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Sample records for ebic

  1. EBIC and LBIC studies of the properties of extended defects in plastically deformed silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, V. I.; Feklisova, O. V.; Yakimov, E. B., E-mail: yakimov@iptm.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronic Technology and Ultra-High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    The results of comparative experimental studies of one- and two-dimensional defects in plastically deformed silicon by the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) and light-beam-induced current (LBIC) techniques are reported. It is shown that the contrast of two-dimensional defects (dislocation trails) in the LBIC method can by much more pronounced than that in the EBIC technique, which is in good agreement with the results of calculations. The higher sensitivity of the LBIC technique is mainly due to deeper penetration of the optical beam into the material in comparison to the penetration of the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope.

  2. High-resolution scanning near-field EBIC microscopy: Application to the characterisation of a shallow ion implanted p+-n silicon junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaali, K.; Faure, J.; El Hdiy, A.; Troyon, M.

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution electron beam induced current (EBIC) analyses were carried out on a shallow ion implanted p + -n silicon junction in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a scanning probe microscope (SPM) hybrid system. With this scanning near-field EBIC microscope, a sample can be conventionally imaged by SEM, its local topography investigated by SPM and high-resolution EBIC image simultaneously obtained. It is shown that the EBIC imaging capabilities of this combined instrument allows the study of p-n junctions with a resolution of about 20 nm

  3. Electron Bio-Imaging Centre (eBIC): the UK national research facility for biological electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Daniel K; Siebert, C Alistair; Hecksel, Corey; Hagen, Christoph; Mordhorst, Valerie; Grange, Michael; Ashton, Alun W; Walsh, Martin A; Grünewald, Kay; Saibil, Helen R; Stuart, David I; Zhang, Peijun

    2017-06-01

    The recent resolution revolution in cryo-EM has led to a massive increase in demand for both time on high-end cryo-electron microscopes and access to cryo-electron microscopy expertise. In anticipation of this demand, eBIC was set up at Diamond Light Source in collaboration with Birkbeck College London and the University of Oxford, and funded by the Wellcome Trust, the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) to provide access to high-end equipment through peer review. eBIC is currently in its start-up phase and began by offering time on a single FEI Titan Krios microscope equipped with the latest generation of direct electron detectors from two manufacturers. Here, the current status and modes of access for potential users of eBIC are outlined. In the first year of operation, 222 d of microscope time were delivered to external research groups, with 95 visits in total, of which 53 were from unique groups. The data collected have generated multiple high- to intermediate-resolution structures (2.8-8 Å), ten of which have been published. A second Krios microscope is now in operation, with two more due to come online in 2017. In the next phase of growth of eBIC, in addition to more microscope time, new data-collection strategies and sample-preparation techniques will be made available to external user groups. Finally, all raw data are archived, and a metadata catalogue and automated pipelines for data analysis are being developed.

  4. Recombination-related properties of a-screw dislocations in GaN: A combined CL, EBIC, TEM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedev, O. S., E-mail: o.s.medvedev@spbu.ru; Mikhailovskii, V. Yu. [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); IRC for Nanotechnology, Research Park, St.-Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Vyvenko, O. F.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Ubyivovk, E. V. [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Peretzki, P.; Seibt, M. [IV. Physikalisches Institut Georg-August Universität Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-06-17

    Cathodoluminescence (CL), electron beam current (EBIC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques have been applied to investigate recombination properties and structure of freshly introduced dislocations in low-ohmic GaN crystals. It was confirmed that the only a-screw dislocations exhibited an intense characteristic dislocation-related luminescence (DRL) which persisted up to room temperature and was red-shifted by about 0.3 eV with respect to the band gap energy not only in HVPE but also in MOCVD grown samples. EBIC contrast of the dislocations was found to be temperature independent indicating that the dislocation-related recombination level is situated below 200 meV with respect of conduction band minimum. With the increasing of the magnification of the dislocation TEM cross-sectional images they were found to disappear, probably, due to the recombination enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) under electron beam exposure which was immediately observed in CL investigations on a large scale. The stacking fault ribbon in the core of dissociated a-screw dislocation which form a quantum well for electrons was proposed to play an important role both in DRL spectrum formation and in REDG.

  5. EBIC and DLTS characterization of pure Si crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Possibilities of measurements of low defect concentration in Si by the electrical methods are discussed. ... of highly integrated circuits, the tolerable concentrations .... centrations in p-type irradiated FZ–Si after WCE and sub- sequent ...

  6. Electron beam induced conductivity in 'PET' and 'FEP'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walzade, S.J.; Jog, J.P.; Dake, S.B.; Bhoraskar, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Electron Beam Induced Conductivity (EBIC), classified into EBIC (bulk) and EBIC (surface) have been measured in PET and FEP respectively. The peculiar oscillatory nature of the induced gain versus beam energy variations is explained in terms of the spatial distributions of the trapping centres near the surface of the polymers. (author)

  7. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  8. Effect of metal contamination on recombination properties of extended defects in multicrystalline Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feklisova, O.V.; Yakimov, E.B. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology, RAS, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Yu, X.; Yang, D. [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2012-10-15

    The effect of iron and copper contamination on the recombination properties of extended defects in multicrystalline Si is investigated by the Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) method. Plastically deformed Si samples containing dislocations and dislocation trails are also studied for a comparison. It is shown that Fe contamination leads to an essential increase of the EBIC contrast of electrically active grain boundaries and dislocation trails. The EBIC contrast of deformation induced dislocations also increases after iron diffusion while the recombination activity of grown-in dislocations in multicrystalline Si does not practically change after such treatment. Cu contamination also leads to an essential increase of the EBIC contrast of electrically active grain boundaries and dislocation trails. But dislocation contrast in both plastically deformed Si and multicrystalline Si does not practically increase after Cu contamination. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. The detection of electron-beam-induced current in junctionless semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Chee Chin; Ong, Vincent K. S.

    2010-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope is a versatile tool and its electron beam techniques have been widely used in semiconductor material and device characterizations. One of these electron beam techniques is the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. One of the limitations of the conventional EBIC technique is that it requires charge collecting junctions which may not be readily available in junctionless samples such as bare substrates unless some special sample preparation procedure such as the fabrication of a diffused junction is done on the junctionless sample. In this paper, the technique of detecting EBIC current in junctionless samples with the use of a two-point probe is presented. It is found that the EBIC current is independent from its physical parameter when the sample thickness is greater than 4L; the width to the right of probe 2 and the width to the left of probe 1 are greater than 2L and 8L, respectively. The parameters affecting this technique of detecting the EBIC current such as the depth of the generation volume, probe spacing, and the applied bias are also discussed in this paper. A commercially available two-dimensional device simulator was used to verify this technique.

  10. The effect of electron range on electron beam induced current collection and a simple method to extract an electron range for any generation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahreche, A.; Beggah, Y.; Corkish, R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of electron range on electron beam induced current (EBIC) is demonstrated and the problem of the choice of the optimal electron ranges to use with simple uniform and point generation function models is resolved by proposing a method to extract an electron range-energy relationship (ERER). The results show that the use of these extracted electron ranges remove the previous disagreement between the EBIC curves computed with simple forms of generation model and those based on a more realistic generation model. The impact of these extracted electron ranges on the extraction of diffusion length, surface recombination velocity and EBIC contrast of defects is discussed. It is also demonstrated that, for the case of uniform generation, the computed EBIC current is independent of the assumed shape of the generation volume. -- Highlights: → Effect of electron ranges on modeling electron beam induced current is shown. → A method to extract an electron range for simple form of generation is proposed. → For uniform generation the EBIC current is independent of the choice of it shape. → Uses of the extracted electron ranges remove some existing literature ambiguity.

