flexible, simple, rapid, and inexpensive method to assess aquatic genotoxicant. Since Singh and co-workers developed the method in 1988, its use has increased exponentially in various fields. This review discourses on the application of this assay in aquatic ecosystems. Various types of cells from various aquatic organisms have been tested by various genotoxicant both direct- and indirect-acting using the comet assay. The applications of this assay suggest that it is a useful assay to assess aquatic genotoxicants. However, there are some factors, which should be taken into account when using this assay as aquatic ecotoxicological assessment device such as inter-animal and cell variability.

  17. Transgenic fish systems and their application in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhyun; Green, Jon M; Tyler, Charles R

    2015-02-01

    The use of transgenics in fish is a relatively recent development for advancing understanding of genetic mechanisms and developmental processes, improving aquaculture, and for pharmaceutical discovery. Transgenic fish have also been applied in ecotoxicology where they have the potential to provide more advanced and integrated systems for assessing health impacts of chemicals. The zebrafish (Daniorerio) is the most popular fish for transgenic models, for reasons including their high fecundity, transparency of their embryos, rapid organogenesis and availability of extensive genetic resources. The most commonly used technique for producing transgenic zebrafish is via microinjection of transgenes into fertilized eggs. Transposon and meganuclease have become the most reliable methods for insertion of the genetic construct in the production of stable transgenic fish lines. The GAL4-UAS system, where GAL4 is placed under the control of a desired promoter and UAS is fused with a fluorescent marker, has greatly enhanced model development for studies in ecotoxicology. Transgenic fish have been developed to study for the effects of heavy metal toxicity (via heat-shock protein genes), oxidative stress (via an electrophile-responsive element), for various organic chemicals acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, thyroid and glucocorticoid response pathways, and estrogenicity. These models vary in their sensitivity with only very few able to detect responses for environmentally relevant exposures. Nevertheless, the potential of these systems for analyses of chemical effects in real time and across multiple targets in intact organisms is considerable. Here we illustrate the techniques used for generating transgenic zebrafish and assess progress in the development and application of transgenic fish (principally zebrafish) for studies in environmental toxicology. We further provide a viewpoint on future development opportunities.

  18. Modeling receptor kinetics in the analysis of survival data for organophosphorus pesticides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, D.T.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Acute ecotoxicological tests usually focus on survival at a standardized exposure time. However, LC50's decrease in time in a manner that depends both on the chemical and on the organism. DEBtox is an existing approach to analyze toxicity data in time, based on hazard modeling (the internal

  19. The ecotoxicological recovery of Ely Creek and tributaries (Lee County, VA) after remediation of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mathew L; Cherry, Donald S; Currie, Rebecca J; Zipper, Carl E

    2012-04-01

    The Ely Creek watershed (Lee County, VA) was determined in 1995 to be the most negatively affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) within the Virginia coalfield. This determination led the US Army Corps of Engineers to design and build passive wetland remediation systems at two major AMD seeps affecting Ely Creek. This study was undertaken to determine if ecological recovery had occurred in Ely Creek. The results indicate that remediation had a positive effect on all monitoring sites downstream of the remediated AMD seeps. At the site most impacted by AMD, mean pH was 2.93 prior to remediation and improved to 7.14 in 2004. Benthic macroinvertebrate surveys revealed that one AMD influenced site had increased taxa richness from zero taxa in 1997 to 24 in 2004. While in situ testing of Asian clams resulted in zero survival at five of seven AMD influenced sites prior to remediation, some clams survived at all sites after. Clam survival was found to be significantly less than upstream references at only two sites, both downstream of un-mitigated AMD seeps in 2004. An ecotoxicological rating (ETR) system that combined ten biotic and abiotic parameters was developed as an indicator of the ecological status for each study site. A comparison of ETRs from before and after remediation demonstrated that all sites downstream of the remediation had experienced some level of recovery. Although the remediation has improved the ecological health of Ely Creek, un-mitigated AMD discharges are still negatively impacting the watershed.

  20. More practical and gentler guides are required for non-mathematicians in ecotoxicology and beyond. Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yuichi

    2017-03-01

    Use of dynamic energy budget (DEB) model [1], and/or other bioenergetic models would be definitely a key in ecotoxicological applications and ecological risk assessments. One of the critical reasons to anticipate so is that we are required to reduce animal use in ecotoxicity testing that usually measures effects of chemicals on survival or reproduction of organisms [2]. Consequently, the prediction of population-level consequences based on ecotoxicological modeling and suborganismal-level effects evaluated by in vitro testing would have more significant value. In this regard, the modeling that can link the sub-organismal responses to organismal- (e.g., survival and reproduction) and then population-levels consequences would be really valuable although challenging [3,4]. Particularly, DEB models have the potential for providing a mechanistic link between sub-organismal and organismal levels once the effects of chemicals on biogenetics (i.e., growth, increased maintenance cost, etc.) are assessed [3]. It should be noted that, even though a considerable amount of work is required to develop such mechanistic models for local populations of a given species [3], a time-consuming model development may not be necessary for ;general; ecological risk assessments as with the case that use of ;standard/surrogate; test species such as Daphnia is accepted in many regulatory contexts. What will be required is probably the agreement on which models/scenarios are used for the assessments.

  1. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-22

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. Patterns of DNA methylation in animals: an ecotoxicological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Jessica A

    2014-07-01

    DNA methylation refers to the addition of a methyl group to nucleotides within DNA. As with other epigenetic endpoints, patterns of DNA methylation are susceptible to alterations due to exposure to environmental stressors, including contaminants. These alterations can persist in the absence of the initial stressor as cells divide, and can even be inherited between generations if they occur in the germ line. Although our knowledge concerning patterns of DNA methylation in animals is increasing, there remains a gap in the literature when it comes to species outside of those typically used for biomedical research. Here, I review the literature relating to DNA methylation in an array of taxa (mammals, fish, birds, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates) and discuss these data from an ecotoxicological perspective. The pattern and extent of DNA methylation is well conserved across species of vertebrates; methylation appears mainly on cytosine residues within a CpG context, and much of the genome is methylated, with the notable exception of cytosines within CpG islands in the promoters of genes. Highly methylated genes in vertebrates tend to be transcriptionally repressed. However, large differences occur between classes of vertebrates in terms of the timing and nature of reprogramming and genomic imprinting: epigenetic processes that establish patterns of DNA methylation in the early embryo and which are sensitive to environmental stress. In invertebrates, patterns of DNA methylation are extremely variable and differ significantly from the condition observed in vertebrates. Some invertebrate genomes exhibit no DNA methylation while others are methylated to a level that is comparable to vertebrates. Additionally, DNA methylation may have different functions in invertebrates, e.g., alternative splicing. This variability in basic patterns of DNA methylation among species during sensitive periods of development suggests that responses to epigenetically active environmental

  3. Ecotoxicological modelling of cosmetics for aquatic organisms: A QSTR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, K; Roy, K

    2017-07-01

    In this study, externally validated quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models were developed for toxicity of cosmetic ingredients on three different ecotoxicologically relevant organisms, namely Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas following the OECD guidelines. The final models were developed by partial least squares (PLS) regression technique, which is more robust than multiple linear regression. The obtained model for P. subcapitata shows that molecular size and complexity have significant impacts on the toxicity of cosmetics. In case of P. promelas and D. magna, we found that the largest contribution to the toxicity was shown by hydrophobicity and van der Waals surface area, respectively. All models were validated using both internal and test compounds employing multiple strategies. For each QSTR model, applicability domain studies were also performed using the "Distance to Model in X-space" method. A comparison was made with the ECOSAR predictions in order to prove the good predictive performances of our developed models. Finally, individual models were applied to predict toxicity for an external set of 596 personal care products having no experimental data for at least one of the endpoints, and the compounds were ranked based on a decreasing order of toxicity using a scaling approach.

  4. Soil ecotoxicology in Latin America: Current research and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Júlia Carina; Chelinho, Sónia; Sousa, José Paulo

    2017-07-01

    Soils from some Latin American countries support the highest biodiversity levels on the planet and simultaneously have some of the most serious environmental impacts attributed to both historical and current agricultural practices and industrial activities. Soil contamination has resulted from intensive use of pesticides, extensive mining and other industrial activities, and uncontrolled management of waste within inappropriate regulatory frameworks. The present study presents an overview of the scientific research on soil ecotoxicology conducted in Latin America, summarizing the recent advances and highlighting the needs for further refinements in this research field. Most of the contributions to the scientific literature have been from Brazil. The most investigated issue is the ecotoxicity of pesticides and earthworms, which were the organisms most frequently used as test species. Needs identified by Latin American researchers include methods and procedures for: 1) identifying and collecting natural soils to be used as reference test-substrates in tests, 2) identifying and discerning the range of sensitivities of native test species to soil contaminants, 3) developing environmental guidelines applicable to tropical/subtropical conditions, and 4) developing methods and procedures for higher tier testing for full development and implementation of environmental risk assessment schemes. The protection of Latin American soils, including provision of goods and services, is currently framed in legislation and other regulations, but implementation requires significant improvement and additional training programs. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1795-1810. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  5. Linking genotoxic responses and reproductive success in ecotoxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.L.; Wild, G.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The potential of genotoxicity biomarkers as predictors of detrimental environmental effects, such as altered reproductive success of wild organisms, must be rigorously determined. Recent research to evaluate relationships between genotoxic responses and indicators of reproductive success in model animals is described from an ecotoxicological perspective. Genotoxicity can be correlated with reproductive effects such as gamete loss due to cell death; embryonic mortality; and heritable mutations in a range of model animals including polychaete worms, nematodes, sea urchins, amphibians, and fish. In preliminary studies, the polychaete worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata, and the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, have also shown the potential for cumulative DNA damage in gametes. If DNA repair capacity is limited in gametes, then selected life history traits such as long and synchronous periods of gametogenesis may confer vulnerability to genotoxic substances in chronic exposures. Recommendations for future research include strategic development of animal models that can be used to elucidate multiple mechanisms of effect (multiend point) at varying levels of biological organization (multilevel). 27 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. AMEG: the new SETAC advisory group on aquatic macrophyte ecotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jo; Dobbs, Michael; Ebke, Peter; Hanson, Mark; Hommen, Udo; Knauer, Katja; Loutseti, Stefania; Maltby, Lorraine; Mohr, Silvia; Poovey, Angela; Poulsen, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    Introduction and background Primary producers play critical structural and functional roles in aquatic ecosystems; therefore, it is imperative that the potential risks of toxicants to aquatic plants are adequately assessed in the risk assessment of chemicals. The standard required macrophyte test species is the floating (non-sediment-rooted) duckweed Lemna spp. This macrophyte species might not be representative of all floating, rooted, emergent, and submerged macrophyte species because of differences in the duration and mode of exposure; sensitivity to the specific toxic mode of action of the chemical; and species-specific traits (e.g., duckweed's very short generation time). Discussion and perspectives These topics were addressed during the workshop entitled “Aquatic Macrophyte Risk Assessment for Pesticides” (AMRAP) where a risk assessment scheme for aquatic macrophytes was proposed. Four working groups evolved from this workshop and were charged with the task of developing Tier 1 and higher-tier aquatic macrophyte risk assessment procedures. Subsequently, a SETAC Advisory Group, the Macrophyte Ecotoxicology Group (AMEG) was formed as an umbrella organization for various macrophyte working groups. The purpose of AMEG is to provide scientifically based guidance in all aspects of aquatic macrophyte testing in the laboratory and field, including prospective as well as retrospective risk assessments for chemicals. As AMEG expands, it will begin to address new topics including bioremediation and sustainable management of aquatic macrophytes in the context of ecosystem services. PMID:20191396

  7. Ecotoxicology of Hexavalent Chromium in Freshwater Fish: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velma, Venkatramreddy; Vutukuru, S.S.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a naturally occurring element found in rocks, animals, plants, and soil, predominantly in its insoluble trivalent form [Cr(III)]. Intense industrialization and other anthropogenic activities have led to the global occurrence of soluble Cr(VI), which is readily leached from soil to groundwater or surface water, in concentrations above permissible levels. The ecotoxicology of Cr(VI) is linked to its environmental persistence and the ability to induce a variety of adverse effects in biologic systems, including fish. In aquatic ecosystems, Cr(VI) exposure poses a significant threat to aquatic life. This paper reviews the fate and transport of Cr(VI) in the environment and its acute and chronic effects on fish. We also discuss Cr(VI) toxicity at the cellular, biochemical, and genetic levels. An attempt is made in this review to comprehend the staggered data on the toxic effects of Cr(VI) to various species of fish. Such data are extremely useful to the scientific community and public officials involved in health risk assessment and management of environmental contaminants as a guide to the best course of action to restore ecosystems and, in turn, to preserve human health. PMID:19658319

  8. Ecotoxicological risk assessment of chosen pharmaceuticals detected in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Załęska-Radziwiłł, Monika; Affek, Katarzyna; Doskocz, Nina

    2017-11-10

    The goal of this work was to assess the risk posed by the presence of ciprofloxacin, 17α-ethinylestradiol and 5-fluorouracil in aquatic ecosystems based on chronic single-species ecotoxicological tests. There were 23 species used in this study: one cyanobacterium, three green algae, one higher plant, one protozoan, two crustaceans, two fish, 12 bacteria and one fungus (yeast). The risk assessment was performed on the basis of the PEC/PNEC ratio (PEC - predicted environmental concentration, PNEC - predicted no-effect concentration). PNEC was calculated using an assessment factor and statistical extrapolation models. The risk in relation to aquatic organisms proved to be high. The potentially affected fraction of aquatic species in the presence of pharmaceutical active ingredients, depending on the calculation method and the selected concentration in surface waters (predicted or measured), ranged from 6.26 to 27.84% for ciprofloxacin, 2.13 to 18.74% for 17α-ethinylestradiol and 4.96 to 39.28% for 5-fluorouracil. The study indicates several gaps in the existing guidelines, which may be considered within the guideline-revision process.

  9. Behavioural ecotoxicology, an “early warning” signal to assess environmental quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In this review, the position of behavioural ecotoxicology within the available means to assess the status of marine environments is described as filling the gap for the needed “early warning” signals. A few examples of studies performed since the 1960s are discussed to highlight the sensitivity of these approaches in investigating the effects of chemicals, including priority pollutants and emerging contaminants, relative to conventional toxicity tests measuring survival. Discussion The advantage of the behavioural response is due to the integration of biochemical and physiological processes that reflect changes at higher levels of organisation with ecological relevance. Avoidance often represents a behavioural symptom easily detected in many animals exposed to contaminants and would be a useful test to explore more widely. This rapid response would reflect a defence mechanism protective against further exposure and the potential development of more pronounced deleterious effects, whilst in some cases, escape could lead to the relocation of a species with negative consequences. An investigation of the avoidance behaviour of mud shrimp, Corophium volutator, along with the chemical analyses of sediments and amphipods to assess the quality of harbour sediments is summarised. The body burden of the amphipods was 1,000 times lower than the one associated with narcosis, emphasizing the sensitivity of this endpoint. The application of this acute toxicity test is briefly compared to additional work that involved intertidal mussels collected in the field. Conclusions Recent research undertaken with mud snails, Ilyanassa obsoleta, and harbour sediments confirmed the usefulness of the escape behaviour as an assessment tool. However, the limits of the state of knowledge regarding the fate of contaminants in species with the ability to metabolise contaminants is further discussed along with directions to be pursued to address questions arising from the reviewed

  10. Species sensitivity distribution for pentachlorophenol to aquatic organisms based on interval ecotoxicological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinsong; Zhang, Run

    2017-11-01

    Species sensitivity distribution (SSD) model is often used to extrapolate the chemicals' effects from the ecotoxicological data on individual species to ecosystems, and is widely applied to derive water quality criteria or to assess ecological risk. Because of the influence of various factors, the ecotoxicological data of a specific chemicals to an individual usually exist in a range. The feasibility of interval ecotoxicological data directly applied to build SSD model has not been clearly stated. In the present study, by means of Bayesian statistics, the half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of pentachlorophenol (PCP) to 161 aquatic organisms, which were organized into 7 groups, i.e., single determined value, geometric mean estimation, median estimation, interval data, and combination of single determined data with other groups, were used to develop SSD models and to estimate the minimum sample sizes. The results showed that the interval data could be directly applied to build SSD model, and when combined with single point data could give the narrowest credible interval that indicates a stable and robust SSD model. Meanwhile, the results also implied that at least 6-14 ecotoxicological data were required to build a stable SSD model. It suggests that the utilization of interval data in building SSD model can effectively enhance the availability of ecotoxicological data, reduce the uncertainty brought by sample size or point estimation, and provide a reliable way to widen the application of SSD model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Old and new tendencies in ecotoxicology: the relevance of stress ecology and ecotoxicogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Reinecke

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The relatively young science, ecotoxicology, has changed substantially during the last decade from a more practically oriented science to a basic one with more focus on problem solving and the search for causalities in the study of effects. In this article the origin and position of the discipline is analysed, as well as the influence of new developments in the fields of bio-informatics and genetics. The merit of this is discussed and the conclusion made that ecotoxicology can be seen as a separate science, notwithstanding its multidisciplinarity. A review is given of the historic development of the subject and its connection with broad ecology as an example of stress ecology. The importance of incorporating the most recent research developments in biology into ecotoxicology, such as bio-informatics, multivariate statistics and genomics, is discussed. The view is expressed that ecotoxicology will be changing in the near future to include ecotoxicogenomics. This will be a result of the interaction between ecotoxicology and ecology on the cross roads with genomics and bio- informatics.

  12. Effects of temperature and salinity on life history of the marine amphipod Gammarus locusta. Implications for ecotoxicological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuparth, T; Costa, F O; Costa, M H

    2002-02-01

    The life history of Gammarus locusta was analysed in the laboratory under the following temperature and salinity combinations: 20 degrees C-33/1000, 15 degrees C-20/1000 and 15 degrees C-33/1000 (reference condition). Life history analysis comprised survival, individual growth, reproductive traits and life table parameters. Compared to 15 degrees C, life history at 20 degrees C was characterised by at least a four-week reduction in the life-span, lower life expectancy, shorter generation time, faster individual growth, anticipation of age at maturity and higher population growth rate. These temperature effects constituted an acceleration and condensation of the life cycle, compared to the reference condition. Concerning salinity effects, with few exceptions, results show that overall this amphipod life history did not differ significantly between the salinity conditions tested. Regarding ecotoxicological testing implications, findings from this study indicate that the range of temperature and salinity conditions acceptable for testing was substantially expanded both for acute and chronic assays. A temperature of 20 degrees C or higher (for a salinity of 33/1000) is suggested for routine chronic sediment toxicity testing with G. locusta, in order to reduce the life cycle and consequently improve cost-effectiveness and standardisation. Results also suggest that a multiple-response approach, including survival, growth and reproduction, should be applied in chronic toxicity tests.

  13. Qualitative use of Dynamic Energy Budget theory in ecotoxicology : case study on oil contamination and Arctic copepods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, T.C.; Hjorth, M.; Dahlloef, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory provides a logic and consistent framework to evaluate ecotoxicological test results. Currently this framework is not regularly applied in ecotoxicology given perceived complexity and data needs. However, even in the case of low data availability the DEB theory

  14. Eco-toxicological impact of “metals” on the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzol, Massimo; Christensen, Per; Schmidt, Jannick Højrup

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of eco-toxicological impacts related to the emission of contaminants into the environment has peculiar characteristics in the context of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and many different Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) methodologies can be used. However, previous studies recognized...... concentrations. This study aims at expanding the discussion about how, and how differently, various methods for LCIA are estimating the impacts related to metals emissions, with a focus on eco-toxicological impacts. A comparison between eight different LCIA methods is presented in relative terms, using......, the characterization phase is critical in determining the disagreement between methods. However, some similarities were found: there is the tendency in most methods to associate the largest share of the total eco-toxicological impacts to metals. Theoretical and practical differences between methods are discussed...

  15. Ecotoxicological studies of CdS nanoparticles on photosynthetic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayner, Roberta; Dahoumane, Si Amar; Nguyen, Julie Ngoc-Lan; Yéprémian, Claude; Djediat, Chakib; Couté, Alain; Fiévet, Fernand

    2011-03-01

    The potential ecotoxicity of nanosized cadmium sulfide (CdS), synthesized by the polyol process, was investigated using common Anabaena flos-aquae cyanobacteria and Euglena gracilis euglenoid microalgae. The photosynthetic activities of these microorganisms, after addition of free Cd2+ ions and CdS nanoparticles, varied with the presence of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) used to protect surface particle to avoid toxicity and also to control particle size and shape during the synthesis. The nanoparticle concentration was varied from 10(-3) to 5 x 10(-4) M. It was observed that the cadmium concentration, the addition of TOPO protective agent and the particle dissolution process in the culture medium play an important role during the ecotoxicological tests. Viability tests were followed by PAM fluorimetry. Cd2+ ions were very toxic for Anabaena flos aquae. The same behavior was observed after contact with CdS and CdS-TOPO nanoparticles. However, for Euglena gracilis, the photosynthetic activity was stable for more than 1 month in the presence of Cd2+ ions. Moreover, it was observed that the toxicity varies with the concentration of CdS and CdS-TOPO nanoparticles, both kind of nanoparticles are toxic for this microorganism. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses of microorganisms ultrathin sections showed that polysaccharides produced by Anabaena flos-aquae, after contact with CdS and CdS-TOPO nanoparticles, protect the microalgae against particle internalization. Only some particles were observed inside the cells. Moreover, the nanoparticle internalization was observed after contact with all nanoparticles in the presence of Euglena gracilis by endocytosis. All nanoparticles are inside vesicles formed by the cells.

  16. Baia Mare accident--brief ecotoxicological report of Czech experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldán, P; Pavonic, M; Boucek, J; Kokes, J

    2001-07-01

    On 30 January 2000, following the breach in the tailing dam of the Aurul SA Baia Mare Co., a major spill of about 100,000 m(3) of cyanide and metal-rich liquid waste was released into the river system near Baia Mare in northwest Romania. The pollutants flowed via different tributaries into the Tizsa (Tisa) river and finally through the Danube river into the Black Sea. Along the way pollutants (especially cyanides) caused rapid death of aquatic organisms and animals living close to the poisoned rivers. Following request from the governments of Romania, Hungary, and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, United Nations sent international mission experts to the area of accident. The Czech team of four experts took very active part in this mission. Samples of surface water collected by this team 3 weeks after the accident showed high toxicity in the rivers on the Romanian territory. Due to this impact, water from the Szamos river and a large area of the Tisza river in Hungarian territory was still medially toxic. Improvement of this situation was detected only in downstream areas of the Tisza/Tisa river. The high toxicity of surface water from the locality of the Lapos river upstream of the accident indicated the possibility of toxic pollution from other sources in the area. Aquatic sediments were highly toxic only in the Aurul reservoir and its surrounding area. Rapid decline of their toxicity indicated more limited adverse impact of the "Aurul pollution" in comparison with surface water. From ecotoxicological results it is evident that there is an urgent need to start abatement activities in the Baia Mare area because the possibility of future accidents still exists (this hypothesis was proved by further accidents on 10.3.2000 and the beginning of May 2000). Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Geotextile composition, application and ecotoxicology-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiewel, Barbara Vé; Lamoree, Marja

    2016-11-05

    Geosynthetics is the umbrella term for thin, flexible material sheets applied in civil and environmental engineering, of which geotextiles form the largest group. Most geotextiles consist of a polymer from the polyolefin, polyester or polyamide family, and additives to improve their stability. The polymer may degrade into microplastic particles over time and under various conditions and can cause adverse effects, as species may ingest these particles or encounter adverse effects due to the interference of the particles with e.g. their photosynthesis system in the case of algae. Leaching of additives may occur from the intact material, as they are often not covalently bound to the polymer backbone, but is greatly enhanced when micro-sized plastic particles have been formed. A total of 42 polymer additives were identified, of which 26 had ecotoxicity information available in terms of a REACH persistence, toxicity and bioaccumulation (PBT) assessment. Of these, 15 were classified as (very) persistent and 2 as toxic. A survey to assess potential toxicity of the remaining 16 substances revealed that no ecotoxicity studies had been performed on 13 of these compounds. For 3 compounds, other toxicity data was found, as well as of several chemical groups known to be used as additives in geotextiles. The current knowledge is thus lacking in two domains: on the one hand, ecotoxicity data is scarce as many substances have not yet been the subject of ecotoxicological studies. On the other hand, in situ toxic effects might be missed by the current approach of single compound toxicity testing. Moreover, environmental occurrence data of the additives are extremely scarce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Comet Assay and its applications in the field of ecotoxicology: a mature tool that continues to expand its perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lapuente, Joaquín; Lourenço, Joana; Mendo, Sónia A.; Borràs, Miquel; Martins, Marta G.; Costa, Pedro M.; Pacheco, Mário

    2015-01-01

    . (iv) To build a constructive criticism and summarize the needs for protocol improvements for future test applications within the field of ecotoxicology. The Comet Assay is still developing and its potential is yet underexploited in experimental models, mesocosmos or natural ecosystems. PMID:26089833

  19. The Comet Assay and its applications in the field of ecotoxicology: a mature tool that continues to expand its perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lapuente, Joaquín; Lourenço, Joana; Mendo, Sónia A; Borràs, Miquel; Martins, Marta G; Costa, Pedro M; Pacheco, Mário

    2015-01-01

    . (iv) To build a constructive criticism and summarize the needs for protocol improvements for future test applications within the field of ecotoxicology. The Comet Assay is still developing and its potential is yet underexploited in experimental models, mesocosmos or natural ecosystems.

  20. Pretreatment levels of peripheral neutrophils and leukocytes as independent predictors of overall survival in patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage IV Melanoma: results of the EORTC 18951 Biochemotherapy Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Suciu, Stefan; Punt, Cornelis J A

    2007-01-01

    of neutrophils and leukocytes were analyzed together with other known prognostic factors: serum lactate dehydrogenase, performance status, metastatic site, and sex. Two multivariate prognostic factor analyses were carried out in the model: one with leukocyte counts and one with neutrophil counts. RESULTS......: A total of 363 patients were randomly assigned and baseline blood neutrophil and leukocyte counts were available from 316 and 350 patients, respectively. A high neutrophil count (> 7.5 x 10(9)/L) was an independent prognostic factor for short overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.1; P...... = 0.02), and a high leukocyte count (> 10 x 10(9)/L) was an independent prognostic factor of both short overall survival (HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.4; P = 0.0005) and short progression-free survival (HR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.1; P = 0.008). CONCLUSION: A high pretreatment count of neutrophils in blood...

  1. Food mediated life history strategies in Daphnia magna : their relevance to ecotoxicological evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enserink, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    The waterflea Daphnia magna is a widely used test organism in ecotoxicological studies. Acute and chronic laboratory tests yield basic information for the development of water quality standards, assessment of potential hazards of (new) chemicals, waste water licences and

  2. Methodology for the Assessment of the Ecotoxicological Potential of Construction Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Patrícia; Silvestre, José D.; Flores-Colen, Inês; Viegas, Cristina A.; de Brito, Jorge; Kurad, Rawaz; Demertzi, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Innovation in construction materials (CM) implies changing their composition by incorporating raw materials, usually non-traditional ones, which confer the desired characteristics. However, this practice may have unknown risks. This paper discusses the ecotoxicological potential associated with raw and construction materials, and proposes and applies a methodology for the assessment of their ecotoxicological potential. This methodology is based on existing laws, such as Regulation (European Commission) No. 1907/2006 (REACH—Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) and Regulation (European Commission) No. 1272/2008 (CLP—Classification, Labelling and Packaging). Its application and validation showed that raw material without clear evidence of ecotoxicological potential, but with some ability to release chemicals, can lead to the formulation of a CM with a slightly lower hazardousness in terms of chemical characterization despite a slightly higher ecotoxicological potential than the raw materials. The proposed methodology can be a useful tool for the development and manufacturing of products and the design choice of the most appropriate CM, aiming at the reduction of their environmental impact and contributing to construction sustainability. PMID:28773011

  3. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biever, Ronald C

    2017-01-01

    . The present paper provides broad guidance for scientists in regulatory authorities, industry, and academia on issues likely to arise during the ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of EAS and EDS. The primary conclusion of this paper, and of the SETAC Pellston Workshop on which it is based...

  4. Omics for aquatic ecotoxicology: Control of extraneous variability to enhance the analysis of environmental effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are multiple sources of biological and technical variation in a typical ecotoxicology study that may not be revealed by traditional endpoints but that become apparent in an omics dataset. As researchers increasingly apply omics technologies to environmental studies, it will...

  5. Mode of Action (MOA) Assignment Classifications for Ecotoxicology: An Evaluation of approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode of toxic action (MOA) is recognized as a key determinant of chemical toxicity and as an alternative to chemical class-based predictive toxicity modeling. However, MOA classification has never been standardized in ecotoxicology, and a comprehensive comparison of classific...

  6. Methodology for the Assessment of the Ecotoxicological Potential of Construction Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Rodrigues

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Innovation in construction materials (CM implies changing their composition by incorporating raw materials, usually non-traditional ones, which confer the desired characteristics. However, this practice may have unknown risks. This paper discusses the ecotoxicological potential associated with raw and construction materials, and proposes and applies a methodology for the assessment of their ecotoxicological potential. This methodology is based on existing laws, such as Regulation (European Commission No. 1907/2006 (REACH—Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals and Regulation (European Commission No. 1272/2008 (CLP—Classification, Labelling and Packaging. Its application and validation showed that raw material without clear evidence of ecotoxicological potential, but with some ability to release chemicals, can lead to the formulation of a CM with a slightly lower hazardousness in terms of chemical characterization despite a slightly higher ecotoxicological potential than the raw materials. The proposed methodology can be a useful tool for the development and manufacturing of products and the design choice of the most appropriate CM, aiming at the reduction of their environmental impact and contributing to construction sustainability.

  7. Ecotoxicological assessment of antibiotics: A call for improved consideration of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Kristian K; Amézquita, Alejandro; Backhaus, Thomas; Boxall, Alistair; Coors, Anja; Heberer, Thomas; Lawrence, John R; Lazorchak, James; Schönfeld, Jens; Snape, Jason R; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Topp, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Antibiotics play a pivotal role in the management of infectious disease in humans, companion animals, livestock, and aquaculture operations at a global scale. Antibiotics are produced, consumed, and released into the environment at an unprecedented scale causing concern that the presence of antibiotic residues may adversely impact aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Here we critically review the ecotoxicological assessment of antibiotics as related to environmental risk assessment (ERA). We initially discuss the need for more specific protection goals based on the ecosystem service concept, and suggest that the ERA of antibiotics, through the application of a mode of toxic action approach, should make more use of ecotoxicological endpoints targeting microorganisms (especially bacteria) and microbial communities. Key ecosystem services provided by microorganisms and associated ecosystem service-providing units (e.g. taxa or functional groups) are identified. Approaches currently available for elucidating ecotoxicological effects on microorganisms are reviewed in detail and we conclude that microbial community-based tests should be used to complement single-species tests to offer more targeted protection of key ecosystem services. Specifically, we propose that ecotoxicological tests should not only assess microbial community function, but also microbial diversity (‘species’ richness) and antibiotic susceptibility. Promising areas for future basic and applied research of relevance to ERA are highlighted throughout the text. In this regard, the most fundamental knowledge gaps probably relate to our rudimentary understanding of the ecological roles of antibiotics in nature and possible adverse effects of environmental pollution with subinhibitory levels of antibiotics.

  8. Methodology for the Assessment of the Ecotoxicological Potential of Construction Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Patrícia; Silvestre, José D; Flores-Colen, Inês; Viegas, Cristina A; de Brito, Jorge; Kurad, Rawaz; Demertzi, Martha

    2017-06-13

    Innovation in construction materials (CM) implies changing their composition by incorporating raw materials, usually non-traditional ones, which confer the desired characteristics. However, this practice may have unknown risks. This paper discusses the ecotoxicological potential associated with raw and construction materials, and proposes and applies a methodology for the assessment of their ecotoxicological potential. This methodology is based on existing laws, such as Regulation (European Commission) No. 1907/2006 (REACH-Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) and Regulation (European Commission) No. 1272/2008 (CLP-Classification, Labelling and Packaging). Its application and validation showed that raw material without clear evidence of ecotoxicological potential, but with some ability to release chemicals, can lead to the formulation of a CM with a slightly lower hazardousness in terms of chemical characterization despite a slightly higher ecotoxicological potential than the raw materials. The proposed methodology can be a useful tool for the development and manufacturing of products and the design choice of the most appropriate CM, aiming at the reduction of their environmental impact and contributing to construction sustainability.

  9. Ecotoxicological studies with newly hatched larvae of Concholepas concholepas (Mollusca, Gastropoda): bioassay with secondary-treated kraft pulp mill effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manríquez, Patricio H; Llanos-Rivera, Alejandra; Galaz, Sylvana; Camaño, Andrés

    2013-12-01

    The Chilean abalone or "loco" (Concholepas concholepas, Bruguière 1789) represent the most economically important marine recourse exploited from inner inshore Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources along the Chilean coast. In this study, newly-hatched larvae of C. concholepas were investigated as a potential model species for marine ecotoxicological studies. The study developed a behavioral standard protocol for assessing the impact that kraft pulp mill effluents after secondary treatment have on C. concholepas larvae. Under controlled laboratory conditions, newly-hatched larvae were exposed to a series of different concentrations of kraft pulp mill effluents with secondary treatment (Pinus spp. and Eucalyptus spp.), potassium dichromate as standard reference toxicant and effluent-free control conditions. Regardless of the type of effluent the results indicated that diluted kraft pulp effluent with secondary treatment had reduced effect on larval survival. Low larval survivals were only recorded when they were exposed to high concentrations of the reference toxicant. This suggests that C. concholepas larval bioassay is a simple method for monitoring the effects of kraft pulp mill effluents with secondary treatment discharged into the sea. The results indicated that dilution of ca. 1% of the effluent with an elemental chlorine free (ECF) secondary treatment is appropriate for achieving low larval mortalities, such as those obtained under control conditions with filtered seawater, and to minimize their impact on early ontogenetic stages of marine invertebrates such as newly-hatched larvae of C. concholepas. The methodological aspects of toxicological testing and behavioral responses described here with newly-hatched larvae of C. concholepas can be used to evaluate in the future the potential effects of other stressful conditions as other pollutants or changes in seawater pH associated with ocean acidification. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  11. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  12. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  13. The use of diatoms in ecotoxicology and bioassessment: Insights, advances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Lalit K; Bergey, Elizabeth A; Lyu, Jie; Park, Jihae; Choi, Soyeon; Lee, Hojun; Depuydt, Stephen; Oh, Young-Tae; Lee, Sung-Mo; Han, Taejun

    2017-07-01

    Diatoms are regularly used for bioassessment and ecotoxicological studies in relation to environmental and anthropogenic disturbances. Traditional taxonomical diatom parameters (cell counts, biovolume estimates, species richness, diversity indices and metrics using sensitive and tolerant diatom species) are regularly used for these studies. In the same context, very less focus was given on new endpoints of diatoms (life-forms, nuclear anomalies, alteration in photosynthetic apparatus shape, motility, lipid bodies, size reduction and deformities), in spite of their numerous merits, such as, their easiness, quickness, cheapness, global acceptation and no especial training in diatom taxonomy. In this review we analyzed 202 articles (from lab and field studies), with the aim to investigate the bioassessment and ecotoxicological advancement taken place in diatom research especially in terms of exploring new endpoints along with the traditional taxonomical parameters in a perspective which can greatly enhance the evaluation of fluvial ecosystem quality for biomonitoring practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Swimming speed alteration in the early developmental stages of Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin as ecotoxicological endpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgana, Silvia; Gambardella, Chiara; Falugi, Carla; Pronzato, Roberto; Garaventa, Francesca; Faimali, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Behavioral endpoints have been used for decades to assess chemical impacts at concentrations unlikely to cause mortality. With recently developed techniques, it is possible to investigate the swimming behavior of several organisms under laboratory conditions. The aims of this study were: i) assessing for the first time the feasibility of swimming speed analysis of the early developmental stage sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus by an automatic recording system ii) investigating any Swimming Speed Alteration (SSA) on P. lividus early stages exposed to a chemical reference; iii) identifying the most suitable stage for SSA test. Results show that the swimming speed of all the developmental stages was easily recorded. The swimming speed was inhibited as a function of toxicant concentration. Pluteus were the most appropriate stage for evaluating SSA in P. lividus as ecotoxicological endpoint. Finally, swimming of sea urchin early stages represents a sensitive endpoint to be considered in ecotoxicological investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Water and Sediment Pollution of the Iskar River bellow Samokov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Diadovski

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A system of integral ecological indices has been worked out to assess the level of pollution of water and sediments with hazardous substances. A model for the dynamics of the integral index for water and sediments pollution is proposed. This index was applied for ecotoxicological assessment of water and sediments pollution of the Iskar river bellow Samokov. A modification method on time series analysis is applied.

  16. Using soil health to assess ecotoxicological impacts of pollutants on soil microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bécaert, Valérie; Deschênes, Louise

    2006-01-01

    Microorganisms are essential for a properly functioning soil ecosystem. However, few methods allow an ecotoxicological evaluation of pollutant impact on the soil microbial community. This review proposes the use of the concept of soil health as an ecotoxicological evaluation tool for soil microflora. Initially limited to sustainable agriculture, the concept of soil health is now being applied to novel situations including contaminated and remediated soils. A large amount of work has been published in the last few decades on soil health indicators, and a review of the most relevant studies is presented here. The most cited work is that of the S-5518 committee set up in 1997 by the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA), which proposed to define soil quality as being "the capacity of a soil to function within the limits of an ecosystem, to support biological production, to maintain environmental quality and to support fauna and flora health." The soil health indicators reviewed here are the ones based on this definition because it relates well to sustainability and durability of the soil functions. Several indicators proposed in these studies could be employed in the evaluation of the ecotoxicological impact of pollutants on the soil microbial community, including microbial diversity, microbial activity, and functional stability. However, research is still required to unify the concept, to set threshold values, and to standardize methodologies.

  17. Ecotoxicological evaluation of industrial port of Venice (Italy) sediment samples after a decontamination treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libralato, Giovanni [Environmental Sciences Department, Venice University Ca Foscari, Campo della Celestia 2737/b, I-30122 Venice (Italy)], E-mail: giovanni.libralato@unive.it; Losso, Chiara; Arizzi Novelli, Alessandra [Environmental Sciences Department, Venice University Ca Foscari, Campo della Celestia 2737/b, I-30122 Venice (Italy); Citron, Marta; Della Sala, Stefano; Zanotto, Emanuele [Environmental Department, Venice Port Authority, Zattere 1401, I-30123, Venice (Italy); Cepak, Franka [Institute of Public Health, Vojkovo nabrezje 4a, 6000 Koper (Slovenia); Volpi Ghirardini, Annamaria [Environmental Sciences Department, Venice University Ca Foscari, Campo della Celestia 2737/b, I-30122 Venice (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    This work assesses the ecotoxicological effects of polluted sediment after a decontamination treatment process using a new sediment washing technique. Sediment samples were collected from four sites in Marghera Port industrial channels (Venice, Italy). Ecotoxicological evaluations were performed with Vibrio fischeri and Crassostrea gigas bioassays. Whole sediment and elutriate were deemed as the most suitable environmental matrices for this study. Toxicity scores developed in the Lagoon of Venice for V. fischeri on whole sediment and for C. gigas on elutriate were considered for the final ranking of samples. Ecotoxicological results showed that the treated sediment samples presented both acute and sub-chronic toxicities, which were mainly attributed to the presence of some remaining chemicals such as metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The acute toxicity ranged from low to medium, while the sub-chronic one from absent to very high, suggesting that treated sediments could not be reused in direct contact with seawater. - A sediment washing technique was assessed for port contaminated sediment remediation and reuse, indicating its reduced efficiency and the need for further improvements.

  18. Refinement of the ECETOC approach to identify endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R; Weyers, Arnd; Galay-Burgos, Malyka

    2013-12-16

    To use and implement an assessment scheme for the evaluation of endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals in ecotoxicology, the types of effect need to be agreed. Effects that merit further consideration in this context should fulfil the following three criteria: caused by an endocrine mode of action, be adverse, and be relevant at the population level to reflect the protection goal of ecotoxicological assessments. Thereafter, a comparison of effect values, regardless of the causative mechanisms, should be made, firstly to determine if endocrine toxicity generates the lowest endpoint within a taxon, and secondly if it is the lowest endpoint compared to that of other taxa living in the same compartment. These comparisons inform on two levels of specificity and determine if endocrine-mediated side-effects determine the ecotoxicological profile of a chemical. Various quantitative measures for the assessment of potency are also presented, which could assist in determining how to handle substances in the risk assessment when a regulatory concern is identified. Finally, derogation criteria should be defined for compounds that were designed as endocrine disruptors for non-vertebrates and those for which there is 'negligible exposure'. This paper discusses and provides proposals on how to apply these concepts for assessment of substances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Medicines, shaken and stirred: a critical review on the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Thomas

    2014-11-19

    Analytical monitoring surveys routinely confirm that organisms in the environment are exposed to complex multi-component pharmaceutical mixtures. We are hence tasked with the challenge to take this into consideration when investigating the ecotoxicology of pharmaceuticals. This review first provides a brief overview of the fundamental approaches for mixture toxicity assessment, which is then followed by a critical review on the empirical evidence that is currently at hand on the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures. It is concluded that, while the classical concepts of concentration addition and independent action (response addition) provide a robust scientific footing, several knowledge gaps remain. This includes, in particular, the need for more and better empirical data on the effects of pharmaceutical mixtures on soil organisms as well as marine flora and fauna, and exploring the quantitative consequences of toxicokinetic, toxicodynamic and ecological interactions. Increased focus should be put on investigating the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures in environmentally realistic settings. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Aquatic ecotoxicology: properties of compounds and ecological risk; Aquatische Oekotoxikologie: Stoffeigenschaften und oekologisches Risiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, W. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Umweltchemie und Oekotoxikologie, Schmallenberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In spite of considerable advances in research ecotoxicology and ecotoxicology for testing purposes, fundamental problems exist owing to the immense range of concepts, prerequisites and goals. Alleged weaknesses of ecotoxicology in terms of knowledge acquisition so far have had their cause not only in its pragmatic empirism but also in inadequate methodics and, especially, inconsistent or diversified target orientation. The methodics currently available provide tools permitting to a very large extent to fulfill requirements with the necessary precision and acuity. But practical execution has to heed the magnitude of effort that society is prepared to make for the benefit of the environment. Here, setting the appropriate priorities is the second major challenge to the objectivity of experts, following the assessment of risk versus benefit. (orig.) [German] Trotz erheblicher Fortschritte in der wissenschaftlichen und Pruefoekotoxikologie bestehen aufgrund der Vielfalt der Konzeptionen, Anforderungen und Zielvorgaben grundsaetzliche Probleme. Bisherige behauptete Schwaechen der Oekotoxikologie im Hinblick auf Erkenntnisfortschritt sind nicht nur durch pragmatische Empirie begruendet, sondern auch in ungenuegender Methodik und insbesondere inkonsistenter bzw. vielfaeltiger Zielorientierung. Mit der derzeit verfuegbaren Methodik koennen Anforderungen mit der jeweils notwendigen Praezision und Aussageschaerfe weitestgehend bearbeitet werden. Die praktische Bearbeitung hat sich jedoch danach zu richten, welchen Aufwand die Gesellschaft bereit ist fuer die Gesundheit der Umwelt zu tragen, wobei die richtige Prioritaetensetzung nach den Kriterien Risiko-Nutzen-Aufwand die wohl groesste Herausforderung an Expertenobjektivitaet darstellt. (orig.)

  1. Paleo-ecotoxicology: What Can Lake Sediments Tell Us about Ecosystem Responses to Environmental Pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosi, Jennifer B; Thienpont, Joshua R; Smol, John P; Blais, Jules M

    2017-09-05

    The development of effective risk reduction strategies for aquatic pollutants requires a comprehensive understanding of toxic impacts on ecosystems. Classical toxicological studies are effective for characterizing pollutant impacts on biota in a controlled, simplified environment. Nonetheless, it is well-acknowledged that predictions based on the results of these studies must be tested over the long-term in a natural ecosystem setting to account for increased complexity and multiple stressors. Paleolimnology (the study of lake sediment cores to reconstruct environmental change) can address many key knowledge gaps. When used as part of a weight-of-evidence framework with more traditional approaches in ecotoxicology, it can facilitate rapid advances in our understanding of the chronic effects of pollutants on ecosystems in an environmentally realistic, multistressor context. Paleolimnology played a central role in the Acid Rain debates, as it was instrumental in demonstrating industrial emissions caused acidification of lakes and associated ecosystem-wide impacts. "Resurrection Ecology" (hatching dormant resting eggs deposited in the past) records evolutionary responses of populations to chronic pollutant exposure. With recent technological advances (e.g., geochemistry, genomic approaches), combined with an emerging paleo-ecotoxicological framework that leverages strengths across multiple disciplines, paleolimnology will continue to provide valuable insights into the most pressing questions in ecotoxicology.

  2. Efficiency of a cleanup technology to remove mercury from natural waters by means of rice husk biowaste: ecotoxicological and chemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luciana S; Lopes, I; Lopes, Cláudia B; Henriques, Bruno; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the efficiency of rice husk to remove Hg(II) from river waters spiked with realistic environmental concentrations of this metal (μg L(-1) range) was evaluated. The residual levels of Hg(II) obtained after the remediation process were compared with the guideline values for effluents discharges and water for human consumption, and the ecotoxicological effects using organisms of different trophic levels were assessed. The rice husk sorbent proved to be useful in decreasing Hg(II) contamination in river waters, by reducing the levels of Hg(II) to values of ca. 8.0 and 34 μg L(-1), for an Hg(II) initial concentration of 50 and 500 μg L(-1), respectively. The remediation process with rice husk biowaste was extremely efficient in river waters spiked with lower levels of Hg(II), being able to eliminate the toxicity to the exposed organisms algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus and ensure the total survival of Daphnia magna species. For concentrations of Hg(II) tenfold higher (500 μg L(-1)), the remediation process was not adequate in the detoxification process, still, the rice husk material was able to reduce considerably the toxicity to the bacteria Vibrio fischeri, algae P. subcapitata and rotifer B. calyciflorus, whose responses where fully inhibited during its exposure to the non-remediated river water. The use of a battery of bioassays with organisms from different trophic levels and whose sensitivity revealed to be different and dependent on the levels of Hg(II) contamination proved to be much more accurate in predicting the ecotoxicological hazard assessment of the detoxification process by means of rice husk biowaste.

  3. Evaluation of charge and agglomeration behavior of TiO₂ nanoparticles in ecotoxicological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Y; Lead, J R; Baalousha, M

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic nature of nanoparticle (NP) agglomeration behavior is of paramount interest to many current studies in environmental nanoscience and nano(eco)toxicology because agglomeration affects the NP bioavailability and toxicity. The present study investigates the surface charge and agglomeration behavior of TiO2 NPs in four different ecotoxicological media (OECD algae, OECD L_variegatus, hardwater and plant media) and two different electrolytes KCl (200 mM) and CaCl2 (50 mM). TiO2 NPs were positively charged, and the zeta potential varied from +1.9 mV in hardwater (at pH7.1) to +24.5 mV in CaCl2 electrolyte (at pH7.4) in all media except algae media, where the zeta potential was -6.7 mV (at pH7.7). Despite the differences in the pH and the surface charge of TiO2 NPs in the different media, an immediate agglomeration of the NPs in all standard ecotoxicological media was observed with aggregate sizes in the micrometer scale, as the measured zeta potentials were insufficient to prevent TiO2 NP agglomeration. The isoelectric point (pHiep) of TiO2 NPs in the studied media varied in the range (6.8-7.6), which was attributed to preferential association of anions and cations to TiO2; that is the pHiep decreases with the increased concentration of Cl and increases with the increased concentrations of Na and Mg. Despite the complexity of the ecotoxicological media and the presence of a mixture of different monovalent and divalent electrolytes, the agglomeration kinetics in the media follows the DVLO theory where two distinct agglomeration rates (slow, reaction limited regime and fast, diffusion limited regime) were observable. The critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of TiO2 NPs in the ecotoxicological media varied from 17.6 to 54.0% v/v standard media in UHPW, due to differences in media pH and TiO2 NP surface charge. In the ecotoxicological media (hardwater, L-variegatus and plant), where TiO2 NPs are positively charged, the CCC decrease with the increased divalent

  4. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  5. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident: ecotoxicological update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, R.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    2003-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl, Ukraine, nuclear reactor on 26 April 1986 released large amounts of radiocesium and other radionuclides into the environment, contaminating much of the northern hemisphere, especially Europe. In the vicinity of Chernobyl, at least 30 people died, more than 115,000 others were evacuated, and consumption of milk and other foods was banned because of radiocontamination. At least 14,000 human cancer deaths are expected in Russia, Belarus, and the Ukraine as a direct result of Chernobyl. The most sensitive local ecosystems, as judged by survival, were the soil fauna, pine forest communities, and certain populations of rodents. Elsewhere, fallout from Chernobyl significantly contaminated freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems and flesh and milk of domestic livestock; in many cases, radionuclide concentrations in biological samples exceeded current radiation protection guidelines. Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) in Scandinavia were among the most seriously afflicted by Chernobyl fallout, probably because their main food during winter (lichens) is an efficient absorber of airborne particles containing radiocesium. Some reindeer calves contaminated with 137Cs from Chernobyl showed 137Cs-dependent decreases in survival and increases in frequency of chromosomal aberrations. Although radiation levels in the biosphere are declining with time, latent effects of initial exposure--including an increased frequency of thyroid and other cancers--are now measurable. The full effect of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on natural resources will probably not be known for at least several decades because of gaps in data on long-term genetic and reproductive effects and on radiocesium cycling and toxicokinetics.

