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Sample records for eastern lau spreading

  1. Crustal Construction and Magma Chamber Properties along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R.; Martinez, F.; Arai, R.; Conder, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Eastern Lau Spreading Center is a key region over which mantle source composition, melt supply, and the general geological and geophysical character of the crust vary in a manner consistent with decreasing "subduction-influence" of slab volatiles in the mantle. One of the key observables is the physical structure of the crust in that it records the changing nature of the mantle as the location of the ridge migrates away from the arc. Using data from the L-SCAN active-source seismic experiment, our group has constructed tomographic images that reveal crustal and mantle structure and the present location and form of the magmatic system beneath ~110 km of the spreading center. When the ridge was closer to the arc, a relatively thick crust was produced with an abnormally low velocity upper crust and an abnormally high velocity lower crust. This can be explained by excess melting in the presence of high water content and a subsequent higher degree of crustal differentiation in the presence of water in the crustal magmatic system. As the ridge moved away from the arc, a step-like transition occurred to more normal crustal velocities and thicknesses, indicating a rapid drop in mantle water content. In addition, the images show that crustal construction was locally variable, consistent with various degrees of volatile influence on mantle melting over short intervals of time. This indicates that slab-derived water exists in variable concentrations in the mantle. Located everywhere beneath the spreading center is a prominent, but narrow, seismic low velocity volume (LVV), presumably due to high temperatures and melt in the crustal magmatic system. The top of the LVV closely follows the ridge axis and steps across 3 overlapping spreading centers. As the offset of the overlap increases, the LVV becomes increasing discontinuous across the ridge limbs. The largest offset, at only 8 km, acted as a major boundary between melts derived from distinct mantle domains for 0.31 Myr

  2. "Near-bottom sonar mapping along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.; Edwards, M.; Dunn, R.; Baker, E. T.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from high resolution sidescan sonar mapping at the Ridge 2000 Lau Integrated Studies Site, a back-arc spreading center in the Southwest Pacific. The survey covered segments of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), which exhibit strong contrasts in geologic and geophysical characteristics, including variations in ridge morphology, volcanic and tectonic structures, lava composition and texture, magma production, and spreading rate. The bulk of the data were collected in 2008 aboard R/V Kilo Moana (KM0804), using the deep-towed IMI120 (DSL120A) sonar, with an array of miniature autonomous plume recorder's (MAPR's) tethered to the tow cable to detect hydrothermal plume signatures in the water column. The ELSC survey covered an area ~10 km wide by 100 km long centered on the spreading axis, with tracks spaced ~1 km apart, but as close as ~500 m in the vicinity of the ABE hydrothermal vent field, and also included the Tow Cam and Kilo Moana vent fields. The VFR survey covered a ~5 km wide by 100 km long area with ~700 m-spaced tracks, including the Vai Lili, Mariner, and Tui Malila vent sites. The IMI120 has a resolution of ~1-2 meters, giving the first detailed view of the on- and off-axis structures in the two focus regions. Navigational corrections to the sidescan data were made through feature-matching between the deep-towed data and a lower resolution background ship bathymetry grid, using software developed by the Hawaiian Mapping and Research Group. Background bathymetry and lower resolution (~100 m) sidescan data were compiled from previous cruises on R/V Kilo Moana, and an early-2009 seismic survey on R/V Marcus G. Langseth (L-SCAN). Hydrothermal plume data collected with the MAPR's are coregistered with the deep-towed sidescan data to illuminate correlations between seafloor structures and plume signatures. The axis of the VFR in the south forms a peaked ridge, inflated by abundant melt supply, and draped with

  3. Variation of Crustal Shear Velocity Structure Along the Eastern Lau Back-Arc Spreading Center Constrained By Seafloor Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Y.; Webb, S. C.; Dunn, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of seafloor compliance, the deformation under long period (typically 30-300 s) ocean wave forcing, are primarily sensitive to crustal shear velocity structure. We analyze seafloor compliance from data collected from a subset of 50 broadband Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBS) deployed at the Eastern Lau spreading center (ELSC) from 2009 to 2010. The ELSC is a 400-km-long back-arc spreading center lying closely to the Tonga subduction trench in the southwestern Pacific. Seafloor morphology, crustal seismic structure and lava composition data show rapid variations along the ridge as the ridge migrates away from the volcanic arc front to the north, indicating a decreasing influence of the subducting slab. We calculate seafloor compliance functions by taking the spectral transfer function between the vertical displacement and pressure signal recorded by the 4-component OBSs, which are equipped with differential pressure gauges (DPGs). In the ridge perpendicular direction, compliance amplitude vary by more than an order of magnitude from the ridge crest to older seafloor covered by sediment. Along the spreading ridge, compliance measured from on-axis sites increases southwards, indicative of a decrease in the upper crustal shear velocity possibly due to increasing porosity and a thickening extrusive layer [Jacobs et al., 2007; Dunn et al., 2013]. We apply a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to invert the compliance functions for crustal shear velocities at various locations along the ELSC.

  4. Major and trace-element speciation in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes of Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J. V.; Toner, B.; Dick, G.; Breier, J. A.; Jiang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridge systems results in the flux of heat and chemical species from the crust to the cold, oxic waters of the deep ocean. The mixing of these fluids creates a buoyant, rising plume with dynamic biogeochemical processes and rapid physical mixing. The global distribution of these vent systems makes hydrothermal plumes an important source and sink of biogeochemically active elements to ocean basins. The goal of this study is to characterize the transport and fate of the chemical species within individual hydrothermal plumes. By doing so, we hope to understand the interrelationship of physical-chemical gradients present in plumes with trace element uptake by plume particles. To achieve this goal a field study was undertaken at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). The larger study will include analysis of all sites, however here we report the geochemical and trace-element speciation of a single buoyant plume within ABE vent field. A series of replicate sample sets were collected by in situ filtration at 0.5m, 40m, 200m within a buoyant plume using the ROV JASON. Above plume background and near bottom background sample sets were also collected. Hydrothermal plume particles in sample replicates have been analysed for bulk geochemistry, chemical speciation, and particle-by-particle mineralogy. The speciation of iron, a major particle forming element, and the distribution of select trace elements (arsenic, vanadium) is described using chemical mapping, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Particle morphology and carbon speciation are described using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). This data is being integrated into a physical-geochemical model, and will be used to estimate the energy available to chemlithoautotrophic organisms in plumes. The distribution of minerals and incorporated trace elements (e.g. arsenic) will be used to interpret uptake mechanisms. The research will help us understand processes

  5. Formation of Zn- and Fe-sulfides near hydrothermal vents at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center: implications for sulfide bioavailability to chemoautotrophs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Mustafa

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The speciation of dissolved sulfide in the water immediately surrounding deep-ocean hydrothermal vents is critical to chemoautotrophic organisms that are the primary producers of these ecosystems. The objective of this research was to identify the role of Zn and Fe for controlling the speciation of sulfide in the hydrothermal vent fields at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC in the southern Pacific Ocean. Compared to other well-studied hydrothermal systems in the Pacific, the ELSC is notable for unique ridge characteristics and gradients over short distances along the north-south ridge axis. Results In June 2005, diffuse-flow ( 250°C vent fluids were collected from four field sites along the ELSC ridge axis. Total and filtered Zn and Fe concentrations were quantified in the vent fluid samples using voltammetric and spectrometric analyses. The results indicated north-to-south variability in vent fluid composition. In the high temperature vent fluids, the ratio of total Fe to total Zn varied from 39 at Kilo Moana, the most northern site, to less than 7 at the other three sites. The concentrations of total Zn, Fe, and acid-volatile sulfide indicated that oversaturation and precipitation of sphalerite (ZnS(s and pyrite (FeS2(s were possible during cooling of the vent fluids as they mixed with the surrounding seawater. In contrast, most samples were undersaturated with respect to mackinawite (FeS(s. The reactivity of Zn(II in the filtered samples was tested by adding Cu(II to the samples to induce metal-exchange reactions. In a portion of the samples, the concentration of labile Zn2+ increased after the addition of Cu(II, indicating the presence of strongly-bound Zn(II species such as ZnS clusters and nanoparticles. Conclusion Results of this study suggest that Zn is important to sulfide speciation at ELSC vent habitats, particularly at the southern sites where Zn concentrations increase relative to Fe. As the hydrothermal

  6. From rifting to active spreading in the Lau Basin - Havre Trough backarc system (SW Pacific): Locking/unlocking induced by seamount chain subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruellan, E.; Delteil, J.; Wright, I.; Matsumoto, T.

    2003-05-01

    Associated with Pacific-Australia plate convergence, the Lau Basin - Havre Trough is an active back-arc basin that has been opened since ˜5.5 Ma by rifting and southward propagating oceanic spreading. Current back-arc opening rates decrease from 159 mm yr-1 in the northern Lau Basin to 15 mm y-1 in the southern Havre Trough. Major tectonic changes occur at the transition between Havre Trough rifting and full oceanic spreading of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC), where the oblique-to-trench, westward subducting Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) sweeps southwards along the Tonga trench. New swath bathymetry, seismic reflection data, and limited rock sampling in this area constrain a tectonic and kinematic back-arc model that incorporates the effects of LSC subduction. The ELSC, which extends southward to 24°55'S, forms a deep rift valley propagating southward through older, rifted arc basement. Present-day seismicity and fresh and fractured pillow lavas at 23°42'S are consistent with rift valley neovolcanism. Conversely, the northern Havre Trough has low seismicity and rifted volcanic basement ridges trending 25-45° oblique to the basin axis consistent with low levels of extensional tectonism and volcanism. This latter structural fabric is interpreted as an early stage of rifting that is now "locked" due to compression on the arc exerted by LSC subduction, while in the Lau Basin such effects have passed as the LSC swept along the Tonga Trench. It is proposed that the Lau-Havre back-arc opening is controlled by tectonic constraints exerted at the limits of the system by the LSC subduction, which determines the southward migration of the Tonga Arc pole of rotation and associated Lau Basin opening. A discrete three-stage back-arc opening evolution is proposed, comprising: (1) an initial phase of back-arc rifting along the whole length of the plate boundary, beginning at ˜6-5 Ma; (2) a subsequent phase, mostly present in the southern part of the back-arc domain

  7. Slab-derived water and the petrogenesis of distinct zones of oceanic crust along spreading centers in the Lau back-arc basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Deborah; Dunn, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Back-arc basin crust formed along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) exhibits dramatic and abrupt changes in magmatic processes and crustal formation with proximity to the nearby Tofua Arc. Systematic variations in seafloor morphology, crustal thickness, seismic properties, and lava composition reflect a decreasing 'subduction influence' with increasing distance from the arc. Results from seismic tomography indicate that the crust that forms near the arc is abnormally thick and compositionally stratified, with a thick low-velocity upper crust and an abnormally high-velocity lower crust. As the ridge moves away from the arc, there is a step-like transition in crustal properties towards crustal velocities and thicknesses more typical of oceanic crust produced at mid-ocean ridges. Likewise, lava compositions exhibit abrupt changes in slab-derived volatiles and trace element enrichments, with silicic, arc-like compositions at the Valu Fa Ridge and southern half of the ELSC, located near the arc, and relatively depleted basalts along the northern ELSC, which is located further from the arc. We attribute the observed changes in the physical and chemical makeup of the crust to excess mantle melting coupled with higher degrees of crustal differentiation near the arc due to higher mantle water contents. We propose a model for the formation of the arc-proximal layered crust whereby water-rich basaltic melts stall and differentiate in the lower crust. High-pressure crystallization concentrates water in the residual melts, decreasing their viscosity and density. Eventually the lighter, more felsic residual melts are extracted from the lower crust, leaving behind a dense, mafic cumulate layer, and go on to produce a silica-rich, porous volcanic layer. We present results of thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibria and develop a petrological model for the formation of this unusual "hydrous" form of oceanic crust.

  8. Petrogenesis of Oceanic Crust at Back-Arc Spreading Centers: Modeling the Effects of Slab-Derived Water on Crustal Accretion in the Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, D. E.; Dunn, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic crust formed along spreading centers in the Lau back-arc basin exhibits a dramatic change in crustal structure and composition with proximity to the nearby Tofua Arc. Results from seismic studies indicate that crust formed near the arc is abnormally thick (~8-9 km) and compositionally stratified, with a thick low-velocity upper crust and an abnormally high-velocity (7.2-7.4+ km/s) lower crust. Lava samples from this area show arc-like compositional enrichments and tend to be more evolved than typical mid-ocean ridge basalts (MgO contents as low as ~1 wt%). We propose that slab-derived water entrained in the near-arc ridge system not only enhances mantle melting, as commonly proposed to explain high crustal production in back-arc environments, but also affects magmatic differentiation and crustal accretion processes. Phase equilibria modeling of the observed compositional trends suggests that the high water contents found in near-arc parental melts can lead to crystallization of an unusually mafic cumulate layer by suppressing plagioclase crystallization relative to olivine and clinopyroxene. Model runs with ~1-2 wt% H2O in the parental melts successfully reproduce the geochemical trends of the erupted lavas while crystallizing a cumulate assemblage with calculated seismic velocities consistent with those observed in the near-arc lower crust. The resulting residual melts are also water-rich, which lowers their density and aids in the extraction and eventual eruption of unusually evolved magmas. We present preliminary results of this petrological model for the formation of back-arc oceanic crust, which successfully predicts the unusual crustal stratification observed in the near-arc regions of the Lau basin, and helps explain the highly fractionated andesites and dacites that erupt there. We also comment on alternative proposed hypotheses for back-arc crustal accretion and discuss some of the challenges facing them in this particular region.

  9. Crustal shear velocity structure in the Southern Lau Basin constrained by seafloor compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.

    2016-05-01

    Seafloor morphology and crustal structure vary significantly in the Lau back-arc basin, which contains regions of island arc formation, rifting, and seafloor spreading. We analyze seafloor compliance: deformation under long period ocean wave forcing, at 30 ocean bottom seismometers to constrain crustal shear wave velocity structure along and across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Velocity models obtained through Monte Carlo inversion of compliance data show systematic variation of crustal structure in the basin. Sediment thicknesses range from zero thickness at the ridge axis to 1400 m near the volcanic arc. Sediment thickness increases faster to the east than to the west of the ELSC, suggesting a more abundant source of sediment near the active arc volcanoes. Along the ELSC, upper crustal velocities increase from the south to the north where the ridge has migrated farther away from the volcanic arc front. Along the axial ELSC, compliance analysis did not detect a crustal low-velocity body, indicating less melt in the ELSC crustal accretion zone compared to the fast spreading East Pacific Rise. Average upper crust shear velocities for the older ELSC crust produced when the ridge was near the volcanic arc are 0.5-0.8 km/s slower than crust produced at the present-day northern ELSC, consistent with a more porous extrusive layer. Crust in the western Lau Basin, which although thought to have been produced through extension and rifting of old arc crust, is found to have upper crustal velocities similar to older oceanic crust produced at the ELSC.

  10. Does the Depth to Slab Control Volatile Contents? New Insights from Glasses Erupted at the Fonualei Spreading Center (NE Lau Basin), a Very Arc-like Back-arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, N. S.; Shaw, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    The role of water and other volatiles in generating arc and back-arc volcanism is fundamental; however, the relationship between physical subduction parameters and volatile recycling remains poorly understood. Here, we present new volatile data from the Fonualei Spreading Centre (FSC), a back-arc environment in the NE Lau Basin where the depth to the slab increases from 125 km in the south (similar to typical arc settings) to 210 km in the north. The southernmost tip of the FSC lies within 20 km of the adjacent Tofua Arc, thus offering an ideal case study of arc-related magmatism. The FSC terminates in the north at the Mangatolu Triple Junction (MTJ), situated ~140 km to the south of the edge of the Australian Plate where a tear in the plate allows the influx from less depleted mantle1. Prior work2 shows that the major and trace element compositions of the FSC are relatively depleted and similar to that of the adjacent Tofua arc, whereas the MTJ samples are derived from a less depleted mantle and trend towards Lau back-arc basin basalt compositions. This geochemical contrast is also found in volatile contents reported here. CO2 and S contents are higher in the northern MTJ samples (up to 110 ppm and 800 ppm, respectively) as compared to the southern FSC samples (less than 10 and 40 ppm). To some extent, this difference can be attributed to enhanced degassing in the FSC samples since they are erupted at shallower depths. Indeed, S contents correlate broadly with CO2 contents; however, degassing cannot solely account for the sharp discrepancy in sulfur contents. The less depleted, more reduced nature of the MTJ mantle has likely influenced the S concentrations. The H2O contents of glasses cover an intermediate back-arc range (1 to 1.5 wt%) and show the characteristic negative correlation with TiO2, indicating that flux melting processes prevail3. A slab signature can be clearly recognized: B/Yb and Ba/Yb both show a positive correlation with H2O/Yb and with each

  11. The sea-floor spreading history of the eastern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas S.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.

    1982-09-01

    The geologic history of the eastern Indian Ocean between northwest Australia and the Java Trench is known to involve two separate events of rifting and sea-floor spreading. Late Jurassic spreading in the Argo Abyssal Plain off northwest Australia was followed by Early Cretaceous spreading in the Cuvier and Perth Abyssal Plains off west Australia. However, the evolution and interaction of these events has not been clear. Mesozoic sea-floor spreading anomalies have been identified throughout the Argo Abyssal Plain that define a rifting event and subsequent northward spreading on the northwestern Australian margin at 155 m.y.b.p. Magnetic anomalies northwest of the Argo Abyssal Plain indicate a ridge jump to the south at about 130 m.y.b.p. that is approximately synchronous with east-west rifting along the southwestern Australian margin. The Joey Rise in the Argo Plain was probably formed by volcanism at the intersection of this new rift and the spreading ridge to the north. The southern and northern spreading systems were connected through the Exmouth Plateau which was stretched and faulted as spreading progressed. The RRR triple junction was formed at the intersection of the two spreading systems and appears to have migrated west along the northern edge of the Gascoyne Abyssal Plain. Spreading off northwest Australia cannot be easily related to simultaneous spreading in the west central Pacific via any simple tectonic scheme.

  12. Electromagnetically induced classical and quantum Lau effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Deqin

    2016-07-01

    We present two schemes of Lau effect for an object, an electromagnetically induced grating generated based on the electromagnetically induced effect. The Lau interference pattern is detected either directly in the way of the traditional Lau effect measurement with a classical thermal light being the imaging light, or indirectly and nonlocally in the way of two-photon coincidence measurement with a pair of entangled photons being the imaging light.

  13. Active Eruptions in the NE Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, J. A.; Embley, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    NE Lau Response Team: K Rubin, E Baker, J Lupton, M Lilley, T Shank, S Merle, R Dziak, T Collasius (Jason 2 Expedition Leader), N Buck, T Baumberger, D Butterfield, D Clague, D Conlin, J Cowen, R Davis, L Evans, J Huber, M Keith, N Keller, P Michael, E Podowski, A-L Reysenbach, K Roe, H Thomas, S Walker. During a May 2009 cruise to W Mata volcano in the NE Lau Basin, we made the first observations of an active eruption on the deep-sea floor. The cruise was organized after volcanic activity was detected at two sites (W Mata volcano and NE Lau Spreading Center, NELSC) during a Nov. 2008 NOAA-PMEL expedition. At that time, both sites had elevated H2 concentrations and volcaniclastic shards in the hydrothermal plumes. Moored hydrophone data since Jan 2009 indicate that the activity at W Mata has been continuous between these expeditions. Results of our cruise and other work suggest that the NE Lau Basin hosts an unusually high level of magmatic activity, making it an ideal location to study the effects of magmatic processes on hydrothermal activity and associated ecosystems. W Mata was visited with 5 ROV Jason 2 dives and 2 dives with the MBARI autonomous mapping vehicle in May 2009. It was actively erupting at the 1200 m deep summit during each, so a hydrophone was deployed locally to collect acoustic data. Ship and shore-based analysis of HD video, molten lava, rocks, sediments, hot spring waters, and micro- and macro biological specimens collected by Jason 2 have provided a wealth of data. The eruption itself was characterized by extrusion of red, molten lava, extensive degassing, formation of large magma bubbles, explosive pyroclast ejection, and the active extrusion of pillow lavas. The erupting magmas are boninite, a relatively rare magma type found only at convergent margins. The hydrothermal fluids are generally acidic and all diffuse fluids collected were microbially active, even those at pH 20 yrs the PMEL-Vents and NSF RIDGE programs have sought to observe

  14. Land abandonment and the spreading of the forest in the Eastern French Pyrenees in the nineteenth to twentieth centuries

    OpenAIRE

    Métailié, Jean-Paul; Paegelow, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Forests have spread throughout the French Mediterranean hills and mountains which have now become some of the most afforested regions in France. The eastern French Pyrenees has recently been affected by dramatic land abandonment and various afforestation dynamics. This study reports on the spread of Pinus uncinata, which is colonizing large areas of the Eastern Pyrenees from 1300 m up to 2400 m. 2 studies are presented with different scales and methodologies. First, a long term history of a f...

  15. Live pig markets in eastern Indonesia: Trader characteristics, biosecurity and implications for disease spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Edwina E C; Geong, Maria; Abdurrahman, Muktasam; Ward, Michael P; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever has been negatively impacting pig production in Nusa Tenggara Timur province in eastern Indonesia since its introduction in the 1990s, with live market trade contributing to disease spread. To understand market trader knowledge and practices regarding pig management, biosecurity, pig movements and pig health (specifically CSF), a repeated survey was conducted with pig sellers and pig buyers at 9 market sites across West Timor and the islands of Flores and Sumba. A total of 292 sellers and 281 buyers were interviewed in 2009 during two periods (rounds), a high-demand month (September) and a low-demand month (November). Information was collected via questionnaire. The majority of traders were male (sellers: 89%; buyers: 87%) with the highest level of completed education being primary school (sellers: 48%; buyers: 41%). The primary occupation of most respondents was farming: 90% of sellers and 87% of buyers were smallholder pig farmers and tended to sell their own home-raised pigs at market (52%). Pigs were sold for monetary gain either for primary (52%) or extra income (44%). Markets tended to be selected based on a good reputation (62%), a location close to residence (62%) and having the desired pig type (59%). Pig sales through markets were reported to be highest from August to October with 31% of sellers trading pigs at two or more markets. Prices at market were significantly higher on Sumba compared to West Timor and cross-bred pigs were significantly more expensive than indigenous pigs. Understanding of CSF and biosecurity was limited: 85% of sellers and 83% of buyers had no prior knowledge of CSF. Fifty-four percent of sellers reported no use of any biosecurity practices at market. Most respondents (88%) were able to recognise at least one clinical sign of a sick pig. Informal pig movements were also identified: 18% of pig buyers purchased pigs directly from other farmers. This study has provided baseline information on market trader

  16. Signs of Recent Volcanism and Hydrothermal Activity Along the Eastern Segment of the Galapagos Spreading Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raineault, N.; Smart, C.; Mayer, L. A.; Ballard, R. D.; Fisher, C. R.; Marsh, L.; Shank, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    Since the initial discovery of the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) vents in 1977, large-scale disturbances resulting from eruptive and tectonic activity have both destroyed and created vent habitats along the GSC. In 2015, the E/V Nautilus returned to the GSC with remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to explore 17 kilometers of the rift valley from the Rosebud site in the west, to a previously unexplored temperature anomaly east of the Tempus Fugit vent site. In the years to over a decade since scientists last visited the Rosebud, Rose Garden, and Tempus Fugit sites, there were many changes. Most notably, the Rosebud site, where scientists found a nascent vent community and left site markers in 2002, was apparently covered with glassy basaltic sheet flows. In addition to visual exploration, oceanographic sensor measurements and direct sampling, we used the ROV Hercules imaging suite, comprised of stereo cameras and a structured light laser sensor to map an area of diffuse flow in the Tempus Fugit field (100 m x 150 m). The centimeter-level photographic and bathymetric maps created with this system, along with ROV HD video, samples, and environmental sensors, documented hydrothermal activity and changes in biological community structure (e.g., Riftia tubeworms observed in nascent stages of community development in 2011 were now, in 2015, in greater abundance (with tubes almost 4 m in length). The detection of active venting and associated faunal assemblages will provide insight into the temporal and spatial variability of venting activity at the Tempus Fugit site. On a visual survey of the Rift east of the Tempus Fugit site, extinct sulfide chimney structures were discovered and sampled. There were several chimneys and sulfide deposits in a span of over 8 km that ranged in height from over a half meter to 1.5 m tall. Diffuse flow hosting white and blue bacterial mats was observed near the chimneys complexes. The base of a large chimney structure, venting white fluids

  17. BIM LAU-PE: Seedlings in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, S.; Pennese, R.; Chapuis, D.; Dainesi, P.; Nebuloni, S.; Garcia, M.; Oriol, A.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of gravity on plant roots is an intensive subject of research. Sounding rockets represent a costeffective platform to study this effect under microgravity conditions. As part of the upcoming MASER 13 sounding rocket campaign, two experiments on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings have been devised: GRAMAT and SPARC. These experiments are aimed at studying (1) the genes that are specifically switched on or off during microgravity, and (2) the position of auxin-transporting proteins during microgravity. To perform these experiments, RUAG Space Switzerland site of Nyon, in collaboration with the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) and the University of Freiburg, has developed the BIM LAU-PE (Biolology In Microgravity Late Access Unit Plant Experiment). In the following an overview of the BIM LAU-PE design is presented, highlighting specific module design features and verifications performed. A particular emphasis is placed on the parabolic flight experiments, including results of the micro-g injection system validation.

  18. Directionality and spread of shallow water waves along the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anoop, T.R.

    height, (b) peak wave period, (c) mean wave direction, (d) wave age, (e) skewness of the surface elevation, and (f) mean spreading angle. The hourly average value of directional width during differ- ent months indicates that the variation is large (≈ 16... between θ and ϕ (Fig. 6c and d). The difference between θ and ϕ at spectral peak is large for Hm0 less than 1 m (Fig. 6e and f) and is neg- ligible (< 5◦) for Hm0 more than 1 m. The directional width is large (∼ 60◦) for the waves from θp < 240◦ with Hm0...

  19. A migration-driven model for the historical spread of leprosy in medieval Eastern and Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Helen D; Michael Taylor, G; Marcsik, Antónia; Molnár, Erika; Pálfi, Gyorgy; Pap, Ildikó; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Pinhasi, Ron; Erdal, Yilmaz S; Velemínsky, Petr; Likovsky, Jakub; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Mariotti, Valentina; Riga, Alessandro; Rubini, Mauro; Zaio, Paola; Besra, Gurdyal S; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Bull, Ian D; O'Grady, Justin; Spigelman, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Leprosy was rare in Europe during the Roman period, yet its prevalence increased dramatically in medieval times. We examined human remains, with paleopathological lesions indicative of leprosy, dated to the 6th-11th century AD, from Central and Eastern Europe and Byzantine Anatolia. Analysis of ancient DNA and bacterial cell wall lipid biomarkers revealed Mycobacterium leprae in skeletal remains from 6th-8th century Northern Italy, 7th-11th century Hungary, 8th-9th century Austria, the Slavic Greater Moravian Empire of the 9th-10th century and 8th-10th century Byzantine samples from Northern Anatolia. These data were analyzed alongside findings published by others. M. leprae is an obligate human pathogen that has undergone an evolutionary bottleneck followed by clonal expansion. Therefore M. leprae genotypes and sub-genotypes give information about the human populations they have infected and their migration. Although data are limited, genotyping demonstrates that historical M. leprae from Byzantine Anatolia, Eastern and Central Europe resembles modern strains in Asia Minor rather than the recently characterized historical strains from North West Europe. The westward migration of peoples from Central Asia in the first millennium may have introduced different M. leprae strains into medieval Europe and certainly would have facilitated the spread of any existing leprosy. The subsequent decline of M. leprae in Europe may be due to increased host resistance. However, molecular evidence of historical leprosy and tuberculosis co-infections suggests that death from tuberculosis in leprosy patients was also a factor.

  20. Structural differences between the western and eastern Qiongdongnan Basin: evidence of Indochina block extrusion and South China Sea seafloor spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cuimei; Wang, Zhenfeng; Sun, Zhipeng; Sun, Zhen; Liu, Jianbao; Wang, Zhangwen

    2013-12-01

    Located at the intersection between a NW-trending slip system and NE-trending rift system in the northern South China Sea, the Qiongdongnan Basin provides key clues for us to understand the proposed extrusion of the Indochina Block along with Red River Fault Zone and extensional margins. In this paper we for the first time systematically reveal the striking structural differences between the western and eastern sector of the Qiongdongnan Basin. Influenced by the NW-trending slip faults, the western Qiongdongnan Basin developed E-W-trending faults, and was subsequently inverted at 30-21 Ma. The eastern sector was dominated by faults with NE orientation before 30 Ma, and thereafter with various orientations from NE, to EW and NW during the period 30-21 Ma; rifting display composite symmetric graben instead of the composite half graben or asymmetric graben in the west. The deep and thermal structures in turn are invoked to account for such deformation differences. The lithosphere of the eastern Qiongdongnan Basin is very hot and thinned because of mantle upwelling and heating, composite symmetric grabens formed and the faults varied with the basal plate boundary. However, the Southern and Northern Uplift area and middle of the central depression is located on normal lithosphere and formed half grabens or simple grabens. The lithosphere in the western sector is transitional from very hot to normal. Eventually, the Paleogene tectonic development of the Qiongdongnan Basin may be summarized into three stages with dominating influences, the retreat of the West Pacific subduction zone (44-36 Ma), slow Indochina block extrusion together with slab-pull of the Proto-South China Sea (36-30 Ma), rapid Indochina block extrusion together with the South China Sea seafloor spreading (30-21 Ma).

  1. Using the Talbot_Lau_interferometer_parameters Spreadsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallman, Jeffrey S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-04

    Talbot-Lau interferometers allow incoherent X-ray sources to be used for phase contrast imaging. A spreadsheet for exploring the parameter space of Talbot and Talbot-Lau interferometers has been assembled. This spreadsheet allows the user to examine the consequences of choosing phase grating pitch, source energy, and source location on the overall geometry of a Talbot or Talbot-Lau X-ray interferometer. For the X-ray energies required to penetrate scanned luggage the spacing between gratings is large enough that the mechanical tolerances for amplitude grating positioning are unlikely to be met.

  2. Discovery of New Hydrothermal Venting Sites in the Lau Basin, Tonga Back Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowhurst, P. V.; Arculus, R. J.; Massoth, G. J.; Baptista, L.; Stevenson, I.; Angus, R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    Between 22 April and 25 June 2009, a systematic search for hydrothermal venting along 1340 km of back-arc features was conducted throughout the Lau Basin aboard the CSIRO owned RV Southern Surveyor. The selection of survey areas was based on bathymetry, sidescan and water column anomaly datasets collected during previous marine science research and commercial exploration voyages. During 54 operational days, 76 CTD tows were completed using real-time plume mapping protocols, augmented with mini autonomous plume recorders, to discern anomalies in light scattering, and oxidation-reduction potential with water samples collected within the peak anomalies. Coincident with CTD towing at an average speed of 1.1 knots high resolution EM300 bathymetry and backscatter data was collected which significantly enhanced geological interpretation of possible source sites for follow up cross tows. 32 venting sites were detected, 24 of which are believed to be new discoveries. 13 dredge operations were conducted on 7 of these sites. Sulfides were recovered from 2 sites, one being a new discovery on the NE Lau spreading centre, ~14 km north of the commercial discovery by Teck and ~7km north of the eruption site discovery during a RV Thompson NOAA survey, both during 2008. The new venting field discoveries at North Mata, northern extent of the CLSC and far southern Valu Fa ridge are beyond any previously known areas of hydrothermal activity and further enhances the reputation of the Lau Basin as one of the most productive back arc regions for hydrothermally active spreading centers. A significant number of filter residue samples collected from the vent sites yielded greater than background values for metals including Cu and Zn, which is interpreted to imply they were sourced from active seafloor massive sulfide systems rather than volcanic activity.

  3. Hydrothermal activity in the Northwest Lau Backarc Basin: Evidence from water column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, J. E.; Arculus, R. J.; Resing, J.; Massoth, G. J.; Greene, R. R.; Evans, L. J.; Buck, N.

    2012-05-01

    The Northwest Lau Backarc Basin, consisting of the Northwest Lau Spreading Center (NWLSC) and the Rochambeau Rifts (RR), is unique in having elevated 3He/4He ratios (up to 28 Ra) in the erupted lavas, clearly indicating a hot spot or ocean island basalt (OIB)-type signature. This OIB-type helium signature does not appear in any other part of the Lau Basin. Water column plume surveys conducted in 2008 and 2010 identified several sites of active hydrothermal discharge along the NWLSC-RR and showed that the incidence of hydrothermal activity is high, consistent with the high spreading rate of ˜100 mm/year. Hydrocasts into the Central Caldera and Southern Caldera of the NWLSC detected elevated3He/4He (δ3He = 55% and 100%, respectively), trace metals (TMn, TFe), and suspended particles, indicating localized hydrothermal venting at these two sites. Hydrocasts along the northern rift zone of the NWLSC also had excess δ3He, TMn, and suspended particles suggesting additional sites of hydrothermal activity. The RR are dominated by Lobster Caldera, a large volcano with four radiating rift zones. Hydrocasts into Lobster Caldera in 2008 detected high δ3He (up to 239%) and suspended particle and TMn signals, indicating active venting within the caldera. A repeat survey of Lobster in 2010 confirmed the site was still active two years later. Plumes at Lobster Caldera and Central Caldera have end-member3He/4He ratios of 19 Ra and 11 Ra, respectively, confirming that hot spot-type helium is also present in the hydrothermal fluids.

  4. Petrogenesis and Tectonic-Magmatic Interplays in Extensive Recent NE Lau Basin Boninite to Dacite Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, K. H.; Embley, R. W.; Hellebrand, E.; Jenner, F. E.; Glancy, S.

    2016-12-01

    The world's fastest opening back-arc region, the NE Lau Basin, hosts a large (roughly 20x20 km) province of visually young boninite volcanoes flanked on the south and west by an even more extensive young dacite volcanism terrane, all in the rear arc, near the northern plate boundary of the basin. The youngest boninite volcanoes are the Mata seamounts, including recently active W. Mata and 8 other discrete volcanoes; the young dacites (more than 300 km2) occur at Niuatahi seamount and in several large low-relief lava fields between the arc and the NE Lau Spreading Center. ROV and dredge sampling on 4 expeditions since 2009 reveals a surprising diversity of boninite and closely related high-Mg andesite lithologies in the Matas, with similar major element compositions to other western Pacific boninite localities (e.g., the Izu-Bonin-Mariana system), but that display significant trace element and isotopic variability over sub-km spatial domains. Together, magma compositions allow for a common boninite petrogenesis process but at a range of source compositions and melting conditions in the NE Lau. In contrast, the dacites are glassy and nearly aphyric, showing very limited major element range, for instance flow LL-B (at 136 km2, the largest and best sampled dacite flow) has remarkably consistent mean silica content of 65.6 ±0.2. Dacites have major and trace element patterns consistent with differentiation of one endmember boninite composition erupted nearby. The close association of boninite and dacite volcanic centers and the petrogenetic link indicate a likely common origin, with crustal storage conditions controlling the extent of pre-eruptive magma differentiation. The highly dispersed arrangement of volcanoes and large lava flow fields in this part of the basin and their association with rift structures suggest a common, widespread and highly productive boninite parent melt regime coupled to tectonic control on the sites of volcanism in the area, with migration

  5. Hydrothermal Cooling Within the Lau Integrated Study Site: No Evidence for Off-axis Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Martinez, F.; Walker, S. L.; Buck, N.; Edwards, M. H.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-12-01

    Decades of intensive hydrothermal surveying, overwhelmingly concentrated within hundreds of meters of the axes of ridge crests, has supported the view that discrete fluid discharge is predominantly concentrated in this same region. This simple view, however, conflicts with emerging evidence for a crustal high-temperature, low-velocity volume (LVV) that extends 2-3 km beyond the ridge crest and generates strongly focused hydrothermal cooling along its off-axis vertical boundaries. In March/April 2008, we used high-resolution sampling of near-bottom waters along 175 km of the hydrothermally active Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) and Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) to comprehensively test the hypothesis that hydrothermal discharge is predominantly near-axis. Our sampling array included a suite of Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorders (temperature, light scattering, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP)) attached above (to a nominal altitude of 400 m) and below the deep-towed IMI120 sonar, plus CTDs and sensors at the bottom of the string (50 m) and on the clump weight (120 m). The ELSC between 19.9° and 21°S (spreading ~80 mm/yr) grades from a broad, flat valley in the north to a shallow high in the south. Ten survey lines at 1 km spacing were centered on the axis, plus five interleaved lines around the axial high of the ABE vent field (1300 km of track). The VFR from 21.9° to 22.4°S (~50 mm/yr) is a sharp ridge that deepens ~200 m within 1 km of the axis. Seven survey lines were run at 0.7 km spacing, plus two shorter lines adjacent to a broad overlapping spreading center (390 km). CTD tows and casts supplemented the IMI120 surveys. The surveys detected emissions from the several known on-axis vent fields, and also identified a substantial unexplored field near 20.65°S, ~10 km north of the ABE field. In neither survey area, however, did we detect evidence of high-temperature discharge beyond the near-axis (±1 km) zone. Because off-axis discharge may be largely low

  6. The influence of 19th century Dutch Colonial Orientalism in spreading Kubah (Islamic Dome and Middle-Eastern architectural styles for mosques in Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemas Ridwan Kurniawan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper researches the possible representation of Orientalism and the spread of Middle Eastern inspired architecture in Indonesia, particularly in Dutch colonial practices in the 19th-century. It challenges the dominant opinion of the people that the Middle Eastern merchants in the East Indies were the only ones that introduced the use of kubah (dome shape to mosque architecture in Indonesia. Consequently, this paper has two objectives: firstly, by looking at the historical relationship between religious architecture and colonial politics, especially in the construction of the Baiturrahman Mosque in Aceh and secondly, by considering Orientalism (besides those beliefs existing in Moslem communities to be one of important intellectual agencies for mixing architectural cultural symbols. The socio-political narrative is analyzed in the context of an Indonesian-Islamic building typology and the relationship between space, people, power, and time. The research itself is based on literature searches specifically related to colonialism and orientalism, along with archive studies and field investigations, including interviews with related historical experts. In order to replace 'non-architectural' traditional roofs, which were considered as representing a less-developed civilization, Dutch political interests were instrumental in bringing the universally-styled Middle Eastern architectural elements into mosque architecture of the Netherland Indies. This political motivation ultimately led to the spread of kubah (dome as an architectonic element in Indonesian mosque architecture throughout the archipelago, specifically in Sumatra.

  7. Analysis of the Lau effect using Walsh functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colautti, C; Sicre, E E; Garavaglia, M

    1988-12-01

    An experiment similar to the Lau effect but employing the Walsh functions as diffracting apertures is performed. The equivalent resonance condition and the corresponding intensity light distribution are derived. This approach is used to implement a spatial-filtering optical device.

  8. Rapid Spread of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Variant in Odisha, Eastern India, in 2008 and 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Khuntia, H. K.; Pal, B. B.; Samal, S K; S K Kar

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and spread of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor variant strains causing severe diarrhea has been witnessed worldwide in recent years. In the state of Odisha, India, the spread of the V. cholerae O1 El Tor variant strains was studied during outbreaks in 2008 and 2009. Analysis of 194 V. cholerae O1 Ogawa strains revealed that V. cholerae O1 El Tor variant strains are spreading gradually throughout the state, causing outbreaks replacing typical V. cholerae O1 El Tor biotype strains.

  9. Formation of volcanic edifices in response to changes in magma budget at intermediate spreading rate ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J.; White, S. M.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Bizimis, M.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices along mid-ocean ridges have a well known correlation with spreading rate. Along slow spreading centers, volcanic edifices are normally distributed about the segment center. Volcanic edifices along fast spreading centers have the opposing trend, i.e. edifices form primarily at the ends of segments. However, in ridges affected by plumes and at back arc basins, the spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices differ from that observed at normal ridges of the same spreading rate. This suggests that magma supply rate may control the spatial and abundance distribution of volcanic edifices. Recent geophysical and geochemical studies along the Galapagos Spreading Centers (GSC), Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) and the Valu Fa (VF) and Eastern Lau Spreading Centers (ELSC) put tight constraints on crustal thickness, making it possible investigate the effect of magma budget and axial morphology on the formation of volcanic edifices. Volcanic edifices are described according to their volume, shape (their height to basal radius ratio) and their location relative to the end or center of a segment (abundance distribution). For the GSC, the shape and distribution of volcanic edifices correlate with changes in crustal thickness and axial morphology, consistent with a magma supply control on their formation in this region. This relationship is not apparent along the SEIR or JdFR, where edifices show little variation with changes in axial morphology at relatively constant spreading rates. Results for VF and ELSC are what we expect for changes in spreading rate, not axial morphology. Our study suggests that the formation of volcanic edifices at intermediate spreading rate ridges are influenced by magma budget but only when it is above a certain threshold.

  10. Asymmetric Talbot-Lau interferometry for inertial sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Simone; Giammarchi, Marco; Olivares, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    We study in detail a peculiar configuration of the Talbot-Lau matter wave interferometer, characterized by unequal distances between the two diffraction gratings and the observation plane. We refer to this apparatus as the "asymmetric Talbot-Lau setup." Particular attention is given to its capabilities as an inertial sensor for particle and atomic beams, also in comparison with the classical moiré deflectometer. The present paper is motivated by possible experimental applications in the context of antimatter wave interferometry, including the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter particles. Therefore we focus our analysis on the current state of the art. To support our findings, we have also performed numerical simulations of realistic particle beams with varying speed distributions.

  11. Study of Lau fringes generated by a photorefractive volume grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Gustavo; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Nestor

    2017-08-01

    In this work the Lau fringes generated by using a combination of an amplitude grating and a photorefractive volume phase grating is theoretically and experimentally analyzed. A model based on the path integral formalism to calculate the patterns intensity is employed. We show that the Lau pattern behavior is governed by the output pupil diameter of the imaging recording system, the DC external electric field and the crystal thickness. The introduction of a phase modulation that gathers the previously mentioned parameters allows determining the condition to optimize the fringe visibility. In this case, the visibility maintains a sinusoidal dependence as it happened with planar grating experiments. The experimental results confirm the theoretical model proposed.