  11. Depletion region surface effects in electron beam induced current measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, Paul M.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Yoon, Heayoung P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Gaury, Benoit [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Current models of EBIC assume that excitations in the p-n junction depletion region result in perfect charge collection efficiency. However, we find that in CdTe and Si samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, there is a reduced and nonuniform EBIC lineshape for excitations in the depletion region. Motivated by this, we present a model of the EBIC response for excitations in the depletion region which includes the effects of surface recombination from both charge-neutral and charged surfaces. For neutral surfaces, we present a simple analytical formula which describes the numerical data well, while the charged surface response depends qualitatively on the location of the surface Fermi level relative to the bulk Fermi level. We find that the experimental data on FIB-prepared Si solar cells are most consistent with a charged surface and discuss the implications for EBIC experiments on polycrystalline materials.

  12. Electron-beam-induced current study of hydrogen passivation on grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon: Influence of GB character and impurity contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Yang Deren; Xi Zhenqiang; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The impacts of grain boundary (GB) character and impurity contamination level on the hydrogen passivation of GBs in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) were studied by means of an electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. In mc-Si with a low contamination of Fe, the 300K EBIC contrast of all kinds of GBs in the H-passivated state was weak and similar to that in the as-grown state. The 100K EBIC contrast of Σ (Σ=3, 9, and 27) GBs decreased about 75-80%, whereas that of random and small-angle GBs decreased about 35-40%. Due to the different impurity gettering ability of different GBs, the variation in 100K EBIC contrast has suggested that the effect of H-passivation depends on both the GB character and impurity contamination level. In the mc-Si with heavy contamination of Fe, at both 300 and 100K, the EBIC contrast of both Σ (Σ=3) and random GBs decreased but the ratio was <40%, suggesting that the H-passivation is mainly affected by the impurity contamination level. on

  13. Electron-beam-induced-current and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast with aberration-corrected electron probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Myung-Geun, E-mail: mghan@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Garlow, Joseph A. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Marshall, Matthew S.J.; Tiano, Amanda L. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Cheong, Sang-Wook [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H. [Department of Applied Physics and Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) are demonstrated in STEM mode combined with in situ electrical biasing in a TEM. • Electrostatic potential maps in ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC data. • Simultaneous EBIC and active SE-VC performed with atomic resolution STEM are demonstrated. - Abstract: The ability to map out electrostatic potentials in materials is critical for the development and the design of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices in modern industry. Electron holography has been an important tool for revealing electric and magnetic field distributions in microelectronics and magnetic-based memory devices, however, its utility is hindered by several practical constraints, such as charging artifacts and limitations in sensitivity and in field of view. In this article, we report electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) with an aberration-corrected electron probe in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), as complementary techniques to electron holography, to measure electric fields and surface potentials, respectively. These two techniques were applied to ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals. Electrostatic potential maps obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC to show that these techniques can be used as a complementary approach to validate quantitative results obtained from electron holography analysis.

  14. Electron-beam-induced current study of small-angle grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Sekiguchi, T.; Xie, R.; Ahmet, P.; Chikyo, T.; Yang, D.; Ito, S.; Yin, F.

    2005-01-01

    Recombination activity of small-angle grain boundaries (SA GBs) in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) was studied by means of electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. In the as-grown mc-Si, the EBIC contrasts of special Σ and random GBs were weak at both 300 and 100 K, whereas those of SA GBs were weak (<3%) at 300 K and strong (30-40%) at 100 K. In the contaminated mc-Si, SA GBs showed stronger EBIC contrast than Σ and R GBs at 300 K. It is indicated that SA GBs possess high density of shallow levels and are easily contaminated with Fe compared to other GBs

  15. High-resolution photocurrent microscopy using near-field cathodoluminescence of quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heayoung P. Yoon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a fast, versatile photocurrent imaging technique to visualize the local photo response of solar energy devices and optoelectronics using near-field cathodoluminescence (CL from a homogeneous quantum dot layer. This approach is quantitatively compared with direct measurements of high-resolution Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC using a thin film solar cell (n-CdS / p-CdTe. Qualitatively, the observed image contrast is similar, showing strong enhancement of the carrier collection efficiency at the p-n junction and near the grain boundaries. The spatial resolution of the new technique, termed Q-EBIC (EBIC using quantum dots, is determined by the absorption depth of photons. The results demonstrate a new method for high-resolution, sub-wavelength photocurrent imaging measurement relevant for a wide range of applications.

  16. SEM technique for experimentally locating latch-up paths in integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressendorfer, P.V.; Armendariz, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is presented for using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) in the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) mode to delineate latch-up paths in CMOS ICs. In the EBIC mode, the current produced by the collection and separation of the electron-beam-generated electron-hole pairs in the space charge regions of the device is measured and used to form an image. Since the collection of these carriers is dependent on space charge region width (and thus junction potential), anything that alters the depletion layer width will affect the collection efficiency. In a latch condition the junctions involved in the latch will be biased differently from those which are not, and thus the EBIC signal from those regions should be measurably different

  17. Numerical simulation of electron-beam-induced current near a silicon grain boundary and impact of a p-n junction space charge region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corkish, R.; Altermatt, P.P.; Heiser, G. [Photovoltaics Special Research Centre, University of New South Wales, 2052 Sydney (Australia)

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) near a vertical silicon grain boundary are demonstrated. They are compared with an analytical model which excludes the effect of carrier generation other than in the bulk base region of a solar cell structure. We demonstrate that in a wide range of solar cell structures recombination in the space charge region (SCR) significantly affects the EBIC results and hence needs to be included in the data evaluation. Apart from these findings, simulations of a realistic silicon solar cell structure (thick emitter, field-dependent mobility, etc.) are demonstrated.

  18. Resistance and sheet resistance measurements using electron beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, A.; Pluska, M.; Ratajczak, J.; Szerling, A.; KaPtcki, J.

    2006-01-01

    A method for measurement of spatially uniform or nonuniform resistance in layers and strips, based on electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique, is described. High electron beam currents are used so that the overall resistance of the measurement circuit affects the EBIC signal. During the evaluation, the electron beam is scanned along the measured object, whose load resistance varies with the distance. The variation is compensated by an adjustable resistance within an external circuit. The method has been experimentally deployed for sheet resistance determination of buried regions of lateral confinements in semiconductor laser heterostructures manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy

  19. The characterization of high quality multicrystalline silicon by the electron beam induced current method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J; Sekiguchi, T; Nara, S; Yang, D

    2004-01-01

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) manufactured by a multi-stage solidification control casting method has been characterized by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. The average diffusion length of the ingot was over 250 μm, which was much longer than that of conventional mc-Si. The EBIC study revealed that the electrical activities of grain boundaries (GBs) varied with the ingot position due to the impurity contamination level. The main impurity detected was iron. The concentration of iron in the central position was much lower than that at the bottom and top positions. GBs in the central position showed no significant EBIC contrast at 300 K, suggesting low contamination level. GBs in the top and bottom positions, however, showed strong EBIC contrast at 300 K, suggesting high contamination level. At 100 K, a denuded zone with bright contrast developed around GBs in the top and bottom positions. The existence of the denuded zone suggested that impurities were gettered at the GBs. It was considered that the variation of the diffusion length in the ingot was related to the variation of recombination activities of GBs in the different positions, which mainly depended on the impurity contamination