  6. Ecotoxicology of polychlorinated biphenyls in fish--a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, T B

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widespread persistent anthropogenic contaminants that can accumulate in tissues of fish. The toxicity of PCBs and their transformation products has been investigated for nearly 50 years, but there is a lack of consensus regarding the effects of these environmental contaminants on wild fish populations. The objective of this review is to critically examine these investigations and evaluate publicly available databases for evidence of effects of PCBs in wild fish. Biological activity of PCBs is limited to a small proportion of PCB congeners [e.g., dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs)] and occurs at concentrations that are typically orders of magnitude higher than PCB levels detected in wild fish. Induction of biomarkers consistent with PCB exposure (e.g., induction of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system) has been evaluated frequently and shown to be induced in fish from some environments, but there does not appear to be consistent reports of damage (i.e., biomarkers of effect) to biomolecules (i.e., oxidative injury) in these fish. Numerous investigations of endocrine system dysfunction or effects on other organ systems have been conducted in wild fish, but collectively there is no consistent evidence of PCB effects on these systems in wild fish. Early life stage toxicity of DL-PCBs does not appear to occur at concentrations reported in wild fish embryos, and results do not support an association between PCBs and decreased survival of early life stages of wild fish. Overall, there appears to be little evidence that PCBs have had any widespread effect on the health or survival of wild fish.

  7. Dibromidodimethyldipyridineplatinum(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairéad E. Kelly

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [PtBr2(CH32(C5H5N2], the PtIV metal centre lies on a twofold rotation axis and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The structure displays weak intramolecular C—H...Br hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  8. Evolutionary ecotoxicology of perfluoralkyl substances (PFASs) inferred from multigenerational exposure: a case study with Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, F; Rusconi, M; Valsecchi, S; Marziali, L

    2014-11-01

    A multigeneration toxicity test on Chironomus riparius was performed with the aim of investigating the evolutionary consequences of exposure to perfluoralkyl substances (perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, PFOS; perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA; perfluorobutane sulfonate, PFBS). Six-hundred larvae were bred per treatment and per generation until emergence and egg deposition under a nominal concentration of 10μg/L of contaminants. Newborn larvae were used to start the next generation. Evolution of genetic variability was evaluated along a total of 10 consecutive generations based on 5 microsatellite loci. Analysis of life-history traits (survival, sex ratio and reproduction) was also carried out. Rapid genetic variability reduction was observed in all treatments, including controls, across generations due to the test conditions. Nevertheless, an increased mutation rate determined a stronger conservation of genetic variability in PFOS and, at minor extent, in PFBS exposed populations compared to controls. No significant effects were induced by exposure to PFOA. Direct mutagenicity or induced stress conditions may be at the base of increased mutation rate, indicating the potential risk of mutational load caused by exposure to PFOS and PFBS. The test provided the opportunity to evaluate the use of approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) and coalescent approaches in evolutionary ecotoxicology. A weak performance was evidenced for ABC, either in terms of bias or dispersion of effective population sizes and of estimates of mutation rate. On the contrary, coalescent simulations proved the sensitivity of traditional genetic endpoints (i.e. heterozygosity and number of alleles) to the alteration of mutation rate, but not to erosion of genetic effective size. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Environmental Risk Limits for alcohols, glycols, and other relatively soluble and/or volatile compounds. 2. Integration of human and ecotoxicological risk limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traas TP; Bontje D; UU/IRAS; SEC

    2005-01-01

    Environmental risk limits are concentrations of a substance in water, air, sediment and soil that are expected to be protective of the environment. In this report environmental risk limits (ERLs) are derived, based on a comparison of human and ecotoxicological risk limits. Ecotoxicological risk

  10. Qualitative use of Dynamic Energy Budget theory in ecotoxicology. Case study on oil contamination and Arctic copepods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Chris; Hjorth, Morten; Dahllöf, Ingela

    2012-10-01

    The Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory provides a logic and consistent framework to evaluate ecotoxicological test results. Currently this framework is not regularly applied in ecotoxicology given perceived complexity and data needs. However, even in the case of low data availability the DEB theory is already useful. In this paper we apply the DEB theory to evaluate the results in three previously published papers on the effects of PAHs on Arctic copepods. Since these results do not allow for a quantitative application we used DEB qualitatively. The ecotoxicological results were thereby set in a wider ecological context and we found a logical explanation for an unexpected decline in hatching success described in one of these papers. Moreover, the DEB evaluation helped to derive relevant ecological questions that can guide future experimental work on this subject.

  11. Aquatic ecotoxicology: what has been accomplished and what lies ahead? An Eastern Canada historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Blaise

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our recent history shows that degradation of aquatic ecosystems essentially stems from industrialization, urbanization and increasing human populations. After a first industrial boom in the late 19th century, contamination pressures on receiving waters now appear to be continual because of expanding economies and technologies developing at the planetary scale. Given the diversity of issues, problems and challenges facing water quality today because of complex waste and chemical discharges into waterways, aquatic ecotoxicology has blossomed with time into a more mature discipline of the environmental sciences. Its two fundamental pillars, bioassays and biomarkers, have become essential tools that allow the determination of numerous and versatile effects measurements. Herein, we demonstrate some of the ways in which thesetools have been applied and how they have evolved over the past decades to appraise the ecotoxicity of contaminants impacting aquatic systems. Examples discussed are largely reflective of work conducted in the Environment Canada (EC laboratories (Saint-Lawrence Centre, Montréal, Canada. Success stories include improvement of industrial effluent quality contributing to beluga whale population recovery in the Saint-Lawrence River, biomarker field studies conducted with endemic and caged bivalves to more fully comprehend urban effluent adverse effects, and increased discernment on the hazard potential posed by emerging classes of chemicals. Ecotoxicology continues to be confronted with diverse issues and needs related to a myriad of chemical contaminants released to aquatic environments worldwide. To cope with these, ecotoxicology will have to bank on new tools (e.g., toxicogenomics, bio-informatics, modelingand become more interdisciplinary by taking into account knowledge provided by other disciplines (e.g., ecology, chemistry, climatology, microbiology in order to more fully understand and adequately interpret hazard. This will

  12. Estimation of the environmental risk posed by landfills using chemical, microbiological and ecotoxicological testing of leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejczyk, Marek; Płaza, Grażyna A; Nałęcz-Jawecki, Grzegorz; Ulfig, Krzysztof; Markowska-Szczupak, Agata

    2011-02-01

    The leachates from 22 municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill sites in Southern Poland were characterized by evaluation of chemical, microbiological and ecotoxicological parameters. Chemical analyses were mainly focused on the identification of the priority hazardous substances according to Directive on Priority Substances, 2008/105/EC (a daughter directive of the WFD) in leachates. As showed, only five substances (Cd, Hg, hexachlorobutadiene, pentachlorobenzene and PAHs) were detected in the leachates. The compounds tested were absent or present at very low concentrations. Among them, only PAHs were found in all samples in the range from 0.057 to 77.2 μg L⁻¹. The leachates were contaminated with bacteria, including aerobic, psychrophilic and mesophilic bacteria, coliform and fecal coliforms, and spore-forming-bacteria, including Clostridium perfringens, and with filamentous fungi. From the analysis of specific microorganism groups (indicators of environmental pollution by pathogenic or opportunistic pathogenic organisms) it can be concluded that the landfill leachates showed sanitary and epidemiological hazard. In the ecotoxicological study, a battery of tests comprised of 5 bioassays, i.e. Microtox(®), Spirotox, Rotoxkit F™, Thamnotoxkit F™ and Daphtoxkit F™ magna was applied. The leachate samples were classified as toxic in 13.6%, highly toxic in 54.6% and very highly toxic in 31.8%. The Spirotox test was the most sensitive bioassay used. The percentage of class weight score was very high - above 60%; these samples could definitely be considered seriously hazardous and acutely toxic to the fauna and microflora. No correlations were found between the toxicity values and chemical parameters. The toxicity of leachate samples cannot be explained by low levels of the priority pollutants. It seems that other kinds of xenobiotics present in the samples at subacute levels gave the high aggregate toxic effect. The chemical, ecotoxicological and microbiological

  13. Evolutionary concepts in ecotoxicology: tracing the genetic background of differential cadmium sensitivities in invertebrate lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallinger, Reinhard; Höckner, Martina

    2013-07-01

    In many toxicological and ecotoxicological studies and experimental setups, the investigator is mainly interested in traditional parameters such as toxicity data and effects of toxicants on molecular, cellular or physiological functions of individuals, species or statistical populations. It is clear, however, that such approaches focus on the phenotype level of animal species, whilst the genetic and evolutionary background of reactions to environmental toxicants may remain untold. In ecotoxicological risk assessment, moreover, species sensitivities towards pollutants are often regarded as random variables in a statistical approach. Beyond statistics, however, toxicant sensitivity of every species assumes a biological significance, especially if we consider that sensitivity traits have developed in lineages of species with common evolutionary roots. In this article, the genetic and evolutionary background of differential Cd sensitivities among invertebrate populations and species and their potential of adaptation to environmental Cd exposure will be highlighted. Important evolutionary and population genetic concepts such as genome structure and their importance for evolutionary adaptation, population structure of affected individuals, as well as micro and macroevolutionary mechanisms of Cd resistance in invertebrate lineages will be stressed by discussing examples of work from our own laboratory along with a review of relevant literature data and a brief discussion of open questions along with some perspectives for further research. Both, differences and similarities in Cd sensitivity traits of related invertebrate species can only be understood if we consider the underlying evolutionary processes and genetic (or epigenetic) mechanisms. Keeping in mind this perception can help us to better understand and interpret more precisely why the sensitivity of some species or species groups towards a certain toxicant (or metal) may be ranked in the lower or higher range of

  14. Drug residues in urban water: A database for ecotoxicological risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destrieux, Doriane; Laurent, François; Budzinski, Hélène; Pedelucq, Julie; Vervier, Philippe; Gerino, Magali

    2017-12-31

    Human-use drug residues (DR) are only partially eliminated by waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), so that residual amounts can reach natural waters and cause environmental hazards. In order to properly manage these hazards in the aquatic environment, a database is made available that integrates the concentration ranges for DR, which cause adverse effects for aquatic organisms, and the temporal variations of the ecotoxicological risks. To implement this database for the ecotoxicological risk assessment (ERA database), the required information for each DR is the predicted no effect concentrations (PNECs), along with the predicted environmental concentrations (PECs). The risk assessment is based on the ratio between the PNECs and the PECs. Adverse effect data or PNECs have been found in the publicly available literature for 45 substances. These ecotoxicity test data have been extracted from 125 different sources. This ERA database contains 1157 adverse effect data and 287 PNECs. The efficiency of this ERA database was tested with a data set coming from a simultaneous survey of WWTPs and the natural environment. In this data set, 26 DR were searched for in two WWTPs and in the river. On five sampling dates, concentrations measured in the river for 10 DR could pose environmental problems of which 7 were measured only downstream of WWTP outlets. From scientific literature and measurements, data implementation with unit homogenisation in a single database facilitates the actual ecotoxicological risk assessment, and may be useful for further risk coming from data arising from the future field survey. Moreover, the accumulation of a large ecotoxicity data set in a single database should not only improve knowledge of higher risk molecules but also supply an objective tool to help the rapid and efficient evaluation of the risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Environmental impact of industrial sludge stabilization/solidification products: chemical or ecotoxicological hazard evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marcos A R; Testolin, Renan C; Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2011-09-15

    Nowadays, the classification of industrial solid wastes is not based on risk analysis, thus the aim of this study was to compare the toxicity classifications based on the chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of four industrial sludges submitted to a two-step stabilization/solidification (S/S) processes. To classify S/S products as hazardous or non-hazardous, values cited in Brazilian chemical waste regulations were adopted and compared to the results obtained with a battery of biotests (bacteria, alga and daphnids) which were carried out with soluble and leaching fractions. In some cases the hazardous potential of industrial sludge was underestimated, since the S/S products obtained from the metal-mechanics and automotive sludges were chemically classified as non-hazardous (but non-inert) when the ecotoxicity tests showed toxicity values for leaching and soluble fractions. In other cases, the environmental impact was overestimated, since the S/S products of the textile sludges were chemically classified as non-inert (but non-hazardous) while ecotoxicity tests did not reveal any effects on bacteria, daphnids and algae. From the results of the chemical and ecotoxicological analyses we concluded that: (i) current regulations related to solid waste classification based on leachability and solubility tests do not ensure reliable results with respect to environmental protection; (ii) the two-step process was very effective in terms of metal immobilization, even at higher metal-concentrations. Considering that S/S products will be subject to environmental conditions, it is of great interest to test the ecotoxicity potential of the contaminants release from these products with a view to avoiding environmental impact given the unreliability of ecotoxicological estimations originating from chemical analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A sputnik IV saga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  17. An ecotoxicological screening tool to prioritise acid mine drainage impacted streams for future restoration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholster, Paul J

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available : An ecotoxicological screening tool to prioritise acid mine drainage impacted streams for 1 future restoration 2 3 4 5 Corresponding author: Prof A-M Botha 6 Department of Genetic, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, 7 Stellenbosch 7600, South Africa... of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, 23 Onderstepoort 0110, South Africa; 24 cCSIR Natural Resources and the Environment, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 25 dDepartment of Genetic, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag 2600, Stellenbosch 7600, South...

  18. Physical-chemical and ecotoxicological evaluation of water based drilling fluids used in Italian off-shore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzaghi, C; Buffagni, M; Cantelli, D; Bonfanti, P; Camatini, M

    1998-12-01

    In order to evaluate the effects on the marine ecosystem caused by an eventual discharge into sea of water based drilling fluids, as current legislation allows, chemical and ecotoxicological analyses were performed on the most common drilling muds and products used in Italian off-shore activities. The chemical analysis on drilling fluids involved the leaching test and the measurement of total content of heavy metals, whereas biodegradation tests were performed on the products used in mud's formulations. As for ecotoxicological evaluation, two marine organisms, the crustacean Artemia salina and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, were selected to determine the LC50 and the EC50 respectively.

  19. Environmental legislation and aquatic ecotoxicology in Mexico: past, present and future scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Cantú, Ania; Ramírez-Romero, Patricia; Pica-Granados, Yolanda

    2007-08-01

    The consolidation of environmental legislation is fundamental for governments that wish to support and promote different actions focused on reducing pollution and protecting natural water resources in order to maintain the present and future benefits that water provides for human beings and wild life. Environmental laws are essential for sustaining human activities and health, preserving biodiversity and promoting sustainable development. In this context, it is important that environmental regulations concentrate on preventing or reducing the harmful impact of pollutants on organisms and ecosystems. The introduction of toxicity bioassays in environmental regulations is a positive step toward achieving this goal. In Mexico, the development of environmental legislation and the introduction of bioassays in water regulation are part of a very recent and complex journey. This article describes how aquatic ecotoxicology tools, particularly bioassays, have influenced water pollution policies in Mexico. Three scenarios are reviewed: the background of Mexican legislation on water protection and Mexico's participation in the Watertox project; the actual efforts of SEMARNAT to develop bioassay batteries for this country; and, the challenges and perspectives of ecotoxicological bioassays as regulatory instruments.

  20. Eco-toxicological effects of the avermectin family with a focus on abamectin and ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shahla Hosseini; Ogbourne, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Avermectin family members are categorised as highly effective but toxic natural products that are used as pharmaceuticals in both humans and animals and for crop protection. Abamectin and ivermectin are the two most commonly used compounds from this family with abamectin the only compound to be used for both crop protection and pharmaceutical purposes. Avermectins are produced by the soil dwelling actinomycetes Streptomyces avermitilis and despite having complex chemical structures, they are manufactured via synthesis in large scales for commercial use. Although the extent of the eco-toxicological effects of avermectins is not well documented, reports of eco-toxicity exist. Avermectins have short half-lives and their residues can be eliminated through different food processing methods. However, avermectins can persist in water, sediment, soil and food products and therefore management practices that reduce the potential risks associated with eco-toxicity of these highly toxic compounds need to be further developed. This manuscript provides a critical review of the eco-toxicological risks and the potential for food contamination associated with avermectin use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Endocrine disrupting compounds and echinoderms: new ecotoxicological sentinels for the marine ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugni, Michela; Mozzi, Daniela; Barbaglio, Alice; Bonasoro, Francesco; Candia Carnevali, Maria Daniela

    2007-02-01

    Echinoderms are valuable test species in marine ecotoxicology and offer a wide range of biological processes appropriate for this approach. In spite of this potential, available data in literature are still rather limited, particularly with regard to the possible effects of endocrine disrupter compounds (EDCs). This review presents echinoderms as useful models for ecotoxicological tests and gives a brief overview of the most significant results obtained in recent years, particularly in the context of the COMPRENDO EU project. In this research project two different aspects of echinoderm physiology, plausibly regulated by humoral mechanisms, were investigated: reproductive biology and regenerative development. Selected EDCs suspected for their androgenic or antiandrogenic action were tested at low concentrations. The results obtained so far showed that different parameters such as regenerative growth, histological pattern, egg diameter and gonad maturation were affected by the exposure to the selected compounds. These results substantiate that reproductive and regenerative phenomena of echinoderms can be considered valuable alternative models for studies on EDCs and confirm that these compounds interfere with fundamental physiological processes, including growth, development and reproductive competence.

  2. Old model organisms and new behavioral end-points: Swimming alteration as an ecotoxicological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faimali, Marco; Gambardella, Chiara; Costa, Elisa; Piazza, Veronica; Morgana, Silvia; Estévez-Calvar, Noelia; Garaventa, Francesca

    2017-07-01

    Behavioral responses of aquatic organisms have received much less attention than developmental or reproductive ones due to the scarce presence of user-friendly tools for their acquisition. The technological development of data acquisition systems for quantifying behavior in the aquatic environment and the increase of studies on the understanding the relationship between the behavior of aquatic organisms and the physiological/ecological activities have generated renewed interest in using behavioral responses also in marine ecotoxicology. Recent reviews on freshwater environment show that behavioral end-points are comparatively fast and sensitive, and warrant further attention as tools for assessing the toxicological effects of environmental contaminants. In this mini-review, we perform a systematic analysis of the most recent works that have used marine invertebrate swimming alteration as behavioral end-point in ecotoxicological studies by assessing the differences between behavioral and acute responses in a wide range of species, in order to compare their sensitivity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Ecotoxicological effects of decabromodiphenyl ether and cadmium contamination on soil microbes and enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Meng; An, Shuai; Xiong, Bang; Li, Hui; Cui, Changzheng; Lin, Kuangfei

    2012-08-01

    The ecotoxicological effects of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) and cadmium (Cd) contamination on soil culturable microbial population, enzyme activity and bacterial community structure were investigated. Results of the indoor incubation test runs performed on many series of control and contaminated soil samples have demonstrated some notable toxic effects due to long term exposure to either or both contaminants. The two contaminants produced notable yet different toxic effects on the test microbes; the population of the exposed species generally declined according to certain dose-response relationships. The soil culturable microbial population and enzyme activity data show that the sensitivity to one or both contaminants followed the order of: bacteria>fungi>actinomycete and urease>saccharase, respectively. The interaction between BDE209 and Cd was dependent on both the exposure dose and time and that the joint toxic effects were synergistic, antagonistic or additive. The PCR-DGGE analysis data of species composition and richness suggest the synergistic combined effects on bacterial community structure during the 30d exposure. Pseudomonas tuomuerensis strain CCM 7280 and Pseudomonas alcaliphila strain AL15-21 were enriched, indicating these species might be major functional populations and highly tolerant. Such observations have provided the useful information of potential ecotoxicological effects of BDE209 and Cd contamination in the environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gravitactic orientation of Euglena gracilis – a sensitive endpoint for ecotoxicological assessment of water pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz eUllah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pollution of aquatic environments with natural and anthropogenically produced substances is one of the major environmental problems of the world. In many countries the decreasing quantity of water coupled with its increasing usage in multiple sectors has adversely affected water quality and caused problems of water pollution. Polluted water has been a main cause of adverse effects on plants, animals and humans throughout the world. Physicochemical analysis of water, which is a common method used for quality assessment of water, alone may not be enough as it cannot evaluate the impact on living organisms. Therefore, bioassessment of water and wastewater quality is considered to be essential to reflect the ultimate effects on living organisms. Many organisms like bacteria, algae, fish, invertebrates and protozoan are used as bioassay organisms for assessment of water quality. This review article elucidates the use of Euglena gracilis, a freshwater motile flagellate of the phylum Euglenophyta, as a suitable organism in ecotoxicological studies with special emphasis on its gravitactic orientation as a sensitive end point in ecotoxicological assessment of water pollutants.

  5. Ecotoxicological assessment of organic wastes spread on land: Towards a proposal of a suitable test battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguier, Pierre; Manier, Nicolas; Chabot, Laure; Bauda, Pascale; Pandard, Pascal

    2015-03-01

    The land spreading of organic wastes in agriculture is a common practice in Europe, under the regulation of the Directive 86/278/EEC. One of the objectives of this Directive is to prevent harmful effects of organic wastes on soil, plants and animals. Despite this regulatory framework, there is still a lack of harmonized ecotoxicological test strategy to assess the environmental hazard of such wastes. The aim of this study was to provide a first step towards the a priori ecotoxicological assessment of organic wastes before their land use. For that purpose, nine different organic wastes were assessed using direct (i.e. terrestrial tests) and indirect (i.e. tests on water eluates) approaches, for a total of thirteen endpoints. Then, multivariate analyzes were used to discriminate the most relevant test strategy, among the application rates and bioassays used. From our results, a draft of test strategy was proposed, using terrestrial bioassays (i.e. earthworms and plants) and a concentration range between one and ten times the recommended application rates of organic wastes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A high-throughput sequencing ecotoxicology study of freshwater bacterial communities and their responses to tebuconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascault, Noémie; Roux, Simon; Artigas, Joan; Pesce, Stéphane; Leloup, Julie; Tadonleke, Rémy D; Debroas, Didier; Bouchez, Agnès; Humbert, Jean-François

    2014-12-01

    The pollution of lakes and rivers by pesticides is a growing problem worldwide. However, the impacts of these substances on microbial communities are still poorly understood, partly because next-generation sequencing (NGS) has rarely been used in an ecotoxicology context to study bacterial communities despite its interest for accessing rare taxa. Microcosm experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of tebuconazole (TBZ) on the structure and composition of bacterial communities from two types of freshwater ecosystem (lakes and rivers) with differing histories of pollutant contamination (pristine vs. previously exposed sites). Pyrosequencing revealed that bacterial diversity was higher in the river than in the lakes and in previously exposed sites than in pristine sites. Lakes and river stations shared very few OTUs, and differences at the phylum level were identified between these ecosystems (i.e. the relative importance of Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria). Despite differences between these ecosystems and their contamination history, no significant effect of TBZ on bacterial community structure or composition was observed. Compared to functional parameters that displayed variable responses, we demonstrated that a combination of classical methods and NGS is necessary to investigate the ecotoxicological responses of microbial communities to pollutants. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. QPCR: a tool for analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joel N

    2010-04-01

    The quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay for DNA damage and repair has been used extensively in laboratory species. More recently, it has been adapted to ecological settings. The purpose of this article is to provide a detailed methodological guide that will facilitate its adaptation to additional species, highlight its potential for ecotoxicological and biomonitoring work, and critically review the strengths and limitations of this assay. Major strengths of the assay include very low (nanogram to picogram) amounts of input DNA; direct comparison of damage and repair in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and different parts of the nuclear genome; detection of a wide range of types of DNA damage; very good reproducibility and quantification; applicability to properly preserved frozen samples; simultaneous monitoring of relative mitochondrial genome copy number; and easy adaptation to most species. Potential limitations include the limit of detection (approximately 1 lesion per 10(5) bases); the inability to distinguish different types of DNA damage; and the need to base quantification of damage on a control or reference sample. I suggest that the QPCR assay is particularly powerful for some ecotoxicological studies.

  8. Advancing the 3Rs in regulatory ecotoxicology: A pragmatic cross-sector approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Natalie; Benstead, Rachel; Clook, Mark; Doyle, Ian; Edwards, Peter; Maynard, Samuel K; Ryder, Kathryn; Sheahan, Dave; Whale, Graham; van Egmond, Roger; Wheeler, James R; Hutchinson, Thomas H

    2016-07-01

    The ecotoxicity testing of chemicals for prospective environmental safety assessment is an area in which a high number of vertebrates are used across a variety of industry sectors. Refining, reducing, and replacing the use of animals such as fish, birds, and amphibians for this purpose addresses the ethical concerns and the increasing legislative requirements to consider alternative test methods. Members of the UK-based National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) Ecotoxicology Working Group, consisting of representatives from academia, government organizations, and industry, have worked together over the past 6 y to provide evidence bases to support and advance the application of the 3Rs in regulatory ecotoxicity testing. The group recently held a workshop to identify the areas of testing, demands, and drivers that will have an impact on the future of animal use in regulatory ecotoxicology. As a result of these discussions, we have developed a pragmatic approach to prioritize and realistically address key opportunity areas, to enable progress toward the vision of a reduced reliance on the use of animals in this area of testing. This paper summarizes the findings of this exercise and proposes a pragmatic strategy toward our key long-term goals-the incorporation of reliable alternatives to whole-organism testing into regulations and guidance, and a culture shift toward reduced reliance on vertebrate toxicity testing in routine environmental safety assessment. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:417-421. © 2015 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  9. Assessment of ecotoxicological hazard and risk of groundwater contamination with different groups of pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavnichenko P.V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to determine ecotoxicological risk of herbicides, insecticides, fungicides of different chemical classes with different mechanisms of action by the method of Melnikov M.M. and leaching potential index by the method of Sergeev S.G. and co-workers. It was established that in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine ecotoxicological hazard of studied herbicides by (1-6 orders of magnitude, fungicides – by (3-5 orders, insecticides – by (2-3 orders lower than DDT. The least ecotoxic are herbicides of the last generations, then fungicides and the most ecotoxic are insecticides and herbicides of the old first generations. It was proved the high danger of groundwater contamination with studied herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, except for mesotrione, the application of which has moderate danger in the soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine. It was shown that in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine, ability of migration from the soil into groundwater of metribuzin, thiamethoxam, paclobutrazole is high, topramezone and mesotrione – moderate, for other substances – low; in terms of hygienic standards in the ground itallows to avoid them getting into the soil flow and minimize the danger of groundwater contamination to public health.

  10. Abandoned coal mining sites: using ecotoxicological tests to support an industrial organic sludge amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiochetta, Claudete G; Radetski, Marilice R; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Tischer, Vinícius; Tiepo, Erasmo N; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-11-01

    The different stages involved in coal mining-related activities result in a degraded landscape and sites associated with large amounts of dumped waste material. Remediation of these contaminated soils can be carried out by application of industrial organic sludge if the concerns regarding the potential negative environmental impacts of this experimental practice are properly addressed. In this context, the objective of this study was to use ecotoxicological tests to determine the quantity of organic industrial sludge that is required as a soil amendment to restore soil production while avoiding environmental impact. Chemical analysis of the solids (industrial sludge and soil) and their leachates was carried out as well as a battery of ecotoxicity tests on enzymes (hydrolytic activity), bacteria, algae, daphnids, earthworms, and higher plants, according to standardized methodologies. Solid and leachate samples of coal-contaminated soil were more toxic than those of industrial sludge towards enzyme activity, bacteria, algae, daphnids, and earthworms. In the case of the higher plants (lettuce, corn, wild cabbage, and Surinam cherry) the industrial sludge was more toxic than the coal-contaminated soil, and a soil/sludge mixture (66:34% dry weight basis) had a stimulatory effect on the Surinam cherry biomass. The ecotoxicological assessment of the coal-contaminated soil remediation using sludge as an amendment is very important to determine application rates that could promote a stimulatory effect on agronomic species without negatively affecting the environment.

  11. Development of mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis holbrooki populations in lentic mesocosms. Perspectives for ecotoxicological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DREZE V.

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available In the perspective of ecotoxicological assays in mesocosms, the development of mosquitofish populations (Gambusia affinis holbrooki has been assessed. The objective was to evaluate the ability of fish to reproduce in these experimental ponds under the climatic conditions of Brittany, and to see if population size and individual criteria were related to the number of adults initially introduced. Six mesocosms (3.2 m diameter and 0.7 m water depth similarly designed received sexually mature mosquitofish at the rate of 12 (6 females and 6 males, 6 (3 females and 3 males and 2 (1 female and 1 male in June 1996. Each assay was duplicated. In December 1996, the entire populations were collected and the weight, size and sex of the individuals were noted. Length-frequency distributions were relatively similar between mesocosms and the different mode groups showed that the reproductive activity occurred until the beginning of fall. The produced biomass (from 4.1 to 38.3 g and number of fish collected (from 26 to 301 were statistically correlated to the number of pairs initially introduced. This study provides interesting perspectives for ecotoxicological investigations in which the effects of pollutants on mosquitofish would be assessed at the population level.

  12. A Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis based methodology for quantitatively scoring the reliability and relevance of ecotoxicological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isigonis, Panagiotis; Ciffroy, Philippe; Zabeo, Alex; Semenzin, Elena; Critto, Andrea; Giove, Silvio; Marcomini, Antonio

    2015-12-15

    Ecotoxicological data are highly important for risk assessment processes and are used for deriving environmental quality criteria, which are enacted for assuring the good quality of waters, soils or sediments and achieving desirable environmental quality objectives. Therefore, it is of significant importance the evaluation of the reliability of available data for analysing their possible use in the aforementioned processes. The thorough analysis of currently available frameworks for the assessment of ecotoxicological data has led to the identification of significant flaws but at the same time various opportunities for improvement. In this context, a new methodology, based on Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) techniques, has been developed with the aim of analysing the reliability and relevance of ecotoxicological data (which are produced through laboratory biotests for individual effects), in a transparent quantitative way, through the use of expert knowledge, multiple criteria and fuzzy logic. The proposed methodology can be used for the production of weighted Species Sensitivity Weighted Distributions (SSWD), as a component of the ecological risk assessment of chemicals in aquatic systems. The MCDA aggregation methodology is described in detail and demonstrated through examples in the article and the hierarchically structured framework that is used for the evaluation and classification of ecotoxicological data is shortly discussed. The methodology is demonstrated for the aquatic compartment but it can be easily tailored to other environmental compartments (soil, air, sediments). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Thirty years of marine ecotoxicological studies at the TNO Laboratory for Applied Marine Research, Den Helder (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, M.C.T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of marine field ecotoxicology at the TNO Laboratory for Applied Marine Research. The scope of research, including biological monitoring with mussels, mesocosm studies and ecological risk analysis, is described. Some highlights from an historical point of view are

  14. Diaquatetrabromidotin(IV trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [SnBr4(H2O2]·3H2O, forms large colourless crystals in originally sealed samples of tin tetrabromide. It constitutes the first structurally characterized hydrate of SnBr4 and is isostructural with the corresponding hydrate of SnCl4. It is composed of SnIV atoms octahedrally coordinated by four Br atoms and two cis-related water molecules. The octahedra exhibit site symmetry 2. They are arranged into columns along [001] via medium–strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the two lattice water molecules (one situated on a twofold rotation axis while the chains are interconnected via longer O—H...Br hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  15. A comparative experimental approach to ecotoxicology in shallow-water and deep-sea holothurians suggests similar behavioural responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alastair; Wright, Roseanna; Mevenkamp, Lisa; Hauton, Chris

    2017-10-01

    Exploration of deep-sea mineral resources is burgeoning, raising concerns regarding ecotoxicological impacts on deep-sea fauna. Assessing toxicity in deep-sea species is technologically challenging, which promotes interest in establishing shallow-water ecotoxicological proxy species. However, the effects of temperature and hydrostatic pressure on toxicity, and how adaptation to deep-sea environmental conditions might moderate these effects, are unknown. To address these uncertainties we assessed behavioural and physiological (antioxidant enzyme activity) responses to exposure to copper-spiked artificial sediments in a laboratory experiment using a shallow-water holothurian (Holothuria forskali), and in an in situ experiment using a deep-sea holothurian (Amperima sp.). Both species demonstrated sustained avoidance behaviour, evading contact with contaminated artificial sediment. However, A. sp. demonstrated sustained avoidance of 5mgl -1 copper-contaminated artificial sediment whereas H. forskali demonstrated only temporary avoidance of 5mgl -1 copper-contaminated artificial sediment, suggesting that H. forskali may be more tolerant of metal exposure over 96h. Nonetheless, the acute behavioural response appears consistent between the shallow-water species and the deep-sea species, suggesting that H. forskali may be a suitable ecotoxicological proxy for A. sp. in acute (≤24h) exposures, which may be representative of deep-sea mining impacts. No antioxidant response was observed in either species, which was interpreted to be the consequence of avoiding copper exposure. Although these data suggest that shallow-water taxa may be suitable ecotoxicological proxies for deep-sea taxa, differences in methodological and analytical approaches, and in sex and reproductive stage of experimental subjects, require caution in assessing the suitability of H. forskali as an ecotoxicological proxy for A. sp. Nonetheless, avoidance behaviour may have bioenergetic consequences that

  16. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  17. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates...

  18. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biever, Ronald C.; Bjerregaard, Poul; Borgert, Christopher; Brugger, Kristin; Blankinship, Amy; Chambers, Janice; Coady, Katherine K.; Constantine, Lisa; Dang, Zhichao; Denslow, Nancy D.; Dreier, David; Dungey, Steve; Gray, L. Earl; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D.; Hecker, Markus; Holbech, Henrik; Iguchi, Taisen; Kadlec, Sarah; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Kawashima, Yukio; Kloas, Werner; Krueger, Henry; Kumar, Anu; Lagadic, Laurent; Leopold, Annegaaike; Levine, Steven L.; Maack, Gerd; Marty, Sue; Meador, James P.; Mihaich, Ellen; Odum, Jenny; Ortego, Lisa; Parrott, Joanne L.; Pickford, Daniel; Roberts, Mike; Schaefers, Christoph; Schwarz, Tamar; Solomon, Keith; Verslycke, Tim; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R.; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffery C.; Yamazaki, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop® “Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)” was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators and policy makers; the aim being to make considered, informed decisions on whether to select an ecotoxicological hazard- or a risk-based approach for regulating a given endocrine-disrupting substance (EDS) under review. The workshop additionally considered recent developments in the identification of EDS. Case studies were undertaken on 6 endocrine-active substances (EAS—not necessarily proven EDS, but substances known to interact directly with the endocrine system) that are representative of a range of perturbations of the endocrine system and considered to be data rich in relevant information at multiple biological levels of organization for 1 or more ecologically relevant taxa. The substances selected were 17α-ethinylestradiol, perchlorate, propiconazole, 17β-trenbolone, tributyltin, and vinclozolin. The 6 case studies were not comprehensive safety evaluations but provided foundations for clarifying key issues and procedures that should be considered when assessing the ecotoxicological hazards and risks of EAS and EDS. The workshop also highlighted areas of scientific uncertainty, and made specific recommendations for research and methods-development to resolve some of the identified issues. The present paper provides broad guidance for scientists in regulatory authorities, industry, and academia on issues likely to arise during the ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of EAS and EDS. The primary conclusion of this paper, and of the SETAC Pellston Workshop on which it is based, is that if data on environmental exposure, effects on sensitive species and life-stages, delayed effects, and effects at low concentrations are robust, initiating environmental risk

  19. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T; Biever, Ronald C; Bjerregaard, Poul; Borgert, Christopher; Brugger, Kristin; Blankinship, Amy; Chambers, Janice; Coady, Katherine K; Constantine, Lisa; Dang, Zhichao; Denslow, Nancy D; Dreier, David A; Dungey, Steve; Gray, L Earl; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D; Hecker, Markus; Holbech, Henrik; Iguchi, Taisen; Kadlec, Sarah; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Kawashima, Yukio; Kloas, Werner; Krueger, Henry; Kumar, Anu; Lagadic, Laurent; Leopold, Annegaaike; Levine, Steven L; Maack, Gerd; Marty, Sue; Meador, James; Mihaich, Ellen; Odum, Jenny; Ortego, Lisa; Parrott, Joanne; Pickford, Daniel; Roberts, Mike; Schaefers, Christoph; Schwarz, Tamar; Solomon, Keith; Verslycke, Tim; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Yamazaki, Kunihiko

    2017-03-01

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop® "Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)" was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators and policy makers; the aim being to make considered, informed decisions on whether to select an ecotoxicological hazard- or a risk-based approach for regulating a given endocrine-disrupting substance (EDS) under review. The workshop additionally considered recent developments in the identification of EDS. Case studies were undertaken on 6 endocrine-active substances (EAS-not necessarily proven EDS, but substances known to interact directly with the endocrine system) that are representative of a range of perturbations of the endocrine system and considered to be data rich in relevant information at multiple biological levels of organization for 1 or more ecologically relevant taxa. The substances selected were 17α-ethinylestradiol, perchlorate, propiconazole, 17β-trenbolone, tributyltin, and vinclozolin. The 6 case studies were not comprehensive safety evaluations but provided foundations for clarifying key issues and procedures that should be considered when assessing the ecotoxicological hazards and risks of EAS and EDS. The workshop also highlighted areas of scientific uncertainty, and made specific recommendations for research and methods-development to resolve some of the identified issues. The present paper provides broad guidance for scientists in regulatory authorities, industry, and academia on issues likely to arise during the ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of EAS and EDS. The primary conclusion of this paper, and of the SETAC Pellston Workshop on which it is based, is that if data on environmental exposure, effects on sensitive species and life-stages, delayed effects, and effects at low concentrations are robust, initiating environmental risk

  20. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  1. Dioxobridged complexes of molybdenum (IV) and tungsten (IV) with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Six new dioxobridged complexes of molybdenum (IV) and tungsten (IV) with N-alkylphenothiazines having the general formula M2O4(L)2(H2O)2 [where M = molybdenum or tungsten and L = N-alkylphenothiazines] have been synthesised. The complexes have been characterised on the basis of analytical, molar ...

  2. Ecotoxicological evaluation of marine sediments using free and immobilized phytoplanktonic algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Giacco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine sediments play an important role in the accumulation-storage and/or release of contaminants in seawaters; sedimets bioassays provide for general information on pollutant bioavailability. This work points out the importance to utilize free and immobilised (Na-alginate marine algae for the ecotoxicological evaluation of metals (Cd, Zn, Cu as well as of elutriates and whole sediment samples collected in harbour sites. The bioassay was carried out with the marine microalga Tetraselmis suecica; algal growth inhibition was determined after 24 and 48 hours as percent growth in comparison to controls. After 24 hours a lower toxicity of metals for the immobilised algae than for free algae was observed; this trend decreased in time. Algae exposed to whole sediment ahowed a greater reduction of growth than algae exposed to the relative elutriate. This result emphasizes that the whole sediments seem to be suitable to detect the toxicity of such complex environmental matrix.

  3. Ecotoxicological evaluation of pesticides in groundwater. Ecotoxicologische evaluatie van bestrijdingsmiddelen in grondwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notenboom, J.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Linders, J.B.H.J.

    1992-02-01

    A preliminary ecotoxicological risk assessment of pesticides in ground water has been performed. Predictable environmental concentrations in shallow ground water, based on both calculations of pesticide leaching and detected levels during monitoring programs, have been compared with aquatic ecotoxicity data. Among pesticides detected in ground water only the levels of aldicarb (including metabolites), 1,3-dichloropropene, and ethoprophos exceed risk boundaries. Among pesticides of which calculations show that they can be expected in concentrations of 0.1 microgram/l or higher a much large number of substances exceed risk boundaries. In particular, cypermethrin, 1,3-dichloropropene, fenpropathrin, pendimethalin, pirimicarb, pirimiphos-methyl, propoxur, terbufos, thiram, and trichlorphon have a large potential risk for groundwater ecosystems.

  4. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biever, Ronald C

    2017-01-01

    . Case studies were undertaken on 6 endocrine-active substances (EAS-not necessarily proven EDS, but substances known to interact directly with the endocrine system) that are representative of a range of perturbations of the endocrine system and considered to be data rich in relevant information......A SETAC Pellston Workshop(®) "Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)" was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators...... and policy makers; the aim being to make considered, informed decisions on whether to select an ecotoxicological hazard- or a risk-based approach for regulating a given endocrine-disrupting substance (EDS) under review. The workshop additionally considered recent developments in the identification of EDS...

  5. Assessment of Giant Duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza L. Schleiden) Turions as Model Objects in Ecotoxicological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Viktor; Hepp, Anna; Mészáros, Ilona

    2016-05-01

    In this study germination of Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden (giant duckweed) turions was assessed under cadmium exposure to test applicability of a novel turion-based ecotoxicology method. Floating success of germinating turions, protrusion of the first and subsequent fronds as test endpoints were investigated and compared to results of standard duckweed growth inhibition tests with fronds of the same species. Our results indicate that turions can be used to characterize effects of toxic substances. Initial phase of turion germination (floating up and appearance of the first frond) was less sensitive to Cd treatments than the subsequent frond production. The calculated effective concentrations for growth rates in turion and normal frond tests were similar. Single frond area produced by germinating turions proved to be the most sensitive test endpoint. Single frond area and colony disintegration as additionally measured parameters in normal frond cultures also changed due to Cd treatments but the sensitivity of these parameters was lower than that of growth rates.

  6. [Ecotoxicology, human ecology, laser biotechnology in primary prevention of environmental health hazards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, J W

    2001-01-01

    Interdisciplinary studies in ecotoxicology (including the influence of complex physical, chemical and biological factors on ecosystems and human food chain), human ecology (related to estimation of individuals exposition to different pollutants both in the natural environment and in-door environment, as well as by food) and environmental biotechnology (based on application of high sensitive biological, especially embryological criteria in biotests for water quality, including image computisation and biosensors)--are scientific base for primary prevention of disturbances of the ecological balance as well as environmental risk factors for human health. Large scale applications of laser biostimulation in environmental engineering is a new chance for system approach in primary prevention by more efficient nutritional prevention, protection of proper water quality (including biotests) and protection of the human environment in working and living places.

  7. Genetic variation in strains of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and the implications for ecotoxicology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, T S; Hamilton, P B; Griffiths, A M; Hodgson, D J; Wahab, M A; Tyler, C R

    2009-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that genetic variation, at both the level of the individual and population, has a significant effect on behaviour, fitness and response to toxicants. Using DNA microsatellites, we examined the genetic variation in samples of several commonly used laboratory strains of zebrafish, Danio rerio, a model species in toxicological studies. We compared the genetic variation to that found in a sample of wild fish from Bangladesh. Our findings show that the wild fish were significantly more variable than the laboratory strains for several measures of genetic variability, including allelic richness and expected heterozygosity. This lack of variation should be given due consideration for any study which attempts to extrapolate the results of ecotoxicological laboratory tests to wild populations.

  8. Reviewing the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) footprint in the aquatic biota: uptake, bioaccumulation and ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliana J G; Pereira, André M P T; Meisel, Leonor M; Lino, Celeste M; Pena, Angelina

    2015-02-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are amongst the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. Their presence, already described in different environmental compartments such as wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments, and their remarkable effects on non-target organisms justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. A comprehensive review of the literature data with focus on their footprint in the aquatic biota, namely their uptake, bioaccumulation and both acute and chronic ecotoxicology is presented. Long-term multigenerational exposure studies, at environmental relevant concentrations and in mixtures of related compounds, such as oestrogenic endocrine disruptors, continue to be sparse and are imperative to better know their environmental impact. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The No Observed Effect Level and its unsuitability as a summary statistic in ecotoxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P.F.; McIndoe, E.C. [Zeneca Agrochemicals, Bracknell (United Kingdom). Jealott`s Hill Research Station

    1994-12-31

    The No Observed Effect level (NOEL) is one of the most commonly reported summary statistics from sub-lethal (or chronic) dose-response experiments in ecotoxicology. Environmental risk assessments are usually made by comparing NOEL or ED50 values with predicted or measured exposure values. The NOEL is usually determined by means of a significance testing procedure so that it is the highest concentration which does not produce a statistically significant adverse effect relative to an untreated control. This procedure is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of statistical inference yet determination of NOELs is widely recommended in regulatory guidelines. The weaknesses of the NOEL as an estimate of a safe concentration are discussed and alternative methods are reviewed. ED point estimation is recommended as the best of the alternatives. Implementation of the alternative is however not straightforward and recommendations are made for how this can be achieved.

  10. Evaluating the efficacy of bioremediating a diesel-contaminated soil using ecotoxicological and bacterial community indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudur, Leadin Salah; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Miranda, Ana F; Morrison, Paul D; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Ball, Andrew S

    2015-10-01

    Diesel represents a common environmental contaminant as a result of operation, storage, and transportation accidents. The bioremediation of diesel in a contaminated soil is seen as an environmentally safe approach to treat contaminated land. The effectiveness of the remediation process is usually assessed by the degradation of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration, without considering ecotoxicological effects. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of two bioremediation strategies in terms of reduction in TPH concentration together with ecotoxicity indices and changes in the bacterial diversity assessed using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The biostimulation strategy resulted in a 90 % reduction in the TPH concentration versus 78 % reduction from the natural attenuation strategy over 12 weeks incubation in a laboratory mesocosm-containing diesel-contaminated soil. In contrast, the reduction in the ecotoxicity resulting from the natural attenuation treatment using the Microtox and earthworm toxicity assays was more than double the reduction resulting from the biostimulation treatment (45 and 20 % reduction, respectively). The biostimulated treatment involved the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus in order to stimulate the microorganisms by creating an optimal C:N:P molar ratio. An increased concentration of ammonium and phosphate was detected in the biostimulated soil compared with the naturally attenuated samples before and after the remediation process. Furthermore, through PCR-DGGE, significant changes in the bacterial community were observed as a consequence of adding the nutrients together with the diesel (biostimulation), resulting in the formation of distinctly different bacterial communities in the soil subjected to the two strategies used in this study. These findings indicate the suitability of both bioremediation approaches in treating hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, particularly biostimulation. Although

  11. Physicochemical and ecotoxicological evaluation of estuarine water quality during a dredging operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Sandro R.; Correa, Albertina X.R.; Schettini, Carlos A.F.; Schwingel, Paulo R.; Sperb, Rafael M.; Radetski, Claudemir M. [Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar, Univ. do Vale do Itajai, Itajai, SC (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Most of the information concerning the effects of contaminated sediments on estuarine organisms deals with the impacts of bed forming sediments. The ecotoxicological potential at the time of a dredging operation is more difficult to assess, and few studies have dealt specifically with resuspended contaminated sediments. The aim of this study was to determine whether release of contaminants through sediment resuspension during a dredging operation in the Itajai-acu estuary (Brazil) changed the water quality classification and had an ecotoxicological impact on the near-field water column during the critical moment of this operation. Materials and methods: Waters from two sites (control and dredged sites) were analyzed for physicochemical parameters before, during, and after a dredging operation. In parallel, a short-term, sensitive battery of biotests (bacteria, algae, and daphnids) was performed with water samples before and during this operation according to the ISO bioassay protocols. Results and discussion: No short-term toxicity was observed with waters collected before or during the dredging operation. The results showed that desorption of contaminants from suspended particles of sediments with a low level of contamination during a dredging operation lowered the water quality in the near-field water column but that this did not promote significant acute toxicity effects on the organisms tested. Conclusions: More detailed studies are needed (e.g., the question of the reliability of biotests under turbulent, particle-rich conditions) to fully understand this complex issue regarding water column ecotoxicity during the whole dredging operation and to support decisions on the management of dredging activities. (orig.)

  12. Five-year lung cancer survival: which advanced stage nonsmall cell lung cancer patients attain long-term survival?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Tina; Nelson, Rebecca A; Bogardus, Alicia; Grannis, Jr, Frederic W

    2010-01-01

    .... In the absence of screening, most symptomatic lung cancer is discovered at advanced stages, with the goal of long-term survival entirely dependent on effective treatment of stage III and IV lung cancer...

  13. Saltwater ecotoxicology of Ag, Au, CuO, TiO2, ZnO and C60 engineered nanoparticles: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetto, D; Volpi Ghirardini, A; Libralato, G

    2016-01-01

    This review paper examined 529 papers reporting experimental nanoecotoxicological original data. Only 126 papers referred to saltwater environments (water column and sediment) including a huge variety of species (n=51), their relative endpoints and engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) (n=38). We tried to provide a synthetic overview of the ecotoxicological effects of ENPs from existing data, refining papers on the basis of cross-cutting selection criteria and supporting a "mind the gap" approach stressing on missing data for hazard and risk assessment. After a codified selection procedure, attention was paid to Ag, Au, CuO, TiO2, ZnO and C60 ENPs, evidencing and comparing the observed nanoecotoxicity range of effect. Several criticisms were evidenced: i) some model organisms are overexploited like microalgae and molluscs compared to annelids, echinoderms and fish; ii) underexploited model organisms: mainly bacteria and fish; iii) exposure scenario variability: high species-specific and ENP scenarios including organism life stage and way of administration/spiking of toxicants; iv) scarce comparability between results due to exposure scenario variability; v) micro- and mesocosms substantially unexplored; vi) mixture effects: few examples are available only for ENPs and traditional pollutants; mixtures of ENPs have not been investigated yet; vii) effects of ions and ENPs: nAg, nCuO and nZnO toxicity aetiology is still a matter of discussion; viii) size and morphology effects of ENPs: scarcely investigated, justified and understood. Toxicity results evidenced that: nAu>nZnO>nAg>nCuO>nTiO2>C60. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Innovations’ Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Tabas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovations currently represent a tool of maintaining the going concern of a business entity and its competitiveness. However, effects of innovations are not infinite and if an innovation should constantly preserve a life of business entity, it has to be a continual chain of innovations, i.e. continual process. Effective live of a single innovation is limited while the limitation is derived especially from industry. The paper provides the results of research on innovations effects in the financial performance of small and medium-sized enterprises in the Czech Republic. Objective of this paper is to determine the length and intensity of the effects of technical innovations in company’s financial performance. The economic effect of innovations has been measured at application of company’s gross production power while the Deviation Analysis has been applied for three years’ time series. Subsequently the Survival Analysis has been applied. The analyses are elaborated for three statistical samples of SMEs constructed in accordance to the industry. The results obtained show significant differences in innovations’ survival within these three samples of enterprises then. The results are quite specific for the industries, and are confronted and discussed with the results of authors’ former research on the issue.