  12. A multidisciplinary methodology for the characterization of a large rock spread in the Northern Calcareous Alps (Eastern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzner, Sandra; Ottowitz, David; Pfeiler, Stefan; Moser, Michael; Motschka, Klaus; Lotter, Michael; Mandl, Gerhard Walter; Rohn, Joachim; Otter, Juergen; Wimmer-Frey, Ingeborg

    2015-04-01

    The Northern Calcareous Alps are characterized by complex lithological and tectonic settings, which are a consequence of the multiphase Alpine orogeny. Several tectonic events caused a varying structural anisotropy with a high susceptibility towards certain types of gravitational mass movement. Mt. Plassen is situated west of the Hallstatt village (Upper Austria). It is composed of Jurassic limestone, which overlies Permotriassic fine-grained clastic rocks and evaporites (mainly part of the so-called Haselgebirge). This geotechnical predisposition causes rock spreading of the more hard and rigid limestone on the weak, mainly clayey rocks. Associated to this large slope instability are secondary rockfall and sliding processes. Further common process chains include rockfall triggering slides and/or earth flows by undrained loading of the ductile clay material. Thus, such fast moving flows/slides may endanger the houses and infrastructures in the Salzberg high valley and Hallstatt village. Recent rockfall activity at Mt. Plassen provide evidences for greater, perhaps accelerating displacement rates of the rock spread. A multidisciplinary assessment strategy was chosen to analyse the ground conditions, to characterize the potential failure mechanisms in more detail and to evaluate the hazard potential of future events. Methods include field mapping (geologic, engineering geologic and geomorphologic), sampling and determination of soil parameters in active process areas, geophysical surveys (airborne geophysics and geoelectric measurements) and kinematic measurements (tape dilatometer and geodetic measurements over a period of 50 years). Results of this multidisciplinary approach form the basis for further decision making such as the installation of a monitoring system or other preventive measures.

  13. Low temperature geomicrobiology follows host rock composition along a geochemical gradient in Lau Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B Sylvan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR comprise a ridge segment in the southwest Pacific Ocean where rapid transitions in the underlying mantle chemistry manifest themselves as gradients in seafloor rock geochemistry. We studied the geology and microbial diversity of three silicate rock samples and three inactive sulfide chimney samples collected, from north to south, at the vent fields Kilo Moana, ABE, Tui Malila and Mariner. This is the first study of microbial populations on basaltic andesite, which was sampled at Mariner vent field. Silicate rock geochemistry exhibits clear latitudinal trends that are mirrored by changes in bacterial community composition. α-proteobacteria, ε-proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes are most common on a silicate collected from Kilo Moana and their proportions decrease linearly on silicates collected further south. Conversely, a silicate from Mariner vent field hosts high proportions of a unique lineage of Chloroflexi unrelated (<90% sequence similarity to previously recovered environmental clones or isolates, which decrease at ABE and are absent at Kilo Moana. The exteriors of inactive sulfide structures are dominated by lineages of sulfur oxidizing α-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria and ε-proteobacteria while the interior of one chimney is dominated by putative sulfur-reducing δ-proteobacteria. A comparison of bacterial communities on inactive sulfides from this and previous studies reveals the presence of a clade of uncultured Bacteroidetes exclusive to sulfidic environments, and a high degree of heterogeneity in bacterial community composition from one sulfide structure to another. In light of the heterogeneous nature of bacterial communities observed here and in previous studies of both active and inactive hydrothermal sulfide structures, the presence of numerous niches may be detected on these structures in the future by finer scale sampling and analysis.

  14. Cross-arc Variations in Lava Chemistry in the Tonga Arc-Lau Back Arc System, 19- 23°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, P. J.; Bezos, A.; Langmuir, C. H.; Escrig, S.; Matzen, A. K.; Asimow, P.; Arculus, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Tonga arc system from 19°-23°S consists of the active Tofua arc, the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC; a back arc spreading center), and numerous seamounts between them. We use the excellent sampling of ELSC and 34 nearby seamounts, along with sparser published analyses of Tofua arc, to examine the spatial relations of chemistry and melting in this subduction system. The spatial constraints can be used to better understand the nature and mechanism of enrichment that is caused by subduction. Geochemistry along the axis of ELSC is related to its distance to the Tofua arc, which decreases continuously from 100 km in the north to 40 km in the south. The subduction influence (e.g., fluid mobile elements) along ELSC increases in several sharp gradients towards the south as ELSC gets closer to the arc. The six different tectonic segments of ELSC display mixing relationships in trace element ratio-ratio diagrams (e.g., Ba/La vs Th/La) in which one end member is a subduction component that is distinctive for each segment (Escrig et al., this meeting). We explore whether the distinctive subduction components of each ELSC segment are reflected by the Tofua arc that is adjacent to that segment, and by the intervening seamounts. Relationships between the arc, back arc and seamounts are different in the north and the south. In the south where the arc-back arc distance is smaller, the Tofua arc volcanic rocks share the distinctive trace element characteristics of their corresponding ELSC segment, and extend the mixing trajectories to higher, more arc-like values. Seamounts that are located between Tofua arc and ELSC also share the distinctive trace element characteristics of the local arc + back-arc, and are intermediate in their trace element ratios. These observations are consistent with the model of Langmuir et al., (2006) in which magmas of back arc spreading centers form from two components: a dry side similar to mid-ocean ridges and a wet (trenchward) side that

  15. Brief Curriculum Vitae: LAU WAN YEE JOSEPH%人物专栏:刘允怡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Professor Lau is currently Professor, Division of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong;Honoarary Consultant in Hepato-pancreato-biliary Surgery in hospitals under the New Territories East Cluster (which includes Prince of Wales Hospital, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital and North District Hospital) and Honorary Consultant Surgeon to the United Christian Hospital.

  16. Experimental research on the feature of Talbot-Lau interferometer vs. tube accelerating voltage

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shenghao; Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Kai; Momose, Atsushi; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    Talbot-Lau interferometer has been used most widely to perform X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a conventional low-brilliance X-ray source, it yields high-sensitivity phase and dark-field images of sample producing low absorption contrast, thus bearing tremendous potential for future clinical diagnosis. In this manuscript, while changing accelerating voltage of the X-ray tube from 35KV to 45KV, X-ray phase-contrast imaging of a test sample were performed at each integer KV position to investigate the characteristic of a Talbot-Lau interferometer (located in the Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Japan.) vs. tube voltage. Experimental results and data analysis show that this Talbot-Lau interferometer is insensitive to the tube accelerating voltage within a certain range, fringe visibility around 44% is maintained in the aforementioned tube voltage range. This experimental research is of guiding significance for choosing optimal tube accelerating voltage with thi...

  17. The use of climatic niches in screening procedures for introduced species to evaluate risk of spread: a case with the American Eastern grey squirrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Febbraro, Mirko; Lurz, Peter W W; Genovesi, Piero; Maiorano, Luigi; Girardello, Marco; Bertolino, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Species introduction represents one of the most serious threats for biodiversity. The realized climatic niche of an invasive species can be used to predict its potential distribution in new areas, providing a basis for screening procedures in the compilation of black and white lists to prevent new introductions. We tested this assertion by modeling the realized climatic niche of the Eastern grey squirrel Sciurus carolinensis. Maxent was used to develop three models: one considering only records from the native range (NRM), a second including records from native and invasive range (NIRM), a third calibrated with invasive occurrences and projected in the native range (RCM). Niche conservatism was tested considering both a niche equivalency and a niche similarity test. NRM failed to predict suitable parts of the currently invaded range in Europe, while RCM underestimated the suitability in the native range. NIRM accurately predicted both the native and invasive range. The niche equivalency hypothesis was rejected due to a significant difference between the grey squirrel's niche in native and invasive ranges. The niche similarity test yielded no significant results. Our analyses support the hypothesis of a shift in the species' climatic niche in the area of introductions. Species Distribution Models (SDMs) appear to be a useful tool in the compilation of black lists, allowing identifying areas vulnerable to invasions. We advise caution in the use of SDMs based only on the native range of a species for the compilation of white lists for other geographic areas, due to the significant risk of underestimating its potential invasive range.

  18. Microelement contents and fatty acid compositions of Rhus coriaria L. and Pistacia terebinthus L. fruits spread commonly in the south eastern Anatolia region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizil, Suleyman; Turk, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Sumac (Rhus coriaria L.) and terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) are two important spice plants of south eastern Anatolia, Turkey. Nutrients, physical properties including moisture, ash, dry matter, protein, fatty oil and essential oil content, along with Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Ni, Pb, Zn and characteristics of fruit sizes and fatty acid compositions of both plants were determined from ripe fruits. The free fatty acid content was determined in the fruit oil, and the main fatty acids of sumac and terebinth were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. They included oleic, linoleic, palmitic and stearic acids in a ratio of 37.7% and 34.8%, 27.4% and 17.3%, 21.1% and 21.7% and, 4.7% and 2.5%, respectively. The fruits of both plants were rich in oil, fatty acids and minerals, suggesting that they are valuable for using in food. The data may also be useful for the evaluation of nutritional information.

  19. The use of climatic niches in screening procedures for introduced species to evaluate risk of spread: a case with the American Eastern grey squirrel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Di Febbraro

    Full Text Available Species introduction represents one of the most serious threats for biodiversity. The realized climatic niche of an invasive species can be used to predict its potential distribution in new areas, providing a basis for screening procedures in the compilation of black and white lists to prevent new introductions. We tested this assertion by modeling the realized climatic niche of the Eastern grey squirrel Sciurus carolinensis. Maxent was used to develop three models: one considering only records from the native range (NRM, a second including records from native and invasive range (NIRM, a third calibrated with invasive occurrences and projected in the native range (RCM. Niche conservatism was tested considering both a niche equivalency and a niche similarity test. NRM failed to predict suitable parts of the currently invaded range in Europe, while RCM underestimated the suitability in the native range. NIRM accurately predicted both the native and invasive range. The niche equivalency hypothesis was rejected due to a significant difference between the grey squirrel's niche in native and invasive ranges. The niche similarity test yielded no significant results. Our analyses support the hypothesis of a shift in the species' climatic niche in the area of introductions. Species Distribution Models (SDMs appear to be a useful tool in the compilation of black lists, allowing identifying areas vulnerable to invasions. We advise caution in the use of SDMs based only on the native range of a species for the compilation of white lists for other geographic areas, due to the significant risk of underestimating its potential invasive range.

  20. Laser and Pulsed Power Electron Density Imaging Through Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Stoeckl, Christian; Mileham, Chad; Begischev, Ildar; Theobald, Wolfgang; Bromage, Jake; Regan, Sean; Klein, Salee; Muñoz-Cordovez, Gonzalo; Vescovi, Milenko; Valenzuela-Villaseca, Vicente; Veloso, Felipe

    2016-10-01

    A Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer was deployed using laser driven and x-pinch x-ray backlighters. The Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer is an ideal electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas with the potential to simultaneously deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single image with source limited resolution. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 10-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using Cu foil targets at the Multi-TeraWatt facility. An areal electron density of 0.050 g/cm2 was obtained at the center of a fluoro-nylon fiber of 300 mm diameter with a source FWHM of 80 µm and resolution of 50 µm. Grating survival and Moiré pattern formation was demonstrated using a Cu x-pinch plasma of FWHM 27 µm, driven by the 350 kA, 350 ns Llampudken pulsed power generator. These results closely match simulations and laboratory results. It was demonstrated that the technique can detect both sharp and smooth density gradients in the range of 2x1023 to 2x1025 cm-3, thus allowing implementation of the electron density technique as a HED plasma diagnostic in both laser and pulsed power experiments U.S. DoE/NNSA and DE-NA0002955.

  1. High-energy x-ray Talbot-Lau radiography of a human knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, F.; Gelse, K.; Jabari, S.; Hauke, C.; Kaeppler, S.; Ludwig, V.; Meyer, P.; Michel, T.; Mohr, J.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Riess, C.; Seifert, M.; Anton, G.

    2017-08-01

    We report on a radiographic measurement of an ex vivo human knee using a grating-based phase-contrast imaging setup and a medical x-ray tube at a tube voltage of 70 kV. The measurement has been carried out using a Talbot-Lau setup that is suitable to achieve a high visibility in the energy regime of medical imaging. In a medical reading by an experienced trauma surgeon signatures of chondrocalcinosis in the medial meniscus have been identified more evidently using the dark-field image in comparison to the conventional attenuation image. The analysis has been carried out at various dose levels down to 0.14 mGy measured as air kerma, which is a dose comparable to clinically used radiographic devices. The diagnosis has been confirmed by a histological analysis of the meniscus tissue. In the introduced high-frequency filtered phase-contrast image the anterior and posterior horn of the medial meniscus and the posterior cruciate ligament have also been visible. Furthermore, atherosclerotic plaque is visible in both imaging modalities, attenuation and dark-field, despite the presence of overlaying bone. This measurement, for the first time, proves the feasibility of Talbot-Lau x-ray imaging at high-energy spectra above 40 kVp and reasonable dose levels with regard to spacious and dense objects.

  2. A Wigner Function Approach to Coherence in a Talbot-Lau Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Imhof

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a thermal gas, we model the signal of a trapped interferometer. This interferometer uses two short laser pulses, separated by time T, which act as a phase grating for the matter waves. Near time 2 T , there is an echo in the cloud’s density due to the Talbot-Lau effect. Our model uses the Wigner function approach and includes a weak residual harmonic trap. The analysis shows that the residual potential limits the interferometer’s visibility, shifts the echo time of the interferometer, and alters its time dependence. Loss of visibility can be mitigated by optimizing the initial trap frequency just before the interferometer cycle begins.

  3. Geodynamic environments of ultra-slow spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    part of Bransfield rift); 2. During back-arc inter-subduction spreading (Ayu trough, northern Fiji basin), 3. During diffuse back-arc spreading (area on the south-eastern border of Scotia sea), 4. During back-arc spreading under splitting of island arc (northern extremity of Mariana trough). Each of the geodynamic environments is characterized by peculiar topographic, geological and geophysical features forming under the same spreading velocities. Development of ultra-slow spreading in each of these environments results in formation of peculiar extension sedimentary basins.

  4. A TERRITORIAL PROFILE OF PUBLIC EXPENDITURES AT LAU 2 LEVEL, FOR 2007-2013 PERIOD IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina\tLINCARU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In view to improve the use of Cohesion policy resources more effectively and efficiently, we propose to explore the achievements of Structural and Cohesion Funds in 2007-13 in Romania at NUTS 5 /LAU 2 level in rural and urban areas. The common reformed cohesion policy represented by the EU Regulation 1303/2013 proposes the integrated approach of territorial development. On this background the territorial unit of analysis is the local administrative unit as the smallest regional hub for integrated public policies, including cohesion policy as well. This analysis involves administrative data provided by MDRP – Regional Development and Public Administration Ministry, connected with socio-economic indicators provided by INS TEMPO. The budgetary capacity of the LAU2 is evaluated using the spatial analysis applications according Anselin (2005, 2006 - using ARC GIS and GEODA software for period 2007-2013. The main result of this article is the territorial heterogenic profile of public expenditures at LAU 2 level with focus on expenditures on projects funded by external grants (irredeemable, useful input for regional policy efficient targeting, especially on the background of the Jobs – Growth - Investment Plan’s New EU Initiative. Looking at the big picture it is visible the higher the spatial heterogeneity tendency in terms of socio economic indicators than the terms of local budget indicators, when is applied the LISA clusters analysis.

  5. Extensive young dacite lava flows between boninite and BABB in a backarc setting: NE Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embley, R. W.; Rubin, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Several hundred square kilometers of young dacite lava flows mapped by their high acoustic backscatter erupted in several batches in proximity to boninite and back-arc basin basalt (BABB) in the NE Lau Basin, the world's fastest opening back-arc region and a site proposed as a modern analogue in some ophiolite models. Where sampled, these lavas are aphyric, glassy dacites and are not associated with andesite extrusives (commonly observed elsewhere). Several flow fields occur on the flank of the large silicic Niuatahi seamount. Two of the largest lava fields and several smaller ones (~220 km2) erupted as far as 60 km north of Niuatahi. Their occurrence is likely controlled by crustal fractures from the long-term extension in this rear-arc region. Determining thickness of these flows is problematic, but relief of 30-100 m on flow fronts and in collapsed areas yields volume estimates as high as ~7-18 km3 for the northern group. The mean silica content of the largest and best sampled dacite flow field (LL-B) is 65.6 ±0.2%, a remarkably consistent composition for such an extensive flow (~140 km2). Camera tows show lower viscosity flow forms, including many anastomatosing pillow tubes and ropey surfaces, as well as endogenous domes, ridges and lobes (some with "crease-like" extrusion ridges, and inflated lobes with extrusion structures). An enigmatic 2 x 1.5 km, 30-m deep collapse depression could mark an eruption center for the LL-B flow field. Low viscosity flow morphologies on portions of LL-B and a nearby smaller flow field implies high effusion rates during some phases of the eruption(s), which in turn implies some combination of higher than normal liquidus temperature and high water content. Submarine dacite flows have been described in ancient sequences from the Archaean through the Miocene but this is the first modern occurrence of large volume submarine dacite flows. The volume of these young dacite flows implies the presence of large differentiated melt

  6. Using 3He/4He to Map the flow of the Samoan-Plume into the Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A.; Jackson, M. G.; Hall, P. S.; Sinton, J. M.; Kurz, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding how the upper mantle flows beneath oceanic lithosphere is crucial to understanding mantle melting, the distribution of geochemical reservoirs, and movement of plate tectonics. Spatial variations in the geochemistry of igneous rocks can provide an understanding of flow in the upper mantle. Numerous geochemical and geophysical anomalies within the northern portion of the Lau basin--the presence of high 3He/4He (up to 28 times atmospheric), latitudinal gradients in trace element and isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb) enrichment, and trench parallel shear wave splitting near the Tonga arc--have been attributed to the southward flow of mantle material from the nearby Samoan hotspot. The Samoan plume is located only 200 km east of the northern terminus of the Tonga trench. North of the terminus, the Pacific plate "tears" and, instead of subducting into the trench, continues to the West. To the South of the terminus, the Pacific plate subducts into the Tonga Trench. The resulting tear generated a "slab window", allowing the Samoan mantle to flow southward beneath the Vitiaz lineament and penetrate into the shallow mantle of the Lau Basin. The juxtaposition of the Samoan hotspot and the Tonga Trench create a unique setting in which the southward flow of the distinctive high 3He/4He Samoan plume mantle can be readily detected in the Lau Basin. High 3He/4He ratios (up to 28.1 Ra) have been reported in a swath within the northern Lau Basin, which drop rapidly to both the South (~400km south of Peggy ridge) and East (Lupton, 2009) of this narrow incursion. It was suggested that the 3He/ 4He would also decline to the west, creating a "finger-like" corridor of Samoan Plume (Turner & Hawkesworth ,1998). However, such a model is not constrained, as 3He/4He ratios have not been reported in the region to the West of the infiltrating plume. Does the Samoan plume material extend broadly to the west, or is it confined to a narrow "finger-like" corridor in the North Lau Basin? We present

  7. Hydrothermal activity in the Lau back-arc basin: Sulfides and water chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, Y.; Charlou, J.L.; Donval, J.P.; Foucher, J.P. (Institut Francais de Recherche et d' Exploitation de la Mer, Plouzane (France)); von Stackelberg, U.; Wiedicke, M. (Bundesanstalt fur Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany)); Erzinger, J. (Justus-Liebig-Universitat, Giessen (Germany)); Herzig, P. (Rheinish-Westfalische Technische Hochschule, Aachen (Germany)); Muhe, R. (Universitat Kiel (Germany)); Soakai, S. (Ministry of Lands Survey and Natural Resources, Nuku' Alofa (Tonga)); Whitechurch, H. (Ecole et Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg (France))

    1991-04-01

    The submersible Nautile completed 22 dives during the Nautilau cruise (R/V Nadir, April 17-May 10, 1989) for a detailed investigation of the southern Lau basin near Tonga. The objective of the scientific team from France, Germany, and Tonga was to understand the process of sea-floor ore formation associated with hydrothermal circulation along the Valu Fa back-arc ridge behind the Tonga-Kermadec trench. The four diving areas, between lat21{degree}25'S and 22{degree}40'S in water{approximately}2000 m deep, were selected on the basis of results from cruises of the R/V Jean Charcot and R/V Sonne. The Nadir cruise provided proof of hydrothermal activity-in all for areas, over more than 100 km-as indicated by the widespread occurence of hydrothermal deposits and by heat flow, conductivity, and temperature measurements near the sea bottom. The most spectacular findings were high-temperature white and black smokers and associated fauna and ore deposits. Hydrothermal water chemistry and sulfide composition data presented here indicate that this hydrothermal field is very different from the hydrothermal fields in oceanic ridges. This difference is seen in water chemistry of the hydrothermal fluid (pH=2 and high metal content) and the chemical composition of sulfides (enrichment in Ba, As, and Pb).

  8. X-ray phase scanning setup for non-destructive testing using Talbot-Lau interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachche, S.; Nonoguchi, M.; Kato, K.; Kageyama, M.; Koike, T.; Kuribayashi, M.; Momose, A.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating interferometry has a great potential for X-ray phase imaging over conventional X-ray absorption imaging which does not provide significant contrast for weakly absorbing objects and soft biological tissues. X-ray Talbot and Talbot-Lau interferometers which are composed of transmission gratings and measure the differential X-ray phase shifts have gained popularity because they operate with polychromatic beams. In X-ray radiography, especially for nondestructive testing in industrial applications, the feasibility of continuous sample scanning is not yet completely revealed. A scanning setup is frequently advantageous when compared to a direct 2D static image acquisition in terms of field of view, exposure time, illuminating radiation, etc. This paper demonstrates an efficient scanning setup for grating-based Xray phase imaging using laboratory-based X-ray source. An apparatus consisting of an X-ray source that emits X-rays vertically, optical gratings and a photon-counting detector was used with which continuously moving objects across the field of view as that of conveyor belt system can be imaged. The imaging performance of phase scanner was tested by scanning a long continuous moving sample at a speed of 5 mm/s and absorption, differential-phase and visibility images were generated by processing non-uniform moire movie with our specially designed phase measurement algorithm. A brief discussion on the feasibility of phase scanner with scanning setup approach including X-ray phase imaging performance is reported. The successful results suggest a breakthrough for scanning objects those are moving continuously on conveyor belt system non-destructively using the scheme of X-ray phase imaging.

  9. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, M; Kaeppler, S; Hauke, C; Horn, F; Pelzer, G; Rieger, J; Michel, T; Riess, C; Anton, G

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  10. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, M.; Kaeppler, S.; Hauke, C.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Michel, T.; Riess, C.; Anton, G.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  11. Preliminary results from Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 - NE Lau: First explorations of hydrothermally active volcanoes across the supra-subduction zone and a return to the West Mata eruption site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, J.; Embley, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    Several expeditions in the past few years have shown that the NE Lau basin has one of the densest concentrations of volcanically and hydrothermally active volcanoes on the planet. In 2008 two active submarine volcanic eruptions were discovered during a one week period and subsequent dives with the Jason remotely operated vehicle at one of the sites (West Mata) revealed an active boninite eruption taking place at 1200 m depth. Two dives at the other revealed evidence for recent eruption along the NE Lau Spreading Center. Several more expeditions in 2010-11 discovered additional evidence about the extent and types of hydrothermal activity in this area. Data from CTDO (conductivity, temperature, depth, optical) vertical casts, tow-yos, and towed camera deployments revealed more than 15 hydrothermal sites at water depths from ~800 to 2700 m that include sites from the magmatic arc, the "rear arc," and the back arc spreading centers. These sites range from high temperature black smoker sulfide-producing systems to those dominated by magmatic degassing. Dives by remotely operated vehicle (Quest 4000) in September 2012 will explore these sites and return samples for chemical, biological and geologic studies. One of the dives will be a return visit to West Mata volcano, the site of the deepest submarine eruption yet observed (in 2009). Recent multibeam data reveal large changes in West Mata's summit, suggesting that the nature of the eruption and the location of the erupting vents may have changed. In addition to the preliminary results from the science team, we will also discuss our use and experience with continuous live video transmission (through the High Definition video camera on the Quest 4000) back to shore via satellite and through the internet. Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 Science Team: Bradley Tebo, Bill Chadwick, Ed Baker, Ken Rubin, Susan Merle, Timothy Shank, Sharon Walker, Andra Bobbitt, Nathan Buck, David Butterfield, Eric Olson, John Lupton, Richard Arculus

  12. Regeneração de plantas após fusão de protoplastos de tangelo 'Page' e toranja 'Lau Tau' Plant regeneration after protoplast fusion of 'Page' tangelo and 'Lau Tau' pummelo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Cristina de Carvalho

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Buscou-se a hibridação somática entre tangelo 'Page' e toranja 'Lau Tau' visando à produção de porta-enxerto semelhante à laranja-azeda, por esta espécie ser considerada um provável híbrido entre C. reticulata e C. grandis. Após isolamento, fusão e cultivo de protoplastos, obtiveram-se brotações que foram enxertadas in vitro, em laranja 'Hamlin'. Dezessete plantas foram aclimatizadas em casa de vegetação. A análise de citometria de fluxo confirmou a constituição diplóide dessas plantas. Marcadores moleculares RAPD das plantas regeneradas apresentaram padrão de bandas similar ao de tangelo 'Page'. Entretanto, todas as plantas apresentaram conformação fenotípica diferente dos genitores.This work aimed to produce somatic hybrid between 'Page' tangelo and 'Lau Tau' pummelo in an attempt to regenerate a similar rootstock to sour orange, because this species is considered a probable hybrid between C. reticulata and C. grandis. After protoplast isolation, fusion and culture regenerated shoots were in vitro grafted on 'Hamlin' sweet orange. Seventeen plants were acclimatized in a greenhouse. Citometric flow analyses revealed that all plants are diploid. RAPD molecular markers of regenerated plants had the same pattern as compared to 'Page' tangelo. However, all plants had phenotypic traits different from both genitors.

  13. Deep sea three component magnetic survey using ROV in the hydrothermal vent of the Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.; Park, C.

    2011-12-01

    We conducted magnetic survey at Apr., 2011 in the western slope of the caldera of TA25, the Lau Basin, the southwestern Pacific using IBRV(Ice Breaker Research Vessel) ARAON of KORDI(Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute), ROV(Remotely Operated Vehicle) of Oceaneering Co. and three component magnetometer(Fig. 1,Fig. 2). The deep-sea three component magnetic survey lines are the 13 N-S lines(100 m spacing) and the 2 E-W lines(Fig. 2). The depth ranges of the survey area are from about 900 m to 1200 m, below sea level. For the magnetic survey, the magnetometer sensor and the data logger was attached with the upper part and lower part of ROV, respectively(Fig. 2). We wanted to make the distance between the magnetometer sensor and ROV over 2 m long to reduce the noise effect of ROV. But, for the safe of deployment and recovery of ROV, the distance between the magnetometer sensor and ROV was 126 cm(Fig. 2). In the magnetic survey, ROV followed the planning tracks at 25~30 m above seafloor using the altimeter and USBL(Ultra Short Base Line) of ROV. IBRV ARAON accompanied ROV on the magnetic survey. The three component magnetometer measure the X(North), Y(East) and Z(Vertical) vector components of a magnetic field. A motion sensor(Oxtans) provided us the data of pitch, roll, yaw for the correction of the magnetic data to the motion of ROV. The data of the magnetometer sensor and the motion sensor were recorded on a notebook through the optical cable of ROV and the network of ARON using magnetometer software. The precision positions of magnetic data were merged by the post-processing of USBL of ROV. Hydrothermal fluids over Curie temperature can quickly alter or replace the iron-rich magnetic minerals, reducing the magnetic remanence of the crustal rocks, in some cases to near 0A/m magnetization. So, the obtained three component magnetic data are fully utilized by finding possible hydrothermal vents of the survey area.

  14. 南水北调东线工程防止钉螺扩散技术研究Ⅲ.湖区拦网防止钉螺扩散效果观察%Techniques to prevent the spread of Oncomelania snails in the eastern route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project Ⅲ The effectiveness of netting to block the spread of Oncomelania snails in lake regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙道宽; 李倩; 王全峰; 蔡守仁; 贾从英; 杭德荣; 黄轶昕

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine how effectively netting blocked the spread of Oncomelania snails in lake regions.Methods The aquatic area where a purse seine was used was Lake GaoYou in Jinhu County,Jiangsu Province.Netting was installed to stop Oncomelania snails at the mid-water level.A regular purse seine served as a control.Reeds marked with red paint and rice hulls served as simulated floaters.The marked reeds were cut to lengths of 5 cm,10 cm,or 20 cm.Simulated floaters were thrown in the lake 50 meters from the seine or netting.The number of simulated floaters of different sizes that passed through the seine or netting was counted after 30 minutes.Previous use of purse seines in the lake area was studied,along with the prevalence/distribution of Oncomelania.The snail-intercepting action of the purse seine was analyzed.Results The netting intercepted 100% of simulated floaters of all sizes.The regular purse seine al so intercepted 100% of the marked reeds but only 89.50% of the rice hulls.No purse seines were found on shoals or on the lakefront where Oncomelania had spread,and no Oncomelania were found on shoals where purse seines had been used.Conclusion Netting can effectively prevent the landing of drifting Oncomelania in a lake area.This technique can be used as a back-up technique to prevent the spread of Oncomelania in the eastern route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project.It can also be combined with aquaculture to prevent the spread of Oncomelania in lake areas.%目的 观察湖区拦网防止钉螺扩散效果.方法 选择江苏省金湖县高邮湖施尖滩养殖围网水域为试验现场;按照中层取水防螺原理设置湖区拦螺网,同时以普通围网为对照;分别以长5、10、20 cm标记芦苇杆和稻壳为模拟漂浮物,在拦网前50 m处投放30 min后分别观察并计数不同大小标记漂浮物通过拦网和围网的数量.调查湖区养殖围网、钉螺及历史钉螺分布情况,分析养

  15. Analysis on Emergence and Spread of"Eastern Turkey"Ethnic Separatism and Violent Terrorism%“东突”民族分裂主义与暴力恐怖主义滋生与蔓延的成因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊有辉

    2013-01-01

    The causes of continuous emergeny and spread of "Eastern Turkey" ethnic separatism and violent ter-rorism are very complicated. The spread and prevalence of "Pan-Islamism" and "Pan-Turkism" in Xinjiang pro-vide the theoretic foundation and spirit pillar. With the pervasion of religious extremism, "Eastern Turkey" Eth-nic influence began to converge with the religious extreme influence confluence, and aim at ethnic separatism with violent terrorism. The lose control of religion management caused rampant illegal religious activities, which became the soil and hotbed of ethnic separatists and violent terrorists. The support of international terror influ-ence made the"Eastern Turkey"ethnic influnence transform into violent terrorists."Eastern Turkey"ethnic sepa-ratists and violent terror orgnizations are tolerated and supported by international anti-China influences and en-gaged in separate and terror activities. The huge gap between the relative poverty and abundant energy resources in South Xinjiang becomes the latent inducement of catalysing terrorists. The errors of realistic policies have in-visible impacts on active occurrence of"Eastern Turkey"ethnic separatism and violent terrorism.%“东突”民族分裂主义与暴力恐怖主义滋生与蔓延的成因极其复杂。“双泛”思潮在新疆的传播和蔓延为滋生“东突”民族分裂主义提供了思想理论基础和精神支柱;宗教极端主义思想的不断传入,与“东突”民族分裂势力合流,使其转变为以民族分裂为目的的暴力恐怖势力;宗教管理的失控致使非法宗教活动猖獗,成为“东突”民族分裂与暴力恐怖分子不断滋生的土壤和温床;国际恐怖势力的积极扶持,使“东突”民族分裂势力迅速完成了由单纯的民族分裂势力向以民族分裂为目的的暴力恐怖势力的嬗变,并有恃无恐地从事分裂与恐怖活动;南疆部分地区相对贫困与能源资源十分丰富之间形

  16. Lipdub-ak, gizarte-lorpenak erdiesteko lanabes gisara. Quebec, AEB, Katalunia eta Euskal Herrian egindako lau kasu paradigmatikoen azterketa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Txema Ramírez de la Piscina Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Artikulu honek laburbiltzen ditu egileak egindako ikerketa baten emaitzak. Berton, lipdub-en fenomenoa aztertu da; zehatzago esanda, nolatan gizarte mugimenduek erabili dezaketen tresna hau gizartean eragin handiagoa lortzeko bidean. Azterketa honetan, autoreak Youtuben inpaktu handia izan duten lau adibide esanguratsu aztertu ditu: “I gotta feeling-UQAM”, Quebec-eko Komunikazioko ikasleek egindakoak (2012ko urtarrilean Internet-en bisita gehien zituen bideoa zen; “The Grand Rapids” (lipdub honek eguneko bisita kopururik handiena zuen orduan; “Lipdub Independència” (lipdub honek orduan lortu zuen parte-hartzaile gehien izatearen mundu-marka, 5.771 pertsonekin eta, azkenik, “Lipdub Kukutza”, Euskal Herrian egindako tipo honetako bideoen artean bisita gehien zituena. Lan honek azpimarratzen du lipdub-ak gizarte mugimenduentzat lanabes garrantzitsuak izan daitezkeela, batetik masa-hedabideetan nagusi diren joerei aurre egiteko eta, bestetik, mugimenduei beraiei komunikabideek sarritan ezartzen dieten ikusezintasuna gainditu ahal izateko.

  17. Information in CDS Spreads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Norden (Lars)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate how public and private information drives corporate CDS spreads before rating announcements. We find that CDS spreads of firms with higher news intensity move significantly earlier and stronger before rating announcements, which can be explained with public information fro

  18. EASTERN UGANDA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EVALUATION OF SELECTED ELITE POTATO GENOTYPES IN. EASTERN ... Significant

  19. The spreading of disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keizer, Kees; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Steg, Linda

    2008-12-12

    Imagine that the neighborhood you are living in is covered with graffiti, litter, and unreturned shopping carts. Would this reality cause you to litter more, trespass, or even steal? A thesis known as the broken windows theory suggests that signs of disorderly and petty criminal behavior trigger more disorderly and petty criminal behavior, thus causing the behavior to spread. This may cause neighborhoods to decay and the quality of life of its inhabitants to deteriorate. For a city government, this may be a vital policy issue. But does disorder really spread in neighborhoods? So far there has not been strong empirical support, and it is not clear what constitutes disorder and what may make it spread. We generated hypotheses about the spread of disorder and tested them in six field experiments. We found that, when people observe that others violated a certain social norm or legitimate rule, they are more likely to violate other norms or rules, which causes disorder to spread.

  20. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F.

    2016-11-01

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ˜1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  1. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdivia, M. P., E-mail: mpvaldivia@pha.jhu.edu; Stutman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Klein, S. R. [Center for Laser Experimental Astrophysical Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 (United States); Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-11-15

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25–29 J, 8–30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ∼1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  2. Higher Order Spreading Models

    CERN Document Server

    Argyros, S A; Tyros, K

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the higher order spreading models associated to a Banach space $X$. Their definition is based on $\\ff$-sequences $(x_s)_{s\\in\\ff}$ with $\\ff$ a regular thin family and the plegma families. We show that the higher order spreading models of a Banach space $X$ form an increasing transfinite hierarchy $(\\mathcal{SM}_\\xi(X))_{\\xi<\\omega_1}$. Each $\\mathcal{SM}_\\xi (X)$ contains all spreading models generated by $\\ff$-sequences $(x_s)_{s\\in\\ff}$ with order of $\\ff$ equal to $\\xi$. We also provide a study of the fundamental properties of the hierarchy.

  3. Animal vectors of eastern dwarf mistletoe of black spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Ostry; Thomas H. Nicholls; D.W. French

    1983-01-01

    Describes a study to determine the importance of animals in the spread of eastern dwarf mistletoe of black spruce. Radio telemetry, banding, and color-marking techniques were used to study vectors of this forest pathogen.

  4. The peptidomimetic Lau-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 antagonizes formyl peptide receptor 2 expressed in mouse neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael; Holdfeldt, André; Linden, Sara; Wang, Ji Ming; Dahlgren, Claes; Franzyk, Henrik; Forsman, Huamei

    2016-11-01

    The formyl peptide receptor (FPR) gene family has a complex evolutionary history and comprises eight murine members but only three human representatives. To enable translation of results obtained in mouse models of human diseases, more comprehensive knowledge of the pharmacological similarities/differences between the human and murine FPR family members is required. Compared to FPR1 and FPR2 expressed by human neutrophils, very little is known about agonist/antagonist recognition patterns for their murine orthologues, but now we have identified two potent and selective formylated peptide agonists (fMIFL and PSMα2) for Fpr1 and Fpr2, respectively. These peptides were used to determine the inhibition profile of a set of antagonists with known specificities for the two FPRs in relation to the corresponding murine receptors. Some of the most potent and selective antagonists for the human receptors proved to be devoid of effect on their murine orthologues as determined by their inability to inhibit superoxide release from murine neutrophils upon stimulation with receptor-specific agonists. The Boc-FLFLF peptide was found to be a selective antagonist for Fpr1, whereas the lipidated peptidomimetic Lau-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 and the hexapeptide WRW4 were identified as Fpr2-selective antagonists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spread codes and spread decoding in network coding

    OpenAIRE

    Manganiello, F; Gorla, E.; Rosenthal, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the class of spread codes for the use in random network coding. Spread codes are based on the construction of spreads in finite projective geometry. The major contribution of the paper is an efficient decoding algorithm of spread codes up to half the minimum distance.

  6. ENDOMETRIOSIS WITH LYMPHATIC SPREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmadha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic endometriosis is a common gynaecologic problem. But the histogenesis of endometriosis was not so clear. Various theories have been proposed by Pathologist in the past. Here we present a case of endometriosis of fallopian tube by lymphatic spread which has been proved histopathologically

  7. Spreading of miscible liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  8. Virus spread in networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieghem, P. van; Omic, J.; Kooij, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the network characteristics on the virus spread is analyzed in a new-the N-intertwined Markov chain-model, whose only approximation lies in the application of mean field theory. The mean field approximation is quantified in detail. The N-intertwined model has been compared with the

  9. Optimizing Hybrid Spreading in Metapopulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Changwang; Cox, Ingemar J; Chain, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    Epidemic spreading phenomena are ubiquitous in nature and society. Examples include the spreading of diseases, information, and computer viruses. Epidemics can spread by \\textit{local spreading}, where infected nodes can only infect a limited set of direct target nodes and \\textit{global spreading}, where an infected node can infect every other node. In reality, many epidemics spread using a hybrid mixture of both types of spreading. In this study we develop a theoretical framework for studying hybrid epidemics, and examine the optimum balance between spreading mechanisms in terms of achieving the maximum outbreak size. In a metapopulation, made up of many weakly connected subpopulations, we show that one can calculate an optimal tradeoff between local and global spreading which will maximise the extent of the epidemic. As an example we analyse the 2008 outbreak of the Internet worm Conficker, which uses hybrid spreading to propagate through the internet. Our results suggests that the worm would have been eve...

  10. Combinatorics of spreads and parallelisms

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Partitions of Vector Spaces Quasi-Subgeometry Partitions Finite Focal-SpreadsGeneralizing André SpreadsThe Going Up Construction for Focal-SpreadsSubgeometry Partitions Subgeometry and Quasi-Subgeometry Partitions Subgeometries from Focal-SpreadsExtended André SubgeometriesKantor's Flag-Transitive DesignsMaximal Additive Partial SpreadsSubplane Covered Nets and Baer Groups Partial Desarguesian t-Parallelisms Direct Products of Affine PlanesJha-Johnson SL(2,

  11. Quasirandom Rumor Spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Doerr, Benjamin; Sauerwald, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We propose and analyse a quasirandom analogue of the classical push model for disseminating information in networks ("randomized rumor spreading"). In the classical model, in each round each informed vertex chooses a neighbor at random and informs it, if it was not before. It is known that this simple protocol succeeds in spreading a rumor from one vertex to all others within O(log n) rounds on complete graphs, hypercubes, random regular graphs, Erdos-Renyi random graph and Ramanujan graphs with high probability. In the quasirandom model, we assume that each vertex has a (cyclic) list of its neighbors. Once informed, it starts at a random position of the list, but from then on informs its neighbors in the order of the list. Surprisingly, irrespective of the orders of the lists, the above mentioned bounds still hold. In some cases even better bounds than for the classical model can be shown.

  12. Spread spectrum image steganography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, L M; Boncelet, C R; Retter, C T

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method of digital steganography, entitled spread spectrum image steganography (SSIS). Steganography, which means "covered writing" in Greek, is the science of communicating in a hidden manner. Following a discussion of steganographic communication theory and review of existing techniques, the new method, SSIS, is introduced. This system hides and recovers a message of substantial length within digital imagery while maintaining the original image size and dynamic range. The hidden message can be recovered using appropriate keys without any knowledge of the original image. Image restoration, error-control coding, and techniques similar to spread spectrum are described, and the performance of the system is illustrated. A message embedded by this method can be in the form of text, imagery, or any other digital signal. Applications for such a data-hiding scheme include in-band captioning, covert communication, image tamperproofing, authentication, embedded control, and revision tracking.

  13. Simulation of dark-field imaging of micro-calcifications in human breast tissue with X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, A.; Anton, G.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Weber, T.; Zang, A.; Michel, T.

    2014-05-01

    A simulation of dark-field imaging of sub-resolution structures with X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry is presented. Data obtained from the simulation shows good agreement to a signal found in the dark-field image of a surgically removed sample of human breast tissue containing micro calcifications. A measure for the type of micro calcifications is introduced which can be calculated from dark-field signals. In a further analysis of the simulated data, it can be shown that the measure can be used to discriminate between different calcifications types.

  14. Estimation of wave directional spreading

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deo, M.C.; Gondane, D.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    One of the useful measures of waves directional spreading at a given location is the directional spreading parameter. This paper presents a new approach to arrive at its characteristic value using the computational technique of Artificial Neural...

  15. A review of Leishmaniasis in Eastern Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter K. Ngure; Albert Kimutai; Zipporah W. Ng'ang'a; Geoffrey Rukunga; Willy K. Tonui

    2009-01-01

    The review presents the epidemiology of leishmaniasis in the Eastern Africa region. We searched PUB MED and MEDLINE with several key words-namely,"leishmaniasis";"cutaneous"," diffuse cutaneous"," mucosal", and "visceral leishmaniasis";"kala azar" and "post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis"-for recont clinical and basic science articles related to leishmaniasis in countries in the Eastern Africa region. Poverty, wars, conflicts and migration have significantly aggravated leishmaniases in Eastern Africa. Of particular concern is the increasing incidence of Leishmania-HIV co-infection in Ethiopia where 20--40% of the persons affected by visceral leishmaniasis are HIV-co-infected. Sudan has the highest prevalence rate of post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis(PKDL) in the world, a skin complication of visceral leishmaniasis(VL) that mainly afflicts children below age ten. In view of its spread to previously non-endemic areas and an increase in imported cases, leishmaniasis in Eastern Africa should be considered a health emergency.

  16. Small-angle scattering computed tomography (SAS-CT) using a Talbot-Lau interferometerand a rotating anode x-ray tube:theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Qi, Zhihua

    2010-06-01

    X-ray differential phase contrast imaging methods, including projection imaging and the corresponding computed tomography (CT), have been implemented using a Talbot interferometer and either a synchrotron beam line or a low brilliance x-ray source generated by a stationary-anode x-ray tube. From small-angle scattering events which occur as an x-ray propagates through a medium, a signal intensity loss can be recorded and analyzed for an understanding of the micro-structures in an image object. This has been demonstrated using a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a stationary-anode x-ray tube. In this paper, theoretical principles and an experimental implementation of the corresponding CT imaging method are presented. First, a line integral is derived from analyzing the cross section of the small-angle scattering events. This method is referred to as small-angle scattering computed tomography (SAS-CT). Next, a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a rotating-anode x-ray tube were used to implement SAS-CT. A physical phantom and human breast tissue sample were used to demonstrate the reconstructed SAS-CT image volumes.