  20. Radiation therapy alone in stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix - a 17-year experience in Southern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Paulo R.F.; Braga-Filho, Aroldo; Barletta, Antonio; Ilha, Ligia A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: External irradiation followed by intracavitary therapy (EBIC) has been considered the standard treatment for stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix. For different reasons, some patients are not suited for intracavitary therapy (ICT), and the treatment may be given entirely by external beam irradiation alone (EBRTA). The purpose of our study is to discuss treatment results and complications for patients undergoing EBIC or EBRTA. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study was carried out on 202 eligible patients with stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix admitted for radiotherapy from 1980-1997. Ninety-three patients were able to receive EBIC (50 Gy, 8 MV RX whole pelvis followed by one session of 38-45 Gy ICT to point A). The remaining received EBRTA (50-70 Gy for 5-9 or more weeks). Median follow-up procedure was 18.5 months (range: 4-182) for all patients and 26 months (range 4-147) for the patients at risk. Results: The most frequent reason for precluding ICT was large residual tumor volume (32.1%). Ten-year overall survival rates, relapse free survival, and pelvic failure rate for the EBIC and EBRTA patients were, respectively, 22.5% x 15.6% (p = 0.0087), 23.5% x 14.8% (p = 0.005), and 51.6% x 68.8% (p = 0.005). However, when the same comparisons were performed with EBIC patients x EBRTA patients receiving a high dose schedule (60 Gy/6-8 wk to 70 Gy/7-9 wk), the results of the EBIC group remained higher, but the differences became insignificant: respectively, 22.5% x 18.9% (p = 0.17), 23.5% x 15.3% (p = 0.052), and 51.6% x 60.0% (p = 0.10). The distribution of complications was similar in both groups. Conclusions: We found that EBIC was the best treatment modality in our patients with stage III-B cancer of the uterine cervix, whereas for patients who were not candidates for ICT, EBRTA with a high dose schedule appears to be an efficient and safe alternative

  1. Modified electron beam induced current technique for in(Ga)As/InAsSb superlattice infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, N.; Reyner, C. J.; Ariyawansa, G.; Duran, J. M.; Scheihing, J. E.; Mabon, J.; Wasserman, D.

    2017-08-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements provide a powerful tool for characterizing semiconductor based materials and devices. By measuring the current generated by the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), EBIC allows us to extract the minority carrier diffusion length (L) and the surface recombination velocity to diffusivity ratio (S/D) of a material. When combined with information on minority carrier lifetime (τ), for instance from time-resolved photoluminescence measurements, the minority carrier mobility of the material can be extracted. However, the EBIC technique relies heavily on the accurate modeling of the carrier generation and collection process. Traditionally, this was achieved using a combination of empirical analytical expressions (and later Monte Carlo simulations) for carrier generation and analytical diffusion/recombination expressions for carrier collection. This approach introduces significant uncertainties into the extracted material parameters. Here, we present a numerical approach to EBIC modeling which improves the spatial resolution of our model, while also retaining information regarding the relative EBIC signal as a function of incident beam energies and currents. We apply this technique to investigate the temperature dependent minority carrier mobility of InAs/InAsSb and InGaAs/InAsSb strained layer superlattice infrared detectors and compare our results to the values obtained using external quantum efficiency measurements of the same samples. Our approach not only allows for an improvement in the uncertainty of the extracted material parameters, but also offers insight into the material and device behavior as a function of nonequilibrium carrier concentration. The technique presented here offers potentially improved characterization of not only infrared detectors, but a range of semiconductor-based devices.

  2. Amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Andrea; Riesen, Yannick; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Dunand, Sylvain; Powolny, François; Jarron, Pierre; Ballif, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were recently introduced to overcome some of the limitations of crystalline silicon and glass MCP. The typical thickness of a-Si:H based MCPs (AMCP) ranges between 80 and 100 μm and the micromachining of the channels is realized by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Advantages and issues regarding the fabrication process are presented and discussed. Electron amplification is demonstrated and analyzed using Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) technique. The gain increases as a function of the bias voltage, limited to −340 V on account of high leakage currents across the structure. EBIC maps on 10° tilted samples confirm that the device active area extend to the entire channel opening. AMCP characterization with the electron beam shows gain saturation and signal quenching which depends on the effectiveness of the charge replenishment in the channel walls.

  3. Axial p-n junction and space charge limited current in single GaN nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhihua; Donatini, Fabrice; Daudin, Bruno; Pernot, Julien

    2018-01-01

    The electrical characterizations of individual basic GaN nanostructures, such as axial nanowire (NW) p-n junctions, are becoming indispensable and crucial for the fully controlled realization of GaN NW based devices. In this study, electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements were performed on two single axial GaN p-n junction NWs grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. I-V characteristics revealed that both ohmic and space charge limited current (SCLC) regimes occur in GaN p-n junction NW. Thanks to an improved contact process, both the electric field induced by the p-n junction and the SCLC in the p-part of GaN NW were disclosed and delineated by EBIC signals under different biases. Analyzing the EBIC profiles in the vicinity of the p-n junction under 0 V and reverse bias, we deduced a depletion width in the range of 116-125 nm. Following our previous work, the acceptor N a doping level was estimated to be 2-3 × 1017 at cm-3 assuming a donor level N d of 2-3 × 1018 at cm-3. The hole diffusion length in n-GaN was determined to be 75 nm for NW #1 and 43 nm for NW #2, demonstrating a low surface recombination velocity at the m-plane facet of n-GaN NW. Under forward bias, EBIC imaging visualized the electric field induced by the SCLC close to p-side contact, in agreement with unusual SCLC previously reported in GaN NWs.

  4. Exploratory graph analysis: A new approach for estimating the number of dimensions in psychological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golino, Hudson F; Epskamp, Sacha

    2017-01-01

    The estimation of the correct number of dimensions is a long-standing problem in psychometrics. Several methods have been proposed, such as parallel analysis (PA), Kaiser-Guttman's eigenvalue-greater-than-one rule, multiple average partial procedure (MAP), the maximum-likelihood approaches that use fit indexes as BIC and EBIC and the less used and studied approach called very simple structure (VSS). In the present paper a new approach to estimate the number of dimensions will be introduced and compared via simulation to the traditional techniques pointed above. The approach proposed in the current paper is called exploratory graph analysis (EGA), since it is based on the graphical lasso with the regularization parameter specified using EBIC. The number of dimensions is verified using the walktrap, a random walk algorithm used to identify communities in networks. In total, 32,000 data sets were simulated to fit known factor structures, with the data sets varying across different criteria: number of factors (2 and 4), number of items (5 and 10), sample size (100, 500, 1000 and 5000) and correlation between factors (orthogonal, .20, .50 and .70), resulting in 64 different conditions. For each condition, 500 data sets were simulated using lavaan. The result shows that the EGA performs comparable to parallel analysis, EBIC, eBIC and to Kaiser-Guttman rule in a number of situations, especially when the number of factors was two. However, EGA was the only technique able to correctly estimate the number of dimensions in the four-factor structure when the correlation between factors were .7, showing an accuracy of 100% for a sample size of 5,000 observations. Finally, the EGA was used to estimate the number of factors in a real dataset, in order to compare its performance with the other six techniques tested in the simulation study.

  5. Silicon radiation detector analysis using back electron beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guye, R.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique for the observation and analysis of defects in silicon radiation detectors is described. This method uses an electron beam from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) impinging on the rear side of the p + n junction of the silicon detector, which itself is active and detects the electron beam induced current (EBIC). It is shown that this current is a sensitive probe of localized trapping centers, either at the junction surface or somewhere in the volume of the silicon crystal. (orig.)

  6. Axial p-n junction and space charge limited current in single GaN nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhihua; Donatini, Fabrice; Daudin, Bruno; Pernot, Julien

    2018-01-05

    The electrical characterizations of individual basic GaN nanostructures, such as axial nanowire (NW) p-n junctions, are becoming indispensable and crucial for the fully controlled realization of GaN NW based devices. In this study, electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements were performed on two single axial GaN p-n junction NWs grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. I-V characteristics revealed that both ohmic and space charge limited current (SCLC) regimes occur in GaN p-n junction NW. Thanks to an improved contact process, both the electric field induced by the p-n junction and the SCLC in the p-part of GaN NW were disclosed and delineated by EBIC signals under different biases. Analyzing the EBIC profiles in the vicinity of the p-n junction under 0 V and reverse bias, we deduced a depletion width in the range of 116-125 nm. Following our previous work, the acceptor N a doping level was estimated to be 2-3 × 10 17 at cm -3 assuming a donor level N d of 2-3 × 10 18 at cm -3 . The hole diffusion length in n-GaN was determined to be 75 nm for NW #1 and 43 nm for NW #2, demonstrating a low surface recombination velocity at the m-plane facet of n-GaN NW. Under forward bias, EBIC imaging visualized the electric field induced by the SCLC close to p-side contact, in agreement with unusual SCLC previously reported in GaN NWs.