  15. Status seminar on BMBF-funded research projects in ecotoxicology. Proceedings; Statusseminar zum Foerderschwerpunkt `Oekotoxikologie` des BMBF. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, M. [ed.; Bauer, H. [ed.

    1995-07-01

    Research projects in the field of ecotoxicology are presented, with particular regard to aquatic and terrestrial ecotoxicology. The report covers pollutant effects on plancton and fish and pollutant monitoring in streams. The effects, distribution and mobility of PAH, PCB and other pollutants in soils and pollutant concentrations in microorganisms are gone into. (SR) [Deutsch] Vorgestellt werden die Forschungsvorhaben zum Thema Oekotoxikologie. Schwerpunkte hierbei sind die aquatische Oekotoxokologie und die terrestrische Oekotoxikologie. Berichtet wird ueber die Wirkung von Fremdstoffen auf Plankton und Fischen, sowie die Bewertung der Belastung von Fliessgewaessern.Ausserdem wird die Wirkung, Verteilung und die Mobilitaet von PAK, PCB und anderen Schadstoffen in Boeden dargestellt, sowie die Belastung von Mikroorganismen mit Schadstoffen. (SR)

  16. Evaluation of the rivers Vilnia and Siesartis ecotoxicological state based on morphological indexes of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintarė Sauliutė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study – to evaluate ecotoxicological state of two probably differently polluted salmon rivers: the Vilnia and Siesartis based on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. juvenile’s morphological indexes. Statistical analysis of estimated fish morphometric parameters and morphological indexes showed that the Vilnia and Siesartis Rivers’ salmon juveniles differ significantly. Condition factor (CF and the gills-somatic index (GSI were found to be the most sensitive biomarkers reflecting the physiological state of the fish. The Vilnia River salmon juvenile CF and GSI value was significantly different as compared with the Siesartis River’s salmon juvenile indexes, apparently, due to the increased water pollution. Since according to the classical physico-chemical parameters, both rivers’ water was very similar [no significant differences were found (p > 0.1], it was suggested that here exist other non-specific chemical factors (pollutants in water, which determine fish physiological and indicate river ecotoxicological states.

  17. The Modern RPG IV Language

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzi, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This updated, classic work on the RPG language covers all the new functions and features that have been added since 2003, including new op codes and built-in functions, new chapters on free-format RPG IV and Web programming interfaces, information on implementing XML within RPG IV, and expanded information on procedures. This reference guide takes both novice and experienced RPG IV programmers through the language, from its foundation to its most advanced techniques. More than 100 charts and tables, as well as 350 real-life code samples of functions and operations are included, showing readers

  18. Chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of ashes obtained from sewage sludge combustion in a fluidised-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapa, N. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)]. E-mail: ncsn@fct.unl.pt; Barbosa, R. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Lopes, M.H. [National Institute of Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI), Department of Energetic Engineering and Environmental Control (DEECA). Edificio J, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Mendes, B. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Abelha, P. [National Institute of Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI), Department of Energetic Engineering and Environmental Control (DEECA). Edificio J, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Gulyurtlu, I. [National Institute of Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI), Department of Energetic Engineering and Environmental Control (DEECA). Edificio J, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos Oliveira, J. [Environmental Biotechnology Researching Unit (UBiA), Faculty of Science and Technology (FCT), New University of Lisbon - UNL, Ed. Departamental, piso 3, gabinete 377, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2007-08-17

    In 1999, the DEECA/INETI and the UBiA/FCT/UNL started a researching project on the partition of heavy metals during the combustion of stabilised sewage sludge (Biogran[reg]), in a fluidised-bed reactor, and on the quality of the bottom ashes and fly ashes produced. This project was entitled Bimetal and was funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology. In this paper only the results on the combustion of Biogran[reg]) are reported. The combustion process was performed in two different trials, in which different amounts of sewage sludge and time of combustion were applied. Several ash samples were collected from the bed (bottom ashes) and from two cyclones (first cyclone and second cyclone ashes). Sewage sludge, bed material (sand) and ash samples were submitted to the leaching process defined in the European leaching standard EN 12457-2. The eluates were characterized for a set of inorganic chemical species. The ecotoxicological levels of the eluates were determined for two biological indicators (Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna). The results were compared with the limit values of the CEMWE French Regulation. The samples were also ranked according to an index based on the chemical characterization of the eluates. It was observed an increase of the concentration of metals along the combustion system. The ashes trapped in the second cyclone, for both combustion trials, showed the highest concentration of metals in the eluates. Chemically, the ashes of the second cyclone were the most different ones. In the ecotoxicological point of view, the ecotoxicity levels of the eluates of the ashes, for both combustion cycles, did not follow the same pattern as observed for the chemical characterization. The ashes of the first cyclone showed the highest ecotoxicity levels for V. fischeri and D. magna. This difference on chemical and ecotoxicological results proves the need for performing both chemical and ecotoxicological characterizations of the sub

  19. Chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of ashes obtained from sewage sludge combustion in a fluidised-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, N; Barbosa, R; Lopes, M H; Mendes, B; Abelha, P; Boavida, D; Gulyurtlu, I; Oliveira, J Santos

    2007-08-17

    In 1999, the DEECA/INETI and the UBiA/FCT/UNL started a researching project on the partition of heavy metals during the combustion of stabilised sewage sludge (Biogran), in a fluidised-bed reactor, and on the quality of the bottom ashes and fly ashes produced. This project was entitled Bimetal and was funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology. In this paper only the results on the combustion of Biogran are reported. The combustion process was performed in two different trials, in which different amounts of sewage sludge and time of combustion were applied. Several ash samples were collected from the bed (bottom ashes) and from two cyclones (first cyclone and second cyclone ashes). Sewage sludge, bed material (sand) and ash samples were submitted to the leaching process defined in the European leaching standard EN 12457-2. The eluates were characterized for a set of inorganic chemical species. The ecotoxicological levels of the eluates were determined for two biological indicators (Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna). The results were compared with the limit values of the CEMWE French Regulation. The samples were also ranked according to an index based on the chemical characterization of the eluates. It was observed an increase of the concentration of metals along the combustion system. The ashes trapped in the second cyclone, for both combustion trials, showed the highest concentration of metals in the eluates. Chemically, the ashes of the second cyclone were the most different ones. In the ecotoxicological point of view, the ecotoxicity levels of the eluates of the ashes, for both combustion cycles, did not follow the same pattern as observed for the chemical characterization. The ashes of the first cyclone showed the highest ecotoxicity levels for V. fischeri and D. magna. This difference on chemical and ecotoxicological results proves the need for performing both chemical and ecotoxicological characterizations of the sub-products of such type

  20. A coordinated set of ecosystem research platforms open to international research in ecotoxicology, AnaEE-France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougin, Christian; Azam, Didier; Caquet, Thierry; Cheviron, Nathalie; Dequiedt, Samuel; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Guillaume, Olivier; Houot, Sabine; Lacroix, Gérard; Lafolie, François; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Michniewicz, Radika; Pichot, Christian; Ranjard, Lionel; Roy, Jacques; Zeller, Bernd; Clobert, Jean; Chanzy, André

    2015-10-01

    The infrastructure for Analysis and Experimentation on Ecosystems (AnaEE-France) is an integrated network of the major French experimental, analytical, and modeling platforms dedicated to the biological study of continental ecosystems (aquatic and terrestrial). This infrastructure aims at understanding and predicting ecosystem dynamics under global change. AnaEE-France comprises complementary nodes offering access to the best experimental facilities and associated biological resources and data: Ecotrons, seminatural experimental platforms to manipulate terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, in natura sites equipped for large-scale and long-term experiments. AnaEE-France also provides shared instruments and analytical platforms dedicated to environmental (micro) biology. Finally, AnaEE-France provides users with data bases and modeling tools designed to represent ecosystem dynamics and to go further in coupling ecological, agronomical, and evolutionary approaches. In particular, AnaEE-France offers adequate services to tackle the new challenges of research in ecotoxicology, positioning its various types of platforms in an ecologically advanced ecotoxicology approach. AnaEE-France is a leading international infrastructure, and it is pioneering the construction of AnaEE (Europe) infrastructure in the field of ecosystem research. AnaEE-France infrastructure is already open to the international community of scientists in the field of continental ecotoxicology.

  1. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Sediment Leachates of Small Watercourses in the Brno City Suburban Area (South Moravia, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Beklová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sediments of two small watercourses Leskava and Troubsky Brook in the Brno city suburban area were examined for their ecotoxicity. Using a standard procedure, extracts of the sediments were prepared for diagnostic tests. These extracts were tested for acute toxicity to fresh-water organisms. The ecotoxicological tests were performed on the fresh-water alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, the vascular water plant Lemna minor, on a representative of invertebrates – the water flea Daphnia magna and on the Xenopus laevis frog embryo and luminiscent Vibrio fischeri bacteria. Possible toxic effects were evaluated using the test determining the inhibition of the growth of white mustard root Sinapis alba. Results of ecotoxicological assessment of sediment leachates showed that their quality varied significantly during the year. Differences were found between results of sediment evaluations from different collection profiles, which may indicate effects of point source pollution. Of the ecotoxicological tests used, the most sensitive organisms included the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, bioluminiscent bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. The highest concentrations of arsenic were found by chemical analysis in both spring and autumn sediment leachate samples collected at Site L1 (Leskava. The highest organic pollutant concentrations were found in autumn sediment leachate samples from Site L1. In total PAH sums, phenanthrene was the dominant pollutant at all the sites investigated.

  2. Proposal of concentration limits for determining the hazard property HP 14 for waste using ecotoxicological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Pierre

    2017-12-05

    Different ecotoxicological test batteries and concentration limits have been proposed to assess the hazard property (HP) HP 14 'Ecotoxic' for waste in the European Union and its member states. In test batteries, if the concentration of waste in the culture/dilution medium producing 50% of inhibitory biological effect in one or more test(s) is below the concentration limit of the test, the waste is classified as hazardous. A summarized review of the test batteries proposed since 1998 is presented. The last proposed test battery uses seven aquatic and terrestrial species with standardized methods, but with options and uniform concentration limits of 10% of waste eluate or solid waste in the culture/dilution medium. No attempt was made to match this hazard assessment with the classification made in the European List of Waste (LoW). The aim of this paper is to propose for the same test battery (reduced to 6 tests without options) concentration limits that match with the European List of Waste. This list was taken as reference (despite the fact that waste can be hazardous for other properties than the most frequent HP 14, and its partly political nature for some opinions). The concentration limits (CLs) for tests are the concentrations producing the highest ecotoxicological effects for each test observed in a non-hazardous waste set. Data from Germany, France and Belgium (from in total 5 different sources from 2009 to 2016) with the above-mentioned test battery (without options) were gathered for 81 samples, being the largest set ever published. In total, ten non-hazardous (NH) waste samples (as defined by the LoW and for most of them checked by chemical composition) were used to establish CLs. These CLs were then applied to 13 hazardous (H) waste by the LoW, and all were classified as hazardous. The matching of the resulting classification with the LoW is convincing. For the 58 'mirror entries' in the LoW (hazardous or not depending of the presence of hazardous

  3. Ecotoxicological assessments show sucralose and fluoxetine affect the aquatic plant, Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amy-Sagers, Cherisse; Reinhardt, Keith; Larson, Danelle M., E-mail: danellelarson77@gmail.com

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Sucralose increased leaf area and photosynthetic capacity of Lemna minor. • Sucralose increased δ {sup 13}C of Lemna, indicating substantial uptake and assimilation. • 100 μg/L-fluoxetine decreased Lemna minor growth and asexual reproduction. - Abstract: Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) are prevalent in aquatic systems, yet the fate and impacts on aquatic plants needs quantification for many compounds. We measured and detected sucralose (an artificial sweetener), fluoxetine (an antidepressant), and other PPCP in the Portneuf River in Idaho, USA, where Lemna minor (an aquatic plant in the environment and used in ecotoxicology studies) naturally occurs. Sucralose was hypothesized to negatively affect photosynthesis and growth of L. minor because sucralose is a chlorinated molecule that may be toxic or unusable for plant metabolism. A priori hypotheses were not created for fluoxetine due to lack of previous studies examining its impacts on plants. We conducted laboratory ecotoxicological assessments for a large range of concentrations of sucralose and fluoxetine on L. minor physiology and photosynthetic function. Frond green leaf area, root length, growth rate, photosynthetic capacity, and plant carbon isotopic composition (discrimination relative to a standard; δ{sup 13}C) were measured among treatments ranging from 0 to 15000 nmol/L-sucralose and 0–323 nmol/L-fluoxetine. Contrary to our predictions, sucralose significantly increased green leaf area, photosynthetic capacity, and δ {sup 13}C of L. minor at environmentally relevant concentrations. The increase of δ {sup 13}C from sucralose amendments and an isotope-mixing model indicated substantial sucralose uptake and assimilation within the plant. Unlike humans who cannot break down and utilize sucralose, we documented that L. minor—a mixotrophic plant—can use sucralose as a sugar substitute to increase its green leaf area and photosynthetic capacity. Fluoxetine

  4. Ecotoxicological assessments show sucralose and fluoxetine affect the aquatic plant, Lemna minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy-Sagers, Cherisse; Reinhardt, Keith; Larson, Danelle M

    2017-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) are prevalent in aquatic systems, yet the fate and impacts on aquatic plants needs quantification for many compounds. We measured and detected sucralose (an artificial sweetener), fluoxetine (an antidepressant), and other PPCP in the Portneuf River in Idaho, USA, where Lemna minor (an aquatic plant in the environment and used in ecotoxicology studies) naturally occurs. Sucralose was hypothesized to negatively affect photosynthesis and growth of L. minor because sucralose is a chlorinated molecule that may be toxic or unusable for plant metabolism. A priori hypotheses were not created for fluoxetine due to lack of previous studies examining its impacts on plants. We conducted laboratory ecotoxicological assessments for a large range of concentrations of sucralose and fluoxetine on L. minor physiology and photosynthetic function. Frond green leaf area, root length, growth rate, photosynthetic capacity, and plant carbon isotopic composition (discrimination relative to a standard; δ 13 C) were measured among treatments ranging from 0 to 15000nmol/L-sucralose and 0-323nmol/L-fluoxetine. Contrary to our predictions, sucralose significantly increased green leaf area, photosynthetic capacity, and δ 13 C of L. minor at environmentally relevant concentrations. The increase of δ 13 C from sucralose amendments and an isotope-mixing model indicated substantial sucralose uptake and assimilation within the plant. Unlike humans who cannot break down and utilize sucralose, we documented that L. minor-a mixotrophic plant-can use sucralose as a sugar substitute to increase its green leaf area and photosynthetic capacity. Fluoxetine significantly decreased L. minor root growth, daily growth rate, and asexual reproduction at 323nmol/L-fluoxetine; however, ambiguity remains regarding the mechanisms responsible and the applicability of these extreme concentrations unprecedented in the natural environment. To our knowledge, this was the

  5. The crab Carcinus maenas as a suitable experimental model in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Elsa Teresa; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo

    2014-09-01

    Aquatic ecotoxicology broadly focuses on how aquatic organisms interact with pollutants in their environment in order to determine environmental hazard and potential risks to humans. Research has produced increasing evidence on the pivotal role of aquatic invertebrates in the assessment of the impact of pollutants on the environment. Its potential use to replace fish bioassays, which offers ethical advantages, has already been widely studied. Nevertheless, the selection of adequate invertebrate experimental models, appropriate experimental designs and bioassays, as well as the control of potential confounding factors in toxicity testing are of major importance to obtain scientifically valid results. Therefore, the present study reviews more than four decades of published research papers in which the Green crab Carcinus maenas was used as an experimental test organism. In general, the surveyed literature indicates that C. maenas is sensitive to a wide range of aquatic pollutants and that its biological responses are linked to exposure concentrations or doses. Current scientific knowledge regarding the biology and ecology of C. maenas and the extensive studies on toxicology found for the present review recognise the Green crab as a reliable estuarine/marine model for routine testing in ecotoxicology research and environmental quality assessment, especially in what concerns the application of the biomarker approach. Data gathered provide valuable information for the selection of adequate and trustworthy bioassays to be used in C. maenas toxicity testing. Since the final expression of high quality testing is a reliable outcome, the present review recommends gender, size and morphotype separation in C. maenas experimental designs and data evaluation. Moreover, the organisms' nutritional status should be taken into account, especially in long-term studies. Studies should also consider the crabs' resilience when facing historical and concurrent contamination. Finally

  6. Soil quality in the Lomellina area using in vitro models and ecotoxicological assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baderna, Diego, E-mail: diego.baderna@marionegri.it [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Colombo, Andrea [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Romeo, Margherita [Department of Molecular Biochemistry and Pharmacology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Cambria, Felice; Teoldi, Federico; Lodi, Marco [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Diomede, Luisa [Department of Molecular Biochemistry and Pharmacology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Benfenati, Emilio [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS—Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Soil quality is traditionally evaluated by chemical characterization to determine levels of pollutants. Biological tools are now employed for soil monitoring since they can take account of the global biological effects induced by all xenobiotics. A combined monitoring of soils based on chemical analyses, human-related in vitro models and ecotoxicological assay was applied in the Lomellina, a semirural area of northern Italy. Chemical characterization indicated overall good quality of the soils, with low levels of toxic and carcinogenic pollutants such as heavy metals, PAHs, PCDD/Fs and PCBs. HepG2 cells were used as a model for the human liver and BALB/c 3T3 cells to evaluate carcinogenic potential. Cells were treated with soil extractable organic matter (EOM) and the MTS assay, DNA release and morphological transformation were selected as endpoints for toxicity and carcinogenicity. Soil EOMs induced dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth at low doses and cytotoxicity only at doses of 500 and 1000 mg soil equivalents/ml. Potential issues for human health can be hypothesized after ingestion of soil samples from some sites. No statistically significant inductions of foci were recorded after exposure to EOMs, indicating that the levels of the soil-extracted organic pollutants were too low to induce carcinogenesis in our experimental conditions. An acute phytotoxicity test and studies on Caenorhabditis elegans were used as ecotoxicological assays for plants and small invertebrates. No significant alerts for ecotoxicity were found. In this proposed case study, HepG2 cells detected differences in the toxicity of soil EOMs, indicating that this cell line could be appropriate to assess the potential harm caused by the ingestion of contaminated soil. Additional information on the carcinogenic potential of mixtures was provided by the cell transformation assay, strengthening the combined approach. - Highlights: • A combined approach for evaluation of soil quality is

  7. APACHE IV versus PPI for predicting community hospital ICU mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrope-Mok, Shaffer R; Propst, Katie A; Iyengar, Rajesh

    2010-06-01

    Both the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV and Palliative Performance Index (PPI) are scales used to estimate intensive care unit (ICU) prognosis and mortality. To Compare the diagnostic utility of the PPI and APACHE IV and their subsequent implications in predicting ICU mortality at a community hospital. This was a Prospective Cohort Study. The study was conducted at the Community hospital ICU. Participants were 211 patients admitted from December 24, 2008 to June 11, 2009. An observer gathered appropriate data and performed the APACHE IV and PPI scales within 24 hours of admission. Results were then analyzed using standard formulae. The study included 211 participants in total with 211 participants in the PPI group (n = 211) and 162 in the APACHE IV group (n = 162). The APACHE score and PPI were found to be significant for predicting ICU mortality (P value of P APACHE IV demonstrated a sensitivity of 84.6%, specificity of 96.0%, PPV of 64.7%, and NPV of 98.6%. In contrast, the PPI possessed a sensitivity of 69.2%, specificity of 96.0%, PPV of 64.7%, and NPV of 97.8%. Limitations may have occurred with the subjective nature of the PPI and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), along with meeting criterion for the APACHE IV. This prospective cohort study in the ICU of a community hospital demonstrated that both the APACHE IV and PPI were significant tools for predicting ICU mortality. When contrasting the 2 scales, the APACHE IV could more accurately rule in mortality when mortality occurred and rule out mortality when survival occurred.

  8. Integrative sediment assessment at Atlantic Spanish harbours by means of chemical and ecotoxicological tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, N; Belzunce-Segarra, M J; Menchaca, I; Garmendia, J M; Franco, J; Nieto, O; Etxebarria, N

    2013-02-01

    This study refers to the integrative assessment of sediment quality in three harbour areas at the Spanish Atlantic Coast: Vigo (Northwestern Spain), Bilbao and Pasajes (Northern Spain). At each site, two lines of evidence have been considered: chemical analyses (metal, PAH and PCB concentrations in sediments and ammonia concentration in bioassays) and toxicity tests (Microtox®, Corophium sp. marine amphipod and Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin larvae). Chemical and ecotoxicological results have been integrated by means of a tabular matrix and a multivariate factorial analysis (FA). Highly toxic samples have been characterised in Vigo and Pasajes harbours while Bilbao samples present toxicity levels ranging from non-toxic to moderately toxic. High toxicity is associated with high levels of contaminants whereas confounding factors (ammonia, organic matter and mud) have been identified to be the main cause of low to moderate toxicity. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that deriving potential toxicity of sediments based on comparison with Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) is in agreement to toxicity results in areas presenting high levels of contaminants. However, at lower levels of toxicity (low to moderate), the mismatch between the potential toxicity (SQG approach) and the toxicity measured by bioassays is greater, as the former only accounts for chemical concentrations, without considering the interaction between contaminants and the effect of confounding factors. Contrarily, the multivariate analysis seems to be a robust tool for the integration and interpretation of different lines of evidence in areas affected by different sources of contamination.

  9. Acute toxicity tests and meta-analysis identify gaps in tropical ecotoxicology for amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sonia L; Donnelly, Maureen A; Kerby, Jacob; Whitfield, Steven M

    2014-09-01

    Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, particularly in tropical regions where amphibian diversity is highest. Pollutants, including agricultural pesticides, have been identified as a potential contributor to decline, yet toxicological studies of tropical amphibians are very rare. The present study assesses toxic effects on amphibians of 10 commonly used commercial pesticides in tropical agriculture using 2 approaches. First, the authors conducted 8-d toxicity assays with formulations of each pesticide using individually reared red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) tadpoles. Second, they conducted a review of available data for the lethal concentration to kill 50% of test animals from the US Environmental Protection Agency's ECOTOX database to allow comparison with their findings. Lethal concentration estimates from the assays ranged over several orders of magnitude. The nematicides terbufos and ethoprophos and the fungicide chlorothalonil were very highly toxic, with evident effects within an order of magnitude of environmental concentrations. Acute toxicity assays and meta-analysis show that nematicides and fungicides are generally more toxic than herbicides yet receive far less research attention than less toxic herbicides. Given that the tropics have a high diversity of amphibians, the findings emphasize the need for research into the effects of commonly used pesticides in tropical countries and should help guide future ecotoxicological research in tropical regions. © 2014 SETAC.

  10. Terrestrial Eco-Toxicological Tests as Screening Tool to Assess Soil Contamination in Krompachy Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ol'ga, Šestinová; Findoráková, Lenka; Hančuľák, Jozef; Fedorová, Erika; Tomislav, Špaldon

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we present screening tool of heavy metal inputs to agricultural and permanent grass vegetation of the soils in Krompachy. This study is devoted to Ecotoxicity tests, Terrestrial Plant Test (modification of OECD 208, Phytotoxkit microbiotest on Sinapis Alba) and chronic tests of Earthworm (Dendrobaena veneta, modification of OECD Guidelines for the testing of chemicals 317, Bioaccumulation in Terrestrial Oligochaetes) as practical and sensitive screening method for assessing the effects of heavy metals in Krompachy soils. The total Cu, Zn, As, Pb and Hg concentrations and eco-toxicological tests of soils from the Krompachy area were determined of 4 sampling sites in 2015. An influence of the sampling sites distance from the copper smeltery on the absolutely concentrations of metals were recorded for copper, lead, zinc, arsenic and mercury. The highest concentrations of these metals were detected on the sampling sites up to 3 km from the copper smeltery. The samples of soil were used to assess of phytotoxic effect. Total mortality was established at earthworms using chronic toxicity test after 7 exposure days. The results of our study confirmed that no mortality was observed in any of the study soils. Based on the phytotoxicity testing, phytotoxic effects of the metals contaminated soils from the samples 3KR (7-9) S.alba seeds was observed.

  11. Methodology for the ecotoxicological evaluation of areas polluted by phosphogypsum wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanchez, M. J.; Garcia-Lorenzo, M. L.; Perez-Sirvent, C.; Martinez-Lopez, S.; Hernandez-Cordoba, M.; Bech, J.

    2012-04-01

    In Spain, the production of phosphoric acid, and hence of phosphogypsum, is restricted to a fertilizer industrial site. The residues contain some radionuclides of the U-series and other contaminants. In order to estimate the risk posed by these materials, chemical methods need to be complemented with biological methods. Then, the aim of this study was to develop a battery of bioassays for the ecotoxicological screening of areas polluted by phosphogypsum wastes. Particularly, the toxicity of water samples, sediments and their pore-water extracts was evaluated by using three assays: bacteria, plants and ostracods. The applied bioassays were: the bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri in superficial water samples using Microtox® bioassay; the root and shoot elongation inhibition and the mortality of Lepidium sativum, Sorghum saccharatum and Sinapis alba using Phytotoxkit® bioassay; and inhibition of Heterocypris incongruens by way of Ostracodtoxkit®. Proposed methodology allows the identification of contamination sources and non contaminated areas, corresponding to decreasing toxicity values.

  12. Review of the ecotoxicological effects of emerging contaminants to soil biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana R; Justino, Celine; Rocha-Santos, Teresa; Freitas, Ana C; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Ruth

    2017-08-24

    In recent years, emerging contaminants (e.g. pesticides and their metabolites, pharmaceuticals, personal and house care products, life-style compounds, food additives, industrial products and wastes, as well as nanomaterials) have become a problem to the environment. In fact, the cumulative use of a panoply of chemical substances in agriculture, industrial activities, in our homes and in health care services has led to their recent appearance in detectable levels in soils, surface, and groundwater resources, with unpredictable consequences for these ecosystems. Few data exist regarding the toxicity and potential for bioaccumulation in biota. When available, data were obtained only for some representatives of the main groups of chemical substances, and for a limited number of species, following non-standard protocols. This makes difficult the calculation of predicted no effect concentrations (PNEC) and the existence of sufficient data to set limits for their release into the environment. This is particularly concerning for the soil compartment, since only recently the scientific community, regulators, and the public have realised the importance of protecting this natural resource and its services to guarantee the sustainability of terrestrial ecosystems and human well-being. In this context, this review paper aims to identify the major groups of soil emerging contaminants, their sources, pathways and receptors, and in parallel to analyse existing ecotoxicological data for soil biota.

  13. Ecotoxicological assessments and the setting of limit values for chemicals in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Committee on the Setting of Limit Values for Chemicals held its first open conference in Denmark in March 1992 at Mogenstrup Kro, Zealand. The conference proceedings were entitled `Risk Management and Risk Assessment in Different Sectors in Denmark`. The conference focused on risk assessment and the setting of limit values for chemicals in connection with human exposure to chemicals. The conference held in January 1996, which is covered by the present proceedings, dealt with the exposure of the environment to chemicals and the state-of-the-art as well as perspectives of ecotoxicological research. Special emphasis was placed on the illustration and discussion of the problems that have to be solved in order to secure satisfactory levels of protection of soil and aquatic environments in connection with exposure to chemicals. Also, problems connected with exposure through the atmosphere were discussed and exemplified by the work on the setting of limit values for tropospheric ozone. Furthermore, the global problems pertaining to what is believed to be the greenhouse effect and the degradation of the stratospheric ozone layer as well as the damage to crops caused by ozone were mentioned. (au)

  14. Ecotoxicological evaluation of leachate from the Limeira sanitary landfill with a view to identifying acute toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Euclides Stipp Paterniani

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Final disposal of solid waste is still a cause for serious impacts on the environment. In sanitary landfills, waste undergoes physical, chemical, and biological decomposition, generating biogas and leachate. Leachate is a highly toxic liquid with a very high pollution potential. The purpose of this work is to evaluate toxicity of in natura leachate samples collected from Limeira Sanitary Landfill, in Limeira, SP. The ecotoxicological evaluation comprised acute toxicity assays using as test organisms Daphnia Similis, seeds of Eruca sativa (arugula, and Allium cepa roots (onion. Analyses of color, pH, turbidity, conductivity, hardness, nitrogen, total organic carbon (TOC, adsorbable organic halogen (AOX, and metals were also carried out. The main results for Eruca sativa (arugula and Allium cepa (onion indicated that the diluted leachate 50% presented similar toxicity to the phenol solution of 1000 mg.L-1 for arugula and 2000 mg.L-1 for onion. With the solution of Cr+6 concentrations of 3000 mg.L-1 for arugula and 2000 mg.L-1 for onion were found. For analyses with Daphnia Similis the EC50 was 9.3% on average. This way it was possible to observe that biological tests are necessary to evaluate the pollution in the effluents or water bodies. These tests serve to determine the toxic potential of a chemical agent or complex mixture.

  15. Objective classification of ecological status in marine water bodies using ecotoxicological information and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiras, Ricardo; Durán, Iria

    2014-12-01

    Some relevant shortcomings have been identified in the current approach for the classification of ecological status in marine water bodies, leading to delays in the fulfillment of the Water Framework Directive objectives. Natural variability makes difficult to settle fixed reference values and boundary values for the Ecological Quality Ratios (EQR) for the biological quality elements. Biological responses to environmental degradation are frequently of nonmonotonic nature, hampering the EQR approach. Community structure traits respond only once ecological damage has already been done and do not provide early warning signals. An alternative methodology for the classification of ecological status integrating chemical measurements, ecotoxicological bioassays and community structure traits (species richness and diversity), and using multivariate analyses (multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis), is proposed. This approach does not depend on the arbitrary definition of fixed reference values and EQR boundary values, and it is suitable to integrate nonlinear, sensitive signals of ecological degradation. As a disadvantage, this approach demands the inclusion of sampling sites representing the full range of ecological status in each monitoring campaign. National or international agencies in charge of coastal pollution monitoring have comprehensive data sets available to overcome this limitation.

  16. Ecotoxicological evaluation of harbour sediments using marine organisms from different trophic levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pane, L.; Giacco, E.; Mariottini, G.L. [Genova Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biology; Corra, C.; Greco, G.; Faimali, M. [CNR - ISMAR-Marine Technology Section, Genova (Italy); Varisco, F. [Multiproject S.r.l., Gorizia (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    Background, aim and scope. The toxicity of contaminated sediments should be evaluated considering the direct exposure of laboratory organisms to whole sediments and the indirect exposure to elutriates or extracts (Tay et al. 1992, Byrne and Halloran 1999, Nendza 2002). The alga Dunaliella tertiolecta is indicated for the use in toxicity bioassays because it is highly sensitive to several xenobiotics. Harpacticoid copepods have been already used for toxicity testing and Tigriopus fulvus is a promising Mediterranean target-species in ecotoxicology (Todaro et al. 2001, Faraponova et al. 2003, Pane et al. 2005a). In this study, the toxicity of sediments collected in harbour sites of the Northeastern Adriatic Sea was evaluated by growth inhibition test with free living and alginate-immobilized Dunaliella tertiolecta and acute toxicity test with nauplii and adult Tigriopus fulvus with the aim of pointing out the importance to utilize model organisms from different trophic levels in sediment ecotoxicology. Methodology. Elutriates and whole sediments were tested on free living and immobilized (Pane et al. 1998) algal cells, and on laboratory reared copepods. Free-living D. tertiolecta were exposed to diluted elutriates in a static, multi-well plate system. Na-alginate immobilized D. tertiolecta were placed in polystyrene inserts fitted with polyester mesh bottoms and exposed to a thin layer (2 mm) of whole sediments in multi-well plates (EPS 1992, Pane and Bertino 1999). Toxicity tests with copepods were carried out on Tigriopus fulvus nauplii (elutriates) and adults (whole sediments and elutriates). Same-aged nauplii useful for toxicity tests were obtained by egg sac detaching and consequent hatching stimulation (Pane et al. 2006). Newborn nauplii (I-II stage) were exposed to elutriates in multi-well plates provided with polystyrene inserts. Adult T. fulvus maintained in polystyrene inserts fitted with polyester mesh bottoms were placed in contact with a thin layer (2 mm

  17. Ecotoxicological impact of MSW landfills: assessment of teratogenic effects by means of an adapted FETAX assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lapuente, J; González-Linares, J; Pique, E; Borràs, M

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of chemical products into the environment can cause long-term effects on the ecosystems. Increasing efforts are being made to determine the extent of contamination in particularly affected areas using diverse methods to assess the ecotoxicological impact. We used a modified Frog Embrio Toxicity Assay-Xenopus method to determine the extent of toxicological load in different sample soils obtained near three municipal solid waste landfills in Catalonia (Spain). The results show that the Garraf landfill facility produces more embryotoxic damage to the surroundings, than the others ones: Can Mata landfill and Montferrer-Castellbó landfill. The aim of this work is to demonstrate how different management of complex sources of contamination as the controlled dumping sites can modulate the presence of toxics in the environment and their effects and through this, help determine the safer way to treat these wastes. To this effect some conceptual modifications have been made on the established American Society for Testing and Materials protocol. The validity of the new model, both as to model of calculation as to protocol, has been demonstrated in three different sites with complex sources of contamination.

  18. Gammarus spp. in aquatic ecotoxicology and water quality assessment: toward integrated multilevel tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Petra Y; Kienle, Cornelia; Gerhardt, Almut

    2010-01-01

    The amphipod genus Gammarus is widespread and is structurally and functionally important in epigean freshwaters of the Northern Hemisphere. Its presence is crucial, because macroinvertebrate feeding is a major rate-limiting step in the processing of stream detrius. In addition, Gammarus interacts with multiple trophic levels bu functioning as prey, predator, herbivore, detritivore, and shredder. Such a broad span of ecosystem participation underlines the importance of Gammarus to pollutants and other disturbances may render it a valuable indicator for ecosystem health. This review summarizes the vast number of studies conducted with Gammarus spp. for evaluating aquatic ecotoxicology endpoints and examines the suitability of this native invertabrate species for the assessment of stream ecosystem health in the Northern Hemisphere. Numerous papers have been published on how pollutants affect gammarind behavior (i.e., mating, predator avoidance), reproduction, development, feeding activity, population structure, as well as the consequences of pollution on host-parasite, predator-prey, or native-invasive species interactions. Some biochemical and molecular biomarkers have already been established, such as the measurement of vitellogenin-like proteins, metallothioneins, alkali-labile phosphates (in proteins), and lipogenic enzyme activities for assessing endocrine distribution and detoxification mechanisms.

  19. Content of PAHs, activities of γ-radionuclides and ecotoxicological assessment in biochars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondek Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the effect of thermal conversion temperature and plant material addition to sewage sludge on the PAHs content and the activity of selected γ-radionuclides in biochars, and to conduct an ecotoxicological assessment. The pyrolysis of the mixtures of sewage sludge and plant materials at 300°C and such temperature caused an increase in the contents of 2- and 3-ring hydrocarbons. During the pyrolysis of organic materials at 600°C, the amount of the following compounds was reduced in biochars: benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, indeno[1,2,3c,d]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, and benzo[g,h,i]perylene. Among γ-radioisotopes of the elements, natural radiogenic isotopes were dominant. 137Cs was the only artificial radioactive isotope. The pyrolysis of the mixtures of municipal sewage sludge and plant materials revealed that isotope 40K had the highest radioactive activity. In the case of other analysed nuclides, activities of 212Pb, 214Pb, 214Bi, and 137Cs were determined after the sample pyrolysis. The extracts from the mixtures of sewage sludge and plant materials were non-toxic to Vibrio fischeri.

  20. Biotests and Biosensors for Ecotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: A Minireview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaja Kasemets

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologies have become a significant priority worldwide. Several manufactured nanoparticles - particles with one dimension less than 100 nm - are increasingly used in consumer products. At nanosize range, the properties of materials differ substantially from bulk materials of the same composition, mostly due to the increased specific surface area and reactivity, which may lead to increased bioavailability and toxicity. Thus, for the assessment of sustainability of nanotechnologies, hazards of manufactured nanoparticles have to be studied. Despite all the above mentioned, the data on the potential environmental effects of nanoparticles are rare. This mini-review is summarizing the emerging information on different aspects of ecotoxicological hazard of metal oxide nanoparticles, focusing on TiO2, ZnO and CuO. Various biotests that have been successfully used for evaluation of ecotoxic properties of pollutants to invertebrates, algae and bacteria and now increasingly applied for evaluation of hazard of nanoparticles at different levels of the aquatic food-web are discussed. Knowing the benefits and potential drawbacks of these systems, a suite of tests for evaluation of environmental hazard of nanoparticles is proposed. Special attention is paid to the influence of particle solubility and to recombinant metal-sensing bacteria as powerful tools for quantification of metal bioavailability. Using recombinant metal-specific bacterial biosensors and multitrophic ecotoxicity assays in tandem will create new scientific knowledge on the respective role of ionic species and of particles in toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles.

  1. Novel N-Arylaminophosphonates Bearing a Pyrrole Moiety and Their Ecotoxicological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Lewkowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of biological activities of aminophosphonates predisposes them to find applications as anticancer, antiviral, antimicrobial, antifungal, or herbicidal agents. Despite a number of positive aspects of the use of aminophosphonates, their applications may cause a risk to the environment, which is well exemplified by the case of glyphosate. Therefore, scientists see a pressing need to rate ecotoxicity of aminophosphonates. Nowadays, it is recommended to use comprehensive tools to carry out appropriate and effective risk assessments of toxic substances. For these purposes, tests based on the acute toxicity of the luminescent bacteria Aliivibrio fischeri, as well as the measurement of sub-chronic toxicity of the crustacean Heterocypris incongruens seem to be the most convenient. A series of five diphenyl N-arylamino(pyrrole-2-ylmethylphosphonates was synthesized and preliminary evaluation of their ecotoxicological properties was performed. In order to carry out such investigations, we applied the two biotests mentioned above. Results showed that the N-(4-nitrophenyl derivative was the most toxic for bacteria in comparison to other tested compounds. As for crustaceans, N-phenyl and N-naphthyl derivatives were found to be the most harmful, simultaneously being relatively harmless for bacteria. Such a phenomenon are discussed in correlation with the literature, while its reason is discussed with respect to the aspect of structure of the tested compounds.

  2. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins in aquatic invertebrates: Evolutionary significance and application in marine ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Hui-Su; Kang, Hye-Min; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2017-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily is known to play a fundamental role in biological processes and is highly conserved across animal taxa. The ABC proteins function as active transporters for multiple substrates across the cellular membrane by ATP hydrolysis. As this superfamily is derived from a common ancestor, ABC genes have evolved via lineage-specific duplications through the process of adaptation. In this review, we summarized information about the ABC gene families in aquatic invertebrates, considering their evolution and putative functions in defense mechanisms. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted to examine the evolutionary significance of ABC gene families in aquatic invertebrates. Particularly, a massive expansion of multixenobiotic resistance (MXR)-mediated efflux transporters was identified in the absence of the ABCG2 (BCRP) gene in Ecdysozoa and Platyzoa, suggesting that a loss of Abcg2 gene occurred sporadically in these species during divergence of Protostome to Lophotrochozoa. Furthermore, in aquatic invertebrates, the ecotoxicological significance of MXR is discussed while considering the role of MXR-mediated efflux transporters in response to various environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental risk assessment of combined effects in aquatic ecotoxicology: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Jonny; Petersen, Karina; Song, You; Ruus, Anders; Grung, Merete; Bakke, Torgeir; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-05-01

    Environmental regulatory edicts within the EU, such as the regulatory framework for chemicals REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals), the Water Framework Directive (WFD), and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) focus mainly on toxicity assessment of individual chemicals although the effect of contaminant mixtures is a matter of increasing concern. This discussion paper provides an overview of the field of combined effects in aquatic ecotoxicology and addresses some of the major challenges related to assessment of combined effects in connection with environmental risk assessment (ERA) and regulation. Potentials and obstacles related to different experimental, modelling and predictive ERA approaches are described. On-going ERA guideline and manual developments in Europe aiming to incorporate combined effects of contaminants, the use of different experimental approaches for providing combined effect data, the involvement of biomarkers to characterize Mode of Action and toxicity pathways and efforts to identify relevant risk scenarios related to combined effects are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Introducing Spectral Structure Activity Relationship (S-SAR Analysis. Application to Ecotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Lacrămă

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel quantitative structure-activity (property relationship model, namelySpectral-SAR, is presented in an exclusive algebraic way replacing the old-fashionedmulti-regression one. The actual S-SAR method interprets structural descriptors as vectorsin a generic data space that is further mapped into a full orthogonal space by means of theGram-Schmidt algorithm. Then, by coordinated transformation between the data andorthogonal spaces, the S-SAR equation is given under simple determinant form for anychemical-biological interactions under study. While proving to give the same analyticalequation and correlation results with standard multivariate statistics, the actual S-SARframe allows the introduction of the spectral norm as a valid substitute for the correlationfactor, while also having the advantage to design the various related SAR models throughthe introduced “minimal spectral path” rule. An application is given performing a completeS-SAR analysis upon the Tetrahymena pyriformis ciliate species employing its reportedeco-toxicity activities among relevant classes of xenobiotics. By representing the spectralnorm of the endpoint models against the concerned structural coordinates, the obtainedS-SAR endpoints hierarchy scheme opens the perspective to further design the eco-toxicological test batteries with organisms from different species.

  5. Evaluation of leaching and ecotoxicological properties of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.A. Papadimitriou; I. Haritou; P. Samaras; A.I. Zouboulis [Technological Educational Institute of West Macedonia, Kozani (Greece)

    2008-03-15

    The objectives of this work were the evaluation of sewage sludge stabilization by mixing with fly ash, the examination of the physicochemical properties of the produced materials and their leachates and the assessment of their environmental impact by the evaluation of the ecotoxic characteristics. Different ratios of fly ash and sewage sludge (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:6, and 1:9) were mixed for 48 and 72 h. After mixing, the liquid phase of the produced materials was analyzed for total coliforms and Escherichia coli, while the solid residue was dried and tested for the leaching characteristics by the application of TCLP and EN 12457-2 standard leaching methods. Furthermore, the produced leachates were analyzed for their content of specific metals, while their ecotoxicological characteristics were determined by the use of toxicity bioassays, using the marine photobacterium Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia magna. The phytotoxicity of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures was also determined by utilizing seeds of three higher plants (one monocotyl and two dicotyls). The mixtures exhibited low metal leaching in all cases, while the ecotoxic properties increased with the increase of fly ash/sewage sludge ratio. The phytotoxicity testing showed increased root length growth inhibition.

  6. Eco-toxicological studies of diesel and biodiesel fuels in aerated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapinskiene, Asta [Klaipeda University, School of Maritime Technology, Department of Technological Processes, Bijunu St. 17, Klaipeda LT-91225 (Lithuania)]. E-mail: ekosistema@one.lt; Martinkus, Povilas [Klaipeda University, School of Maritime Technology, Department of Technological Processes, Bijunu St. 17, Klaipeda LT-91225 (Lithuania)]. E-mail: martinkus.p@one.lt; Rebzdaite, Vilija [Klaipeda University, School of Maritime Technology, Department of Technological Processes, Bijunu St. 17, Klaipeda LT-91225 (Lithuania)]. E-mail: rebzdaite300@one.lt

    2006-08-15

    The goal of this study was to compare diesel fuel to biodiesel fuel by determining the toxicity of analyzed materials and by quantitatively evaluating the microbial transformation of these materials in non-adapted aerated soil. The toxicity levels were determined by measuring the respiration of soil microorganisms as well as the activity of soil dehydrogenases. The quantitative evaluation of biotransformation of analyzed materials was based on the principle of balancing carbon in the following final products: (a) carbon dioxide; (b) humus compounds; (c) the remainder of non-biodegraded analyzed material; and (d) intermediate biodegradation products and the biomass of microorganisms. The results of these studies indicate that diesel fuel has toxic properties at concentrations above 3% (w/w), while biodiesel fuel has none up to a concentration of 12% (w/w). The diesel fuel is more resistant to biodegradation and produces more humus products. The biodiesel is easily biotransformed. - The comparison of diesel and biodiesel fuels' eco-toxicological parameters in non-adapted aerated soil is relevant when considering the effects of these substances on the environment in cases of accidental spills.

  7. Ecotoxicological assessment of dewatered drinking water treatment residue for environmental recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Nannan; Wang, Changhui; Wendling, Laura A; Pei, Yuansheng

    2017-09-01

    The beneficial recycle of drinking water treatment residue (DWTR) in environmental remediation has been demonstrated in many reports. However, the lack of information concerning the potential toxicity of dewatered DWTR hinders its widespread use. The present study examined the ecotoxicity of dewatered aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) DWTR leachates to a green alga, Chlorella vulgaris. Data from the variations of cell density and chlorophyll a content suggested that algal growth in DWTR leachates was inhibited. The algal cellular oxidation stress was initially induced but completely eliminated within 72 h by antioxidant enzymes. The expression of three photosynthesis-related algae genes (psaB, psbC, and rbcL) also temporarily decreased (within 72 h). Moreover, the algal cells showed intact cytomembranes after exposure to DWTR leachates. Further investigation confirmed that inhibition of algal growth was due to DWTR-induced phosphorus (P) deficiency in growth medium, rather than potentially toxic contaminants (e.g. copper and Al) contained in DWTR. Interestingly, the leachates could potentially promote algal growth via increasing the supply of new components (e.g. calcium, kalium, magnesium, and ammonia nitrogen) from DWTR. In summary, based on the algae toxicity test, the dewatered Fe/Al DWTR was nontoxic and its environment recycling does not represent an ecotoxicological risk to algae.

  8. Ecotoxicological effects of rice field waters on selected planktonic species: comparison between conventional and organic farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Serrano, Andrea; Ibáñez, Carles; Lacorte, Silvia; Barata, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicological effects of water coming from untreated organic and conventional rice field production areas in the Ebro Delta (Catalonia, Spain) treated with the herbicides oxadiazon, benzofenap, clomazone and bensulfuron-methyl and the fungicides carbendazim, tricyclazole and flusilazole. Irrigation and drainage channels of the study locations were also included to account for potential toxic effects of water coming in and out of the studied rice fields. Toxicity tests included four species (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Desmodesmus subcapitatus, Chlorella vulgaris and Daphnia magna), three endpoints (microalgae growth, D. magna mortality and feeding rates), and two trophic levels: primary producers (microalgae) and grazers (D. magna). Pesticides in water were analyzed by solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Negative effects on algae growth and D. magna feeding rates were detected mainly after application of herbicides and fungicides, respectively, in the conventional rice field. Results indicated that most of the observed negative effects in microalgae and D. magna were explained by the presence of herbicides and fungicides. The above mentioned analyses also denoted an inverse relationship between phytoplankton biomass measured as chlorophyll a and herbicides. In summary, this study indicates that in real field situations low to moderate levels of herbicides and fungicides have negative impacts to planktonic organisms and these effects seem to be short-lived.

  9. Ibuprofen removal by heterogeneous photocatalysis and ecotoxicological evaluation of the treated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, João P; Andrade, Sandro J; Fonseca, Ana L; Silva, Flávio S; Silva, Milady R A; Kondo, Márcia M

    2017-03-01

    Emerging contaminants including pharmaceuticals are a class of compounds that are causing great concern due to several environmental problems. Conventional water and wastewater treatments do not achieve high removal efficiencies for many of these drugs. Therefore, the present work investigated the removal of ibuprofen (IBP) by heterogeneous photocatalysis using TiO2 irradiated with artificial UV light or solar radiation. The treated solutions were tested against Daphnia similis and Raphidocelis subcapitata, which are species commonly used as bioindicators of environmental conditions. The results indicated that IBP removal reached 92% after 1 h of treatment using artificial UV and 1000 mg L(-1) of TiO2, which was the optimum catalyst concentration in the range studied (20-1000 mg L(-1)). TOC removal reached up to 78% after 60 min of treatment using TiO2/artificial UV. Ecotoxicological bioassays indicated that the treated solutions had acute effects, with 30% immobilization of D. similis and 40% growth inhibition of R. subcapitata.

  10. Metabolic Effect Level Index Links Multivariate Metabolic Fingerprints to Ecotoxicological Effect Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Janet; Schreiber, René; Otto, Matthias; Heilmeier, Hermann; Altenburger, Rolf; Schmitt-Jansen, Mechthild

    2015-07-07

    A major goal of ecotoxicology is the prediction of adverse outcomes for populations from sensitive and early physiological responses. A snapshot of the physiological state of an organism can be provided by metabolic fingerprints. However, to inform chemical risk assessment, multivariate metabolic fingerprints need to be converted to readable end points suitable for effect estimation and comparison. The concentration- and time-dependent responsiveness of metabolic fingerprints to the PS-II inhibitor isoproturon was investigated by use of a Myriophyllum spicatum bioassay. Hydrophilic and lipophilic leaf extracts were analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and preprocessed with XCMS. Metabolic changes were aggregated in the quantitative metabolic effect level index (MELI), allowing effect estimation from Hill-based concentration-response models. Hereby, the most sensitive response on the concentration scale was revealed by the hydrophilic MELI, followed by photosynthetic efficiency and, 1 order of magnitude higher, by the lipophilic MELI and shoot length change. In the hydrophilic MELI, 50% change compares to 30% inhibition of photosynthetic efficiency and 10% inhibition of dry weight change, indicating effect development on different response levels. In conclusion, aggregated metabolic fingerprints provide quantitative estimates and span a broad response spectrum, potentially valuable for establishing adverse outcome pathways of chemicals in environmental risk assessment.