  17. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen F [London, TN; Dress, William B [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  18. Fundamentals of spread spectrum modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziemer, Rodger E

    2007-01-01

    This lecture covers the fundamentals of spread spectrum modulation, which can be defined as any modulation technique that requires a transmission bandwidth much greater than the modulating signal bandwidth, independently of the bandwidth of the modulating signal. After reviewing basic digital modulation techniques, the principal forms of spread spectrum modulation are described. One of the most important components of a spread spectrum system is the spreading code, and several types and their characteristics are described. The most essential operation required at the receiver in a spread spect

  19. Rifts in spreading wax layers

    CERN Document Server

    Ragnarsson, R; Santangelo, C D; Bodenschatz, E; Ragnarsson, Rolf; Ford, J Lewis; Santangelo, Christian D; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    1995-01-01

    We report experimental results on the rift formation between two freezing wax plates. The plates were pulled apart with constant velocity, while floating on the melt, in a way akin to the tectonic plates of the earth's crust. At slow spreading rates, a rift, initially perpendicular to the spreading direction, was found to be stable, while above a critical spreading rate a "spiky" rift with fracture zones almost parallel to the spreading direction developed. At yet higher spreading rates a second transition from the spiky rift to a zig-zag pattern occurred. In this regime the rift can be characterized by a single angle which was found to be dependent on the spreading rate. We show that the oblique spreading angles agree with a simple geometrical model. The coarsening of the zig-zag pattern over time and the three-dimensional structure of the solidified crust are also discussed.

  20. LAU RENT SALOMON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    洛朗·所罗门生于1954年。从1971年至1979年.他在巴黎建筑学校求学,该校位于“大宫殿”中,在那里,国家高级美术学校设有工作室。他从1979年一毕业就与人在萨瓦省合伙创建了尚贝里市建筑与城市规划公共工作室,直到1983年。他在这个时期的实践中发现了政府的公共建筑及其与城市规划的关系,此后他创立了“联合建筑师事务所”,该事务所的主要工作是重新构造城市的外围。1988年,他放弃了这个团队.投资成立自己的工作室.在保留现有的业务活动的同时,还扩大了下列的业务范围:

  1. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  2. Heat transfer and fire spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hal E. Anderson

    1969-01-01

    Experimental testing of a mathematical model showed that radiant heat transfer accounted for no more than 40% of total heat flux required to maintain rate of spread. A reasonable prediction of spread was possible by assuming a horizontal convective heat transfer coefficient when certain fuel and flame characteristics were known. Fuel particle size had a linear relation...

  3. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  4. Sinking, wedging, spreading - viscous spreading on a layer of fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergemann, Nico; Juel, Anne; Heil, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the axisymmetric spreading of a sessile drop on a pre-existing layer of the same fluid in a regime where the drop is sufficiently large so that the spreading is driven by gravity while capillary and inertial effects are negligible. Experiments performed with 5 ml drops and layer thicknesses in the range 0.1 mm drop evolves as R tn , where the spreading exponent n increases with the layer thickness h. Numerical simulations, based on the axisymmetric free-surface Navier-Stokes equations, reveal three distinct spreading regimes depending on the layer thickness. For thick layers the drop sinks into the layer, accompanied by significant flow in the layer. By contrast, for thin layers the layer ahead of the propagating front is at rest and the spreading behaviour resembles that of a gravity-driven drop spreading on a dry substrate. In the intermediate regime the spreading is characterised by an advancing wedge, which is sustained by fluid flow from the drop into the layer.

  5. Spreading convulsions, spreading depolarization and epileptogenesis in human cerebral cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jens P; Major, Sebastian; Pannek, Heinz-Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Spreading depolarization of cells in cerebral grey matter is characterized by massive ion translocation, neuronal swelling and large changes in direct current-coupled voltage recording. The near-complete sustained depolarization above the inactivation threshold for action potential generating...

  6. Prevalence of blood parasites in eastern versus Western house finches: are eastern birds resistant to infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew K; Hood, Wendy R; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2013-09-01

    The rapid spread of the bacterial disease, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), throughout the introduced range of house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) in eastern North America, compared to its slower spread through the native western range, has puzzled researchers and highlights the need to understand the relative differences in health state of finches from both populations. We conducted a light-microscope survey of hemoparasites in populations of finches from Arizona (within the western range) and from Alabama (within the eastern range), and compared our estimates of prevalence to published reports from house finches sampled in both ranges. Of the 33 Arizona birds examined, we recorded hematozoan infections in 16 (48.5%) individuals, compared to 1 infected Alabama bird out of 30 birds examined (3.3%). Based on independent surveys of seven western North American and five eastern North American populations of house finches the average prevalence of blood parasites in western populations is 38.8% (±17.9 SD), while the average prevalence within the eastern range is only 5.9% (±6.1 SD). The average rate of infection among all songbirds sampled in the east is 34.2% (±4.8 SD). Thus, our surveys of wild birds as well as previously published observations point to eastern house finches having a much lower prevalence of blood parasite infections than their western counterparts. Combined with the fact that eastern finches also tend to have lower rates of avian pox infections than do western birds (based on a literature review), these observations suggest that eastern birds have either strong resistance to these infections or high susceptibility and associated mortality.

  7. Spreading the Bible in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    According to records of the Bible Society in China, more than 300 million copies of the Bible in Chinese have been published and distributed since 1823. The spread of the Bible in China has gone through five stages.

  8. Spread effects - methodology; Spredningseffekter - metodegrunnlag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Diffusion of technology, environmental effects and rebound effects are the principal effects from the funding of renewable energy and energy economising. It is difficult to estimate the impact of the spread effects both prior to the measures are implemented and after the measures are carried out. Statistical methods can be used to estimate the spread effects, but they are insecure and always need to be complemented with qualitative and subjective evaluations. It is more adequate to evaluate potential spread effects from market and market data surveillance for a selection of technologies and parties. Based on this information qualitative indicators for spread effects can be constructed and used both ex ante and ex post (ml)

  9. Roles of Ties in Spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Ai-Xiang; Zhou, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Background: Controlling global epidemics in the real world and accelerating information propagation in the artificial world are of great significance, which have activated an upsurge in the studies on networked spreading dynamics. Lots of efforts have been made to understand the impacts of macroscopic statistics (e.g., degree distribution and average distance) and mesoscopic structures (e.g., communities and rich clubs) on spreading processes while the microscopic elements are less concerned. In particular, roles of ties are not yet clear to the academic community. Methodology/Principle Findings: Every edges is stamped by its strength that is defined solely based on the local topology. According to a weighted susceptible-infected-susceptible model, the steady-state infected density and spreading speed are respectively optimized by adjusting the relationship between edge's strength and spreading ability. Experiments on six real networks show that the infected density is increased when strong ties are favored i...

  10. Epidemic spreading in complex networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie ZHOU; Zong-hua LIU

    2008-01-01

    The study of epidemic spreading in complex networks is currently a hot topic and a large body of results have been achieved.In this paper,we briefly review our contributions to this field,which includes the underlying mechanism of rumor propagation,the epidemic spreading in community networks,the influence of varying topology,and the influence of mobility of agents.Also,some future directions are pointed out.

  11. Multiple seafloor spreading modes in the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetry and TOBI deep-towed sidescan sonar data have been used to produce a preliminary geological map of the ultra-slow (~16 km/Ma) Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre (MCSC, the world's deepest spreading centre. The MCSC consists of two spreading segments, the northern of which is offset some 10 km dextrally from the southern, separated by an oceanic core complex (OCC), Mt. Dent. Each segment contains an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) displaying typical young, hummocky volcanic terrain. The northern AVR runs the length of the segment and its southern end abuts the north flank of Mt. Dent, suggesting it is about to cut off and terminate slip on the OCC detachment. A prominent ridge to the east of the northern AVR is not, as appears from the bathymetry, a separate AVR, but a fault block in the eastern MV wall. Recent-looking lavas erupt from partway up this fault. The southern AVR occupies the southern part of the southern segment. Both AVRs, but most prominently the northern one, exhibit NE trending volcanic spurs on their eastern flanks, which may be attributed to the action of dextral shear stresses associated with the plate boundary. The world's deepest hydrothermal vents (Beebe Vent Field) is located at the foot of one of these spurs. Between the southern AVR and Mt. Dent is a linear ridge, displaying considerable evidence of faulting but little recognisable volcanic terrain. The most likely tectonic interpretation is that this is a peridotite ridge produced by direct exhumation of mantle material, similar to those seen in 'smooth' seafloor on the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. Its NNW-SSE orientation is somewhat paradoxical in this N-S spreading centre. This tectonised ridge is flanked by two flat-floored basins characterised by fairly uniform, moderate backscatter terrain typical of relatively young flat-lying lava flows. There are several smaller areas of young, flat-lying lavas, including the one to the east of the northern AVR. Another

  12. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pei, Sen

    2013-01-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from the epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community -- LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them involve in spreading. For the spreading processes in Li...

  13. 9 CFR 319.762 - Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. 319.762 Section 319.762 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Salads and Meat Spreads § 319.762 Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. “Ham Spread,” “Tongue...

  14. The global spread of HIV-1 subtype B epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Angelis, Konstantinos; Mamais, Ioannis; Katzourakis, Aris; Hatzakis, Angelos; Albert, Jan; Lawyer, Glenn; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Gomes, Perpétua; Camacho, Ricardo J; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Anders; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Lepej, Snjezana J; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elizabeth; Schmit, Jean Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Stylianou, Dora C; Boucher, Charles A B; Nikolopoulos, Georgios; Vasylyeva, Tetyana; Friedman, Samuel R; van de Vijver, David; Angarano, Gioacchino; Chaix, Marie-Laure; de Luca, Andrea; Korn, Klaus; Loveday, Clive; Soriano, Vincent; Yerly, Sabine; Zazzi, Mauricio; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was discovered in the early 1980s when the virus had already established a pandemic. For at least three decades the epidemic in the Western World has been dominated by subtype B infections, as part of a sub-epidemic that traveled from Africa through Haiti to United States. However, the pattern of the subsequent spread still remains poorly understood. Here we analyze a large dataset of globally representative HIV-1 subtype B strains to map their spread around the world over the last 50years and describe significant spread patterns. We show that subtype B travelled from North America to Western Europe in different occasions, while Central/Eastern Europe remained isolated for the most part of the early epidemic. Looking with more detail in European countries we see that the United Kingdom, France and Switzerland exchanged viral isolates with non-European countries than with European ones. The observed pattern is likely to mirror geopolitical landmarks in the post-World War II era, namely the rise and the fall of the Iron Curtain and the European colonialism. In conclusion, HIV-1 spread through specific migration routes which are consistent with geopolitical factors that affected human activities during the last 50years, such as migration, tourism and trade. Our findings support the argument that epidemic control policies should be global and incorporate political and socioeconomic factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Olive oil in food spreads

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanco Muñoz, Miguel A

    2004-01-01

    .... The use of olive oil to prepare fat spread opens new insights into the commercial development of healthy novel foods with a positive image in terms of consumer appeal.La hidrogenación química de los...

  16. Worldwide spreading of economic crisis

    CERN Document Server

    Garas, Antonios; Rozenblat, Celine; Tomassini, Marco; Havlin, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    We model the spreading of a crisis by constructing a global economic network and applying the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) epidemic model with a variable probability of infection. The probability of infection depends on the strength of economic relations between the pair of countries, and the strength of the target country. It is expected that a crisis which originates in a large country, such as the USA, has the potential to spread globally, like the recent crisis. Surprisingly we show that also countries with much lower GDP, such as Belgium, are able to initiate a global crisis. Using the {\\it k}-shell decomposition method to quantify the spreading power (of a node), we obtain a measure of ``centrality'' as a spreader of each country in the economic network. We thus rank the different countries according to the shell they belong to, and find the 12 most central countries. These countries are the most likely to spread a crisis globally. Of these 12 only six are large economies, while the other six ar...

  17. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Sen; Makse, Hernán A.

    2013-12-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, and social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community—LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in the LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them are involved in spreading. For the spreading processes in LiveJournal, while degree can locate nodes participating in information diffusion with higher probability, k-shell is more effective in finding nodes with a large influence. Our results should provide useful information for designing efficient spreading strategies in reality.

  18. The Eastern Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian L.; Vilson, Maili

    2014-01-01

    When the EU launched the Eastern Partnership (EaP) in 2009, it did so with much rhetoric about projecting its soft power into Eastern Europe. Yet today, the EU's soft power project seems to have stalled, with developments in the region being less than favourable. This article argues that the EaP ...

  19. Eastern Europe's Silicon Rush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Colin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents how the fast expansion of information technology industry in eastern Slovakia is putting a strain on its labor supply. Suddenly, computer-science graduates have become one of the former Eastern Bloc's greatest assets, attracting multinational technology companies hungry for skilled programmers, technicians, and engineers.…

  20. Spreading lengths of Hermite polynomials

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Moreno, P; Manzano, D; Yáñez, R; 10.1016/j.cam.2009.09.043

    2009-01-01

    The Renyi, Shannon and Fisher spreading lengths of the classical or hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials, which are quantifiers of their distribution all over the orthogonality interval, are defined and investigated. These information-theoretic measures of the associated Rakhmanov probability density, which are direct measures of the polynomial spreading in the sense of having the same units as the variable, share interesting properties: invariance under translations and reflections, linear scaling and vanishing in the limit that the variable tends towards a given definite value. The expressions of the Renyi and Fisher lengths for the Hermite polynomials are computed in terms of the polynomial degree. The combinatorial multivariable Bell polynomials, which are shown to characterize the finite power of an arbitrary polynomial, play a relevant role for the computation of these information-theoretic lengths. Indeed these polynomials allow us to design an error-free computing approach for the entropic moments (w...

  1. Epidemic spreading by objective traveling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming; Liu, Zonghua; Li, Baowen

    2009-07-01

    A fundamental feature of agent traveling in social networks is that traveling is usually not a random walk but with a specific destination and goes through the shortest path from starting to destination. A serious consequence of the objective traveling is that it may result in a fast epidemic spreading, such as SARS etc. In this letter we present a reaction-traveling model to study how the objective traveling influences the epidemic spreading. We consider a random scale-free meta-population network with sub-population at each node. Through a SIS model we theoretically prove that near the threshold of epidemic outbreak, the objective traveling can significantly enhance the final infected population and the infected fraction at a node is proportional to its betweenness for the traveling agents and approximately proportional to its degree for the non-traveling agents. Numerical simulations have confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  2. Equatorial Spread F Fossil Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Satyanarayana , P., and Ossakow, S. L.: The morphology of a multi-bubble system in the ionosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 88, 5528–5536, 1983. de La Beaujardiere...Haerendel, G.: Theory of equatorial spread F , preprint, Max Planck Inst. Extraterr. Phys., Munich, Germany, 1974. Haerendel, G., Eccles, J. V ., and...weather issues, J. Atmos. Terr. Phys., 58, 1527–1574, 1996. Sekar, R., Chakrabarty, D., Sarkhel, S., Patra, A. K., Devasia, C. V ., and Kelley, M. C

  3. Technique of green mulch spreading

    OpenAIRE

    Schäfer, Winfried; Väisänen, Jaana; Pihala, Marjo

    2001-01-01

    Finland’s policy of subsidising the conversion to organic production precipitated the rapid growth of organic farming in the 1990’s. As a consequence, many stockless farms encountered the problems of nitrogen deficit, poor grain quality, and weed control. Since the spreading of green mulch on cash crops is very common especially in tropical agriculture, organic fertilisers like green mulch may be an alternative that would compensate for the prohibition on the use of mineral N-fertilisers. How...

  4. Quality Improvement of Cheese Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-25

    Annatto (2% bixin) 3.5 mL Use as needed to conform color Vitamin A 0.14 0.003 Not less than 800 retinol units Added to comply with product...for samples with citrates (CIT) and altered levels of phosphates (LP) (Table 7). Although the citrates and phosphates have similar ionic components...Effect of vitamins The guidelines for cheese spread fortification include the addition of retinol (vitamin A), thiamine (vitamin B1), pyridoxine

  5. Physically Protected Spread Spectrum Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    for the FH system in those days was because of implementation issues, such as a frequency -ringing problem , which occurred whenever a frequency was...PS-TR-2016-0046 HAS BEEN REVIEWED AND IS APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASSIGNED DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. KHANH PHAM PAUL D. LEVAN...keying (MPSK) and M-ary quadrature amplitude-shift keying (MQAM) for a slow frequency hopping (FH) spread spectrum (SS) system because, recently

  6. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  7. Epidemic Spread in Human Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sahneh, Faryad Darabi

    2011-01-01

    One of the popular dynamics on complex networks is the epidemic spreading. An epidemic model describes how infections spread throughout a network. Among the compartmental models used to describe epidemics, the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) model has been widely used. In the SIS model, each node can be susceptible, become infected with a given infection rate, and become again susceptible with a given curing rate. In this paper, we add a new compartment to the classic SIS model to account for human response to epidemic spread. Each individual can be infected, susceptible, or alert. Susceptible individuals can become alert with an alerting rate if infected individuals exist in their neighborhood. An individual in the alert state is less probable to become infected than an individual in the susceptible state; due to a newly adopted cautious behavior. The problem is formulated as a continuous-time Markov process on a general static graph and then modeled into a set of ordinary differential equations using...

  8. Spread of entanglement and causality

    CERN Document Server

    Casini, Horacio; Mezei, Márk

    2015-01-01

    We investigate causality constraints on the time evolution of entanglement entropy after a global quench in relativistic theories. We first provide a general proof that the so-called tsunami velocity is bounded by the speed of light. We then generalize the free particle streaming model of arXiv:cond-mat/0503393 to general dimensions and to an arbitrary entanglement pattern of the initial state. In more than two spacetime dimensions the spread of entanglement in these models is highly sensitive to the initial entanglement pattern, but we are able to prove an upper bound on the normalized rate of growth of entanglement entropy, and hence the tsunami velocity. The bound is smaller than what one gets for quenches in holographic theories, which highlights the importance of interactions in the spread of entanglement in many-body systems. We propose an interacting model which we believe provides an upper bound on the spread of entanglement for interacting relativistic theories. In two spacetime dimensions with multi...

  9. Spread of entanglement and causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Horacio; Liu, Hong; Mezei, Márk

    2016-07-01

    We investigate causality constraints on the time evolution of entanglement entropy after a global quench in relativistic theories. We first provide a general proof that the so-called tsunami velocity is bounded by the speed of light. We then generalize the free particle streaming model of [1] to general dimensions and to an arbitrary entanglement pattern of the initial state. In more than two spacetime dimensions the spread of entanglement in these models is highly sensitive to the initial entanglement pattern, but we are able to prove an upper bound on the normalized rate of growth of entanglement entropy, and hence the tsunami velocity. The bound is smaller than what one gets for quenches in holographic theories, which highlights the importance of interactions in the spread of entanglement in many-body systems. We propose an interacting model which we believe provides an upper bound on the spread of entanglement for interacting relativistic theories. In two spacetime dimensions with multiple intervals, this model and its variations are able to reproduce intricate results exhibited by holographic theories for a significant part of the parameter space. For higher dimensions, the model bounds the tsunami velocity at the speed of light. Finally, we construct a geometric model for entanglement propagation based on a tensor network construction for global quenches.

  10. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  11. Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bite of an infected mosquito. Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) is a rare illness in humans, and only ... EEEV have no apparent illness. Severe cases of EEE (involving encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain) begin ...

  12. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  13. Liquid Spreading under Nanoscale Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checco, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy in the noncontact regime is used to study the morphology of a nonvolatile liquid (squalane) as it spreads along wettable nanostripes embedded in a nonwettable surface. Results show that the liquid profile depends on the amount of lateral confinement imposed by the nanostripes, and it is truncated at the microscopic contact line in good qualitative agreement with classical mesoscale hydrodynamics. However, the width of the contact line is found to be significantly larger than expected theoretically. This behavior may originate from small chemical inhomogeneity of the patterned stripes as well as from thermal fluctuations of the contact line.

  14. Spreading widths of doorway states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pace, A., E-mail: depace@to.infn.i [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Molinari, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica dell' Universita di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Weidenmueller, H.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-01-01

    As a function of energy E, the average doorway strength function S(E)-bar of a doorway state is commonly assumed to be Lorentzian in shape and characterized by two parameters, the peak energy E{sub 0} and the spreading width {Gamma}{sup {down_arrow}}. The simple picture is modified when the density of background states that couple to the doorway state changes significantly in an energy interval of size {Gamma}{sup {down_arrow}}. For that case we derive an approximate analytical expression for S(E)-bar. We test our result successfully against numerical simulations. Our result may have important implications for shell-model calculations.

  15. Migration Helps Spread Bird Flu Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161473.html Migration Helps Spread Bird Flu Worldwide Scientists recommend keeping ... birds can spread bird flu worldwide and monitoring migration routes could provide early warning of outbreaks, researchers ...

  16. Lexical Ambiguity: Making a Case against Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Jennifer J.; Rogness, Neal T.; Fisher, Diane G.

    2012-01-01

    We argue for decreasing the use of the word "spread" when describing the statistical idea of dispersion or variability in introductory statistics courses. In addition, we argue for increasing the use of the word "variability" as a replacement for "spread."

  17. Eastern Europe and Community of Independent States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmann, A

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on migration, HIV/AIDS, and sexually transmitted diseases in Eastern Europe and the Community of Independent States (CIS): Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and the former Yugoslavian countries; and Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. There is little in-depth research on the prevalence of HIV/AIDS. After the collapse of the USSR, the opening up of borders presented greater options for the spread of HIV. During 1991-1996, HIV-infected persons increased from 0.3/100,000 to 7.8/100,000. Syphilis and gonorrhea also spread in the 1990s. The increased prevalence is attributed to changes in sexual behavior due to increased travel and migration, disruption among families, and changes in sexual mores; and changes in the structure, availability, and effectiveness of health services. Many migrants in the CIS are young people. Mobile populations in the CIS include labor migrants, refugees, persons displaced by armed conflicts, repatriates, forced migrants, resettlement of formerly deported persons, and ecological migrants. It is general knowledge that migrants are poorly informed about HIV/AIDS. Condoms are not readily available in the CIS. Eastern Europe has high rates of HIV among migrant sex workers.

  18. The spreading of misinformation online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vicario, Michela; Bessi, Alessandro; Zollo, Fabiana; Petroni, Fabio; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-19

    The wide availability of user-provided content in online social media facilitates the aggregation of people around common interests, worldviews, and narratives. However, the World Wide Web (WWW) also allows for the rapid dissemination of unsubstantiated rumors and conspiracy theories that often elicit rapid, large, but naive social responses such as the recent case of Jade Helm 15--where a simple military exercise turned out to be perceived as the beginning of a new civil war in the United States. In this work, we address the determinants governing misinformation spreading through a thorough quantitative analysis. In particular, we focus on how Facebook users consume information related to two distinct narratives: scientific and conspiracy news. We find that, although consumers of scientific and conspiracy stories present similar consumption patterns with respect to content, cascade dynamics differ. Selective exposure to content is the primary driver of content diffusion and generates the formation of homogeneous clusters, i.e., "echo chambers." Indeed, homogeneity appears to be the primary driver for the diffusion of contents and each echo chamber has its own cascade dynamics. Finally, we introduce a data-driven percolation model mimicking rumor spreading and we show that homogeneity and polarization are the main determinants for predicting cascades' size.

  19. On the Safeguarding of Dong Ka Lau from the Love Song in Northern Dong Language%从侗族北部方言区玩山歌看侗族大歌的保护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨先明

    2012-01-01

    The real crisis of Dong Ka Lau is the impact of modern civilization which led to the loss of its living soil,confused various safeguarding measures do not solve the safeguarding problems.The traditional love song in Northern Dong Language create new form one by melted and absorbed Han cultural elements,and that shows us the new ideas to safeguard Dong Ka Lau.%侗族大歌面临的真正危机,是现代文明的冲击致使其失去了生存的土壤;多声部纷杂的保护措施,并没有解决侗族大歌的保护问题;侗族北部方言区传统情歌以我为主融摄汉文化元素而创造的玩山歌,向我们显示了侗族大歌保护的新思路。

  20. Rumor spreading in gaming social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yichao; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2011-01-01

    So far, the focus on rumor spreading are mainly on some simple backgrounds, in other words, only taking consideration of the overall topological influences on its dynamical behavior. However, in the prospect of the individuality, personal strategies in the social networks play a more non-trivial role in the real social networks. To fill this gap, we will investigate the rumor spreading in gaming social networks. Our analysis is supported by the results of numerical simulations. We observe that the original rumor is still the most well known edition in case that the content is modified by the defectors. However, the portion decays with the stimulus generally. For the case that defectors keep silence in the spreading process, the scale of spreading decays with stimulus generally, suggesting the rumor can hardly spread in a community of defectors. This highlights the key role that stimulus plays in rumor spreading and the necessity to study information spreading in competitive circumstances.

  1. Random Information Spread in Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lapus, Raymond; Tittmann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Let G=(V,E) be an undirected loopless graph with possible parallel edges and s and t be two vertices of G. Assume that vertex s is labelled at the initial time step and that every labelled vertex copies its labelling to neighbouring vertices along edges with one labelled endpoint independently with probability p in one time step. In this paper, we establish the equivalence between the expected s-t first arrival time of the above spread process and the notion of the stochastic shortest s-t path. Moreover, we give a short discussion of analytical results on special graphs including the complete graph and s-t series-parallel graphs. Finally, we propose some lower bounds for the expected s-t first arrival time.

  2. Bank Lending, Housing and Spreads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslam, Aqib; Santoro, Emiliano

    The framework presented in this paper takes its cue from recent financial events and attempts to develop a tractable framework for policy analysis of macro-linkages, in particular a first attempt at the integration of an independent profit-maximising banking sector that lends to and borrows from...... agents in the economy, and through which changes in the monetary policy rate by the central bank are transmitted. The inter-linkages between housing and the role of the banking sector in the transmission of monetary policy is emphasized. Two competing effects are highlighted: (i) a financial accelerator...... channel, due to the presence of collateralized borrowers, and (ii) a banking attenuator effect, which crucially arises from the spread in interest rates caused by the introduction of monopolistically competitive financial intermediaries. We show how the classical amplification mechanism explored in models...

  3. Interpolating point spread function anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Gentile, M; Meylan, G

    2012-01-01

    Planned wide-field weak lensing surveys are expected to reduce the statistical errors on the shear field to unprecedented levels. In contrast, systematic errors like those induced by the convolution with the point spread function (PSF) will not benefit from that scaling effect and will require very accurate modeling and correction. While numerous methods have been devised to carry out the PSF correction itself, modeling of the PSF shape and its spatial variations across the instrument field of view has, so far, attracted much less attention. This step is nevertheless crucial because the PSF is only known at star positions while the correction has to be performed at any position on the sky. A reliable interpolation scheme is therefore mandatory and a popular approach has been to use low-order bivariate polynomials. In the present paper, we evaluate four other classical spatial interpolation methods based on splines (B-splines), inverse distance weighting (IDW), radial basis functions (RBF) and ordinary Kriging...

  4. Bank Lending, Housing and Spreads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslam, Aqib; Santoro, Emiliano

    of private borrowing between collaterally-constrained 'impatient' households and unconstrained 'patient' households, such as those put forward by Kiyotaki and Moore (1997) and Iacoviello (2005), is counteracted by the banking attenuator effect, given an endogenous steady state spread between loan and savings......The framework presented in this paper takes its cue from recent financial events and attempts to develop a tractable framework for policy analysis of macro-linkages, in particular a first attempt at the integration of an independent profit-maximising banking sector that lends to and borrows from...... agents in the economy, and through which changes in the monetary policy rate by the central bank are transmitted. The inter-linkages between housing and the role of the banking sector in the transmission of monetary policy is emphasized. Two competing effects are highlighted: (i) a financial accelerator...

  5. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The promotion of interaction among investigators of all oceanographic disciplines studying the eastern Pacific Ocean was the goal of the 1990 Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference (EPOC), held October 17-19 on the snow-covered slopes of Mt. Hood, Oreg. Thirty oceanographers representing all disciplines attended.Dick Barber, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, N.C., chaired a session on the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, emphasizing issues related to biological activity. Steve Ramp of the Naval Postgraduate School in Montery, Calif., chaired a session on recent results from northern and central California experiments. On October 19, following an early morning earthquake, a business meeting and discussions regarding a collaboration in future experiments were held.

  6. Decadal variability in the Eastern North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köllner, Manuela; Klein, Birgit; Kieke, Dagmar; Klein, Holger; Rhein, Monika; Roessler, Achim; Denker, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    then, although with different timing and strength. The time series at the MAR demonstrate the advectice spreading of LSW anomalies from its source region in the Labrador Sea but along the eastern margin the time series of uLSW and dLSW show different opposing trends and influences of changing properties in the subtropical waters as well as changes in its relative contribution to the ambient waters. During the second phase of RACE (2016-2018) it is planned to deploy a mooring array across the eastern shelf break at Goban Spur to monitor the poleward eastern boundary current transport and variability in the water mass properties.

  7. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul Samuel

    For many years, wiring has been treated as a system that could be installed and expected to work for the life of the aircraft. As aircraft age far beyond their original expected life span, this attitude is rapidly changing. Wiring problems have recently been identified as the cause of several tragic mishaps and hundreds of thousands of lost mission hours. Intermittent wiring faults have been and continue to be difficult to resolve. Test methods that pinpoint faults on the ground can miss intermittent failures. New test methods involving spread spectrum signals are investigated that could be used in flight to locate intermittent failures, including open circuits, short circuits, and arcs. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry (SSTDR) and sequence time domain reflectometry (STDR) are analyzed in light of the signals commonly present on aircraft wiring. Pseudo noise codes used for the generation of STDR and SSTDR signals are analyzed for application in a STDR/SSTDR test system in the presence of noise. The effects of Mil-Std 1553 and white noise on the STDR and SSTDR signals are discussed analytically, through simulations, and with the use of test hardware. A test system using STDR and SSTDR is designed, built, and used to collect STDR and SSTDR test data. The data collected with the STDR/SSTDR test hardware is analyzed and compared to the theoretical results. Experimental data for open and short circuits collected using SSTDR and a curve fitting algorithm shows a maximum range estimation error of +/-0.2 ft for 75O coaxial cable up to 100ft, and +/-0.6ft for a sample 32.5ft non-controlled impedance aircraft cable. Mil-Std 1553 is specified to operate reliably with a signal-to-noise ratio of 17.5dB, and the SSTDR test system was able to locate an open circuit on a cable also carrying simulated Mil-Std 1553 data where the SSTDR signal was 50dB below the Mil-Std 1553 signal. STDR and SSTDR are shown to be effective in detecting and locating dry and wet arcs on wires.

  8. DISCOVERING BEIJING Eastern Promise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Dongcheng District, literally meaning eastern city, covers Beijing’s downtown area to the northeast of the central axis of old Beijing. The district has a total area of 25 square km and a population of 600,000. With a large number of cultural and historical sites and tourist attractions,

  9. Eastern Spruce Dwarf Mistletoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Baker; Joseph O' Brien; R. Mathiasen; Mike Ostry

    2006-01-01

    Eastern spruce dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum) is a parasitic flowering plant that causes the most serious disease of black spruce (Picea mariana) throughout its range. The parasite occurs in the Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland; in the Lake States of Minnesota,...

  10. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D' Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  11. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jinghong; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  12. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  13. A general method for identifying node spreading influence via the adjacent matrix and spreading rate

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    With great theoretical and practical significance, identifying the node spreading influence of complex network is one of the most promising domains. So far, various topology-based centrality measures have been proposed to identify the node spreading influence in a network. However, the node spreading influence is a result of the interplay between the network topology structure and spreading dynamics. In this paper, we build up the systematic method by combining the network structure and spreading dynamics to identify the node spreading influence. By combining the adjacent matrix $A$ and spreading parameter $\\beta$, we theoretical give the node spreading influence with the eigenvector of the largest eigenvalue. Comparing with the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model epidemic results for four real networks, our method could identify the node spreading influence more accurately than the ones generated by the degree, K-shell and eigenvector centrality. This work may provide a systematic method for identifyi...

  14. Equatorial spread F fossil plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Ossakow

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Behaviour of equatorial spread F (ESF fossil plumes, i.e., ESF plumes that have stopped rising, is examined using the NRL SAMI3/ESF three-dimensional simulation code. We find that fossil bubbles, plasma density depletions associated with fossil plumes, can persist as high-altitude equatorial depletions even while being "blown" by zonal winds. Corresponding airglow-proxy images of fossil plumes, plots of electron density versus longitude and latitude at a constant altitude of 288 km, are shown to partially "fill in" in most cases, beginning with the highest altitude field lines within the plume. Specifically, field lines upon which the E field has fallen entirely to zero are affected and only the low altitude (≤600 km portion if each field line fills in. This suggests that it should be possible to observe a bubble at high altitude on a field line for which the corresponding airglow image no longer shows a depletion. In all cases ESF plumes stop rising when the flux-tube-integrated ion mass density inside the upper edge of the bubble is equal to that of the nearby background, further supporting the result of Krall et al. (2010b.

  15. Drops spreading on flexible fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somszor, Katarzyna; Boulogne, François; Sauret, Alban; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Fibrous media are encountered in many engineered systems such as textile, paper and insulating materials. In most of these materials, fibers are randomly oriented and form a complex network in which drops of wetting liquid tend to accumulate at the nodes of the network. Here we investigate the role of the fiber flexibility on the spreading of a small volume of liquid on a pair of crossed flexible fibers. A drop of silicone oil is dispensed at the point of contact of the fibers and we characterize the liquid morphologies as we vary the volume of liquid, the angle between the fibers, and the length and bending modulus of the fibers. Drop morphologies previously reported for rigid fibers, i.e. a drop, a column and a mixed morphology, are also observed on flexible fibers with modified domains of existence. Moreover, at small inclination angles of the fibers, a new behavior is observed: the fibers bend and collapse. Depending on the volume, the liquid can adopt a column or a mixed morphology on the collapsed fibers. We rationalize our observations with a model based on energetic considerations. Our study suggests that the fiber flexibility adds a rich variety of behaviors that can be crucial for industrial applications.

  16. Information Spreading in Dynamic Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Clementi, Andrea; Trevisan, Luca

    2011-01-01

    We present a general approach to study the flooding time (a measure of how fast information spreads) in dynamic graphs (graphs whose topology changes with time according to a random process). We consider arbitrary converging Markovian dynamic graph process, that is, processes in which the topology of the graph at time $t$ depends only on its topology at time $t-1$ and which have a unique stationary distribution. The most well studied models of dynamic graphs are all Markovian and converging. Under general conditions, we bound the flooding time in terms of the mixing time of the dynamic graph process. We recover, as special cases of our result, bounds on the flooding time for the \\emph{random trip} model and the \\emph{random path} models; previous analysis techniques provided bounds only in restricted settings for such models. Our result also provides the first bound for the \\emph{random waypoint} model (which is tight for certain ranges of parameters) whose analysis had been an important open question.

  17. Dynamical model for virus spread

    CERN Document Server

    Camelo-Neto, G

    1995-01-01

    The steady state properties of the mean density population of infected cells in a viral spread is simulated by a general forest fire like cellular automaton model with two distinct populations of cells ( permissive and resistant ones) and studied in the framework of the mean field approximation. Stochastic dynamical ingredients are introduced in this model to mimic cells regeneration (with probability {\\it p}) and to consider infection processes by other means than contiguity (with probability {\\it f}). Simulations are carried on a L \\times L square lattice considering the eight first neighbors. The mean density population of infected cells (D_i) is measured as function of the regeneration probability {\\it p}, and analyzed for small values of the ratio {\\it f/p } and for distinct degrees of the cell resistance. The results obtained by a mean field like approach recovers the simulations results. The role of the resistant parameter R (R \\geq 2) on the steady state properties is investigated and discussed in com...

  18. What Drives the POLONIA Spread in Poland?

    OpenAIRE

    Yinqiu Lu

    2012-01-01

    Since the start of the 2008 - 09 financial crisis, the Polish Overnight Index Average (POLONIA) has persistently been below the policy rate, suggesting a limited influence of the NBP’s open market operations on the short-term interbank rate. In this regard, this paper analyzes the behavior of the POLONIA spread and explore several potential factors that could influence the spread. An empirical analysis confirms that the negative POLONIA spread is related to a few factors, which include the ...

  19. Information spreading and development of cultural centers

    CERN Document Server

    Dybiec, Bartlomiej; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    The historical interplay between societies are governed by many factors, including in particular spreading of languages, religion and other symbolic traits. Cultural development, in turn, is coupled to emergence and maintenance of information spreading. Strong centralized cultures exist thanks to attention from their members, which faithfulness in turn relies on supply of information. Here, we discuss a culture evolution model on a planar geometry that takes into account aspects of the feedback between information spreading and its maintenance. Features of model are highlighted by comparing it to cultural spreading in ancient and medieval Europe, where it in particular suggests that long lived centers should be located in geographically remote regions.

  20. Credit Spreads Across the Business Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Stenbo

    This paper studies how corporate bond spreads vary with the business cycle. I show that both level and slope of empirical credit spread curves are correlated with the state of the economy, and I link this to variation in idiosyncratic jump risk. I develop a structural credit risk model that accou......This paper studies how corporate bond spreads vary with the business cycle. I show that both level and slope of empirical credit spread curves are correlated with the state of the economy, and I link this to variation in idiosyncratic jump risk. I develop a structural credit risk model...... to firm fundamentals....

  1. Identifying main drivers and testing control strategies for CCHFV spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, T; Breton, E; Josse, M; Deniz, A; Guven, E; Vatansever, Z

    2016-03-01

    Crimean Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is an emerging zoonotic disease. The causative agent is a virus (CCHFV), mainly transmitted by ticks of the species Hyalomma marginatum in Eastern Europe and Turkey. In order to test potential scenarios for the control of pathogen spread, the basic reproduction number (R0) for CCHF was calculated. This calculation was based on a population dynamics model and parameter values from the literature for pathogen transmission. The tick population dynamics model takes into account the major processes involved and gives estimates for tick survival from one stage to the other and number of feeding ticks. It also considers the influence of abiotic (meteorological variables) and biotic factors (host densities) on model outputs, which were compared with data collected in Central Anatolia (Turkey). R0 computation was thereafter used to test control strategies and especially the effect of acaricide treatment. Simulation results indicate that such treatments could have valuable effects provided that the acaricide is applied regularly throughout the spring and summer, and over several years. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis to abiotic and biotic factors showed that, even though temperature has a strong impact on model outputs, host (mainly hare) densities also play a role. The kind of model we have developed provides insight into the ability of different strategies to prevent and control disease spread and has proved its relevance when associated with field trials.

  2. Olive oil in food spreads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids is a commonly applied reaction to food industries. The process may imply the movement of double bonds in their positions on the fatty acid carbon chain, producing positional and geometrical isomers ( trans fatty acids. Through hydrogenation, unsaturated oils are converted to margarines and vegetable shortenings. The presence of trans fatty acids in foods is undesirable, as trans fatty acids raise the plasma levels of total and low-density lipoproteins (LDL, while decrease the plasma level of high-density lipoproteins (HDL, among other effects. The use of olive oil to prepare fat spread opens new insights into the commercial development of healthy novel foods with a positive image in terms of consumer appeal.La hidrogenación química de los ácidos grasos insaturados es una reacción que se utiliza con frecuencia en la industria alimentaria. El proceso implica el movimiento de los dobles enlaces en la cadena hidrocarbonada de los ácidos grasos, y la aparición de isómeros posicionales y geométricos (ácidos grasos trans . La ingesta inadecuada de alimentos que pueden contener cantidades significativas de ácidos grasos trans se asocia con el aumento en sangre de colesterol total y LDL, y la disminución de HDL, entre otros efectos. Por lo tanto, el uso de aceite de oliva en la preparación de grasas para untar constituye un importante avance en el desarrollo comercial de nuevos alimentos saludables con una imagen positiva para el consumidor.

  3. Age, spreading rates, and spreading asymmetry of the world's ocean crust

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The authors present four companion digital models of the age, age uncertainty, spreading rates and spreading asymmetries of the world's ocean basins as geographic...

  4. Trends in Employee Ownership in Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Employee-owned companies are those where the broad group of employees owns the majority of shares. They have been widespread in the early transition process in Eastern Europe. This raises the question of why this type of ownership was so frequently used in some of the countries involved, and why...... there was a subsequent rapid transfer to manager ownership or outside ownership. This article gives a theoretical overview of the factors driving and hampering employee ownership, and develops hypotheses about how the transition process provided specific conditions for the development of these firms. The predictions...... employee ownership. The article concludes that privatization was the main determinant for the initial spread of employee ownership. However, other factors undermined the sustainability of employee-owned firms. No institutions created a framework for employee ownership. The long and deep production crisis...

  5. Modelling unidirectional liquid spreading on slanted microposts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, Andrea; Blow, Matthew L.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2013-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann algorithm is used to simulate the slow spreading of drops on a surface patterned with slanted micro-posts. Gibb's pinning of the interface on the sides or top of the posts leads to unidirectional spreading over a wide range of contact angles and inclination angles of the posts...

  6. Spreading to localized targets in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Ma, Long; Zeng, An; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-12-01

    As an important type of dynamics on complex networks, spreading is widely used to model many real processes such as the epidemic contagion and information propagation. One of the most significant research questions in spreading is to rank the spreading ability of nodes in the network. To this end, substantial effort has been made and a variety of effective methods have been proposed. These methods usually define the spreading ability of a node as the number of finally infected nodes given that the spreading is initialized from the node. However, in many real cases such as advertising and news propagation, the spreading only aims to cover a specific group of nodes. Therefore, it is necessary to study the spreading ability of nodes towards localized targets in complex networks. In this paper, we propose a reversed local path algorithm for this problem. Simulation results show that our method outperforms the existing methods in identifying the influential nodes with respect to these localized targets. Moreover, the influential spreaders identified by our method can effectively avoid infecting the non-target nodes in the spreading process.

  7. The Imaging of Large Nerve Perineural Spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Mitesh; Sommerville, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    We present a review of the imaging findings of large nerve perineural spread within the skull base. The MRI techniques and reasons for performing different sequences are discussed. A series of imaging examples illustrates the appearance of perineural tumor spread with an emphasis on the zonal staging system.

  8. Fire spread characteristics determined in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard C. Rothermel; Hal E. Anderson

    1966-01-01

    Fuel beds of ponderosa pine needles and white pine needles were burned under controlled environmental conditions to determine the effects of fuel moisture and windspeed upon the rate of fire spread. Empirical formulas are presented to show the effect of these parameters. A discussion of rate of spread and some simple experiments show how fuel may be preheated before...