  7. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Abou-Ras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe2 solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe2/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe2 layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w2 and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  8. Correlation between morphological defects, electron beam-induced current imaging, and the electrical properties of 4H-SiC Schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Ali, G.N.; Mikhov, M.K.; Vaidyanathan, V.; Skromme, B.J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.

    2005-01-01

    Defects in SiC degrade the electrical properties and yield of devices made from this material. This article examines morphological defects in 4H-SiC and defects visible in electron beam-induced current (EBIC) images and their effects on the electrical characteristics of Schottky diodes. Optical Nomarski microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to observe the morphological defects, which are classified into 26 types based on appearance alone. Forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics were used to extract barrier heights, ideality factors, and breakdown voltages. Barrier heights decrease about linearly with increasing ideality factor, which is explained by discrete patches of low barrier height within the main contact. Barrier height, ideality, and breakdown voltage all degrade with increasing device diameter, suggesting that discrete defects are responsible. Electroluminescence was observed under reverse bias from microplasmas associated with defects containing micropipes. EBIC measurements reveal several types of features corresponding to recombination centers. The density of dark spots observed by EBIC correlates strongly with ideality factor and barrier height. Most morphological defects do not affect the reverse characteristics when no micropipes are present, but lower the barrier height and worsen the ideality factor. However, certain multiple-tailed defects, irregularly shaped defects and triangular defects with 3C inclusions substantially degrade both breakdown voltage and barrier height, and account for most of the bad devices that do not contain micropipes. Micropipes in these wafers are also frequently found to be of Type II, which do not run parallel to the c axis

  9. Charge carrier transport in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar-cells studied by electron beam induced current and temperature and illumination dependent current voltage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichterwitz, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    This work contributes to the understanding of generation dependent charge-carrier transport properties in Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGSe)/ CdS/ ZnO solar cells and a consistent model for the electronic band diagram of the heterojunction region of the device is developed. Cross section electron-beam induced current (EBIC) and temperature and illumination dependent current voltage (IV) measurements are performed on CIGSe solar cells with varying absorber layer compositions and CdS thickness. For a better understanding of possibilities and limitations of EBIC measurements applied on CIGSe solar cells, detailed numerical simulations of cross section EBIC profiles for varying electron beam and solar cell parameters are performed and compared to profiles obtained from an analytical description. Especially the effects of high injection conditions are considered. Even though the collection function of the solar cell is not independent of the generation function of the electron beam, the local electron diffusion length in CIGSe can still be extracted. Grain specific values ranging from (480±70) nm to (2.3±0.2) μm are determined for a CuInSe 2 absorber layer and a value of (2.8±0.3) μm for CIGSe with a Ga-content of 0.3. There are several models discussed in literature to explain generation dependent charge carrier transport, all assuming a high acceptor density either located in the CIGSe layer close to the CIGSe/CdS interface (p + layer), within the CdS layer or at the CdS/ZnO interface. In all models, a change in charge carrier collection properties is caused by a generation dependent occupation probability of the acceptor type defect state and the resulting potential distribution throughout the device. Numerical simulations of EBIC and IV data are performed with parameters according to these models. The model that explains the experimental data best is that of a p + layer at the CIGSe/CdS interface and acceptor type defect states at the CdS/ZnO interface. The p + layer leads

  10. Characterization of electrical and optical properties of silicon based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Guobin

    2009-12-04

    In this work, the electrical and luminescence properties of a series of silicon based materials used for photovoltaics, microelectronics and nanoelectronics have been investigated by means of electron beam induced current (EBIC), cathodoluminescence (CL), photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) methods. Photovoltaic materials produced by block casting have been investigated by EBIC on wafers sliced from different parts of the ingot. Various solar cell processings have been compared in parallel wafers by means of EBIC collection efficiency measurements and contrast-temperature C(T) behaviors of the extended defects, i. e. dislocations and grain boundaries (GBs). It was found that the solar cell processing with phosphorus diffusion gettering (PDG) followed with a SiN firing greatly reduces the recombination activity of extended defects at room temperature, and improves the bulk property simultaneously. A remaining activity of the dislocations indicates the limitation of the PDG at extended defects. Abnormal behavior of the dislocation activity after certain solar cell processes was also observed in the region with high dislocation density, the dislocations are activated after certain solar cell processings. In order to evaluate the properties of a thin polycrystalline silicon layer prepared by Al-induced layer exchange (Alile) technique, epitaxially layer grown on silicon substrate with different orientations was used as a model system to investigate the impact by the process temperature and the substrates. EBIC energy dependent collection efficiency measurements reveal an improvement of the epilayer quality with increasing substrate temperature during the growth from 450 C to 650 C, and a decrease of epilayer quality at 700 C. PL measurements on the epitaxially grown Si layer on silicon substrates revealed no characteristic dislocation-related luminescence (DRL) lines at room temperature and 77 K, while in the samples prepared by Alile process, intense

  11. Electric field and space-charge distribution in SI GaAs: effect of high-energy proton irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Castaldini, A; Polenta, L; Canali, C; Nava, F

    1999-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on semi-insulating gallium arsenide Schottky diodes has been investigated by means of surface potential measurements and spectroscopic techniques. Before and after irradiation the electric field exhibits a Mott barrier-like distribution, and the box-shaped space charge modifies its distribution with irradiation. The increase in density or the generation of some traps changes the compensation ratio producing a deeper active region and a more homogeneous distribution of the electric field. The latter phenomenon is also observed by EBIC images of edge-mounted diodes.

  12. Development of diode junction nuclear battery using 63Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmen, B.; Miley, G.H.; Desai, P.D.; Moghaddam, S.; Masel, R.I.

    2009-01-01

    The diode junction nuclear battery is a long-lived, high-energy-density, but low electrical current power source with many specialized applications. In this type of battery, nuclear radiation is directly converted to electric power. A model is described and used to design the device configuration. Details of fabrication and testing of a planar geometry battery with 63 Ni radiation source are described. The electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurement technique and CASINO Monte Carlo simulation code were employed to analyze the device performance. Finally, an improved design with 3-dimensional surface microstructures that will provide improved performance is presented. (author)

  13. The cross-validated AUC for MCP-logistic regression with high-dimensional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dingfeng; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Ying

    2013-10-01

    We propose a cross-validated area under the receiving operator characteristic (ROC) curve (CV-AUC) criterion for tuning parameter selection for penalized methods in sparse, high-dimensional logistic regression models. We use this criterion in combination with the minimax concave penalty (MCP) method for variable selection. The CV-AUC criterion is specifically designed for optimizing the classification performance for binary outcome data. To implement the proposed approach, we derive an efficient coordinate descent algorithm to compute the MCP-logistic regression solution surface. Simulation studies are conducted to evaluate the finite sample performance of the proposed method and its comparison with the existing methods including the Akaike information criterion (AIC), Bayesian information criterion (BIC) or Extended BIC (EBIC). The model selected based on the CV-AUC criterion tends to have a larger predictive AUC and smaller classification error than those with tuning parameters selected using the AIC, BIC or EBIC. We illustrate the application of the MCP-logistic regression with the CV-AUC criterion on three microarray datasets from the studies that attempt to identify genes related to cancers. Our simulation studies and data examples demonstrate that the CV-AUC is an attractive method for tuning parameter selection for penalized methods in high-dimensional logistic regression models.