  11. Aquatic live animal radiotracing studies for ecotoxicological applications: Addressing fundamental methodological deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Tom; Metian, Marc; Golding, Lisa A; Wood, Mike D

    2017-11-01

    The use of live animal gamma radioisotope tracer techniques in the field of ecotoxicology allows laboratory studies to accurately monitor contaminant biokinetics in real time for an individual organism. However, methods used in published studies for aquatic organisms are rarely described in sufficient detail to allow for study replication or an assessment of the errors associated with live animal radioanalysis to be identified. We evaluate the influence of some important methodological deficiencies through an overview of the literature on live aquatic animal radiotracer techniques and through the results obtained from our radiotracer studies on four aquatic invertebrate species. The main factors discussed are animal rinsing, radioanalysis and geometry corrections. We provide examples of three main techniques in live aquatic animal radiotracer studies to improve data quality control and demonstrate why each technique is crucial in interpreting the data from such studies. The animal rinsing technique is also relevant to non-radioisotope tracer studies, especially those involving nanoparticles. We present clear guidance on how to perform each technique and explain the importance of proper reporting of the validation of each technique for individual studies. In this paper we describe methods that are often used in lab-based radioecology studies but are rarely described in great detail. We hope that this paper will act as the basis for standard operating procedures for future radioecology studies to improve study replication and data quality control. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of Survival Time in Brachionus Rotifers: Synchronization of Maternal Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Gen; Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Gribble, Kristin E; Welch, David M; Ushio, Hideki

    2016-07-22

    Rotifers are microscopic cosmopolitan zooplankton used as models in ecotoxicological and aging studies due to their several advantages such as short lifespan, ease of culture, and parthenogenesis that enables clonal culture. However, caution is required when measuring their survival time as it is affected by maternal age and maternal feeding conditions. Here we provide a protocol for powerful and reproducible measurement of the survival time in Brachionus rotifers following a careful synchronization of culture conditions over several generations. Empirically, poor synchronization results in early mortality and a gradual decrease in survival rate, thus resulting in weak statistical power. Indeed, under such conditions, calorie restriction (CR) failed to significantly extend the lifespan of B. plicatilis although CR-induced longevity has been demonstrated with well-synchronized rotifer samples in past and present studies. This protocol is probably useful for other invertebrate models, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, because maternal age effects have also been reported in these species.

  13. Analysis reports on the ecotoxicological evaluation of discharges of spent water at the cogeneration/central heating plants Alloeverket, Borgaas, Haendeloeverket, Moelnlycke, Saevenaes and Aelmhult; Analysrapporter avseende ekotoxikologisk bedoemning av utslaepp av utgaaende vatten vid Alloeverket, Borgaas, Haendeloeverket, Moelnlycke, Saevenaes och Aelmhult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jonas; Axby, Fredrik; Persson, Maarten; Rossander, Annelie; Schultz, Emma; Svaerd, Sara [Carl Bro AB, Kristianstad (Sweden)

    2007-04-15

    The discharges to water at six biofuelled Swedish cogeneration/district heating plants are evaluated in light of the EU Water Framework Directive concerning ecotoxicological impacts. Ecotoxicological data for the 33 prioritized substances are also reviewed.

  14. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  15. 11. IV avati Draakoni galeriis...

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Tanel Saare (sünd. 1979) näitus "Gott und huhn episode IV: seed shower". Eksponeeritakse väljavõtteid aktsioonidest aastatel 2000-2004 Turus, Nürnbergis, Berliinis, Lohusalus ja Soulis. Osa aktsioone toimus koos rühmitusega Non Grata

  16. Occurrence, ecotoxicological effects and risk assessment of antihypertensive pharmaceutical residues in the aquatic environment--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Aline A; Kummrow, Fábio; Pamplin, Paulo Augusto Z

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a review of the investigated antihypertensives in different aquatic compartments. It aims to compare these data with those regarding ecotoxicity effects in order to find out ecotoxicological data gaps for these pharmaceuticals and to point out the need for future studies. In addition, part of this article is dedicated to the risk assessment of the parent compounds atenolol, metoprolol, propranolol and verapamil, which are of great environmental concern in terms of contamination levels and for which there are sufficient ecotoxicological data available. 79 articles were retrieved presenting quantization data for 34 different antihypertensives and/or their metabolites. Only 43 articles were found regarding acute and chronic ecotoxicological effects of antihypertensive drugs. The results indicated that the beta-blockers atenolol, metoprolol and propranolol are the antihypertensives most frequently detected in the aquatic environment. They are also the drugs which reached the highest maximum concentrations in surface waters in the data reported in the literature. The highest percentages of ecotoxicity data regarding antihypertensives were also related to these beta-blockers. On the other hand, there is clearly a lack of ecotoxicity data, especially the chronic ones, regarding other antihypertensives. The environmental risk assessment (ERA) showed that all three of the evaluated beta-blockers can pose a potential long-term risk for non-target organisms of both fresh and marine water species. However, more meaningful ecotoxicity data for antihypertensives, including saltwater species, are required to refine and enlarge these results. Additional studies focusing on potential interactions between pharmaceutical mixtures, including antihypertensives, are also an urgent need. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Olive oil mill wastewaters before and after treatment: a critical review from the ecotoxicological point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justino, Celine I L; Pereira, Ruth; Freitas, Ana C; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Panteleitchouk, Teresa S L; Duarte, Armando C

    2012-03-01

    The olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) is a problematic and polluting effluent which may degrade the soil and water quality, with critical negative impacts on ecosystems functions and services provided. The main purpose of this review paper is presenting the state of the art of OMW treatments focusing on their efficiency to reduce OMW toxicity, and emphasizing the role of ecotoxicological tests on the evaluation of such efficiency before the up-scale of treatment methodologies being considered. In the majority of research works, the reduction of OMW toxicity is related to the degradation of phenolic compounds (considered as the main responsible for the toxic effects of OMW on seed germination, on bacteria, and on different species of soil and aquatic invertebrates) or the decrease of chemical oxygen demand content, which is not scientifically sound. Batteries of ecotoxicological tests are not applied before and after OMW treatments as they should be, thus leading to knowledge gaps in terms of accurate and real assessment of OMW toxicity. Although the toxicity of OMW is usually high, the evaluation of effects on sub-lethal endpoints, on individual and multispecies test systems, are currently lacking, and the real impacts yielded by its dilution, in freshwater trophic chains of receiving systems can not be assessed. As far as the terrestrial compartment is considered, ecotoxicological data available include tests only with plants and the evaluation of soil microbial parameters, reflecting concerns with the impacts on crops when using OMW for irrigation purposes. The evaluation of its ecotoxicity to other edaphic species were not performed giving rise to a completely lack of knowledge about the consequences of such practice on other soil functions. OMW production is a great environmental problem in Mediterranean countries; hence, engineers, chemists and ecotoxicologists should face this problem together to find an ecologically friend solution.

  18. Ecotoxicological assays of Diethyltoluamide and Lemongrass Essencial Oil in irradiated and non-irradiated aquatic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimiliani, Giovana T.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Martini, Gisela A.; Rogero, Jose R., E-mail: sorogero@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Aquatic invertebrates can be potentially exposed to nonradioactive contaminants in conjunction with ionizing radiation, especially in highly industrialized areas surrounding nuclear facilities, where radionuclides can accidentally be discharged in the aquatic environment containing stable chemicals. The aquatic organisms have continually been exposed to chemical contaminants like personal care products (PCPs) which have been found in various environmental matrices and may cause adverse effects to aquatic life and human health as radioactive products. In this study was used C. silvestrii as bioindicator organism in chronic ecotoxicity assays with lemongrass essencial oil (LEO) and Diethyltoluamide (DEET), both are insect repellent. In addition to exposition of the compounds, the organisms were irradiated with gamma rays from Co-60 source. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the possible synergistic effect of gamma radiation and mosquito repellent products in the reproduction of Ceriodaphnia silvestrii utilizing standardized ecotoxicological tests. The C. silvestrii inhibition concentration (IC25; 7 days) result after DEET exposition was 16.4 ± 1.4 mg L{sup -1} and for LEO was 3.1 ± 1.4 mg L{sup -1}. In the irradiated (25 Gy) C. silvestrii exposed to DEET and LEO, the concentration that inhibited reproduction was 16.1 ± 0.9 mg L{sup -1} and 2.4 ± 0.3 mg L{sup -1} respectively. The results showed that the reproduction of irradiated C. silvestrii was not significantly affected when compared with non-irradiated organisms when exposed to DEET or LEO. (author)

  19. Estimating ecotoxicological effects of pesticide drift on nontarget arthropods in field hedgerows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Stefan; Lazzaro, Luca; Finizio, Antonio; Zanin, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    When hedgerows grow in orchards where pesticides are applied, they can play a double role: Providing a barrier for chemical spray drift and as a refuge for beneficial arthropods such as pollinators and predators. Effectiveness of hedgerows as barriers to drift depends mainly on canopy density (that can be estimated through optical porosity) and wind speed. When optical porosity is low, the hedgerow can intercept a significant amount of spray drift and act as an effective barrier, but the intercepted pesticide can negatively affect the beneficial arthropods living there. A drift model was used to simulate drift in a hedgerow- vineyard system, and a deposition distribution model was used to calculate the pesticide spatial pattern distribution on a hedgerow with different optical porosity and wind speed conditions. The possible ecotoxicological effects were estimated for 28 active ingredients with different median lethal rates for two nontarget arthropods, Aphidius rhopalosiphi and Typhlodromus pyri. A spatialized risk assessment for a hedgerow is suggested to improve procedures based on application rate, standard drift, and vegetation distribution values, as in the hazard quotient approach. An alternative method for calculation of the exposure is also proposed, with a step-by-step example of a toxicity/exposure ratio calculation. The results highlighted the importance of the spatial pattern of drift and proved that a hedgerow can be an effective barrier against spray drift. Analysis of the toxicity/exposure ratio values showed that a hedgerow can continue its shelter and feeding function for nontarget arthropods when low-toxicity pesticides are used, there is no significant wind interference, or both.

  20. Removal of pesticides and ecotoxicological changes during the simultaneous treatment of triazines and chlorpyrifos in biomixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizano-Fallas, Verónica; Masís-Mora, Mario; Espinoza-Villalobos, David; Lizano-Brenes, Michelle; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E

    2017-09-01

    Biopurification systems constitute a biological approach for the treatment of pesticide-containing wastewaters produced in agricultural activities, and contain an active core called biomixture. This work evaluated the performance of a biomixture to remove and detoxify a combination of three triazine herbicides (atrazine/terbuthylazine/terbutryn) and one insecticide (chlorpyrifos), and this efficiency was compared with dissipation in soil alone. The potential enhancement of the process was also assayed by bioaugmentation with the ligninolytic fungi Trametes versicolor. Globally, the non-bioaugmented biomixture exhibited faster pesticide removal than soil, but only in the first stages of the treatment. After 20 d, the largest pesticide removal was achieved in the biomixture, while significant removal was detected only for chlorpyrifos in soil. However, after 60 d the removal values in soil matched those achieved in the biomixture for all the pesticides. The bioaugmentation failed to enhance, and even significantly decreased the biomixture removal capacity. Final removal values were 82.8% (non-bioaugmented biomixture), 43.8% (fungal bioaugmented biomixture), and 84.7% (soil). The ecotoxicological analysis revealed rapid detoxification (from 100 to 170 TU to pesticide removal. On the contrary, despite important herbicide elimination, no clear detoxification patterns were observed in the phytotoxicity towards Lactuca sativa. Findings suggest that the proposed biomixture is useful for fast removal of the target pesticides; even though soil also removes the agrochemicals, longer periods would be required. On the other hand, the use of fungal bioaugmentation is discouraged in this matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ecorad 2001. Radioecology/ ecotoxicology in continental and estuarine media; Ecorad 2001. Radioecologie / ecotoxicologie des milieux continentaux et estuariens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    This conference about radioecology is divided in eight sessions that concern the following subjects: behaviour and transfer of radionuclides in soil, in terrestrial ecosystems (plants and animal transfers), in freshwater ecosystems, in estuaries are the subjects of the four first sessions. The effects of toxicants in environment are detailed in the fifth session. The sixth session is devoted to the methods of measurement of environmental radioactivity. The seventh session is relative to the consequences of accidental and chronicle situations (Chernobyl consequences, countermeasures and decontamination). This conference ends with the ethical aspects of environmental radio ecotoxicology with the eighth session. (N.C.)

  2. Organic Trace Compounds as Emisions of Incineration Plants and their Toxicological and Ecotoxicological Classification - Part 2. Toxicological and ecotoxicological classification; Organische Spurenstoffe als Emissionen aus Verbrennungsanlagen und deren humantoxikologische und oekotoxikologische Einordnung. T. 2. Humantoxikologische und oekotoxikologische Einordnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, G.; Wiedmann, T.; Ballschmiter, K.

    1998-02-01

    In this report (`Organic Trace Compounds as Emissions of Incineration Plants and their Toxicological and Ecotoxicologial Classification - Part 2: Toxicological and Ecotoxicological Classification`) emissions of organic compounds, measured from German municipal waste incineration plants, are compared with toxicological and ecotoxicological data, limits and threshold values and environmental baseline levels. Emission data of other combustion processes are integrated if available. A modern waste incineration plant, observing German emission regulations, emits less of most substances reported here than other industrial processes or e.g. the combustion of wood or coal. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im vorliegenden Arbeitsbericht (`Organische Spurenstoffe als Emissionen aus Verbrennungsanlagen und deren humantoxikologische und oekotoxikologische Einordnung - Teil 2: Humantoxikologische und oekotoxikologische Einordnung`) werden die realen organischen Emissionen von Muellverbrennungsanlagen in groesstmoeglicher stofflicher Differenzierung toxikologisch eingeordnet. Hierzu werden die Daten mit human-/oekotoxikologischen Kenngroessen, Grenz- und Orientierungswerten sowie mit der Hintergrundbelastung verglichen und die inhalative Zusatzbelastung wird berechnet. Diese liegt fuer alle Stoffe im Bereich von 10{sup -9} bis 10{sup -1} Prozent. Eine Ausnahme bilden die Phthalsaeureester mit einem Spitzenwert fuer die Zusatzbelastung von 6,5%. Wenn vorhanden, werden die Emissionsdaten von anderen Verbrennungsprozessen mit in die Einordnung aufgenommen. Von vielen Substanzklassen wird bei einer Abfallverbrennungsanlage, die die Grenzwerte der 17. BImSchV einhaelt, weniger an die Umgebungsluft abgegeben als bei anderen industriellen Prozessen oder z.B. bei der Verbrennung von Kohle oder Holz. (orig.)

  3. 20 CFR 410.361 - Determination of dependency; surviving divorced wife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of dependency; surviving... HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship and Dependency § 410.361 Determination of dependency; surviving divorced wife. An individual who is the miner's surviving...

  4. Alle har en historie, IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydegaard, Torbjørn

    Alle har en historie IV: Pædagogik med Freedom Writers lader et væld af pædagogiske facetter udspringe af den kendte skole-film Freedom Writers’ scener og handlinger. Der er både fokus på en almen tilgang til pædagogik og på Freedom Writer-metodikken, dels gennem de filmscener, der sættes til...

  5. Mortality Prediction in Patients Admitted in Surgical Intensive Care Unit by Using APACHE IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetr, Wetwet Wetw; Shoukat, Hassan; Muhammad, Yar; Gondal, Khalid Masood; Aslam, Imran

    2016-11-01

    To predict the mortality by the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV score of all the patients admitted in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and comparing the score of the survivors and non-survivors. Descriptive study. Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from June 2013 to November 2014. All adult patients admitted in the Surgical ICU were included in this study. The demographics and other data of the patients were recorded. The APACHE IV scores of all patients were calculated at the time of admission. The scores of the survivors and the non-survivors were compared for prediction of survival and mortality. The age of these patients ranged from 13 to 70 (mean 38.39) years with 86 (55.48%) males and 69 (44.52%) females. The mean APACHE IV score of these patients was 34.96 ±14.93 ranging from 11 to 63 years. Eighty-three (53.55%) patients survived and 72 (46.45%) died. With respect to gender, 41 (47.67%) males out of 86 and 31 (44.92%) females out of 69 did not survive. The mortality increased with an increase in APACHE IV score and all the patients with score more than 39 did not survive. The predicted mortality can be assessed by APACHE IV score, so it is good for application among the surgical ICU patients.

  6. Review Of Ecotoxicological Studies Of The Marine And Estuarine Environments Of The Baixada Santista (São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduinetty Ceci Pereira Moreira de Sousa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify, through ecotoxicological assays, the most critical areas in the Baixada Santista area by compiling scientific papers and technical reports of the state environmental agency. Sediment samples were assessed employing Tiburonella viscana, Leptocheirus plumulosus, Nitokra sp., and embryos of Lytechinus variegatus and Perna perna. Water column samples were assessed by using Vibrio fischeri and Lytechinus variegatus. A total of 217 samples were compiled. It was found that the frequency of acute toxicity was higher in integral sediment samples from the Santos Channel (70.68% and the lowest frequency was obtained for Bertioga beach samples (15%. Sediment from the Santos and São Vicente Channels, Santos Bay and the area for the disposal of dredged material are the places most affected, whereas the beaches of Guarujá and Bertioga presented low levels of toxicity. No ecotoxicological studies were found in Mongaguá, Itanhaém or Peruíbe cities.

  7. Evaluation of a bioassays battery for ecotoxicological screening of marine sediments from Ionian Sea (Mediterranea Sea, Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Ermelinda; Parlapiano, Isabella; Biandolino, Francesca

    2012-09-01

    Sediments are an ecologically important component of the aquatic environment and may play a key role in mediating the exchange of contaminants between particulate, dissolved, and biological phases. For a comprehensive assessment of potential sediment toxicity, the use of a single species may not detect toxicant with a specific mode of action. Therefore it is advisable to carry out ecotoxicological tests on a base-set of taxa utilizing test species belonging to different trophic levels. This paper describes the ecotoxicological evaluation of marine sediments from seven sites of Mar Piccolo estuary (Southern, Italy), four of them were located in the first inlet and three in the second inlet of Mar Piccolo estuary. Sediment samples from a site in Taranto Gulf were used as control sediment. Dunaliella tertiolecta, Tigriopus fulvus, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Corophium insidiosum, were employed to identify the quality of sediments. The integration of biological tests results showed that all sampling sites located in the first inlet of Mar Piccolo were identified as toxic, according to all tests, while the sites of second inlet were found not toxic. The results obtained in this study indicate that the use of a battery of biological tests have important implications for risk assessment in estuarine e coastal waters.

  8. Effect-Based Tools for Monitoring and Predicting the Ecotoxicological Effects of Chemicals in the Aquatic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Richard E.; Geist, Juergen; Werner, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Ecotoxicology faces the challenge of assessing and predicting the effects of an increasing number of chemical stressors on aquatic species and ecosystems. Herein we review currently applied tools in ecological risk assessment, combining information on exposure with expected biological effects or environmental water quality standards; currently applied effect-based tools are presented based on whether exposure occurs in a controlled laboratory environment or in the field. With increasing ecological relevance the reproducibility, specificity and thus suitability for standardisation of methods tends to diminish. We discuss the use of biomarkers in ecotoxicology including ecotoxicogenomics-based endpoints, which are becoming increasingly important for the detection of sublethal effects. Carefully selected sets of biomarkers allow an assessment of exposure to and effects of toxic chemicals, as well as the health status of organisms and, when combined with chemical analysis, identification of toxicant(s). The promising concept of “adverse outcome pathways (AOP)” links mechanistic responses on the cellular level with whole organism, population, community and potentially ecosystem effects and services. For most toxic mechanisms, however, practical application of AOPs will require more information and the identification of key links between responses, as well as key indicators, at different levels of biological organization, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services. PMID:23112741

  9. Overview on the European green crab Carcinus spp. (Portunidae, Decapoda), one of the most famous marine invaders and ecotoxicological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leignel, V; Stillman, J H; Baringou, S; Thabet, R; Metais, I

    2014-01-01

    Green crabs (Carcinus, Portunidae) include two species native to Europe--Carcinus aestuarii (Mediterranean species) and Carcinus maenas (Atlantic species). These small shore crabs (maximal length carapace, approximately 10 cm) show rapid growth, high fecundity, and long planktonic larval stages that facilitate broad dispersion. Carcinus spp. have a high tolerance to fluctuations of environmental factors including oxygen, salinity, temperature, xenobiotic compounds, and others. Shipping of Carcinus spp. over the past centuries has resulted in its invasions of America, Asia, and Australia. Classified as one of the world's 100 worst invaders by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, Carcinus spp. are the most widely distributed intertidal crabs in the world. Their voracious predatory activity makes them strong interactors in local communities, and they are recognized as a model for invasiveness in marine systems as well as a sentinel species in ecotoxicology. This review shows an exhaustive analysis of the literature on the life cycle, diversity, physiological tolerance, genomic investigations, ecotoxicological use, historical invasion, control programs, and putative economical valorization of shore crabs.

  10. Preliminary assays for lemongrass essential oil ecotoxicological test in D. similis and C. silvestrii submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimiliani, Giovana T.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose R., E-mail: gtgimiliani@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Culturas Celulares

    2011-07-01

    Pharmaceutical products are of great interest in ecotoxicological studies due to being found some of these products in the superficial waters and sediments, water and sewage treatment effluents. It was verified an increase of insect repellent chemical products in the aquatic environment because of the increase of diseases transmitted by mosquitoes like dengue. As these compounds show toxicity, the use of essential oils natural products with repellent properties is increasing and the literature about the impact in the aquatic environment is scarce. The hydric frame would suffer natural radiation and radiations from energy generation nuclear plants impacts fall out of tests and nuclear accidents. There is no universal definition of environmental protection and there are few studies on radiation effects in the aquatic environment. In this study was determined the lemon grass essential oil toxicity level as well as the lethal dose of ionizing radiation, LD{sub 50}, in aquatic organisms. Cytotoxicity test was performed by in vitro neutral red uptake method in NCTC clone L929 cell line. In the LD{sub 50} test aquatic organisms were submitted to gamma radiation. The essential oil of lemongrass Cymbopogon flexuosus showed cytotoxicity index IC{sub 50} about 50{mu}g.mL{sup -1}. The LD{sub 50} for Daphnia similis was 242 Gy and Ceriodaphnia silvestrii about 525 Gy. Studies will be continued with acute and chronic ecotoxicological tests of lemongrass essential oil in natural organisms and in organisms submitted to gamma radiation, utilizing the results obtained in this work. (author)

  11. Snails under stress. Gastropods as models in ecophysiology and ecotoxicology; Schnecken unter Stress. Gastropoden als Modelle in Oekophysiologie und Oekotoxikologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triebskorn, Rita [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Oekotoxikologie und Oekophysiologie, Rottenburg (Germany); Physiologische Oekologie der Tiere, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Background: In ecophysiology and ecotoxicology, gastropods are important both as target organisms for molluscicides and non-target organisms for environmental pollutants or other environmental stressors. With respect to both aspects, biomarkers are investigated at different levels of biological organization in order to understand mechanisms which enable gastropods to cope with or even to benefit from unfavourable environmental conditions. Main topics: The paper focuses on the ecotoxicological and ecophysiological work of the author on gastropods which will be reviewed in the context of the state of knowledge in this field of research. In addition to cellular aspects in biomarker research, also biochemical responses of snails to environmental stress (stress proteins, metallothioneins, and metabolic enzymes) will be addressed. Conclusions: The paper highlights the suitability of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods as sensitive indicators of environmental stress induced by chemicals or other non-chemical factors. Biomarker studies have been shown not only to be applicable in environmental risk assessment but also to provide fundamental and background knowledge necessary to understand correlations of responses at different levels of biological organization. Recommendations and perspectives: A standardized toxicity test with the grapevine snail (ISO 15952) has been established for toxicity assessment in terrestrial habitats. However, freshwater gastropods display a high sensitivity as well, e.g. to endocrine disrupters, and should be incorporated into future standardized assays for aquatic toxicity testing on the basis of existing knowledge. (orig.)

  12. Chemical and ecotoxicological assessments of water samples before and after being processed by a Water Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Teresa Rosim Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical and ecotoxicological measurements were employed to appraise the water quality of the Corumbataí River raw water (RW intake, and that of its filtered (FW and treated (TW waters, processed by the Water Treatment Plant (WTP of Piracicaba (SP, Brazil during 2010. Some herbicides: ametrine, atrazine, simazine and tebuthiuron, were measured, with levels ranging from 0.01 to 10.3 µg L-1 . These were lower than those required to produce ecotoxicological effects to aquatic life based on published literature. Similarly, trihalomethanes, such as chloroform and bromodichloromethane produced as a result of the WTP process were also shown to be present in concentrations that would neither harm environmental nor human health. Elevated free chlorine concentrations found in FW and TW were credibly responsible for toxicity effects observed in algae and daphnids. (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna. In contrast, results of toxicity testing conducted with Hydra attenuata suggested that this organism is resistant to free chorine and could be used for drinking water evaluations. Coupling bioassays with chemical analyses proved valuable to uncover putative cause-effect relationships existing between physical, chemical and toxic results, as well as in optimizing data interpretation of water quality.

  13. Use of retrospective data to assess ecotoxicological monitoring needs for terrestrial vertebrates residing in Atlantic coast estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J.B.; Rattner, B.A.; Golden, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    The 'Contaminant Exposure and Effects--Terrestrial Vertebrates' (CEE-TV) database contains 4,336 records of ecotoxicological information for free-ranging amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals residing in Atlantic and Florida Gulf coast estuaries and their drainages. To identify spatial data gaps, those CEE-TV records for which the specific study location were known (n=2,740) were combined with watershed and wildlife management unit boundaries using Geographic Information Systems software. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Index of Watershed Indicators (IWI), which classifies watersheds based on water quality and their vulnerability to pollution, was used to prioritize these data gaps. Of 136 watersheds in the study area, 15 that are classified by the IWI as having water quality problems or high vulnerability to pollution lacked terrestrial vertebrate ecotoxicological monitoring or research in the past decade. Older studies within some of these watersheds documented high levels of contaminants in wildlife tissues. Of 90 National Wildlife Refuge units, 42 without current data fall within watersheds of concern. Of 40 National Park units larger than 1 km2, 17 without current data fall within watersheds of concern. Issues encountered in this analysis highlighted the need for spatially and temporally replicated field monitoring programs that utilize random sampling. Without data from such studies, it will be difficult to perform unbiased assessments of regional trends in contaminant exposure and effects in terrestrial vertebrates.

  14. A model compound study: The ecotoxicological evaluation of five organic contaminants employing a battery of marine bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macken, Ailbhe [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Focas Institute, DIT, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: ailbhe.macken@dit.ie; Giltrap, Michelle [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Focas Institute, DIT, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Marine Institute, Rinville, Oranmore, Co. Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: michelle.giltrap@marine.ie; Foley, Barry [School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, DIT, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: barry.foley@dit.ie; McGovern, Evin [Marine Institute, Rinville, Oranmore, Co. Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: evin.mcgovern@marine.ie; McHugh, Brendan [Marine Institute, Rinville, Oranmore, Co. Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: brendan.mchugh@marine.ie; Davoren, Maria [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Focas Institute, DIT, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: maria.davoren@dit.ie

    2008-06-15

    This paper describes the ecotoxicological evaluation of five organic contaminants frequently detected in marine sediments (tributyltin, triphenyltin, benzo[a]pyrene, fluoranthene, and PCB 153) using three marine species (Vibrio fischeri, Tetraselmis suecica, and Tisbe battagliai). The sensitivity of each species varied for all compounds. The triorganotins were consistently the most toxic to all species. The applicability of each test system to assess the acute toxicity of environmental contaminants and their use in Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) is discussed. Suitability of the Microtox and T. battagliai tests for employment in TIE studies were further assessed through spiking experiments with tributyltin. Results demonstrated that the most effective treatment to remove organotin toxicity from the sample was the C{sub 18} resin. The results of this study have important implications for risk assessment in estuarine and coastal waters in Ireland, where, at present the monitoring of sediment and water quality is predominantly reliant on chemical analysis alone. - Ecotoxicological evaluation of five organic marine sediment contaminants was conducted and the suitability of the test species for marine porewater TIE discussed.

  15. Towards a more representative in vitro method for fish ecotoxicology: morphological and biochemical characterisation of three-dimensional spheroidal hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Matthew G; Purcell, Wendy M; Jackson, Simon K; Owen, Stewart F; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2012-11-01

    The use of fish primary cells and cell lines offer an in vitro alternative for assessment of chemical toxicity and the evaluation of environmental samples in ecotoxicology. However, their uses are not without limitations such as short culture periods and loss of functionality, particularly with primary tissue. While three-dimensional (spheroid) technology is now established for in vitro mammalian toxicity studies, to date it has not been considered for environmental applications in a model aquatic species. In this study we report development of a reproducible six-well plate, gyratory-mediated method for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocyte spheroid culture and compare their functional and biochemical status with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer hepatocytes. Primary liver spheroid formation was divided into two stages, immature (1-5 days) and mature (≥6 days) according to size, shape and changes in functional and biochemical parameters (protein, glucose, albumin and lactate dehydrogenase). Mature spheroids retained the morphological characteristics (smooth outer surface, tight cell-cell contacts) previously described for mammalian spheroids as demonstrated by light and scanning electron microscopy. Glucose production and albumin synthesis were significantly higher in mature spheroids when compared to conventional 2D monolayer cultures (P ecotoxicological studies.

  16. Standardizing acute toxicity data for use in ecotoxicology models: influence of test type, life stage, and concentration reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Sandy; Vivian, Deborah N; Barron, Mace G

    2009-10-01

    Ecotoxicological models generally have large data requirements and are frequently based on existing information from diverse sources. Standardizing data for toxicological models may be necessary to reduce extraneous variation and to ensure models reflect intrinsic relationships. However, the extent to which data standardization is necessary remains unclear, particularly when data transformations are used in model development. An extensive acute toxicity database was compiled for aquatic species to comprehensively assess the variation associated with acute toxicity test type (e.g., flow-through, static), reporting concentrations as nominal or measured, and organism life stage. Three approaches were used to assess the influence of these factors on log-transformed acute toxicity: toxicity ratios, log-linear models of factor groups, and comparison of interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) models developed using either standardized test types or reported concentration type. In general, median ratios were generally less than 2.0, the slopes of log-linear models were approximately one for well-represented comparisons, and ICE models developed using data from standardized test types or reported concentrations did not differ substantially. These results indicate that standardizing test data by acute test type, reported concentration type, or life stage may not be critical for developing ecotoxicological models using large datasets of log-transformed values.

  17. Quantitative genetics approaches to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology; a perspective from research on the evolution of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerks, Paul L; Xie, Lingtian; Levinton, Jeffrey S

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative genetic approaches are often used to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology. This paper focuses on the evolution of resistance to environmental contaminants-an important evolutionary process in ecotoxicology. Three approaches are commonly employed to study the evolution of resistance: (1) Assessing whether a contaminant-exposed population has an increased resistance relative to a control population, using either spatial or temporal comparisons. (2) Estimating a population's heritability of resistance. (3) Investigating responses in a laboratory selection experiment. All three approaches provide valuable information on the potential for contaminants to affect a population's evolutionary trajectory via natural selection. However, all three approaches have inherent limitations, including difficulty in separating the various genetic and environmental variance components, responses being dependent on specific population and testing conditions, and inability to fully capture natural conditions in the laboratory. In order to maximize insights into the long-term consequences of adaptation, it is important to not just look at resistance itself, but also at the fitness consequences and at correlated responses in characteristics other than resistance. The rapid development of molecular genetics has yielded alternatives to the "black box" approach of quantitative genetics, but the presence of different limitations and strengths in the two fields means that they should be viewed as complementary rather than exchangeable. Quantitative genetics is benefiting from the incorporation of molecular tools and remains an important field for studying evolutionary toxicology. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  18. Ecotoxicological test batteries: results of a ring test promoted by DBU; Oekotoxikologische Testbatterien: Ergebnisse eines DBU-gefoerderten Ringtests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hund-Rinke, K.; Koerdel, W. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Angewandte Oekologie (IME), Schmallenberg (Germany); Heiden, S.; Erb, R. (eds.)

    2002-07-01

    The goal of the present integrated project was to provide an innovative and integrative instrumentarium for assessing the quality of soils and soil substrates (contaminated and decontaminated soils). In addition to physicochemical methods this instrumentarium was also to make use of ecotoxicological tests, in pursuit of the dual goal of protecting human health and ecological soil functions. An essential prerequisite for this was the provision of a validated test battery for assessing soils and soil substrates. For this purpose ecotoxicological tests on soil eluates as well as terrestial tests were validated by means of ring tests. This was necessary because before this they were only standardised with respect to the effects of specific chemicals, not for use with soils and soil substrates. [German] Ziel des Verbundvorhabens ist die Bereitstellung eines integrativen innovativen Instrumentariums zur Bewertung der Qualitaet von Boeden und Bodensubstraten (belastete und gereinigte Boeden), das sich neben den chemisch-physikalischen Methoden auch auf oekotoxikologische Tests stuetzt, um neben dem Schutz der menschlichen Gesundheit auch das Ziel des Schutzes der oekologischen Bodenfunktionen realisieren zu koennen. Dazu bildet die Bereitstellung einer validierten ''Testbatterie'' zur Beurteilung von Boeden/Bodensubstraten die Voraussetzung. Daher werden oekotoxikologische Tests mit Bodeneluaten sowie terrestrische Tests, die zwar fuer die Erfassung von Wirkungen durch Chemikalien als Norm vorliegen, jedoch fuer die Testung von Boeden und Bodensubstraten noch validiert werden muessen, Ringtests unterworfen. (orig.)

  19. Effect-Based Tools for Monitoring and Predicting the Ecotoxicological Effects of Chemicals in the Aquatic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Connon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecotoxicology faces the challenge of assessing and predicting the effects of an increasing number of chemical stressors on aquatic species and ecosystems. Herein we review currently applied tools in ecological risk assessment, combining information on exposure with expected biological effects or environmental water quality standards; currently applied effect-based tools are presented based on whether exposure occurs in a controlled laboratory environment or in the field. With increasing ecological relevance the reproducibility, specificity and thus suitability for standardisation of methods tends to diminish. We discuss the use of biomarkers in ecotoxicology including ecotoxicogenomics-based endpoints, which are becoming increasingly important for the detection of sublethal effects. Carefully selected sets of biomarkers allow an assessment of exposure to and effects of toxic chemicals, as well as the health status of organisms and, when combined with chemical analysis, identification of toxicant(s. The promising concept of “adverse outcome pathways (AOP” links mechanistic responses on the cellular level with whole organism, population, community and potentially ecosystem effects and services. For most toxic mechanisms, however, practical application of AOPs will require more information and the identification of key links between responses, as well as key indicators, at different levels of biological organization, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services.

  20. Effect-based tools for monitoring and predicting the ecotoxicological effects of chemicals in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Richard E; Geist, Juergen; Werner, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Ecotoxicology faces the challenge of assessing and predicting the effects of an increasing number of chemical stressors on aquatic species and ecosystems. Herein we review currently applied tools in ecological risk assessment, combining information on exposure with expected biological effects or environmental water quality standards; currently applied effect-based tools are presented based on whether exposure occurs in a controlled laboratory environment or in the field. With increasing ecological relevance the reproducibility, specificity and thus suitability for standardisation of methods tends to diminish. We discuss the use of biomarkers in ecotoxicology including ecotoxicogenomics-based endpoints, which are becoming increasingly important for the detection of sublethal effects. Carefully selected sets of biomarkers allow an assessment of exposure to and effects of toxic chemicals, as well as the health status of organisms and, when combined with chemical analysis, identification of toxicant(s). The promising concept of "adverse outcome pathways (AOP)" links mechanistic responses on the cellular level with whole organism, population, community and potentially ecosystem effects and services. For most toxic mechanisms, however, practical application of AOPs will require more information and the identification of key links between responses, as well as key indicators, at different levels of biological organization, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services.

  1. DNA repair activity in fish and interest in ecotoxicology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzler, Aude; Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain

    2013-06-15

    The knowledge of DNA repair in a target species is of first importance as it is the primary line of defense against genotoxicants, and a better knowledge of DNA repair capacity in fish could help to interpret genotoxicity data and/or assist in the choice of target species, developmental stage and tissues to focus on, both for environmental biomonitoring studies and DNA repair testing. This review focuses in a first part on what is presently known on a mechanistic basis, about the various DNA repair systems in fish, in vivo and in established cell lines. Data on base excision repair (BER), direct reversal with O⁶-alkylguanine transferase and double strand breaks repair, although rather scarce, are being reviewed, as well as nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photoreactivation repair (PER), which are by far the most studied repair mechanisms in fish. Most of these repair mechanisms seem to be strongly species and tissue dependent; they also depend on the developmental stage of the organisms. BER is efficient in vivo, although no data has been found on in vitro models. NER activity is quite low or even inexistent depending on the studies; however this lack is partly compensated by a strong PER activity, especially in early developmental stage. In a second part, a survey of the ecotoxicological studies integrating DNA repair as a parameter responding to single or mixture of contaminant is realized. Three main approaches are being used: the measurement of DNA repair gene expression after exposure, although it has not yet been clearly established whether gene expression is indicative of repair capacity; the monitoring of DNA damage removal by following DNA repair kinetics; and the modulation of DNA repair activity following exposure in situ, in order to assess the impact of exposure history on DNA repair capacity. Since all DNA repair processes are possible targets for environmental pollutants, we can also wonder at which extent such a modulation of repair capacities

  2. Ecotoxicological sediment survey of large German rivers; Oekotoxikologische Sedimentkartierung der grossen Fluesse Deutschlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duft, M.; Tillmann, M. [Internationales Hochschulinstitut Zittau (Germany); Oehlmann, J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Zoologisches Inst., Abt. Oekologie und Evolution

    2003-05-01

    In this project, a nation-wide, ecotoxicologically-based sediment survey was carried out. For this purpose, a total of about 200 sediment samples from 12 selected large German rivers (Danube, Elbe, Ems, Main, Mosel, Neckar, Neisse, Odra, Rhine, Ruhr, Saar and Weser) were analysed with regard to abiotic parameters (heavy metals, PAH, organic carbon content, particle size) and also by means of two biological test systems with benthic invertebrates (nematode test with the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans and chironomid test with the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius). Subsequently, this comprehensive data set was analysed statistically. By means of an iterative method, a five-stage, statistically-derived assessment concept which is founded on the results of the biological tests, was developed following the EU water framework directive. In general, the classification with the nematode test turned out to be the more sensitive method. A principal component analysis and correlations showed that the parameters of both biotests provide different information which suggests a combined use of both tests. Correlations also indicate a connection of biotest results and abiotic parameters (organic carbon content, particle size and heavy metal contamination). (orig.) [German] Im Projekt wurde eine bundesweite oekotoxikologische Sedimentkartierung grosser Fliessgewaesser durchgefuehrt. Dazu wurden insgesamt etwa 200 Sedimentproben aus 12 ausgewaehlten grossen Fluessen Deutschlands (Donau, Elbe, Ems, Main, Mosel, Neckar, Neisse, Oder, Rhein, Ruhr, Saar und Weser) auf ihre abiotischen Parameter (Schwermetalle, PAK, organischer Kohlenstoffgehalt, Korngroesse) hin analysiert sowie mit zwei biologischen Testverfahren mit benthischen Invertebraten (Nematodentest mit dem Fadenwurm Caenorhabditis elegans und Chironomidentest mit der Zuckmuecke Chironomus riparius) untersucht. Dieses umfangreiche Datenmaterial wurde anschliessend statistisch ausgewertet und mit Hilfe eines iterativen

  3. New approach to weight-of-evidence assessment of ecotoxicological effects in regulatory decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A Tilghman; Belanger, Scott E; Guiney, Pat D; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; Maack, Gerd; Stubblefield, William; Martin, Olwenn

    2017-07-01

    Ecological risk assessments and risk management decisions are only as sound as the underlying information and processes to integrate them. It is important to develop transparent and reproducible procedures a priori to integrate often-heterogeneous evidence. Current weight-of-evidence (WoE) approaches for effects or hazard assessment tend to conflate aspects of the assessment of the quality of the data with the strength of the body of evidence as a whole. We take forward recent developments in the critical appraisal of the reliability and relevance of individual ecotoxicological studies as part of the effect or hazard assessment of prospective risk assessments and propose a streamlined WoE approach. The aim is to avoid overlap and double accounting of criteria used in reliability and relevance with that used in current WoE methods. The protection goals, problem formulation, and evaluation process need to be clarified at the outset. The data are first integrated according to lines of evidence (LoEs), typically mechanistic insights (e.g., cellular, subcellular, genomic), in vivo experiments, and higher-tiered field or observational studies. Data are then plotted on the basis of both relevance and reliability scores or categories. This graphical approach provides a means to visually assess and communicate the credibility (reliability and relevance of available individual studies), quantity, diversity, and consistency of the evidence. In addition, the external coherence of the body of evidence needs to be considered. The final step in the process is to derive an expression of the confidence in the conclusions of integrating the information considering these 5 aspects in the context of remaining uncertainties. We suggest that this streamlined approach to WoE for the effects or hazard characterization should facilitate reproducible and transparent assessments of data across different regulatory requirements. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:573-579. © 2017 The Authors

  4. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS IV does not affect intelligence. The life expectancy of individuals with MPS IV ... GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B patients: possible common origin for the prevalent p.R59H mutation among gypsies. ...

  5. The use of enclosed plankton communities in aquatic ecotoxicology : fate effects of mercury, cadmium and selected aromatic organics in a marine model ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, J.

    1982-01-01

    Most investigations in ecotoxicology are carried out in the laboratory. Although laboratory experiments are indispensable and yield useful information, it is difficult if not impossible to extrapolate results of short-term laboratory tests currently in use to real field situations. The

  6. Use of digestate from a decentralized on-farm biogas plant as fertilizer in soils: An ecotoxicological study for future indicators in risk and life cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivato, Alberto; Vanin, Stefano; Raga, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    was assessed by a battery of ecotoxicological tests considering the potential pollutants present in the digestate as a whole by using the ‘‘matrixbased” approach (also known as ‘‘whole effluent toxicity” for eluates or waste water effluents). The directand indirect tests included plant bioassays with Lepidium...

  7. Impact of soil properties on critical concentrations of cadmium, lead, copper, zinc and mercury in soil and soil solution in view of ecotoxicological effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Lofts, S.; Tipping, E.; Meili, M.; Groenenberg, J.E.; Schutze, G.

    2007-01-01

    Concern about the input of metals to terrestrial ecosystems is related to (i) the ecotoxicological impact on soil organisms and plants (Bringmark et al. 1998; Palmborg et al. 1998) and also on aquatic organisms resulting from runoff to surface water and (ii) the uptake via food chains into animal

  8. Simultaneous determination of metal traces using SPE preconcentration on Amberlite XAD-7 by ICP-MS in environmental water and sample ecotoxicology assessment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubova, Z.; Sommer, L.; Moos, Martin; Kuta, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, 10A (2012), s. 3127-3135 ISSN 1018-4619 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Solid Phase Extraction * Amberlite XAD-7 * ICP-MS and Waters * Ecotoxicology Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.641, year: 2012

  9. Transformation of benzoxazinones and derivatives and microbial activity in the test environment of soil ecotoxicological tests on Poecilus cupreus and Folsomia candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomsgaard, Inge S; Mortensen, Anne G; Idinger, Jacqueline; Coja, Tamara; Blümel, Sylvia

    2006-02-22

    Benzoxazinones, such as 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA) and 2,4-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIBOA), and benzoxazolinones, such as 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (MBOA) and 2-benzoxazolinone (BOA), are biologically active secondary metabolites found in cereals. Because these compounds could be exploited as part of a strategy for reducing the use of synthetic pesticides, ecotoxicological tests were performed recently. In this paper, the transformation of the compounds in the test environment of the ecotoxicological tests was studied. DIMBOA was degraded and partly transformed to MBOA during the period of ecotoxicological testing of the compounds. During testing of MBOA on Poecilus cupreus test media the analysis showed that at the initial concentrations of 2 and 10 mg kg(-1) no MBOA was left after 45 days of testing, but the metabolite 2-amino-phenoxazin-3-one (AMPO) was formed. During testing of BOA on both Folsomia candida and Poecilus cupreus the more biologically active compound 2-amino-phenoxazin-3-one (APO) was formed. Thus, the ecotoxicological test results on MBOA and BOA were partly due to the microbial transformation of the compounds during the time of testing.

  10. 21 CFR 1308.14 - Schedule IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule IV. 1308.14 Section 1308.14 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Schedules § 1308.14 Schedule IV. (a) Schedule IV shall consist of the drugs and other substances, by...

  11. The Titan IV launch vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Arthur C.; O'Neill, Stephen T.

    1989-09-01

    Titan launch vehicles have been contributing to the national space accomplishments for more than 20 years. As the U.S. space program has grown, the Titan family has expanded to meet the changing requirements. The dependability and versatility of Titan vehicles have been demonstrated by their selection for various missions, including strategic intercontinental ballistic missile weapon systems, manned Gemini space flights, NASA interplanetary missions, and critical national security programs. This article summarizes the Titan legacy and is an overview of the newest Titan family member - the Titan IV.

  12. Retrospective ecotoxicological data and current information needs for terrestrial vertebrates residing in coastal habitat of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Eisenreich, K.M.; Golden, N.H.; McKernan, M.A.; Hothem, R.L.; Custer, T.W.

    2005-01-01

    The Contaminant Exposure and Effects—Terrestrial Vertebrates (CEE-TV) database was developed to conduct simple searches for ecotoxicological information, examine exposure trends, and identify significant data gaps. The CEE-TV database contains 16,696 data records on free-ranging amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals residing in estuarine and coastal habitats of the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts, Alaska, Hawaii, and the Great Lakes. Information in the database was derived from over 1800 source documents, representing 483 unique species (about 252,000 individuals), with sample collection dates spanning from 1884 to 2003. The majority of the records contain exposure data (generally contaminant concentrations) on a limited number (n = 209) of chlorinated and brominated compounds, cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, economic poisons, metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons, whereas only 9.3% of the records contain biomarker or bioindicator effects data. Temporal examination of exposure data provides evidence of declining concentrations of certain organochlorine pesticides in some avian species (e.g., ospreys, Pandion haliaetus), and an apparent increase in the detection and possibly the incidence of avian die-offs related to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides. To identify spatial data gaps, 11,360 database records with specific sampling locations were combined with the boundaries of coastal watersheds, and National Wildlife Refuge and National Park units. Terrestrial vertebrate ecotoxicological data were lacking in 41.9% of 464 coastal watersheds in the continental United States. Recent (1990–2003) terrestrial vertebrate contaminant exposure or effects data were available for only about half of the National Wildlife Refuge and National Park units in the geographic area encompassed by the database. When these data gaps were overlaid on watersheds exhibiting serious water quality problems and/or high vulnerability to pollution, 72 coastal watersheds, and

  13. Cloning, expression, and activity of type IV antifreeze protein from cultured subtropical olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Kyu Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antifreeze proteins (AFPs lower the freezing point but not the melting point of aqueous solutions by inhibiting the growth of ice crystals via an adsorption-inhibition mechanism. However, the function of type IV AFP (AFP IV is questionable, as its antifreeze activity is on the verge of detectable limits, its physiological concentration in adult fish blood is too low to function as a biological antifreeze, and its homologues are present even in fish from tropic oceans as well as freshwater. Therefore, we speculated that AFP IV may have gained antifreeze activity not by selective pressure but by chance. To test this hypothesis, we cloned, expressed, and assayed AFP IV from cultured subtropical olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus, which do not require antifreeze protein for survival. Among the identified expressed sequence tags of the flounder liver sample, a 5′-deleted complementary DNA (cDNA sequence similar to the afp4 gene of the longhorn sculpin was identified, and its full-length cDNA and genome structure were examined. The deduced amino acid sequence of flounder AFP IV shared 55, 53, 52, and 49 % identity with those of Pleuragramma antarcticum, Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus, Myoxocephalus scorpius, and Notothenia coriiceps, respectively. Furthermore, the genomic structure of this gene was conserved with those of other known AFP IVs. Notably, the recombinant AFP IV showed a weak but distinct thermal hysteresis of 0.07 ± 0.01 °C at the concentration of 0.5 mg/mL, and ice crystals in an AFP IV solution grew star-shaped, which are very similar to those obtained from other polar AFP IVs. Taken together, our results do not support the hypothesis of evolution of AFP IV by selective pressure, suggesting that the antifreeze activity of AFP IV may have been gained by chance.