  9. Spreading Modes on Copper and Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feoktistov Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and liquid flow rate on the dynamic contact angle during spreading of distilled nondeaerated water drop on a solid horizontal substrate. Copper and steel substrates with different roughness have been investigated. Three spreading modes were conventionally indicated. It was found that the spreading of drops on substrates made of different materials occurs in similar modes. However, the duration of each mode for substrates made of copper and steel are different. Spreading of a liquid above the asperities of a surface micro relief was observed to be dominant for large volumetric flow rates of drops (0.01 ml/s. Liquid was spreading inside the grooves of a rough substrate at low rates (0.005 ml/s.

  10. Information spreading on dynamic social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chuang

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, information spreading on social networks has triggered an explosive attention in various disciplines. Most of previous related works in this area mainly focus on discussing the effects of spreading probability or immunization strategy on static networks. However, in real systems, the peer-to-peer network structure changes constantly according to frequently social activities of users. In order to capture this dynamical property and study its impact on information spreading, in this Letter, a link rewiring strategy based on the Fermi function is introduced. In the present model, the informed individuals tend to break old links and reconnect to ones with more uninformed neighbors. Simulation results on the susceptible-infected (\\textit{SI}) model with non-redundancy contacts indicate that the information spread more faster and broader with the rewiring strategy. Extensive analyses of the information cascading show that the spreading process of the initial steps plays a very important role, that is to s...

  11. Enhanced droplet spreading due to thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, A M; Freund, J B, E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.ed [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    The lubrication equation that governs the dynamics of thin liquid films can be augmented to account for stochastic stresses associated with the thermal fluctuations of the fluid. It has been suggested that under certain conditions the spreading rate of a liquid drop on a surface will be increased by these stochastic stresses. Here, an atomistic simulation of a spreading drop is designed to examine such a regime and provide a quantitative assessment of the stochastic lubrication equation for spreading. It is found that the atomistic drop does indeed spread faster than the standard lubrication equations would suggest and that the stochastic lubrication equation of Gruen et al (2006 J. Stat. Phys. 122 1261-91) predicts the spread rate.

  12. Interpolating point spread function anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, M.; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.

    2013-01-01

    Planned wide-field weak lensing surveys are expected to reduce the statistical errors on the shear field to unprecedented levels. In contrast, systematic errors like those induced by the convolution with the point spread function (PSF) will not benefit from that scaling effect and will require very accurate modeling and correction. While numerous methods have been devised to carry out the PSF correction itself, modeling of the PSF shape and its spatial variations across the instrument field of view has, so far, attracted much less attention. This step is nevertheless crucial because the PSF is only known at star positions while the correction has to be performed at any position on the sky. A reliable interpolation scheme is therefore mandatory and a popular approach has been to use low-order bivariate polynomials. In the present paper, we evaluate four other classical spatial interpolation methods based on splines (B-splines), inverse distance weighting (IDW), radial basis functions (RBF) and ordinary Kriging (OK). These methods are tested on the Star-challenge part of the GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2010 (GREAT10) simulated data and are compared with the classical polynomial fitting (Polyfit). In all our methods we model the PSF using a single Moffat profile and we interpolate the fitted parameters at a set of required positions. This allowed us to win the Star-challenge of GREAT10, with the B-splines method. However, we also test all our interpolation methods independently of the way the PSF is modeled, by interpolating the GREAT10 star fields themselves (i.e., the PSF parameters are known exactly at star positions). We find in that case RBF to be the clear winner, closely followed by the other local methods, IDW and OK. The global methods, Polyfit and B-splines, are largely behind, especially in fields with (ground-based) turbulent PSFs. In fields with non-turbulent PSFs, all interpolators reach a variance on PSF systematics σ2sys better than the 1

  13. Genetic variation among African swine fever genotype II viruses, eastern and central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Carmina; Fernández-Pinero, Jovita; Pelayo, Virginia; Gazaev, Ismail; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pridotkas, Gediminas; Nieto, Raquel; Fernández-Pacheco, Paloma; Bokhan, Svetlana; Nevolko, Oleg; Drozhzhe, Zhanna; Pérez, Covadonga; Soler, Alejandro; Kolvasov, Denis; Arias, Marisa

    2014-09-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) was first reported in eastern Europe/Eurasia in 2007. Continued spread of ASFV has placed central European countries at risk, and in 2014, ASFV was detected in Lithuania and Poland. Sequencing showed the isolates are identical to a 2013 ASFV from Belarus but differ from ASFV isolated in Georgia in 2007.

  14. Development of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerardekani, Ahmad; Karim, Roselina; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Chin, Nyuk Ling

    2013-03-01

    Pistachio nut (Pistacia vera L.) is one of the most delicious and nutritious nuts in the world. Pistachio spreads were developed using pistachio paste as the main component, icing sugar, soy protein isolate (SPI), and red palm oil (RPO), at different ratios. The highest mean scores of all the sensory attributes were depicted by spreads that were made without addition of SPI. It was found that the work of shear was 0 to 11.0 kg s for an acceptable spread. Sensory spreadability, overall texture, spreadability, and overall acceptability were negatively correlated (R > 0.83) with the work of shear of spreads. The findings indicated that the presence of RPO had a direct effect on the viscoelastic behavior of the pistachio spreads. The a values, which are related to the green color of the pistachio product ranged from 1.7 to 3.9 for spread without addition of RPO, and 4.0 to 5.3 in the presence of RPO. The development of pistachio spread would potentially increase the food uses of pistachio and introduce consumers with a healthier snack food. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  16. Spread polynomials, rotations and the butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Goh, Shuxiang

    2009-01-01

    The spread between two lines in rational trigonometry replaces the concept of angle, allowing the complete specification of many geometrical and dynamical situations which have traditionally been viewed approximately. This paper investigates the case of powers of a rational spread rotation, and in particular, a curious periodicity in the prime power decomposition of the associated values of the spread polynomials, which are the analogs in rational trigonometry of the Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind. Rational trigonometry over finite fields plays a role, together with non-Euclidean geometries.

  17. Pulsations, interpulsations, and sea-floor spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessagno, E. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    It is postulated that worldwide transgressions (pulsations) and regressions (interpulsations) through the course of geologic time are related to the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems and to sea-floor spreading. Two multiple working hypotheses are advanced to explain major transgressions and regressions and the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems. One hypothesis interrelates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to the hypothesis of sub-Mohorovicic serpentinization. The second hypothesis relates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to a hypothesis involving thermal expansion and contraction.

  18. Stochastic dynamic model of SARS spreading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yaolin

    2003-01-01

    Based upon the simulation of the stochastic process of infection, onset and spreading of each SARS patient, a system dynamic model of SRAS spreading is constructed. Data from Vietnam is taken as an example for Monte Carlo test. The preliminary results indicate that the time-dependent infection rate is the most important control factor for SARS spreading. The model can be applied to prediction of the course with fluctuations of the epidemics, if the previous history of the epidemics and the future infection rate under control measures are known.

  19. Paleotsunamis in Eastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Jiun-Yee; Yu, Neng-Ti; Hirakawa, Kazuomi; Chyi, Shyh-Jeng; Huang, Shao-Yi

    2017-04-01

    Although Taiwan is located in the active collision zone between Eurasian and the Philippine Sea plate with very high seismicity in and surrounding the island, and supposedly highly susceptible to tsunami hazard. However, there is no record of tsunami hazard in the past one hundred years, and only very few historical records show some possible extreme event occurred. Therefore study of tsunami was scarce in Taiwan. Although historical records do show possible tsunami events, the records were too sparse and incomplete to confidently reconstruct the paleotsunami events. In the past few years, numerical simulations based on possible tsunami-genic zones near Taiwan show that the island could be affected by the correctly directed tsunami. Nevertheless, there is no detail, scientific research of paleotsunami records yet in Taiwan. Our field survey in eastern Taiwan (facing the western Pacific Ocean) along the coast uncovered several outcrops contain gravels embedded in well-developed soil layers. The rounded meta-sandstone gravels are clearly beach-origin and were brought to their current location upon extreme wave events, which is composed of either volcanic-clastic deposits from nearby hills or organic soil layers formed locally. Our investigation indicates that there are at least 3 events in the northern half of eastern Taiwan and at least 2 events in southern part of eastern Taiwan. Although these outcrops are next to the shoreline and Taiwan is susceptible from typhoons, these gravels could be farther away from the beach at the time of their deposition due to current high retreat rate of the sea cliff. Further investigations are needed to delineate possible sources of tsunamis that caused the deposits.

  20. Zika Probably Not Spread Through Saliva: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167531.html Zika Probably Not Spread Through Saliva: Study Research with ... HealthDay News) -- Scientists have some interesting news about Zika: You're unlikely to get the virus from ...

  1. Spreading paths in partially observed social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how far information, behaviors, or pathogens spread in social networks is an important problem, having implications for both predicting the size of epidemics, as well as for planning effective interventions. There are, however, two main challenges for inferring spreading path lengths in real-world networks. One is the practical difficulty of observing a dynamic process on a network, and the other is the typical constraint of only partially observing a network. Using a static, structurally realistic social network as a platform for simulations, we juxtapose three distinct paths: (1) the stochastic path taken by a simulated spreading process from source to target; (2) the topologically shortest path in the fully observed network, and hence the single most likely stochastic path, between the two nodes; and (3) the topologically shortest path in a partially observed network. In a sampled network, how closely does the partially observed shortest path (3) emulate the unobserved spreading path (1)? Alt...

  2. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  3. Emergence of Blind Areas in Information Spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zi-Ke; Han, Xiao-Pu; Liu, Chuang

    2013-01-01

    Recently, contagion-based (disease, information, etc.) spreading on social networks has been extensively studied. In this paper, other than traditional full interaction, we propose a partial interaction based spreading model, considering that the informed individuals would transmit information to only a certain fraction of their neighbors due to the transmission ability in real-world social networks. Simulation results on three representative networks (BA, ER, WS) indicate that the spreading efficiency is highly correlated with the network heterogeneity. In addition, a special phenomenon, namely \\emph{Information Blind Areas} where the network is separated by several information-unreachable clusters, will emerge from the spreading process. Furthermore, we also find that the size distribution of such information blind areas obeys power-law-like distribution, which has very similar exponent with that of site percolation. Detailed analyses show that the critical value is decreasing along with the network heterog...

  4. Spreading of charged micro-droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Iaia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the spreading of a charged microdroplet on a flat dielectric surface whose spreading is driven by surface tension and electrostatic repulsion. This leads to a third order nonlinear partial differential equation that gives the evolution of the height profile. Assuming the droplets are circular we are able to prove existence of solutions with infinite contact angle and in many cases we are able to prove nonexistence of solutions with finite contact angle.

  5. Mapping the Spread of Mounted Warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Turchin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Military technology is one of the most important factors affecting the evolution of complex societies. In particular, mounted warfare, the use of horse-riders in military operations, revolutionized war as it spread to different parts of Eurasia and Africa during the Ancient and Medieval eras, and to the Americas during the Early Modern period. Here we use a variety of sources to map this spread.

  6. Gossip spread in social network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Gossip almost inevitably arises in real social networks. In this article we investigate the relationship between the number of friends of a person and limits on how far gossip about that person can spread in the network. How far gossip travels in a network depends on two sets of factors: (a) factors determining gossip transmission from one person to the next and (b) factors determining network topology. For a simple model where gossip is spread among people who know the victim it is known that a standard scale-free network model produces a non-monotonic relationship between number of friends and expected relative spread of gossip, a pattern that is also observed in real networks (Lind et al., 2007). Here, we study gossip spread in two social network models (Toivonen et al., 2006; Vázquez, 2003) by exploring the parameter space of both models and fitting them to a real Facebook data set. Both models can produce the non-monotonic relationship of real networks more accurately than a standard scale-free model while also exhibiting more realistic variability in gossip spread. Of the two models, the one given in Vázquez (2003) best captures both the expected values and variability of gossip spread.

  7. Wave directional spreading from point field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, M. L.; Venugopal, V.; Borthwick, A. G. L.

    2017-04-01

    Ocean waves have multidirectional components. Most wave measurements are taken at a single point, and so fail to capture information about the relative directions of the wave components directly. Conventional means of directional estimation require a minimum of three concurrent time series of measurements at different spatial locations in order to derive information on local directional wave spreading. Here, the relationship between wave nonlinearity and directionality is utilized to estimate local spreading without the need for multiple concurrent measurements, following Adcock & Taylor (Adcock & Taylor 2009 Proc. R. Soc. A 465, 3361-3381. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2009.0031)), with the assumption that directional spreading is frequency independent. The method is applied to measurements recorded at the North Alwyn platform in the northern North Sea, and the results compared against estimates of wave spreading by conventional measurement methods and hindcast data. Records containing freak waves were excluded. It is found that the method provides accurate estimates of wave spreading over a range of conditions experienced at North Alwyn, despite the noisy chaotic signals that characterize such ocean wave data. The results provide further confirmation that Adcock and Taylor's method is applicable to metocean data and has considerable future promise as a technique to recover estimates of wave spreading from single point wave measurement devices.

  8. Spreading of liquid drops over porous substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starov, V M; Zhdanov, S A; Kosvintsev, S R; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G

    2003-07-01

    The spreading of small liquid drops over thin and thick porous layers (dry or saturated with the same liquid) has been investigated in the case of both complete wetting (silicone oils of different viscosities) and partial wetting (aqueous SDS solutions of different concentrations). Nitrocellulose membranes of different porosity and different average pore size have been used as a model of thin porous layers, glass and metal filters have been used as a model of thick porous substrates. The first problem under investigation has been the spreading of small liquid drops over thin porous layers saturated with the same liquid. An evolution equation describing the drop spreading has been deduced, which showed that both an effective lubrication and the liquid exchange between the drop and the porous substrates are equally important. Spreading of silicone oils over different nitrocellulose microfiltration membranes was carried out. The experimental laws of the radius of spreading on time confirmed the theory predictions. The spreading of small liquid drops over thin dry porous layers has also been investigated from both theoretical and experimental points of view. The drop motion over a dry porous layer appears caused by the interplay of two processes: (a). the spreading of the drop over already saturated parts of the porous layer, which results in a growth of the drop base, and (b). the imbibition of the liquid from the drop into the porous substrate, which results in a shrinkage of the drop base and a growth of the wetted region inside the porous layer. As a result of these two competing processes the radius of the drop base goes through a maximum as time proceeds. A system of two differential equations has been derived to describe the time evolution of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted region inside the porous layer. This system includes two parameters, one accounts for the effective lubrication coefficient of the liquid over the wetted porous substrate, and

  9. Parallel Impurity Spreading During Massive Gas Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Extended-MHD simulations of disruption mitigation in DIII-D demonstrate that both pre-existing islands (locked-modes) and plasma rotation can significantly influence toroidal spreading of impurities following massive gas injection (MGI). Given the importance of successful disruption mitigation in ITER and the large disparity in device parameters, empirical demonstrations of disruption mitigation strategies in present tokamaks are insufficient to inspire unreserved confidence for ITER. Here, MHD simulations elucidate how impurities injected as a localized jet spread toroidally and poloidally. Simulations with large pre-existing islands at the q = 2 surface reveal that the magnetic topology strongly influences the rate of impurity spreading parallel to the field lines. Parallel spreading is largely driven by rapid parallel heat conduction, and is much faster at low order rational surfaces, where a short parallel connection length leads to faster thermal equilibration. Consequently, the presence of large islands, which alter the connection length, can slow impurity transport; but the simulations also show that the appearance of a 4/2 harmonic of the 2/1 mode, which breaks up the large islands, can increase the rate of spreading. This effect is seen both for simulations with spontaneously growing and directly imposed 4/2 modes. Given the prevalence of locked-modes as a cause of disruptions, understanding the effect of large islands is of particular importance. Simulations with and without islands also show that rotation can alter impurity spreading, even reversing the predominant direction of spreading, which is toward the high-field-side in the absence of rotation. Given expected differences in rotation for ITER vs. DIII-D, rotation effects are another important consideration when extrapolating experimental results. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  10. A network model for Ebola spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Pedalino, Biagio; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    The availability of accurate models for the spreading of infectious diseases has opened a new era in management and containment of epidemics. Models are extensively used to plan for and execute vaccination campaigns, to evaluate the risk of international spreadings and the feasibility of travel bans, and to inform prophylaxis campaigns. Even when no specific therapeutical protocol is available, as for the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), models of epidemic spreading can provide useful insight to steer interventions in the field and to forecast the trend of the epidemic. Here, we propose a novel mathematical model to describe EVD spreading based on activity driven networks (ADNs). Our approach overcomes the simplifying assumption of homogeneous mixing, which is central to most of the mathematically tractable models of EVD spreading. In our ADN-based model, each individual is not bound to contact every other, and its network of contacts varies in time as a function of an activity potential. Our model contemplates the possibility of non-ideal and time-varying intervention policies, which are critical to accurately describe EVD spreading in afflicted countries. The model is calibrated from field data of the 2014 April-to-December spreading in Liberia. We use the model as a predictive tool, to emulate the dynamics of EVD in Liberia and offer a one-year projection, until December 2015. Our predictions agree with the current vision expressed by professionals in the field, who consider EVD in Liberia at its final stage. The model is also used to perform a what-if analysis to assess the efficacy of timely intervention policies. In particular, we show that an earlier application of the same intervention policy would have greatly reduced the number of EVD cases, the duration of the outbreak, and the infrastructures needed for the implementation of the intervention.

  11. High-temperature spreading kinetics of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, N.

    2005-05-15

    In this PhD work a drop transfer setup combined with high speed photography has been used to analyze the spreading of Ag on polished polycrystalline Mo and single crystalline Mo (110) and (100) substrates. The objective of this work was to unveil the basic phenomena controlling spreading in metal-metal systems. The observed spreading kinetics were compared with current theories of low and high temperature spreading such as a molecular kinetic model and a fluid flow model. Analyses of the data reveal that the molecular model does describe the fastest velocity data well for all the investigated systems. Therefore, the energy which is dissipated during the spreading process is a dissipation at the triple line rather than dissipation due to the viscosity in the liquid. A comparison of the determined free activation energy for wetting of {delta}G95{approx}145kJ/mol with literature values allows the statement that the rate determining step seems to be a surface diffusion of the Ag atoms along the triple line. In order to investigate possible ridge formation, due to local atomic diffusion of atoms of the substrate at the triple during the spreading process, grooving experiments of the polycrystalline Mo were performed to calculate the surface diffusities that will control ridge evolution. The analyses of this work showed that a ridge formation at the fastest reported wetting velocities was not possible if there is no initial perturbation for a ridge. If there was an initial perturbation for a ridge the ridge had to be much smaller than 1 nm in order to be able to move with the liquid font. Therefore ridge formation does not influence the spreading kinetics for the studied system and the chosen conditions. SEM, AFM and TEM investigations of the triple line showed that ridge formation does also not occur at the end of the wetting experiment when the drop is close to equilibrium and the wetting velocity is slow. (orig.)

  12. Variation of wave directional spread parameters along the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.

    Directional spreading of wave energy is popularly modeled with the help of the Cosine Power model and it mainly depends on the spreading parameter. This paper describes the variation of the spreading parameter estimated based on the wave data...

  13. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i

  14. Free energy analysis of cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Eóin; Deshpande, Vikram S; McGarry, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    In this study we present a steady-state adaptation of the thermodynamically motivated stress fiber (SF) model of Vigliotti et al. (2015). We implement this steady-state formulation in a non-local finite element setting where we also consider global conservation of the total number of cytoskeletal proteins within the cell, global conservation of the number of binding integrins on the cell membrane, and adhesion limiting ligand density on the substrate surface. We present a number of simulations of cell spreading in which we consider a limited subset of the possible deformed spread-states assumed by the cell in order to examine the hypothesis that free energy minimization drives the process of cell spreading. Simulations suggest that cell spreading can be viewed as a competition between (i) decreasing cytoskeletal free energy due to strain induced assembly of cytoskeletal proteins into contractile SFs, and (ii) increasing elastic free energy due to stretching of the mechanically passive components of the cell. The computed minimum free energy spread area is shown to be lower for a cell on a compliant substrate than on a rigid substrate. Furthermore, a low substrate ligand density is found to limit cell spreading. The predicted dependence of cell spread area on substrate stiffness and ligand density is in agreement with the experiments of Engler et al. (2003). We also simulate the experiments of Théry et al. (2006), whereby initially circular cells deform and adhere to "V-shaped" and "Y-shaped" ligand patches. Analysis of a number of different spread states reveals that deformed configurations with the lowest free energy exhibit a SF distribution that corresponds to experimental observations, i.e. a high concentration of highly aligned SFs occurs along free edges, with lower SF concentrations in the interior of the cell. In summary, the results of this study suggest that cell spreading is driven by free energy minimization based on a competition between decreasing

  15. Post-Tanner spreading of nematic droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechkov, S; Oshanin, G [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Cazabat, A M, E-mail: mechkov@lptmc.jussieu.f, E-mail: anne-marie.cazabat@lps.ens.f, E-mail: oshanin@lptmc.jussieu.f [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 75252 Paris Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-11-18

    The quasistationary spreading of a circular liquid drop on a solid substrate typically obeys the so-called Tanner law, with the instantaneous base radius R(t) growing with time as Rapproxt{sup 1/10}-an effect of the dominant role of capillary forces for a small-sized droplet. However, for droplets of nematic liquid crystals, a faster spreading law sets in at long times, so that Rapproxt{sup a}lpha with alpha significantly larger than the Tanner exponent 1/10. In the framework of the thin film model (or lubrication approximation), we describe this 'acceleration' as a transition to a qualitatively different spreading regime driven by a strong substrate-liquid interaction specific to nematics (antagonistic anchoring at the interfaces). The numerical solution of the thin film equation agrees well with the available experimental data for nematics, even though the non-Newtonian rheology has yet to be taken into account. Thus we complement the theory of spreading with a post-Tanner stage, noting that the spreading process can be expected to cross over from the usual capillarity-dominated stage to a regime where the whole reservoir becomes a diffusive film in the sense of Derjaguin.

  16. International risk of yellow fever spread from the ongoing outbreak in Brazil, December 2016 to May 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorigatti, Ilaria; Hamlet, Arran; Aguas, Ricardo; Cattarino, Lorenzo; Cori, Anne; Donnelly, Christl A; Garske, Tini; Imai, Natsuko; Ferguson, Neil M

    2017-01-01

    States in south-eastern Brazil were recently affected by the largest Yellow Fever (YF) outbreak seen in a decade in Latin America. Here we provide a quantitative assessment of the risk of travel-related international spread of YF indicating that the United States, Argentina, Uruguay, Spain, Italy and Germany may have received at least one travel-related YF case capable of seeding local transmission. Mitigating the risk of imported YF cases seeding local transmission requires heightened surveillance globally. PMID:28749337

  17. Lateral spread as a special form of soil movement in Dolina area in municipality Puconci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Čarman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a particular form of soil instability, which is rarely observed in Slovenia. This is a lateral spread of the soil, which appeared some years ago in the central part of Dolina area in the municipality of Puconci. The area is mainly build up from clay and sandy sediments of the Pannonian Sea, predominantly Pliocene age. A significant damage of building has begun several years ago. According to data from research carried out, we suggest that the flat area is disintegrated into individual blocks, moving in different directions. These led to such extensive damage to buildings. Possible cause could be erosion of Dolinski stream at the eastern edge of the area or seismic survey (blasting, vibrations, which were carried out here about 20 years ago. Determination the exact cause of the formation of the soil lateral spread, its extent and dynamics, remain a challenge for the future.

  18. Social distancing strategies against disease spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Valdez, L D; Macri, P A; Braunstein, L A

    2013-01-01

    The recurrent infectious diseases and their increasing impact on the society has promoted the study of strategies to slow down the epidemic spreading. In this review we outline the applications of percolation theory to describe strategies against epidemic spreading on complex networks. We give a general outlook of the relation between link percolation and the susceptible-infected-recovered model, and introduce the node void percolation process to describe the dilution of the network composed by healthy individual, $i.e$, the network that sustain the functionality of a society. Then, we survey two strategies: the quenched disorder strategy where an heterogeneous distribution of contact intensities is induced in society, and the intermittent social distancing strategy where health individuals are persuaded to avoid contact with their neighbors for intermittent periods of time. Using percolation tools, we show that both strategies may halt the epidemic spreading. Finally, we discuss the role of the transmissibil...

  19. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saeedian, M; Jafari, G R; Kertesz, J

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences peoples willingness to contact others: A friendly contact may be turned to unfriendly to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected (SI) disease spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heiders theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte-Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find loc...

  20. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks, and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully connected networks—with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size—is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static-network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concurs that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics.

  1. Substrate stress relaxation regulates cell spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Gu, Luo; Darnell, Max; Klumpers, Darinka; Bencherif, Sidi A.; Weaver, James C.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Mooney, David J.

    2015-02-01

    Studies of cellular mechanotransduction have converged upon the idea that cells sense extracellular matrix (ECM) elasticity by gauging resistance to the traction forces they exert on the ECM. However, these studies typically utilize purely elastic materials as substrates, whereas physiological ECMs are viscoelastic, and exhibit stress relaxation, so that cellular traction forces exerted by cells remodel the ECM. Here we investigate the influence of ECM stress relaxation on cell behaviour through computational modelling and cellular experiments. Surprisingly, both our computational model and experiments find that spreading for cells cultured on soft substrates that exhibit stress relaxation is greater than cells spreading on elastic substrates of the same modulus, but similar to that of cells spreading on stiffer elastic substrates. These findings challenge the current view of how cells sense and respond to the ECM.

  2. Disordered contact process with asymmetric spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Róbert

    2013-02-01

    An asymmetric variant of the contact process where the activity spreads with different and independent random rates to the left and to the right is introduced. A real space renormalization scheme is formulated for the model by means of which it is shown that the local asymmetry of spreading is irrelevant on large scales if the model is globally (statistically) symmetric. Otherwise, in the presence of a global bias in either direction, the renormalization method predicts two distinct phase transitions, which are related to the spreading of activity in and against the direction of the bias. The latter is found to be described by an infinite randomness fixed point while the former is not.

  3. Extended oil spill spreading with Langmuir circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simecek-Beatty, Debra; Lehr, William J

    2017-09-15

    When spilled in the ocean, most crude oils quickly spread into a thin film that ruptures into smaller slicks distributed over a larger area. Observers have also reported the film tearing apart into streaks that eventually merge forming fewer but longer bands of floating oil. Understanding this process is important to model oil spill transport. First, slick area is calculated using a spreading model. Next, Langmuir circulation models are used to approximate the merging of oiled bands. Calculations are performed on Troll blended and Alaska North Slope crude oils and results compared with measurements from the 1990s North Sea field experiments. Langmuir circulation increases the oil area but decreases the surface coverage of oil. This work modifies existing oil spreading formulas by providing a surface area correction due to the effects of Langmuir circulation. The model's simplicity is advantageous in situations with limited data, such as emergency oil spill response. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Petter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully-connected networks -- with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size -- is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concur that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics.

  5. Analysis of BER Performance of the Spread Spectrum Communication System with Constrained Spreading Code

    OpenAIRE

    長谷川, 孝明; 羽渕, 裕真

    1996-01-01

    Copyright notice. c1996 IEICE All rights reserved. "Analysis of BER Performance of the Spread Spectrum Communication System with Constrained Spreading Code"Hiromasa HABUCHI, Toshio TAKEBAYASHI, Takaaki HASEGAWA. IEICE TRANSACTIONS on Fundamentals of Electronics, Communications and Computer Sciences ,1996 Vol.E79-A No.12 pp. 2078-2080 許諾No.07RB0055.

  6. Spreading of Ultrarelativistic Wave Packet and Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Lev, Felix M

    2012-01-01

    The red shift of light coming to the Earth from distant objects is usually explained as a consequence of the fact that the Universe is expanding. Such an explanation implies that photons emitted by distant objects travel in the interstellar medium practically without interaction with interstellar matter and hence they can survive their long journey to the Earth. We analyze this assumption by considering wave-packet spreading for an ultrarelativistic particle. We derive a formula which shows that spreading in the direction perpendicular to the particle momentum is very important and cannot be neglected. The implications of the results are discussed.

  7. Origin and turbulence spreading of plasma blobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Stroth, U. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck. Str. 1, Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching (Germany); Ribeiro, T. T.; Scott, B. D.; Carralero, D.; Müller, S. H.; Müller, H. W.; Wolfrum, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching (Germany); Fuchert, G. [IJL, Université de Lorraine, CNRS (UMR 7198), BP 40239, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2015-02-15

    The formation of plasma blobs is studied by analyzing their trajectories in a gyrofluid simulation in the vicinity of the separatrix. Most blobs arise at the maximum radial electric field outside the separatrix. In general, blob generation is not bound to one particular radial position or instability. A simple model of turbulence spreading for the scrape-off layer is derived. The simulations show that the blob dynamics can be represented by turbulence spreading, which constitutes a substantial energy drive for far scrape-off layer turbulence and is a more suitable quantity to study blob generation compared to the skewness.

  8. Technique for Controlling Spread of Limnotic Oncomelania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Damei(李大美); WANG Xiangsan(王祥三); LAI Yonggen

    2003-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease mostly found in areas along the Changjiang River of China. The disease is spread solely through an intermediary named oncomelania, so its spread of schistosomiasis can be controlled by properly designing water intakes which prevent oncomelania from entering fanning land or residential areas. This paper reports a successful design process and a new oncomelania-free intake device. The design of the new intake is based on a sound research program in which extensive experimental studies were carried out to gain knowledge of oncomelania eco-hydraulic behavior and detailed flow field information through CFD simulation.

  9. Burstiness and spreading on temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lambiotte, Renaud; Delvenne, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how spreading processes on temporal networks are impacted by the shape of their inter-event time distributions. Through simple mathematical arguments and toy examples, we find that the key factor is the ordering in which events take place, a property that tends to be affected by the bulk of the distributions and not only by their tail, as usually considered in the literature. We show that a detailed modeling of the temporal patterns observed in complex networks can change dramatically the properties of a spreading process, such as the ergodicity of a random walk process or the persistence of an epidemic.

  10. International business of banking: the pricing example of retail currency spreads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enn Listra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the pricing of a specific service of currency exchange based on the retail exchange rate spreads is studied on the example of four international banking groups. The aim of this study is to explore pricing of currency exchange services based on bid-ask differences in some commercial banks and possible price discrimination in this segment of market comparing the behaviour of Western mothers and Eastern daughters in European international banking groups. The retail currency rate spreads in different bank groups and countries are compared with each other. The main results of the study are that statistically significant differences exist in the spreads set by banking groups in different countries. All banking groups in the pilot sample offer more favourable rates in Western countries indicating that the pricing policy of bank groups may be discriminatory. The volatility of spreads over different currencies suggests that different decision making mechanisms may be present in the groups depending on the location of banking unit. The results of this pilot study suggest that further research is needed to understand the extent and the mechanism of findings.

  11. Reconstructing the origin and spread of horse domestication in the Eurasian steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmuth, Vera; Eriksson, Anders; Bower, Mim Ann; Barker, Graeme; Barrett, Elizabeth; Hanks, Bryan Kent; Li, Shuicheng; Lomitashvili, David; Ochir-Goryaeva, Maria; Sizonov, Grigory V; Soyonov, Vasiliy; Manica, Andrea

    2012-05-22

    Despite decades of research across multiple disciplines, the early history of horse domestication remains poorly understood. On the basis of current evidence from archaeology, mitochondrial DNA, and Y-chromosomal sequencing, a number of different domestication scenarios have been proposed, ranging from the spread of domestic horses out of a restricted primary area of domestication to the domestication of numerous distinct wild horse populations. In this paper, we reconstruct both the population genetic structure of the extinct wild progenitor of domestic horses, Equus ferus, and the origin and spread of horse domestication in the Eurasian steppes by fitting a spatially explicit stepping-stone model to genotype data from >300 horses sampled across northern Eurasia. We find strong evidence for an expansion of E. ferus out of eastern Eurasia about 160 kya, likely reflecting the colonization of Eurasia by this species. Our best-fitting scenario further suggests that horse domestication originated in the western part of the Eurasian steppe and that domestic herds were repeatedly restocked with local wild horses as they spread out of this area. By showing that horse domestication was initiated in the western Eurasian steppe and that the spread of domestic herds across Eurasia involved extensive introgression from the wild, the scenario of horse domestication proposed here unites evidence from archaeology, mitochondrial DNA, and Y-chromosomal DNA.

  12. Relativistic suppression of wave packet spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Q; Smetanko, B; Grobe, R

    1998-03-30

    We investigate numerically the solution of Dirac equation and analytically the Klein-Gordon equation and discuss the relativistic motion of an electron wave packet in the presence of an intense static electric field. In contrast to the predictions of the (non-relativistic) Schroedinger theory, the spreading rate in the field's polarization direction as well as in the transverse directions is reduced.

  13. Hiding Single Photons With Spread Spectrum Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Belthangady, Chinmay; Yu, Ite A; Yin, G Y; Kahn, J M; Harris, S E

    2010-01-01

    We describe a proof-of-principal experiment demonstrating the use of spread spectrum technology at the single photon level. We show how single photons with a prescribed temporal shape, in the presence of interfering noise, may be hidden and recovered.

  14. Modeling and simulation of epidemic spread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shatnawi, Maad; Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja; Zaki, Nazar

    2013-01-01

    and control such epidemics. This paper presents an overview of the epidemic spread modeling and simulation, and summarizes the main technical challenges in this field. It further investigates the most relevant recent approaches carried out towards this perspective and provides a comparison and classification...

  15. Restricted spread of tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, P.C.; Joosten, N.N.; Goldbach, R.W.; Peters, D.

    2003-01-01

    Spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and population development of its vector Frankliniella occidentalis were studied on the pepper accessions CPRO-1 and Pikante Reuzen, which are resistant and susceptible to thrips, respectively. Viruliferous thrips were released on plants of each accession (

  16. Damage spreading on networks: Clustering effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Z Z Guo; Xiao-Wei Wu; Chun-An Wang

    2007-04-01

    The damage spreading of the Ising model on three kinds of networks is studied with Glauber dynamics. One of the networks is generated by evolving the hexagonal lattice with the star-triangle transformation. Another kind of network is constructed by connecting the midpoints of the edges of the topological hexagonal lattice. With the evolution of these structures, damage spreading transition temperature increases and a general explanation for this phenomenon is presented from the view of the network. The relationship between the transition temperature and the network measure-clustering coefficient is set up and it is shown that the increase of damage spreading transition temperature is the result of more and more clustering of the network. We construct the third kind of network-random graphs with Poisson degree distributions by changing the average degree of the network. We show that the increase in the average degree is equivalent to the clustering of nodes and this leads to the increase in damage spreading transition temperature.

  17. Social distancing strategies against disease spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, L. D.; Buono, C.; Macri, P. A.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2014-03-01

    The recurrent infectious diseases and their increasing impact on the society has promoted the study of strategies to slow down the epidemic spreading. In this review we outline the applications of percolation theory to describe strategies against epidemic spreading on complex networks. We give a general outlook of the relation between link percolation and the susceptible-infected-recovered model, and introduce the node void percolation process to describe the dilution of the network composed by healthy individual, i.e, the network that sustain the functionality of a society. Then, we survey two strategies: the quenched disorder strategy where an heterogeneous distribution of contact intensities is induced in society, and the intermittent social distancing strategy where health individuals are persuaded to avoid contact with their neighbors for intermittent periods of time. Using percolation tools, we show that both strategies may halt the epidemic spreading. Finally, we discuss the role of the transmissibility, i.e, the effective probability to transmit a disease, on the performance of the strategies to slow down the epidemic spreading.

  18. Spread of Rare Fungus from Vancouver Island

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-12-20

    Cryptococcus gattii, a rare fungus normally found in the tropics, has infected people and animals on Vancouver Island, Canada. Dr. David Warnock, Director, Division of Foodborne, Bacterial, and Mycotic Diseases, CDC, discusses public health concerns about further spread of this organism.  Created: 12/20/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 12/29/2006.

  19. Energy spread in plasma-based acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, A.; Trines, R.; Goloviznin, V.

    2000-01-01

    Electron acceleration in a one-dimensional plasma wave has been simulated, with emphasis on minimizing the energy spread of an accelerated electron bunch, while keeping the mean energy gain at a reasonable level. Bunch length, beam loading, and the injection phase are tuned to reach this goal. The s

  20. Optimization of network protection against virus spread

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gourdin, E.; Omic, J.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of virus spreading in a telecommunication network, where a certain curing strategy is deployed, can be captured by epidemic models. In the N-intertwined model proposed and studied in [1], [2], the probability of each node to be infected depends on the curing and infection rate of its neig

  1. Experiments in water spreading at Newark, Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggess, Durward Haye; Rima, Donald Robert

    1962-01-01

    Two experiments in water spreading were made at Newark, Del., to evaluate the prospects of using excess storm runoff to recharge the shallow water-table aquifer which serves the community. Water was diverted from 1 of the city's 3 production wells and released into an infiltration ditch near the municipal well field. Although slightly more than 65,000 cubic feet of water (nearly 500,000 gallons ) was spread in the infiltration ditch and allowed to seep into the subsurface, there was no indication that any appreciable amount of water reached the producing aquifer. Instead, a perched zone of saturation was created by the presence of an impermeable or slightly permeable bed above the water table. So effective is this barrier to the downward movement of water that within a period of less than 1 day, the apex of the perched zone rose about 10 feet to the level of the bottom of the infiltration ditch. As more water was added, the mound of saturation spread laterally. On the basis of these experiments, it appears that the principal aquifer at Newark, Del., would not be benefited by spreading water in shallow infiltration ditches or basins. However, the absorptive capacity of the unsaturated materials which occur at a shallow depth, is sufficient to permit the disposal of large volumes of storm runoff.

  2. Centerfolds: Your Newspaper's Most Exciting Spreads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Jose

    1977-01-01

    Gives guidelines for planning copy and design for the centerfold spread of a newspaper in order to use this natural display section to enhance the overall interest of the newspaper. Shows how college and professional papers have used centerfolds effectively. (GW)

  3. ParB spreading requires DNA bridging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graham, Thomas G. W.; Wang, Xindan; Song, Dan; Etson, Candice M.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Rudner, David Z.; Loparo, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The parABS system is a widely employed mechanism for plasmid partitioning and chromosome segregation in bacteria. ParB binds to parS sites on plasmids and chromosomes and associates with broad regions of adjacent DNA, a phenomenon known as spreading. Although essential for ParB function, the mechani

  4. DataSpread: Unifying Databases and Spreadsheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendre, Mangesh; Sun, Bofan; Zhang, Ding; Zhou, Xinyan; Chang, Kevin ChenChuan; Parameswaran, Aditya

    2015-08-01

    Spreadsheet software is often the tool of choice for ad-hoc tabular data management, processing, and visualization, especially on tiny data sets. On the other hand, relational database systems offer significant power, expressivity, and efficiency over spreadsheet software for data management, while lacking in the ease of use and ad-hoc analysis capabilities. We demonstrate DataSpread, a data exploration tool that holistically unifies databases and spreadsheets. It continues to offer a Microsoft Excel-based spreadsheet front-end, while in parallel managing all the data in a back-end database, specifically, PostgreSQL. DataSpread retains all the advantages of spreadsheets, including ease of use, ad-hoc analysis and visualization capabilities, and a schema-free nature, while also adding the advantages of traditional relational databases, such as scalability and the ability to use arbitrary SQL to import, filter, or join external or internal tables and have the results appear in the spreadsheet. DataSpread needs to reason about and reconcile differences in the notions of schema, addressing of cells and tuples, and the current "pane" (which exists in spreadsheets but not in traditional databases), and support data modifications at both the front-end and the back-end. Our demonstration will center on our first and early prototype of the DataSpread, and will give the attendees a sense for the enormous data exploration capabilities offered by unifying spreadsheets and databases.

  5. Spreading of Excellence in Serious Gaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim; Berta, Riccardo; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Bellotti, Francesco; Nadolski, Rob; Padrón-Nápoles, Carmen Luisa; Boyle, Liz; Beligan, Daniel; Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke

    2014-01-01

    Westera, W., Berta, R., Moreno-Ger, P., Bellotti, F., Nadolski, R., Padrón-Nápoles, C. L., Boyle, L., Beligan, D., & Baalsrud Hauge, J. (2013, December 12). Spreading of Excellence in Serious Gaming. Presentation on the GALA project review meeting. Luxembourg: European Commission.

  6. Natural Spread of Plant Viruses by Birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, D.; Engels, C.; Sarra, S.

    2012-01-01

    Observations made in Mali strongly suggest that Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV) is spread by weaverbirds (Quelea quelea) below and around baobab trees (Adansonia digitata) in which they nest. Rice leaves in bird nests appeared to be infected. In Spain, an infection of Southern bean mosaic virus (SBM

  7. Experiments and modelling on vertical flame spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Mangs, J. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    he principle and some preliminary results are shown of a new vertical flame spread modelling effort. Quick experimental screenings on relevant phenomena are made, some models are evaluated, and a new set of needed measuring instruments is proposed. Finally a single example of FRNC cable is shown as application of the methods. (orig.)

  8. Turbulence spreading in gyro-kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliano, P.; Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Hornsby, W. A.; Peeters, A. G.; Stauffert, O.

    2016-01-01

    In this letter a new operative definition for the turbulence intensity in connection with magnetized plasmas is given. In contrast to previous definitions the new definition satisfies a Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov type equation. Furthermore, explicit expressions for the turbulence intensity and the turbulence intensity flux, that allow for the first time direct numerical evaluation, are derived. A carefully designed numerical experiment for the case of a tokamak is performed to study the impact of turbulence spreading. The effective turbulence diffusion coefficient is measured to be smaller than the heat conduction coefficient and the turbulence spreading length is found to be of the order of the turbulence correlation length. The results show that turbulence spreading can play a role in the non-local flux gradient relation, or in the scaling of transport coefficients with the normalized Larmor radius, only over lengths scale of the order of the turbulence correlation length. A new turbulence convection mechanism, due to the drift connected with the magnetic field inhomogeneities, is described. The convective flux integrates to zero under the flux surface average unless there is an up-down asymmetry in the tubulence intensity. The latter asymmetry can be generated through a radial inhomogeneity or plasma rotation. It is shown that the turbulence convection can lead to a spreading of the order of the correlation length.

  9. Spreading of water nanodroplets on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Joseph; Sinha, Shayandev; Chung, Peter; Das, Siddhartha

    Understanding the wetting of 2D materials is central to the successful application of these materials in a variety of disciplines that involve the interaction of a liquid with such layered substrates. Recent studies focusing on wetting statics and contact angle selection on graphene-coated solids indicate a wetting translucent behavior of graphene. However, little research has been done on the wetting dynamics of graphene-coated systems. Here, we simulate the wetting dynamics of water drops on free-standing graphene layers using a molecular dynamics framework. We employ the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model to simulate the water drops. Our simulations are validated against the experimental results of water drop contact angles on graphite. Unlike many existing MD studies, we obtain the results starting from a physical consideration of spherical water drops. We observe the half power law for the spreading dynamics, i.e., r~t(1/2) (r is the spreading radius and t is the spreading time). Identical spreading laws have been identified for Lennard Jones (LJ) nanodroplets on non-layered surfaces; therefore, we establish that the change in the nature of the substrate (non-layered to 2D) and the liquid (LJ to water) does not alter the physics of wetting dynamics of nanodroplets.