  14. Recombination properties of dislocations in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Eugene B.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2018-04-01

    The recombination activity of threading dislocations in n-GaN with different dislocation densities and different doping levels was studied using electron beam induced current (EBIC). The recombination velocity on a dislocation, also known as the dislocation recombination strength, was calculated. The results suggest that dislocations in n-GaN giving contrast in EBIC are charged and surrounded by a space charge region, as evidenced by the observed dependence of dislocation recombination strength on dopant concentration. For moderate (below ˜108 cm-2) dislocation densities, these defects do not primarily determine the average diffusion length of nonequilibrium charge carriers, although locally, dislocations are efficient recombination sites. In general, it is observed that the effect of the growth method [standard metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), epitaxial lateral overgrowth versions of MOCVD, and hydride vapor phase epitaxy] on the recombination activity of dislocations is not very pronounced, although the average diffusion lengths can widely differ for various samples. The glide of basal plane dislocations at room temperature promoted by low energy electron irradiation does not significantly change the recombination properties of dislocations.

  15. Environmental Binorganic Chemistry 2008 Gordon Research Conference (June 18-20, 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne O. Summers

    2009-08-28

    This highly interdisciplinary conference is known for rigorous and wide-ranging consideration of the roles of elements traditionally called 'inorganic' in living systems at scales from the molecular to the global. EBIC brings together those studying the biotic-inorganic interface across the Periodic Table, mingling chemists, ecologists, geneticists, oceanographers, and computational biologists, among others. Topics range from transport, enzymology, and homeostasis in individual cells and organisms to the environmental processes they experience and influence, as well as the latest techniques enabling observation of these phenomena. This conference is distinct from other metallobiology meetings in having a substantial environmental theme and a broader view of the Periodic Table, regularly including radionuclides, metalloids, the halides, silicon, and non-metal essential nutrients. When possible we mix speakers working at the nanometer-nanosecond scale in the same session with those working at the kilometer-megayear scale, a practice demanding high quality introductory material from each speaker and discussion leader. EBIC provides a forum for leading scientists (many of whom will never have met before) with expertise in the inorganic dimensions of life to identify fundamental cross-cutting themes and unrecognized anomalies and share the latest on acquiring, analyzing, and applying bioinorganic chemical concepts to real world issues from public health to climate change.

  16. Electrical characteristics of schottky barriers on 4H-SiC: The effects of barrier height nonuniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skromme, B. J.; Luckowski, E.; Moore, K.; Bhatnagar, M.; Weitzel, C. E.; Gehoski, T.; Ganser, D.

    2000-03-01

    Electrical properties, including current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, have been measured on a large number of Ti, Ni, and Pt-based Schottky barrier diodes on 4H-SiC epilayers. Various nonideal behaviors are frequently observed, including ideality factors greater than one, anomalously low I-V barrier heights, and excess leakage currents at low forward bias and in reverse bias. The nonidealities are highly nonuniform across individual wafers and from wafer to wafer. We find a pronounced linear correlation between I-V barrier height and ideality factor for each metal, while C-V barrier heights remain constant. Electron beam induced current (EBIC) imaging strongly suggests that the nonidealities result from localized low barrier height patches. These patches are related to discrete crystal defects, which become visible as recombination centers in the EBIC images. Alternative explanations involving generation-recombination current, uniform interfacial layers, and effects related to the periphery are ruled out.

  17. Electron beam and optical depth profiling of quasibulk GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyak, L.; Osinsky, A.; Nootz, G.; Schulte, A.; Jasinski, J.; Benamara, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Look, D. C.; Molnar, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam and optical depth profiling of thick (5.5--64 μm) quasibulk n-type GaN samples, grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy, were carried out using electron beam induced current (EBIC), microphotoluminescence (PL), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The minority carrier diffusion length, L, was found to increase linearly from 0.25 μm, at a distance of about 5 μm from the GaN/sapphire interface, to 0.63 μm at the GaN surface, for a 36-μm-thick sample. The increase in L was accompanied by a corresponding increase in PL band-to-band radiative transition intensity as a function of distance from the GaN/sapphire interface. We attribute the latter changes in PL intensity and minority carrier diffusion length to a reduced carrier mobility and lifetime at the interface, due to scattering at threading dislocations. The results of EBIC and PL measurements are in good agreement with the values for dislocation density obtained using TEM

  18. Minority carrier blockade in MIND model solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, M.; Kuznicki, Z.T.; Ballutaud, D.

    2003-01-01

    A continuous amorphized a-Si nanostructure with sharp a-Si/c-Si heterointerfaces is inserted in a c-Si wafer by medium-energy P ion implantation followed by a thermal treatment at 500 deg. C. New photovoltaic phenomena in the mesoscopically transformed material are expected and were presented recently. The simulation of the band structure taking into account the differences between the two Si phases of the MIND (multi-interface novel device) model solar cell indicates the presence of a high barrier blocking the minority carriers, which are photogenerated in the bulk superficial region of the wafer. Consequently, the collection efficiency (i.e. collected carriers versus penetrating photons) is deteriorated in UV. Collection efficiency and EBIC measurements were used to give a theoretical and experimental analysis of the causes and the consequences of such a deterioration on the photocurrent

  19. 3D-Mössbauer spectroscopic microscope for mc-Si solar cell evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ino, Y., E-mail: y-ino@ob.sist.ac.jp; Soejima, H.; Hayakawa, K.; Yukihira, K.; Tanaka, K.; Fujita, H.; Watanabe, T. [Shizuoka Institute of Science and Technology (Japan); Ogai, K.; Moriguchi, K.; Harada, Y. [APCO. Ltd. (Japan); Yoshida, Y. [Shizuoka Institute of Science and Technology (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    A 3D-Mössbauer Spectroscopic Microscope is developed to evaluate Fe impurities in multi-crystalline Si solar cells, which combines the Mössbauer spectroscopic microscope with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), an electron beam induced current (EBIC), an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and an electron energy analyzer (HV-CSA). In addition, a new moving-coil-actuator with a liner encoder of 100 nm-resolution is incorporated for the operations with both a constant velocity and a constant acceleration mode successfully with the same precision as that obtained by the conventional transducers. Furthermore, a new multi-capillary X-ray lens is designed to achieve a γ-ray spot size less than 100 μm in diameter. The new microscope provides us to investigate the space correlation between Fe impurities and the lattice defects such as grain boundaries in multi-crystalline Si solar cells.

  20. Field effect transistors and photodetectors based on nanocrystalline graphene derived from electron beam induced carbonaceous patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurra, Narendra; Bhadram, Venkata Srinu; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Kulkarni, G U

    2012-01-01

    We describe a transfer-free method for the fabrication of nanocrystalline graphene (nc-graphene) on SiO 2 substrates directly from patterned carbonaceous deposits. The deposits were produced from the residual hydrocarbons present in the vacuum chamber without any external source by using an electron beam induced carbonaceous deposition (EBICD) process. Thermal treatment under vacuum conditions in the presence of Ni catalyst transformed the EBIC deposit into nc-graphene patterns, confirmed using Raman and TEM analysis. The nc-graphene patterns have been employed as an active p-type channel material in a field effect transistor (FET) which showed a hole mobility of ∼90 cm 2 V −1 s −1 . The nc-graphene also proved to be suitable material for IR detection. (paper)

  1. Model improvements to simulate charging in SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, K. T.; Klimpel, T.; Hagen, C. W.

    2018-03-01

    Charging of insulators is a complex phenomenon to simulate since the accuracy of the simulations is very sensitive to the interaction of electrons with matter and electric fields. In this study, we report model improvements for a previously developed Monte-Carlo simulator to more accurately simulate samples that charge. The improvements include both modelling of low energy electron scattering and charging of insulators. The new first-principle scattering models provide a more realistic charge distribution cloud in the material, and a better match between non-charging simulations and experimental results. Improvements on charging models mainly focus on redistribution of the charge carriers in the material with an induced conductivity (EBIC) and a breakdown model, leading to a smoother distribution of the charges. Combined with a more accurate tracing of low energy electrons in the electric field, we managed to reproduce the dynamically changing charging contrast due to an induced positive surface potential.