  14. Ecotoxicological standard tests confirm beneficial effects of nitrate capture in organically coated grapewood biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Andreas; Kammann, Claudia; Löhnertz, Otmar

    2017-04-01

    Due to the rising use of mineral N fertilizers and legume use in agriculture, the input of reactive N into the global N cycle has dramatically increased. Therefore new agricultural techniques that increase N use efficiency and reduce the loss of soil mineral N to surface and ground waters are urgently required. Pyrogenic carbon (biochar) produced from biomass may be used as a beneficial soil amendment to sequester carbon (C) in soils, increase soil fertility in the long term, and reduce environmental pollution such as nitrate leaching or N2O emissions. However, reduced nitrate leaching is not a constant finding when using biochar as a soil amendment and the mechanisms are poorly understood. To investigate if biochar is able to reduce nitrate pollution and its subsequent effects on soil and aquatic fauna, we conducted a series of experiments using standard ecotoxicological test methods: (1) the collembolan reproduction test (ISO 11267 (1999)), (2) the earthworm reproduction test (ISO 11268-2 (1998)), (3) the aquatic Daphnia acute test (ISO 6341 (1996)) and (4) a seedling emergence and growth test (ISO 11269-2 (2006)) also involving leaching events. For the tests grapewood biochar produced with a Kon-Tiki kiln (600-700°C) was used which had previously demonstrated nitrate capture; terrestrial tests were carried out with loamy sand standard soil 2.2 (LUFA-Speyer, Germany). The tests included the factors: (A) nitrate addition (using critical values for the test organisms) or no nitrate addition, (B) control (no biochar), pure biochar and organically-coated biochar. In the aquatic test (3), a nitrate amount which caused 50% of the Daphnia-immobilizing toxic nitrate concentration in leachates was applied to the soil or soil-biochar mixtures. Subsequently, soils were incubated overnight and leached on the next day, producing (in the control) the calculated nitrate concentrations. Daphnids were incubated for 48 hours. Test results without nitrate confirmed that soil

  15. Survival and low grade glioma: the emergence of genetic information

    OpenAIRE

    Claus, Elizabeth B.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Wiencke, John; Molinaro, Annette M.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Berger, Mitchel; Jenkins, Robert; Wrensch, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Significant gaps exist in our understanding of the causes and clinical management of glioma. One of the biggest gaps is how best to manage low grade (World Health Organization (WHO) grade II) glioma patients. Low grade glioma is a uniformly fatal disease of young adults (mean age 41 years) with survival averaging approximately 7 years. Although low grade glioma patients have better survival than patients with high grade (WHO grade III/IV) glioma, all low grade gliomas eventually progress to h...

  16. An ecotoxicological approach to evaluate the effects of tourism impacts in the Marine Protected Area of La Maddalena (Sardinia, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschino, V; Schintu, M; Marrucci, A; Marras, B; Nesto, N; Da Ros, L

    2017-09-15

    In the Marine Protected Area of La Maddalena Archipelago, environmental protection rules and safeguard measures for nautical activities have helped in reducing anthropogenic pressure; however, tourism related activities remain particularly significant in summer. With the aim of evaluating their impacts, the biomarker approach using transplanted Mytilus galloprovincialis as sentinel organisms coupled with POCIS deployment was applied. Mussels, translocated to four marine areas differently impacted by tourism activities, were sampled before, during and after the tourist season. Moreover, endocrine disruptors in passive samplers POCIS and the cellular toxicity of whole POCIS extracts on mussel haemocytes were evaluated to integrate ecotoxicological information. Lysosomal biomarkers, condition index and mortality rate, as well as metals in tissues suggested an alteration of the health status of mussels transplanted to the most impacted sites. The cellular toxicity of POCIS extracts was pointed out, notwithstanding the concentrations of the examined compounds were always below the detection limits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel approach to ecotoxicological risk assessment of sediments cores around the shipwreck by the use of self-organizing maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowska, Justyna; Kudłak, Błażej; Tsakovski, Stefan; Wolska, Lidia; Simeonov, Vasil; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-06-01

    Marine and coastal pollution plays an increasingly important role due to recent severe accidents which drew attention to the consequences of oil spills causing widespread devastation of marine ecosystems. All these problems cannot be solved without conducting environmental studies in the area of possible oil spill and performing chemometric evaluation of the data obtained looking for similar patterns among pollutants and optimize environmental monitoring during eventual spills and possible remediation actions - what is the aim of the work presented. Following the chemical and ecotoxicological studies self-organising maps technique has been applied as a competitive learning algorithm based on unsupervised learning process. Summarizing it can be stated that biotests enable assessing the impact of complex chemical mixtures on the organisms inhabiting particular ecosystems. Short and simple application of biotests cannot easily explain the observable toxicity without more complex chemometric evaluation of datasets obtained describing dependence between xenobiotics and toxicological results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prognostic significance of the expression of MUC1 and collagen type IV in advanced gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, H; Aihara, R; Ohno, T; Ogata, K; Mochiki, E; Kuwano, H

    2009-08-01

    Scirrhous gastric carcinoma is characterized by excessive deposition of collagen in the stroma. However, the clinical significance of this fibrosis of the stomach has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to examine the fibrotic mechanism in several histological types of gastric carcinoma, and the combination of MUC1 and collagen type IV as a possible predictor of patient survival. One hundred and two paraffin-embedded specimens of gastric carcinoma were examined by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibodies against collagen type IV and MUC1. Collagen type IV-positive expression was significantly associated with depth of wall penetration (P = 0.025) and stage (P = 0.023). There was a significant relationship between MUC1-positive expression and interstitial collagen type IV-positive expression (P = 0.035). Survival was shorter for patients with the combination of MUC1-positive expression and interstitial collagen type IV-negative expression than for those with other expression patterns. In patients with differentiated-type advanced gastric carcinoma, the combination of MUC1-positive and interstitial collagen type IV-negative expression may be a marker of unfavourable prognosis. Copyright 2009 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. BACTERIAL COMMUNITY DYNAMICS AND ECOTOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT DURING BIOREMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED BY BIODIESEL AND DIESEL/BIODIESEL BLENDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, G I; Junior, C S; Oliva, T C; Subtil, D F; Matsushita, L Y; Chaves, A L; Lutterbach, M T; Sérvulo, E F; Agathos, S N; Stenuit, B

    2015-01-01

    The gradual introduction of biodiesel in the Brazilian energy landscape has primarily occurred through its blending with conventional petroleum diesel (e.g., B20 (20% biodiesel) and B5 (5% biodiesel) formulations). Because B20 and lower-level blends generally do not require engine modifications, their use as transportation fuel is increasing in the Brazilian distribution networks. However, the environmental fate of low-level biodiesel blends and pure biodiesel (B100) is poorly understood and the ecotoxicological-safety endpoints of biodiesel-contaminated environments are unknown. Using laboratory microcosms consisting of closed reactor columns filled with clay loam soil contaminated with pure biodiesel (EXPB100) and a low-level blend (EXPB5) (10% w/v), this study presents soil ecotoxicity assessement and dynamics of culturable heterotrophic bacteria. Most-probable-number (MPN) procedures for enumeration of bacteria, dehydrogenase assays and soil ecotoxicological tests using Eisenia fetida have been performed at different column depths over the course of incubation. After 60 days of incubation, the ecotoxicity of EXPB100-derived samples showed a decrease from 63% of mortality to 0% while EXPB5-derived samples exhibited a reduction from 100% to 53% and 90% on the top and at the bottom of the reactor column, respectively. The dehydrogenase activity of samples from EXPB100 and EXPB5 increased significantly compared to pristine soil after 60 days of incubation. Growth of aerobic bacterial biomass was only observed on the top of the reactor column while the anaerobic bacteria exhibited significant growth at different column depths in EXPB100 and EXPB5. These preliminary results suggest the involvement of soil indigenous microbiota in the biodegradation of biodiesel and blends. However, GC-FID analyses for quantification of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons and targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA tags using illumina platforms will provide important

  20. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Wehrli, Bernhard [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L{sup −1} molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L{sup −1}. From OPV, copper (14 μg L{sup −1}), zinc (87 μg L{sup −1}) and silver (78 μg L{sup −1}) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk. - Highlights: • Photovoltaics may be disposed in the environment after usage. • Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic (OPV) cells were compared. • Morphological and molecular effects were assessed in zebrafish embryos. • Environmental condition affected metal leaching and ecotoxicological activity. • Damaged CIGS cells pose higher risk to the environment than OPV cells.

  1. Standardization of a Patella spp. (Mollusca, Gastropoda) embryo-larval bioassay and advantages of its use in marine ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Sara; Fernández, Nuria; Ribeiro, Pedro A

    2016-05-01

    The use of three limpet species, Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, Patella depressa Pennant, 1777 and Patella ulyssiponensis Gmelin, 1791 as model organisms in marine ecotoxicology has been evaluated. Initial laboratory experiments were aimed to standardize a biological test with embryos and larvae of Patella spp, establishing the percentage of normal trochophore larvae as endpoint. Before conducting in vitro fertilization, oocytes must be maturated artificially by incubation in an alkaline solution; therefore, alkalinizing agent, pH and time of eggs alkalinization were evaluated. Moreover, time of sperm activation, optimum sperm and oocytes concentration during fertilization, gamete contact time, use of stirring during the fertilization, egg concentration and incubation temperature were examined. Minimum sample size per treatment was also estimated. Exposure of oocytes for 10min to FSW alkalinized with NH4OH at pH 9.0, the use of undiluted sperm pre-activated during 45min and a concentration of 200 oocytesmL(-1), a gamete-contact time of 180min and egg incubation at 18°C during 24h at a concentration of 80 eggsmL(-1) were the conditions allowing maximal embryo-larval development success. With an error of 0.05, a sampling size ≥320 allows a 95% confidence in the estimate. This Patella spp. acute bioassay fulfills a number of important a priori requirements to be used in ecotoxicological studies. Nevertheless, in vitro fertilization requires considerable handling, which may lead to failure in fecundation. Such difficulties are also addressed, in order to facilitate the routine use of this protocol by other laboratories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pollution Assessment of the Biobío River (Chile): Prioritization of Substances of Concern Under an Ecotoxicological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Álvaro; Figueroa, Ricardo; Castro-Díez, Pilar

    2017-05-01

    The water demand for human activities is rapidly increasing in developing countries. Under these circumstances, preserving aquatic ecosystems should be a priority which requires the development of quality criteria. In this study we perform a preliminary prioritization of the risky substances based on reported ecotoxicological studies and guidelines for the Biobío watershed (Central Chile). Our specific aims are (1) reviewing the scientific information on the aquatic pollution of this watershed, (2) determining the presence and concentration of potential toxic substances in water, sediment and effluents, (3) searching for quality criteria developed by other countries for the selected substances and (4) prioritizing the most risky substances by means of deterministic ecotoxicological risk assessment. We found that paper and mill industries were the main sources of point pollution, while forestry and agriculture were mostly responsible for non-point pollution. The most risky organic substances in the water column were pentachlorophenol and heptachlor, while the most relevant inorganic ones were aluminum, copper, unionized ammonia and mercury. The most risky organic and inorganic substances in the sediment were phenanthrene and mercury, respectively. Our review highlights that an important effort has been done to monitor pollution in the Biobío watershed. However there are emerging pollutants and banned compounds—especially in sediments—that require to be monitored. We suggest that site-specific water quality criteria and sediment quality criteria should be developed for the Biobío watershed, considering the toxicity of mixtures of chemicals to endemic species, and the high natural background level of aluminum in the Biobío.

  3. Novel approach for assessing heavy metal pollution and ecotoxicological status of rivers by means of passive sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Neus; Nadal, Martí; Sierra, Jordi; Ginebreda, Antoni; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2011-05-01

    In order to study the pollution of fluvial ecosystems, it is necessary to analyze not only the levels of chemical contaminants in water, but also those accumulated in the sediment matrix, as well as to assess its ecotoxicological status. Eleven Catalan (Spain) river sections (one sampling point per river) located near urban and industrial areas were sampled during winter of 2009. Water pollutants were collected by using passive samplers as Diffusive Gradient in Thin-Films (DGTs) and Semi-Permeable Membrane Devices (SPMDs). Point water samples were also collected. The concentrations of potentially toxic elements (PTE) in water, filtered water, DGTs and sediment samples were analyzed. Aqueous and organic solvent extracts of sediments samples and organic extracts of SPMDs were performed to assess acute toxicity to Vibrio fischeri by Microtox(®), and chronic toxicity to the green alga Pseudokirschneriella subcapitata. Microtox(®) test was also performed with DGT extracts. The results show that metals content of Catalan river waters are below the freshwater screening US EPA benchmarks, excepting some industrial areas (for Hg, Pb, and Zn). In contrast, sediments levels of some rivers were far above freshwater sediment screening US EPA benchmarks (for Zn, As, Cr, Pb, Ni, Hg, and Mn), particularly in the most industrialized areas. A good correlation was found between toxicity values of extracts (from sediments and DGTs) and PTE levels in sediments. The current results support the suitability of using combined point and passive sampling methods for assessing the chemical and ecotoxicological status of aqueous environments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Population-relevant endpoints in the evaluation of endocrine-active substances (EAS) for ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Mary S; Blankinship, Amy; Chambers, Janice; Constantine, Lisa; Kloas, Werner; Kumar, Anupama; Lagadic, Laurent; Meador, James; Pickford, Daniel; Schwarz, Tamar; Verslycke, Tim

    2017-03-01

    For ecotoxicological risk assessment, endocrine disruptors require the establishment of an endocrine mode of action (MoA) with a plausible link to a population-relevant adverse effect. Current ecotoxicity test methods incorporate mostly apical endpoints although some also include mechanistic endpoints, subcellular-through-organ level, which can help establish an endocrine MoA. However, the link between these endpoints and adverse population-level effects is often unclear. The case studies of endocrine-active substances (EAS) (tributyltin, ethinylestradiol, perchlorate, trenbolone, propiconazole, and vinclozolin) evaluated from the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Pellston Workshop ® "Ecotoxicological Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)" were used to evaluate the population relevance of toxicity endpoints in various taxa according to regulatory endocrine-disruptor frameworks such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Conceptual Framework for Testing and Assessment of Endocrine Disruptors. A wide variety of potentially endocrine-relevant endpoints were identified for mollusks, fish, amphibians, birds, and mammals, although the strength of the relationship between test endpoints and population-level effects was often uncertain. Furthermore, testing alone is insufficient for assessing potential adaptation and recovery processes in exposed populations. For this purpose, models that link effects observed in laboratory tests to the dynamics of wildlife populations appear to be necessary, and their development requires reliable and robust data. As our understanding of endocrine perturbations and key event relationships improves, adverse population-level effects will be more easily and accurately predicted. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:317-330. © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  5. From the sea to the laboratory: Characterization of microplastic as prerequisite for the assessment of ecotoxicological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Annegret; Oelschlägel, Kathrin; Schmitt-Jansen, Mechthild; Rummel, Christoph Daniel; Kühnel, Dana

    2017-05-01

    The presence of microplastic (MP) in the aquatic environment is recognized as a global-scale pollution issue. Secondary MP particles result from an ongoing fragmentation process governed by various biotic and abiotic factors. For a reliable risk assessment of these MP particles, knowledge about interactions with biota is needed. However, extensive testing with standard organisms under reproducible laboratory conditions with well-characterized MP suspensions is not available yet. As MP in the environment represents a mixture of particles differing in properties (e.g., size, color, polymer type, surface characteristics), it is likely that only specific particle fractions pose a threat towards organisms. In order to assign hazardous effects to specific particle properties, these characteristics need to be analyzed. As shown by the testing of particles (e.g. nanoparticles), characteristics other than chemical properties are important for the emergence of toxicity in organisms, and parameters such as surface area or size distribution need consideration. Therefore, the use of "well-defined" particles for ecotoxicological testing (i.e., standard particles) facilitates the establishment of causal links between physical-chemical properties of MP particles and toxic effects in organisms. However, the benefits of well-defined particles under laboratory conditions are offset by the disadvantage of the unknown comparability with MP in the environment. Therefore, weathering effects caused by biological, chemical, physical or mechanical processes have to be considered. To date, the characterization of the progression of MP weathering based on powder and suspension characterization methods is in its infancy. The aim of this commentary is to illustrate the prerequisites for testing MP in the laboratory from 3 perspectives: (i) knowledge of particle properties; (ii) behavior of MP in test setups involving ecotoxicological test organisms; and (iii) accordingly, test conditions that

  6. Toxicity of four veterinary pharmaceuticals on the survival and reproduction of Folsomia candida in tropical soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortéa, Talyta; Segat, Julia C; Maccari, Ana Paula; Sousa, José Paulo; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Baretta, Dilmar

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of veterinary pharmaceuticals (VPs) used to control endo- and ectoparasites in ruminants, on the survival and reproduction of the collembolan species Folsomia candida. Standard ecotoxicological tests were conducted in Tropical Artificial Soil and the treatments consisted of increasing dosages of four commercial products with different active ingredients: ivermectin, fipronil, fluazuron and closantel. Ecotoxicological effects were related to the class and mode of action of the different compounds. Fipronil and ivermectin were the most toxic compounds causing a significant reduction in the number of juveniles at the lowest doses tested (LOECreprod values of 0.3 and 0.2 mg kg-1 of dry soil, respectively) and similar low EC50 values (fipronil: 0.19 mg kg-1 dry soil, CL95% 0.16-0.22; ivermectin: 0.43 mg kg-1 dry soil, CL95% 0.09-0.77), although the effects observed in the former compound were possibly related to a low adult survival (LC50 of 0.62 mg kg-1 dry soil; CL95%: 0.25-1.06). For the latter compound no significant lethal effects were observed. Fluazuron caused an intermediate toxicity (EC50 of 3.07 mg kg-1 dry soil, CL95%: 2.26-3.87), and also here a decrease in adult survival could explain the effects observed at reproduction. Closantel, despite showing a significant reduction on the number of juveniles produced, no dose-response relationship nor effects higher than 50% were observed. Overall, all tested compounds, especially ivermectin, when present in soil even at sub-lethal concentrations, can impair the reproduction of collembolans and possibly other arthropods. However, the actual risk to arthropod communities should be further investigated performing tests under a more realistic exposure (e.g., by testing the dung itself as the contaminated matrix) and by deriving ecotoxicologically relevant exposure concentration in soil derived from the presence of cattle dung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. Phase II Study of HER-2/Neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Disis, Mary L

    2005-01-01

    .... This proposal outlines a Phase II clinical trial designed to estimate survival in Stage IV HER2 positive breast cancer patients with no evidence of disease and receiving trastuzumab and a HER2 ICD peptide based vaccine...

  8. Phase II Study of HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Disis, Mary L

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of this grant is to determine the overall survival benefit in Stage IV HER2 positive breast cancer patients vaccinated with a HER2 ICD peptide-based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab...

  9. Phase II Study of HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Disis, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of this grant is to determine the overall survival benefit in Stage IV HER2 positive breast cancer patients vaccinated with a HER2 ICD peptide-based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab...

  10. [Surgical treatment of the primary tumor in stage IV breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Anula, Juan; Sánchez Andújar, Belén; Machuca Chiriboga, Pablo; Navarro Cecilia, Joaquín; Dueñas Rodríguez, Basilio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of loco-regional surgery on survival of patients with stage IV breast cancer. Retrospective study that included patients with breast cancer and synchronous metastases. Patients with ECOG above 2 and high-risk patients were excluded. The following variables were evaluated: age, tumor size, nodal involvement, histological type, histological grade, hormone receptor status, HER2 overexpression, number of affected organs, location of metastases and surgical treatment. The impact of surgery and several clinical and pathologic variables on survival was analyzed by Cox regression model. A total of 69 patients, of whom 36 (52.2%) underwent surgery (study group) were included. After a mean follow-up of 34 months, the median survival of the series was 55 months and no significant differences between the study group and the group of patients without surgery (P=0.187) were found. Two factors associated with worse survival were identified: the number of organs with metastases (HR=1.69, IC 95%: 1.05-2.71) and triple negative breast cancer (HR=3.49, IC 95%: 1.39-8.74). Loco-regional surgery, however, was not associated with survival. Loco-regional surgical treatment was not associated with improved survival inpacientes with stage IV breast cancer. The number of organs with metastases and tumors were triple negative prognostic factors for survival. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. The influence of design characteristics on statistical inference in nonlinear estimation: A simulation study based on survival data and hazard modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.S.; Bedaux, J.J.M.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of design characteristics on the statistical inference for an ecotoxicological hazard-based model using simulated survival data. The design characteristics of interest are the number and spacing of observations (counts) in time, the number and spacing of exposure...... concentrations (within c(min) and c(max)), and the initial number of individuals at time 0 in each concentration. A comparison of the coverage probabilities for confidence limits arising from the profile-likelihood approach and the Wald-based approach is carried out. The Wald-based approach is very sensitive...

  12. Clinical characteristics of patients with Rutherford category IV, compared with V and VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketsugu Tsuchiya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients categorized Rutherford category IV might have different characteristics compared with Rutherford category V and VI. Our study aims were to estimate the clinical differences between Rutherford category IV and Rutherford category V and VI, for those underwent endovascular therapy for isolated infrapopliteal disease, and also to find risk factors for endovascular therapy in Rutherford category IV. Methods: Based on the Japanese multi-center registry data, 1091 patients with 1332 limbs (Rutherford category IV: 226 patients with 315 limbs, Rutherford category V and VI: 865 patients with 1017 limbs were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Patients’ backgrounds and lesions’ characteristics had significant differences. Both freedom rate from major adverse limb event with perioperative death and amputation-free survival rate at 1 year were better in Rutherford category IV than Rutherford category V and VI (93.6% vs 78.3%, 87.7% vs 66.7% and those maintained to 3 years (p  3.0 mg/dL, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and coronary artery disease in Rutherford category IV. Conclusion: From the present results, Rutherford category IV should be recognized to have quite different backgrounds and better outcome from Rutherford category V and VI.

  13. Astragaloside IV enhances cardioprotection of remote ischemic conditioning after acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Songyi; Yu, Peng; Yang, Li; Shi, Haibo; He, Anxia; Chen, Hanyu; Han, Jie; Xie, Liang; Chen, Jiandong; Chen, Xiaohu

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) has been shown to be a practical method for protecting the heart from ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury. In the present study, we investigated whether or not the combination of RIC and Astragaloside IV (AS-IV) could improve cardioprotection against acute myocardial infarction (AMI)-induced heart failure (HF) when compared with individual treatments. A rat model of AMI was established via permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Postoperatively, the rats were randomly grouped into a sham group (n=10), a model group (n=15), an AS-IV alone group (n=15), an RIC alone group (n=15) and a combined treatment group (AS-IV+RIC; n=15). All treatments were administered for 2 weeks. After treatment for 2 weeks, the survival rate was improved, the cardiac function was preserved and the infarcted size was limited in AS-IV alone and RIC alone treatment groups compared to the model group, whereas the combined treatment yielded the most optimal protective effects. Additional studies suggested that AS-IV enhanced the cardioprotective effects of RIC by alleviating myocardial fibrosis, suppressing inflammation, attenuating apoptosis and ameliorating impairment of the myocardial ultrastructural. AS-IV enhances the cardioprotective effects of RIC against AMI-induced HF and ventricular remodeling, which represents a potential therapeutic approach for preserving cardiac function and improving the prognosis of AMI.

  14. Therapeutic role of axillary lymph node dissection in patients with stage IV breast cancer: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, San-Gang; Li, Feng-Yan; Chen, Yue; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Lin, Qin; He, Zhen-Yu

    2017-03-01

    To assess the clinical value of axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection in stage IV breast cancer. Patients with a diagnosis of stage IV breast cancer from 1990 to 2010 were identified using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to analyze the effect of ALN dissection and ALN status on breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS). A total of 11,645 patients were identified. Of these, 7358 (63.2%) patients underwent ALN dissection, and 6168 (83.8%) patients showed nodal positivity. During this time, the rate of ALN dissection increased. Patients with delayed diagnosis, age 2 cm), and married women were more likely to undergo ALN dissection. ALN dissection was associated with improved BCSS and OS in multivariate analysis. ALN dissection improved the survival in patients with bone and liver metastasis, and patients with single site of distant metastasis also had survival benefit by ALN dissection. Lymph node staging based on the number of positive lymph nodes was the independent prognostic factor for BCSS and OS in multivariate analysis; patients with advanced lymph node staging had a poor survival. ALN dissection may improve survival in patients with stage IV breast cancer who received primary tumor surgery, especially in patients with bone, liver, and single site of distant metastasis. The lymph node staging was also the prognostic factor in patients with stage IV breast cancer.

  15. The Parthenogenetic Cosmopolitan Chironomid, Paratanytarsus grimmii, as a New Standard Test Species for Ecotoxicology: Culturing Methodology and Sensitivity to Aqueous Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Bryant S; Long, Sara M; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2015-09-01

    Chironomids from the genus Chironomus are widely used in laboratory ecotoxicology, but are prone to inbreeding depression, which can compromise test results. The standard Chironomus test species (C. riparius, C. dilutus and C. yoshimatsui) are also not cosmopolitan, making it difficult to compare results between geographic regions. In contrast, the chironomid Paratanytarsus grimmii is cosmopolitan, and not susceptible to inbreeding depression because it reproduces asexually by apomictic parthenogenesis. However, there is no standardised culturing methodology for P. grimmii, and a lack of acute toxicity data for common pollutants (metals and pesticides). In this study, we developed a reliable culturing methodology for P. grimmii. We also determined 24-h first instar LC50s for the metals Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd and the insecticide imidacloprid. By developing this culturing methodology and generating the first acute metal and imidacloprid LC50s for P. grimmii, we provide a basis for using P. grimmii in routine ecotoxicological testing.

  16. Ecotoxicological screen of Potential Release Site 50-006(d) of Operable Unit 1147 of Mortandad Canyon and relationship to the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facilities project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, G.J.; Newell, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    Potential ecological risk associated with soil contaminants in Potential Release Site (PRS) 50-006(d) of Mortandad Canyon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was assessed by performing an ecotoxicological risk screen. The PRS surrounds Outfall 051, which discharges treated effluent from the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. Discharge at the outfall is permitted under the Clean Water Act National Pollution Discharge Elimination System. Radionuclide discharge is regulated by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5. Ecotoxicological Screening Action Levels (ESALSs) were computed for nonradionuclide constituents in the soil, and human risk SALs for radionuclides were used as ESALs. Within the PRS and beginning at Outfall 051, soil was sampled at three points along each of nine linear transects at 100-ft intervals. Soil samples from 3 depths for each sampling point were analyzed for the concentration of a total of 121 constituents. Only the results of the surface sampling are reported in this report.

  17. In-hospital resuscitation: opioids and other factors influencing survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamarie Fecho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Karamarie Fecho1, Freeman Jackson1, Frances Smith1, Frank J Overdyk21Department of Anesthesiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USAPurpose: “Code Blue” is a standard term used to alertt hospital staff that a patient requires resuscitation. This study determined rates of survival from Code Blue events and the role of opioids and other factors on survival.Methods: Data derived from medical records and the Code Blue and Pharmacy databases were analyzed for factors affecting survival.Results: During 2006, rates of survival from the code only and to discharge were 25.9% and 26.4%, respectively, for Code Blue events involving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; N = 216. Survival rates for events not ultimately requiring CPR (N = 77 were higher, with 32.5% surviving the code only and 62.3% surviving to discharge. For CPR events, rates of survival to discharge correlated inversely with time to chest compressions and defibrillation, precipitating event, need for airway management, location and age. Time of week, witnessing, postoperative status, gender and opioid use did not influence survival rates. For non-CPR events, opioid use was associated with decreased survival. Survival rates were lowest for patients receiving continuous infusions (P < 0.01 or iv boluses of opioids (P < 0.05.Conclusions: One-quarter of patients survive to discharge after a CPR Code Blue event and two-thirds survive to discharge after a non-CPR event. Opioids may influence survival from non-CPR events.Keywords: code blue, survival, opioids, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, cardiac arrest, patient safety

  18. A Gaussian IV estimator of cointegrating relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bårdsen, Gunnar; Haldrup, Niels

    2006-01-01

    -nonparametricestimators. Theoretically ideal instruments can be defined to ensure a limitingGaussian distribution of IV estimators, but unfortunately such instruments areunlikely to be found in real data. In the present paper we suggest an IV estimatorwhere the Hodrick-Prescott filtered trends are used as instruments forthe regressors...

  19. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  20. Multinationals and plant survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate how different ownership structures affect plant survival, and second, to analyze how the presence of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) affects domestic plants’ survival. Using a unique and detailed data set on the Swedish manufacturing...... sector, I am able to separate plants into those owned by foreign MNEs, domestic MNEs, exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. In line with previous findings, the result, when conditioned on other factors affecting survival, shows that foreign MNE plants have lower survival rates than non......-MNE plants. However, separating the non-MNEs into exporters and non-exporters, the result shows that foreign MNE plants have higher survival rates than non-exporting non-MNEs, while the survival rates of foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants do not seem to differ. Moreover, the simple non...

  1. Occurrence of pharmaceutical compounds in wastewater and sludge from wastewater treatment plants: removal and ecotoxicological impact of wastewater discharges and sludge disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, J; Camacho-Muñoz, D; Santos, J L; Aparicio, I; Alonso, E

    2012-11-15

    The occurrence of sixteen pharmaceutically active compounds in influent and effluent wastewater and in primary, secondary and digested sludge in one-year period has been evaluated. Solid-water partition coefficients (Kd) were calculated to evaluate the efficiency of removal of these compounds from wastewater by sorption onto sludge. The ecotoxicological risk to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, due to wastewater discharges to the receiving streams and to the application of digested sludge as fertilizer onto soils, was also evaluated. Twelve of the pharmaceuticals were detected in wastewater at mean concentrations from 0.1 to 32 μg/L. All the compounds found in wastewater were also found in sewage sludge, except diclofenac, at mean concentrations from 8.1 to 2206 μg/kg dm. Ibuprofen, salicylic acid, gemfibrozil and caffeine were the compounds at the highest concentrations. LogKd values were between 1.17 (naproxen) and 3.48 (carbamazepine). The highest ecotoxicological risk in effluent wastewater and digested sludge is due to ibuprofen (risk quotient (RQ): 3.2 and 4.4, respectively), 17α-ethinylestradiol (RQ: 12 and 22, respectively) and 17β-estradiol (RQ: 12 and 359, respectively). Ecotoxicological risk after wastewater discharge and sludge disposal is limited to the presence of 17β-estradiol in digested-sludge amended soil (RQ: 2.7). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Roa, Linfeng; Weger, H.T.; Felmy, A.R. [Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State University (United States); Yui, Mikazu [Waste Isolation Research Division, Tokai Works, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This report provides thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments, and contributes to an integration of the JNC chemical thermodynamic database, JNC-TDB (previously PNC-TDB), for the performance analysis of geological isolation system for high-level radioactive wastes. Thermodynamic data for the formation of complexes or compounds with hydroxide, chloride, fluoride, carbonate, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate are discussed in this report. Where data for specific actinide(IV) species was lacking, the data were selected based on chemical analogy to other tetravalent actinides. In this study, the Pitzer ion-interaction model is used to extrapolate thermodynamic constants to zero ionic strength at 25degC. (author)

  3. Biological test methods for the ecotoxicological characterization of wastes. Final report; Biologische Testerverfahren zur oekotoxikologischen Charakterisierung von Abfaellen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Roland [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung, Berlin (Germany); Donnevert, Gerhild [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany). FB MNI; Roembke, Joerg [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Floersheim am Main (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The ecotoxicological characterization of waste is part of their assessment as hazardous or non-hazardous according to the European Waste List. Despite its transfer into national law in the waste list ordnance 2001 no methodological recommendations have been provided to cover the hazard criterion (H14 ''ecotoxicity'') which was taken over from the legislation on dangerous substances. Based on the recommendations of CEN guideline 14735 (2005), an international ring test was organised by BAM, FH Giessen-Friedberg and ECT GmbH. In total, 67 laboratories from 15 countries participated in the ring test. It was performed with three representative waste types: an ash from an incineration plant mainly contaminated with heavy metals, a soil containing high concentrations of organic contaminants (PAHs) and a preserved wood waste contaminated with copper and other heavy metals. Samples were prepared by BAM (e.g. inter alia dried, sieved and homogenised) and distributed. Parallel to the biological testing the eluates and solid samples were chemically characterized. The basic test battery used in the ring test consisted of three aquatic (Algae test, Daphnia acute test and Microtox test) and three terrestrial (earthworm acute and plant test with two species (oat, rape)) tests. In addition, data were submitted for ten additional tests (five aquatic (including a genotoxicity test) and five terrestrial ones). Almost all tests were performed according to ISO guidelines, providing EC50 values as measurement of toxicity. Data evaluation was done following recent recommendations made by ISO (2002) and Environment Canada (2005). Besides a high number of reference test data, 634 data sets were produced in the basic test battery and 204 data sets in the additional tests. Only few data sets were not acceptable (e.g. due to lack of reference data) and even less results were identified as statistical or biological outliers. For example, in the case of the basic test

  4. A pesticide monitoring survey in rivers and lakes of northern Greece and its human and ecotoxicological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Emmaluel N; Vryzas, Zisis; Kotopoulou, Athena; Kintzikoglou, Katerina; Makris, Konstantinos C; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2015-06-01

    A pesticide monitoring study covering the main rivers and lakes of Northern Greece (Macedonia, Thrace and Thessaly) was undertaken. A total of 416 samples were collected over a 1.5-year sampling period (September 1999- February 2001) from six rivers and ten lakes. The water samples were analyzed with an off-line solid phase extraction technique coupled with a gas chromatography ion trap mass spectrometer using an analytical method for 147 pesticides and their metabolites, including organochlorines, organophosphates, triazines, chloroacetanilides, pyrethroids, carbamates, phthalimides and other pesticides (herbicides, insecticides and fungicides). Based on the pesticide survey results, a human health carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk assessment was conducted for adults and children. Ecotoxicological risk assessment was also conducted using default endpoint values and the risk quotient method. Results showed that the herbicides metolachlor, prometryn, alachlor and molinate, were the most frequently detected pesticides (29%, 12.5%, 12.5% and 10%, respectively). They also exhibited the highest concentration values, often exceeding 1 μg/L. Chlorpyrifos ethyl was the most frequently detected insecticide (7%). Seasonal variations in measured pesticide concentrations were observed in all rivers and lakes. The highest concentrations were recorded during May-June period, right after pesticide application. Concentrations of six pesticides were above the maximum allowable limit of 0.1 μg/L set for drinking water. Alachlor, atrazine and a-HCH showed unacceptable carcinogenic risk estimates (4.5E-06, 4.6E-06 and 1.3E-04, respectively). Annual average concentrations of chlorpyriphos ethyl (0.031 μg L), dicofol (0.01 μg/L), dieldrin (0.02 μg/L) and endosulfan a (0.065 μg/L) exceeded the EU environmental quality standards. The risk quotient estimates for the insecticides chorpyrifos ethyl, diazinon and parathion methyl and herbicide prometryn were above acceptable risk

  5. Colorectal cancer survival by stage of cases diagnosed in Mallorca, Spain, between 2006 and 2011 and factors associated with survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M; Montaño, J; Esteva, M; Barceló, A; Franch, P

    2016-04-01

    To establish cause-specific survival by stage of colorectal cancer up to 8 years from diagnosis, and to identify factors which explain and predict the likelihood of survival. Retrospective follow-up study of people diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer during 2006-2011, identified through the Mallorca Cancer Registry. DCO and lymphomas were excluded. Sex, age, diagnostic method, site, histology, T, N, M, and stage, date of diagnosis, date of follow-up or death, and cause of death were collected. End point of follow-up was 31st December 2013. Multiple imputation (MI) method was performed to obtain stage when unknown. Actuarial and Kaplan-Meier methods were used for survival analysis. Extended Cox models were built to identify factors that explain and predict survival. 2889 cases were identified, 41.7% in women and 58.3% in men, with a mean age of 70.5 years. Unknown stage represented 15.3% of cases. After MI, 15% were in stage I, 26.7% were in II, 32.7% in III, and 25.6% in IV. Survival was 56% at the end of the 5th year. Survival by stage changed significantly after MI and was estimated to 83% at stage I, 73% at II, 62% at III, and 16% at IV. Extended Cox model showed that survival worsened with age, mucinous histology, and stage. Risk of dying was 17.0 times higher in stage IV compared to stage I, 3.7 times in stage III, and 1.6 times in stage II. More than half of colorectal cancer patients will survive 5 years after diagnosis, but only if diagnosed in stages I-III. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Water fleas require microbiota for survival, growth and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Mushegian, Alexandra A; Ebert, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota have diverse roles in the functioning of their hosts; experiments using model organisms have enabled investigations into these functions. In the model crustacean Daphnia, little knowledge exists about the effect of microbiota on host well being. We assessed the effect of microbiota on Daphnia magna by experimentally depriving animals of their microbiota and comparing their growth, survival and fecundity to that of their bacteria-bearing counterparts. We tested Daphnia coming from both lab-reared parthenogenetic eggs of a single genotype and from genetically diverse field-collected resting eggs. We showed that bacteria-free hosts are smaller, less fecund and have higher mortality than those with microbiota. We also manipulated the association by exposing bacteria-free Daphnia to a single bacterial strain of Aeromonas sp., and to laboratory environmental bacteria. These experiments further demonstrated that the Daphnia-microbiota system is amenable to manipulation under various experimental conditions. The results of this study have implications for studies of D. magna in ecotoxicology, ecology and environmental genomics.

  7. Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Gorden, Anne E.V.; Teat, Simon J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-12

    As part of a study to characterize the detailed coordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-ray diffraction structures have been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with the naturally-occurring ligand maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one) and its derivative bromomaltol (5-bromo-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one). Although Ce(IV) is generally accepted as a structural analog for Pu(IV), and the maltol complexes of these two metals are isostructural, the corresponding bromomaltol complexes are strikingly different with respect to ligand orientation about the metal ion: All complexes exhibit trigonal dodecahedral coordination geometry but the Ce(IV)-bromomaltol complex displays an uncommon ligand arrangement not mirrored in the Pu(IV) complex, although the two metal species are generally accepted to be structural analogs.

  8. Tooth survival after root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balto, Khaled

    2011-01-01

    ) tooth not functioning as an abutment for removable or fixed prosthesis; and (iv) tooth type or specifically non-molar teeth. Statistical heterogeneity was substantial in some cases, but its source could not be investigated because of insufficient available information. The pooled proportion of teeth surviving over 2-10 years following RCTx ranged between 86% and 93%. Four factors (listed above) were identified as significant prognostic factors with concurrence between all three strands of evidence.

  9. A test battery approach for ecotoxicological characterization of Mar Piccolo sediments in Taranto (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narracci, M; Cavallo, R A; Acquaviva, M I; Prato, E; Biandolino, F

    2009-01-01

    The eco-toxicological approach is based on the determination of the toxic effects on organisms pertaining to various ecosystems and supplies information about the contaminants mixture bioavailability, in complex matrices as sediments. The use of a single species for a correct evaluation of the toxicity levels can be reductive, concerning the complexity of the ecosystem. In this work we have used species with various evolutionary levels and habitats; in particular, three different organisms: two amphipods species (Corophium insidiosum and Gammarus aequicauda) and one bacterium Vibrio fischeri. We have compared these organisms for the evaluation of sediments toxicity in four sites along the Ionian coast (Taranto, Italy); in particular, three sites in Mar Piccolo and one site in Mar Grande. The toxicity of sediments measured using Vibrio fischeri (Microtox Solid Phase Test protocol) has been compared with the mortality of the two amphipods. Both in polluted (Mar Piccolo sites) and in non-polluted environments (Mar Grande), the results of the three biological tests carried out converge into the evaluation of sediments quality monitored. In conclusion, these preliminary results show the potential use of Corophium insidiosum and Gammarus aequicauda as test species for a correct evaluation of sediments quality, together with Vibrio fischeri.

  10. An ecotoxicological study on tin- and bismuth-catalysed PDMS based coatings containing a surface-active polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretti, Carlo; Oliva, Matteo; Mennillo, Elvira; Barbaglia, Martina; Funel, Marco; Reddy Yasani, Bhaskar; Martinelli, Elisa; Galli, Giancarlo

    2013-12-01

    Novel films were prepared by condensation curing reaction of a poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) matrix with bismuth neodecanoate and dibutyltin diacetate catalysts. An ecotoxicological study was performed on the leachates of the coatings using the bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the unicellular alga Dunaliella tertiolecta, the crustacean Artemia salina and the fish Sparus aurata (larvae) as testing organisms. A copper-based self-polishing commercial paint was also tested as reference. The results showed that the tin-catalysed coatings and the copper paint were highly toxic against at least two of the four test organisms, whereas bismuth-catalysed coatings did not show any toxic effect. Moreover, the same biological assessment was also carried out on PDMS coatings containing a surface-active fluorinated polymer. The toxicity of the entire polymeric system resulted only from the tin catalyst used for the condensation curing reaction, as the bismuth catalysed coatings incorporating the surface-active polymer remained atoxic toward all the tested organisms. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Strategies for quantifying C(60) fullerenes in environmental and biological samples and implications for studies in environmental health and ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pycke, Benny F G; Benn, Troy M; Herckes, Pierre; Westerhoff, Paul; Halden, Rolf U

    2011-01-01

    Fullerenes are sphere-like molecules with unique physico-chemical properties, which render them of particular interest in biomedical research, consumer products and industrial applications. Human and environmental exposure to fullerenes is not a new phenomenon, due to a long history of hydrocarbon-combustion sources, and will only increase in the future, as incorporation of fullerenes into consumer products becomes more widespread for use as anti-aging, anti-bacterial or anti-apoptotic agents.An essential step in the determination of biological effects of fullerenes (and their surface-functionalized derivatives) is establishment of exposure-assessment techniques. However, in ecotoxicological studies, quantification of fullerenes is performed infrequently because robust, uniformly applicable analytical approaches have yet to be identified, due to the wide variety of sample types. Moreover, the unique physico-chemistry of fullerenes in aqueous matrices requires reassessment of conventional analytical approaches, especially in more complex biological matrices (e.g., urine, blood, plasma, milk, and tissue).Here, we present a review of current analytical approaches for the quantification of fullerenes and propose a consensus approach for determination of these nanomaterials in a variety of environmental and biological matrices.

  12. The common ecotoxicology laboratory strain of Hyalella azteca is genetically distinct from most wild strains sampled in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Kaley; Soucek, David J; Giordano, Rosanna; Wetzel, Mark J; Soto-Adames, Felipe

    2013-11-01

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca is commonly used as a model for determining safe concentrations of contaminants in freshwaters. The authors sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for representatives of 38 populations of this species complex from US and Canadian toxicology research laboratories and eastern North American field sites to determine their genetic relationships. With 1 exception, all US and Canadian laboratory cultures sampled were identified as conspecific. In 22 wild populations spanning 5 US states and 1 Canadian province, the commonly occurring laboratory species was found only in northern Florida, USA. Therefore, the diversity of the H. azteca species complex detected in the wild is not accurately represented in North American laboratories, questioning the reliability of H. azteca cultures currently in use to accurately predict the responses of wild populations in ecotoxicological assays. The authors also examined the utility of different COI nucleotide fragments presently in use to determine phylogenetic relationships in this group and concluded that saturation in DNA sequences leads to inconsistent relationships between clades. Amino acid sequences for COI were not saturated and may allow a more accurate phylogeny estimate. Hyalella azteca is crucial for developing water-quality regulations; therefore, laboratories should know and standardize the strain(s) they use to confidently compare toxicity tests across laboratories and determine whether they are an appropriate surrogate for their regions. © 2013 SETAC.

  13. Ecotoxicological evaluation of Mediterranean dredged sediment ports based on elutriates with oyster embryotoxicity tests after composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Libralato, Giovanni; Roméo, Michèle; Hurel, Charlotte; Losso, Chiara; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi; Marmier, Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    The ecotoxicological effect of dredged sediments was estimated by embryo-larval toxicity of the oyster Crassosstrea gigas in sediment elutriates (filtered and unfiltered). The study covers the main ports from the French Mediterranean coast. Composted sediments from a navy harbour (A), a commercial port (B) and two composite specimens (C and D) obtained after mixing various sediments were taken into consideration. Effective concentrations affecting 50% of larvae (EC50) were obtained from different elutriate concentrations (from 0 to 100%). Toxicity results obtained from filtered elutriates decreased according to the following gradient: sample A (5.68%), B (20.50%), C (37.60%) and D (47.17%). Chemical concentrations in whole sediments were in agreement with those in elutriates. Among the measured contaminants in elutriates, Cu and Zn resulted as the main contributors to toxicity. Dissolved organic carbon played an important role by exerting a protective effect against the toxicity of dissolved Cu. Toxicity results were interpreted on the basis of toxicity scores to give indication about sediment quality which provided more severe judgement than risk score based on chemical concentrations in sediments. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Eco-toxicological effects of two kinds of lead compounds on forest tree seed in alkaline soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Zhou, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jin-Xin

    2016-03-01

    In order to compare the different eco-toxicological effects of lead nitrate and lead acetate on forest tree seed, a biological incubation experiment was conducted to testify the inhibition effects of two lead compounds on rates of seed germination, root and stem elongation, and seedling fresh weight for six plants (Amaorpha fruticosa L., Robinia psedoacacia L., Pinus tabuliformis Carr., Platycladus orientalis L., Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm., Hippophae rhamnoides L.) in soil. The results indicate that the inhibition effects of the two lead compounds on the rates of root elongation of plants were greater than other indices; root elongation can possibly be used as indices to investigate the relationship between lead toxicity and plant response. The response of trees to lead toxicity varied significantly, and the order of tolerance to lead pollution was as follows: Amaorpha fruticosa L. > Platycladus orientalis L. > Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm. > Robinia psedoacacia L. > Pinus tabuliformis Carr. > Hippophae rhamnoides L. Therefore, we suggest that Amaorpha fruticosa L. and Platycladus orientalis L. be used as tolerant plants for soil phytoremediation and Hippophae rhamnoides L. as an indicative plant to diagnose the toxicity of lead pollution on soil quality. Lead nitrate and lead acetate differentially restrain seeds, with seeds being more sensitive to lead nitrate than lead acetate in the soil. Thus, the characteristics of lead compounds should be taken into full consideration to appraise its impact on the environment.

  15. Brief communication: the ecosystem perspective in ecotoxicology as a way forward for the ecological risk assessment of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laender, Frederik; Janssen, Colin R

    2013-07-01

    One of the objectives of the European Union (EU) ecological risk assessment of chemicals (ERA) is to derive maximum environmental concentrations that are not expected to cause adverse ecological effects. To this end, related EU directives list protection goals as well as guidelines that should be used to reach these goals. It is generally accepted that the individual-level endpoints on which these guidelines are based do not correspond to the listed population- and ecosystem-level protection goals. In this article, we identify 5 research topics that are key to bridging this gap: 1) the refinement of population-level effects and recovery rates by explicitly taking into account competition and 2) predation, 3) the assessment of chemical effects on biodiversity, 4) the assessment of chemical stress on ecosystem functions and services, and 5) the quantification of the effects of chemical mixtures. In addition, we illustrate why an ecosystem perspective is needed to address these topics and to inform the risk assessment process. We propose the use of existing ecotoxicological community, food web, and ecosystem models to tackle these issues and discuss why new models are needed to predict chemical effects on biodiversity. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  16. Efficiency of soil organic and inorganic amendments on the remediation of a contaminated mine soil: II. Biological and ecotoxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, T; Clemente, R; Alvarenga, P; Bernal, M P

    2014-07-01

    The feasibility of two organic materials (pig slurry and compost) in combination with hydrated lime for the remediation of a highly acidic trace elements (TEs) contaminated mine soil was assessed in a mesocosm experiment. The effects of the amendments on soil biochemical and ecotoxicological properties were evaluated and related with the main physicochemical characteristics of soil and soil solution. The original soil showed impaired basic ecological functions due to the high availability of TEs, its acidic pH and high salinity. The three amendments slightly reduced the direct and indirect soil toxicity to plants, invertebrates and microorganisms as a consequence of the TEs' mobility decrease in topsoil, reducing therefore the soil associated risks. The organic amendments, especially compost, thanks to the supply of essential nutrients, were able to improve soil health, as they stimulated plant growth and significantly increased enzyme activities related with the key nutrients in soil. Therefore, the use of compost or pig slurry, in combination with hydrated lime, decreased soil ecotoxicity and seems to be a suitable management strategy for the remediation of highly acidic TEs contaminated soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ecotoxicological assessment of pesticides and their combination on rhizospheric microbial community structure and function of Vigna radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvekar, Varsha Ashok; Bajaj, Swati; Singh, Dileep K; Sharma, Shilpi

    2017-07-01

    India is one of the leading countries in production and indiscriminate consumption of pesticides. Owing to their xenobiotic nature, pesticides affect soil microorganisms that serve as mediators in plant growth promotion. Our study aimed to deliver a comprehensive picture, by comparing the effects of synthetic pesticides (chlorpyriphos, cypermethrin, and a combination of both) with a biopesticide (azadirachtin) at their recommended field application level (L), and three times the recommended dosage (H) on structure and function of microbial community in rhizosphere of Vigna radiata. Effect on culturable fraction was assessed by enumeration on selective media, while PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was employed to capture total bacterial community diversity. This was followed by a metabolic sketch using community-level physiological profiling (CLPP), to obtain a broader picture of the non-target effects on rhizospheric microbial community. Although plant parameters were not significantly affected by pesticide application, the microbial community structure experienced an undesirable impact as compared to control devoid of pesticide treatment. Examination of DGGE banding patterns through cluster analysis revealed that microbial community structure of pesticide-treated soils had only 70% resemblance to control rhizospheric soil even at 45 days post application. Drastic changes in the metabolic profiles of pesticide-treated soils were also detected in terms of substrate utilization, rhizospheric diversity, and evenness. It is noteworthy that the effects exacerbated by biopesticide were comparable to that of synthetic pesticides, thus emphasizing the significance of ecotoxicological assessments before tagging biopesticides as "safe alternatives."