  10. Spreading depolarization may link migraine and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Migraine increases the risk of stroke, particularly in young and otherwise healthy adults. Being the most frequent neurological condition, migraine prevalence is on a par with that of other common stroke risk factors, such as diabetes or hypertension. Several patterns of association have emerged: (1) migraine and stroke share a common association (eg, vasculopathies, patent foramen ovale, or pulmonary A-V malformations); (2) injury to the arterial wall such as acute arterial dissections can present as migraine aura attacks or stroke; (3) strokes rarely develop during a migraine attack, as described for "migrainous stroke." Increasing experimental evidence suggests that cerebral hyperexcitability and enhanced susceptibility to spreading depolarization, the electrophysiologic event underlying migraine, may serve as a mechanism underlying the migraine-stroke association. Mice carrying human vascular or neuronal migraine mutations exhibit an enhanced susceptibility to spreading depolarization while being particularly vulnerable to cerebral ischemia. The severe stroke phenotype in migraine mutant mice can be prevented by suppressing spreading depolarization. If confirmed in the clinical setting, inhibiting spreading depolarization might protect migraineurs at stroke risk as well as decrease attacks of migraine. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  11. Spreading of Excellence in Serious Gaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim; Berta, Riccardo; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Bellotti, Francesco; Nadolski, Rob; Padrón-Nápoles, Carmen Luisa; Boyle, Liz; Beligan, Daniel; Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke

    2014-01-01

    Westera, W., Berta, R., Moreno-Ger, P., Bellotti, F., Nadolski, R., Padrón-Nápoles, C. L., Boyle, L., Beligan, D., & Baalsrud Hauge, J. (2013, December 12). Spreading of Excellence in Serious Gaming. Presentation on the GALA project review meeting. Luxembourg: European Commission.

  12. Modelling of fire spread in car parks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordijk, L.M.; Lemaire, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    Currently, design codes assume that in a car park fire at most 3-4 vehicles are on fire at the same time. Recent incidents in car parks have drawn international attention to such assumptions and have raised questions as to the fire spreading mechanism and the resulting fire load on the structure.

  13. Fossil Overlapping Spreading Centre in the Central Pacific at the Trace of the Pacific-Cocos-Nazca Triple Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, M.; Barckhausen, U.; Weinrebe, W.; Engels, M.

    2005-12-01

    The Central Pacific region between 125° W/5° N and 110° W/10° S which contains the "plate tectonic mirror image" to the region of the Cocos plate currently being subducted beneath Central America has been the target of an investigation using multibeam bathymetry, magnetics and gravity. One of the main points of interest was the formation of the triple junction of Pacific, Cocos and Nacza plates in the Late Oligocene/Early Miocene (around 24 Myrs). This event indicates the breakup of the Farallon plate on the eastern side of the East-Pacific-Rise into Cocos and Nazca plates. At this time the first Cocos-Nazca spreading centre (CNS-1) a precursor of the currently active spreading centre (CNS-3) between Cocos and Nazca plates was initiated. The breakup process is a result of changing spreading directions caused by global changes in plate movement directions. This is documented in the area of investigation in the Central Pacific in changes in the strike direction of magnetic lineations from north to south and morphological structures of the seafloor. Irregularities in the magnetic lineation pattern in a small area in the centre of the investigation area and curved morphological structures on the oceanic seafloor are interpreted in terms of remnants of a fossil overlapping spreading centre. The overlapping spreading centre was formed as a consequence of shiftings in the spreading axis which subsequently are straightened out by processes like the one described.

  14. Eastern Siberia terrain intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1942-01-01

    The following folio of terrain intelligence maps, charts and explanatory tables represent an attempt to bring together available data on natural physical conditions such as will affect military operations in Eastern Siberia. The area covered is the easternmost section of the U.S.S.R.; that is the area east of the Yenisei River. Each map and accompanying table is devoted· to a specialized set of problems; together they cover such subjects as geology, construction materials, mineral fuels, terrain, water supply, rivers and climate. The data is somewhat generalized due to the scale of treatment as well as to the scarcity of basic data. Each of the maps are rated as to reliability according to the reliability scale on the following page. Considerable of the data shown is of an interpretative nature, although precise data from literature was used wherever possible. The maps and tables were compiled  by a special group from the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Intelligence Branch of the Office, Chief of Engineers, War Department.

  15. Phase diagram of epidemic spreading - unimodal vs. bimodal probability distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Lancic, Alen; Sikic, Mile; Stefancic, Hrvoje

    2009-01-01

    The disease spreading on complex networks is studied in SIR model. Simulations on empirical complex networks reveal two specific regimes of disease spreading: local containment and epidemic outbreak. The variables measuring the extent of disease spreading are in general characterized by a bimodal probability distribution. Phase diagrams of disease spreading for empirical complex networks are introduced. A theoretical model of disease spreading on m-ary tree is investigated both analytically and in simulations. It is shown that the model reproduces qualitative features of phase diagrams of disease spreading observed in empirical complex networks. The role of tree-like structure of complex networks in disease spreading is discussed.

  16. Connectivity disruption sparks explosive epidemic spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Böttcher, L; Goles, E; Helbing, D; Herrmann, H J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the spread of an infection or other malfunction of cascading nature when a system component can recover only if it remains reachable from a functioning central component. We consider the susceptible-infected-susceptible model, typical of mathematical epidemiology, on a network. Infection spreads from infected to healthy nodes, with the addition that infected nodes can only recover when they remain connected to a predefined central node, through a path that contains only healthy nodes. In this system, clusters of infected nodes will absorb their noninfected interior because no path exists between the central node and encapsulated nodes. This gives rise to the simultaneous infection of multiple nodes. Interestingly, the system converges to only one of two stationary states: either the whole population is healthy or it becomes completely infected. This simultaneous cluster infection can give rise to discontinuous jumps of different sizes in the number of failed nodes. Larger jumps emerge at lower ...

  17. Epidemic spreading on weighted complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ye [Institute of Information Economy, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Alibaba Research Center of Complexity Science, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Liu, Chuang, E-mail: liuchuang@hznu.edu.cn [Institute of Information Economy, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Alibaba Research Center of Complexity Science, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Zhang, Chu-Xu [Institute of Information Economy, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Alibaba Research Center of Complexity Science, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Zhang, Zi-Ke, E-mail: zhangzike@gmail.com [Institute of Information Economy, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Alibaba Research Center of Complexity Science, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China)

    2014-01-31

    Nowadays, the emergence of online services provides various multi-relation information to support the comprehensive understanding of the epidemic spreading process. In this Letter, we consider the edge weights to represent such multi-role relations. In addition, we perform detailed analysis of two representative metrics, outbreak threshold and epidemic prevalence, on SIS and SIR models. Both theoretical and simulation results find good agreements with each other. Furthermore, experiments show that, on fully mixed networks, the weight distribution on edges would not affect the epidemic results once the average weight of whole network is fixed. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of epidemic spreading on multi-relation and weighted networks.

  18. Forces driving epithelial spreading in zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrndt, Martin; Salbreux, Guillaume; Campinho, Pedro; Hauschild, Robert; Oswald, Felix; Roensch, Julia; Grill, Stephan W; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2012-10-12

    Contractile actomyosin rings drive various fundamental morphogenetic processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound healing. Actomyosin rings are generally thought to function by circumferential contraction. Here, we show that the spreading of the enveloping cell layer (EVL) over the yolk cell during zebrafish gastrulation is driven by a contractile actomyosin ring. In contrast to previous suggestions, we find that this ring functions not only by circumferential contraction but also by a flow-friction mechanism. This generates a pulling force through resistance against retrograde actomyosin flow. EVL spreading proceeds normally in situations where circumferential contraction is unproductive, indicating that the flow-friction mechanism is sufficient. Thus, actomyosin rings can function in epithelial morphogenesis through a combination of cable-constriction and flow-friction mechanisms.

  19. Compressive Sensing for Spread Spectrum Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Larsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of ubiquitous computing there are two design parameters of wireless communication devices that become very important: power efficiency and production cost. Compressive sensing enables the receiver in such devices to sample below the Shannon-Nyquist sampling rate, which may lead...... to a decrease in the two design parameters. This paper investigates the use of Compressive Sensing (CS) in a general Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) receiver. We show that when using spread spectrum codes in the signal domain, the CS measurement matrix may be simplified. This measurement scheme, named...... Compressive Spread Spectrum (CSS), allows for a simple, effective receiver design. Furthermore, we numerically evaluate the proposed receiver in terms of bit error rate under different signal to noise ratio conditions and compare it with other receiver structures. These numerical experiments show that though...

  20. Spatial spread of the Hantavirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso, José A.; de la Rubia, F. Javier

    2015-03-01

    The spatial propagation of Hantavirus-infected mice is considered a serious threat for public health. We analyze the spatial spread of the infected mice by including diffusion in the stage-dependent model for Hantavirus infection recently proposed by Reinoso and de la Rubia [Phys. Rev. E 87, 042706 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.042706]. We consider a general scenario in which mice propagate in fronts from their refugia to the surroundings and find an expression for the speed of the front of infected mice. We also introduce a depletion time that measures the time scale for an appreciable impoverishment of the environment conditions and show how this new situation may change the spreading of the infection significantly.

  1. Branching Dynamics of Viral Information Spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarren, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Despite its importance for rumors or innovations propagation, peer-to-peer collaboration, social networking or Marketing, the dynamics of information spreading is not well understood. Since the diffusion depends on the heterogeneous patterns of human behavior and is driven by the participants' decisions, its propagation dynamics shows surprising properties not explained by traditional epidemic or contagion models. Here we present a detailed analysis of our study of real Viral Marketing campaigns where tracking the propagation of a controlled message allowed us to analyze the structure and dynamics of a diffusion graph involving over 31,000 individuals. We found that information spreading displays a non-Markovian branching dynamics that can be modeled by a two-step Bellman-Harris Branching Process that generalizes the static models known in the literature and incorporates the high variability of human behavior. It explains accurately all the features of information propagation under the "tipping-point" and can...

  2. Directional spread parameter at intermediate water depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; AshokKumar, K.

    formulations (Niedzwecki and Whatley, 1991). The cosine power ‘2s’ model, originally proposed by Longuet-Higgins et al. (1963), is very popular due to its proven generality. 1.1. The cosine power ‘2s’ model The cosine power ‘2s’ model is as follows; D(f,u) 5 G...(s)cos 2s [(u2u m )/2] (1) where G(s) 5 2 2s 2p G 2 (s 1 1) G(2s 1 1) 5 1 2 p G(s 1 1) G(s 1 0.5) (2) and D(f,u) is directional spreading function, f is wave frequency, u is wave direction, u m is mean wave direction, G is gamma function and s is spreading...

  3. Spreading Models in Banach Space Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Argyros, S A; Tyros, K

    2010-01-01

    We extend the classical Brunel-Sucheston definition of the spreading model by introducing the $\\mathcal{F}$-sequences $(x_s)_{s\\in\\mathcal{F}}$ in a Banach space and the plegma families in $\\mathcal{F}$ where $\\mathcal{F}$ is a regular thin family. The new concept yields a transfinite increasing hierarchy of classes of 1-subsymmetric sequences. We explore the corresponding theory and we present examples establishing this hierarchy and illustrating the limitation of the theory.

  4. Morphogenetic action through flux-limited spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeni, M.; Sánchez, O.; Mollica, E.; Siegl-Cachedenier, I.; Carleton, A.; Guerrero, I.; Ruiz i Altaba, A.; Soler, J.

    2013-12-01

    A central question in biology is how secreted morphogens act to induce different cellular responses within a group of cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Modeling morphogenetic output in multicellular systems has so far employed linear diffusion, which is the normal type of diffusion associated with Brownian processes. However, there is evidence that at least some morphogens, such as Hedgehog (Hh) molecules, may not freely diffuse. Moreover, the mathematical analysis of such models necessarily implies unrealistic instantaneous spreading of morphogen molecules, which are derived from the assumptions of Brownian motion in its continuous formulation. A strict mathematical model considering Fick's diffusion law predicts morphogen exposure of the whole tissue at the same time. Such a strict model thus does not describe true biological patterns, even if similar and attractive patterns appear as results of applying such simple model. To eliminate non-biological behaviors from diffusion models we introduce flux-limited spreading (FLS), which implies a restricted velocity for morphogen propagation and a nonlinear mechanism of transport. Using FLS and focusing on intercellular Hh-Gli signaling, we model a morphogen gradient and highlight the propagation velocity of morphogen particles as a new key biological parameter. This model is then applied to the formation and action of the Sonic Hh (Shh) gradient in the vertebrate embryonic neural tube using our experimental data on Hh spreading in heterologous systems together with published data. Unlike linear diffusion models, FLS modeling predicts concentration fronts and the evolution of gradient dynamics and responses over time. In addition to spreading restrictions by extracellular binding partners, we suggest that the constraints imposed by direct bridges of information transfer such as nanotubes or cytonemes underlie FLS. Indeed, we detect and measure morphogen particle velocity in such cell extensions in different

  5. Directional Wave Spectra Using Normal Spreading Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    energy spectral density function U. g. Army Engineer Waternays Experiment Station. Coastal Engineering Research Center P. 0. lox 631, Vicksburg...Z39-18 D(f,e) = spreading function E (f,(3) = directional spectral density function f = frequency in cycles per second 8 = direction in radians...of this assumption depends on the narrow bandedness of the energy spectral density function . For fairly narrow spectra (e.g., a swell train), the

  6. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  7. Lognormal Infection Times of Online Information Spread

    CERN Document Server

    Doerr, Christian; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-01-01

    The infection times of individuals in online information spread such as the inter-arrival time of Twitter messages or the propagation time of news stories on a social media site can be explained through a convolution of lognormally distributed observation and reaction times of the individual participants. Experimental measurements support the lognormal shape of the individual contributing processes, and have resemblance to previously reported lognormal distributions of human behavior and contagious processes.

  8. Spreading the word ... hospice information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Avril; Hodson, Melanie; Brady, Denise; Pahl, Nick

    The rapid spread of Saunders' thinking across the world has been facilitated by the Hospice Information service and library at St Christopher's Hospice which she helped to create and further enhanced by Help the Hospices. We have set this article in the context of the Web and other information systems as they are developing today. "Connecting people" and "collecting people's experiences" were terms often used by Cicely Saunders when she described the work of Hospice Information, a service that has in some measure contributed to the rapid spread of her thinking across the world and which is currently in close contact with palliative care workers in over 120 countries. Connecting--or networking--putting people and organizations in touch with each other for mutual benefit and collecting and disseminating people's experiences are central to our work as a U.K. and international resource on hospice and palliative care for professionals and the public. Add to these the crucial role of information provision and advocacy for patients, carers, and health professionals alike and we hope that you may begin to appreciate how our respective organizations have contributed to the spread of Cicely Saunders' vision.

  9. Geomagnetic storm and equatorial spread-F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Becker-Guedes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In August 2000, a new ionospheric sounding station was established at Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W; dip latitude 17.6° S, Brazil, by the University of Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP. Another ionospheric sounding station was established at Palmas (10.2° S, 48.2° W; dip latitude 5.5° S, Brazil, in April 2002, by UNIVAP in collaboration with the Lutheran University Center of Palmas (CEULP, Lutheran University of Brazil (ULBRA. Both the stations are equipped with digital ionosonde of the type known as Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI. In order to study the effects of geomagnetic storms on equatorial spread-F, we present and discuss three case studies, two from the ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos (September and November 2000 and one from the simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos and Palmas (July 2003. Salient features from these ionospheric observations are presented and discussed in this paper. It has been observed that sometimes (e.g. 4-5 November 2000 the geomagnetic storm acts as an inhibitor (high strong spread-F season, whereas at other times (e.g. 11-12 July 2003 they act as an initiator (low strong spread-F season, possibly due to corresponding changes in the quiet and disturbed drift patterns during different seasons.

  10. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedian, M.; Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Jafari, G. R.; Kertesz, J.

    2017-02-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences people's willingness to contact others: A "friendly" contact may be turned to "unfriendly" to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected disease-spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heider's theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find local minima corresponding to the so-called jammed states. We study the effect of the ratio of initial friendly to unfriendly connections on the propagation of disease. The steady state can be balanced or a jammed state such that a coexistence occurs between susceptible and infected nodes in the system.

  11. Did ice-age bovids spread tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Bruce M.; Martin, Larry D.

    2006-11-01

    Pathognomonic metacarpal undermining is a skeletal pathology that has been associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bovids. Postcranial artiodactyl, perissodactyl, and carnivore skeletons were examined in major university and museum collections of North America and Europe for evidence of this and other pathology potentially attributable to tuberculosis. Among nonproboscidean mammals from pre-Holocene North America, bone lesions indicative of tuberculosis were restricted to immigrant bovids from Eurasia. No bone lesions compatible with diagnosis of tuberculosis were found in large samples of other pre-Holocene (164 Oligocene, 397 Miocene, and 1,041 Plio Pleistocene) North American mammals, including 114 antilocaprids. Given the unchanged frequency of bovid tubercular disease during the Pleistocene, it appears that most did not die from the disease but actually reached an accommodation with it (as did the mastodon) (Rothschild and Laub 2006). Thus, they were sufficiently long-lived to assure greater spread of the disease. The relationships of the proboscidean examples need further study, but present evidence suggests a Holarctic spread of tuberculosis during the Pleistocene, with bovids acting as vectors. While the role of other animals in the transmission of tuberculosis could be considered, the unique accommodation achieved by bovids and mastodons makes them the likely “culprits” in its spread.

  12. Spread Across Liquids Continues to Fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fletcher J.

    2001-01-01

    The physics and behavior of a flame spreading across a flammable liquid is an active area of research at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Spills of fuels and other liquids often result in considerable fire hazards, and much remains unknown about the details of how a flame, once ignited, moves across a pool. The depth of the liquid or size of the spill, the temperature, and wind, if any, can all complicate the combustion processes. In addition, with the advent of the International Space Station there may be fire hazards associated with cleaning, laboratory, or other fluids in space, and it is essential to understand the role that gravity plays in such situations. The Spread Across Liquids (SAL) experiment is an experimental and computational effort dedicated to understanding the detailed mechanisms of flame spread across a flammable liquid initially below its flashpoint temperature. The experimental research is being carried out in-house by a team of researchers from Glenn, the National Center for Microgravity Combustion, and Zin Technologies, with computer modeling being provided via a grant with the University of California, Irvine. Glenn's Zero Gravity Facility is used to achieve short microgravity periods, and normal gravity testing is done in the Space Experiments Laboratory. To achieve longer periods of microgravity, the showcase SAL hardware flies aboard a sounding rocket launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, approximately once per year. In addition to extended microgravity, this carrier allows the use of detailed diagnostics that cannot be employed in a drop tower.

  13. Branching dynamics of viral information spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, José Luis; Moro, Esteban

    2011-10-01

    Despite its importance for rumors or innovations propagation, peer-to-peer collaboration, social networking, or marketing, the dynamics of information spreading is not well understood. Since the diffusion depends on the heterogeneous patterns of human behavior and is driven by the participants’ decisions, its propagation dynamics shows surprising properties not explained by traditional epidemic or contagion models. Here we present a detailed analysis of our study of real viral marketing campaigns where tracking the propagation of a controlled message allowed us to analyze the structure and dynamics of a diffusion graph involving over 31 000 individuals. We found that information spreading displays a non-Markovian branching dynamics that can be modeled by a two-step Bellman-Harris branching process that generalizes the static models known in the literature and incorporates the high variability of human behavior. It explains accurately all the features of information propagation under the “tipping point” and can be used for prediction and management of viral information spreading processes.

  14. Holocene paleoenvironmental change in southeastern Africa (Makwe Rockshelter, Zambia): Implications for the spread of pastoralism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joshua R.; Rowan, John

    2017-01-01

    The paleoenvironmental conditions surrounding the origins of pastoralism and the movement of herders from eastern to southern Africa sometime between ∼4000 and 2000 ybp have been much debated. We lack, however, detailed paleoenvironmental data from sites sampling the hunter-to-herder transition in southeastern Africa, the likely corridor from eastern to southern Africa for early pastoralists. Here we report on new paleoenvironmental data from a site in the under-sampled area of eastern Zambia, Makwe Rockshelter, which has two aggregates of archaeological horizons representing the mid-Holocene (∼5700-5000 ybp) and the late Holocene (∼1600-800 ybp). The mid-Holocene sediments at Makwe document a foraging society, whereas the late Holocene sediments include both wild game and domestic livestock. Using stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of herbivore enamel (n = 107), we show that the shift from mid-Holocene to late Holocene paleoenvironments was characterized by an increase in C4 vegetation. These data are complemented by paleoenvironmental records from Lake Malawi that show that C4 vegetation peaked after ∼2000 ybp and was coincident with the onset of cooler, more arid climates. This combined paleoenvironmental record has implications for the spread of pastoralism across southeastern Africa between ∼3000 and 2000 ybp and potential 'animal disease barriers' these early herders may have faced.

  15. Infanticide in Eastern Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcikić, Mladen; Dumencić, Boris; Matuzalem, Elizabeta; Marjanović, Ksenija; Pozgain, Ivan; Ugljarević, Mladen

    2006-06-01

    For the layperson no crime is more difficult to comprehend than the killing of a child by his or her own parents. This is a retrospective study of neonaticide and infanticide in Eastern Croatia from 1980 to 2004. Judicial records of infanticide cases stored in Regional and County Courts were analyzed for the circumstances surrounding the offense. Twenty-four babies were discovered in various places during investigating period of time. The victims were almost equally divided between boys (12) and girls (11). The gender of one baby was unknown. The mean weight of babies was 2.7 SD = 0.66 kg. The perpetrators preferred rubbish-heaps (33.4%), burying in soil (16.7%), various premises in or around the house (16.7%) and garbage cans (12.5%) as places for hiding the dead babies. The most dominant cause of death in sixteen cases of live birth was asphyxia (37%) with equal distribution of smothering, stuffing the mouth with rags and strangulation. Other frequent causes of death were placing the child in a plastic bag and abandonment (25%), brain injury (25%) and wounding using a sharp weapon (12.5%). The cause of death for six babies remained unknown due to advanced decomposition. Two babies were stillborn. The age of accused mothers varied from 16 to 33, mean 24 SD=5.2 years. Most of them were unmarried (60%) and had limited formal education. They usually kept the pregnancy a secret (73%) and gave birth (93%) without public welfare assistance. The mother lived in the terror of shame and with the guilt that accompany conception without marriage. Fear seemed to be a pronounced motivating factor for committing infanticide. The data on court proceedings were available in fifteen cases. The mothers were officially indicted in all cases for infanticide under the Croatian Criminal Code. The perpetrator remained unidentified in nine suspicious crimes. The court convicted ten mothers of the crime of infanticide. Often juries were unwilling to punish the mother, citing the mother

  16. Iron-rich basal sediments from the eastern equatorial pacific: Leg 16, deep sea drilling project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronan, D.S.; Van Andel, T. H.; Ross, Heath G.; Dinkelman, M.G.; Bennett, R.H.; Bukry, D.; Charleston, S.; Kaneps, A.; Rodolfo, K.S.; Yeats, R.S.

    1972-01-01

    Iron-rich sediments chemically similar to those forming at present on the crest of the East Pacific Rise have been found just above basement at widely separated drill sites in the eastern equatorial Pacific, including three sites of Leg 16 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. These sediments were probably formed when the basement was at the crest of this rise and have moved to their present location as a result of sea-floor spreading.

  17. Ice Control with Brine Spread with Nozzles on Highways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolet, Lars; Fonnesbech, Jens Kristian

    2010-01-01

    . The improvements gained by the county of Funen were mainly due to the use of technologies (brine spreading with nozzles) giving a more precise spread pattern than the traditional gritting of pre-wetted salt. The spread pattern for every spreader, tested in The County of Funen, has been meassured 3 hours after...... spreading on a highway with traffic. A total of 800 spots were measured for residual salt for every spreader. The measurements and the spread pattern for brine spreading with nozzles were so precisely, that we learned: “When there is moisture, water or ice on the road, we need to take into account...

  18. Eastern Orthodox perspectives on violence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton Saggau, Emil

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: In the post-communist era, the contemporary national Eastern Orthodox churches have often been accused of taking either direct or ideological part in violence across Eastern Europe. In several scholarly analyses, the churches have been linked with ethnic and national violence. They have...... thus been identified as an ideological root for a distinctive ethno-religious nationalism either blocking the way for a pluralistic society or simply defying it. These cases of violence and conflicts, as well as their subsequent analysis, only point to a practical and visible manifestation of conflicts......, and they therefore don’t answer a broader theological question, namely the question of the general position of the Eastern Orthodox churches regarding violence. This article will address this broader question of what the Orthodox churches’ position is on violence and discuss the co-relation and intersection between...

  19. Regional Development of Eastern Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hergezelová

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: The aim of the work is to provide an overview of regional development in Eastern Slovakia, where are Košice and Prešov Region. The originality of the work lies in the work of enriching the SWOT analysis from the author Eve Rajčáková, which is given in the book deals with the issue of Regional development and regional policy of the European Union and Slovakia. Research question: The conditions of life of people in eastern Slovakia. Method: For writing this contribution will be used method of analysis and statistics. Knowledge on this subject have been looking on the internet and in books and sources of information publicly available. Using the data collected, we dealt with the issue of regional development in the Košice and Prešov regions. Results: The topic was the beginning focused on the overall characteristics of eastern Slovakia. Furthermore, we are at work we dealt with social and economic phenomena in both regions of eastern Slovakia. We focused on GDP, unemployment and tourism, which is in the region is widespread. Society: It is well known that there are obviously different living conditions in eastern Slovakia as in other parts of Slovakia. People are forced to, mainly because of employment, leave their region to move or commute to work to the west. The paper point out the right of this negative phenomenon that is quite visible - high unemployment. Limitations: The limits of work are limited by problems of regional development in eastern Slovakia, mainly focusing on economic and social phenomena in the society.

  20. Explosive spread of a neuroinvasive lineage 2 West Nile virus in Central Europe, 2008/2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakonyi, Tamás; Ferenczi, Emőke; Erdélyi, Károly; Kutasi, Orsolya; Csörgő, Tibor; Seidel, Bernhard; Weissenböck, Herbert; Brugger, Katharina; Bán, Enikő; Nowotny, Norbert

    2013-07-26

    For the first time outside sub-Saharan Africa, a lineage 2 West Nile virus (WNV) emerged in Hungary in 2004. It caused sporadic cases of encephalitis in goshawks (Accipiter gentilis), other predatory birds, and in mammals. As a consequence, a surveillance program was initiated in Hungary and in Austria, which included virological, molecular, serological and epidemiological investigations in human beings, birds, horses, and mosquitoes. The virus strain became endemic to Hungary, however only sporadic cases of infections were observed between 2004 and 2007. Unexpectedly, explosive spread of the virus was noted in 2008, when neuroinvasive West Nile disease (WND) was diagnosed all over Hungary in dead goshawks and other birds of prey (n=25), in horses (n=12), and humans (n=22). At the same time this virus also spread to the eastern part of Austria, where it was detected in dead wild birds (n=8). In 2009, recurrent WND outbreaks were observed in Hungary and Austria, in wild birds, horses, and humans in the same areas. Virus isolates of both years exhibited closest genetic relationship to the lineage 2 WNV strain which emerged in 2004. As we know today, the explosive spread of the lineage 2 WNV in 2008 described here remained not restricted to Hungary and Austria, but this virus dispersed further to the south to various Balkan states and reached northern Greece, where it caused the devastating neuroinvasive WND outbreak in humans in 2010.

  1. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine and Spreading Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi KAZEMI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Kazemi H, Speckmann EJ, Gorji A. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine and Spreading Depression. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer;8(3: 6-11. AbstractObjectiveFamilial hemiplegic migraine (FHM is an autosomal dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with aura, characterized by transient neurological signs and symptoms. Typical hemiplegic migraine attacks start in the first or second decade of life. Some patients with FHM suffer from daily recurrent attacks since childhood. Results from extensive studies of cellular and animal models have indicated that gene mutations in FHM increase neuronal excitability and reduce the threshold for spreading depression (SD. SD is a transient wave of profound neuronal and glial depolarization that slowly propagates throughout the brain tissue and is characterized by a high amplitude negative DC shift. After induction of SD, S218L mutant mice exhibited neurological signs highly reminiscent of clinical attacks in FHM type 1 patients carrying this mutation. FHM1 with ataxia is attributable to specific mutations that differ from mutations that cause pure FHM1 and have peculiar consequences on cerebellar Cav2.1 currents that lead to profound Purkinje cell dysfunction and neuronal loss with atrophy. SD in juvenile rats produced neuronal injury and death. Hormonal factors involved in FHM affect SD initiation and propagation. The data identify SD as a possible target of treatment of FHM. In addition, FHM is a useful model to explore the mechanisms of more common types of migraine. ReferencesRussell MB, Ducros A. Sporadic and familial hemiplegic migraine: pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and management. Lancet Neurol 2011 (5:457-70.The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version.Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society (IHS. Cephalalgia2013;33(9:629-808.Thomsen LL, Eriksen MK, Roemer SF

  2. Morphological Analysis on Dr. LAU Feng-shueh’s Neo-classical Dance%刘凤学“新古典”舞蹈文化形态分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李超

    2015-01-01

    本文以台湾刘凤学“新古典舞团”舞蹈作品为例,对舞蹈艺术在当代文化语境下的“新古典”形态进行考察,并从训练方法、剧场演出形态、创作观等几个方面对刘凤学之“新古典”舞蹈观念进行文化形态分析研究。文章通过“文化的身体与技术的身体”两个层面的阐述对刘凤学唐乐舞训练之途径和目的展开探讨,从“古典精神的当代时态”之角度集中论述了刘凤学唐乐舞在形式及审美中与当下时空的融合及对抗,并通过对不同作品的创作分析注述了“新古典”在现代创作中的探索和实践。%This paper explores the Neo-classical dance of Lau feng-shueh ’s dance works existing in the contemporary,and analyzes the conception of Neo-classical dance from the perspectives of body training,morphology of theatre dance and the idea of choreography,explaining the significance and effect of Neo-classical dance in the contemporary choreography and performing practice.

  3. The Lipidated Peptidomimetic Lau-((S)-Aoc)-(Lys-βNphe)6-NH2 Is a Novel Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 Agonist That Activates Both Human and Mouse Neutrophil NADPH Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdfeldt, André; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael; Nielsen, Christina; Perez-Gassol, Iris; Larsen, Camilla Josephine; Wang, Ji Ming; Karlsson, Anna; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-09-16

    Neutrophils expressing formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) play key roles in host defense, immune regulation, and resolution of inflammation. Consequently, the search for FPR2-specific modulators has attracted much attention due to its therapeutic potential. Earlier described agonists for this receptor display potent activity for the human receptor (FPR2) but low activity for the mouse receptor orthologue (Fpr2), rendering them inapplicable in murine models of human disease. Here we describe a novel FPR2 agonist, the proteolytically stable α-peptide/β-peptoid hybrid Lau-((S)-Aoc)-(Lys-βNphe)6-NH2 (F2M2), showing comparable potency in activating human and mouse neutrophils by inducing a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and assembly of the superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase. This FPR2/Fpr2 agonist contains a headgroup consisting of a 2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) residue acylated with lauric acid (C12 fatty acid), which is linked to a peptide/peptoid repeat ((Lys-βNphe)6-NH2). Both the fatty acid moiety and the (S)-Aoc residue were required for FPR2/Fpr2 activation. This type of proteolytically stable FPR2-specific peptidomimetics may serve as valuable tools for future analysis of FPR2 signaling as well as for development of prophylactic immunomodulatory therapy. This novel class of cross-species FPR2/Fpr2 agonists should enable translation of results obtained with mouse neutrophils (and disease models) into enhanced understanding of human inflammatory and immune diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Default Spread dan Term Spread sebagai Variabel Proxy Siklus Bisnis pada Model Fama-French

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Hendra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to apply the Fama-French models and test the effect of alternative variable of bond yield spread, default spread (RBBB – RAAA and RAAA – RF, and the term spread (RSUN10-RSUN1, as proxy variables of the business cycle, in IDX stock data during 2005-2010. Four types of asset pricing models tested are Sharpe-Lintner CAPM, Fama-French models, Hwang et al.model, and hybrid model. The results showed that the size effect and value effect has an impact on excess stock returns. Slopes of market beta, SMB, and HML are more sensitive to stock big size and high B / M. Default spreads and term spreads in Hwang et al. model can explain the value effect, and weakly explain the size effect, meanwhile the power of explanation disappeared on Hybrid models. Based on the assessment adjusted R2 and the frequency of rejection of non-zero alpha, is found that the hybrid model is the most suitable model.  

  5. Vectorised Spreading Activation algorithm for centrality measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Troussov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spreading Activation is a family of graph-based algorithms widely used in areas such as information retrieval, epidemic models, and recommender systems. In this paper we introduce a novel Spreading Activation (SA method that we call Vectorised Spreading Activation (VSA. VSA algorithms, like “traditional” SA algorithms, iteratively propagate the activation from the initially activated set of nodes to the other nodes in a network through outward links. The level of the node’s activation could be used as a centrality measurement in accordance with dynamic model-based view of centrality that focuses on the outcomes for nodes in a network where something is flowing from node to node across the edges. Representing the activation by vectors allows the use of the information about various dimensionalities of the flow and the dynamic of the flow. In this capacity, VSA algorithms can model multitude of complex multidimensional network flows. We present the results of numerical simulations on small synthetic social networks and multi­dimensional network models of folksonomies which show that the results of VSA propagation are more sensitive to the positions of the initial seed and to the community structure of the network than the results produced by traditional SA algorithms. We tentatively conclude that the VSA methods could be instrumental to develop scalable and computationally efficient algorithms which could achieve synergy between computation of centrality indexes with detection of community structures in networks. Based on our preliminary results and on improvements made over previous studies, we foresee advances and applications in the current state of the art of this family of algorithms and their applications to centrality measurement.

  6. Multiscale modeling of virus replication and spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumberger, Peter; Frey, Felix; Schwarz, Ulrich S; Graw, Frederik

    2016-07-01

    Replication and spread of human viruses is based on the simultaneous exploitation of many different host functions, bridging multiple scales in space and time. Mathematical modeling is essential to obtain a systems-level understanding of how human viruses manage to proceed through their life cycles. Here, we review corresponding advances for viral systems of large medical relevance, such as human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). We will outline how the combination of mathematical models and experimental data has advanced our quantitative knowledge about various processes of these pathogens, and how novel quantitative approaches promise to fill remaining gaps.

  7. Epidemic spreading with immunization on bipartite networks

    CERN Document Server

    Tanimoto, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    Bipartite networks are composed of two types of nodes and there are no links between nodes of the same type. Thus the study of epidemic spread and control on such networks is relevant to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). When entire populations of two types cannot be immunized and the effect of immunization is not perfect, we have to consider the targeted immunization with immunization rates. We derive the epidemic thresholds of SIR and SIS models with immunization and illustrate the results with STDs on heterosexual contact networks.

  8. Rumor spreading models with random denials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorno, Virginia; Spina, Serena

    2016-11-01

    The concept of denial is introduced on rumor spreading processes. The denials occur with a certain rate and they reset to start the initial situation. A population of N individuals is subdivided into ignorants, spreaders and stiflers; at the initial time there is only one spreader and the rest of the population is ignorant. The denials are introduced in the classic DK model and in its generalization, in which a spreader can transmit the rumor at most to k ignorants. The steady state densities are analyzed for these models. Finally, a numerical analysis is performed to study the rule of the involved parameters and to compare the proposed models.

  9. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  10. Perceptual transparency in neon color spreading displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekroll, Vebjørn; Faul, Franz

    2002-08-01

    In neon color spreading displays, both a color illusion and perceptual transparency can be seen. In this study, we investigated the color conditions for the perception of transparency in such displays. It was found that the data are very well accounted for by a generalization of Metelli's (1970) episcotister model of balanced perceptual transparency to tristimulus values. This additive model correctly predicted which combinations of colors would lead to optimal impressions of transparency. Color combinations deviating slightly from the additive model also looked transparent, but less convincingly so.

  11. Forced versus Spontaneous Spreading of Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Karim, A; Davis, S H; Kavehpour, H P

    2016-10-11

    Two sets of experiments are performed, one for the free spreading of a liquid drop on a glass substrate and the other for the forced motion of a glass plate through a gas-liquid interface. The measured macroscopic advancing contact angle, θA, versus the contact line speed, U, differ markedly between the two configurations. The hydrodynamic theory (HDT) and the molecular kinetic theory (MKT) are shown to apply separately to the two systems. This distinction has not been previously noted. Rules of thumb are given that for an experimentalist involve a priori knowledge of the expected behavior.

  12. Optimization of Axial Intensity Point Spread Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Haifeng; GAN Fuxi; CHEN Zhongyu

    2001-01-01

    It is known that for the converged laser beam, the axial intensity distribution corresponds to a Gaussian curve, that is, the intensity on the focal plane is the peak intensity. When it defocuses, the intensity would decrease rapidly. In optical data storage, for instance, we expect the intensity within a certain distance to be almost equal. In this paper, we propose to use a pure phase superresolution apodizer to optimize the axial intensity distribution of the converged laser beam and at the same time improve the resolution. The intensity point spread function remains almost identical in a wide range within the focal depth.

  13. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, S.; Medo, M.; Zhang, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a minimal self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation. For a wide range of parameters, the system is in a critical state and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution similar to the empirically observed one. We further generalize the model to reproduce volatility clustering and other observed properties of real stocks.

  14. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Gualdi, Stanislao; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system's elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution-similar to the empirically observed one-over a wide range of parameters.

  15. Migrant workers spreading HIV in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-21

    Interruption of the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) across southeast Asian borders by legal and illegal migrant laborers is a major concern of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). ASEAN intends to move immediately to implement regional projects focused on education, information sharing, and improved surveillance. HIV transmission from laborers from poorer countries in search of jobs in economically booming regions underscores the global nature of the AIDS problem. Malaysia, for example, has over 1 million illegal workers. Moreover, many legal guest workers who enter Malaysia with letters from a physician stating they are not HIV-infected have falsified documents.

  16. Simultaneous spreading and evaporation: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Sergey; Trybala, Anna; Rubio, Ramon G; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Velarde, Manuel G

    2014-04-01

    The recent progress in theoretical and experimental studies of simultaneous spreading and evaporation of liquid droplets on solid substrates is discussed for pure liquids including nanodroplets, nanosuspensions of inorganic particles (nanofluids) and surfactant solutions. Evaporation of both complete wetting and partial wetting liquids into a nonsaturated vapour atmosphere are considered. However, the main attention is paid to the case of partial wetting when the hysteresis of static contact angle takes place. In the case of complete wetting the spreading/evaporation process proceeds in two stages. A theory was suggested for this case and a good agreement with available experimental data was achieved. In the case of partial wetting the spreading/evaporation of a sessile droplet of pure liquid goes through four subsequent stages: (i) the initial stage, spreading, is relatively short (1-2 min) and therefore evaporation can be neglected during this stage; during the initial stage the contact angle reaches the value of advancing contact angle and the radius of the droplet base reaches its maximum value, (ii) the first stage of evaporation is characterised by the constant value of the radius of the droplet base; the value of the contact angle during the first stage decreases from static advancing to static receding contact angle; (iii) during the second stage of evaporation the contact angle remains constant and equal to its receding value, while the radius of the droplet base decreases; and (iv) at the third stage of evaporation both the contact angle and the radius of the droplet base decrease until the drop completely disappears. It has been shown theoretically and confirmed experimentally that during the first and second stages of evaporation the volume of droplet to power 2/3 decreases linearly with time. The universal dependence of the contact angle during the first stage and of the radius of the droplet base during the second stage on the reduced time has been

  17. Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Viruses B Z Z Z Z . Aside from ... or Aedes albopictus ) can spread dengue, chikungunya, or Zika viruses. People become infected with dengue, chikungunya, or ...

  18. Spreading depolarisations and outcome after traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Bullock, M Ross; Okonkwo, David O

    2011-01-01

    Pathological waves of spreading mass neuronal depolarisation arise repeatedly in injured, but potentially salvageable, grey matter in 50-60% of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We aimed to ascertain whether spreading depolarisations are independently associated with unfavourable...

  19. Expanded HIV Screening Projected to Decrease Spread of the Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Virus Expanded HIV Screening Projected To Decrease Spread of the Virus Email Facebook Twitter April ... 2014, April 3). Expanded HIV Screening Projected To Decrease Spread of the Virus. Retrieved from https://www. ...

  20. Breast Cancer Cells May Change When They Spread to Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162415.html Breast Cancer Cells May Change When They Spread to Brain: ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When breast cancer spreads to the brain, important molecular changes may ...

  1. Recording, analysis, and interpretation of spreading depolarizations in neurointensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jens P; Fabricius, Martin; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-01-01

    recorded during multimodal neuromonitoring in neurocritical care as a causal biomarker providing a diagnostic summary measure of metabolic failure and excitotoxic injury. Focal ischemia causes spreading depolarization within minutes. Further spreading depolarizations arise for hours to days due to energy...... electrocorticographic monitoring affords even remote detection of injury because spreading depolarizations propagate widely from ischemic or metabolically stressed zones; characteristic patterns, including temporal clusters of spreading depolarizations and persistent depression of spontaneous cortical activity, can...

  2. Analysis of Yield Spreads on Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities

    OpenAIRE

    Brian A. Maris; William Segal

    2002-01-01

    Yield spreads on commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) are defined as the difference between the yield on CMBS and the yield on comparable-maturity Treasuries. CMBS yield spreads declined dramatically from 1992 until 1997, then increased in 1998 and 1999. The relationship between CMBS yield spreads and other variables is estimated in an effort to explain recent trends. Results identify several variables that are related to yield spreads on both fixed-rate and variable-rate CMBS. Howeve...

  3. Western juniper in eastern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald R. Gedney; David L. Azuma; Charles L. Bolsinger; Neil. McKay

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes and summarizes a 1988 inventory of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis Hook.) in eastern Oregon. This inventory, conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station of the USDA Forest Service, was intensified to meet increased need for more information about the juniper resource than was available in previous inventories. A...

  4. Citizenship Norms in Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Hilde; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    Research on Eastern Europe stresses the weakness of its civil society and the lack of political and social involvement, neglecting the question: What do people themselves think it means to be a good citizen? This study looks at citizens' definitions of good citizenship in Poland, Slovenia, the Czech Republic and Hungary, using 2002 European Social…

  5. Citizenship norms in Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, H.R.; Lippe, T. van der

    2010-01-01

    Research on Eastern Europe stresses the weakness of its civil society and the lack of political and social involvement, neglecting the question: What do people themselves think it means to be a good citizen? This study looks at citizens’ definitions of good citizenship in Poland, Slovenia, the Czech

  6. Citizenship norms in Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, H.R.; Lippe, T. van der

    2010-01-01

    Research on Eastern Europe stresses the weakness of its civil society and the lack of political and social involvement, neglecting the question: What do people themselves think it means to be a good citizen? This study looks at citizens’ definitions of good citizenship in Poland, Slovenia, the Czech

  7. Currency substitution in Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aarle, B.; Budina, N.

    1995-01-01

    Monetary instability during the transition process from a command economy to a market economy has induced a considerable increase in currency substitution in Eastern Europe. Currency substitution itself affects monetary stability since it reduces the stability of velocity. This paper investigates cu

  8. Astroparticle Physics at Eastern Colombia

    CERN Document Server

    Asorey, Hernan

    2015-01-01

    We present the emerging panorama of Astroparticle Physics at Eastern Colombia, and describe several ongoing projects, most of them related to the Latin American Giant Observatory (LAGO) Project. This research work is carried out at the Grupo de Investigaciones en Relatividad y Gravitaci\\'on of Universidad Industrial de Santander.