  2. On the intrinsic gettering in Cu-contaminated Cz-Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, K.; Kirscht, F.G.; Babanskaja, I.; Kittler, M.; Richter, H.; Seifert, W.

    1985-01-01

    NAA, TEM, DLTS, and EBIC investigations of Cu-contaminated Cz-Si with an intrinsic-gettering procedure realized by a multistep heat treatment demonstrate the efficiency of intrinsic gettering concerning redistribution to volume defects for Cu-contamination up to 10 16 cm -3 . The Cu-precipitation at the surface can still be suppressed for such contamination due to volume defects. However, in this case the concentration of contamination induced deep level centers at the surface is independent of the volume defect density. Only for Cu-contamination of about 10 15 cm -3 the gettering effect is strong enough to prevent the introduction of contamination induced deep levels at the surface. (author)

  3. Diffusion length measurements in bulk and epitaxially grown 3-5 semiconductors using charge collection microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Diffusion lengths and surface recombination velocities were measured in GaAs diodes and InP finished solar cells. The basic techniques used was charge collection microscopy also known as electron beam induced current (EBIC). The normalized currents and distances from the pn junction were read directly from the calibrated curves obtained while using the line scan mode in an SEM. These values were then equated to integral and infinite series expressions resulting from the solution of the diffusion equation with both extended generation and point generation functions. This expands previous work by examining both thin and thick samples. The surface recombination velocity was either treated as an unknown in a system of two equations, or measured directly using low e(-) beam accelerating voltages. These techniques give accurate results by accounting for the effects of surface recombination and the finite size of the generation volume.

  4. Photovoltaic X-ray detectors based on epitaxial GaAs structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achmadullin, R.A. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Artemov, V.V. [Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, 59 Leninski pr., Moscow B-333, 117333 (Russian Federation); Dvoryankin, V.F. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: vfd217@ire216.msk.su; Dvoryankina, G.G. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Dikaev, Yu.M. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Ermakov, M.G. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Ermakova, O.N. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Chmil, V.B. [Scientific State Center, High Energy Physics Institute, Protvino, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Holodenko, A.G. [Scientific State Center, High Energy Physics Institute, Protvino, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, A.A.; Krikunov, A.I.; Petrov, A.G.; Telegin, A.A. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Vorobiev, A.P. [Scientific State Center, High Energy Physics Institute, Protvino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2005-12-01

    A new type of the photovoltaic X-ray detector based on epitaxial p{sup +}-n-n'-n{sup +} GaAs structures which provides a high efficiency of charge collection in the non-bias operation mode at room temperature is proposed. The GaAs epitaxial structures were grown by vapor-phase epitaxy on heavily doped n{sup +}-GaAs(1 0 0) substrates. The absorption efficiency of GaAs X-ray detector is discussed. I-V and C-V characteristics of the photovoltaic X-ray detectors are analyzed. The built-in electric field profiles in the depletion region of epitaxial structures are measured by the EBIC method. Charge collection efficiency to {alpha}-particles and {gamma}-radiation are measured. The application of X-ray detectors is discussed.

  5. A study of the electrical properties of defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    This work contains the most comprehensive qualitative and quantitative electron beam induced current (EBIC) study of recombination at contaminated defects in silicon. It is also a rigorous quantitative investigation of the effect of hydrogen on individual transition metal contaminated defects. In addition, the recombination behaviour exhibited by point and extended defects has been investigated using EBIC and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). As a result of these measurements, techniques for the preparation of transition metal contaminated specimens have been refined. Successful hydrogen passivation of copper, nickel and iron contaminated silicon specimens containing oxidation-induced stacking faults has been achieved in two experimental systems. It is found that hydrogen passivates those states that are deepest in the semiconductor band gap in preference to those that are shallow. Furthermore, it has been concluded that during hydrogen passivation treatment, even at low temperatures, unwanted metallic impurities can be introduced. Three types of recombination behaviour have been identified from the defects-studied in this work and they are discussed with relevance to present recombination models. An investigation of the recombination behaviour of defects that lie in the depletion region and in the specimen bulk has concluded that the recombination type observed is independent of the depth of the defect. Evidence for the presence of compound defects showing mixed recombination behaviour type is presented. In conclusion, it is postulated that the transition metal impurities introduce a 'band of states' with a range of energies rather than a single energy state. This proposal is provided as an explanation for the recombination types found in this work and the effect of the hydrogen passivation. This work is placed in context of previous investigations into the behaviour of dislocations in silicon in the presence of transition metals, and the ability of

  6. Self-organized pattern formation of biomolecules at silicon surfaces: Intended application of a dislocation network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittler, M.; Yu, X.; Vyvenko, O.F.; Birkholz, M.; Seifert, W.; Reiche, M.; Wilhelm, T.; Arguirov, T.; Wolff, A.; Fritzsche, W.; Seibt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Defined placement of biomolecules at Si surfaces is a precondition for a successful combination of Si electronics with biological applications. We aim to realize this by Coulomb interaction of biomolecules with dislocations in Si. The dislocations form charged lines and they will be surrounded with a space charge region being connected with an electric field. The electric stray field in a solution of biomolecules, caused by dislocations located close to the Si surface, was estimated to yield values up to few kVcm -1 . A regular dislocation network can be formed by wafer direct bonding at the interface between the bonded wafers in case of misorientation. The adjustment of misorientation allows the variation of the distance between dislocations in a range from 10 nm to a few μm. This is appropriate for nanobiotechnology dealing with protein or DNA molecules with sizes in the nm and lower μm range. Actually, we achieved a distance between the dislocations of 10-20 nm. Also the existence of a distinct electric field formed by the dislocation network was demonstrated by the technique of the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC). Because of the relatively short range of the field, the dislocations have to be placed close to the surface. We positioned the dislocation network in an interface being 200 nm parallel to the Si surface by layer transfer techniques using hydrogen implantation and bonding. Based on EBIC and luminescence data we postulate a barrier of the dislocations at the as bonded interface < 100 meV. We plan to dope the dislocations with metal atoms to increase the electric field. We demonstrated that regular periodic dislocation networks close to the Si surface formed by bonding are realistic candidates for self-organized placing of biomolecules. Experiments are underway to test whether biomolecules decorate the pattern of the dislocation lines

  7. Root causes investigation of catastrophic optical bulk damage in high-power InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yongkun; Lingley, Zachary; Ayvazian, Talin; Brodie, Miles; Ives, Neil

    2018-02-01

    High-power single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers are critical components for both terrestrial and space satellite communications systems. Since these lasers predominantly fail by catastrophic and sudden degradation due to COD, it is especially crucial for space satellite applications to investigate reliability, failure modes, and degradation mechanisms of these lasers. Our group reported a new failure mode in MM and SM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers in 2009 and 2016, respectively. Our group also reported in 2017 that bulk failure due to catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD) is the dominant failure mode of both SM and MM lasers that were subject to long-term life-tests. For the present study, we report root causes investigation of COBD by performing long-term lifetests followed by failure mode analysis (FMA) using various micro-analytical techniques including electron beam induced current (EBIC), time-resolved electroluminescence (EL), focused ion beam (FIB), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Our life-tests with accumulated test hours of over 25,000 hours for SM lasers and over 35,000 hours for MM lasers generated a number of COBD failures with various failure times. EBIC techniques were employed to study dark line defects (DLDs) generated in SM COBD failures stressed under different test conditions. FIB and high-resolution TEM were employed to prepare cross sectional and plan view TEM specimens to study DLD areas (dislocations) in post-aged SM lasers. Time-resolved EL techniques were employed to study initiation and progressions of dark spots and dark lines in real time as MM lasers were aged. Lastly, to investigate precursor signatures of failure and degradation mechanisms responsible for COBD in both SM and MM lasers, we employed DLTS techniques to study a role that electron traps (non-radiative recombination centers) play in degradation of these