  18. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Wehrli, Bernhard; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L(-1) molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L(-1). From OPV, copper (14 μg L(-1)), zinc (87 μg L(-1)) and silver (78 μg L(-1)) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ecotoxicological approach for assessing the contamination of a Hawaiian coral reef ecosystem (Honolua Bay, Maui) by metals and a metalloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hédouin, Laetitia; Metian, Marc; Gates, Ruth D

    2011-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the contamination of Honolua Bay using an ecotoxicological approach. First, the concentrations of 9 contaminants (metals and metalloid) were assessed in sediments and tropical marine organisms (alga Halimeda kanaloana, goatfish Parupeneus multifasciatus and urchin Tripneustes gratilla) sampled from Honolua and surrounding Bays. Then, the ecological parameters characterizing coral health (e.g. coral cover) were evaluated in Honolua Bay in the context of these contaminants. High concentrations of Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, and V in sediments from Honolua and Honokohau Bay were measured, but these concentrations were not mirrored in the organisms examined, except for Mn, suggesting that the metals are generally bound in chemically inert forms in these sediments. Moreover, few anthropogenic activities impact these bays and so the elevated Co, Cr, Mn, Ni and V concentrations in sediments appear to stem from their high natural background in Honolua and Honokohau watersheds. An analysis of the relationship between the ecological parameters and metal concentrations in Honolua Bay revealed a significant correlation between coral cover and Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, V, Zn concentrations in sediments, with coral cover decreasing with increasing metal concentration. Collectively, however, the data suggest that a complex mixture of land-based stressors (e.g. sediment, metals, nutrients) affect the coral health in Honolua Bay, rather than metal stress alone. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ecotoxicological diagnosis of striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Mediterranean basin by skin biopsy and gene expression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panti, Cristina; Spinsanti, Giacomo; Marsili, Letizia; Casini, Silvia; Frati, Francesco; Fossi, Maria Cristina

    2011-11-01

    Mediterranean cetacean odontocetes are exposed to environmental stress, in particular to persistent organic pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace elements. In the present study, the response of "gene-expression biomarkers" was evaluated in Mediterranean striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) skin biopsies collected in three sampling areas: Pelagos sanctuary (Ligurian sea), Ionian sea, and Strait of Gibraltar. The mRNA levels of five putative biomarker genes (aryl hydrocarbon receptor, E2F-1 transcription factor, cytochrome P450 1A, estrogen receptor 1, and heat shock protein 70) were measured for the first time by quantitative real-time PCR in cetacean skin biopsies. The different responses of most of the genes reflected contamination levels in the three sampling areas. Pelagos sanctuary dolphins appeared to be the most exposed to toxicological stress, having the highest up-regulation of CYP1A and AHR. Moreover, a cluster analysis distinguished the populations on the basis of the gene expression biomarker used in our study, showing different pattern between Mediterranean sea and Strait of Gibraltar. Our results suggest that this molecular approach applied to non-destructive biopsy material is a powerful diagnostic tool for evaluating ecotoxicological impact on cetacean populations.

  1. Ecotoxicological evaluation of the short term effects of fresh and stabilized textile sludges before application in forest soil restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Edson V C; Giuradelli, Thayse M; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Rörig, Leonardo R; Schwingel, Paulo R; Resgalla, Charrid; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2007-03-01

    The short term (eco)toxicity potential of fresh and stabilized textile sludges, as well as the short term (eco)toxicity of leachates obtained from both fresh and stabilized textile sludges, was evaluated by a battery of toxicity tests carried out with bacteria, algae, daphnids, fish, earthworms, and higher plants. The (eco)toxicological results showed that, after 120 d of stabilization, the experimental loading ratio of 25% sludge:75% soil (v/v) (equivalent to 64.4 ton/ha) did not significantly increase toxicity effects and increased significantly the biomass yield for earthworms and higher plants. The rank of biological sensitivity endpoints was: Algae approximately Plant biomass > Plant germination approximately Daphnids > Bacteria approximately Fish > Annelids. The lack of short term toxicity effects and the stimulant effect observed with higher plants and earthworms are good indications of the fertilizer/conditioner potential of this industrial waste, which after stabilization can be used in the restoration of a non-productive forest soil.

  2. Ecotoxicological evaluation of the short term effects of fresh and stabilized textile sludges before application in forest soil restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Edson V.C. [Universidade do Vale do Itajai, Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar, Rua Uruguai, 458, Itajai SC 88302-202 (Brazil); Giuradelli, Thayse M. [Universidade do Vale do Itajai, Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar, Rua Uruguai, 458, Itajai SC 88302-202 (Brazil); Correa, Albertina X.R. [Universidade do Vale do Itajai, Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar, Rua Uruguai, 458, Itajai SC 88302-202 (Brazil); Roerig, Leonardo R. [Universidade do Vale do Itajai, Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar, Rua Uruguai, 458, Itajai SC 88302-202 (Brazil); Schwingel, Paulo R. [Universidade do Vale do Itajai, Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar, Rua Uruguai, 458, Itajai SC 88302-202 (Brazil); Resgalla, Charrid [Universidade do Vale do Itajai, Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar, Rua Uruguai, 458, Itajai SC 88302-202 (Brazil); Radetski, Claudemir M. [Universidade do Vale do Itajai, Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar, Rua Uruguai, 458, Itajai SC 88302-202 (Brazil)]. E-mail: radetski@univali.br

    2007-03-15

    The short term (eco)toxicity potential of fresh and stabilized textile sludges, as well as the short term (eco)toxicity of leachates obtained from both fresh and stabilized textile sludges, was evaluated by a battery of toxicity tests carried out with bacteria, algae, daphnids, fish, earthworms, and higher plants. The (eco)toxicological results showed that, after 120 d of stabilization, the experimental loading ratio of 25% sludge:75% soil (v/v) (equivalent to 64.4 ton/ha) did not significantly increase toxicity effects and increased significantly the biomass yield for earthworms and higher plants. The rank of biological sensitivity endpoints was: Algae {approx} Plant biomass > Plant germination {approx} Daphnids > Bacteria {approx} Fish > Annelids. The lack of short term toxicity effects and the stimulant effect observed with higher plants and earthworms are good indications of the fertilizer/conditioner potential of this industrial waste, which after stabilization can be used in the restoration of a non-productive forest soil. - Short term ecotoxicity evaluation of textile sludge showed that stabilized sludge can be used in the restoration of a non-productive forest soil.

  3. Interactions between oxovanadium (IV), glycylvaline and imidazoles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    made using the SCOGS computer program. Keywords. Oxovanadium (IV); glycylvaline; imidazoles. 1. Introduction. The aqueous chemistry of vanadium has been attracting interest for many years. Solution equilibria involving oxovanadium can be followed very conveniently using potentiometry and EPR spectroscopy.

  4. Effects of DFA IV in rats: calcium absorption and metabolism of DFA IV by intestinal microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K; Hira, T; Suzuki, T; Hara, H; Yokota, A; Tomita, F

    1999-04-01

    Di-D-fructose-2,6':6,2'-dianhydride (DFA IV) is a disaccharide consisting of two fructose residues that can be prepared from levan by levan fructotransferase from Arthrobacter nicotinovorans GS-9, and it can be expected to have novel physiological functions from its unique structure. In this study, the effects of DFA IV on calcium absorption and the metabolism of DFA IV by intestinal microorganisms were studied in rats to examine the physiological functions of DFA IV. The apparent calcium absorption in rats fed with DFA IV was significantly higher than that in the control rats, and it seems that calcium absorption had almost been completed at the end of the small intestine. DFA IV also increased the calcium absorption in in vitro experiments, using everted jejunal and ileal sacs, and this result supports the finding obtained in the in vivo experiments. These results indicate that DFA IV may have a function for increasing the calcium absorption in the small intestine of rats. However, the effect in the large intestine could not be clearly observed because of the lack of calcium that reached there. The results of analyses of organic acids in the cecal and colonic contents and of DFA IV in the fecal, cecal, and colonic contents showed that the metabolism of DFA IV by microorganisms in the large intestine progressed gradually, and that DFA IV was converted mainly to acetate, butyrate, and lactate.

  5. Mirizzi Syndrome Type IV: A challenging diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Navarini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mirizzi Syndrome type IV is an extremely rare condition, which is confused with the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma in many cases. This report describes a case of a forty-three-year old patient, who was forwarded to our department of general surgery with a high suspicion of a choledochal neoplasic lesion. During the hospitalization he was diagnosed with Mirizzi Syndrome type IV. We concisely describe the case and the literature review about this pathology.

  6. Observational properties of decameter type IV bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoly; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Briand, Carine; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Frantzusenko, Anatoly; Panchenko, Michael; Poedts, Stefan; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Shergelashvili, Bidzina

    2013-04-01

    Oscillations of decameter type IV bursts were registered during observations of solar radio emission by UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA in 2011-2012. Large majority of these bursts were accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were observed by SOHO and STEREO in the visible light. Only in some cases decameter type IV bursts were not associated with CMEs. The largest periods of oscillations P were some tens of minutes. There were some modes of long periods of oscillations simultaneously. Periods of oscillations in flux and in polarization profiles were close. Detailed properties of oscillations at different frequencies were analyzed on the example of two type IV bursts. One of them was observed on April 7, 2011 when a CME happened. Another one (August 1, 2011) was registered without any CME. The 7 April type IV burst had two periods in the frames 75-85 and 35-85 minutes. Interesting feature of these oscillations is decreasing periods with time. The observed decreasing rates dP/dt equaled 0.03-0.07. Concerning type IV burst observed on August 1, 2011 the period of its oscillations increases from 17 min. at 30 MHz to 44 min. at 10 MHz. Connection of type IV burst oscillations with oscillations of magnetic arches and CMEs at corresponding altitudes are discussed. The work is fulfilled in the frame of FP7 project "SOLSPANET".

  7. Ecotoxicological assessment of using oil sands coke in aquatic reclamation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, A.J.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Toxicology Centre

    2004-07-01

    Syncrude Canada Ltd. and Suncor Energy Inc. are two of the companies presently mining the Athabasca oil sands. Each company produces more than 2,000 tons of coke waste product daily as part of the oil upgrading process. Since coke has a high organic carbon content, it has been proposed as an amendment agent in wetland reclamation strategies. However, coke also contains metals and organic compounds which can leach out once submerged in water. The coke from both companies has been used in several leaching/weathering experiments to determine their potential to leach out contaminants while exposed to freeze thaw cycles, high and low dissolved oxygen content, and pH levels of 5, 7.5 and 10. Samples of the coke and interstitial waters were taken for chemical analysis throughout each experiment. This was followed by exposing Chironomus tentans larvae to both coke types along with leachates to differentiate between effects of solid coke and leachate. None of the leachates showed an important impact on the survival or growth of the larvae. However, some effects were noted following exposure to weathered coke. The experiments will be instrumental in determining if either coke may adversely affect aquatic organisms if used as an uncovered capping option during an aquatic reclamation program in the Athabasca oil sands area.

  8. Network ties and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acheampong, George; Narteh, Bedman; Rand, John

    2017-01-01

    Poultry farming has been touted as one of the major ways by which poverty can be reduced in low-income economies like Ghana. Yet, anecdotally there is a high failure rate among these poultry farms. This current study seeks to understand the relationship between network ties and survival chances...... of small commercial poultry farms (SCPFs). We utilize data from a 2-year network survey of SCPFs in rural Ghana. The survival of these poultry farms are modelled using a lagged probit model of farms that persisted from 2014 into 2015. We find that network ties are important to the survival chances...... but this probability reduces as the number of industry ties increases but moderation with dynamic capability of the firm reverses this trend. Our findings show that not all network ties aid survival and therefore small commercial poultry farmers need to be circumspect in the network ties they cultivate and develop....

  9. Prognostic impact of tumor MET expression among patients with stage IV gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Rune; Kelsh, Michael A; Oliner, Kelly S

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: We aimed to investigate the prevalence and prognostic impact of tumor mesenchymal epithelial transition factor (MET) expression in stage IV gastric cancers in a real-world clinical setting because existing evidence is sparse. METHODS: The study included archived cancer specimens from 103...... stage IV gastric cancer patients (2003-2010). We analyzed MET-protein expression by immunohistochemistry (MET-positive if ≥25% of tumor cells showed MET expression). We calculated overall survival using the Kaplan-Meier method and hazard ratios comparing mortality among MET-positive and MET.......6 months), corresponding to an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.7). CONCLUSIONS: Tumor MET expression is prevalent and has substantial prognostic impact in stage IV gastric cancer patients....

  10. Synthesis and characterization of chiral thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) benzamidinate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, Sebastian; Maerz, Juliane; Kaden, Peter; Patzschke, Michael; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2017-06-01

    Two chiral benzamidinate complexes of tetravalent actinides (Th(IV) and U(IV)) were synthesized using a salt metathesis reaction of the corresponding actinide(IV) tetrachlorides and the potassium salt of the chiral benzamidine (S,S)-N,N-Bis-(1-phenylethyl)-benzamidine ((S)-HPEBA). The structure of the complexes was determined with single crystal X-ray diffraction. These are the first examples of chiral amidinate complexes of actinides.

  11. Aircraft Survivability: Rotorcraft Survivability. Summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    protect those who serve to protect us?” The answer is a mixed bag. I am fortunate to have joined a group of dedicated men and women who represent this...and Service subject matter experts on rotorcraft safety and survivability to complete the study and report the results to the Joint Chiefs of...Operations and Support CDD TEMP DT DT/OT LUT IOT &E BLRIP TEMP TEMP LRIP Acquisition & LFT Strategies B C LFT&E Review Requirements Approve TEMPs

  12. Prognostic significance of the combined expression of neutral endopeptidase and dipeptidyl peptidase IV in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients after surgery resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu JY

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jianyong Zhu,1,* XiaoDong Guo,2,* Baoan Qiu,1 Zhiyan Li,2 Nianxin Xia,1 Yingxiang Yang,1 Peng Liu1 1Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Navy General Hospital, PLA, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2302 Hospital of PLA, Beijing, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the expression of neutral endopeptidase (NEP and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV proteins, and the clinical significance of the two proteins in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (IHCC. Methods: Expression patterns and subcellular localizations of NEP and DPP IV proteins in 186 primary IHCC and 60 noncancerous liver tissue specimens were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: Both the expression of NEP and DPP IV proteins in IHCC tissues were significantly higher than those in noncancerous liver tissues (both P<0.001. Of 186 patients with IHCC, 128 (68.82% highly expressed both NEP and DPP IV proteins. In addition, the coexpression of NEP and DPP IV proteins was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage (P=0.009, positive lymph node metastasis (P=0.016 and distant metastasis (P=0.013, and the presence of recurrence (P=0.027. Moreover, Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that IHCC patients with high NEP expression, high DPP IV expression, and combined overexpression of NEP and DPP IV proteins all had poorer overall survival and early recurrence after surgery. Furthermore, Cox analysis suggested that NEP expression, DPP IV expression, and combined expression of NEP and DPP IV proteins were all independent prognostic markers for overall survival and recurrence-free survival in patients with IHCC. Conclusion: Our data suggest, for the first time, that both the expression of NEP and DPP IV proteins may be upregulated in human IHCC tissues and the combined expression of NEP and DPP IV proteins may play important roles in progression and prognosis of patients

  13. Axis IV--psychosocial and environmental problems--in the DSM-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, A; Ekselius, L; Ramklint, M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to further explore the properties of axis IV in the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV). In a naturalistic cross-sectional design, a group (n = 163) of young (18-25 years old) Swedish psychiatric outpatients was assessed according to DSM-IV. Psychosocial and environmental problems/axis IV were evaluated through structured interviewing by a social worker and by self-assessment on a questionnaire. Reliability between professional assessment and self-assessment of axis IV was examined. Concurrent validity of axis IV was also examined. Reliability between professional and self-assessed axis IV was fair to almost perfect, 0.31-0.83, according to prevalence and bias-adjusted kappa. Categories of psychosocial stress and environmental problems were related to the presence of axis I disorders, co-morbidity, personality disorders and decreasing Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) values. The revised axis IV according to DSM-IV seems to have concurrent validity, but is still hampered by limited reliability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Ecotoxicological assessment of water and sediment of the Corumbataí River, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GM. Jardim

    Full Text Available The Corumbataí River drains an economically important area which is mainly represented by the municipalities of Piracicaba and Rio Claro. In view of the impacts caused by the discharge of industrial waste and domestic sewage into the Piracicaba River, the Corumbataí has become increasingly significant as a source of water for the municipality of Piracicaba. However, chemical, physical, and microbiological analyses carried out prior to the present study had already indicated a decline in the quality of the Corumbataí waters. This study aimed to assess, through water and sediment samples, both acute and chronic toxicity to Daphnia magna and Daphnia similis, and to analyze acid-volatile sulfide (AVS and simultaneously extracted metal (SEM in the sediment. Resulting data were intended to be a contribution to future projects for the management and recuperation of this system. To that aim, water and sediment were collected at seven Corumbataí sampling stations in November 2003 and March 2004. Acute toxicity to D. similis was detected in water and sediment samples from the Piracicaba station, located at the mouth of the Corumbataí River. Chronic toxicity was identified in the water or sediment samples of all stations, with the exception of Analândia Montante (upstream, at the head of the river. This was found to affect survival, growth, and fecundity of the test-organisms. The AVS and SEM analyses showed the bioavailability of the metals, thus explaining toxicity found in bioassaying samples of water and sediment. The use of two test-organism species made it possible to obtain a better assessment of the condition of both water and sediment samples of the Corumbataí River.

  15. Effects of the artificial sweetener sucralose on Daphnia magna and Americamysis bahia survival, growth and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggett, D B; Stoddard, K I

    2011-10-01

    The artificial sweetener sucralose has been detected in municipal wastewater effluent and surface waters at concentrations ranging from ng/L to low μg/L. Few chronic ecotoxicological data are available in the peer reviewed literature with respect to sucralose. To address this data gap, 21 d Daphnia magna and 28 d Americamysis bahia (mysid shrimp) studies were conducted to assess the effects of sucralose on the survival, growth and reproduction of these organisms. Concentrations ⩽1800mg/L resulted in no statistically significant reduction in D. magna survival or reproduction. Survival, growth and reproduction of mysid shrimp were unaffected by ⩽93mg/L sucralose. The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) and lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) for the D. magna study were 1800 and >1800mg/L, respectively. The NOEC and LOEC for the mysid study were 93 and >93mg/L, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that the concentrations of sucralose detected in the environment are well below those required to elicit chronic effects in freshwater or marine invertebrates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Protective effect of astragaloside IV against acute liver failure in experimental mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Li, S J; Zhou, Y

    2016-10-20

    Objective: To investigate the clinical effect of astragaloside IV in the early treatment of mice with acute liver failure and possible mechanisms. Methods: A mouse model of acute liver failure induced by D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (D-GalN/LPS) was established, and the mice were given astragaloside IV at different doses. The survival rate of mice, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, liver histopathological changes, apoptosis of hepatocytes, and the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in each group. The least significant difference test was used for data with homogeneity of variances, the Dunnett's T3 test was used for data with heterogeneity of variance, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Results: Compared with the model group, the high-dose astragaloside IV group had a significant increase in the 48-hour survival rate [60% (9/15) vs 13.3% (2/15), P liver histopathological indices and the degree of apoptosis of hepatocytes (P liver homogenate (P acute liver injury in mice, and its mechanisms may be associated with its effects against cell apoptosis and oxidative damage.

  17. Identification, assessment and prioritization of ecotoxicological risks on the scale of a territory: Application to WWTP discharges in a geographical area located in northeast Lyon, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, Alain; Perrodin, Yves

    2017-12-01

    The ecotoxicological risk assessment methodologies developed up to now mainly focus on local pollution and do not incorporate an evaluation and prioritization of the different risk situations present in the same territory. This article presents the different phases of formulating an innovative methodology developed to fill this gap, and its application to all the 18 WasteWater Treatment Plants (WWTP) of a geographical area located northeast of Lyon, France. The aim was also take into account emerging pollutants that are very often "forgotten" in ecotoxicological risk assessments. The results of the study show the extreme diversity of the ecotoxicity of the pollutants present in discharges, with "minimum" PNEC values in the region of a millionth of a microgram (10(-6) μg/l) and "maximum" PNEC values in the region of several tens of micrograms. They also show very considerable diversity of the flows of the receiving watercourses in the territory concerned (from several m(3)/s to 600 m(3)/s). The Risk Quotients (RQ) resulting from these 2 datasets, calculated for each WWTP and for each of the 10 pollutants most implicated in ecotoxicological risks (Diclofenac, Amoxicillin, Trimethoprim, Roxithromycin, 17β-estradiol, 17α-Ethynylestradiol, Estrone, Nonylphenol, Octylphenol, Nickel, et NH4(+)), vary from 0.000002 to 187.7 when using the median concentration values of these pollutants, and from 0.000007 to 3750 when using their maximum concentration values. Globally, they show that: (1) the risks are higher for small streams that receive WWTP discharges of average size, (2) the risks are low to very low for discharges into watercourses with high flow rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a novel method in ecotoxicology — determination of morphometric and somatic data in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Markus, E-mail: markus.brinkmann@bio5.rwth-aachen.de [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Rizzo, Larissa Y.; Lammers, Twan; Gremse, Felix [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Schiwy, Sabrina [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Kiessling, Fabian [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Hollert, Henner, E-mail: henner.hollert@bio5.rwth-aachen.de [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); College of Resources and Environmental Science, Chongqing University, 1 Tiansheng Road Beibei, Chongqing 400715 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University (China)

    2016-02-01

    Fish are important sentinel organisms for the assessment of water quality and play a central role in ecotoxicological research. Of particular importance to the assessment of health and fitness of fish stocks in response to environmental conditions or pollution are morphometric (e.g. Fulton's condition index) and somatic indices (e.g. hepatosomatic, and gonadosomatic index). Standard measurements of somatic indices are invasive and require, by definition, the sacrifice of examined animals, thus prohibiting longitudinal studies and relocation of animals captured in the field. As a potential solution, in the present study, we propose the use of micro-computed tomography (μCT) as imaging modality to non-invasively tomographically image rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to different sediment suspensions. We here demonstrate that μCT can be used as a tool to reliably measure the volumes of different organs, which could then be applied as a substitute of their weights in calculation of somatic indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report the results of μCT analyses in the context of ecotoxicological research in rainbow trout. It has the potential to greatly increase the information value of experiments conducted with fish and also to potentially reduce the number of animals required for studying temporal effects through facilitating longitudinal studies within the same individuals. - Highlights: • μCT was used for volumetric imaging sediment-exposed and unexposed rainbow trout • Liver volumes determined by μCT were highly correlated with liver weights. • The perfusion of organs in fish could also be studied by means of μCT. • It was shown that μCT is a useful tool in context of ecotoxicological research.

  19. Occurrence, enantiomeric signature and ecotoxicological risk assessment of HCH isomers and DDT metabolites in the sediments of Kabul River, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Khan, Sardar; Niu, Lili; Zhu, Siyu; Khan, Anwarzeb

    2017-08-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) metabolites were analyzed in sediments of three different depths (0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm) collected from Kabul River, Pakistan, in February 2014. The occurrence levels, enantiomer fractions and potential ecological risk of these organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were evaluated. The total concentrations of ∑HCHs and ∑DDTs in surface sediments ranged from 4.9-23.9 ng g-1 and from 6.4-18.8 ng g-1 (dry weight basis), respectively. The vertical contamination profile of DDTs was found in order of 20-30 cm >10-20 cm >0-10 cm, indicated that the residue levels of DDTs gradually decreased after it was banned. The ratios of β-HCH/HCHs ranged from 0.04 to 0.73 (69 % of samples below 0.5) suggesting the fresh input of HCHs, while isomeric ratios of α-HCH/γ-HCH (ranged from 0.02 to 7.94), with 76 % of samples less than 3, indicating the cocktail use of technical grade HCH and lindane in the study area. The ratio of (DDE + DDD)/DDTs (ranged from 0.42 to 0.90) indicated long-term biodegradation of parent DDT. The enantiomer of α-HCH was generally racemic or close to racemic for most of the samples, with enantiomeric fraction (EF) value DDT the EF values >0.5 indicated the depletion of (-)-o,p'-DDT enantiomer in most of the samples. According to sediment quality guidelines (SQGs), HCH contamination is the main concern for ecotoxicological risk in Kabul River.

  20. The Comet Assay and its applications in the field of ecotoxicology: a mature tool that continues to expand its perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin ede Lapuente

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since Singh and colleagues, in 1988, launched to the scientific community the alkaline Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE protocol, or Comet Assay, its uses and applications has been increasing. The thematic areas of its current employment in the evaluation of genetic toxicity are vast, either in vitro or in vivo, both in the laboratory and in the environment, terrestrial or aquatic. It has been applied to a wide range of experimental models: bacteria, fungi, cells culture, arthropods, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, mammals and humans. This document is intended to be a comprehensive review of what has been published to date on the field of ecotoxicology, aiming at the following main aspects: (i to show the most relevant experimental models used as bioindicators both in the laboratory and in the field. Fishes are clearly the most adopted group, reflecting their popularity as bioindicator models, as well as a primary concern over the aquatic environment health. Amphibians are among the most sensitive organisms to environmental changes, mainly due to an early aquatic-dependent development stage and a highly permeable skin. Moreover, in the terrestrial approach, earthworms, plants or mammalians are excellent organisms to be used as experimental models for genotoxic evaluation of pollutants, complex mix of pollutants and chemicals, in both laboratory and natural environment. (ii To review the development and modifications of the protocols used and the cell types (or tissues used. The most recent developments concern the adoption of the enzyme linked assay (digestion with lesion-specific repair endonucleases and prediction of the ability to repair of oxidative DNA damage, which is becoming a widespread approach, albeit challenging. For practical/technical reasons, blood is the most common choice but tissues/cells like gills, sperm cells, early larval stages, coelomocytes, liver or kidney have been also used. (iii To highlight correlations with other

  1. Human and ecotoxicological impacts assessment from the Mexican oil industry in the Coatzacoalcos region, as revealed by the USEtox model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Mora, M A; Rodríguez-Pérez, B; Martínez-Delgadillo, S A; Rosa-Domínguez, E; Nolasco-Hipólito, C

    2014-01-01

    Human and ecotoxicological impacts were analyzed in the lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River (Veracruz, State in Mexico). High pollution levels of contaminants from the oil industry have been reported in natural streams and the Coatzacoalcos River and in their sediments. USEtox model was employed to evaluate environmental fate, exposure, and effect of nine organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and one of which was in the group of polychlorinated biphenyls), a heavy metal (lead), and the effect of the industrial wastewater emitted into the river, on the Coatzacoalcos region. Most of these compounds are highly toxic; they bioaccumulate in human and animal tissue, mainly in the fatty tissues and can damage different organs and systemic targets such as the liver, kidney, hormonal system, nervous system, etc., of both humans and wildlife. The model estimates that 96% (3,247 kg/day) of organic compounds is transferred from the water into air, whereas only 4% (151 kg/day) remains in the water. In addition, it predicts that humans are mainly exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) congeners (28 and 153) by eating contaminated fish, due to PCBs accumulating in the fish fat tissue. The number of cases of cancer and noncancer (1 in 862 habitants per additional kilogram) is expected to have an increment due to the higher PCBs exposure of human population. Genetic damages in fishes, earthworms, and toads have been observed and related to higher exposure to organic compounds. The relationship between the field reported data and those one predicted by the USEtox model have been confirmed empirically by using the nonparametric correlation analysis (Spearman's rho). Based on the USEtox model, the environmental stress in the Coatzacoalcos industrial zone is between 2 and 6 orders of magnitude over geometric mean of acute aquatic EC₅₀s. We think that USEtox model can be used to expand the number of substances that have the current water quality guidelines to

  2. A versatile and low-cost open source pipetting robot for automation of toxicological and ecotoxicological bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Sebastian; Nüßer, Leonie; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Ruchter, Nadine; Schumann, Mark; Döring, Ricarda; Cofalla, Catrina; Ostfeld, Avi; Salomons, Elad; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Hollert, Henner; Brinkmann, Markus

    2017-01-01

    In the past decades, bioassays and whole-organism bioassay have become important tools not only in compliance testing of industrial chemicals and plant protection products, but also in the monitoring of environmental quality. With few exceptions, such test systems are discontinuous. They require exposure of the biological test material in small units, such as multiwell plates, during prolonged incubation periods, and do not allow online read-outs. It is mostly due to these shortcomings that applications in continuous monitoring of, e.g., drinking or surface water quality are largely missing. We propose the use of pipetting robots that can be used to automatically exchange samples in multiwell plates with fresh samples in a semi-static manner, as a potential solution to overcome these limitations. In this study, we developed a simple and low-cost, versatile pipetting robot constructed partly using open-source hardware that has a small footprint and can be used for online monitoring of water quality by means of an automated whole-organism bioassay. We tested its precision in automated 2-fold dilution series and used it for exposure of zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio)-a common model species in ecotoxicology-to cadmium chloride and permethrin. We found that, compared to conventional static or semi-static exposure scenarios, effects of the two chemicals in zebrafish embryos generally occurred at lower concentrations, and analytically verified that the increased frequency of media exchange resulted in a greater availability of the chemical. In combination with advanced detection systems this custom-made pipetting robot has the potential to become a valuable tool in future monitoring strategies for drinking and surface water.

  3. Use of the land snail Helix aspersa as sentinel organism for monitoring ecotoxicologic effects of urban pollution: an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regoli, Francesco; Gorbi, Stefania; Fattorini, Daniele; Tedesco, Sara; Notti, Alessandra; Machella, Nicola; Bocchetti, Raffaella; Benedetti, Maura; Piva, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution from vehicular traffic is a matter of growing interest, often leading to temporary restrictions in urban areas. Although guidelines indicate limits for several parameters, the real toxicologic impacts remain largely unexplored in field conditions. In this study our aim was to validate an ecotoxicologic approach to evaluate both bioaccumulation and toxicologic effects caused by airborne pollutants. Specimens of the land snail Helix aspersa were caged in five sites in the urban area of Ancona, Italy. After 4 weeks, trace metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured and these data integrated with the analyses of molecular and biochemical responses. Such biomarkers reflected the induction of detoxification pathways or the onset of cellular toxicity caused by pollutants. Biomarkers that correlated with contaminant accumulation included levels of metallothioneins, activity of biotransformation enzymes (ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase), and peroxisomal proliferation. More general responses were investigated as oxidative stress variations, including efficiency of antioxidant defenses (catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferases, glutathione peroxidases, and total glutathione) and total oxyradical scavenging capacity toward peroxyl and hydroxyl radicals, onset of cellular damages (i.e., lysosomal destabilization), and loss of DNA integrity. Results revealed a marked accumulation of metals and PAHs in digestive tissues of organisms maintained in more traffic-congested sites. The contemporary appearance of several alterations confirmed the cellular reactivity of these chemicals with toxicologic effects of potential concern for human health. The overall results of this exploratory study suggest the utility of H. aspersa as a sentinel organism for biomonitoring the biologic impact of atmospheric pollution in urban areas. Key

  4. Ecotoxicological risk assessment of chemical pollution in four Iberian river basins and its relationship with the aquatic macroinvertebrate community status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanović, Maja; López-Doval, Julio C; De Castro-Català, Núria; Guasch, Helena; Petrović, Mira; Muñoz, Isabel; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barceló, Damià

    2016-01-01

    Ecotoxicological risk assessment of chemical pollution in four Iberian river basins (Llobregat, Ebro, Júcar and Guadalquivir) was performed. The data set included more than 200 emerging and priority compounds measured at 77 sampling sites along four river basins studied. The toxic units (TU) approach was used to assess the risk of individual compounds and the concentration addition model (CA) to assess the site specific risk. Link between chemical pollution and aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in situ was examined by using four biological indexes; SPEAR ("Species at Risk Index") as the indicator of decline of sensitive species in relation to general organic (SPEARorganic) and pesticides (SPEARpesticides) pollution; and Shannon and Margalef biodiversity indexes. The results of the study suggested that organic chemicals posed the risk of acute effects at 42% of the sampling sites and the risk of chronic effects at all the sites. Metals posed the acute risk at 44% of the sites. The main drivers of the risk were mainly pesticides and metals. However, several emerging contaminants (e.g. the antidepressant drug sertraline and the disinfectant triclosan) were contributing to the chronic effects risk. When risk associated with metals and organic chemicals was compared, the latter dominated in 2010, mainly due to the presence of highly toxic pesticides, while metals did in 2011. Compounds that are not regulated on the European level were posing the risk of chronic effects at 23% of the sites. The decline of sensitive macroinvertebrate taxa expressed in terms of SPEAR index was correlated with the increase of toxic stress related to organic compounds Biodiversity indexes were negatively correlated with the metals and the urban land use type in the catchment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Functional genomics to assess biological responses to marine pollution at physiological and evolutionary timescales: toward a vision of predictive ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Noah M; Whitehead, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Marine pollution is ubiquitous, and is one of the key factors influencing contemporary marine biodiversity worldwide. To protect marine biodiversity, how do we surveil, document and predict the short- and long-term impacts of pollutants on at-risk species? Modern genomics tools offer high-throughput, information-rich and increasingly cost-effective approaches for characterizing biological responses to environmental stress, and are important tools within an increasing sophisticated kit for surveiling and assessing impacts of pollutants on marine species. Through the lens of recent research in marine killifish, we illustrate how genomics tools may be useful for screening chemicals and pollutants for biological activity and to reveal specific mechanisms of action. The high dimensionality of transcriptomic responses enables their usage as highly specific fingerprints of exposure, and these fingerprints can be used to diagnose environmental problems. We also emphasize that molecular pathways recruited to respond at physiological timescales are the same pathways that may be targets for natural selection during chronic exposure to pollutants. Gene complement and sequence variation in those pathways can be related to variation in sensitivity to environmental pollutants within and among species. Furthermore, allelic variation associated with evolved tolerance in those pathways could be tracked to estimate the pace of environmental health decline and recovery. We finish by integrating these paradigms into a vision of how genomics approaches could anchor a modernized framework for advancing the predictive capacity of environmental and ecotoxicological science. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The mysid Siriella armata as a model organism in marine ecotoxicology: comparative acute toxicity sensitivity with Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Sara; Beiras, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Siriella armata (Crustacea, Mysidacea) is a component of the coastal zooplankton that lives in swarms in the shallow waters of the European neritic zone, from the North Sea to the Mediterranean. Juveniles of this species were examined as standard test organisms for use in marine acute toxicity tests. The effects of reference toxicants, three trace metals (Copper, Cadmium and Zinc), and one surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied on S. armata neonates (\\24 h) reared in the laboratory. Acute toxicity tests were carried out with filtered sea water on individual chambers (microplate wells for metals or glass vials for SDS) incubated in an isothermal room at 20 degrees C, with 16 h light: 8 h dark photoperiod for 96 h. Each neonate was fed daily with 10-15 nauplii of Artemia salina. Acute (96 h) LC50 values, in increasing order, were 46.9 lg/L for Cu, 99.3 lg/L for Cd, 466.7 lg/L for Zn and 8.5 mg/L for SDS. The LC(10), NOEC and LOEC values were also calculated. Results were compared with Daphnia magna, a freshwater cladoceran widely used as a standard ecotoxicological test organism. Acute (48 h) LC(50) values were 56.2 lg/L for Cu, 571.5 lg/L for Cd, 1.3 mg/L for Zn and 27.3 mg/L for SDS. For all the reference toxicants studied, the marine mysid Siriella armata showed higher sensitivity than the freshwater model organism Daphnia magna, validating the use of Siriella mysids as model organisms in marine acute toxicity tests.

  7. A versatile and low-cost open source pipetting robot for automation of toxicological and ecotoxicological bioassays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Steffens

    Full Text Available In the past decades, bioassays and whole-organism bioassay have become important tools not only in compliance testing of industrial chemicals and plant protection products, but also in the monitoring of environmental quality. With few exceptions, such test systems are discontinuous. They require exposure of the biological test material in small units, such as multiwell plates, during prolonged incubation periods, and do not allow online read-outs. It is mostly due to these shortcomings that applications in continuous monitoring of, e.g., drinking or surface water quality are largely missing. We propose the use of pipetting robots that can be used to automatically exchange samples in multiwell plates with fresh samples in a semi-static manner, as a potential solution to overcome these limitations. In this study, we developed a simple and low-cost, versatile pipetting robot constructed partly using open-source hardware that has a small footprint and can be used for online monitoring of water quality by means of an automated whole-organism bioassay. We tested its precision in automated 2-fold dilution series and used it for exposure of zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio-a common model species in ecotoxicology-to cadmium chloride and permethrin. We found that, compared to conventional static or semi-static exposure scenarios, effects of the two chemicals in zebrafish embryos generally occurred at lower concentrations, and analytically verified that the increased frequency of media exchange resulted in a greater availability of the chemical. In combination with advanced detection systems this custom-made pipetting robot has the potential to become a valuable tool in future monitoring strategies for drinking and surface water.

  8. Global change ecotoxicology: Identification of early life history bottlenecks in marine invertebrates, variable species responses and variable experimental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, M

    2012-05-01

    Climate change is a threat to marine biota because increased atmospheric CO₂ is causing ocean warming, acidification, hypercapnia and decreased carbonate saturation. These stressors have toxic effects on invertebrate development. The persistence and success of populations requires all ontogenetic stages be completed successfully and, due to their sensitivity to environmental stressors, developmental stages may be a population bottleneck in a changing ocean. Global change ecotoxicology is being used to identify the marine invertebrate developmental stages vulnerable to climate change. This overview of research, and the methodologies used, shows that most studies focus on acidification, with few studies on ocean warming, despite a long history of research on developmental thermotolerance. The interactive effects of stressors are poorly studied. Experimental approaches differ among studies. Fertilization in many species exhibits a broad tolerance to warming and/or acidification, although different methodologies confound inter-study comparisons. Early development is susceptible to warming and most calcifying larvae are sensitive to acidification/increased pCO₂. In multistressor studies moderate warming diminishes the negative impact of acidification on calcification in some species. Development of non-calcifying larvae appears resilient to near-future ocean change. Although differences in species sensitivities to ocean change stressors undoubtedly reflect different tolerance levels, inconsistent handling of gametes, embryos and larvae probably influences different research outcomes. Due to the integrative 'developmental domino effect', life history responses will be influenced by the ontogenetic stage at which experimental incubations are initiated. Exposure to climate change stressors from early development (fertilization where possible) in multistressor experiments is needed to identify ontogenetic sensitivities and this will be facilitated by more consistent

  9. Photodegradation and ecotoxicology of acyclovir in water under UV254and UV254/H2O2processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Danilo; Siciliano, Antonietta; Guida, Marco; Galdiero, Emilia; Amoresano, Angela; Andreozzi, Roberto; Reis, Nuno M; Li Puma, Gianluca; Marotta, Raffaele

    2017-10-01

    The photochemical and ecotoxicological fate of acyclovir (ACY) through UV 254 direct photolysis and in the presence of hydroxyl radicals (UV 254 /H 2 O 2 process) were investigated in a microcapillary film (MCF) array photoreactor, which provided ultrarapid and accurate photochemical reaction kinetics. The UVC phototransformation of ACY was found to be unaffected by pH in the range from 4.5 to 8.0 and resembled an apparent autocatalytic reaction. The proposed mechanism included the formation of a photochemical intermediate (ϕ ACY  = (1.62 ± 0.07)·10 -3  mol ein -1 ) that further reacted with ACY to form by-products (k' = (5.64 ± 0.03)·10 -3  M -1  s -1 ). The photolysis of ACY in the presence of hydrogen peroxide accelerated the removal of ACY as a result of formation of hydroxyl radicals. The kinetic constant for the reaction of OH radicals with ACY (k OH/ACY ) determined with the kinetic modeling method was (1.23 ± 0.07)·10 9  M -1  s -1 and with the competition kinetics method was (2.30 ± 0.11)·10 9  M -1  s -1 with competition kinetics. The acute and chronic effects of the treated aqueous mixtures on different living organisms (Vibrio fischeri, Raphidocelis subcapitata, D. magna) revealed significantly lower toxicity for the samples treated with UV 254 /H 2 O 2 in comparison to those collected during UV 254 treatment. This result suggests that the addition of moderate quantity of hydrogen peroxide (30-150 mg L -1 ) might be a useful strategy to reduce the ecotoxicity of UV 254 based sanitary engineered systems for water reclamation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A new bioassay for the ecotoxicological testing of VOCs on groundwater invertebrates and the effects of toluene on Niphargus inopinatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avramov, Maria; Schmidt, Susanne I. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Groundwater Ecology, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Griebler, Christian, E-mail: christian.griebler@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Groundwater Ecology, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► A new bioassay for testing the toxicity of VOCs on groundwater fauna is presented. ► Results on the toxicity of toluene to Niphargus inopinatus are now available. ► Henry equilibrium needs to be considered when bioassays with VOCs are designed. ► Methodological aspects related to “difficult-to-test substances” are discussed. -- Abstract: A protocol was developed for testing the ecotoxicological effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on groundwater invertebrates. Test substance volatility was addressed in a “closed from start to analysis”-design. Since manifestation of toxic effects may be delayed in ‘slower metabolizing’ organisms such as groundwater fauna, a time-independent (TI-) approach was adopted. Toluene was used as a model substance and its toxicity to the groundwater amphipod Niphargus inopinatus was assessed as an example. The method evaluation process considered various methodological issues such as partitioning of the toxicant between the water and the gas phase (Henry equilibrium), the possible depletion of oxygen in closed test vials, as well as microbial biodegradation of the test substance. For N. inopinatus, an LC{sub 50},{sub 14} {sub days} of 46.6 mg L{sup −1} toluene was obtained. The ultimate LC{sub 50} value was estimated at 23.3 mg L{sup −1} toluene. No oxygen depletion occurred in the test vials and Henry equilibrium was found to be established after 6 h. The new test system proposed now awaits broad practical application.

  11. Ecotoxicological risk assessment of hospital wastewater: a proposed framework for raw effluents discharging into urban sewer network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmanuel, E. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, Ecole Nationale des Travaux Publics de l' Etat, Rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France) and Laboratoire d' Analyse Environnementale des Procedes et Systemes Industriels, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: evemm1@yahoo.fr; Perrodin, Y. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, Ecole Nationale des Travaux Publics de l' Etat, Rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Keck, G. [Unite d' Ecotoxicologie, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Lyon, BP 83, 69280 Marcy l' Etoile (France); Blanchard, J.-M. [Laboratoire d' Analyse Environnementale des Procedes et Systemes Industriels, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Vermande, P. [Laboratoire d' Analyse Environnementale des Procedes et Systemes Industriels, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2005-01-14

    In hospitals a large variety of substances are in use for medical purposes such as diagnostics and research. After application, diagnostic agents, disinfectants and excreted non-metabolized pharmaceuticals by patients, reach the wastewater. This form of elimination may generate risks for aquatic organisms. The aim of this study was to present: (i) the steps of an ecological risk assessment and management framework related to hospital effluents evacuating into wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) without preliminary treatment; and (ii) the results of its application on wastewater from an infectious and tropical diseases department of a hospital of a large city in southeastern France. The characterization of effects has been made under two assumptions, which were related to: (a) the effects of hospital wastewater on biological treatment process of WWTP, particularly on the community of organisms in charge of the biological decomposition of the organic matter; (b) the effects on aquatic organisms. COD and BOD{sub 5} have been measured for studying global organic pollution. Assessment of halogenated organic compounds was made using halogenated organic compounds absorbable on activated carbon (AOX) concentrations. Heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chrome, copper, mercury, nickel, lead and zinc) were measured. Low most probable number (MPP) for faecal coliforms has been considered as an indirect detection of antibiotics and disinfectants presence. For toxicity assessment, bioluminescence assay using Vibrio fischeri photobacteria, 72-h EC{sub 50} algae growth Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and 24-h EC{sub 50} on Daphnia magna were used. The scenario allows to a semi-quantitative risk characterization. It needs to be improved on some aspects, particularly those linked to: long term toxicity assessment on target organisms (bioaccumulation of pollutants, genotoxicity, etc.); ecotoxicological interactions between pharmaceuticals, disinfectants used both in diagnostics and in

  12. Ecotoxicological impacts of effluents generated by oil sands bitumen extraction and oil sands lixiviation on Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debenest, T., E-mail: tdebenest@yahoo.fr [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada); Turcotte, P. [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada); Gagne, F., E-mail: francois.gagne@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada); Gagnon, C.; Blaise, C. [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    The exploitation of Athabasca oil sands deposits in northern Alberta has known an intense development in recent years. This development has raised concern about the ecotoxicological risk of such industrial activities adjacent to the Athabasca River. Indeed, bitumen extraction generated large amounts of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) which are discharged in tailing ponds in the Athabasca River watershed. This study sought to evaluate and compare the toxicity of OSPW and oil sands lixiviate water (OSLW) with a baseline (oil sands exposed to water; OSW) on a microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, at different concentrations (1.9, 5.5, 12.25, 25 and 37.5%, v/v). Chemical analyses of water-soluble contaminants showed that OSPW and OSLW were enriched in different elements such as vanadium (enrichment factor, EF = 66 and 12, respectively), aluminum (EF = 64 and 15, respectively), iron (EF = 52.5 and 17.1, respectively) and chromium (39 and 10, respectively). The toxicity of OSPW on cells with optimal intracellular esterase activity and chlorophyll autofluorescence (viable cells) (72 h-IC 50% < 1.9%) was 20 times higher than the one of OSW (72 h-IC 50% > 37.5%, v/v). OSLW was 4.4 times less toxic (IC 50% = 8.5%, v/v) than OSPW and 4.5 times more toxic than OSW. The inhibition of viable cell growth was significantly and highly correlated (<-0.7) with the increase of arsenic, beryllium, chromium, copper, lead, molybdenum and vanadium concentrations. The specific photosynthetic responses studied with JIP-test (rapid and polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence emission) showed a stimulation of the different functional parameters (efficiency of PSII to absorb energy from photons, size of effective PSII antenna and vitality of photosynthetic apparatus for energy conversion) in cultures exposed to OSPW and OSLW. To our knowledge, our study highlights the first evidence of physiological effects of OSPW and OSLW on microalgae.

  13. Weight-of-evidence approach in assessment of ecotoxicological risks of acid sulphate soils in the Baltic Sea river estuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Jaana; Karjalainen, Anna K; Schultz, Eija; Järvistö, Johanna; Leppänen, Matti; Vuori, Kari-Matti

    2015-03-01

    Acidity and leaching of metals from acid sulphate soils (ASSs) impair the water quality of receiving surface waters. The largest ASS areas in Europe are found in the coasts of the northern Baltic Sea. We used weight-of-evidence (WoE) approach to assess potential risks in 14 estuary sites affected by ASS in the Gulf of Finland, northern Baltic Sea. The assessment was based on exposure and effect profiles utilizing sediment and water metal concentrations and concurrent pH variation, sediment toxicity tests using the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the midge Chironomus riparius, and the ecological status of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Sediment metal concentrations were compared to national sediment quality criteria/guidelines, and water metal concentrations to environmental quality standards (EQSs). Hazard quotients (HQs) were established for maximum aluminium, cadmium and zinc concentrations at low pH based on applicable US EPA toxicity database. Sediment metal concentrations were clearly elevated in most of the studied estuaries. The EQS of cadmium (0.1 μg/l) was exceeded in 3 estuaries out of 14. The pH-minima were below the national threshold value (5.5) between good and satisfactory water quality in 10 estuaries. V. fischeri bioluminescence indicated toxicity of the sediments but toxic response was not observed in the C. riparius emergence test. Benthic invertebrate communities were deteriorated in 6 out of 14 sites based on the benthic invertebrate quality index. The overall ecotoxicological risk was assessed as low in five, moderate in three and high in five of the estuary sites. The risk assessment utilizing the WoE approach indicated that harmful effects of ASSs are likely to occur in the Baltic Sea river estuaries located at the ASS hotspot area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ecotoxicological effects of larvicide used in the control of Aedes aegypti on nontarget organisms: Redefining the use of pyriproxyfen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Santos, Vanessa Santana; Caixeta, Evelyn Siqueira; Campos Júnior, Edimar Olegário de; Pereira, Boscolli Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    The continued widespread use of larvicides in Aedes aegypti control programs is still a necessary strategy, since there are no apparent efficient vaccines against arboviruses. However, chemical approaches may affect nontarget organisms and produce detrimental effects to environmental health. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct toxicity testing for pyriproxyfen at different concentrations using Daphnia magna and Artemia salina as model organisms to evaluate the ecotoxicological parameters. This study describes the toxicological effects of pyriproxyfen on both microcrustaceans, which are widely used in bioassays because of their sensitivity to changes in hydrosphere. Data demonstrated that the calculated EC50-48h value of pyriproxyfen was 2.5 μg/for D. magna and A. salina; the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) and the lowest-observed-effect concentration (LOEC) of pyriproxyfen were found to be 0.63 and 1.25 μg/L for Artemia salina and Daphnia magna, respectively. In chronic toxicity and reproduction tests on D. magna, a calculated CL50-7day (lethality on 50% of daphnids after 7 days of chronic test) and an EC50-21day (50% reduction in the reproductive output of parental daphnids after 21 days of exposure) higher than 1.25 μg/L pyriproxyfen were observed. The time of first reproduction was significantly increased in D. magna after exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of pyriproxyfen, but other reproduction parameters were not markedly altered. Environmental risk assessment revealed that pyriproxyfen is highly toxic for both branchiopods. Data demonstrated that pyriproxyfen may produce adverse effects on the aquatic ecosystem at concentrations required to control Ae. aegypti.