  9. Anthracnose Diseases of Eastern Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick H. Berry

    1985-01-01

    Anthracnose diseases of hardwood trees are widespread throughout the Eastern United States. The most common symptom of these diseases is dead areas or blotches on the leaves. Because of the brown and black, scorched appearance of the leaves, the diseases are sometimes called leaf blight.

  10. 21 CFR 133.175 - Pasteurized cheese spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized cheese spread. 133.175 Section 133.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Cheese and Related Products § 133.175 Pasteurized cheese spread. Pasteurized cheese spread is the food...

  11. Spreading the Experience of Preschool Educational Establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Dyukov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper observes the issue of spreading the innovative experience of municipal preschool educational establishments (MPEE. The author outlines the ways of spreading the ideas of «Development Program of MPEE» and « Educational Program of MPEE» worked out according to the federal state requirements. Theoretical methodological basis of the research combines the fundamental studies of the last century’s Russian teachers and psychologists: L. S. Vygodsky, A. N. Leontyev, L. I. Bozhovitch, A. V. Zaporozhets, V. V. Davydov, etc. Based on their studies, a series of teaching methodical manuals was developed in the Institute of Reflexive Psychology of Creativity and Humanizing the Education at the International Academy of Humanizing the Education, Sotchi–Magdeburg: «Russian Education 2020 – the Model of Preschool Education» and «Pedagogic Innovations in MPEE of Innovative Type».In author’s opinion, the outcome of the research can promote the modernization efficiency in preschool education.

  12. Spreading the Experience of Preschool Educational Establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Dyukov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper observes the issue of spreading the innovative experience of municipal preschool educational establishments (MPEE. The author outlines the ways of spreading the ideas of «Development Program of MPEE» and « Educational Program of MPEE» worked out according to the federal state requirements. Theoretical methodological basis of the research combines the fundamental studies of the last century’s Russian teachers and psychologists: L. S. Vygodsky, A. N. Leontyev, L. I. Bozhovitch, A. V. Zaporozhets, V. V. Davydov, etc. Based on their studies, a series of teaching methodical manuals was developed in the Institute of Reflexive Psychology of Creativity and Humanizing the Education at the International Academy of Humanizing the Education, Sotchi–Magdeburg: «Russian Education 2020 – the Model of Preschool Education» and «Pedagogic Innovations in MPEE of Innovative Type».In author’s opinion, the outcome of the research can promote the modernization efficiency in preschool education.

  13. Intramolecular epitope spreading in Heymann nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pallavi; Tramontano, Alfonso; Makker, Sudesh P

    2007-12-01

    Immunization with megalin induces active Heymann nephritis, which reproduces features of human idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis. Megalin is a complex immunological target with four discrete ligand-binding domains (LBDs) that may contain epitopes to which pathogenic autoantibodies are directed. Recently, a 236-residue N-terminal fragment, termed "L6," that spans the first LBD was shown to induce autoantibodies and severe disease. We used this model to examine epitope-specific contributions to pathogenesis. Sera obtained from rats 4 weeks after immunization with L6 demonstrated reactivity only with the L6 fragment on Western blot, whereas sera obtained after 8 weeks demonstrated reactivity with all four recombinant fragments of interest (L6 and LBDs II, III, and IV). We demonstrated that the L6 immunogen does not contain the epitopes responsible for the reactivity to the LBD fragments. Therefore, the appearance of antibodies directed at LBD fragments several weeks after the primary immune response suggests intramolecular epitope spreading. In vivo, we observed a temporal association between increased proteinuria and the appearance of antibodies to LBD fragments. These data implicate B cell epitope spreading in antibody-mediated pathogenesis of active Heymann nephritis, a model that should prove valuable for further study of autoimmune dysregulation.

  14. Principles of spread-spectrum communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Torrieri, Don

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a concise but lucid explanation of the fundamentals of spread-spectrum systems with an emphasis on theoretical principles. The choice of specific topics is tempered by the author’s judgment of their practical significance and interest to both researchers and system designers. The book contains many improved derivations of the classical theory and presents the latest research results that bring the reader to the frontier of the field. This third edition includes new coverage of topics such as CDMA networks, acquisition and synchronization in DS-CDMA cellular networks, hopsets for FH-CDMA ad hoc networks, implications of information theory, the central limit theorem, the power spectral density of FH/CPM complex envelopes, adaptive filters, and adaptive arrays.   ·         Focuses on the fundamentals of spread-spectrum communication systems and provides current examples of their applications ·         Includes problem sets at the end of each chapter to assist readers in co...

  15. Asynchronous Rumor Spreading on Random Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Panagiotou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    We perform a thorough study of various characteristics of the asynchronous push-pull protocol for spreading a rumor on Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random graphs $G_{n,p}$, for any $p>c\\ln(n)/n$ with $c>1$. In particular, we provide a simple strategy for analyzing the asynchronous push-pull protocol on arbitrary graph topologies and apply this strategy to $G_{n,p}$. We prove tight bounds of logarithmic order for the total time that is needed until the information has spread to all nodes. Surprisingly, the time required by the asynchronous push-pull protocol is asymptotically almost unaffected by the average degree of the graph. Similarly tight bounds for Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random graphs have previously only been obtained for the synchronous push protocol, where it has been observed that the total running time increases significantly for sparse random graphs. Finally, we quantify the robustness of the protocol with respect to transmission and node failures. Our analysis suggests that the asynchronous protocols are particu...

  16. A lattice model for influenza spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Liccardo

    Full Text Available We construct a stochastic SIR model for influenza spreading on a D-dimensional lattice, which represents the dynamic contact network of individuals. An age distributed population is placed on the lattice and moves on it. The displacement from a site to a nearest neighbor empty site, allows individuals to change the number and identities of their contacts. The dynamics on the lattice is governed by an attractive interaction between individuals belonging to the same age-class. The parameters, which regulate the pattern dynamics, are fixed fitting the data on the age-dependent daily contact numbers, furnished by the Polymod survey. A simple SIR transmission model with a nearest neighbors interaction and some very basic adaptive mobility restrictions complete the model. The model is validated against the age-distributed Italian epidemiological data for the influenza A(H1N1 during the [Formula: see text] season, with sensible predictions for the epidemiological parameters. For an appropriate topology of the lattice, we find that, whenever the accordance between the contact patterns of the model and the Polymod data is satisfactory, there is a good agreement between the numerical and the experimental epidemiological data. This result shows how rich is the information encoded in the average contact patterns of individuals, with respect to the analysis of the epidemic spreading of an infectious disease.

  17. Strong Robustness of Randomized Rumor Spreading Protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Doerr, Benjamin; Levavi, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Randomized rumor spreading is a classical protocol to disseminate information across a network. At SODA 2008, a quasirandom version of this protocol was proposed and competitive bounds for its run-time were proven. This prompts the question: to what extent does the quasirandom protocol inherit the second principal advantage of randomized rumor spreading, namely robustness against transmission failures? In this paper, we present a result precise up to $(1 \\pm o(1))$ factors. We limit ourselves to the network in which every two vertices are connected by a direct link. Run-times accurate to their leading constants are unknown for all other non-trivial networks. We show that if each transmission reaches its destination with a probability of $p \\in (0,1]$, after $(1+\\e)(\\frac{1}{\\log_2(1+p)}\\log_2n+\\frac{1}{p}\\ln n)$ rounds the quasirandom protocol has informed all $n$ nodes in the network with probability at least $1-n^{-p\\e/40}$. Note that this is faster than the intuitively natural $1/p$ factor increase over th...

  18. SIS Epidemic Spreading with Heterogeneous Infection Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we aim to understand the influence of the heterogeneity of infection rates on the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) epidemic spreading. Specifically, we keep the recovery rates the same for all nodes and study the influence of the moments of the independently identically distributed (i.i.d.) infection rates on the average fraction $y_\\infty$ of infected nodes in the meta-stable state, which indicates the severity of the overall infection. Motivated by real-world datasets, we consider the log-normal and gamma distributions for the infection rates and we design as well a symmetric distribution so that we have a systematic view of the influence of various distributions. By continuous-time simulations on several types of networks, theoretical proofs and physical interpretations, we conclude that: 1) the heterogeneity of infection rates on average retards the virus spread, and 2) a larger even-order moment of the infection rates leads to a smaller average fraction of infected nodes, but the odd-...

  19. Epidemics spreading in interconnected complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Institute of High Performance Computing, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Xiao, G., E-mail: egxxiao@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-09-03

    We study epidemic spreading in two interconnected complex networks. It is found that in our model the epidemic threshold of the interconnected network is always lower than that in any of the two component networks. Detailed theoretical analysis is proposed which allows quick and accurate calculations of epidemic threshold and average outbreak/epidemic size. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that, generally speaking, the epidemic size is not significantly affected by the inter-network correlation. In interdependent networks which can be viewed as a special case of interconnected networks, however, impacts of inter-network correlation on the epidemic threshold and outbreak size are more significant. -- Highlights: ► We study epidemic spreading in two interconnected complex networks. ► The epidemic threshold is lower than that in any of the two networks. And Interconnection correlation has impacts on threshold and average outbreak size. ► Detailed theoretical analysis is proposed which allows quick and accurate calculations of epidemic threshold and average outbreak/epidemic size. ► We demonstrated and proved that Interconnection correlation does not affect epidemic size significantly. ► In interdependent networks, impacts of inter-network correlation on the epidemic threshold and outbreak size are more significant.

  20. Modelling dengue epidemic spreading with human mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmak, D. H.; Dorso, C. O.; Otero, M.

    2016-04-01

    We explored the effect of human mobility on the spatio-temporal dynamics of Dengue with a stochastic model that takes into account the epidemiological dynamics of the infected mosquitoes and humans, with different mobility patterns of the human population. We observed that human mobility strongly affects the spread of infection by increasing the final size and by changing the morphology of the epidemic outbreaks. When the spreading of the disease is driven only by mosquito dispersal (flight), a main central focus expands diffusively. On the contrary, when human mobility is taken into account, multiple foci appear throughout the evolution of the outbreaks. These secondary foci generated throughout the outbreaks could be of little importance according to their mass or size compared with the largest main focus. However, the coalescence of these foci with the main one generates an effect, through which the latter develops a size greater than the one obtained in the case driven only by mosquito dispersal. This increase in growth rate due to human mobility and the coalescence of the foci are particularly relevant in temperate cities such as the city of Buenos Aires, since they give more possibilities to the outbreak to grow before the arrival of the low-temperature season. The findings of this work indicate that human mobility could be the main driving force in the dynamics of vector epidemics.

  1. Cultural Incubators and Spread of Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Enrico R; Lake, Mark W

    2015-07-01

    Several forms of social learning rely on the direct or indirect evaluation of the fitness of cultural traits. Here we argue, via a simple agent-based model, that payoff uncertainty, that is, the correlation between a trait and the signal used to evaluate its fitness, plays a pivotal role in the spread of beneficial innovation. More specifically, we examine how this correlation affects the evolutionary dynamics of different forms of social learning and how each form can generate divergent historical trajectories depending on the size of the sample pool. In particular, we demonstrate that social learning by copying the best model is particularly susceptible to a sampling effect caused by the interaction of payoff uncertainty, the number of models sampled (the sample pool), and the frequency with which a trait is present in the population. As a result, we identify circumstances in which smaller sample pools can act as "cultural incubators" that promote the spread of innovations, while more widespread sampling of the population actually retards the rate of cultural evolution.

  2. Wave-like spread of Ebola Zaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade the Zaire strain of Ebola virus (ZEBOV has emerged repeatedly into human populations in central Africa and caused massive die-offs of gorillas and chimpanzees. We tested the view that emergence events are independent and caused by ZEBOV variants that have been long resident at each locality. Phylogenetic analyses place the earliest known outbreak at Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo, very near to the root of the ZEBOV tree, suggesting that viruses causing all other known outbreaks evolved from a Yambuku-like virus after 1976. The tendency for earlier outbreaks to be directly ancestral to later outbreaks suggests that outbreaks are epidemiologically linked and may have occurred at the front of an advancing wave. While the ladder-like phylogenetic structure could also bear the signature of positive selection, our statistical power is too weak to reach a conclusion in this regard. Distances among outbreaks indicate a spread rate of about 50 km per year that remains consistent across spatial scales. Viral evolution is clocklike, and sequences show a high level of small-scale spatial structure. Genetic similarity decays with distance at roughly the same rate at all spatial scales. Our analyses suggest that ZEBOV has recently spread across the region rather than being long persistent at each outbreak locality. Controlling the impact of Ebola on wild apes and human populations may be more feasible than previously recognized.

  3. Language in Education in Eastern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, T. P., Ed.

    This volume contains the papers given at the first Eastern Africa Conference on Language and Linguistics, held in Dar es Salaam in December 1968, under the auspices of the Survey of Language Use and Language Teaching in Eastern Africa. The chief aim of the Conference was to bring together scholars and teachers working in Eastern Africa interested…

  4. The formation of post-spreading volcanic ridges in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minghui; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; He, Enyuan; Tan, Pingchuan; Wang, Jian; Qiu, Xuelin

    2016-04-01

    In the South China Sea (SCS), the post-spreading magmatism (˜8-13 Ma) largely masks the previous spreading fabric. The resulting post-spreading seamounts are more numerous in the northern part than in the southern part of the East sub-basin. In the eastern part of the East sub-basin, the post-spreading volcanic ridge (PSVR) is approximately N055° oriented and follows the extinct spreading ridge (ESR). In the western part of the East sub-basin, the PSVR, called the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain, is E-W oriented and hides the ESR. Based on swath bathymetric and magnetic data, the ESR in the eastern part of the East basin is also N055° oriented and thus is oblique the E-W Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain (Sibuet et al., 2016). We conducted a seismic refraction survey covering both the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain and the adjacent ESR, providing new constraints for understanding the relationship between the PSVR and the ESR. The detailed velocity structure shows that the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain was emplaced through a typical oceanic crust. The thicknesses of Zhenbei (14 km) and Huangyan seamounts (8 km) are larger than the ones of the normal oceanic crust. The correlation between crustal thicknesses and mean lower-crustal seismic velocities suggest that an asymmetric generation of seamounts in the East sub-basin where active upwelling mantle (Holbrook et al., 2001), the presence of a fertile mantle component (Korenaga et al., 2002), or buoyancy-driven decompression melting may happened (Castillo et al., 2010). Below the seamounts, the thickened lower crust is probably due to secondary magmatic intrusions and the large thickness of upper crust is possibly due to volcanic extrusions. The crustal thicknesses as well as the mean lower-crustal velocities of the Zhenbei and Huangyan seamounts are different, suggesting an independent origin for magmatic feeding. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91028002, 91428204

  5. Evaluation of forecasts by accuracy and spread in the MiKlip decadal climate prediction system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kadow

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the evaluation of temperature and precipitation forecasts obtained with the MiKlip decadal climate prediction system. These decadal hindcast experiments are verified with respect to the accuracy of the ensemble mean and the ensemble spread as a representative for the forecast uncertainty. The skill assessment follows the verification framework already used by the decadal prediction community, but enhanced with additional evaluation techniques like the logarithmic ensemble spread score. The core of the MiKlip system is the coupled Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. An ensemble of 10 members is initialized annually with ocean and atmosphere reanalyses of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. For assessing the effect of the initialization, we compare these predictions to uninitialized climate projections with the same model system. Initialization improves the accuracy of temperature and precipitation forecasts in year 1, particularly in the Pacific region. The ensemble spread well represents the forecast uncertainty in lead year 1, except in the tropics. This estimate of prediction skill creates confidence in the respective 2014 forecasts, which depict less precipitation in the tropics and a warming almost everywhere. However, large cooling patterns appear in the Northern Hemisphere, the Pacific South America and the Southern Ocean. Forecasts for 2015 to 2022 show even warmer temperatures than for 2014, especially over the continents. The evaluation of lead years 2 to 9 for temperature shows skill globally with the exception of the eastern Pacific. The ensemble spread can again be used as an estimate of the forecast uncertainty in many regions: It improves over the tropics compared to lead year 1. Due to a reduction of the conditional bias, the decadal predictions of the initialized system gain skill in the accuracy compared to the uninitialized simulations in the lead years 2 to 9. Furthermore, we show that

  6. Primary production in the eastern tropical Pacific: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, J. Timothy; Mahoney, Kevin L.; Kuwahara, Victor S.; Kolber, Dorota D.; Calienes, Ruth; Chavez, Francisco P.

    2006-05-01

    The eastern tropical Pacific includes 28 million km 2 of ocean between 23.5°N and S and Central/South America and 140°W, and contains the eastern and equatorial branches of the north and South Pacific subtropical gyres plus two equatorial and two coastal countercurrents. Spatial patterns of primary production are in general determined by supply of macronutrients (nitrate, phosphate) from below the thermocline. Where the thermocline is shallow and intersects the lighted euphotic zone, biological production is enhanced. In the eastern tropical Pacific thermocline depth is controlled by three interrelated processes: a basin-scale east/west thermocline tilt, a basin-scale thermocline shoaling at the gyre margins, and local wind-driven upwelling. These processes regulate supply of nutrient-rich subsurface waters to the euphotic zone, and on their basis we have divided the eastern tropical Pacific into seven main regions. Primary production and its physical and chemical controls are described for each. Enhanced rates of macronutrient supply maintains levels of primary production in the eastern tropical Pacific above those of the oligotrophic subtropical gyres to the north and south. On the other hand lack of the micronutrient iron limits phytoplankton growth (and nitrogen fixation) over large portions of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific, depressing rates of primary production and resulting in the so-called high nitrate-low chlorophyll condition. Very high rates of primary production can occur in those coastal areas where both macronutrients and iron are supplied in abundance to surface waters. In these eutrophic coastal areas large phytoplankton cells dominate; conversely, in the open-ocean small cells are dominant. In a ‘shadow zone’ between the subtropical gyres with limited subsurface ventilation, enough production sinks and decays to produce anoxic and denitrified waters which spread beneath very large parts of the eastern tropical Pacific. Seasonal

  7. Resource Allocation with Adaptive Spread Spectrum OFDM Using 2D Spreading for Power Line Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudais Jean-Yves

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bit-loading techniques based on orthogonal frequency division mutiplexing (OFDM are frequently used over wireline channels. In the power line context, channel state information can reasonably be obtained at both transmitter and receiver sides, and adaptive loading can advantageously be carried out. In this paper, we propose to apply loading principles to an spread spectrum OFDM (SS-OFDM waveform which is a multicarrier system using 2D spreading in the time and frequency domains. The presented algorithm handles the subcarriers, spreading codes, bits and energies assignment in order to maximize the data rate and the range of the communication system. The optimization is realized at a target symbol error rate and under spectral mask constraint as usually imposed. The analytical study shows that the merging principle realized by the spreading code improves the rate and the range of the discrete multitone (DMT system in single and multiuser contexts. Simulations have been run over measured power line communication (PLC channel responses and highlight that the proposed system is all the more interesting than the received signal-to-noise ratio (SNR is low.

  8. Non-aqueous phase liquid spreading during soil vapor extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hunt, James R.

    2004-02-01

    Many non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are expected to spread at the air-water interface, particularly under non-equilibrium conditions. In the vadose zone, this spreading should increase the surface area for mass transfer and the efficiency of volatile NAPL recovery by soil vapor extraction (SVE). Observations of spreading on water wet surfaces led to a conceptual model of oil spreading vertically above a NAPL pool in the vadose zone. Analysis of this model predicts that spreading can enhance the SVE contaminant recovery compared to conditions where the liquid does not spread. Experiments were conducted with spreading volatile oils hexane and heptane in wet porous media and capillary tubes, where spreading was observed at the scale of centimeters. Within porous medium columns up to a meter in height containing stagnant gas, spreading was less than ten centimeters and did not contribute significantly to hexane volatilization. Water film thinning and oil film pinning may have prevented significant oil film spreading, and thus did not enhance SVE at the scale of a meter. The experiments performed indicate that volatile oil spreading at the field scale is unlikely to contribute significantly to the efficiency of SVE.

  9. Mutual Feedback Between Epidemic Spreading and Information Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Xiu-Xiu; Zhou, Ge; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Sun, Gui-Quan; Zhu, Jonathan J H

    2015-01-01

    The impact that information diffusion has on epidemic spreading has recently attracted much attention. As a disease begins to spread in the population, information about the disease is transmitted to others, which in turn has an effect on the spread of disease. In this paper, using empirical results of the propagation of H7N9 and information about the disease, we clearly show that the spreading dynamics of the two-types of processes influence each other. We build a mathematical model in which both types of spreading dynamics are described using the SIS process in order to illustrate the influence of information diffusion on epidemic spreading. Both the simulation results and the pairwise analysis reveal that information diffusion can increase the threshold of an epidemic outbreak, decrease the final fraction of infected individuals and significantly decrease the rate at which the epidemic propagates. Additionally, we find that the multi-outbreak phenomena of epidemic spreading, along with the impact of inform...

  10. Topology dependent epidemic spreading velocity in weighted networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei; Quax, Rick; Lees, Michael; Qiu, Xiaogang; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Many diffusive processes occur on structured networks with weighted links, such as disease spread by airplane transport or information diffusion in social networks or blogs. Understanding the impact of weight-connectivity correlations on epidemic spreading in weighted networks is crucial to support decision-making on disease control and other diffusive processes. However, a real understanding of epidemic spreading velocity in weighted networks is still lacking. Here we conduct a numerical study of the velocity of a Reed-Frost epidemic spreading process in various weighted network topologies as a function of the correlations between edge weights and node degrees. We find that a positive weight-connectivity correlation leads to a faster epidemic spreading compared to an unweighted network. In contrast, we find that both uncorrelated and negatively correlated weight distributions lead to slower spreading processes. In the case of positive weight-connectivity correlations, the acceleration of spreading velocity is weak when the heterogeneity of weight distribution increases.

  11. FACTORS INFLUENCING YIELD SPREADS OF THE MALAYSIAN BONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norliza Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysian bond market is developing rapidly but not much is understood in terms of macroeconomic factors that could influence the yield spread of the Ringgit Malaysian denominated bonds. Based on a multifactor model, this paper examines the impact of four macroeconomic factors namely: Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (KLCI, Industry Production Index (IPI, Consumer Price Index (CPI and interest rates (IR on bond yield spread of the Malaysian Government Securities (MGS and Corporate Bonds (CBs for a period from January 2001 to December 2008. The findings support the expected hypotheses that CPI and IR are the major drivers that influence the changes in MGS yield spreads. However IPI and KLCI have weak and no influence on MGS yield spreads respectively Whilst IR, CPI and IPI have significant influence on the yield spreads of CB1, CB2 and CB3, KLCI has significant influence only on the CB1 yield spread but not on CB2 and CB3 yield spreads.

  12. DETERMINANTS OF INTEREST RATE SPREAD IN BANKING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo GHASEMI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is done to consider affecting factors on spread rate and define a suitable model of spread rate in banking industry. Spread rate is a difference between two related interest rates. In banking industry, spread rate is the difference between debts rate (especially for deposit and assets rate (Especially for loan. Interest rate spread has always been one of the most important and significant economic issues in different countries of the world. In this study, affecting factors on spread rate are considering in an Iranian bank during the last 19 month. Some variables such as NPL ratio, ratio of demand deposits on deposits, non interest income, and interest assets to assets, capital adequacy ratio, ROA ratio and inflation and exchange rate are analyzed on spread rate and a model is defined for bank according to prior studies and economical issues of Iran.  

  13. Effective information spreading based on local information in correlated networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Wei; Pan, Liming; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2016-12-01

    Using network-based information to facilitate information spreading is an essential task for spreading dynamics in complex networks. Focusing on degree correlated networks, we propose a preferential contact strategy based on the local network structure and local informed density to promote the information spreading. During the spreading process, an informed node will preferentially select a contact target among its neighbors, basing on their degrees or local informed densities. By extensively implementing numerical simulations in synthetic and empirical networks, we find that when only consider the local structure information, the convergence time of information spreading will be remarkably reduced if low-degree neighbors are favored as contact targets. Meanwhile, the minimum convergence time depends non-monotonically on degree-degree correlation, and a moderate correlation coefficient results in the most efficient information spreading. Incorporating the local informed density information into contact strategy, the convergence time of information spreading can be further reduced, and be minimized by an moderately preferential selection.

  14. Exploring Geographic Variability in Cancer Prevalence in Eastern Morocco: A Retrospective Study over Eight Years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Elidrissi Errahhali

    substantial differences in cancer patterns between areas of Eastern Morocco. These findings are important for cancer control and highlight the need to develop program aiming at controlling and preventing the spread of major cancer sites in Eastern Morocco, particularly in areas with increased cancer prevalence rates.

  15. Tectonic differences between eastern and western sub-basins of the Qiongdongnan Basin and their dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbao; Sun, Zhen; Wang, Zhenfeng; Sun, Zhipeng; Zhao, Zhongxian; Wang, Zhangwen; Zhang, Cuimei; Qiu, Ning; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2015-03-01

    The central depression of the Qiongdongnan Basin can be divided into the eastern and western sub-basins by the Lingshui-Songnan paleo-uplift. To the northwest, the orientation of the faults turns from NE, to EW, and later to NW; In the southwest, the orientation of the faults turns from NE, to NNE, and then to NW, making the central depression much wider towards the west. In the eastern sub-basin, the NE-striking faults and the EW-striking faults made up an echelon, making the central depression turn wider towards the east. Fault activity rates indicate that faulting spreads gradually from both the east and west sides to the middle of the basin. Hence, extensional stress in the eastern sub-basin may be related to the South China Sea spreading system, whereas the western sub-basin was more under the effect of the activity of the Red River Fault. The extreme crustal stretching in the eastern sub-basin was probably related to magmatic setting. It seems that there are three periods of magmatic events that occurred in the eastern sub-basin. In the eastern part of the southern depression, the deformed strata indicate that the magma may have intruded into the strata along faults around T60 (23.3 Ma). The second magmatic event occurred earlier than 10.5 Ma, which induced the accelerated subsidence. The final magmatic event commenced later than 10 Ma, which led to today's high heat flow. As for the western sub-basin, the crust thickened southward, and there seemed to be a southeastward lower crustal flow, which happened during continental breakup which was possibly superimposed by a later lower crustal flow induced by the isostatic compensation of massive sedimentation caused by the right lateral slipping of the Red River Fault. Under the huge thick sediment, super pressure developed in the western sub-basin. In summary, the eastern sub-basin was mainly affected by the South China Sea spreading system and a magma setting, whereas the western sub-basin had a closer

  16. Spreading of cooperative behaviour across interdependent groups

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Luo-Luo

    2013-01-01

    Recent empirical research has shown that links between groups reinforce individuals within groups to adopt cooperative behaviour. Moreover, links between networks may induce cascading failures, competitive percolation, or contribute to efficient transportation. Here we show that there in fact exists an intermediate fraction of links between groups that is optimal for the evolution of cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game. We consider individual groups with regular, random, and scale-free topology, and study their different combinations to reveal that an intermediate interdependence optimally facilitates the spreading of cooperative behaviour between groups. Excessive between-group links simply unify the two groups and make them act as one, while too rare between-group links preclude a useful information flow between the two groups. Interestingly, we find that between-group links are more likely to connect two cooperators than in-group links, thus supporting the conclusion that they are of paramount impor...

  17. Emergence and spreading potential of Zika virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Fajardo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an arthropod-borne Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae closely related to dengue, yellow fever and West Nile viruses. ZIKV remained neglected, confined to enzootic transmission cycles in Africa and Asia, until the first significant outbreak was reported in Micronesia in 2007. Subsequent epidemics of growing incidence occurred in French Polynesia and other South Pacific Islands, and recently, in the Americas. The latter and currently ongoing outbreak of unprecedented incidence revealed the association of ZIKV infection with the occurrence of severe congenital malformations and neurological diseases, leading to a widespread concern about its potential to pose a global public health threat. Serological and molecular data suggest that the genetic and geographic diversification of ZIKV may be greatly underestimated. Here we discuss several ecological and epidemiological aspects, together with the evolutionary processes that may have driven the emergence and abrupt spread of ZIKV in the Americas.

  18. Avian Influenza spread and transmission dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourouiba, Lydia; Gourley, Stephen A.; Liu, Rongsong; Takekawa, John Y.; Wu, Jianhong; Chen, Dongmei; Moulin, Bernard; Wu, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    The spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of type A of subtype H5N1 has been a serious threat to global public health. Understanding the roles of various (migratory, wild, poultry) bird species in the transmission of these viruses is critical for designing and implementing effective control and intervention measures. Developing appropriate models and mathematical techniques to understand these roles and to evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation strategies have been a challenge. Recent development of the global health surveillance (especially satellite tracking and GIS techniques) and the mathematical theory of dynamical systems combined have gradually shown the promise of some cutting-edge methodologies and techniques in mathematical biology to meet this challenge.

  19. Spread of Misinformation in Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Acemoglu, Daron; ParandehGheibi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    We provide a model to investigate the tension between information aggregation and spread of misinformation in large societies (conceptualized as networks of agents communicating with each other). Each individual holds a belief represented by a scalar. Individuals meet pairwise and exchange information, which is modeled as both individuals adopting the average of their pre-meeting beliefs. When all individuals engage in this type of information exchange, the society will be able to effectively aggregate the initial information held by all individuals. There is also the possibility of misinformation, however, because some of the individuals are "forceful," meaning that they influence the beliefs of (some) of the other individuals they meet, but do not change their own opinion. The paper characterizes how the presence of forceful agents interferes with information aggregation. Under the assumption that even forceful agents obtain some information (however infrequent) from some others (and additional weak regular...

  20. Spreading of Persistent Infections in Heterogeneous Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, J; Moreno, Y

    2010-01-01

    Up to now, the effects of having heterogeneous networks of contacts have been studied mostly for diseases which are not persistent in time, i.e., for diseases where the infectious period can be considered very small compared to the lifetime of an individual. Moreover, all these previous results have been obtained for closed populations, where the number of individuals does not change during the whole duration of the epidemics. Here, we go one step further and analyze, both analytically and numerically, a radically different kind of diseases: those that are persistent and can last for an individual's lifetime. To be more specific, we particularize to the case of Tuberculosis' (TB) infection dynamics, where the infection remains latent for a period of time before showing up and spreading to other individuals. We introduce an epidemiological model for TB-like persistent infections taking into account the heterogeneity inherent to the population structure. This sort of dynamics introduces new analytical and numer...

  1. Global Spread of Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naas, Thierry; Poirel, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Carbapenemases increasingly have been reported in Enterobacteriaceae in the past 10 years. Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases have been reported in the United States and then worldwide, with a marked endemicity at least in the United States and Greece. Metallo-enzymes (Verona integron–encoded metallo-β-lactamase, IMP) also have been reported worldwide, with a higher prevalence in southern Europe and Asia. Carbapenemases of the oxacillinase-48 type have been identified mostly in Mediterranean and European countries and in India. Recent identification of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 producers, originally in the United Kingdom, India, and Pakistan and now worldwide, is worrisome. Detection of infected patients and carriers with carbapenemase producers is necessary for prevention of their spread. Identification of the carbapenemase genes relies mostly on molecular techniques, whereas detection of carriers is possible by using screening culture media. This strategy may help prevent development of nosocomial outbreaks caused by carbapenemase producers, particularly K. pneumoniae. PMID:22000347

  2. Initial Distribution Spread: A density forecasting approach

    CERN Document Server

    Machete, Reason L

    2012-01-01

    Ensemble forecasting of nonlinear systems involves the use of a model to run forward a discrete ensemble (or set) of initial states. Data assimilation techniques tend to focus on estimating the true state of the system, even though model error limits the value of such efforts. This paper argues for choosing the initial ensemble in order to optimise forecasting performance rather than estimate the true state of the system. Density forecasting and choosing the initial ensemble are treated as one problem. Forecasting performance can be quantified by some scoring rule. In the case of the logarithmic scoring rule, theoretical arguments and empirical results are presented. It turns out that, if the underlying noise dominates model error, we can diagnose the noise spread.

  3. Formation of Tethers from Spreading Cellular Aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaune, Grégory; Winnik, Françoise M; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    Membrane tubes are commonly extruded from cells and vesicles when a point-like force is applied on the membrane. We report here the unexpected formation of membrane tubes from lymph node cancer prostate (LNCaP) cell aggregates in the absence of external applied forces. The spreading of LNCaP aggregates deposited on adhesive glass substrates coated with fibronectin is very limited because cell-cell adhesion is stronger than cell-substrate adhesion. Some cells on the aggregate periphery are very motile and try to escape from the aggregate, leading to the formation of membrane tubes. Tethered networks and exchange of cargos between cells were observed as well. Growth of the tubes is followed by either tube retraction or tube rupture. Hence, even very cohesive cells are successful in escaping aggregates, which may lead to epithelial mesenchymal transition and tumor metastasis. We interpret the dynamics of formation and retraction of tubes in the framework of membrane mechanics.

  4. Density enhancements associated with equatorial spread F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Joyce

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Forces governing the three-dimensional structure of equatorial spread-F (ESF plumes are examined using the NRL SAMI3/ESF three-dimensional simulation code. As is the case with the equatorial ionization anomaly (IA, density crests within the plume occur where gravitational and diffusive forces are in balance. Large E×B drifts within the ESF plume place these crests on field lines with apex heights higher than those of the background IA crests. Large poleward field-aligned ion velocities within the plume result in large ion-neutral diffusive forces that support these ionization crests at altitudes higher than background IA crest altitudes. We show examples in which density enhancements associated with ESF, also called "plasma blobs," can occur within an ESF plume on density-crest field lines, at or above the density crests. Simulated ESF density enhancements reproduce all key features of those that have been observed in situ.

  5. Trigeminal perineural spread of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornik, Alejandro; Rosenblum, Jordan; Biller, Jose [Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, Chicago (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A 55-year-old man had a five-day history of 'pins and needles' sensation on the left chin. Examination showed decreased pinprick sensation on the territory of the left mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium showed enhancement involving the left mandibular branch. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed a left kidney mass diagnosed as renal carcinoma following nephrectomy. The 'numb-chin' syndrome heralds or accompanies systemic malignancies. Trigeminal perineural spread has been well-documented in head and neck neoplasms, however, to our knowledge, it has not been reported in renal neoplasms. (author)

  6. Emergence and Spreading Potential of Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Álvaro; Cristina, Juan; Moreno, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae) closely related to dengue, yellow fever and West Nile viruses. ZIKV remained neglected, confined to enzootic transmission cycles in Africa and Asia, until the first significant outbreak was reported in Micronesia in 2007. Subsequent epidemics of growing incidence occurred in French Polynesia and other South Pacific Islands, and recently, in the Americas. The latter and currently ongoing outbreak of unprecedented incidence revealed the association of ZIKV infection with the occurrence of severe congenital malformations and neurological diseases, leading to a widespread concern about its potential to pose a global public health threat. Serological and molecular data suggest that the genetic and geographic diversification of ZIKV may be greatly underestimated. Here we discuss several ecological and epidemiological aspects, together with the evolutionary processes that may have driven the emergence and abrupt spread of ZIKV in the Americas. PMID:27812357

  7. Wolbachia spread dynamics in stochastic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Linchao; Huang, Mugen; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe; Zheng, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease with 100 million people infected annually. A novel strategy for dengue control uses the bacterium Wolbachia to invade dengue vector Aedes mosquitoes. As the impact of environmental heterogeneity on Wolbachia spread dynamics in natural areas has been rarely quantified, we develop a model of differential equations for which the environmental conditions switch randomly between two regimes. We find some striking phenomena that random regime transitions could drive Wolbachia to extinction from certain initial states confirmed Wolbachia fixation in homogeneous environments, and mosquito releasing facilitates Wolbachia invasion more effectively when the regimes transit frequently. By superimposing the phase spaces of the ODE systems defined in each regime, we identify the threshold curves below which Wolbachia invades the whole population, which extends the theory of threshold infection frequency to stochastic environments.

  8. Quantifier spreading: children misled by ostensive cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin É. Kiss

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper calls attention to a methodological problem of acquisition experiments. It shows that the economy of the stimulus employed in child language experiments may lend an increased ostensive effect to the message communicated to the child. Thus, when the visual stimulus in a sentence-picture matching task is a minimal model abstracting away from the details of the situation, children often regard all the elements of the stimulus as ostensive clues to be represented in the corresponding sentence. The use of such minimal stimuli is mistaken when the experiment aims to test whether or not a certain element of the stimulus is relevant for the linguistic representation or interpretation. The paper illustrates this point by an experiment involving quantifier spreading. It is claimed that children find a universally quantified sentence like 'Every girl is riding a bicycle 'to be a false description of a picture showing three girls riding bicycles and a solo bicycle because they are misled to believe that all the elements in the visual stimulus are relevant, hence all of them are to be represented by the corresponding linguistic description. When the iconic drawings were replaced by photos taken in a natural environment rich in accidental details, the occurrence of quantifier spreading was radically reduced. It is shown that an extra object in the visual stimulus can lead to the rejection of the sentence also in the case of sentences involving no quantification, which gives further support to the claim that the source of the problem is not (or not only the grammatical or cognitive difficulty of quantification but the unintended ostensive effect of the extra object.  This article is part of the special collection: Acquisition of Quantification

  9. Smallpox: emergence, global spread, and eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, F

    1993-01-01

    Speculatively, it is suggested that variola virus, the cause of smallpox, evolved from an orthopoxvirus of animals of the central African rain forests (possibly now represented by Tatera poxvirus), some thousands of years ago, and first became established as a virus specific for human beings in the dense populations of the Nile valley perhaps five thousand years ago. By the end of the first millennium of the Christian era, it had spread to all the densely populated parts of the Eurasian continent and along the Mediterranean fringe of north Africa. It became established in Europe during the times of the Crusades. The great voyages of European colonization carried smallpox to the Americas and to Africa south of the Sahara. Transported across the Atlantic by Europeans and their African slaves, it played a major role in the conquest of Mexico and Peru and the European settlement of north America. Variolation, an effective preventive inoculation, was devised as early as the tenth century. In 1798 this practice was supplanted by Jenner's cowpox vaccine. In 1967, when the disease was still endemic in 31 countries and caused ten to fifteen million cases and about two million deaths annually, the World Health Organization embarked on a programme that was to see the disease eradicated globally just over ten years later, and the world was formally declared to be free of smallpox in May 1980. Smallpox is unique--a specifically human disease that emerged from some animal reservoir, spread to become a worldwide, severe and almost universal affliction, and finally underwent the reverse process to emergence, namely global eradication.

  10. Strategy Formation in Eastern Jutland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    in the area.   The municipalities acknowledge the articulation of the city region and the initiated planning process.  However, the municipalities might see the arena as means to lobby for infrastructure investments in Eastern Jutland, as it is doubtful whether the municipalities will feel encouraged to enter...... a process, which is aiming at increasing the national regulation within their territory.    The result might very well be that the discussion about future infrastructure investments is not linked to discussions about future urban development in Eastern Jutland.  These aspects raises serious questions about...... on which level a serious strategy formation process can take place.  There is a danger that a common strategic spatial plan is more an expression of the lowest common denominator and the municipalities request for infrastructure investments rather than being a spatial strategy with transformative power. ...

  11. Deep-tow studies of the overlapping spreading centers at 9°03&primeN on the East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempere, Jean-Christophe; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1986-10-01

    The deeply-towed instrument package of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography was used to study for the first time the fine scale structure of an overlapping spreading center (OSC) system: the 9°03'N OSC on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The eastern and western limbs of this OSC system which are 8 km apart and overlap by 27 km show marked differences. Away from the tips, the spreading centers are highly tectonized and differ greatly from the ridge tips. The western ridge tip exhibits a few fissures but no sign of recent volcanic activity whereas the eastern ridge tip is highly fissured and has experienced more recent volcanic episodes which are confined to a narrow zone within this highly fissured area. In both cases, the ridge tip fissures are 10°-15° oblique to the strike of the faults that occur on the flanks of the adjacent portion of the opposite spreading axis, indicating a recent change in the direction of deviatoric tension and suggesting that the eastern and western spreading centers have been propagating southward and northward respectively. The eastern ridge tip fissures are transecting the flank of the western spreading axis suggesting that the eastern spreading center is about to become the through-going trace of the East Pacific Rise. In contrast, the western spreading center disappears into abyssal hill terrain that was presumably created at the eastern ridge axis. Some of the very few tectonic features observed in the overlap basin may reflect the existence of a short-lived shear couple due to the interaction of the two overlapping spreading centers. Sediment cover over the whole area and especially in the overlap basin is relatively thick, supporting the idea of a time-averaged deficit in the magmatic budget at this OSC. We suggest that the 9°03'N OSC developed where two magmatic pulses, independent in space and time and propagating along the strike of the East Pacific Rise away from the loci of melt emplacement, failed to meet. Misalignment of

  12. Redispersal of seeds by a keystone ant augments the spread of common wildflowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canner, Judith E.; Dunn, Robert R.; Giladi, Itamar; Gross, Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Myrmecochory (dispersal of seeds by ants) is an evolutionarily and ecologically common mutualism. Most of the research on the costs and benefits of myrmecochory in North America assumes that ant-dispersed seeds are taken to, and left in, the ant nest. Here, we use a novel seed-tracking technique to quantify secondary dispersal of seeds from the nest into the surrounding leaf litter by the keystone seed-dispersing ant, Aphaenogaster rudis. We found that A. rudis redispersed >90% of the seeds it took into its nest an average distance of 51.5 cm. A mathematical model shows redispersal increases the rate of population spread of the myrmecochores Hexastylis arifolia and Asarum canadense by 22.5%, and increases the expected cumulative dispersal distance away from the parent plant by 24%. Our results suggest myrmecochory benefits plants in eastern North American forests by increasing the distance between the seed and parent plant and reducing competition among siblings.