  8. Electrical, optical, and structural properties of GaN films prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.Y.; Smirnov, N.B.; Yakimov, E.B.; Usikov, A.S.; Helava, H.; Shcherbachev, K.D.; Govorkov, A.V.; Makarov, Yu N.; Lee, In-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • GaN films are prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). • Residual donors and deep traps show a minimum density versus growth temperature. • This minimum is located close to the HVPE growth temperature of 950 °C. • Good crystalline GaN with residual donor density < 10 16 cm −3 can be grown at 950 °C. - Abstract: Two sets of undoped GaN films with the thickness of 10–20 μm were prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and characterized by capacitance–voltage (C–V) profiling, microcathodoluminescence (MCL) spectra measurements, MCL imaging, electron beam induced current (EBIC) imaging, EBIC dependence on accelerating voltage, deep levels transient spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction measurements. The difference in growth conditions was mainly related to the lower (850 °C, group 1) or higher (950 °C, group 2) growth temperature. Both groups of samples showed similar crystalline quality with the dislocation density close to 10 8 cm −2 , but very different electrical and optical properties. In group 1 samples the residual donors concentration was ∼10 17 cm −3 or higher, the MCL spectra were dominated by the band-edge luminescence, and the diffusion length of charge carriers was close to 0.1 μm. Group 2 samples had a 2–4.5 μm thick highly resistive layer on top, for which MCL spectra were determined by green, yellow and red defect bands, and the diffusion length was 1.5 times higher than in group 1. We also present brief results of growth at the “standard” HVPE growth temperature of 1050 °C that show the presence of a minimum in the net donor concentration and deep traps density as a function of the growth temperature. Possible reasons for the observed results are discussed in terms of the electrical compensation of residual donors by deep traps

  9. Sputtered indium-tin oxide/cadmium telluride junctions and cadmium telluride surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courreges, F.G.; Fahrenbruch, A.L.; Bube, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The properties of indium-tin oxide (ITO)/CdTe junction solar cells prepared by rf sputtering of ITO on P-doped CdTe single-crystal substrates have been investigated through measurements of the electrical and photovoltaic properties of ITO/CdTe and In/CdTe junctions, and of electron beam induced currents (EBIC) in ITO/CdTe junctions. In addition, surface properties of CdTe related to the sputtering process were investigated as a function of sputter etching and thermal oxidation using the techniques of surface photovoltage and photoluminescence. ITO/CdTe cells prepared by this sputtering method consist of an n + -ITO/n-CdTe/p-CdTe buried homojunction with about a 1-μm-thick n-type CdTe layer formed by heating of the surface of the CdTe during sputtering. Solar efficiencies up to 8% have been observed with V/sub 0c/=0.82 V and J/sub s/c=14.5 mA/cm 2 . The chief degradation mechanism involves a decrease in V/sub 0c/ with a transformation of the buried homojunction structure to an actual ITO/CdTe heterojunction

  10. An electron beam induced current study of gallium nitride and diamond materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cropper, A.D.; Moore, D.J.; Scott, C.S.; Green, R.

    1995-01-01

    The continual need for microelectronic devices that operate under severe electronic and environmental conditions (high temperature, high frequency, high power, and radiation tolerance) has sustained research in wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The properties suggest these wide-bandgap semiconductor materials have tremendous potential for military and commercial applications. High frequency bipolar transistors and field effect transistors, diodes, and short wavelength optical devices have been proposed using these materials. Although research efforts involving the study of transport properties in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Diamond have made significant advances, much work is still needed to improve the material quality so that the electrophysical behavior of device structures can be further understood and exploited. Electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements can provide a method of understanding the transport properties in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Diamond. This technique basically consists of measuring the current or voltage transient response to the drift and diffusion of carriers created by a short-duration pulse of radiation. This method differs from other experimental techniques because it is based on a fast transient electron beam probe created from a high speed, laser pulsed photoemission system

  11. Investigation of the extraction of short diffusion lengths from simulated electron-beam induced current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, D.; Parish, G.; Nener, B. [Microelectronics Research Group, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, 6009 Crawley (Perth) (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    This paper reports on the investigations via 2-D simulation into the accuracy of diffusion length extraction from scanning electron-beam induced current measurements when the diffusion length, L is very short. L is extracted by using the direct method proposed by Chan et al.[1] and later refined by Kurniawan and Ong[2] to take finite junction depth into account. The 2-D simulations were undertaken using Synopsys {sup registered} Sentaurus TCAD and a realistic electron-hole pair generation volume was created using CASINO v2.42[3], a Monte Carlo Scanning Electron Microscope interaction simulation software, and imported into Sentaurus. The voltage and diameter of the electron beam and diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of the semiconductor materials were varied in the simulations to determine the errors in the diffusion length extracted from the EBIC signals as a function of these parameters. The results of the simulation show that the accuracy of the method proposed in[1] is reasonably accurate and that the beam voltage and spot size do not have significant effects on the accuracy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Investigation of the extraction of short diffusion lengths from simulated electron-beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, D.; Parish, G.; Nener, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the investigations via 2-D simulation into the accuracy of diffusion length extraction from scanning electron-beam induced current measurements when the diffusion length, L is very short. L is extracted by using the direct method proposed by Chan et al.[1] and later refined by Kurniawan and Ong[2] to take finite junction depth into account. The 2-D simulations were undertaken using Synopsys registered Sentaurus TCAD and a realistic electron-hole pair generation volume was created using CASINO v2.42[3], a Monte Carlo Scanning Electron Microscope interaction simulation software, and imported into Sentaurus. The voltage and diameter of the electron beam and diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of the semiconductor materials were varied in the simulations to determine the errors in the diffusion length extracted from the EBIC signals as a function of these parameters. The results of the simulation show that the accuracy of the method proposed in[1] is reasonably accurate and that the beam voltage and spot size do not have significant effects on the accuracy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. A Two-Step Absorber Deposition Approach To Overcome Shunt Losses in Thin-Film Solar Cells: Using Tin Sulfide as a Proof-of-Concept Material System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, Vera; Chakraborty, Rupak; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Hartman, Katy; Brandt, Riley E.; Polizzotti, Alex; Yang, Chuanxi; Moriarty, Tom; Gradečak, Silvija; Gordon, Roy G.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-08-31

    As novel absorber materials are developed and screened for their photovoltaic (PV) properties, the challenge remains to reproducibly test promising candidates for high-performing PV devices. Many early-stage devices are prone to device shunting due to pinholes in the absorber layer, producing 'false-negative' results. Here, we demonstrate a device engineering solution toward a robust device architecture, using a two-step absorber deposition approach. We use tin sulfide (SnS) as a test absorber material. The SnS bulk is processed at high temperature (400 degrees C) to stimulate grain growth, followed by a much thinner, low-temperature (200 degrees C) absorber deposition. At a lower process temperature, the thin absorber overlayer contains significantly smaller, densely packed grains, which are likely to provide a continuous coating and fill pinholes in the underlying absorber bulk. We compare this two-step approach to the more standard approach of using a semi-insulating buffer layer directly on top of the annealed absorber bulk, and we demonstrate a more than 3.5x superior shunt resistance Rsh with smaller standard error ..sigma..Rsh. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements indicate a lower density of pinholes in the SnS absorber bulk when using the two-step absorber deposition approach. We correlate those findings to improvements in the device performance and device performance reproducibility.