  15. Are whale sharks exposed to persistent organic pollutants and plastic pollution in the Gulf of California (Mexico)? First ecotoxicological investigation using skin biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossi, Maria Cristina; Baini, Matteo; Panti, Cristina; Galli, Matteo; Jiménez, Begoña; Muñoz-Arnanz, Juan; Marsili, Letizia; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Ramírez-Macías, Dení

    2017-09-01

    The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is an endangered species that may be exposed to micro- and macro-plastic ingestion as a result of their filter-feeding activity, particularly on the sea surface. In this pilot project we perform the first ecotoxicological investigation on whale sharks sampled in the Gulf of California exploring the potential interaction of this species with plastic debris (macro-, micro-plastics and related sorbed contaminants). Due to the difficulty in obtaining stranded specimens of this endangered species, an indirect approach, by skin biopsies was used for the evaluation of the whale shark ecotoxicological status. The levels of organochlorine compounds (PCBs, DDTs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) plastic additives, and related biomarkers responses (CYP1A) were investigated for the first time in the whale shark. Twelve whale shark skin biopsy samples were collected in January 2014 in La Paz Bay (BCS, Mexico) and a preliminary investigation on microplastic concentration and polymer composition was also carried out in seawater samples from the same area. The average abundance pattern for the target contaminants was PCBs>DDTs>PBDEs>HCB. Mean concentration values of 8.42ng/g w.w. were found for PCBs, 1.31ng/g w.w. for DDTs, 0.29ng/g w.w. for PBDEs and 0.19ng/g w.w. for HCB. CYP1A-like protein was detected, for the first time, in whale shark skin samples. First data on the average density of microplastics in the superficial zooplankton/microplastic samples showed values ranging from 0.00items/m 3 to 0.14items/m 3 . A focused PCA analysis was performed to evaluate a possible correlation among the size of the whale sharks, contaminants and CYP1A reponses. Further ecotoxicological investigation on whale shark skin biopsies will be carried out for a worldwide ecotoxicological risk assessment of this endangerd species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Screening of ecotoxicological, qualitative and reproductive variables in male European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) reared in three different fish farms: Facility location and typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangialosi, Maria Vittoria; Corsi, Ilaria; Bonacci, Stefano; Sensini, Cristiana; Cicero, Nicola; Focardi, Silvano; Mazzola, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of both facility location and typology of fish farm on some ecotoxicological, qualitative and reproductive variables in European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax L. Several variables were investigated: gonado-somatic index (GSI), liver-somatic index (LSI); 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), benzo(a)pyrene monooxygenase and acetylcholinesterase activities; glutathione (GSH), testosterone, 17β-estradiol, total lipid, phospholipid (PL) and triglyceride contents. In addition, the histological sections of gonads were examined. Results suggest that LSI, EROD activity, GSI, GSH, PL, hormone levels and gonad morphology were influenced by different facility locations and typologies of fish farm.

  17. Catalytically defective ganglioside neuraminidase in mucolipidosis IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Yoseph, Y.; Momoi, T.; Hahn, L.C.; Nadler, H.L. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (USA))

    1982-01-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with mucolipidosis IV were found to be deficient in neuraminidase activity toward GDsub(la) and GDsub(lb) gangliosides radiolabelled in C/sub 3/ and C/sub 7/ analogs of their sialic acid residues. Neuraminidase activities toward 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, neuraminlactose, and radiolabelled neuraminlactitol, fetuin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-acid glycoprotein were within the range of normal controls. Fibroblasts from parents of patients with mucolipidosis IV demonstrated intermediate levels of ganglioside neuraminidase activity and normal levels of glycoprotein neuraminidase activity. The redidual acidic neuraminidase activity toward GDsub(1a) ganglioside in the patients' fibroblasts did not differ from that of controls in its pH optimum and thermostability, but had an abnormal apparent Ksub(m) which was about 18 times higher than that of the normal enzyme. These findings suggest that mucolipidosis IV is a ganglioside sialidosis due to a catalytically defective ganglioside neuraminidase.

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Delyana I.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Schindler, Dwayne; Messier, Claude

    2013-01-01

    New editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence and Memory scales are now available. Yet, given the significant changes in these new releases and the skepticism that has met them, independent evidence on their psychometric properties is much needed but currently lacking. We administered the WAIS-IV and the Older Adult version of the WMS-IV to 145…

  19. Muscle Function in Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Louis-Nicolas; Darsaklis, Vasiliki B; Montpetit, Kathleen; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank

    2017-05-04

    Results of previous studies suggest that children and adolescents with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type IV have muscle force deficits. However, muscle function remains to be objectively quantified in this population. This study aimed to assess upper and lower extremity muscle function in patients with OI type IV. It was carried out in the outpatient department of a pediatric orthopedic hospital; 27 individuals with OI type IV (7-21 years; 13 males), 27 age- and sex-matched individuals with OI type I, and 27 age- and sex-matched controls. Upper extremity muscle force was assessed with hydraulic hand dynamometry, and lower extremity muscle function (peak force per body weight and peak power per body mass) was measured by mechanography through five tests: multiple two-legged hopping, multiple one-legged hopping, single two-legged jump, chair-rise test, and heel-rise test. Upper-limb grip force was normal for patients with OI type IV when compared to height and sex reference data (average z-score = 0.17 ± 1.30; P = 0.88). Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, patients with OI type IV had approximately 30% lower-limb peak force and 50% peak power deficits (P values <0.05). At the lower-limb level, they had a 50% lower peak power than age- and sex-matched patients with OI type I (P < 0.05). Patients with OI type IV have normal upper-limb muscle force but a muscle function deficit at the lower-limb level. These results suggest that lower-limb muscle weakness may contribute to functional deficits in these individuals.

  20. Oxochloroalkoxide of the Cerium (IV and Titanium (IV as oxides precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Luiz Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cerium (IV and Titanium (IV oxides mixture (CeO2-3TiO2 was prepared by thermal treatment of the oxochloroisopropoxide of Cerium (IV and Titanium (IV. The chemical route utilizing the Cerium (III chloride alcoholic complex and Titanium (IV isopropoxide is presented. The compound Ce5Ti15Cl16O30 (iOPr4(OH-Et15 was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR and TG/DTG. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the oxides resulting from the thermal decomposition of the precursor at 1000 degreesC for 36 h indicated the formation of cubic cerianite (a = 5.417Å and tetragonal rutile (a = 4.592Å and (c = 2.962 Å, with apparent crystallite sizes around 38 and 55nm, respectively.

  1. Commencement Bay Study. Volume IV. Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    AD-AI12 555 DAMES AND MOORE SEATTLE WA* FIG 8/1 COMMENCEMENT BAY STUDY. VOLUME IV. INVERTEBRATES .(U)DEC 81 W M BAYLOCK, J P HOUGHTON DACW67-80-C-OIDI...December 1981 Volume IV, Invertebrates 6. PERFORMINO ORG. REPORT NUMBER 682-021-05 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUmaER(S) DACW67-80-C-0101 S. PERFORMING... Invertebrates Air Quality, Birds Is. KEY WORDS (Continue an reverse old. It necomemy w red ty a b eek mireber) Salmonids Wetlands Noise Aesthetics Marine Fish

  2. Functions in Free-Format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Written especially for programmers adopting a free-format style, this manual explores the role of functions in writing RPG IV programs. Demonstrating the potential of functions, many topics are explored such as details about existing RPG IV built-in functions, writing new functions, using ILE concepts to use C functions, and utilizing IBM API's functions. Explaining how to write small programs, either as sub-procedures or modules, and how to gather those parts together to make programs that are easy to write and maintain, this is a natural next step for programmers familiar with a free-format

  3. Proof-Carrying Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    pp.289-302 ( Impact factor : 2.09). 2. Julic, J. and Zuo, Y. (2012). “An RFID Survivability Impact Model in the Military Domain”, Proc. of 18 th...Availability, Reliability and Security, 40(4), pp. 406-418 ( Impact factor : 2.016). 10. Zuo, Y. (2010). “A Holistic Approach for Specification of Security... Impact factor : 1.596). 20. Zuo, Y., Pimple, M. and Lande, S. (2009). “A Framework for RFID Survivability Requirement Analysis and Specification”, Proc

  4. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081 ...

  5. Expiry date guidelines for a centralized IV admixture service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, J W; Mighton-Eryou, L M

    1986-06-01

    Expiry date guidelines for a centralized pharmacy-based IV admixture program are documented. These guidelines form part of an overall quality assurance program for the IV admixture service. Factors affecting IV admixture expiry times include drug compatibility with the vehicle(s) and container, microbiological parameters, and established standards of practice for pharmacy-based IV admixture programs.

  6. Survivability via Control Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.

    2000-08-11

    Control objectives open an additional front in the survivability battle. A given set of control objectives is valuable if it represents good practices, it is complete (it covers all the necessary areas), and it is auditable. CobiT and BS 7799 are two examples of control objective sets.

  7. Artists’ Survival Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Jensen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readdressed this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic...... education has a significant impact on artists’ careers in the arts and we find important industry differences....

  8. Education for Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of current approaches to education and concludes that none of these is sufficient to meet the challenges that now face the human race. It argues instead for a new concept of education for survival. (Contains 1 note.)

  9. Flexible survival regression modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Scheike, Thomas H; Martinussen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Regression analysis of survival data, and more generally event history data, is typically based on Cox's regression model. We here review some recent methodology, focusing on the limitations of Cox's regression model. The key limitation is that the model is not well suited to represent time-varyi...

  10. Seeds to survive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S.P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Seeds are important for man, either as propagation material of crops or directly for the production of foods, fodder and drinks. The natural function of seeds is dispersal of its genes to successive generations. Survival mechanisms seed have evolved sometimes interfere with those preferred by

  11. Survival After Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Clark; Youngblood, Stuart A.

    1986-01-01

    Examined survival rates after retirement in a large corporation. A regression analysis was performed to control for age, sex, job status, and type of work differences that may influence longevity. Short-term suvivors seemed to undergo a different adjustment process than long-term survivors. (Author/ABL)

  12. Genetics Home Reference: mucolipidosis type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it does result in unusually high levels of gastrin in the blood. Gastrin is a hormone that regulates the production of ... Resources (2 links) GeneReview: Mucolipidosis IV MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Gastrin General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  13. ATHENA-IV. Inelastic Scattering Form Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwieroth, F.S.; Dodson, J.I.; Johnson, M.B.; Owen, L.W.; Satchler, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1969-09-05

    ATHENA-IV computes form factors for inelastic scattering calculations, using single-particle wave functions that are eigenstates of motion in either a Woods-Saxon potential well or a harmonic oscillator well. Two-body forces of Gauss, Coulomb, Yukawa, and a sum of cut-off Yukawa radial dependences are available.

  14. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-29

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  15. Painlevé IV coherent states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, David, E-mail: david.bermudez@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Departamento de Física, Cinvestav, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico); Contreras-Astorga, Alonso, E-mail: aloncont@iun.edu [Department of Mathematics and Actuarial Science, Indiana University Northwest, 3400 Broadway, Gary IN 46408 (United States); Departamento de Física, Cinvestav, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico); Fernández C, David J., E-mail: david@fis.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Física, Cinvestav, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-11-15

    A simple way to find solutions of the Painlevé IV equation is by identifying Hamiltonian systems with third-order differential ladder operators. Some of these systems can be obtained by applying supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY QM) to the harmonic oscillator. In this work, we will construct families of coherent states for such subset of SUSY partner Hamiltonians which are connected with the Painlevé IV equation. First, these coherent states are built up as eigenstates of the annihilation operator, then as displaced versions of the extremal states, both involving the related third-order ladder operators, and finally as extremal states which are also displaced but now using the so called linearized ladder operators. To each SUSY partner Hamiltonian corresponds two families of coherent states: one inside the infinite subspace associated with the isospectral part of the spectrum and another one in the finite subspace generated by the states created through the SUSY technique. - Highlights: • We use SUSY QM to obtain Hamiltonians with third-order differential ladder operators. • We show that these systems are related with the Painlevé IV equation. • We apply different definitions of coherent states to these Hamiltonians using the third-order ladder operators and some linearized ones. • We construct families of coherent states for such systems, which we called Painlevé IV coherent states.

  16. Bis(4-methylpiperidinium hexachloridostannate(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Helliwell

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, (C6H14N2[SnCl6], is built of 4-methylpiperidinium cations, occupying special positions on the mirror plane, and hexachloridostannate(IV anions on a special position of 2/m symmetry. The ions are linked via N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds into chains running along the b axis.

  17. Assessment criteria for using the sea-urchin embryo test with sediment elutriates as a tool to classify the ecotoxicological status of marine water bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Iria; Beiras, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    A large, multiyear data set was generated by pooling the sediment elutriate (SET) results collected during previous studies conducted in the Galician Rias (northwest Iberian Peninsula) that met the acceptability criteria in the controls, to ensure optimum quality of data (n=162). Two subsets of equal to reference and lower than reference sites were identified by comparing the Percentage Net Response (PNR) value from each sampling site with nontoxic, cruise-specific, reference sites by using the t test with the unequal variance assumption. Ecotoxicological Assessment Criteria (EAC0, EAC1, EAC2, and EAC3) were then derived from those two subsets to classify the SET results into five categories of ecotoxicological status: high, good, moderate, poor, and bad, in line with the European legislation. The 50th and 5th percentiles of the PNR distribution of the equal to reference sites subset were EAC0=0.879 and EAC1=0.694. An EAC2=0.508 was obtained from the 50th percentile of the lower than reference sites subset. Because the PNR values of the entire database showed a distribution that can be adjusted to two normal populations, the EAC3=0.240 PNR was calculated as the intersection between the first and second normal distributions identified. Power analysis proved that the limit between acceptable and unacceptable status (EAC1) corresponded to a detectable PNR difference to control with a confidence level>99% and a power of 95%. Copyright (c) 2010 SETAC.

  18. Evaluation of dredged sediment co-composted with green waste as plant growing media assessed by eco-toxicological tests, plant growth and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Paola; Pastorelli, Roberta; Rami, Gabriele; Mocali, Stefano; Giagnoni, Laura; Gonnelli, Cristina; Renella, Giancarlo

    2017-07-05

    Dredged sediments have currently no broad reuse options as compared to other wastes due to their peculiar physico-chemical properties, posing problems for the management of the large volumes of sediments dredged worldwide. In this study we evaluated the performance of sediment (S) co-composted with green waste (GW) as growing medium for ornamental plants. Analysis of the microbial community structure, eco-toxicological tests, were conducted on sediments at 1:1 and 3:1S:GW composting ratios. Sediment-based growing media were then reused to growth the ornamental plant Photina x fraseri in a pilot-scale experiment and plants' physiological and chemical parameters were measured. The results showed that co-composting with green waste increased the diversity of bacteria, fungi and archaea as compared to the untreated sediments, and that both the 1:1 and 3:1 S:GW composted sediments had no substantial eco-toxicological impacts, allowing an excellent plant growth. We concluded that co-composted of sediment with green waste produce a growing medium with suitable properties for growing ornamental plants, and represent a sustainable option for beneficial use of dredged sediments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The effect of the feeding pattern of complex industrial wastewater on activated sludge characteristics and the chemical and ecotoxicological effluent quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caluwé, Michel; Dobbeleers, Thomas; Daens, Dominique; Blust, Ronny; Geuens, Luc; Dries, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Research has demonstrated that the feeding pattern of synthetic wastewater plays an important role in sludge characteristics during biological wastewater treatment. Although considerable research has been devoted to synthetic wastewater, less attention has been paid to industrial wastewater. In this research, three different feeding strategies were applied during the treatment of tank truck cleaning (TTC) water. This industry produces highly variable wastewaters that are often loaded with hazardous chemicals, which makes them challenging to treat with activated sludge (AS). In this study, it is shown that the feeding pattern has a significant influence on the settling characteristics. Pulse feeding resulted in AS with a sludge volume index (SVI) of 68 ± 15 mL gMLSS-1. Slowly and continuously fed AS had to contend with unstable SVI values that fluctuated between 100 and 600 mL gMLSS-1. These fluctuations were clearly caused by the feeding solution. The obtained settling characteristics are being supported by the microscopic analysis, which revealed a clear floc structure for the pulse fed AS. Ecotoxicological effluent assessment with bacteria, Crustacea and algae identified algae as the most sensitive organism for all effluents from all different reactors. Variable algae growth inhibitions were measured between the different reactors. The chemical and ecotoxicological effluent quality was comparable between the reactors.

  20. Assessing the relevance of a multiplexed methodology for proteomic biomarker measurement in the invertebrate species Gammarus fossarum: A physiological and ecotoxicological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, D; Chaumot, A; Charnot, A; Queau, H; Armengaud, J; Almunia, C; Salvador, A; Geffard, O

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a protein sequence database was built specifically for the sentinel non-model species Gammarus fossarum using a proteogenomics approach. A quantitative multiplexed targeted proteomics assay (using Selected Reaction Monitoring mass spectrometry) was then developed for a fast and simultaneous quantification of dozens of biomarker peptides specific of this freshwater sentinel crustacean species. In order to assess the relevance of this breakthrough methodology in ecotoxicology, the response patterns of a panel of 26 peptides reporting for 20 proteins from the Gammarus fossarum proteome with putative key functional roles (homeostasis, osmoregulation, nutrition, reproduction, molting,…) were recorded through male and female reproductive cycles and after exposure to environmental concentrations of cadmium and lead in laboratory-controlled conditions. Based on these results, we validated the implication of annotated vtg-like peptides in the oogenesis process, and the implication of Na + /K + ATPase proteins in the molt cycle of organisms. Upon metal (cadmium and lead) contamination, peptides belonging to proteins annotated as involved in antioxidant and detoxification functions, immunity and molting were significantly down-regulated. Overall, this multiplex assay allowed gaining relevant insights upon disruption of different main functions in the sentinel species Gammarus fossarum. This breakthrough methodology in ecotoxicology offers a valid and high throughput alternative to currently used protocols, paving the way for future practical applications of proteogenomics-derived protein biomarkers in chemical risk assessment and environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a novel method in ecotoxicology--determination of morphometric and somatic data in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Markus; Rizzo, Larissa Y; Lammers, Twan; Gremse, Felix; Schiwy, Sabrina; Kiessling, Fabian; Hollert, Henner

    2016-02-01

    Fish are important sentinel organisms for the assessment of water quality and play a central role in ecotoxicological research. Of particular importance to the assessment of health and fitness of fish stocks in response to environmental conditions or pollution are morphometric (e.g. Fulton's condition index) and somatic indices (e.g. hepatosomatic, and gonadosomatic index). Standard measurements of somatic indices are invasive and require, by definition, the sacrifice of examined animals, thus prohibiting longitudinal studies and relocation of animals captured in the field. As a potential solution, in the present study, we propose the use of micro-computed tomography (μCT) as imaging modality to non-invasively tomographically image rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to different sediment suspensions. We here demonstrate that μCT can be used as a tool to reliably measure the volumes of different organs, which could then be applied as a substitute of their weights in calculation of somatic indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report the results of μCT analyses in the context of ecotoxicological research in rainbow trout. It has the potential to greatly increase the information value of experiments conducted with fish and also to potentially reduce the number of animals required for studying temporal effects through facilitating longitudinal studies within the same individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Distribution, potential source and ecotoxicological risk of polychlorinated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the surface water of the Three Gorges Dam region of the Yangtze River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Yun, Xiaoyan; Liu, Minxia; Yang, Yuyi; Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Distributions, potential sources and ecotoxicological risks of PCBs and PBDEs in surface water of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) region (Yangtze River, China) were investigated. Samples were collected from 18 sites from upstream (UTGD) and downstream (DTGD) of the TGD. Thirty-two PCBs and ten PBDEs were analyzed. ΣPCBs from the UTGD and DTGD ranged from 10.6 to 26.1 and 1.7 to 29.8 ng L(-1), respectively. ΣPBDEs from the UTGD and DTGD ranged from 2.0 to 17.6 and 0.8 to 11.1 ng L(-1), respectively. The total concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs showed a declining trend from the UTGD to DTGD. Independent-samples t test analysis showed no statistical significance of ΣPCBs and ΣPBDEs between the UTGD and DTGD samples. Principal component analysis indicated the difference of potential sources and levels of PCBs and PBDEs in the study area. The potential eco-toxicological risk of PCBs in surface water of the TGD region is very low, whereas special attention needs to be paid to PBDEs in the study area.

  3. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-03-29

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product

  4. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germain Dominique P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS, is an inherited connective tissue disorder defined by characteristic facial features (acrogeria in most patients, translucent skin with highly visible subcutaneous vessels on the trunk and lower back, easy bruising, and severe arterial, digestive and uterine complications, which are rarely, if at all, observed in the other forms of EDS. The estimated prevalence for all EDS varies between 1/10,000 and 1/25,000, EDS type IV representing approximately 5 to 10% of cases. The vascular complications may affect all anatomical areas, with a tendency toward arteries of large and medium diameter. Dissections of the vertebral arteries and the carotids in their extra- and intra-cranial segments (carotid-cavernous fistulae are typical. There is a high risk of recurrent colonic perforations. Pregnancy increases the likelihood of a uterine or vascular rupture. EDS type IV is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait that is caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene coding for type III procollagen. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, non-invasive imaging, and the identification of a mutation of the COL3A1 gene. In childhood, coagulation disorders and Silverman's syndrome are the main differential diagnoses; in adulthood, the differential diagnosis includes other Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis can be considered in families where the mutation is known. Choriocentesis or amniocentesis, however, may entail risk for the pregnant woman. In the absence of specific treatment for EDS type IV, medical intervention should be focused on symptomatic treatment and prophylactic measures. Arterial, digestive or uterine complications require immediate hospitalisation, observation in an intensive care unit. Invasive imaging techniques are contraindicated. Conservative approach is usually recommended when caring for a vascular

  5. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Dominique P

    2007-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), is an inherited connective tissue disorder defined by characteristic facial features (acrogeria) in most patients, translucent skin with highly visible subcutaneous vessels on the trunk and lower back, easy bruising, and severe arterial, digestive and uterine complications, which are rarely, if at all, observed in the other forms of EDS. The estimated prevalence for all EDS varies between 1/10,000 and 1/25,000, EDS type IV representing approximately 5 to 10% of cases. The vascular complications may affect all anatomical areas, with a tendency toward arteries of large and medium diameter. Dissections of the vertebral arteries and the carotids in their extra- and intra-cranial segments (carotid-cavernous fistulae) are typical. There is a high risk of recurrent colonic perforations. Pregnancy increases the likelihood of a uterine or vascular rupture. EDS type IV is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait that is caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene coding for type III procollagen. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, non-invasive imaging, and the identification of a mutation of the COL3A1 gene. In childhood, coagulation disorders and Silverman's syndrome are the main differential diagnoses; in adulthood, the differential diagnosis includes other Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis can be considered in families where the mutation is known. Choriocentesis or amniocentesis, however, may entail risk for the pregnant woman. In the absence of specific treatment for EDS type IV, medical intervention should be focused on symptomatic treatment and prophylactic measures. Arterial, digestive or uterine complications require immediate hospitalisation, observation in an intensive care unit. Invasive imaging techniques are contraindicated. Conservative approach is usually recommended when caring for a vascular complication in a patient suffering

  6. Clustering pesticides according to their molecular properties and their impacts by considering additional ecotoxicological parameters in the TyPol method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traore, Harouna; Crouzet, Olivier; Mamy, Laure; Sireyjol, Christine; Rossard, Virginie; Servien, Remy; Latrille, Eric; Benoit, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    The understanding of the fate of pesticides and their environmental impacts largely relies on their molecular properties. We recently developed 'TyPol' (Typology of Pollutants), a clustering method based on statistical analyses combining several environmental endpoints (i.e. environmental parameters such as sorption coefficient, degradation half-life) and one ecotoxicological one (bioconcentration factor), and structural molecular descriptors (number of atoms in the molecule, molecular surface, dipole moment, energy of orbitals…). TyPol has been conceived on the available knowledge on QSAR of a wide diversity of organic compounds (Mamy et al., 2015). This approach also allows to focus on transformation products present in different clusters and to infer possible changes in environmental fate consecutively to different degradation processes (Servien et al., 2014; Benoit et al., 2016). The initial version of TyPol did not include any ecotoxicological parameters except the bioconcentration factor (BCF), which informs more on the transfer along the trophic chain rather than on the effects on non-target organisms. The objective was to implement the TyPol database with a data set of ecotoxicological data concerning pesticides and several aquatic and terrestrial organisms, in order to test the possibility to extend TyPol to ecotoxicological effects on various organisms. The data analysis (available literature and databases) revealed that relevant ecotoxicological endpoints for terrestrial organisms such as soil microorganisms and macroinvertebrates are lacking compared to aquatic organisms. We have added seven parameters for acute (EC50, LC50) and chronic (NOEC) toxicological effects for the following organisms: Daphnia, Algae, Lemna and Earthworm. In this new configuration, TyPol was used to classify about 45 pesticides in different behavioural and ecotoxicity clusters. The clustering results were analyzed to reveals relationships between molecular descriptors

  7. Centralized treatment of advanced stages of ovarian cancer improves survival: a nationwide Danish survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten L; Høgdall, Claus; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This retrospective, nationwide, observational study was designed to compare treatment in tertiary referral centers vs. regional hospitals on overall survival for patients with stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer. Material and methods. The study took place in all gynecological departments.......021). Treatment in a referral center was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival hazard ratio, 0.83 (confidence interval 0.70-0.98). Conclusion. Patients with stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer benefit from treatment in a tertiary referral center....

  8. Weight-of-evidence approach in assessment of ecotoxicological risks of acid sulphate soils in the Baltic Sea river estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, Jaana, E-mail: jaana.wallin@jyu.fi [Finnish Environment Institute SYKE, Survontie 9 A, FI-40500 Jyväskylä (Finland); Karjalainen, Anna K. [Finnish Environment Institute SYKE, Survontie 9 A, FI-40500 Jyväskylä (Finland); Schultz, Eija [Finnish Environment Institute SYKE, Hakuninmaantie 6, FI-00430 Helsinki (Finland); Järvistö, Johanna; Leppänen, Matti; Vuori, Kari-Matti [Finnish Environment Institute SYKE, Survontie 9 A, FI-40500 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2015-03-01

    Acidity and leaching of metals from acid sulphate soils (ASSs) impair the water quality of receiving surface waters. The largest ASS areas in Europe are found in the coasts of the northern Baltic Sea. We used weight-of-evidence (WoE) approach to assess potential risks in 14 estuary sites affected by ASS in the Gulf of Finland, northern Baltic Sea. The assessment was based on exposure and effect profiles utilizing sediment and water metal concentrations and concurrent pH variation, sediment toxicity tests using the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the midge Chironomus riparius, and the ecological status of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Sediment metal concentrations were compared to national sediment quality criteria/guidelines, and water metal concentrations to environmental quality standards (EQSs). Hazard quotients (HQs) were established for maximum aluminium, cadmium and zinc concentrations at low pH based on applicable US EPA toxicity database. Sediment metal concentrations were clearly elevated in most of the studied estuaries. The EQS of cadmium (0.1 μg/l) was exceeded in 3 estuaries out of 14. The pH-minima were below the national threshold value (5.5) between good and satisfactory water quality in 10 estuaries. V. fischeri bioluminescence indicated toxicity of the sediments but toxic response was not observed in the C. riparius emergence test. Benthic invertebrate communities were deteriorated in 6 out of 14 sites based on the benthic invertebrate quality index. The overall ecotoxicological risk was assessed as low in five, moderate in three and high in five of the estuary sites. The risk assessment utilizing the WoE approach indicated that harmful effects of ASSs are likely to occur in the Baltic Sea river estuaries located at the ASS hotspot area. - Highlights: • Acid sulphate soils release high amounts of metals and acidity. • Metals and acidity are transported to estuary sites. • Acid sulphate soils impair the ecological status

  9. Eco-toxicological bioassay of atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) with Photobacterium Phosphoreum T3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenxin; Shi, Chanzhen; Yan, Yan; Yang, Yunfei; Zhou, Bin

    2016-11-01

    A bioluminescent bacterium, Photobacterium phosphoreum T3 (PPT3), was used as a bio-indicator for the atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) to determine the eco-toxicity of PM2.5. The PM2.5 contains toxic chemicals, which reduce light output. The PM2.5 samples were collected in the period from March 2014 to January 2015 in Nanjing and analyzed for the chemical composition versus their eco-toxicity. The eco-toxicological responses of each toxicant were detected in PM2.5 samples with PPT3. The dose-response curves obtained were verified using the Weibull fitting function. According to the measured EC50 values (EC50, the concentration of a toxicant that inhibits 50% of the bioluminescence), the toxicity sequence was: B[a]P>hexa-PCB>tetra-PCB>tri-PCB>Pb(2+)>DEHP>Cu(2+)>DBP>BDE209>Zn(2+)>DMP>DEP, where B[a]P is benzo(a)pyrene, PCB is polychlorinated biphenyl, DEHP is diethylhexyl phthalate, DBP is dibutyl phthalate, BDE209 is decabromodiphenyl ether, DMP is dimethyl phthalate, and DEP is diethyl phthalate. All the PM2.5 samples analyzed proved to be weak toxic for PPT3. The toxicity of PM2.5 was assessed by the dose-addition of organic species and heavy metallic elements existing in PM2.5 with PPT3. The bioluminescence test showed that the metals and organics detected in PM2.5 promoted PM2.5 toxicity. The total detectable organics (denoted by ΣOrs) exhibited slightly higher toxicity than the total metals (denoted by ΣMs). In contrast, the sum of water-soluble ions (denoted by ΣIons) was beneficial to PPT3. The PM2.5 toxicity increased as the PM2.5 trapped more organics or metallic elements from the industrial or densely populated urban areas, where the PM2.5 had a high inhibition rate of bioluminescence for PPT3 in contrast to the residential PM2.5 samples, where the minimum inhibition rate was observed. The toxicity of PM2.5 samples varied with the mass concentrations, chemical constituents, and sampling locations. The chemicals in PM2.5, especially organic

  10. Choice of experimental venue matters in ecotoxicology studies: Comparison of a laboratory-based and an outdoor mesocosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Imrei, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2015-10-01

    The heavy application of pesticides and its potential effects on natural communities has attracted increasing attention to inadvertent impacts of these chemicals. Toxicologists conventionally use laboratory-based tests to assess lethal concentrations of pesticides. However, these tests often do not take into account indirect, interactive and long-term effects, and tend to ignore different rates of disintegration in the laboratory and under natural conditions. Our aim was to investigate the importance of the experimental venue for ecotoxicology tests. We reared tadpoles of the agile frog (Rana dalmatina) in the laboratory and in outdoor mesocosms and exposed them to three initial concentrations of a glyphosate-based herbicide (0, 2 and 6.5 mg a.e./L glyphosate), and to the presence or absence of caged predators (dragonfly larvae). The type of experimental venue had a large effect on the outcome: The herbicide was less lethal to tadpoles reared in outdoor mesocosms than in the laboratory. Further, while the herbicide had a negative effect on development time and on body mass in the laboratory, tadpoles exposed to the herbicide in mesocosms were larger at metamorphosis and developed faster in comparison to those reared in the absence of the herbicide. The effect of the herbicide on morphological traits of tadpoles also differed between the two venues. Finally, in the presence of the herbicide, tadpoles tended to be more active and to stay closer to the bottom of laboratory containers, while tadpole behaviour shifted in the opposite direction in outdoor mesocosms. Our results demonstrate major discrepancies between results of a classic laboratory-based ecotoxicity test and outcomes of an experiment performed in outdoor mesocosms. Consequently, the use of standard laboratory tests may have to be reconsidered and their benefits carefully weighed against the difficulties of performing experiments under more natural conditions. Tests validating experimentally estimated

  11. Foreign acquisition, plant survival, and employment growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger; Görg, Holger

    This paper analyses the effect of foreign acquisition on survival probability and employment growth of target plant using data on Swedish manufacturing plants during the period 1993-2002.  An improvement over previous studies is that we take into account firm level heterogeneity by separating...... the lifetime of the acquired plants only if the plant was an exporter.  The effect differs depending on whether the acquisition is horizontal or vertical.  We also find robust positive employment growth effects only for exporters, and only if the takeover is vertical, not horizontal....... the targeted plants into those within Swedish MNEs, Swedish exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms before foreign takeover. The results, controlling for possible endogeneity of the acquisition dummy using an IV and propensity score matching approach suggest that acquisition by foreign owners increases...

  12. Use of psamobenthos in the marine ecotoxicology in Brazil: bibliographical revision with petroleum substances emphasis; Uso de psamobentos em estudos de ecotoxicologia marinha no Brasil: revisao bibliografica com enfase em substancias de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendolan, Rodrigo A.; Gomes, Abilio Soares [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Marinha]. E-mail: 1gbmrabpg@vm.uff.br; abiliosg@vm.uff.br

    2003-07-01

    This study aims to make a bibliographical revision on studies about marine ecotoxicology in Brazil. The emphasis is on psamobenthos species used as test-organisms and petroleum substances as toxicants. Sediments are important repositories of pollutants in the sea. Compared to the overlaying water, pollutants become highly enriched in sediments, the reasons for this are physical adsorption and chemical bonding that occurs between the pollutants and sediment constituents. Among marine habitats, the benthos shows the highest biodiversity, and their components are important as living resources themselves or as food for economically exploited pelagic species. These contaminants could potentially cause damages to local fishing production, among other environmental consequences. These review shows that ecotoxicological tests carried out with psamobenthos are still scarce in Brazil. The current Brazilian research groups on ecotoxicology have tested only five psamobenthic species, and none of them is a standard species adopted by local environmental agencies. The search for other relevant psamobenthic species for use in ecotoxicological tests is urgent. A larger number of species could be more representative of the natural diversity of benthos, in way that testing more species, one could get a better assessment of the actual impact of pollutants on the structure and function of ecosystems. (author)

  13. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012". DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings......, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations...... of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality....

  14. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012." DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings......, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations...... of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality....

  15. Cracking the survival code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Heldring, Nina; Hermanson, Ola; Joseph, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Modifications of histones, the chief protein components of the chromatin, have emerged as critical regulators of life and death. While the “apoptotic histone code” came to light a few years ago, accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy, a cell survival pathway, is also heavily regulated by histone-modifying proteins. In this review we describe the emerging “autophagic histone code” and the role of histone modifications in the cellular life vs. death decision. PMID:24429873

  16. Artillery Survivability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    experiment mode also enables users to set their own design of experiment by manipulating an editable CSV file. The second one is a real-time mode that...renders a 3D virtual environment of a restricted battlefield where the survivability movements of an artillery company are visualized . This mode...provides detailed visualization of the simulation and enables future experimental uses of the simulation as a training tool. 14. SUBJECT TERMS

  17. On the stabilization of niobium(V) solutions by zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    Niobium cannot be separated from zirconium or hafnium when these elements occur together in solution with common anions such as chloride and sulphate. This is ascribed to the co-polymerization of niobium(V) and the hydrolysed ionic species of zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) to form colloidal partic...... particles. In hydrochloric acid the particles are positively charged, whereas in sulphate solution the Zr- and Hf-sulphate complexes confer a negative charge. The two cases are considered separately....

  18. Twelve-year results of fenestrated endografts for juxtarenal and group IV thoracoabdominal aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Tara M; Eagleton, Matthew J; Kuramochi, Yuki; Bathurst, Shona; Wolski, Katherine

    2015-02-01

    The practice of using fenestrated endografts to treat juxtarenal and group IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) has become more accepted, but long-term outcomes are still unknown. We report long-term survival, complications, and branch-related outcomes from a single-center experience. The study included consecutive patients enrolled prospectively into a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption classified as undergoing group IV TAAA or juxtarenal aneurysm repair by the treating surgeon using fenestrated endografts. Device morphology was used to subclassify this group of patients. Long-term survival and a composite outcome of secondary intervention, branch occlusion, stent migration, endoleak, aneurysm growth, or spinal cord injury were calculated. Descriptive analysis of branch-related outcomes and need for any reintervention was performed. Univariate and multivariate analysis of mortality and the composite outcome was performed to determine associative risks. Long-term survival for patients with juxtarenal and group IV TAAA aneurysms treated with fenestrated stent grafts was 20% at 8 years. Multivariate analysis showed long-term survival for this patient population was negatively associated with increasing age, congestive heart failure, cancer, and previous aneurysm repair. The risk of spinal cord ischemia (SCI) in this group was 1.2% and of aortic-related mortality was 2%. The risk of a spinal event increased with coverage above the celiac artery (52 mm of coverage above the celiac artery in patients with SCI vs 33 mm without SCI; P = .099). More complex device configurations were more likely to require an increased rate of reinterventions, and patients with celiac fenestrations were more likely to experience celiac occlusion over time (3.5% vs 0.5%; P = .019). However, less complex designs were complicated by an increased risk of type I endoleak over time (10.4% for renal fenestrations only vs 1.9% for others; P < .01). As experience evolved

  19. Survival analysis models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xian

    2012-01-01

    Survival analysis concerns sequential occurrences of events governed by probabilistic laws.  Recent decades have witnessed many applications of survival analysis in various disciplines. This book introduces both classic survival models and theories along with newly developed techniques. Readers will learn how to perform analysis of survival data by following numerous empirical illustrations in SAS. Survival Analysis: Models and Applications: Presents basic techniques before leading onto some of the most advanced topics in survival analysis.Assumes only a minimal knowledge of SAS whilst enablin

  20. Protective effect of Astragaloside IV against sepsis-induced acute lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiqin Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to explore the protective effects of AS-IV against sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP method in Sprague Dawley rats. Rats were randomly assigned into five groups: animals undergoing a sham CLP (sham group; animals undergoing CLP (CLP group; animals undergoing CLP and treated with AS-IV at 2.5 mg/kg bw (low-dose AS-IV [L-AS] group, at 5 mg/kg bw (mid-dose AS-IV [M-AS] group, and at 10 mg/kg bw (high-dose AS-IV [H-AS] group. At 6 h, 12 h and 24 h post-CLP surgery, six rats were respectively sacrificed to collect blood and lung tissue samples. The levels of arterial blood gas index, lung water content, protein level and leukocyte counts (total amount, neutrophils and lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 in BALF were measured at each time point in different groups. HE-staining and optical microscopy were performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. The 72 h-survival rate of each group was also recorded. PaO2 was decreased significantly, while the lung water content, BALF protein level, cell numbers, BALF cytokine TNF-α and IL-6 levels were increased significantly for CLP group as compared with sham group. Moreover, pathological injury was observed in lung tissue indicating the successful sepsis-induced ALI model. Speaking of the effect of AS-IV, we founded that, compared with the CLP group, the AS-IV treatment groups could significantly alleviate all the above negative changes exited in the CLP group in a dose-dependent manner. What’s more, the pathological injury was also gradually improved by AS-IV treatment compared with the CLP rats. AS-IV exerts its protective effect against sepsis-induced ALI in rats via improving pulmonary ventilation function, decreasing the permeability of alveolar epithelium and capillary as well as repressing lung inflammation.

  1. Kategorizace léčiv

    OpenAIRE

    Slanařová, Eliška Bc.

    2008-01-01

    Farmaceutický průmysl je velmi prestižním odvětvím, ve kterém se točí spousta peněz. Pro rok 2006 bylo za léčiva utraceno 64 miliard Kč. Kategorizace léčiv je jedním z nástrojů lékové politiky, jak zamezit stále rostoucím nákladům na farmakoterapii. Práce podává souhrnný přehled o jednotlivých stakeholders v oblasti lékové politiky, vývoji lékové politiky v ČR, spotřebě léčiv a celkově analyzuje situaci v ČR.

  2. Inhibition of CaMKK β and CaMK IV is detrimental in cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Louise D.; Tarabishy, Sami; Benashski, Sharon; Xu, Yan; Ribar, Thomas; Means, Anthony; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Elevation of intracellular calcium was traditionally thought to be detrimental in stroke pathology. However, clinical trials testing treatments which block calcium signaling have failed to improve outcomes in ischemic stroke. Emerging data suggest that calcium may also trigger endogenous protective pathways following stroke. CaMKK (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase) is a major kinase activated by rising intracellular calcium. Compelling evidence has suggested that CaMKK and its downstream kinase CaMK IV are critical in neuronal survival when cells are under ischemic stress. We examined the functional role of CaMKK/CaMK IV signaling in stroke. Methods We utilized middle cerebral artery occlusion model in mice. Results Our data demonstrated that pharmacological and genetic inhibition of CaMKK aggravated stroke injury. Additionally, deletion of CaMKK β, one of the two CaMKK isoforms, reduced CaMK IV activation and CaMK IV deletion in mice worsened stroke outcome. Finally, CaMKK β or CaMK IV KO mice had exacerbated BBB (blood brain barrier) disruption evidenced by increased hemorrhagic transformation rates and activation of matrix metalloproteinase. We observed transcriptional inactivation including reduced levels of BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) and HDAC4 (histone deacetylase 4) phosphorylation in those KO mice after stroke. Conclusions Our data has established that the CaMKK/CaMK IV pathway is a key endogenous protective mechanism in ischemia. Our results suggest that this pathway serves as important regulator of BBB integrity and transcriptional activation of neuroprotective molecules in stroke. PMID:23868268

  3. HIF-1α signaling activation by post-ischemia treatment with astragaloside IV attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Si

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the effect of astragaloside IV (Ast IV post-ischemia treatment on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury (IRI. We also examined whether hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and its downstream gene-inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase (iNOS play roles in the cardioprotective effect of Ast IV. Cultured cardiomyocytes and perfused isolated rat hearts were exposed to Ast IV during reperfusion in the presence or absence of the HIF-1α inhibitor 2-methoxyestradiol (2-MeOE2. The post-ischemia treatment with Ast IV protected cardiomyocytes from the apoptosis and death induced by simulated IRI (SIRI. Additionally, in cardiomyocytes, 2-MeOE2 and HIF-1α siRNA treatment each not only abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of post-ischemia treatment with Ast IV but also reversed the upregulation of HIF-1α and iNOS expression. Furthermore, after treatment with Ast IV, post-ischemic cardiac functional recovery and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release in the coronary flow (CF were improved, and the myocardial infarct size was decreased. Moreover, the number of apoptotic cells was reduced, and the upregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and downregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Caspase3 were reversed. 2-MeOE2 reversed these effects of Ast IV on IR-injured hearts. These results suggest that post-ischemia treatment with Ast IV can attenuate IRI by upregulating HIF-1α expression, which transmits a survival signal to the myocardium.

  4. Dipyridinium tribromidochloridobis(4-chlorophenylstannate(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Mun Lo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The tin atom in the substituted ammonium stannate(IV, (C5H6N2[SnBr3(C6H4Cl2Cl], lies on a center of symmetry in a distorted octahedral coordination geometry. Each independent halogen site is occupied by bromine and chlorine anions in an approximate 3:1 ratio. The pyridinium cation forms a hydrogen bond to only one of the halogen atoms.

  5. Annotations on Mexico's WISC-IV: a validity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, Anthony D; Sánchez-Escobedo, Pedro; Hollingworth, Liz

    2012-01-01

    This project seeks to provide evidence on the internal structure of the Escala Wechsler de Inteligencia para Niños-IV (EWIN-IV; Wechsler, 2007a ) through a confirmatory factor analysis and intercorrelational study. Also provided is information on the adaptation process and other sources of validity evidence in support of the EWIN-IV norms. The standardization data for the EWIN-IV were used for all analyses. The factor loadings and correlational patterns found on the EWIN-IV are comparable to those seen in the American versions of the test. The proposed factor and scoring structure of the EWIN-IV was supported.

  6. Effects of cell-bound microcystins on survival and feeding of Daphnia spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrlack, T; Dittmann, E; Börner, T

    2001-01-01

    microcystin synthesis, were compared. Additionally, the relationship between microcystin ingestion rate by the Daphnia clones and Daphnia survival time was analyzed. Microcystins ingested with Microcystis cells were poisonous to all Daphnia clones tested. The median survival time of the animals was closely......-producing and -lacking cells, and (iv) the strength of the toxic effect can be predicted from the microcystin ingestion rate of the animals....

  7. Occurrence, fate and ecotoxicological assessment of pharmaceutically active compounds in wastewater and sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Chongqing, the Three Gorges Reservoir Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Qing, E-mail: qyan2005@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region' s Eco-Environments of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045 (China); College of Geography Science and Tourism, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing 400047 (China); Gao, Xu, E-mail: gaoxu@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region' s Eco-Environments of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045 (China); Chen, You-Peng [Key Laboratory of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region' s Eco-Environments of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045 (China); Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 401122 (China); Peng, Xu-Ya; Zhang, Yi-Xin; Gan, Xiu-Mei; Zi, Cheng-Fang [Key Laboratory of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region' s Eco-Environments of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045 (China); Guo, Jin-Song [Key Laboratory of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region' s Eco-Environments of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045 (China); Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 401122 (China)

    2014-02-01

    The occurrence, removal and ecotoxicological assessment of 21 pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) including antibiotics, analgesics, antiepileptics, antilipidemics and antihypersensitives, were studied at four municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Chongqing, the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. Individual treatment unit effluents, as well as primary and secondary sludge, were sampled and analyzed for the selected PhACs to evaluate their biodegradation, persistence and partitioning behaviors. PhACs were identified and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction. All the 21 analyzed PhACs were detected in wastewater and the target PhACs except acetaminophen, ibuprofen and gemfibrozil, were also found in sludge. The concentrations of the antibiotics and SVT were comparable to or even higher than those reported in developed countries, while the case of other target PhACs was opposite. The elimination of PhACs except acetaminophen was incomplete and a wide range of elimination efficiencies during the treatment were observed, i.e. from “negative removal” to 99.5%. The removal of PhACs was insignificant in primary and disinfection processes, and was mainly achieved during the biological treatment. Based on the mass balance analysis, biodegradation is believed to be the primary removal mechanism, whereas only about 1.5% of the total mass load of the target PhACs was removed by sorption. Experimentally estimated distribution coefficients (< 500 L/kg, with a few exceptions) also indicate that biodegradation/transformation was responsible for the removal of the target PhACs. Ecotoxicological assessment indicated that the environment concentrations of single compounds (including sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole, ofloxacin, azithromycin and erythromycin-H{sub 2}O) in effluent and sludge, as well as the mixture of the 21 detected PhACs in effluent, sludge and receiving water had a significant

  8. Applied survival analysis using R

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Dirk F

    2016-01-01

    Applied Survival Analysis Using R covers the main principles of survival analysis, gives examples of how it is applied, and teaches how to put those principles to use to analyze data using R as a vehicle. Survival data, where the primary outcome is time to a specific event, arise in many areas of biomedical research, including clinical trials, epidemiological studies, and studies of animals. Many survival methods are extensions of techniques used in linear regression and categorical data, while other aspects of this field are unique to survival data. This text employs numerous actual examples to illustrate survival curve estimation, comparison of survivals of different groups, proper accounting for censoring and truncation, model variable selection, and residual analysis. Because explaining survival analysis requires more advanced mathematics than many other statistical topics, this book is organized with basic concepts and most frequently used procedures covered in earlier chapters, with more advanced topics...

  9. Principles of ecotoxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, C. H

    2012-01-01

    ... of instructors.Discussing the fundamental chemical and ecological nature of pollution processes, the authors identifiy the major classes of pollutants and their environmental fate while examining those pollutants...

  10. Ecotoxicological effects extrapolation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1996-09-01

    One of the central problems of ecological risk assessment is modeling the relationship between test endpoints (numerical summaries of the results of toxicity tests) and assessment endpoints (formal expressions of the properties of the environment that are to be protected). For example, one may wish to estimate the reduction in species richness of fishes in a stream reach exposed to an effluent and have only a fathead minnow 96 hr LC50 as an effects metric. The problem is to extrapolate from what is known (the fathead minnow LC50) to what matters to the decision maker, the loss of fish species. Models used for this purpose may be termed Effects Extrapolation Models (EEMs) or Activity-Activity Relationships (AARs), by analogy to Structure-Activity Relationships (SARs). These models have been previously reviewed in Ch. 7 and 9 of and by an OECD workshop. This paper updates those reviews and attempts to further clarify the issues involved in the development and use of EEMs. Although there is some overlap, this paper does not repeat those reviews and the reader is referred to the previous reviews for a more complete historical perspective, and for treatment of additional extrapolation issues.

  11. Marine Pollution and Ecotoxicology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    of metals in different organs suggested that the mollusks played a signif- icant role in trace metal trophic transfer. The removal of metals from the aquatic ecosystem by macrophytes is of immense use to preserve the lake water. In this regard, the study..., India) is of great significance. They observed that the roots of macrophytes were the most efficient part than its stems and leaves. It was thus found to be very useful to remove the toxic metals from lake water. 3. Trace metals Ray et al. evaluated...

  12. Ecotoxicology: problems and approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levin, Simon A

    1989-01-01

    .... The readers is guided through the field starting with a discussion of contemporary concepts and issues and proceeding to a review of the response of ecosystems to chemical stress, examples of methods...

  13. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease...... as well as for cost-benefit estimation of new blood safety interventions....

  14. Nuclear War Survival Skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearny, C.H.

    2002-06-24

    The purpose of this book is to provide Americans with information and instructions that will significantly increase their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. It brings together field-tested instructions that, if followed by a large fraction of Americans during a crisis that preceded an attack, could save millions of lives. The author is convinced that the vulnerability of our country to nuclear threat or attack must be reduced and that the wide dissemination of the information contained in this book would help achieve that objective of our overall defense strategy.

  15. Design of survivable networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stoer, Mechthild

    1992-01-01

    The problem of designing a cost-efficient network that survives the failure of one or more nodes or edges of the network is critical to modern telecommunications engineering. The method developed in this book is designed to solve such problems to optimality. In particular, a cutting plane approach is described, based on polyhedral combinatorics, that is ableto solve real-world problems of this type in short computation time. These results are of interest for practitioners in the area of communication network design. The book is addressed especially to the combinatorial optimization community, but also to those who want to learn polyhedral methods. In addition, interesting new research problemsare formulated.