  13. Toe spreading ability in men with chronic pelvic pain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ugur; Rothman, Ivan; Ciol, Marcia A; Yang, Claire C; Berger, Richard E

    2005-01-01

    Background We examined toe-spreading ability in subjects with chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) to test the hypothesis that subjects with CPPS could have deficiencies in lower extremity functions innervated by sacral spinal roots. Methods Seventy two subjects with CPPS and 98 volunteer controls were examined as part of a larger study on CPPS. All the subjects underwent a detailed urologic and neurological examination including a toe-spreading examination with a quantitative scoring system. We compared the groups in terms of ability of toe-spreading as either "complete" (all toes spreading) or "incomplete" (at least one interdigital space not spreading) and also by comparing the number of interdigital spaces. For CPPS subjects only, we also analyzed the variation of the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) scales by toe-spreading categories. Results CPPS subjects were less often able to spread all toes than subjects without CPPS (p = 0.005). None of the NIH-CPSI sub-scales (pain, urinary symptoms, and quality of life), nor the total score showed an association with toe spreading ability. Conclusion We found toe spreading to be diminished in subjects with CPPS. We hypothesize that incomplete toe spreading in subjects with CPPS may be related to subtle deficits involving the most caudal part of the spinal segments. PMID:15949041

  14. Toe spreading ability in men with chronic pelvic pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Claire C

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined toe-spreading ability in subjects with chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS to test the hypothesis that subjects with CPPS could have deficiencies in lower extremity functions innervated by sacral spinal roots. Methods Seventy two subjects with CPPS and 98 volunteer controls were examined as part of a larger study on CPPS. All the subjects underwent a detailed urologic and neurological examination including a toe-spreading examination with a quantitative scoring system. We compared the groups in terms of ability of toe-spreading as either "complete" (all toes spreading or "incomplete" (at least one interdigital space not spreading and also by comparing the number of interdigital spaces. For CPPS subjects only, we also analyzed the variation of the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI scales by toe-spreading categories. Results CPPS subjects were less often able to spread all toes than subjects without CPPS (p = 0.005. None of the NIH-CPSI sub-scales (pain, urinary symptoms, and quality of life, nor the total score showed an association with toe spreading ability. Conclusion We found toe spreading to be diminished in subjects with CPPS. We hypothesize that incomplete toe spreading in subjects with CPPS may be related to subtle deficits involving the most caudal part of the spinal segments.

  15. The reasons for successful spreading of the fishes from the genus Carassius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Kalous

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater fishes of the genus Carassius are widespread throughout home Eurasia but also other continents (Kottelat and Feryhof, 2007. They represent important aquaculture fishes and include the world's most important pet fish, the goldfish (Rylková et al., 2010. On the other hand they are also the most successful invasive pests with a considerable ecological impact at many places (Ribeiro et al., 2015; Copp et al., 2005. High similarities in morphological taxa definitions and occurrence of species complexes have brought lot of confusion in their taxonomy, biogeography and introduction history (Kalous et al., 2012. We present a historical overview and outline past and present reasons that have led to their successful spreading. Our findings are based on phylogenetic, historical and social-economic data. Europe is inhabited by at least five mtDNA lineages of the genus Carassius, which correspond to four taxa and one undescribed species. In Europe there occur: Carassius carassius, feral populations of Carassius auratus, Carassius gibelio, Carassius langsdorfii and Carassius sp.. C. auratus and C. langsdorfii are not native to Europe C. carassius is native to Eastern, Central and Northern Europe (Kalous et al., 2012. The populations of C. gibelio in Eastern and Central Europe should be considered a result of natural postglacial range expansion but the whole Europe was also colonized by introduced Carassius biotypes of various genome combinations from East Asia in the 20th century (Rylková et al., 2013. The spreading of non-native fishes of the genus Carassius has been caused mainly by human activities comprising pet trade, aquaculture and recreational fisheries (Kalous et al., 2013; Kalous et al., 2015.

  16. Formation of post-spreading volcanic ridges in the East sub-basin of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, E.; Zhao, M.; Sibuet, J. C.; Tan, P.; Wang, J.; Qiu, X.

    2016-12-01

    In the South China Sea (SCS), the post-spreading magmatism ( 3-13 Ma) largely masks the initial seafloor spreading fabric. The resulting post-spreading seamounts are more numerous in the northern part than in the southern part of the East sub-basin. In the eastern part of the East sub-basin, the post-spreading volcanic ridge (PSVR) is approximately N055° oriented and follows the extinct spreading ridge (ESR). In the western part of the East sub-basin, the PSVR, called the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain, is E-W oriented and hides the ESR (Sibuet et al., 2016). We conducted a seismic refraction survey covering both the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamount chain and the location of the adjacent ESR. Three E-W oriented profiles and one N-S oriented profile are parallel and perpendicular to the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain, respectively. Our research is focused on the understanding of the relationship between the crustal thicknesses and crustal seismic velocities. The detailed velocity structure shows that the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamount chain was emplaced through a typical oceanic crust. Crustal thicknesses and seismic velocities suggest an asymmetric generation of seamounts in the East sub-basin, where active upwelling mantle (Holbrook et al., 2001) or buoyancy-driven decompression melting happened (Castillo et al., 2010). The Zhenbei and Huangyan seamounts were probably formed 3-5 Ma and 7-9 Ma, after seafloor spreading cessation; their thickened lower crusts were probably due to magmatic intrusions associated with a high-velocity layer (7.4-7.6 km/s),and their large thickness of upper crust were mainly due to volcanic extrusions. These two seamounts presents a different structural orientation and their crustal thicknesses are different, suggesting an independent origin for their magmatic feeding. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91428204, 91028002, 41176053).

  17. Growth form and distribution of introduced plants in their native and non-native ranges in Eastern Asia and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Ricklefs; Qinfeng Guo; Hong Qian

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing interest in understanding the influence of plant traits on their ability to spread in non-native regions. Many studies addressing this issue have been based on relatively small areas or restricted taxonomic groups. Here, we analyse a large data base involving 1567 plant species introduced between Eastern Asia and North America or from elsewhere to...

  18. Recognizing detachment-mode seafloor spreading in the deep geological past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, M.; Morris, A.; Anderson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Large-offset oceanic detachment faults are a characteristic of slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges, leading to the formation of oceanic core complexes (OCCs) that expose upper mantle and lower crustal rocks on the seafloor. The lithospheric extension accommodated by these structures is now recognized as a fundamentally distinct 'detachment-mode' of seafloor spreading compared to classical magmatic accretion. Given the widespread occurrence of oceanic detachment faults and associated OCCs in young lithosphere close to present day spreading axes, there is clearly a need to establish whether this mode of spreading was also significant in the deep geological past. This can be achieved by searching for potential examples of detachment-mode fault systems in ancient oceanic lithosphere preserved in ophiolites. Paleomagnetic analyses of OCC footwall sections sampled by scientific ocean drilling along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge have demonstrated that unroofing during detachment faulting is characteristically accommodated by tectonic rotation around ridge-parallel, shallowly plunging axes, consistent with flexural, isostatic rolling-hinge deformation. However, recognition of this signature in ophiolites requires separation of seafloor spreading and emplacement-related tectonic signatures and analysis of rotation in an original seafloor frame of reference. We illustrate this approach using a potential example of a fossil OCC identified by Tremblay et al. (2009, Tectonophysics, 473, 36-52) in the northern Mirdita ophiolite of Albania. This is a slice of Jurassic (c. 165 Ma) oceanic lithosphere, representing a remnant of the eastern branch of the slow-spreading Tethys Ocean that was obducted during Europe-Adria convergence. It consists of a partially serpentinized lherzolitic mantle sequence (containing discrete gabbro intrusions) overlain tectonically by an upper crustal sequence of sheeted dikes and lavas. The contact between mantle and upper crustal rocks in the region of the

  19. Asymmetrically interacting spreading dynamics on complex layered networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Hui; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lee, GyuWon

    2014-01-01

    The spread of disease through a physical-contact network and the spread of information about the disease on a communication network are two intimately related dynamical processes. We investigate the asymmetrical interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics, each occurring on its own layer, by focusing on the two fundamental quantities underlying any spreading process: epidemic threshold and the final infection ratio. We find that an epidemic outbreak on the contact layer can induce an outbreak on the communication layer, and information spreading can effectively raise the epidemic threshold. When structural correlation exists between the two layers, the information threshold remains unchanged but the epidemic threshold can be enhanced, making the contact layer more resilient to epidemic outbreak. We develop a physical theory to understand the intricate interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics.

  20. Asymmetrically interacting spreading dynamics on complex layered networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Yang, Hui; Younghae Do; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lee, Gyuwon

    2014-05-01

    The spread of disease through a physical-contact network and the spread of information about the disease on a communication network are two intimately related dynamical processes. We investigate the asymmetrical interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics, each occurring on its own layer, by focusing on the two fundamental quantities underlying any spreading process: epidemic threshold and the final infection ratio. We find that an epidemic outbreak on the contact layer can induce an outbreak on the communication layer, and information spreading can effectively raise the epidemic threshold. When structural correlation exists between the two layers, the information threshold remains unchanged but the epidemic threshold can be enhanced, making the contact layer more resilient to epidemic outbreak. We develop a physical theory to understand the intricate interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics.

  1. Fire Spread Model for Old Towns Based on Cellular Automaton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Nan; WENG Wenguo; MA Wei; NI Shunjiang; HUANG Quanyi; YUAN Hongyong

    2008-01-01

    Old towns like Lijiang have enormous historic,artistic,and architectural value.The buildings in such old towns are usually made of highly combustible materials,such as wood and grass.If a fire breaks out,it will spread to multiple buildings,so fire spreading and controlling in old towns need to be studied.This paper presents a fire spread model for old towns based on cellular automaton.The cellular automaton rules were set according to historical fire data in empirical formulas.The model also considered the effects of climate.The simulation results were visualized in a geography information system.An example of a fire spread in Lijiang was investigated with the results showing that this model provides a realistic tool for predicting fire spread in old towns.Fire brigades can use this tool to predict when and how a fire spreads to minimize the losses.

  2. Minimizing Energy Spread In The REX/HIE-ISOLDE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Yucemoz, Mert

    2017-01-01

    This report tries to minimize the energy spread of the beam at the end of the REX-HIE-ISOLDE Linac using the last RF cavity as a buncher. Beams with very low energy spread are often required by the users of the facility In addition, one of the main reason to have minimum energy spread in longitudinal phase space is that higher beam energy spread translates in to a position spread after interacting with target. This causes an overlap in the position of different particles that makes it difficult to distinguish them. Hence, in order to find the operation settings for minimum energy spread at the end of the REX-HIE-ISOLDE linac and to inspect the ongoing physics, several functions on Matlab were created that runs beam dynamics program called “TRACKV39” that provides some graphs and values as a result for analysis.

  3. Suppressing disease spreading by using information diffusion on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Braunstein, Lidia A; Stanley, H Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Although there is always an interplay between the dynamics of information diffusion and disease spreading, the empirical research on the systemic coevolution mechanisms connecting these two spreading dynamics is still lacking. Here we investigate the coevolution mechanisms and dynamics between information and disease spreading by utilizing real data and a proposed model on multiplex network. Our empirical analysis finds asymmetrical interactions between the information and disease spreading dynamics. Our results obtained from both the theoretical framework and intensive stochastic numerical simulations suggest that an information outbreak can be triggered on a communication network by its own spreading dynamics or the disease outbreak on a contact network, but that the disease threshold is not affected by information spreading. Our key finding is that there is an optimal information transmission rate that markedly suppresses the disease speading. We find that the time evolution of the dynamics in the proposed...

  4. Unification of theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Stanley, H. Eugene; Braunstein, Lidia A.

    2017-03-01

    Models of epidemic spreading on complex networks have attracted great attention among researchers in physics, mathematics, and epidemiology due to their success in predicting and controlling scenarios of epidemic spreading in real-world scenarios. To understand the interplay between epidemic spreading and the topology of a contact network, several outstanding theoretical approaches have been developed. An accurate theoretical approach describing the spreading dynamics must take both the network topology and dynamical correlations into consideration at the expense of increasing the complexity of the equations. In this short survey we unify the most widely used theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks in terms of increasing complexity, including the mean-field, the heterogeneous mean-field, the quench mean-field, dynamical message-passing, link percolation, and pairwise approximation. We build connections among these approaches to provide new insights into developing an accurate theoretical approach to spreading dynamics on complex networks.

  5. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  6. Dynamic properties of epidemic spreading on finite size complex networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying; Liu Yang; Shan Xiu-Ming; Ren Yong; Jiao Jian; Qiu Ben

    2005-01-01

    The Internet presents a complex topological structure, on which computer viruses can easily spread. By using theoretical analysis and computer simulation methods, the dynamic process of disease spreading on finite size networks with complex topological structure is investigated. On the finite size networks, the spreading process of SIS (susceptibleinfected-susceptible) model is a finite Markov chain with an absorbing state. Two parameters, the survival probability and the conditional infecting probability, are introduced to describe the dynamic properties of disease spreading on finite size networks. Our results can help understanding computer virus epidemics and other spreading phenomena on communication and social networks. Also, knowledge about the dynamic character of virus spreading is helpful for adopting immunity policy.

  7. Risk assessment for canine leishmaniasis spreading in the north of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Morosetti

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis has not only been recognized but is, in fact, increasing in territories of northern continental Italy previously regarded as non-endemic. Recent findings of sporadic autochthonous canine infections and the presence of phlebotomine vectors in some provinces of north-eastern Italy have stimulated risk assessment for the spreading of leishmaniasis in the autonomous province of Bolzano-South Tyrol, the northernmost territory of the Italian eastern Alps. In July 2008, 61 phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera, Psychodidae were caught and identified as Phlebotomus perniciosus and Sergentomyia minuta. This is the first record in South Tyrol of P. perniciosus, the most competent vector of Leishmania infantum in Mediterranean countries. Leishmania serology on local dogs kept in kennels gave negative results, while only imported canine leishmaniasis cases were reported by local veterinarians through a questionnaire survey. Bio-geographic aspects and epidemiological consequences are analyzed in relation with the risk of leishmaniasis introduction into the area.

  8. On the spreading of impacting drops

    CERN Document Server

    Wildeman, Sander; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The energy budget and dissipation mechanisms during droplet impact on solid surfaces are studied numerically and theoretically. We find that for high impact velocities and negligible surface friction, about one half of the initial kinetic energy is transformed into surface energy, independent of the impact parameters and the detailed energy loss mechanism(s). We argue that this seemingly universal rule is related to the deformation mode of the droplet and is reminiscent of pipe flow undergoing a sudden expansion, for which the head loss can be calculated by multiplying the kinetic energy of the incoming flow by a geometrical factor. For impacts on a no-slip surface also dissipation in the shear boundary layer at the solid surface is important. In this case the head loss acts as a lower bound on the total dissipation for small viscosities. This new view on the impact problem allows for simple analytical estimates of the maximum spreading diameter of impacting drops as a function of the impact parameters and th...

  9. Is heartworm disease really spreading in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Claudio; Rinaldi, L; Cascone, C; Mortarino, M; Cringoli, G

    2005-10-24

    Based on recently published surveys and newly acquired data, a study was conducted to verify the distribution of filarial worm (Filarioidea) infections in Europe, with particular emphasis on canine heartworm infection (Dirofilaria immitis). A Geographic Information System based on thermal regimen was constructed as a means to identify areas potentially suitable for heartworm transmission, taking into account that the development of D. immitis larvae in the mosquito does not occur below the threshold temperature of approximately 14 degrees C. Furthermore, a bionomic model of D. immitis in its mosquito vectors, which calculates the moving cumulative heartworm development unit parameter, was applied using the available temperature data to assess the theoretic transmission timing of heartworm in Europe. The results show that the earliest infection risk occurs in Spain on March 21 and the latest risk occurs in Spain on September 11. The longest risk period occurs in Spain (Murcia station: March 21-November 11), and the shortest risk period occurs in northeastern Europe. The study also provides the first risk assessment maps for Europe and suggests that if the actual climatic trend continues, filarial infection should spread into previously infection-free areas.

  10. Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus): Spreading by fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Grundel, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In many forest ecosystems, fire is critical in maintaining indigenous plant communities, but can either promote or arrest the spread of invasive species depending on their regeneration niche and resprouting ability. We examined the effects of cutting and burning treatments on the vegetative response (cover, stem density) and root resources of Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), a liana invasive to North America that was introduced from East Asia. Treatments were control, spring cut, spring burn, spring cut & burn, summer cut, fall cut, fall burn, fall cut & burn, and fall herbicide. Cover was reduced the greatest by herbicide and summer cutting treatments, but increased more in the second year on moraine soils than on sandy soils. Burning and cutting & burning combined resulted in a resprout density four times greater than stem density prior to treatment for stems suckers, and survival increased with increasing stem size. While cutting of C. orbiculatus during the growing season (summer) reduced total nonstructural carbohydrates by 50% below early growing season levels and 75% below dormant season levels, burning did not significantly reduce total nonstructural carbohydrates. Thus, Oriental bittersweet is quite responsive to burning as a disturbance and resprouting and root-suckering creates additional opportunities for growth and attainment of the forest canopy. The positive response of Oriental bittersweet to burning has important implications for management of invasive lianas in fire-dependent forest landscapes.

  11. Spreading continents kick-started plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Patrice F; Coltice, Nicolas; Flament, Nicolas

    2014-09-18

    Stresses acting on cold, thick and negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere are thought to be crucial to the initiation of subduction and the operation of plate tectonics, which characterizes the present-day geodynamics of the Earth. Because the Earth's interior was hotter in the Archaean eon, the oceanic crust may have been thicker, thereby making the oceanic lithosphere more buoyant than at present, and whether subduction and plate tectonics occurred during this time is ambiguous, both in the geological record and in geodynamic models. Here we show that because the oceanic crust was thick and buoyant, early continents may have produced intra-lithospheric gravitational stresses large enough to drive their gravitational spreading, to initiate subduction at their margins and to trigger episodes of subduction. Our model predicts the co-occurrence of deep to progressively shallower mafic volcanics and arc magmatism within continents in a self-consistent geodynamic framework, explaining the enigmatic multimodal volcanism and tectonic record of Archaean cratons. Moreover, our model predicts a petrological stratification and tectonic structure of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, two predictions that are consistent with xenolith and seismic studies, respectively, and consistent with the existence of a mid-lithospheric seismic discontinuity. The slow gravitational collapse of early continents could have kick-started transient episodes of plate tectonics until, as the Earth's interior cooled and oceanic lithosphere became heavier, plate tectonics became self-sustaining.

  12. Spread Spectrum Communication with Chaotic Frequency Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkovskii, Alexander R.; Tsimring, Lev S.; Rulkov, Nikolai F.; Langmore, Ian; Young, Stephen C.

    We describe two different approaches to employ chaotic signals in spread-spectrum (SS) communication systems with phase and frequency modulation. In the first one a chaotic signal is used as a carrier. We demonstrate that using a feedback loop controller, the local chaotic oscillator in the receiver can be synchronized to the transmitter. The information can be transmitted using phase or frequency modulation of the chaotic carrier signal. In the second system the chaotic signal is used for frequency modulation of a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to provide a SS signal similar to frequency hopping systems. We show that in a certain parameter range the receiver VCO can be synchronized to the transmitter VCO using a relatively simple phase lock loop (PLL) circuit. The same PLL is used for synchronization of the chaotic oscillators. The information signal can be transmitted using a binary phase shift key (BPSK) or frequency shift key (BFSK) modulation of the frequency modulated carrier signal. Using an experimental circuit operating at radio frequency band and a computer modeling we study the bit error rate (BER) performance in a noisy channel as well as multiuser capability of the system.

  13. Spreading Optics in the primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargallo, Ana; Gómez-Varela, Ana I.; Gónzalez-Nuñez, Héctor; Delgado, Tamara; Almaguer, Citlalli; Cambronero, Ferran; García-Sánchez, Ángel; Pallarés, David; Aymerich, María; Aragón, Ángel L.; Flores-Arias, Maria T.

    2015-04-01

    The USC-OSA is a student chapter located at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) whose objective is to bring optics and photonics knowledge closer to general public. In order to arouse kids' interest in Optics we developed an activity called Funny Light. This activity consisted on a visit of some USC-OSA members to a several local primary schools where we organized several optics experiments. In this work we present the optics demonstrations and the reaction of the 6 years-old students. The activities with greater acceptance include an explanation of light properties as polarization, refraction or reflection, and the workshop where they learnt how to build their own kaleidoscope and made a chromatic disk. Besides, they also participated in a demonstration and explanation of color properties and some optical illusions. We think that this activity has several benefits including spreading Optics through children meanwhile they have fun and experiment science in real life, as well as helping teachers to explain some complex properties and Physics phenomena of light. Given the broad acceptance of this activity, we are intending to make it a routine event of our student chapter repeating it every year.

  14. Facing Two Rapidly Spreading Internet Worms

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    The Internet is currently facing a growing number of computer infections due to two rapidly spreading worms. The "Conficker" and "Downadup" worms have infected an estimated 1.1 million PCs in a 24-hour period, bringing the total number of infected computers to 3.5 million [1]. Via a single USB stick, these worms were also responsible for the infection of about 40 laptops at the last EGEE conference in Istanbul. In order to reduce the impact of these worms on CERN Windows computers, the Computer Security Team has suggested several preventive measures described here. Disabling the Windows AutoRun and AutoPlay Features The Computer Security Team and the IT/IS group have decided to disable the "AutoRun" and "AutoPlay" functionality on all centrally-managed Windows computers at CERN. When inserting CDs, DVDs or USB sticks into a PC, "AutoRun" and "AutoPlay" are responsible for automatically playing music or films stored on these media, or ...

  15. Estimating spread of violent behaviour with children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkova E.N.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is to problems of violence (physical, psychological, sexual to children in the region of Nyzhniy Novgorod in the Russian Federation. It was used international tool for questionnaire ICAST-C. В исследовании приняли участие 227 children par- ticipated in this study (131 girls, 96 boys in the age of 11 to 18 years old. The results show that 78,4% of children have some experience of violence and abuse. 3/4 — in family, and 2/3 — at school. High level of psychological abuse at home was shown (more than 2/3 , at home it is more often than at school (54% versus 30%. Children suffer from physical abuse at home (49% versus 33% at school. Though they suffer from sexual abuse at school (27%. All kinds of abuse take place among girls as well as among boys. Except physical abuse at school where it is more usual among boys (45%, versus (33% girls. Girls suffer more at home. Teenagers suffer less, than youngsters. Emotional abuse is not spread widely (40% versus 60—75% in other groups. In general they suffer from sexual abuse not often, though it is usually at home (8,5% cases.

  16. Information Spreading in Stationary Markovian Evolving Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Clementi, Andrea; Pasquale, Francesco; Silvestri, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Markovian evolving graphs are dynamic-graph models where the links among a fixed set of nodes change during time according to an arbitrary Markovian rule. They are extremely general and they can well describe important dynamic-network scenarios. We study the speed of information spreading in the "stationary phase" by analyzing the completion time of the "flooding mechanism". We prove a general theorem that establishes an upper bound on flooding time in any stationary Markovian evolving graph in terms of its node-expansion properties. We apply our theorem in two natural and relevant cases of such dynamic graphs. "Geometric Markovian evolving graphs" where the Markovian behaviour is yielded by "n" mobile radio stations, with fixed transmission radius, that perform independent random walks over a square region of the plane. "Edge-Markovian evolving graphs" where the probability of existence of any edge at time "t" depends on the existence (or not) of the same edge at time "t-1". In both cases, the obtained upper...

  17. Order Optimal Information Spreading Using Algebraic Gossip

    CERN Document Server

    Avin, Chen; Censor-Hillel, Keren; Lotker, Zvi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study gossip based information spreading with bounded message sizes. We use algebraic gossip to disseminate $k$ distinct messages to all $n$ nodes in a network. For arbitrary networks we provide a new upper bound for uniform algebraic gossip of $O((k+\\log n + D)\\Delta)$ rounds with high probability, where $D$ and $\\Delta$ are the diameter and the maximum degree in the network, respectively. For many topologies and selections of $k$ this bound improves previous results, in particular, for graphs with a constant maximum degree it implies that uniform gossip is \\emph{order optimal} and the stopping time is $\\Theta(k + D)$. To eliminate the factor of $\\Delta$ from the upper bound we propose a non-uniform gossip protocol, TAG, which is based on algebraic gossip and an arbitrary spanning tree protocol $\\S$. The stopping time of TAG is $O(k+\\log n +d(\\S)+t(\\S))$, where $t(\\S)$ is the stopping time of the spanning tree protocol, and $d(\\S)$ is the diameter of the spanning tree. We provide two general...

  18. Potential for international spread of wild poliovirus via travelers

    OpenAIRE

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Leong, Wei-Yee; Lopez, Luis Fernandez; Amaku, Marcos; Quam, Mikkel; Khan, Kamran; MASSAD, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The endgame of polio eradication is hampered by the international spread of poliovirus via travelers. In response to ongoing importations of poliovirus into polio-free countries, on 5 May 2014, WHO's Director-General declared the international spread of wild poliovirus a public health emergency of international concern. Our objective was to develop a mathematical model to estimate the international spread of polio infections. Methods: Our model took into account polio endemicity i...

  19. Exchange Rate Policy and Sovereign Bond Spreads in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    We test the hypothesis of a link between exchange rate policy and sovereign bonds. We analyze the effect of exchange rate policies on supply and credit spreads of sovereign bonds issued by developing countries. An exchange rate policy is captured by the de facto exchange rate regime and the real exchange rate misalignment. The main findings are: (1) real exchange rate overvaluation significantly increases sovereign bond issue probability and raises bond spreads; (2) spreads and the likelihood...

  20. Discrete Modeling of the Worm Spread with Random Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masato

    In this paper, we derive a set of discrete time difference equations that models the spreading process of computer worms such as Code-Red and Slammer, which uses a common strategy called “random scanning” to spread through the Internet. We show that the derived set of discrete time difference equations has an exact relationship with the Kermack and McKendrick susceptible-infectious-removed (SIR) model, which is known as a standard continuous time model for worm spreading.

  1. Genetic origins of lactase persistence and the spread of pastoralism in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranciaro, Alessia; Campbell, Michael C; Hirbo, Jibril B; Ko, Wen-Ya; Froment, Alain; Anagnostou, Paolo; Kotze, Maritha J; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Nyambo, Thomas; Omar, Sabah A; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2014-04-03

    In humans, the ability to digest lactose, the sugar in milk, declines after weaning because of decreasing levels of the enzyme lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, encoded by LCT. However, some individuals maintain high enzyme amounts and are able to digest lactose into adulthood (i.e., they have the lactase-persistence [LP] trait). It is thought that selection has played a major role in maintaining this genetically determined phenotypic trait in different human populations that practice pastoralism. To identify variants associated with the LP trait and to study its evolutionary history in Africa, we sequenced MCM6 introns 9 and 13 and ~2 kb of the LCT promoter region in 819 individuals from 63 African populations and in 154 non-Africans from nine populations. We also genotyped four microsatellites in an ~198 kb region in a subset of 252 individuals to reconstruct the origin and spread of LP-associated variants in Africa. Additionally, we examined the association between LP and genetic variability at candidate regulatory regions in 513 individuals from eastern Africa. Our analyses confirmed the association between the LP trait and three common variants in intron 13 (C-14010, G-13907, and G-13915). Furthermore, we identified two additional LP-associated SNPs in intron 13 and the promoter region (G-12962 and T-956, respectively). Using neutrality tests based on the allele frequency spectrum and long-range linkage disequilibrium, we detected strong signatures of recent positive selection in eastern African populations and the Fulani from central Africa. In addition, haplotype analysis supported an eastern African origin of the C-14010 LP-associated mutation in southern Africa.

  2. Suppressing disease spreading by using information diffusion on multiplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Quan-Hui; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-07-01

    Although there is always an interplay between the dynamics of information diffusion and disease spreading, the empirical research on the systemic coevolution mechanisms connecting these two spreading dynamics is still lacking. Here we investigate the coevolution mechanisms and dynamics between information and disease spreading by utilizing real data and a proposed spreading model on multiplex network. Our empirical analysis finds asymmetrical interactions between the information and disease spreading dynamics. Our results obtained from both the theoretical framework and extensive stochastic numerical simulations suggest that an information outbreak can be triggered in a communication network by its own spreading dynamics or by a disease outbreak on a contact network, but that the disease threshold is not affected by information spreading. Our key finding is that there is an optimal information transmission rate that markedly suppresses the disease spreading. We find that the time evolution of the dynamics in the proposed model qualitatively agrees with the real-world spreading processes at the optimal information transmission rate.

  3. Reducing influenza spreading over the airline network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Jose; Kaiser, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Disease spreading through human travel networks has been a topic of great interest in recent years, such as with swine influenza or SARS pandemics. Most studies have proposed removing highly connected nodes (hubs) to control spreading. Here, we test alternative strategies using edge removal (flight cancellation) for spreading over the airline network. Flight cancellation was more efficient than shutting down whole airports: spreading took 81% longer if solely selected flights were removed, compared to a 52% reduction when entire airports were shutdown, affecting the same number of flights. PMID:20020673

  4. Probing models of information spreading in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zoller, J

    2014-01-01

    We apply signal processing analysis to the information spreading in scale-free network. To reproduce typical behaviors obtained from the analysis of information spreading in the world wide web we use a modified SIS model where synergy effects and influential nodes are taken into account. This model depends on a single free parameter that characterize the memory-time of the spreading process. We show that by means of fractal analysis it is possible -from aggregated easily accessible data- to gain information on the memory time of the underlying mechanism driving the information spreading process.

  5. A theoretical analysis of global characteristics of spread-F

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Spread-F is an important ionosphere pheonome non and it has much effect on radio wave propogation. Tak ing magnetic inclination and declination into consideration, a theoretical model is deduced for the linear growth-rate of spread-F. It is a generalization of the earlier equatorial model and a relatively complete description o f the spread-F pheonomenon. This theory shows that the magnetic configu ration, i.e. the magnetic strength, inclination and declination,affects the occurrence rate greatly, which forms some re gional distribution characteristics of the spread-F.

  6. Spread of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus across Lowland Populations of Túngara Frogs in Panamá

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Brenes, Sofía; Rodriguez, David; Ibáñez, Roberto; Ryan, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is an emergent infectious disease partially responsible for worldwide amphibian population declines. The spread of Bd along highland habitats (> 500 meters above sea level, m a.s.l.) of Costa Rica and Panamá is well documented and has been linked to amphibian population collapses. In contrast, data are scarce on the prevalence and dispersal of Bd in lowland habitats where amphibians may be infected but asymptomatic. Here we describe the spread (2009 to 2014) of Bd across lowland habitats east of the Panamá Canal (< 500 m a.s.l.) with a focus on the Túngara frog (Physalaemus [Engystomops] pustulosus), one of the most common and abundant frog species in this region. Highland populations in western Panamá were already infected with Bd at the start of the study, which was consistent with previous studies indicating that Bd is enzootic in this region. In central Panamá, we collected the first positive samples in 2010, and by 2014, we detected Bd from remote sites in eastern Panamá (Darién National Park). We discuss the importance of studying Bd in lowland species, which may serve as potential reservoirs and agents of dispersal of Bd to highland species that are more susceptible to chytridiomycosis. PMID:27176629

  7. Spread of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus across Lowland Populations of Tungara Frogs in Panama.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Rodríguez-Brenes

    Full Text Available Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, is an emergent infectious disease partially responsible for worldwide amphibian population declines. The spread of Bd along highland habitats (> 500 meters above sea level, m a.s.l. of Costa Rica and Panamá is well documented and has been linked to amphibian population collapses. In contrast, data are scarce on the prevalence and dispersal of Bd in lowland habitats where amphibians may be infected but asymptomatic. Here we describe the spread (2009 to 2014 of Bd across lowland habitats east of the Panamá Canal (< 500 m a.s.l. with a focus on the Túngara frog (Physalaemus [Engystomops] pustulosus, one of the most common and abundant frog species in this region. Highland populations in western Panamá were already infected with Bd at the start of the study, which was consistent with previous studies indicating that Bd is enzootic in this region. In central Panamá, we collected the first positive samples in 2010, and by 2014, we detected Bd from remote sites in eastern Panamá (Darién National Park. We discuss the importance of studying Bd in lowland species, which may serve as potential reservoirs and agents of dispersal of Bd to highland species that are more susceptible to chytridiomycosis.

  8. Region 1 Acoustic Bat Inventory: National Wildlife Refuges in Eastern Oregon, Eastern Washington, and Idaho

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bat species were inventoried on National Wildlife Refuges in Eastern Oregon, Eastern Washington, and Idaho using acoustic methods. Samples were collected between...

  9. Strategy Formation in Eastern Jutland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian

    2008-01-01

      In Eastern Jutland a strategy formation process has been initiated with the aim of developing a strategic spatial plan for the city region.  An organisation has been set up to deal with the first phase of the process, which is to carry out three functional analyses and prepare a common vision...... on which level a serious strategy formation process can take place.  There is a danger that a common strategic spatial plan is more an expression of the lowest common denominator and the municipalities request for infrastructure investments rather than being a spatial strategy with transformative power. ...

  10. Spreading depression sends microglia on Levy flights.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Y Grinberg

    Full Text Available Spreading depression (SD is thought to cause migraine aura, and perhaps migraine, and includes a transient loss of synaptic activity preceded and followed by increased neuronal excitability. Activated microglia influence neuronal activity and play an important role in homeostatic synaptic scaling via release of cytokines. Furthermore, enhanced neuronal function activates microglia to not only secrete cytokines but also to increase the motility of their branches, with somata remaining stationary. While SD also increases the release of cytokines from microglia, the effects on microglial movement from its synaptic activity fluctuations are unknown. Accordingly, we used time-lapse imaging of rat hippocampal slice cultures to probe for microglial movement associated with SD. We observed that in uninjured brain whole microglial cells moved. The movements were well described by the type of Lévy flight known to be associated with an optimal search pattern. Hours after SD, when synaptic activity rose, microglial cell movement was significantly increased. To test how synaptic activity influenced microglial movement, we enhanced neuronal activity with chemical long-term potentiation or LPS and abolished it with TTX. We found that microglial movement was significantly decreased by enhanced neuronal activity and significantly increased by activity blockade. Finally, application of glutamate and ATP to mimic restoration of synaptic activity in the presence of TTX stopped microglial movement that was otherwise seen with TTX. Thus, synaptic activity retains microglial cells in place and an absence of synaptic activity sends them off to influence wider expanses of brain. Perhaps increased microglial movements after SD are a long-lasting, and thus maladaptive, response in which these cells increase neuronal activity via contact or paracrine signaling, which results in increased susceptibility of larger brain areas to SD. If true, then targeting mechanisms that

  11. Genetic reconstruction of a bullfrog invasion to elucidate vectors of introduction and secondary spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pauline L.; Sepulveda, Adam; Layhee, Megan J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing historical colonization pathways of an invasive species is critical for uncovering factors that determine invasion success and for designing management strategies. The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) is endemic to eastern North America, but now has a global distribution and is considered to be one of the worst invaders in the world. In Montana, several introduced populations have been reported, but little is known of their sources and vectors of introduction and secondary spread. We evaluated the genetic composition of introduced populations at local (Yellowstone River floodplain) and regional (Montana and Wyoming) scales in contrast to native range populations. Our objectives were to (1) estimate the number of introductions, (2) identify probable native sources, (3) evaluate genetic variation relative to sources, and (4) characterize properties of local- and regional-scale spread. We sequenced 937 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b locus in 395 tadpoles collected along 100 km of the Yellowstone River, from three additional sites in MT and a proximate site in WY. Pairwise ΦST revealed high divergence among nonnative populations, suggesting at least four independent introductions into MT from diverse sources. Three cyt b haplotypes were identical to native haplotypes distributed across the Midwest and Great Lakes regions, and AMOVA confirmed the western native region as a likely source. While haplotype (Hd = 0.69) and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.005) were low in introduced bullfrogs, the levels of diversity did not differ significantly from source populations. In the Yellowstone, two identified haplotypes implied few introduction vectors and a significant relationship between genetic and river distance was found. Evidence for multiple invasions and lack of subsequent regional spread emphasizes the importance of enforcing legislation prohibiting bullfrog importation and the need for continuing public education to prevent

  12. The transition from rifting to spreading in the Red Sea: No sign of discrete spreading nodes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, N.; Devey, C. W.; Feldens, P.; van der Zwan, F. M.; Bantan, R.; Kwasnitschka, T.

    2012-12-01

    The rifting of a continent and its eventual splitting by the formation of an ocean basin is one of the decisive processes in plate tectonics - it is responsible for the formation of continental margins (home to most of the world's submarine hydrocarbon reserves) and has repeatedly divided and re-distributed the continental plates. The Red Sea is one of the few places on Earth where this process is presently occurring, with continental rifting occurring in the northern Red Sea (north of 23°N) and ocean floor creation in the south (south of 19.5°N). In the central region it has been proposed that the extension is accommodated in a series of discrete seafloor spreading cells in the so called "transition-" or "multi-deeps region". This suggestion is mainly based on interpretations of bathymetric, magnetic, gravimetric and seismic observations made in the late 1970's and mid 1980's at resolutions far below those possible today. During two major expeditions with the German and Dutch research vessels Poseidon (cruise #408) and Pelagia (cruise #350/51) in 2011 and 2012 we collected a continuous multibeam bathymetric dataset over and between the Red Sea deeps from the Thetis Deep at 23°N to the Red Sea Rift at 16.5°N, with a spatial acoustic resolution of 15-30 m over a total N-S distance of about 700 km. This data enables us to view in detail the bathymetric structures formed during extension and to make a detailed interpretation of the structural, tectonic, magmatic and sedimentary evolution of the Red Sea rift. Based on an analysis of the bathymetric datasets, combined with acoustic backscatter, shallow seismics, ground truthing sampling, and magmatic geochemical information, we arrive at a much simplier and less exotic model of the transition from rifting to spreading than previously proposed. Geomorphological features strongly indicate a continuous oceanic rift valley at least from Nereus Deep at 23°N southwards to the Danakil triple junction at 17°N. We can

  13. Snakebite ethnopharmacopoeia of eastern Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Felix G; Anderson, Gregory J

    2005-01-04

    Results of an ethnopharmacognostic study of snakebite treatments in eastern Nicaragua are presented. Data and specimens were collected during several years of field studies. Field work consisted of plant collecting trips and interviews of snakedoctors. The annual mortality from snakebites in eastern Nicaragua is about 25% and most bites are caused by the fer-de-lance (Bothrops asper). The vascular flora of the region is estimated at 2500 species of which 435 have medicinal application including 81 that are used in snakebite treatment. The majority of species used in snakebite cures are flowering plants, 76% dicots and 20% monocots, and 80% are obtained from the second-growth forest. About half the species are herbs. Leaves are the most frequently utilized plant part. Most herbal remedies are prepared as decoctions and are administered orally. Remedies are mostly prepared with native wild species, but some are introduced domesticates, derived from either the American or Old World Tropics. All the species used contain at least one bioactive compound, and most of these bioactives have been shown in other studies to have pharmacological effects. The use of species in snakebite treatments does not necessarily imply efficacy, but it does give a limited list of species that can be studied pharmacologically for possible bioactive effects. Studies like this one are also important because they document traditional practices and species utilized for the people of the region studied as well.

  14. 12 CFR 619.9180 - Fixed interest spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fixed interest spread. 619.9180 Section 619.9180 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9180 Fixed interest spread. A percentage to be added to the cost of money to the bank or association as the means...

  15. Comparative study on spreading function for directional wave spectra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.S.; Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.

    -dimensional wave energy S(f) and the directional spreading function D(f, theta). This paper reviews various spreading functions proposed in the past for estimating the directional wave energy and presents their application to the Indian wave condition. It is found...

  16. Regime-dependent determinants of Euro area sovereign CDS spreads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blommestein, H.J.; Eijffinger, Sylvester; Qian, Zongxin

    2016-01-01

    We study the determinants of sovereign CDS spreads of five Euro area countries (Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, and Spain) after the collapse of Lehman Brothers. We find that global and/or European Monetary Union (EMU)-wide factors are the main drivers of changes in the sovereign CDS spreads in ou

  17. Raman hyperspectral imaging and analysis of fat spreads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen, van G.; Velzen, van E.J.J.; Heussen, P.C.M.; Sovago, M.; Malssen, van K.F.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure of fat spreads is of fundamental importance to their sensorial properties such as texture, mouthfeel and spreadability. Fat spreads are water in oil emulsions,with a continuous phase supported by a fat crystal network. Confocal Raman microscopy offers the possibility for the

  18. Influence of livestock markets on the spread of FMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boklund, Anette; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, whether cattle markets would influence the duration, size and economic consequences of a potential FMD epidemic in Denmark. The spread of FMD was simulated using the InterSpread Plus. For movements of cattle to and from markets, we modeled the frequency...

  19. Spreading depression transiently disrupts myelin via interferon-gamma signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Aya D; Mitchell, Heidi M; Kunkler, Phillip E; Klauer, Neal; Kraig, Richard P

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura are clinically correlated and both show imaging changes suggestive of myelin disruption. Furthermore, cortical myelin loss in the cuprizone animal model of multiple sclerosis enhances susceptibility to spreading depression, the likely underlying cause of migraine with aura. Since multiple sclerosis pathology involves inflammatory T cell lymphocyte production of interferon-gamma and a resulting increase in oxidative stress, we tested the hypothesis that spreading depression disrupts myelin through similar signaling pathways. Rat hippocampal slice cultures were initially used to explore myelin loss in spreading depression, since they contain T cells, and allow for controlled tissue microenvironment. These experiments were then translated to the in vivo condition in neocortex. Spreading depression in slice cultures induced significant loss of myelin integrity and myelin basic protein one day later, with gradual recovery by seven days. Myelin basic protein loss was abrogated by T cell depletion, neutralization of interferon-gamma, and pharmacological inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase-2. Conversely, one day after exposure to interferon-gamma, significant reductions in spreading depression threshold, increases in oxidative stress, and reduced levels of glutathione, an endogenous neutral sphingomyelinase-2 inhibitor, emerged. Similarly, spreading depression triggered significant T cell accumulation, sphingomyelinase activation, increased oxidative stress, and reduction of gray and white matter myelin in vivo. Myelin disruption is involved in spreading depression, thereby providing pathophysiological links between multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura. Myelin disruption may promote spreading depression by enhancing aberrant excitability. Thus, preservation of myelin integrity may provide novel therapeutic targets for migraine with aura.

  20. A case study on fractal simulation of forest fire spread

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper relates to the semi-empirical model based on fire field energy balance and the physical model based on land temperature,aiming to provide a practical way of describing fire spread.Fire spread is determined by the characteristics of combustible materials and the agency of meteorological factors and terrains.Combustible materials,such as surface area,have no featured scale,yet the process of forest fire spread contains the self-replicating feature,both of which contribute to the self-similarity of fire spread.Consequently,fire behavior can be described by fractal geometry.In this research,we select Wuchagou forest in Da Hinggan Mountains as the experimental site where a forest fire took place three years ago.The forest fire was detected on low-resolution NOAA-AVHRR images,and fire spread was simulated on high-resolution TM images as another attempt to merge information.Based on remote sensing and GIS,we adopted the method of limited spreading lumping (DLA) to describe growing phenomenon to simulate the dynamic process of fire spread and adjusting shape of the result of fire simulation by the scale rule.As a result,the simulated fire and the actual fire manifest the self-similarity in their spreading shapes as well as the quantitative similarity in their areas.