  14. What is the real value of diffusion length in GaN?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakimov, E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The applicability of SEM methods for diffusion length measurements in GaN is discussed. • The discussion is based on our own experiments and on the available literature data. • A study of EBIC dependence on beam energy suits well for a small diffusion length. • The most reliable diffusion length values in the state-of-the-art n-GaN are evaluated. - Abstract: The applicability of scanning electron microscopy methods for excess carrier diffusion length measurements in GaN is discussed. The discussion is based on author’s experiments and on the available literature data. It is shown that for semiconductors with submicron diffusion length special attention should be paid to the choice of measuring method and experimental conditions. Some reasons for diffusion length overestimation and underestimation are analyzed. It is shown that a measurement of collected current dependence on electron beam energy is the most suitable method for submicron diffusion length evaluations because it is much easier to meet conditions for a proper application of this method than for other widely used methods. The analysis of data previously reported in literature and author’s results have shown that the diffusion length values in the range from 70 to 400 nm are the most reliable for state-of-the-art n-GaN epilayers

  15. Current–voltage characteristics of manganite–titanite perovskite junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Ifland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available After a general introduction into the Shockley theory of current voltage (J–V characteristics of inorganic and organic semiconductor junctions of different bandwidth, we apply the Shockley theory-based, one diode model to a new type of perovskite junctions with polaronic charge carriers. In particular, we studied manganite–titanate p–n heterojunctions made of n-doped SrTi1−yNbyO3, y = 0.002 and p-doped Pr1−xCaxMnO3, x = 0.34 having a strongly correlated electron system. The diffusion length of the polaron carriers was analyzed by electron beam-induced current (EBIC in a thin cross plane lamella of the junction. In the J–V characteristics, the polaronic nature of the charge carriers is exhibited mainly by the temperature dependence of the microscopic parameters, such as the hopping mobility of the series resistance and a colossal electro-resistance (CER effect in the parallel resistance. We conclude that a modification of the Shockley equation incorporating voltage-dependent microscopic polaron parameters is required. Specifically, the voltage dependence of the reverse saturation current density is analyzed and interpreted as a voltage-dependent electron–polaron hole–polaron pair generation and separation at the interface.

  16. Electrical and optical characterization of surface passivation in GaAs nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Chi, Chun-Yung; Yao, Maoqing; Huang, Ningfeng; Chen, Chun-Chung; Theiss, Jesse; Bushmaker, Adam W; Lalumondiere, Stephen; Yeh, Ting-Wei; Povinelli, Michelle L; Zhou, Chongwu; Dapkus, P Daniel; Cronin, Stephen B

    2012-09-12

    We report a systematic study of carrier dynamics in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As-passivated GaAs nanowires. With passivation, the minority carrier diffusion length (L(diff)) increases from 30 to 180 nm, as measured by electron beam induced current (EBIC) mapping, and the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime increases from sub-60 ps to 1.3 ns. A 48-fold enhancement in the continuous-wave PL intensity is observed on the same individual nanowire with and without the Al(x)Ga(1-x)As passivation layer, indicating a significant reduction in surface recombination. These results indicate that, in passivated nanowires, the minority carrier lifetime is not limited by twin stacking faults. From the PL lifetime and minority carrier diffusion length, we estimate the surface recombination velocity (SRV) to range from 1.7 × 10(3) to 1.1 × 10(4) cm·s(-1), and the minority carrier mobility μ is estimated to lie in the range from 10.3 to 67.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the passivated nanowires.

  17. Mechanism on radiation degradation of Si space solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Taylor, S.J.; Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Matsuda, Sumio

    1998-01-01

    Radiation testing of Si n + -p-p + structure space solar cells has revealed an anomalous increase in short-circuit current Isc, followed by an abrupt decrease and cell failure, induced by high fluence electron and proton irradiations. A model to explain these phenomena by expressing the change in carrier concentration p of the base region is proposed in addition to the well-known model where Isc is decreased by minority-carrier lifetime reduction with irradiation. Change in carrier concentration causes broadening the depletion layer to contribute increase in the generated photocurrent and increase in recombination-generation current in the depletion layer, and increase in the resistivity of the base layer to result in the abrupt decrease of Isc and failure of the solar cell. Type conversion from p-type to n-type in base layer has been confirmed by EBIC (electron-beam induced current) and spectral response measurements. Moreover, origins of radiation-induced defects in heavily irradiated Si and generation of deep donor defects have also been examined by using DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) analysis. (author)

  18. SEM-based characterization techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope is now a common instrument in materials characterization laboratories. The basic role of the SEM as a topographic imaging system has steadily been expanding to include a variety of SEM-based analytical techniques. These techniques cover the range of basic semiconductor materials characterization to live-time device characterization of operating LSI or VLSI devices. This paper introduces many of the more commonly used techniques, describes the modifications or additions to a conventional SEM required to utilize the techniques, and gives examples of the use of such techniques. First, the types of signals available from a sample being irradiated by an electron beam are reviewed. Then, where applicable, the type of spectroscopy or microscopy which has evolved to utilize the various signal types are described. This is followed by specific examples of the use of such techniques to solve problems related to semiconductor technology. Techniques emphasized include: x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, electron beam induced current (EBIC), stroboscopic voltage analysis, cathodoluminescnece and electron beam IC metrology. Current and future trends of some of the these techniques, as related to the semiconductor industry are discussed

  19. Catastrophic optical bulk degradation in high-power single- and multi-mode InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers: part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yongkun; Ayvazian, Talin; Brodie, Miles; Lingley, Zachary

    2018-03-01

    High-power single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers are critical components for both terrestrial and space satellite communications systems. Since these lasers predominantly fail by catastrophic and sudden degradation due to catastrophic optical damage (COD), it is especially crucial for space satellite applications to investigate reliability, failure modes, precursor signatures of failure, and degradation mechanisms of these lasers. Our group reported a new failure mode in MM and SM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers in 2009 and 2016, respectively. Our group also reported in 2017 that bulk failure due to catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD) is the dominant failure mode of both SM and MM lasers that were subject to long-term life-tests. For the present study, we continued our physics of failure investigation by performing long-term life-tests followed by failure mode analysis (FMA) using nondestructive and destructive micro-analytical techniques. We performed long-term accelerated life-tests on state-of-the-art SM and MM InGaAs- AlGaAs strained QW lasers under ACC mode. Our life-tests have accumulated over 25,000 test hours for SM lasers and over 35,000 test hours for MM lasers. We first employed electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique to identify failure modes of degraded SM lasers by observing dark line defects. All the SM failures that we studied showed catastrophic and sudden degradation and all of these failures were bulk failures. Since degradation mechanisms responsible for COBD are still not well understood, we also employed other techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) and high-resolution TEM to further study dark line defects and dislocations in post-aged lasers. Keywor

  20. Probing photo-carrier collection efficiencies of individual silicon nanowire diodes on a wafer substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, S W; Brönstrup, G; Shalev, G; Srivastava, S K; Bashouti, M Y; Döhler, G H; Christiansen, S H

    2014-07-21

    Vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) diodes are promising candidates for the integration into various opto-electronic device concepts for e.g. sensing or solar energy conversion. Individual SiNW p-n diodes have intensively been studied, but to date an assessment of their device performance once integrated on a silicon substrate has not been made. We show that using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a nano-manipulator and an optical fiber feed-through for tunable (wavelength, power using a tunable laser source) sample illumination, the dark and illuminated current-voltage (I-V) curve of individual SiNW diodes on the substrate wafer can be measured. Surprisingly, the I-V-curve of the serially coupled system composed of SiNW/wafers is accurately described by an equivalent circuit model of a single diode and diode parameters like series and shunting resistivity, diode ideality factor and photocurrent can be retrieved from a fit. We show that the photo-carrier collection efficiency (PCE) of the integrated diode illuminated with variable wavelength and intensity light directly gives insight into the quality of the device design at the nanoscale. We find that the PCE decreases for high light intensities and photocurrent densities, due to the fact that considerable amounts of photo-excited carriers generated within the substrate lead to a decrease in shunting resistivity of the SiNW diode and deteriorate its rectification. The PCE decreases systematically for smaller wavelengths of visible light, showing the possibility of monitoring the effectiveness of the SiNW device surface passivation using the shown measurement technique. The integrated device was pre-characterized using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), TCAD simulations and electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements to validate the properties of the characterized material at the single SiNW diode level.