  16. Investigation of widely used nanomaterials (TiO{sub 2}, Ag) and gold nanoparticles in standardized ecotoxicological tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Klawonn, Thorsten [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Angewandte Oekologie (IME), Schmallenberg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    nanomaterial gold. Since ecotoxicological data based on standardised test methods, as requested for risk assessment, are not available for these substances, and information on modifications to standardised procedures for testing nanoparticles is lacking, the aim of the present project was to contribute to the following topics: - Recommendations concerning the improvement of existing OECD Test Guidelines for the testing of nanoparticles; - Recommendations on the application of the investigated nanoparticles to the test medium; - Ecotoxicity of TiO{sub 2} and Ag nanoparticles with respect to: Earthworm reproduction, Respiration rate of soil microflora, Nitrification of soil microflora, Growth of plants, Reproduction of chironomids, Reproduction of daphnids. - Ecotoxicity of gold with respect to: Growth of algae, Immobilisation of daphnids, Development of fish embryos, Reproduction of chironomids. As a first step in the present project the German Federal Environment Agency selected several nanoparticles from the priority list of the OECD Sponsorship Programme, and the tests that should be performed with these nanoparticles were selected on the basis of available informa-tion and priority.

  17. Astragaloside IV Attenuates Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells through Raf-MEK-ERK Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongcai Yue

    Full Text Available Astragaloside IV (AGS-IV is a main active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus Bunge, a medicinal herb prescribed as an immunostimulant, hepatoprotective, antiperspirant, a diuretic or a tonic as documented in Chinese Materia Medica. In the present study, we employed a high-throughput comparative proteomic approach based on 2D-nano-LC-MS/MS to investigate the possible mechanism of action involved in the neuroprotective effect of AGS-IV against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Differential proteins were identified, among which 13 proteins survived the stringent filter criteria and were further included for functional discussion. Two proteins (vimentin and Gap43 were randomly selected, and their expression levels were further confirmed by western blots analysis. The results matched well with those of proteomics. Furthermore, network analysis of protein-protein interactions (PPI and pathways enrichment with AGS-IV associated proteins were carried out to illustrate its underlying molecular mechanism. Proteins associated with signal transduction, immune system, signaling molecules and interaction, and energy metabolism play important roles in neuroprotective effect of AGS-IV and Raf-MEK-ERK pathway was involved in the neuroprotective effect of AGS-IV against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. This study demonstrates that comparative proteomics based on shotgun approach is a valuable tool for molecular mechanism studies, since it allows the simultaneously evaluate the global proteins alterations.

  18. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-01-01

    . PATIENTS: Patients who were diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer between 2009 and 2013 and underwent elective resection of their primary tumors were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was all-cause mortality depending on the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were...... the administration of and time to adjuvant chemotherapy, metastasectomy rate, and risk factors for leak. RESULTS: Of the 774 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who were included, 71 (9.2%) developed anastomotic leaks. Anastomotic leak had a significant impact on the long-term survival of patients with colon...... cancer (p = 0.04) but not on those with rectal cancer (p = 0.91). Anastomotic leak was followed by the decreased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with colon cancer (p = 0.007) but not in patients with rectal cancer (p = 0.47). Finally, anastomotic leak had a detrimental impact...

  19. Longevity of dental implants in type IV bone: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, M C; dos Santos, D M; Santiago, J F; Moreno, A; Pellizzer, E P

    2014-09-01

    Bone quality and quantity are important factors with regard to the survival rate of dental implants. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of dental implants inserted in low-density bone and to determine the survival rate of dental implants with surface treatments over time. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken by two independent individuals; the Medline/PubMed database was searched for the period July 1975 to March 2013. Relevant reports on bone quality and osseointegration of dental implants were selected. The search retrieved 1018 references, and after inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 19 studies were selected for review. A total of 3937 patients, who had received a total of 12,465 dental implants, were analyzed. The survival rates of dental implants according to the bone density were: type I, 97.6%; type II, 96.2%; type III, 96.5%; and type IV, 88.8%. The survival rate of treated surface implants inserted in low-density bone was higher (97.1%) than that of machined surface implants (91.6%). Surface-treated dental implants inserted in low-density bone have a high survival rate and may be indicated for oral rehabilitation. However, more randomized studies are required to better evaluate this issue. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 21 CFR 880.5025 - I.V. container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false I.V. container. 880.5025 Section 880.5025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... I.V. container. (a) Identification. An I.V. container is a container made of plastic or glass used...

  1. 78 FR 18325 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Transportation Regulation, Part IV Web site at http://www.transcom.mil/dtr/part-iv/phaseiii.cfm (DPM SECTION... published in the Federal Register and incorporated into the Defense Transportation Regulation (DTR) Part IV (DTR 4500.9R). These program requirements do not impose a legal requirement, obligation, sanction or...

  2. The OECD expert meeting on ecotoxicology and environmental fate — Towards the development of improved OECD guidelines for the testing of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühnel, Dana, E-mail: dana.kuehnel@ufz.de [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoser Str. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Nickel, Carmen, E-mail: nickel@iuta.de [IUTA e.V., Air Quality and Sustainable Nanotechnology, Bliersheimer Str. 60, 47229 Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    On behalf of the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN) an expert meeting on ecotoxicology and environmental fate of nanomaterials (NMs) took place in January 2013 in Berlin. At this meeting experts from science, industry and regulatory bodies discussed the applicability of OECD test guidelines (TGs) for chemicals to nanomaterials. The objective was to discuss the current state of the relevant science and provide recommendations to the OECD WPMN on (1) the need for updating current OECD TGs and the need for developing new ones specific to nanomaterials; and (2) guidance needed for the appropriate and valid testing of environmental fate and ecotoxicity endpoints for NMs. Experts at the workshop agreed that the majority of the OECD TG for chemicals were generally applicable for the testing of NM, with the exception of TG 105 (water solubility) and 106 (adsorption-desorption). Additionally, the workshop also highlighted considerations when conducting OECD chemical TG on nanomaterials (e.g., sample preparation, dispersion, analysis, dosimetry and characterisation). These considerations will lead to the future development of proposals for new TG and guidance documents (GDs) to ensure that OECD TG give meaningful, repeatable, and accurate results when used for nanomaterials. This report provides a short overview of topics discussed during the meeting and the main outcomes. A more detailed report of the workshop will become available through the OECD, however, due to the urgency of having OECD TG relevant for nanomaterials, this brief report is being shared with the scientific community through this communication. - Highlights: • OECD test guidelines (TGs) were developed for the testing of conventional chemicals. • Need for discussion on applicability of current TGs to nanomaterials • An expert meeting addressing this issue was held. • The focus was on TGs covering ecotoxicology and environmental fate. • Recommendations for updating current OECD

  3. Assessment of the environmental impact of landfill sites with open combustion located in arid regions by combined chemical and ecotoxicological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, H; Kolb, M; Jopke, P; Schmidt, C; Alawi, M; Bahadir, M

    2006-12-01

    Two different waste disposal sites in Jordan were investigated in order to determine the environmental situation in context with waste disposal techniques. One landfill, located at Marka/Amman, had been closed about 25 years ago and covered with soil. Here, the waste had been actively open combusted and openings in the cover, still emitting smoke, indicated that waste was still smoldering inside the landfill's body. The second disposal site close to Ekeeder/Irbid is still operated. On this ground, the solid waste is not intentionally burned, although spontaneous fires frequently come up. Samples of waste, soil, and entrained dust were collected and analyzed. From the solid samples, respectively, their eluates, sum parameters, ecotoxicological effects as well as contents of elements/heavy metals and organic pollutants (PAH, PCDD/F) were determined. In general, the Ekeeder-samples were low-contaminated. The investigation of the Marka-samples showed higher contamination of the site's center, clearly being influenced by combustion processes. A significant contamination of the landfill's vicinity by its emissions could not be derived from the analytical data. Ecotoxicological investigations, applying a bio-test battery, revealed correlations with the sum parameters but not with the trace pollutants. Thus, the Marka-samples with the highest measured values of sum parameters caused adverse effects on three different test species, whereas other samples from Marka and Ekeeder had small or no effects. The results of these investigations depict the influence of different disposal techniques on the contamination situation of a landfill and they shall contribute to assess the conditions of other disposal sites in (semi)arid regions.

  4. Use of a Battery of Chemical and Ecotoxicological Methods for the Assessment of the Efficacy of Wastewater Treatment Processes to Remove Estrogenic Potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, Nicola; Baynes, Alice; Kanda, Rakesh; Mills, Matthew R; Arias-Salazar, Karla; Collins, Terrence J; Jobling, Susan

    2016-09-11

    Endocrine Disrupting Compounds pose a substantial risk to the aquatic environment. Ethinylestradiol (EE2) and estrone (E1) have recently been included in a watch list of environmental pollutants under the European Water Framework Directive. Municipal wastewater treatment plants are major contributors to the estrogenic potency of surface waters. Much of the estrogenic potency of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can be attributed to the discharge of steroid estrogens including estradiol (E2), EE2 and E1 due to incomplete removal of these substances at the treatment plant. An evaluation of the efficacy of wastewater treatment processes requires the quantitative determination of individual substances most often undertaken using chemical analysis methods. Most frequently used methods include Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GCMS/MS) or Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS/MS) using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Although very useful for regulatory purposes, targeted chemical analysis can only provide data on the compounds (and specific metabolites) monitored. Ecotoxicology methods additionally ensure that any by-products produced or unknown estrogenic compounds present are also assessed via measurement of their biological activity. A number of in vitro bioassays including the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) are available to measure the estrogenic activity of wastewater samples. Chemical analysis in conjunction with in vivo and in vitro bioassays provides a useful toolbox for assessment of the efficacy and suitability of wastewater treatment processes with respect to estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds. This paper utilizes a battery of chemical and ecotoxicology tests to assess conventional, advanced and emerging wastewater treatment processes in laboratory and field studies.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) complexes with Schiff bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radoske, Thomas; Maerz, Juliane; Kaden, Peter; Patzschke, Michael; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2017-06-01

    We report herein the synthesis and characterization of several imine complexes of tetravalent thorium (Th(IV)) and uranium (U(IV)). The ligands investigated in this study are a Schiff base type, including the well-known salen ligand (H{sub 2}Le, Fig. 1). The complexation in solution was investigated by NMR measurements indicating paramagnetic effects of unpaired f-electrons of U(IV) on the ligand molecule. We also determined the solid-state molecular structures of the synthesized complexes by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The synthesized complexes show an eight-fold coordination geometry around the actinide center surrounded by two tetradentate ligands with 2N- and 2O-donor atoms.

  6. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  7. Research in collegiate mathematics education IV

    CERN Document Server

    Dubinsky, Ed; Kaput, Jim

    2001-01-01

    This fourth volume of Research in Collegiate Mathematics Education (RCME IV) reflects the themes of student learning and calculus. Included are overviews of calculus reform in France and in the U.S. and large-scale and small-scale longitudinal comparisons of students enrolled in first-year reform courses and in traditional courses. The work continues with detailed studies relating students' understanding of calculus and associated topics. Direct focus is then placed on instruction and student comprehension of courses other than calculus, namely abstract algebra and number theory. The volume co

  8. Reconstruction for Type IV Radial Polydactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-09-01

    Type IV radial polydactyly represents a thumb with an extra proximal and distal phalanx. Assessment of the thumb for surgical reconstruction includes observing thumb function, evaluating thumb size and stability, and assessing the first web space. Reconstruction includes excision of the smaller thumb, typically the radial thumb, and re-creating thumb stability and alignment by addressing tendon insertion and joint orientation. Although surgical results are satisfying and complications are uncommon, additional surgical intervention may be required over time owing to thumb malalignment or instability. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  10. The gonococcal genetic island and type IV secretion in the pathogenic Neisseria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E Ramsey

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Eighty percent of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains and some Neisseria meningitidis strains encode a 57 kb gonococcal genetic island (GGI. The GGI was horizontally acquired and is inserted in the chromosome at the replication terminus. The GGI is flanked by direct repeats, and site-specific recombination at these sites results in excision of the GGI and may be responsible for its original acquisition. Although the role of the GGI in N. meningitidis is unclear, the GGI in N. gonorrhoeae encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS. Type IV secretion systems are versatile multi-protein complexes and include both conjugation systems as well as effector systems that translocate either proteins or DNA-protein complexes. In N. gonorrhoeae, the T4SS secretes single-stranded chromosomal DNA into the extracellular milieu in a contact-independent manner. Importantly, the DNA secreted through the T4SS is effective in natural transformation and therefore contributes to the spread of genetic information through Neisseria populations. Mutagenesis experiments have identified genes for DNA secretion including those encoding putative structural components of the apparatus, peptidoglycanases which may act in assembly, and relaxosome components for processing the DNA and delivering it to the apparatus. The T4SS may also play a role in infection by N. gonorrhoeae. During intracellular infection, N. gonorrhoeae requires the Ton complex for iron acquisition and survival. However, N. gonorrhoeae strains that do not express the Ton complex can survive intracellularly if they express structural components of the T4SS. These data provide evidence that the T4SS is expressed during intracellular infection and suggest that the T4SS may provide an advantage for intracellular survival. Here we review our current understanding of how the GGI and type IV secretion affect natural transformation and pathogenesis in N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis.

  11. Topological characterisation and identification of critical domains within glucosyltransferase IV (GtrIV of Shigella flexneri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Anesh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three bacteriophage genes gtrA, gtrB and gtr(type are responsible for O-antigen glucosylation in Shigella flexneri. Both gtrA and gtrB have been demonstrated to be highly conserved and interchangeable among serotypes while gtr(type was found to be specific to each serotype, leading to the hypothesis that the Gtr(type proteins are responsible for attaching glucosyl groups to the O-antigen in a site- and serotype- specific manner. Based on the confirmed topologies of GtrI, GtrII and GtrV, such interaction and attachment of the glucosyl groups to the O-antigen has been postulated to occur in the periplasm. Results In this study, the topology of GtrIV was experimentally determined by creating different fusions between GtrIV and a dual-reporter protein, PhoA/LacZ. This study shows that GtrIV consists of 8 transmembrane helices, 2 large periplasmic loops, 2 small cytoplasmic N- and C- terminal ends and a re-entrant loop that occurs between transmembrane helices III and IV. Though this topology differs from that of GtrI, GtrII, GtrV and GtrX, it is very similar to that of GtrIc. Furthermore, both the N-terminal periplasmic and the C-terminal periplasmic loops are important for GtrIV function as shown via a series of loop deletion experiments and the creation of chimeric proteins between GtrIV and its closest structural homologue, GtrIc. Conclusion The current study provides the basis for elucidating the structure and mechanism of action of this important O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase.

  12. Zirconium(IV) and Hafnium(IV)-Catalyzed Highly Enantioselective Epoxidation of Homoallylic and Bishomoallylic Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-01-01

    In this report, zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)-bishydroxamic acid complexes were utilized in the highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic alcohols and bishomoallylic alcohols, which used to be quite difficult substrates for other types of asymmetric epoxidation reactions. The performance of the catalyst was improved by adding polar additive and molecular sieves. For homoallylic alcohols, the reaction could provide epoxy alcohols in up to 81% yield and up to 98% ee, while for bishomoallylic alcohols, up to 75% yield and 99% ee of epoxy alcohols rather than cyclize compounds could be obtained in most cases. PMID:20481541

  13. Zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-catalyzed highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-06-16

    In this report, zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-bishydroxamic acid complexes were utilized in the highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic alcohols and bishomoallylic alcohols, which used to be quite difficult substrates for other types of asymmetric epoxidation reactions. The performance of the catalyst was improved by adding polar additive and molecular sieves. For homoallylic alcohols, the reaction could provide epoxy alcohols in up to 83% yield and up to 98% ee, while, for bishomoallylic alcohols, up to 79% yield and 99% ee of epoxy alcohols rather than cyclized tetrahydrofuran compounds could be obtained in most cases.

  14. Hospitalization Costs for Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery Treated With Intravenous Acetaminophen (IV-APAP) Plus Other IV Analgesics or IV Opioid Monotherapy for Postoperative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Brett A; Pham, An T; Shah, Manasee V; Eaddy, Michael T; Lunacsek, Orsolya E; Wan, George J

    2017-02-01

    To assess the impact on hospitalization costs of multimodal analgesia (MMA), including intravenous acetaminophen (IV-APAP), versus IV opioid monotherapy for postoperative pain management in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Utilizing the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Hospital Drug Database (HDD), patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), total hip arthroplasty (THA), or surgical repair of hip fracture between 1/1/2011 and 8/31/2014 were separated into postoperative pain management groups: MMA with IV-APAP plus other IV analgesics (IV-APAP group) or an IV opioid monotherapy group. All patients could have received oral analgesics. Baseline characteristics and total hospitalization costs were compared. Additionally, an inverse probability treatment weighting [IPTW] with propensity scores analysis further assessed hospitalization cost differences. The IV-APAP group (n = 33,954) and IV opioid monotherapy group (n = 110,300) differed significantly (P opioid monotherapy group (US$12,540 ± $9564 vs. $13,242 ± $35,825; P opioid monotherapy. This difference was driven by medical costs; importantly, there was no difference in pharmacy costs. Generalizability of the results may be limited to patients admitted to hospitals similar to those included in HDD. Dosing could not be determined, so it was not possible to quantify utilization of IV-APAP or ascertain differences in opioid consumption between the 2 groups. This study did not account for healthcare utilization post-discharge.

  15. OBESITY IN CANCER SURVIVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is a well known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colorectal cancer. We note that the evidence over-represents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors. PMID:22540252

  16. Surviving relatives after suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelykke, Helle; Cohrt, Pernille

    suicide in Denmark. This means that at least 400 people undergo the trauma it is when one of their near relatives commits suicide. We also know that the loss from suicide involves a lot of conflicting feelings - like anger, shame, guilt and loss and that the lack of therapy/treatment of these difficult...... and conflicting feelings may result in pathological expansion of grief characterized by extremely reduced quality of life involving severe psychical and social consequences. Suicide a subject of taboo In the 1980s WHO drafted a health policy document (‘Health for all year 2000’) with 38 targets for attaining......We would like to focus on the surviving relatives after suicides, because it is generally accepted that it is especially difficult to recover after the loss from suicide and because we know as a fact that one suicide affects five persons on average. Every year approximately 700 people commit...

  17. Obesity in cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V

    2012-08-21

    Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colo-rectal cancer. We note that the evidence overrepresents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors.

  18. Candida survival strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polke, Melanie; Hube, Bernhard; Jacobsen, Ilse D

    2015-01-01

    Only few Candida species, e.g., Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida dubliniensis, and Candida parapsilosis, are successful colonizers of a human host. Under certain circumstances these species can cause infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated candidiasis. The success of C. albicans, the most prevalent and best studied Candida species, as both commensal and human pathogen depends on its genetic, biochemical, and morphological flexibility which facilitates adaptation to a wide range of host niches. In addition, formation of biofilms provides additional protection from adverse environmental conditions. Furthermore, in many host niches Candida cells coexist with members of the human microbiome. The resulting fungal-bacterial interactions have a major influence on the success of C. albicans as commensal and also influence disease development and outcome. In this chapter, we review the current knowledge of important survival strategies of Candida spp., focusing on fundamental fitness and virulence traits of C. albicans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Psychology and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D P; Ruth, T E; Wagner, L M

    1993-11-06

    We examined the deaths of 28,169 adult Chinese-Americans, and 412,632 randomly selected, matched controls coded "white" on the death certificate. Chinese-Americans, but not whites, die significantly earlier than normal (1.3-4.9 yr) if they have a combination of disease and birthyear which Chinese astrology and medicine consider ill-fated. The more strongly a group is attached to Chinese traditions, the more years of life are lost. Our results hold for nearly all major causes of death studied. The reduction in survival cannot be completely explained by a change in the behaviour of the Chinese patient, doctor, or death-registrar, but seems to result at least partly from psychosomatic processes.

  20. After SDSS-IV: Pioneering Panoptic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmeier, Juna; AS4 Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    I will describe the current plans for a next generation sky survey that will begin After SDSS-IV --- AS4. AS4 will be an unprecedented all-sky spectroscopic survey of over six million objects. It is designed to decode the history of the Milky Way galaxy, trace the emergence of the chemical elements, reveal the inner workings of stars, the growth of black holes, and investigate the origin of planets. It will provide the most comprehensive all-sky spectroscopy to multiply the science from the Gaia, TESS and eROSITA missions. AS4 will also create a contiguous spectroscopic map of the interstellar gas in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies that is 1,000 times larger than the state of the art, uncovering the self-regulation mechanisms of Galactic ecosystems. It will pioneer systematic, spectroscopic monitoring across the whole sky, revealing changes on timescales from 20 minutes to 20 years. The project is now developing new hardware to build on the SDSS-IV infrastructure, designing the detailed survey strategy, and actively seeking to complete its consortium of institutional and individual members.

  1. Creep in generation IV nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rissanen, L. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland))

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear power has an important role in fulfilling the world's growing energy needs and reducing the carbon dioxide emission. Six new, innovative nuclear energy systems have been identified and selected for further development by the international Generation Four International Forum (GIF). These generation four (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems include a variety of reactor, energy conversion and fuel cycle technologies. The successful development and deployment of these largely depend on the performance and reliability of the available structural materials. These potential materials need to sustain their mechanical properties up to high temperatures, high neutron doses and corrosive environments of the new or enhanced types of coolants. Current knowledge on material properties, material-coolant interaction and especially material degradation processes in these new environments are limited. This paper gives an overview of the Gen IV material issues with special emphasis on European design of supercritical light water reactor concept high performance light water reactor (HPLWR). The challenges for the structural materials and the components most likely to suffer from creep and creep-irradiation are highlighted. Some results from relatively short term creep testing in supercritical water are presented for AISI 316NG, 347H and 1.4970 steels. The 1.4970 steel was superior in creep and oxidation resistance (orig.)

  2. Targeted pancreatic cancer therapy with the small molecule drug conjugate SW IV-134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Yassar M; Spitzer, Dirk; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Hornick, Mary C; Garg, Gunjal; Hornick, John R; Goedegebuure, Peter; Mach, Robert H; Hawkins, William G

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is highly resistant to conventional therapeutics and has been shown to evade apoptosis by deregulation of the X-linked and cellular inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (XIAP and cIAP). Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) induces and amplifies cell death by reversing the anti-apoptotic activity of IAPs. Thus, Smac-derived peptide analogues (peptidomimetics) have been developed and shown to represent promising cancer therapeutics. Sigma-2 receptors are overexpressed in many proliferating tumor cells including pancreatic cancer. Selected ligands to this receptor are rapidly internalized by cancer cells. These characteristics have made the sigma-2 receptor an attractive target for drug delivery because selective delivery to cancer cells has the potential to increase therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. Here, we describe the initial characterization of SW IV-134, a chemically linked drug conjugate between the sigma-2 ligand SW43 and the Smac mimetic SW IV-52 as a novel treatment option for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The tumor killing characteristics of our dual-domain therapeutic SW IV-134 was far greater than either component in isolation or in an equimolar mix and suggests enhanced cellular delivery when chemically linked to the sigma-2 ligand. One of the key findings was that SW IV-134 retained target selectivity of the Smac cargo with the involvement of the NF-κB/TNFα signaling pathway. Importantly, SW IV-134 slowed tumor growth and improved survival in murine models of pancreatic cancer. Our data support further study of this novel therapeutic and this drug delivery strategy because it may eventually benefit patients with pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Predicting DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Li, Chanjuan; Liu, Zhihong; Du, Jiewen; Ye, Jiming; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a promising Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drug target. DPP-IV inhibitors prolong the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), improve glucose homeostasis without weight gain, edema, and hypoglycemia. However, the marketed DPP-IV inhibitors have adverse effects such as nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, hypersensitivity, skin reactions and pancreatitis. Therefore, it is still expected for novel DPP-IV inhibitors with minimal adverse effects. The scaffolds of existing DPP-IV inhibitors are structurally diversified. This makes it difficult to build virtual screening models based upon the known DPP-IV inhibitor libraries using conventional QSAR approaches. In this paper, we report a new strategy to predict DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches involving naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods. We built 247 machine learning models based on 1307 known DPP-IV inhibitors with optimized molecular properties and topological fingerprints as descriptors. The overall predictive accuracies of the optimized models were greater than 80%. An external test set, composed of 65 recently reported compounds, was employed to validate the optimized models. The results demonstrated that both NB and RP models have a good predictive ability based on different combinations of descriptors. Twenty "good" and twenty "bad" structural fragments for DPP-IV inhibitors can also be derived from these models for inspiring the new DPP-IV inhibitor scaffold design.

  4. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  5. Impact of Marital Status on Tumor Stage at Diagnosis and on Survival in Male Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekolujo, Orimisan Samuel; Tadisina, Shourya; Koduru, Ujwala; Gernand, Jill; Smith, Susan Jane; Kakarala, Radhika Ramani

    2017-07-01

    The effect of marital status (MS) on survival varies according to cancer type and gender. There has been no report on the impact of MS on survival in male breast cancer (MBC). This study aims to determine the influence of MS on tumor stage at diagnosis and survival in MBC. Men with MBC ≥18 years of age in the SEER database from 1990 to 2011 were included in the study. MS was classified as married and unmarried (including single, divorced, separated, widowed). Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the 5-year cancer-specific survival. Multivariate regression analyses were done to determine the effect of MS on presence of Stage IV disease at diagnosis and on cancer-specific mortality. The study included 3,761 men; 2,647 (70.4%) were married. Unmarried men were more often diagnosed with Stage IV MBC compared with married (10.7% vs. 5.5%, p < .001). Unmarried men (compared with married) were significantly less likely to undergo surgery (92.4% vs. 96.7%, p < .001). Overall unmarried males with Stages II, III, and IV MBC have significantly worse 5-year cancer-specific survival compared with married. On multivariate analysis, being unmarried was associated with increased hazard of death (HR = 1.43, p < .001) and increased likelihood of Stage IV disease at diagnosis ( OR = 1.96, p < .001). Unmarried males with breast cancer are at greater risk for Stage IV disease at diagnosis and poorer outcomes compared with married males.

  6. Simultaneous expression of 70 kilodalton type IV collagenase and type IV collagen alpha 1 (IV) chain genes by cells of early human placenta and gestational endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio-Harmainen, H; Hurskainen, T; Niskasaari, K; Höyhtyä, M; Tryggvason, K

    1992-08-01

    In this study we used in situ hybridization to investigate the expression of the genes 70 kilodalton (kd) collagenase and the alpha 1(IV) collagen chain of type IV collagen in cells of early human placenta and gestational endometrium. The aim was to study the spatial distribution of these gene expressions within a developing tissue which possesses physiologic invasive potential. The results obtained for the 70 kd type IV collagenase mRNA expression were also compared with the immunohistochemical distribution of the corresponding antigen. Expression of mRNAs for these proteins was found in cells of trophoblastic columns, stromal cells of villi and in cells of decidua and endometrial stroma. The only differences between the expressions was the lower level of signals for 70 kd type IV collagenase in fibroblastic stromal cells and endothelial cells of villi and in the pericytic cells of spiral arteries. Otherwise the results for both types of mRNA were comparable. We also studied the immunohistochemical distribution of the 70 kd type IV collagenase using specific monoclonal antibodies against the enzyme. Immunohistochemistry supported well the findings obtained by in situ hybridization. The results indicate that the genes for the 70 kd type IV collagenase and for the alpha 1(IV) collagen chain are simultaneously active in cells of placenta and gestational endometrium and the same cells which produce type IV collagen also can produce the cleaving enzyme, the 70 kd type IV collagenase. The results also show that the cytotrophoblastic cells, which during early pregnancy invade the extracellular matrix and spiral arteries of uterine wall contain significant amount of mRNA for the 70 kd type IV collagenase. This finding supports the concept that the 70 kd type IV collagenase would be important for invasion, and in the case of this study, also for the physiologic invasion of placental cytotrophoblasts.

  7. Aqueous chemistry of Ce(iv): estimations using actinide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Rémi; Réal, Florent; Banik, Nidhu Lal; Pédrot, Mathieu; Pourret, Olivier; Vallet, Valérie

    2017-10-10

    The prediction of cerium (Ce) aqueous speciation is relevant in many research fields. Indeed, Ce compounds are used for many industrial applications, which may require the control of Ce aqueous chemistry for their synthesis. The aquatic geochemistry of Ce is also of interest. Due to its growing industrial use and its release into the environment, Ce is now considered as an emerging contaminant. Cerium is also used as a proxy of (paleo)redox conditions due to the Ce(iv)/Ce(iii) redox transition. Finally, Ce(iv) is often presented as a relevant analogue of tetravalent actinides (An(iv)). In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were conducted to highlight the similarities between the structures of Ce(iv) and tetravalent actinide (An(iv); An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu) aqua-ions, especially Pu(iv). The current knowledge of An(iv) hydrolysis, solubility and colloid formation in water was briefly reviewed but important discrepancies were observed in the available data for Ce(iv). Therefore, new estimations of the hydrolysis constants of Ce(iv) and the solubility of Ce(iv)-(hydr)oxides are proposed, by analogy with Pu(iv). By plotting pH-Eh (Pourbaix) diagrams, we showed that the pH values corresponding to the onset of Ce(iv) species formation (i.e. Ce(iv)-(hydr)oxide or dissolved Ce(iv)) agreed with various experimental results. Although further experimental studies are required to obtain a more accurate thermodynamic database, the present work might yet help to predict more accurately the Ce chemical behavior in aqueous solution.

  8. [The relationships of intelligence and memory assessed using the WAIS-IV and the WMS-IV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepach, A C; Daseking, M; Petermann, F; Waldmann, H C

    2013-11-01

    This study examines the relationships of intelligence and memory scores derived from WAIS-IV and WMS-IV. We were especially interested in the reciprocal predictive values of the test scales. A sample of 137 healthy adults with an age range between 16 and 69 years was assessed with the WAIS-IV and the WMS-IV. The test order was balanced. Pearson correlations were conducted on the subtest and scale level. A series of 14 linear regression models was tested with memory performance as predictor for intelligence and vice versa. A model including the 3 main memory scales of the WMS-IV was able to predict the global IQ best. It nevertheless explained only 46% of the variance. The memory and intelligence measures show significant relationships, but also represent distinct functions. WAIS-IV and WMS-IV complement one another. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. A manganese(IV)/iron(IV) intermediate in assembly of the manganese(IV)/iron(III) cofactor of Chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Hoffart, Lee M; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J Martin

    2007-07-31

    We recently showed that the class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis uses a Mn(IV)/Fe(III) cofactor to generate protein and substrate radicals in its catalytic mechanism [Jiang, W., Yun, D., Saleh, L., Barr, E. W., Xing, G., Hoffart, L. M., Maslak, M.-A., Krebs, C., and Bollinger, J. M., Jr. (2007) Science 316, 1188-1191]. Here, we have dissected the mechanism of formation of this novel heterobinuclear redox cofactor from the Mn(II)/Fe(II) cluster and O2. An intermediate with a g = 2 EPR signal that shows hyperfine coupling to both 55Mn and 57Fe accumulates almost quantitatively in a second-order reaction between O2 and the reduced R2 complex. The otherwise slow decay of the intermediate to the active Mn(IV)/Fe(III)-R2 complex is accelerated by the presence of the one-electron reductant, ascorbate, implying that the intermediate is more oxidized than Mn(IV)/Fe(III). Mössbauer spectra show that the intermediate contains a high-spin Fe(IV) center. Its chemical and spectroscopic properties establish that the intermediate is a Mn(IV)/Fe(IV)-R2 complex with an S = 1/2 electronic ground state arising from antiferromagnetic coupling between the Mn(IV) (S(Mn) = 3/2) and high-spin Fe(IV) (S(Fe) = 2) sites.

  10. The Design of the IGE Evaluation Project Phase IV Comparative Studies. Comparative Study of Phase IV IGE Evaluation Project. Phase IV, Project Paper 80-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberg, Thomas A.; And Others

    This paper outlines the design of two Comparative Studies of Phase IV of the Individually Guided Education (IGE) Evaluation Project. More than 2,000 elementary schools in 25 states use the IGE system. The Evaluation Project was designed to gain a comprehensive view of the system's operation and effectiveness. Phase IV investigated pupil outcomes,…

  11. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Eun H; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2017-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans.

  12. Small-diameter titanium Grade IV and titanium-zirconium implants in edentulous mandibles : three-year results from a double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirynen, Marc; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Razavi, Amir; Reichert, Torsten E.; Schimmel, Martin; Storelli, Stefano; Romeo, Eugenio

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare crestal bone-level changes, soft tissue parameters and implant success and survival between small-diameter implants made of titanium/zirconium (TiZr) alloy or of Grade IV titanium (Ti) in edentulous mandibles restored with removable overdentures.

  13. Carpentier, la otra novela (cap. IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Martínez Carmenate

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente ensayo está extraído de la obra inédita de Urbano Martínez Carmenate, Carpentier, la otra novela (cap. IV. Ofrece una mirada sobre los primeros años de la trayectoria profesional de Alejo Carpentier. Se muestra cómo, durante la década de 1920, se inicia como periodista y cronista teatral. A la vez, comienzan sus conexiones con el Grupo Minorista, que desempeña un papel destacado en la etapa republicana en Cuba. También se contempla su viaje a México en 1926, que constituye su primer contacto directo con la naturaleza y la cultura americanas.

  14. Carpentier, la otra novela (cap. IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Martínez Carmenate

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente ensayo está extraído de la obra inédita de Urbano Martínez Carmenate, Carpentier, la otra novela (cap. IV. Ofrece una mirada sobre los primeros años de la trayectoria profesional de Alejo Carpentier. Se muestra cómo, durante la década de 1920, se inicia como periodista y cronista teatral. A la vez, comienzan sus conexiones con el Grupo Minorista, que desempeña un papel destacado en la etapa republicana en Cuba. También se contempla su viaje a México en 1926, que constituye su primer contacto directo con la naturaleza y la cultura americanas.

  15. Ultrathin magnetic structures IV applications of nanomagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Bretislav

    2004-01-01

    The ability to understand and control the unique properties of interfaces has created an entirely new field of magnetism which already has a profound impact in technology and is providing the basis for a revolution in electronics. The last decade has seen dramatic progress in the development of magnetic devices for information technology but also in the basic understanding of the physics of magnetic nanostructures. Volume III describes thin film magnetic properties and methods for characterising thin film structure topics that underpin the present 'spintronics' revolution in which devices are based on combined magnetic materials and semiconductors. The present volume (IV) deals with the fundamentals of spintronics: magnetoelectronic materials, spin injection and detection, micromagnetics and the development of magnetic random access memory based on GMR and tunnel junction devices. Together these books provide readers with a comprehensive account of an exciting and rapidly developing field. The treatment is de...

  16. A polymeric oxovanadium(IV pyromellitate complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJORDJE STOJAKOVIC

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of oxovanadium(IV sulphate with 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid (pyromellitic acid in the presence of potassium carbonate yields a polymeric complex, K2[VO(pyr]·6H2O (I [pyr = pyromellitate(4- ion]. The PM3(tm calculations and IR spectroscopy suggest that the polymeric structure of I consists of -V-pyr-V-pyr- chains formed by the 1,4- or 1,5-bridging by the pyr ions. The chains are additionally cross-linked by the chelate function of one of the COO- groups of the pyr ion. Magnetic measurements do not reveal the presence of antiferromagnetic coupling between the V centers.

  17. Classification of amok in DSM-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaw, A C; Bernstein, R L

    1992-08-01

    Culture-bound syndromes have been described worldwide in many individuals and, for certain syndromes, in epidemic proportion, yet these disorders have been classified as rare and exotic conditions warranting minimal attention. Development of the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the tenth edition of the International Classification of Diseases offers an opportunity for providing a more sophisticated classification of these phenomena. The authors examine amok, a syndrome first described in Malaysia that consists of homicidal frenzy preceded by a state of brooding and ending with somnolence and amnesia. They discuss the concept of and criteria for a culture-specific disorder and propose that amok be classified as a culture-specific explosive behavioral disorder in DSM-IV.

  18. Review of the BCI Competition IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangermann, Michael; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Aertsen, Ad; Birbaumer, Niels; Braun, Christoph; Brunner, Clemens; Leeb, Robert; Mehring, Carsten; Miller, Kai J.; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.; Nolte, Guido; Pfurtscheller, Gert; Preissl, Hubert; Schalk, Gerwin; Schlögl, Alois; Vidaurre, Carmen; Waldert, Stephan; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The BCI competition IV stands in the tradition of prior BCI competitions that aim to provide high quality neuroscientific data for open access to the scientific community. As experienced already in prior competitions not only scientists from the narrow field of BCI compete, but scholars with a broad variety of backgrounds and nationalities. They include high specialists as well as students. The goals of all BCI competitions have always been to challenge with respect to novel paradigms and complex data. We report on the following challenges: (1) asynchronous data, (2) synthetic, (3) multi-class continuous data, (4) session-to-session transfer, (5) directionally modulated MEG, (6) finger movements recorded by ECoG. As after past competitions, our hope is that winning entries may enhance the analysis methods of future BCIs. PMID:22811657

  19. IV CONGRESO NACIONAL DE MORFOLOGÍA

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Los dias 4,5 y 6 de septiembre de 2008 tendrá lugar el IV Congreso Nacional de Morfologíaen la ciudad de Manizales con la participación de reconocidos profesores, médicos y doctores,quienes expondrán temas de mucha actualidad, relacionados con la morfología macroscópica ymicroscópica.Los trabajos serán originales o meta-análisis y tendrán dos modalidades de presentación:simposio o póster y los contenidos abarcarán asuntos de anatomia macroscópica, histologia,Embriologia, neuroanatomia, enseña...

  20. Characterization of a Grape Class IV Chitinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A chitinase was purified from Vitis vinifera Manzoni Bianco grape juice and characterized. On the basis of proteomic analysis of tryptic peptides, a significant match identified the enzyme as a type IV grape chitinase previously found in juices of other V. vinifera varieties. The optimal pH and temperature for activity toward colloidal chitin were found to be 6 and 30 °C, respectively. The enzyme was found to hydrolyze chitin and oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine, generating N,N′-diacetylchitobiose and N-acetylglucosamine as products, but was inactive toward N,N′-diacetylchitobiose. The enzyme exhibited both endo- and exochitinase activities. Because yeast contains a small amount of chitin in the cell wall, the possibility of growth inhibition was tested. At a concentration and pH expected in ripe grapes, no inhibition of wine yeast growth by the chitinase was observed. PMID:24845689

  1. Oil-suspended particulate material aggregates as a tool in preventing potential ecotoxicological impacts in the São Paulo river, Todos os Santos Bay, Bahia, Brazil: Influence of salinity and suspended particulate material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Lorena S; Moreira, Ícaro T A; Oliveira, Olívia M C; Santos, Carlito P; Pinheiro, Samires M M; Oliveira, Lua M L; Martins, Adriele B O; Filho, Milton S C

    2016-11-15

    Recent studies have revealed the occurrence of a natural process of interaction between oil droplets and suspended particulate material, resulting in the formation of aggregates which are dispersed in the water column, known as oil-suspended particulate material aggregates (OSAs). The experiments aimed to investigate the contribution of OSAS in indicating where most likely is the oil sedimentation in the São Paulo river, Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil, in order to predict possible ecotoxicological risks caused by oil spills. The results showed that salinity and MPS concentration interfere on the formation of aggregates. In addition, the point 3 was nominated as the most vulnerable area to the potential ecotoxicological impacts of oil spills and should be treated as a priority area for the application of preventive and mitigating techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunohistochemical investigation of alpha1 (IV) and alpha5 (IV) collagen chains in a broad spectrum of melanocytic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatresooz, Pascale; Piérard, Gérald E

    2005-06-01

    Cells of melanocytic naevi and cutaneous malignant melanomas (MM) are surrounded by a basement membrane (BM). To scrutinize any difference between the deposits of alpha1 (IV) and alpha5 (IV) collagen chains in melanocytic naevi and MM. A total of 27 common melanocytic naevi, 11 dysplastic naevi, 21 atypical naevi (melanocytomas) including Spitz and non-Spitz types, as well as 24 MM were studied. Their phenotypic and functional characteristics defined by immunohistochemistry using a panel of antibodies, including those directed to the alpha1 (IV), alpha3 (IV) and alpha5 (IV) collagen chains. Almost all naevi and half the melanocytomas exhibited a strong positivity for the alpha1 (IV) collagen chain. By contrast, the remaining melanocytomas and MM presented a heterogeneous staining pattern for the alpha1 (IV) collagen chain. One third of the naevi, 23% of the MM without cutaneous micrometastasis and 83% of MM with cutaneous micrometastasis showed discrete cytoplasmic positivity for the alpha5 (IV) collagen chain. All other melanocytic tumours were negative for this antibody. Rare MM cells in transepidermal migration were stained with the anti-alpha1 (IV) or alpha5 (IV) collagen chain antibodies. No immunoreactivity for the alpha3 (IV) collagen chain was disclosed in any of the samples. We report the expression of alpha1 (IV) and alpha5 (IV) collagen chains in naevi and MM. The inconsistent staining pattern for alpha1 (IV) collagen chain in phenotypically atypical melanocytomas and in MM highlight the heterogeneity in both cell differentiation and stroma-tumour interactions. This biological aspect may be related to neoplastic progression and influence metastatic potential.

  3. Surviving a Suicide Attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Harrasi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support. All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor.

  4. Surviving a Suicide Attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al Maqbali, Mandhar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2016-09-01

    Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors) and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support). All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor.

  5. Will the olympics survive?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, T.

    1977-01-01

    The United States of America dominated 58 events in athletics, field and swimming, which between them accounted for 35 per cent of all events in the Munich Olympiad. 1972; these events favour taller individuals. But, in 25 per cent of other events (1) cycling, (2) fencing, (3) gymnastics, (4) judo, (5) weightlifting and (6) Graeco Roman wrestling the U.S.A. did not win a single medal. The failure of the U.S.A. to maintain her lead in Munich was largely due to weaknesses in these other events in many of which the potential medallists can be derived from the lower half of the height distribution (events 3 to 6). These weaknesses are Russia's strength and they continued to remain unstrengthened at Montreal. Also, the domination held by the U.S.A. in swimming was seriously challenged by East Germany. The present trends indicate that the U.S.A.'s ranking is likely to slip further to the third position in Moscow 1980. Factors inhibiting the survival of the Olympics are pointed. PMID:861436

  6. Overoxidation of phenol by hexachloroiridate(IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Na; Stanbury, David M

    2011-12-19

    It has been previously established that the aqueous oxidation of phenol by a deficiency of [IrCl(6)](2-) proceeds through the production of [IrCl(6)](3-) and phenoxyl radicals. Coupling of the phenoxyl radicals leads primarily to 4,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol, 2,4'-biphenol, and 4-phenoxyphenol. Overoxidation occurs through the further oxidation of these coupling products, leading to a rather complex mixture of final products. The rate laws for oxidation of the four coupling products by [IrCl(6)](2-) have the same form as those for the oxidation of phenol itself: -d[Ir(IV)]/dt = {(k(ArOH) + k(ArO(-))K(a)/[H(+)])/(1 + K(a)/[H(+)])}[ArOH](tot)[Ir(IV)]. Values for k(ArOH) and k(ArO(-)) have been determined for the four substrates at 25 °C and are assigned to H(2)O-PCET and electron-transfer mechanisms, respectively. Kinetic simulations of a combined mechanism that includes the rate of oxidation of phenol as well as the rates of these overoxidation steps show that the degree of overoxidation is rather limited at high pH but quite extensive at low pH. This pH-dependent overoxidation leads to a pH-dependent stoichiometric factor in the rate law for oxidation of phenol and causes some minor deviations in the rate law for oxidation of phenol. Empirically, these minor deviations can be accommodated by the introduction of a third term in the rate law that includes a "pH-dependent rate constant", but this approach masks the mechanistic origins of the effect. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Survival After Relapse of Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschmann, Carl; Bloom, Karina; Upadhyaya, Santhosh; Geyer, J Russell; Leary, Sarah E S

    2016-05-01

    Survival after recurrence of medulloblastoma has not been reported in an unselected cohort of patients in the contemporary era. We reviewed 55 patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma between 2000 and 2010, and treated at Seattle Children's Hospital to evaluate patterns of relapse treatment and survival. Fourteen of 47 patients (30%) over the age of 3 experienced recurrent or progressive medulloblastoma after standard therapy. The median time from diagnosis to recurrence was 18.0 months (range, 3.6 to 62.6 mo), and site of recurrence was metastatic in 86%. The median survival after relapse was 10.3 months (range, 1.3 to 80.5 mo); 3-year survival after relapse was 18%. There were trend associations between longer survival and having received additional chemotherapy (median survival 12.8 vs. 1.3 mo, P=0.16) and radiation therapy (15.4 vs. 5.9 mo, P=0.20). Isolated local relapse was significantly associated with shorter survival (1.3 vs. 12.8 mo, P=0.009). Recurrence of medulloblastoma is more likely to be metastatic than reported in previous eras. Within the limits of our small sample, our data suggest a potential survival benefit from retreatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation even in heavily pretreated patients. This report serves as a baseline against which to evaluate novel therapy combinations.

  8. Long-term outcomes of combined androgen blockade therapy in stage IV prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Taeko; Kawai, Koji; Kimura, Tomokazu; Kojima, Takahiro; Onozawa, Mizuki; Miyazaki, Jun; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Hinotsu, Shiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2015-04-01

    To clarify which subset of stage IV prostate cancer patients benefit from combined androgen blockade (CAB) using Japanese nationwide database. A total of 3,752 patients with stage IV disease from the prospective nationwide cohort database of the Japan Study Group of Prostate Cancer (J-CaP) were enrolled. All patients started primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT) between 2001 and 2003, and the present study was performed using the data set from December 2011. Patients were divided into two groups according to initial treatments: CAB with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRH) plus anti-androgen (AA) and non-CAB treatments such as LHRH monotherapy. The overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) for each group were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 2,967 patients (79.1%) received CAB. Overall, no significant difference was observed in OS and CSS between the CAB group and the non-CAB group. However, CAB resulted in significantly better OS and CSS compared to non-CAB in patients with very high Japan Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (J-CAPRA) scores of ten or greater (P = 0.007 and 0.013, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that CAB was an independent predictive factor for better OS (P = 0.013, hazard ratio = 0.83). Based on large-scale nationwide database, as PADT for prostate cancer patients with very high-risk disease, CAB resulted in better OS than other endocrine treatments.

  9. Update and review of the multidisciplinary management of stage IV colorectal cancer with liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Carl R

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of stage IV colorectal cancer with liver metastases has historically involved a multidisciplinary approach. In the last several decades, there have been great strides made in the therapeutic options available to treat these patients with advancements in medical, surgical, locoregional and adjunctive therapies available to patients with colorectal liver metastases(CLM. As a result, there have been improvements in patient care and survival. Naturally, the management of CLM has become increasingly complex in coordinating the various aspects of care in order to optimize patient outcomes. Review A review of historical and up to date literature was undertaken utilizing Medline/PubMed to examine relevant topics of interest in patients with CLM including criterion for resectability, technical/surgical considerations, chemotherapy, adjunctive and locoregional therapies. This review explores the various disciplines and modalities to provide current perspectives on the various options of care for patients with CLM. Conclusion Improvements in modern day chemotherapy as allowed clinicians to pursue a more aggressive surgical approach in the management of stage IV colorectal cancer with CLM. Additionally, locoregional and adjunctive therapies has expanded the armamentarium of treatment options available. As a result, the management of patients with CLM requires a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach utilizing various modalities and a more aggressive approach may now be pursued in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer with CLM to achieve optimal outcomes.

  10. Use of digestate from a decentralized on-farm biogas plant as fertilizer in soils: An ecotoxicological study for future indicators in risk and life cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivato, Alberto; Vanin, Stefano; Raga, Roberto; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Barausse, Alberto; Rieple, Antonia; Laurent, Alexis; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, the number of decentralized farm biogas plants has increased significantly in the EU. This development leads not only to an increasing amount of biogas produced, but also to a higher amount of digestate obtained. One of the most attractive options to manage the digestate is to apply it as biofertiliser to the soil, because this gives the opportunity of recovering the nutrients, primarily nitrogen and phosphorus, and of attenuating the loss of organic matter suffered by soils under agricultural exploitation. Studies have claimed that digestates can present a residual biodegradability, and contain complex organic elements, salts or pathogenic bacteria that can damage terrestrial organisms. However few ecotoxicological studies have been performed to evaluate the ecological impact of digestate application on soil. In this study, the use of digestate as biofertiliser in agriculture was assessed by a battery of ecotoxicological tests considering the potential pollutants present in the digestate as a whole by using the "matrix-based" approach (also known as "whole effluent toxicity" for eluates or wastewater effluents). The direct and indirect tests included plant bioassays with Lepidium sativum, earthworm bioassays with Eisenia fetida, aquatic organisms (Artemia sp. and Daphnia magna) and luminescent bacteria bioassays (Vibrio fischeri). Direct tests occurred to be more sensitive than indirect tests. The earthworm bioassays did not show serious negative effects for concentrations up to 15% (dry weight/dry weight percent, w/w dm) and the plant bioassays showed no negative effect, but rather a positive one for concentrations lower than 20% (w/w dm), which encourages the use of digestate as a biofertiliser in agriculture provided that proper concentrations are used. The indirect tests, on the eluate, with the using aquatic organisms and luminescent bacteria showed an LC50 value of 13.61% volume/volume percent, v/v) for D. magna and no toxicity for

  11. Pembuatan Aplikasi Salesforce Automation System Pada Toko IV Berbasis Android

    OpenAIRE

    Soenaryo, S