  1. A Deadly Path: Bacterial Spread During Bubonic Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo J; Miller, Virginia L

    2016-04-01

    Yersinia pestis causes bubonic plague, a fulminant disease where host immune responses are abrogated. Recently developed in vivo models of plague have resulted in new ideas regarding bacterial spread in the body. Deciphering bacterial spread is key to understanding Y. pestis and the immune responses it encounters during infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dogwood Anthracnose and its Spread in the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Anderson; John L. Knighten; Mark Windham; Keith Langdon; Floyd Hedrix; Ron Roncadori

    In the 15 years since it was first reported in the United States, dogwood anthracnose (caused by Discula destructive sp. nov.) has spread rapidly and caused serious losses among flowering dogwoods (Cornus florida L.), particularly in the South. Infection begins in leaves and spreads to twigs and branches, which dieback. Main-stem infections cause cankers, which kill...

  3. Swimming propulsion forces are enhanced by a small finger spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Reis, Victor M; Kjendlie, Per L; Alves, Francisco B; Vilas-Boas, João P; Machado, Leandro; Silva, António J; Rouboa, Abel I

    2010-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of finger spread on the propulsive force production in swimming using computational fluid dynamics. Computer tomography scans of an Olympic swimmer hand were conducted. This procedure involved three models of the hand with differing finger spreads: fingers closed together (no spread), fingers with a small (0.32 cm) spread, and fingers with large (0.64 cm) spread. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent code. The measured forces on the hand models were decomposed into drag and lift coefficients. For hand models, angles of attack of 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, 75 degrees, and 90 degrees, with a sweep back angle of 0 degrees, were used for the calculations. The results showed that the model with a small spread between fingers presented higher values of drag coefficient than did the models with fingers closed and fingers with a large spread. One can note that the drag coefficient presented the highest values for an attack angle of 90 degrees in the three hand models. The lift coefficient resembled a sinusoidal curve across the attack angle. The values for the lift coefficient presented few differences among the three models, for a given attack angle. These results suggested that fingers slightly spread could allow the hand to create more propulsive force during swimming.

  4. Effective information spreading based on local information in correlated networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Lei; Pan, Liming; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Using network-based information to facilitate information spreading is an essential task for spreading dynamics in complex networks, which will benefit the promotion of technical innovations, healthy behaviors, new products, etc. Focusing on degree correlated networks, we propose a preferential contact strategy based on the local network structure and local informed density to promote the information spreading. During the spreading process, an informed node will preferentially select a contact target among its neighbors, basing on their degrees or local informed densities. By extensively implementing numerical simulations in synthetic and empirical networks, we find that when only consider the local structure information, the convergence time of information spreading will be remarkably reduced if low-degree neighbors are favored as contact targets. Meanwhile, the minimum convergence time depends non-monotonically on degree-degree correlation, and moderate correlation coefficients result in most efficient info...

  5. Rapid evolution accelerates plant population spread in fragmented experimental landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer L; Kendall, Bruce E; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-07-29

    Predicting the speed of biological invasions and native species migrations requires an understanding of the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of spreading populations. Theory predicts that evolution can accelerate species' spread velocity, but how landscape patchiness--an important control over traits under selection--influences this process is unknown. We manipulated the response to selection in populations of a model plant species spreading through replicated experimental landscapes of varying patchiness. After six generations of change, evolving populations spread 11% farther than nonevolving populations in continuously favorable landscapes and 200% farther in the most fragmented landscapes. The greater effect of evolution on spread in patchier landscapes was consistent with the evolution of dispersal and competitive ability. Accounting for evolutionary change may be critical when predicting the velocity of range expansions.

  6. Stability of Spreading Processes with General Transmission and Recovery Times

    CERN Document Server

    Ogura, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Although viral spreading processes taking place in networks are commonly analyzed using Markovian models in which both the transmission times and the recovery times follow exponential distributions, empirical studies show that, in most real scenarios, the distribution of these times are far from exponential. To overcome this limitation, we first introduce a generalized spreading model that allows for transmission and recovery times to follow arbitrary distributions within an arbitrary accuracy. In this context, we derive conditions for the generalized spreading process to converge towards the disease-free equilibrium (in other words, to eradicate the viral spread) without relying on mean-field approximations. Based on our results, we illustrate how the particular shape of the transmission/recovery distribution heavily influences the boundary of the stability region of the spread, as well as the decay rate inside this region. Therefore, modeling non-exponential transmission/recovery times observed in realistic...

  7. Spreading of Viscous Liquids at High Temperature: Silicate Glasseson Molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Moya, Jose S.; Tomsia,Antoni P.

    2004-12-15

    The spreading of Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, spreading can take place under reactive or non-reactive conditions. As the nucleation of the reaction product under reactive conditions is slow in comparison to the spreading kinetics, in both cases the glass front moves on the metal surface with similar spreading velocities. Spreading can be described using a molecular dynamics model where the main contribution to the wetting activation energy comes from the viscous interactions in the liquid. Enhanced interfacial diffusions in low-oxygen activities (reactive cases) form triple-line ridges that can pin the wetting front and cause a stick-slip motion.

  8. Comments on Landau damping due to synchrotron frequency spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    An inductive/space-charge impedance shifts the synchrotron frequency downwards above/below transition, but it is often said that the coherent synchrotron frequency of the bunch is not shifted in the rigid-dipole mode. On the other hand, the incoherent synchrotron frequency due to the sinusoidal rf always spreads in the downward direction. This spread will therefore not be able to cover the coherent synchrotron frequency, implying that there will not be any Landau damping no matter how large the frequency spread is. By studying the dispersion relation, it is shown that the above argument is incorrect, and there will be Landau damping if there is sufficient frequency spread. The main reason is that the coherent frequency of the rigid-dipole mode will no longer remain unshifted in the presence of a synchrotron frequency spread.

  9. Statistical analysis and model of spread F occurrence in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The spread F data obtained over Lanzhou (36.1°N,103.9°E),Chongqing (29.5°N,106.4°E) and Haikou (20.0°N,110.3°E) of China during the period from 1978 to 1997 are used to analyze the occurrence characteristics.The statistical results show that the post midnight spread F occurrence is maximum during the summer solstice months of the lower solar activity period,while post sunset spread F is dominant in equinoxes of higher solar activity period over Haikou station.Over Chongqing and Lanzhou stations,spread F mostly occurs at post midnight and relates negatively with solar activity.Using regression method and Fourier expansion,the preliminary single-station model of spread F occurrence is established and the accuracy of the model is evaluated.

  10. Single molecular force across single integrins dictates cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Farhan; Li, Isaac T S; Leslie, Benjamin J; Doğanay, Sultan; Singh, Rishi; Wang, Xuefeng; Seong, Jihye; Lee, Sang-Hak; Park, Seongjin; Wang, Ning; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-10-01

    Cells' ability to sense and interpret mechanical signals from the extracellular milieu modulates the degree of cell spreading. Yet how cells detect such signals and activate downstream signaling at the molecular level remain elusive. Herein, we utilize tension gauge tether (TGT) platform to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of cell spreading. Our data from both differentiated cells of cancerous and non-cancerous origin show that for the same stiff underlying glass substrates and for same ligand density it is the molecular forces across single integrins that ultimately determine cell spreading responses. Furthermore, by decoupling molecular stiffness and molecular tension we demonstrate that molecular stiffness has little influence on cell spreading. Our data provide strong evidence that links molecular forces at the cell-substrate interface to the degree of cell spreading.

  11. Efficient allocation of heterogeneous response times in information spreading process

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Ai-Xiang; Tang, Ming; Fu, Yan; Liang, Xiaoming; Do, Younghae

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the impacts of spatiotemporal heterogeneities of human activities on spreading dynamics have attracted extensive attention. In this paper, to study heterogeneous response times on information spreading, we focus on the susceptible-infected spreading dynamics with adjustable power-law response time distribution based on uncorrelated scale-free networks. We find that the stronger the heterogeneity of response times is, the faster the information spreading is in the early and middle stages. Following a given heterogeneity, the procedure of reducing the correlation between the response times and degrees of individuals can also accelerate the spreading dynamics in the early and middle stages. However, the dynamics in the late stage is slightly more complicated, and there is an optimal value of the full prevalence time changing with the heterogeneity of response times and the response time-degree correlation, respectively. The optimal phenomena results from the efficient allocation of heterogeneous respon...

  12. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AND ITS GLOBAL SPREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery during the 20th century, antimicrobial agents (antibiotics and related medicinal drugs have substantially reduced the threat posed by infectious diseases. The use of these “wonder drugs”, combined with improvements in sanitation, housing, and nutrition, and the advent of widespread immunization programmes, has led to a dramatic drop in deaths from diseases that were previously widespread, untreatable, and frequently fatal. Over the years, antimicrobials have saved the lives and eased the suffering of millions of people. By helping to bring many serious infectious diseases under control, these drugs hav also contributed to the major gains in life expectancy experienced during the latter part of the last century. These gains are now seriously jeopardized by another recent development: the emergence and spread of microbes that are resistant to cheap and effective first-choice, or “first- line” drugs. The bacterial infections which contribute most to human disease are also those in which emerging microbial resistance is most evident: diarrhoeal diseases, respiratory tract infections, meningitis, sexually transmitted infections, and hospital-acquired infections. Some important examples include penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multi-resistant salmonellae, and multi-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of resistance to drugs commonly used to treat malaria is of particular concern, as is the emerging resistance to anti-HIV drugs. Treatment, resu.lting in prolonged illness and greater risk of death, Treatment failures also lead to longer periods of infectivity, which increase the numbers of infected people moving in the community and thus expose the general population to the risk of contracting a resistant strain of infection. When infections become resistant to first-line antimicrobials, treatment has to be switched

  13. Flame spread over inclined electrical wires with AC electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Lim, Seung J.

    2017-07-21

    Flame spread over polyethylene-insulated electrical wires was studied experimentally with applied alternating current (AC) by varying the inclination angle (θ), applied voltage (VAC), and frequency (fAC). For the baseline case with no electric field applied, the flame spread rate and the flame width of downwardly spreading flames (DSFs) decreased from the horizontal case for −20° ≤ θ < 0° and maintained near constant values for −90° ≤ θ < −20°, while the flame spread rate increased appreciably as the inclination angle of upwardly spreading flames (USFs) increased. When an AC electric field was applied, the behavior of flame spread rate in DSFs (USFs) could be classified into two (three) sub-regimes characterized by various functional dependences on VAC, fAC, and θ. In nearly all cases of DSFs, a globular molten polyethylene formed ahead of the spreading flame edge, occasionally dripping onto the ground. In these cases, an effective flame spread rate was defined to represent the burning rate by measuring the mass loss due to dripping. This effective spread rate was independent of AC frequency, while it decreased linearly with voltage and was independent of the inclination angle. In DSFs, when excessively high voltage and frequency were applied, the dripping led to flame extinction during propagation and the extinction frequency correlated well with applied voltage. In USFs, when high voltage and frequency were applied, multiple globular molten PEs formed at several locations, leading to ejections of multiple small flame segments from the main flame, thereby reducing the flame spread rate, which could be attributed to the electrospray phenomenon.

  14. Old age mortality in Eastern and South-Eastern Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danan Gu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eastern and South-Eastern Asian countries have witnessed a marked decline in old age mortality in recent decades. Yet no studies have investigated the trends and patterns in old age morality and cause-of-death in the region. Objective: We reviewed the trends and patterns of old age mortality and cause-of-death for countries in the region. Methods: We examined data on old age mortality in terms of life expectancy at age 65 and age-specific death rates from the 2012 Revision of the World Population Prospects for 14 countries in the region (China, Hong Kong, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Viet Nam and data on cause-of-death from the WHO for five countries (China, Hong Kong, Japan, Republic of Korea, and Singapore from 1980 to 2010. Results: While mortality transitions in these populations took place in different times, and at different levels of socioeconomic development and living environment, changes in their age patterns and sex differentials in mortality showed certain similarities: women witnessed a similar decline to men in spite of their lower mortality, and young elders had a larger decline than the oldest-old. In all five countries examined for cause-of-death, most of the increases in life expectancy at age 65 in both men and women were attributable to declines in mortality from stroke and heart disease. GDP per capita, educational level, and urbanization explained much of the variations in life expectancy and cause-specific mortality, indicating critical contributions of these basic socioeconomic development indicators to the mortality decline over time in the region. Conclusions: These findings shed light on the relationship between epidemiological transition, changing age patterns of mortality, and improving life expectancy in these populations.

  15. Reconstructing the lost eastern Tethys Ocean Basin: Convergence history of the SE Asian margin and marine gateways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Christian; Müller, R. Dietmar; Gaina, Carmen

    Plate tectonic reconstructions for the late Mesozoic-Cenozoic evolution of the eastern Tethyan Ocean Basin, separating eastern Gondwanaland from Proto-Southeast Asia, are usually based on geological data gathered from the different tectonic blocks accreted to Southeast Asia. However, this approach only provides few constraints on the reconstruction of the eastern Tethys Ocean and the drift path of various terranes. We have used marine magnetic anomalies in the Argo and Gascoyne Abyssal Plains off the Australian Northwest Shelf, jointly with published geological data, to reconstruct the seafloor spreading history and plate tectonic evolution of the eastern Tethys and Proto-Indian Ocean basins for the time between 160 Ma and the present. Based on the assumption of symmetrical seafloor spreading and a hotspot-track-based plate reference frame, we have created a relative and absolute plate motion model and a series of oceanic paleo-age grids that show the evolution of Tethyan mid-ocean ridges and the convergence history along the southeast Asian margin through time. A thermal boundary layer model for oceanic lithosphere is used to compute approximate paleo-depths to oceanic basement to predict the opening and closing of oceanic gateways. The proposed model not only provides improved boundary conditions for paleoclimate reconstructions and modelling of oceanic currents through time, but also for understanding stress changes in the overriding plate and the formation of new accretionary crust along the Southeast Asian margin, driven by changing subduction parameters like hinge rollback and slab dip.

  16. Seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies in the Enderby Basin, East Antarctic

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Desa, M.

    of eastern Gondwanaland. Inadequate age information either in the form of magnetic anomaly isochrons or dating of oceanic rocks from the conjugate margins of Antarctica and India perhaps led several authors to propose incomplete plate reconstruction models...

  17. Outcomes of Children Adopted from Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie; Chan, Wilma; Tirella, Linda; Perrin, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral problems are frequent among post-institutionalized Eastern European adoptees. However, risk factors related to outcomes have not been fully delineated. We evaluated 50 Eastern European adoptees, age 8-10 years, with their adoptive families for more than five years. Cognitive and behavioral outcomes and parenting stress were evaluated in…

  18. Eastern European retailers and wholesalers' buying behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Stacey, Julia

    1999-01-01

    During the last ten years, retailing in Eastern Europe has undergone considerable changes. The entry of Western European retail chains into Eastern Europe has helped accelerate the distributive trade of Eastern Europe. But what does it take to sell fish and cheese to retailers and wholesalers....... Low prices and favourable terms of payment are most important when retailers in Eastern Europe buy fish and cheese. Then follows the supplier's range of products, trustworthiness of the supplier and product quality. Eastern European wholesalers also rank price and financial conditions as most....... In comparison,Western European retailers prefer doing business with suppliers that are capable of supplying all shops in a chain. Also the question about traceability is decisive.Retailers also prefer doing business with suppliers that are interested in a long-term trade relationship and who are from their own...

  19. HOMED-Homicides Eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colville-Ebeling, Bonnie; Frisch, Morten; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Background:An introduction to a forensic medical homicide database established at the Department of Forensic Medicine in Copenhagen. Content: The database contains substantial clinical and demographic data obtained in conjunction with medico-legal autopsies of victims and forensic clinical...... examinations of perpetrators in homicide cases in eastern Denmark. Validity and coverage: The database contains information on all homicide cases investigated at the Department of Forensic Medicine in Copenhagen since 1971. Coverage for the catchment area of the department is assumed to be very good because...... of a medico-legal homicide autopsy rate close to 100%. Regional differences might exist however, due to the fact that the catchment area of the department is dominated by the city of Copenhagen. Conclusions: The strength of the database includes a long running time, near complete regional coverage...

  20. Agent-based modeling to simulate the dengue spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chengbin; Tao, Haiyan; Ye, Zhiwei

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel method ABM in simulating the unique process for the dengue spread. Dengue is an acute infectious disease with a long history of over 200 years. Unlike the diseases that can be transmitted directly from person to person, dengue spreads through a must vector of mosquitoes. There is still no any special effective medicine and vaccine for dengue up till now. The best way to prevent dengue spread is to take precautions beforehand. Thus, it is crucial to detect and study the dynamic process of dengue spread that closely relates to human-environment interactions where Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) effectively works. The model attempts to simulate the dengue spread in a more realistic way in the bottom-up way, and to overcome the limitation of ABM, namely overlooking the influence of geographic and environmental factors. Considering the influence of environment, Aedes aegypti ecology and other epidemiological characteristics of dengue spread, ABM can be regarded as a useful way to simulate the whole process so as to disclose the essence of the evolution of dengue spread.

  1. Spreading of a Lidocaine Formulation on Microneedle-Treated Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Atul; Das, Diganta B; Chao, Tzu C; Starov, Victor M

    2015-12-01

    The spreadability of a liquid drug formulation on skin is an indication of it either remaining stationary or distributing (spreading) as a droplet. Factors determining droplet spreadability of the formulation are spreading area, diameter of the droplet base, viscosity of the liquid, contact angle, volume of droplet on skin and any others. The creation of microcavities from the application of microneedle (MN) has the potential to control droplet spreading, and hence, target specific areas of skin for drug delivery. However, there is little work that demonstrates spreading of liquid drug formulation on MN-treated skin. Below, spreading of a lidocaine hydrogel formulation and lidocaine solution (reference liquid) on porcine skin is investigated over MN-treated skin. Controlled spreadability was achieved with the lidocaine hydrogel on MN-treated skin as compared with lidocaine solution. It was observed that the droplet spreading parameters such as spreading radius, droplet height and dynamic contact angle were slightly lower for the lidocaine hydrogel than the lidocaine solution on skin. Also, the lidocaine hydrogel on MN-treated skin resulted in slower dynamic reduction of droplet height, contact angle and reduced time taken in attaining static advancing droplets because of the MN microcavities.

  2. Axisymmetric model of drop spreading on a horizontal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Aashutosh; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-09-01

    Spreading of an initially spherical liquid drop over a textured surface is analyzed by solving an integral form of the governing equations. The mathematical model extends Navier-Stokes equations by including surface tension at the gas-liquid boundary and a force distribution at the three phase contact line. While interfacial tension scales with drop curvature, the motion of the contact line depends on the departure of instantaneous contact angle from its equilibrium value. The numerical solution is obtained by discretizing the spreading drop into disk elements. The Bond number range considered is 0.01-1. Results obtained for sessile drops are in conformity with limiting cases reported in the literature [J. C. Bird et al., "Short-time dynamics of partial wetting," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 234501 (2008)]. They further reveal multiple time scales that are reported in experiments [K. G. Winkels et al., "Initial spreading of low-viscosity drops on partially wetting surfaces," Phys. Rev. E 85, 055301 (2012) and A. Eddi et al., "Short time dynamics of viscous drop spreading," Phys. Fluids 25, 013102 (2013)]. Spreading of water and glycerin drops over fully and partially wetting surfaces is studied in terms of excess pressure, wall shear stress, and the dimensions of the footprint. Contact line motion is seen to be correctly captured in the simulations. Water drops show oscillations during spreading while glycerin spreads uniformly over the surface.

  3. [Cortical spreading depolarization: a new pathophysiological mechanism in neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Santos, Edgar

    2014-05-20

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a wave of almost complete depolarization of the neuronal and glial cells that occurs in different neurological diseases such as migraine with aura, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, head trauma and stroke. These depolarization waves are characterized by a change in the negative potential with an amplitude between -10 and -30mV, duration of ∼1min and changes in the ion homeostasis between the intra- and extracellular space. This results in neuronal edema and dendritic distortion. Under pathologic states of hypoperfusion, cortical spreading depolarization can produce oxidative stress, worsen hypoxia and induce neuronal death. This is due to intense arterial vasoconstriction produced by an inverse response called spreading ischemia. Only in the last years there has been an electrophysiological confirmation of cortical spreading depolarization in human brains. Occurrence of cortical spreading depolarization has been associated with worse outcome in patients. Currently, increased knowledge regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms supports the hypothetical correlation of cortical spreading depolarization with brain damage in humans. There are diverse therapeutic alternatives that promise inhibition of cortical spreading depolarization and subsequent better outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of trust in the spreading of information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongrun; Arenas, Alex; Gómez, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The understanding and prediction of information diffusion processes on networks is a major challenge in network theory with many implications in social sciences. Many theoretical advances occurred due to stochastic spreading models. Nevertheless, these stochastic models overlooked the influence of rational decisions on the outcome of the process. For instance, different levels of trust in acquaintances do play a role in information spreading, and actors may change their spreading decisions during the information diffusion process accordingly. Here, we study an information-spreading model in which the decision to transmit or not is based on trust. We explore the interplay between the propagation of information and the trust dynamics happening on a two-layer multiplex network. Actors' trustable or untrustable states are defined as accumulated cooperation or defection behaviors, respectively, in a Prisoner's Dilemma setup, and they are controlled by a memory span. The propagation of information is abstracted as a threshold model on the information-spreading layer, where the threshold depends on the trustability of agents. The analysis of the model is performed using a tree approximation and validated on homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. The results show that the memory of previous actions has a significant effect on the spreading of information. For example, the less memory that is considered, the higher is the diffusion. Information is highly promoted by the emergence of trustable acquaintances. These results provide insight into the effect of plausible biases on spreading dynamics in a multilevel networked system.

  5. Acceleration of Evolutionary Spread by Long-Range Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    2014-03-01

    The spreading of evolutionary novelties across populations is the central element of adaptation. Unless population are well-mixed (like bacteria in a shaken test tube), the spreading dynamics not only depends on fitness differences but also on the dispersal behavior of the species. Spreading at a constant speed is generally predicted when dispersal is sufficiently short-ranged. However, the case of long-range dispersal is unresolved: While it is clear that even rare long-range jumps can lead to a drastic speedup, it has been difficult to analyze the ensuing stochastic growth process. We present a simple self-consistent argument supported by simulations that accurately predicts evolutionary spread for broad distributions of long distance dispersal. In contrast to the exponential laws predicted by deterministic ``mean-field'' models, spread is either according to a super-linear power-law or a stretched exponential law, depending on the tails of the dispersal kernel. Fluctuations and the relation to supercritical long-range percolation are discussed. Due to the simplicity of our model, which lacks any complex interactions between individuals, we expect our results to be applicable to a wide range of spreading processes. Our results may be used, in particular, to estimate the spread of modern human epidemics, which are greatly accelerated by the human aviation. Based on joint work with Daniel S. Fisher, Stanford.

  6. Energy-Spread-Feedback System for the KEKB Injector Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Satoh, Masanori; Suwada, Tsuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    New energy-spread feedback system using nondestructive energy-spread monitors have been developed in order to control and stabilize the energy spreads of single-bunch electron and positron beams in the KEKB injector linac. The well-controlled feedback systems of the injector linac are successfully working in dairy operation not only for keeping the injection rate higher along with the beam-orbit and energy feedback systems but also for reducing a background level to the high-energy B-factory experiment. The energy spreads of the injection beams are well stabilized within 0.2%, 0.5% and 0.3% for the electron beam, the positron beam, and the high-current primary electron beam for positron production, respectively, through the energy-spread feedback system under the nominal operation condition. In this paper, we will report in detail the energy-spread feedback system using the nondestructive energy-spread monitors with multi-strip-line electrodes and their performance in the KEKB operation.

  7. Where are the undiscovered hydrothermal vents on oceanic spreading ridges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    In nearly four decades since the discovery of deep-sea vents, one-third of the length of global oceanic spreading ridges has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity. Active submarine vent fields are now known along the boundaries of 46 out of 52 recognized tectonic plates. Hydrothermal survey efforts over the most recent decade were sparked by national and commercial interests in the mineral resource potential of seafloor hydrothermal deposits, as well as by academic research. Here we incorporate recent data for back-arc spreading centers and ultraslow- and slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to revise a linear equation relating the frequency of vent fields along oceanic spreading ridges to spreading rate. We apply this equation globally to predict a total number of vent fields on spreading ridges, which suggests that ~900 vent fields remain to be discovered. Almost half of these undiscovered vent fields (comparable to the total of all vent fields discovered during 35 years of research) are likely to occur at MORs with full spreading rates less than 60 mm/yr. We then apply the equation regionally to predict where these hydrothermal vents may be discovered with respect to plate boundaries and national jurisdiction, with the majority expected to occur outside of states' exclusive economic zones. We hope that these predictions will prove useful to the community in the future, in helping to shape continuing ridge-crest exploration.

  8. Neuronal networks provide rapid neuroprotection against spreading toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andrew J; Robertson, Graham; Zagnoni, Michele; Connolly, Christopher N

    2016-09-21

    Acute secondary neuronal cell death, as seen in neurodegenerative disease, cerebral ischemia (stroke) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), drives spreading neurotoxicity into surrounding, undamaged, brain areas. This spreading toxicity occurs via two mechanisms, synaptic toxicity through hyperactivity, and excitotoxicity following the accumulation of extracellular glutamate. To date, there are no fast-acting therapeutic tools capable of terminating secondary spreading toxicity within a time frame relevant to the emergency treatment of stroke or TBI patients. Here, using hippocampal neurons (DIV 15-20) cultured in microfluidic devices in order to deliver a localized excitotoxic insult, we replicate secondary spreading toxicity and demonstrate that this process is driven by GluN2B receptors. In addition to the modeling of spreading toxicity, this approach has uncovered a previously unknown, fast acting, GluN2A-dependent neuroprotective signaling mechanism. This mechanism utilizes the innate capacity of surrounding neuronal networks to provide protection against both forms of spreading neuronal toxicity, synaptic hyperactivity and direct glutamate excitotoxicity. Importantly, network neuroprotection against spreading toxicity can be effectively stimulated after an excitotoxic insult has been delivered, and may identify a new therapeutic window to limit brain damage.

  9. Propagating rift tectonics of a Caledonian marginal basin: Multi-stage seafloor spreading history of the Solund-Stavfjord ophiolite in western Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, Yildirim; Furnes, Harald; Skjerlie, K. P.

    1997-10-01

    northern and southern parts of the ophiolite complex and are separated by the ENE-trending Domain III, in which isotropic to pegmatitic gabbros and dike swarms are plastically deformed along ENE-striking sinistral shear zones. These shear zones, which locally include fault slivers of serpentinite intrusions, are crosscut by N20°E-striking undeformed basaltic dike swarms that contain xenoliths of gabbroic material. The NW-trending sheeted dike complex in the northern part of Domain II curves into an ENE orientation approaching Domain III in the south. The anomalous nature of deformed crust in Domain III is interpreted to have developed within an oceanic fracture zone or transform fault boundary. REE chemistry of representative extrusive and dike rocks from all three domains indicates N- to E-MORB affinities of their magmas with high Th/Ta ratios that are characteristic of subduction zone environments. The magmatic evolution of Domain I encompasses closed-system fractional crystallization of high-Mg basaltic magmas in small ephemeral chambers, which gradually interconnected to form large chambers in which mixing of primary magmas with more evolved and fractionated magma caused resetting of magma compositions through time. The compositional range from high-Mg basalts to ferrobasalts within Domain I is reminiscent of modern propagating rift basalts. We interpret the NE-trending Domain I as a remnant of an intermediate-spread rift system that propagated northeastwards (in present coordinate system) into a pre-existing oceanic crust, which was developed along the NW-trending doomed rift (Domain II) in the marginal basin. The N20°E dikes laterally intruding into the anomalous oceanic crust in Domain III represent the tip of the rift propagator. The inferred propagating rift tectonics of the Solund-Stavfjord ophiolite is similar to the evolutionary history of the modern Lau back-arc basin in the SW Pacific and suggests a complex magmatic evolution of the Caledonian marginal

  10. Lichens of neglected habitats in Eastern and East-Central European lowlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurga Motiejūnaitē

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Situation of lichens of aquatic and transient habitats in Eastern and East-Central European lowlands is discussed basing on example of several selected species: Leptogium biatorinum, Sarcosagium campestre, Steinia geophana, Verrucaria aquatilis, V. hydrela, V. praetermissa, V. xyloxena. Both habitat types are generally very much neglected in the region and all species show large spatial gaps in recording, which makes it difficult to judge both about their true distribution limits and spreading dynamics. On the other hand, targeted search through the suitable habitats and abundance of such indicate that many of these lichens are probably not uncommon in the region.

  11. Did vaccination slow the spread of bluetongue in France?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioz, Maryline; Guis, Hélène; Pleydell, David; Gay, Emilie; Calavas, Didier; Durand, Benoît; Ducrot, Christian; Lancelot, Renaud

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most efficient ways to control the spread of infectious diseases. Simulations are now widely used to assess how vaccination can limit disease spread as well as mitigate morbidity or mortality in susceptible populations. However, field studies investigating how much vaccines decrease the velocity of epizootic wave-fronts during outbreaks are rare. This study aimed at investigating the effect of vaccination on the propagation of bluetongue, a vector-borne disease of ruminants. We used data from the 2008 bluetongue virus serotype 1 (BTV-1) epizootic of southwest France. As the virus was newly introduced in this area, natural immunity of livestock was absent. This allowed determination of the role of vaccination in changing the velocity of bluetongue spread while accounting for environmental factors that possibly influenced it. The average estimated velocity across the country despite restriction on animal movements was 5.4 km/day, which is very similar to the velocity of spread of the bluetongue virus serotype 8 epizootic in France also estimated in a context of restrictions on animal movements. Vaccination significantly reduced the propagation velocity of BTV-1. In comparison to municipalities with no vaccine coverage, the velocity of BTV-1 spread decreased by 1.7 km/day in municipalities with immunized animals. For the first time, the effect of vaccination has been quantified using data from a real epizootic whilst accounting for environmental factors known to modify the velocity of bluetongue spread. Our findings emphasize the importance of vaccination in limiting disease spread across natural landscape. Finally, environmental factors, specifically those related to vector abundance and activity, were found to be good predictors of the velocity of BTV-1 spread, indicating that these variables need to be adequately accounted for when evaluating the role of vaccination on bluetongue spread.

  12. Did vaccination slow the spread of bluetongue in France?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryline Pioz

    Full Text Available Vaccination is one of the most efficient ways to control the spread of infectious diseases. Simulations are now widely used to assess how vaccination can limit disease spread as well as mitigate morbidity or mortality in susceptible populations. However, field studies investigating how much vaccines decrease the velocity of epizootic wave-fronts during outbreaks are rare. This study aimed at investigating the effect of vaccination on the propagation of bluetongue, a vector-borne disease of ruminants. We used data from the 2008 bluetongue virus serotype 1 (BTV-1 epizootic of southwest France. As the virus was newly introduced in this area, natural immunity of livestock was absent. This allowed determination of the role of vaccination in changing the velocity of bluetongue spread while accounting for environmental factors that possibly influenced it. The average estimated velocity across the country despite restriction on animal movements was 5.4 km/day, which is very similar to the velocity of spread of the bluetongue virus serotype 8 epizootic in France also estimated in a context of restrictions on animal movements. Vaccination significantly reduced the propagation velocity of BTV-1. In comparison to municipalities with no vaccine coverage, the velocity of BTV-1 spread decreased by 1.7 km/day in municipalities with immunized animals. For the first time, the effect of vaccination has been quantified using data from a real epizootic whilst accounting for environmental factors known to modify the velocity of bluetongue spread. Our findings emphasize the importance of vaccination in limiting disease spread across natural landscape. Finally, environmental factors, specifically those related to vector abundance and activity, were found to be good predictors of the velocity of BTV-1 spread, indicating that these variables need to be adequately accounted for when evaluating the role of vaccination on bluetongue spread.

  13. Properly pricing country risk: a model for pricing long-term fundamental risk applied to central and eastern European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Revoltella

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The private sector has used proxies such as sovereign credit ratings, spreads on sovereign bonds and spreads on sovereign credit default swaps (CDS to gauge country risk, even though these measures are pricing the risk of default of government bonds, which is different from the risks facing private participants in cross-border financing. Under normal market conditions, the CDS spreads are a very useful source of information on country risk. However, the recent crisis has shown that the CDS spreads might lead to some underpricing or overpricing of fundamentals in the case of excessively low or excessively high risk aversion. In this paper we develop an alternative measure of country risk that extracts the volatile, short-term market sentiment component from the sover eign CDS spread in order to improve its reliability in periods of market distress. We show that adverse market sentiment was a key driver of the sharp increase in sovereign CDS spreads of central and eastern European (CEE countries during the most severe phase of the crisis. We also show that our measure of country risk sheds some light on the observed stability of cross-border bank flows to CEE banks during the crisis.

  14. Epidemic spreading with immunization rate on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Tanimoto, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the spread of diseases, computer viruses or information on complex networks and also immunization strategies to prevent or control the spread. When an entire population cannot be immunized and the effect of immunization is not perfect, we need the targeted immunization with immunization rate. Under such a circumstance we calculate epidemic thresholds for the SIR and SIS epidemic models. It is shown that, in scale-free networks, the targeted immunization is effective only if the immunization rate is equal to one. We analyze here epidemic spreading on directed complex networks, but similar results are also valid for undirected ones.

  15. Production of low energy spread ion beams with multicusp sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Perkins, L.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Gough, R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffmann, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Kunkel, W.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leung, K.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Sarstedt, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Vujic, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Weber, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Williams, M.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-11

    The use of multicusp sources to generate ion beams with narrow energy spread has been investigated. It is found that the presence of a magnetic filter can reduce the longitudinal energy spread significantly. This is achieved by creating a uniform plasma potential distribution in the discharge chamber region, eliminating ion production in the extraction chamber and in the sheath of the exit aperture and by minimizing the probability of charge exchange processes in the extraction chamber. An energy spread as low as 1 eV has been measured. (orig.).

  16. Production of low energy spread ion beams with multicusp sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y., Lee; Perkins, L. T.; Gough, R. A.; Hoffmann, M.; Kunkel, W. B.; N. Leung, K.; Sarstedt, M.; Vujic, J.; Weber, M.; Williams, M. D.

    1996-02-01

    The use of multicusp sources to generate ion beams with narrow energy spread has been investigated. It is found that the presence of a magnetic filter can reduce the longitudinal energy spread significantly. This is achieved by creating a uniform plasma potential distribution in the discharge chamber region, eliminating ion production in the extraction chamber and in the sheath of the exit aperture and by minimizing the probability of charge exchange processes in the extraction chamber. An energy spread as low as 1 eV has been measured.

  17. Spreading of Trisiloxanes on Thin Water Film: Dry Spot Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Derrick Ovunda NJOBUENWU

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation of the spreading of trisiloxanes EO6, EO7, EO8, EO9 and sodium dodecyl sulphate SDS on thin films which are 320 microns in thickness; the concentrations covered are above the CMC. The spreading of SDS is accompanied by the formation of a “dry spot” which advances in time roughly as t1/4. The trisiloxanes spreading gave rise to dry spot formation that was accompanied by “irregularities”, which corresponded to an abrupt jump in the...

  18. Numerical simulation of filler metal droplets spreading in laser brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanbin; Feng, Xiaosong; Li, Liqun

    2007-11-01

    A finite element model was constructed using a commercial software Fidap to analyze the Cu-base filler metal droplet spreading process in laser brazing, in which the temperature distribution, droplet geometry, and fluid flow velocity were calculated. Marangoni and buoyancy convection and gravity force were considered, and the effects of laser power and spot size on the spreading process were evaluated. Special attention was focused on the free surface of the droplet, which determines the profile of the brazing spot. The simulated results indicate that surface tension is the dominant flow driving force and laser spot size determines the droplet spreading domain.

  19. Dynamic wetting and spreading and the role of topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Shirtcliffe, Neil J

    2009-11-18

    The spreading of a droplet of a liquid on a smooth solid surface is often described by the Hoffman-de Gennes law, which relates the edge speed, v(e), to the dynamic and equilibrium contact angles θ and θ(e) through [Formula: see text]. When the liquid wets the surface completely and the equilibrium contact angle vanishes, the edge speed is proportional to the cube of the dynamic contact angle. When the droplets are non-volatile this law gives rise to simple power laws with time for the contact angle and other parameters in both the capillary and gravity dominated regimes. On a textured surface, the equilibrium state of a droplet is strongly modified due to the amplification of the surface chemistry induced tendencies by the topography. The most common example is the conversion of hydrophobicity into superhydrophobicity. However, when the surface chemistry favors partial wetting, topography can result in a droplet spreading completely. A further, frequently overlooked consequence of topography is that the rate at which an out-of-equilibrium droplet spreads should also be modified. In this report, we review ideas related to the idea of topography induced wetting and consider how this may relate to dynamic wetting and the rate of droplet spreading. We consider the effect of the Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter equations on the driving forces and discuss how these may modify power laws for spreading. We relate the ideas to both the hydrodynamic viscous dissipation model and the molecular-kinetic theory of spreading. This suggests roughness and solid surface fraction modified Hoffman-de Gennes laws relating the edge speed to the dynamic and equilibrium contact angle. We also consider the spreading of small droplets and stripes of non-volatile liquids in the capillary regime and large droplets in the gravity regime. In the case of small non-volatile droplets spreading completely, a roughness modified Tanner's law giving the dependence of dynamic contact angle on time is

  20. Modelling spreading dynamics of liquid crystals in three spatial dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Te-Sheng; Thiele, Uwe; Cummings, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    We study spreading dynamics of nematic liquid crystal droplets within the framework of the long-wave approximation. A fourth order nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation governing the free surface evolution is derived. The influence of elastic distortion energy and of imposed anchoring variations at the substrate are explored through linear stability analysis and scaling arguments, which yield useful insight and predictions for the behaviour of spreading droplets. This behaviour is captured by fully nonlinear time-dependent simulations of three dimensional droplets spreading in the presence of anchoring variations that model simple defects in the nematic orientation at the substrate.

  1. Spreads of bonds issued by sub-sovereign European governments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Jannone Bellot

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies the factors that affect the primary and secondary market spreads of fixed and variable rate bonds issued by sub-sovereign European governments. The two markets were analyzed separately to compare whether the factors for the primary market coincided with those for the secondary market. Data for the period between February 2008 and December 2013 were analyzed using panel data estimation. The two markets behaved almost identically, and the signs of the variables were as expected in nearly every case. The most important factor determining the spread of sub-sovereign bonds was the spread of the sovereign bond.

  2. Numerical simulation of filler metal droplets spreading in laser brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanbin Chen; Xiaosong Feng; Liqun Li

    2007-01-01

    A finite element model was constructed using a commercial software Fidap to analyze the Cu-base filler metal droplet spreading process in laser brazing, in which the temperature distribution, droplet geometry,and fluid flow velocity were calculated. Marangoni and buoyancy convection and gravity force were considered, and the effects of laser power and spot size on the spreading process were evaluated. Special attention was focused on the free surface of the droplet, which determines the profile of the brazing spot.The simulated results indicate that surface tension is the dominant flow driving force and laser spot size determines the droplet spreading domain.

  3. Spreading dynamics in heterogeneous graphs: Beyond the assortativity coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarelli, Michele; Vergni, Davide

    2017-02-01

    We study spreading dynamics of a reaction-diffusion process in a special class of heterogeneous graphs with Poissonian degree distribution and composed of both local and long range links. The behavior of the spreading dynamics on such networks are investigated by relating them to the topological features of graphs. We find that the degree of assortativity can give just some indication about the large scale behavior of the spreading dynamics while a detailed description of the process can be addressed by introducing new, more appropriate, topological quantities linked to the distance between nodes.

  4. Genetic structure and rabies spread potential in raccoons: the role of landscape barriers and sex-biased dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Héloïse; Garant, Dany; Robert, Karine; Mainguy, Julien; Pelletier, Fanie

    2012-06-01

    Identifying natural barriers to movements of hosts associated with infectious diseases is essential for developing effective control strategies. Raccoon rabies variant (RRV) is a zoonosis of concern for humans because its main vector, the raccoon (Procyon lotor), is found near residential areas. In Québec, Canada, all cases of RRV found in raccoons since 2006 were detected on the eastern side of the Richelieu River, suggesting that this river acts as a barrier to gene flow and thus the potential for RRV to spread. The objectives of this study were to characterize the genetic structure of raccoon populations and assess the effect of the Richelieu River on the population structure in southern Québec, Canada. We also evaluated whether RRV spread potential differed between sex and at a larger spatial scale. Our analyses revealed a weak signal of genetic differentiation among individuals located on each side of the Richelieu River. At a larger spatial scale, genetic structuring was weak. Our results suggest that rivers might not always efficiently restrain raccoon movements and spread of RRV. We suggest that the difference in genetic structure found between sexes can be partly explained by male movements during the breeding season in winter, when ice bridges allow passage over most rivers in Québec.

  5. Rumor Spreading Model with Trust Mechanism in Complex Social Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-Qi; YANG Xiao-Yuan; HAN Yi-Liang; WANG Xu-An

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,to study rumor spreading,we propose a novel susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) model by introducing the trust mechanism.We derive mean-field equations that describe the dynamics of the SIR model on homogeneous networks and inhomogeneous networks.Then a steady-state analysis is conducted to investigate the critical threshold and the final size of the rumor spreading.We show that the introduction of trust mechanism reduces the final rumor size and the velocity of rumor spreading,but increases the critical thresholds on both networks.Moreover,the trust mechanism not only greatly reduces the maximum rumor influence,but also postpones the rumor terminal time,which provides us with more time to take measures to control the rumor spreading.The theoretical results are confirmed by sufficient numerical simulations.

  6. Epidemic spreading on random surfer networks with infected avoidance strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yun; Ding, Li; Huang, Yun-Han; Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study epidemic spreading on random surfer networks with infected avoidance (IA) strategy. In particular, we consider that susceptible individuals’ moving direction angles are affected by the current location information received from infected individuals through a directed information network. The model is mainly analyzed by discrete-time numerical simulations. The results indicate that the IA strategy can restrain epidemic spreading effectively. However, when long-distance jumps of individuals exist, the IA strategy’s effectiveness on restraining epidemic spreading is heavily reduced. Finally, it is found that the influence of the noises from information transferring process on epidemic spreading is indistinctive. Project supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61403284, 61272114, 61673303, and 61672112) and the Marine Renewable Energy Special Fund Project of the State Oceanic Administration of China (Grant No. GHME2013JS01).

  7. The effect of the forget-remember mechanism on spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Jiao; Cai, Xu

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new mechanism---the forget-remember mechanism into the spreading process. Equipped with such a mechanism an individual is prone to forget the "message" received and remember the one forgotten, namely switching his state between active (with message) and inactive (without message). The probability of state switch is governed by linear or exponential forget-remember functions of history time which is measured by the time elapsed since the most recent state change. Our extensive simulations reveal that the forget-remember mechanism has significant effects on the saturation of message spreading, and may even lead to a termination of spreading under certain conditions. This finding may shed some light on how to control the spreading of epidemics. It is found that percolation-like phase transitions can occur. By investigating the properties of clusters, formed by connected, active individuals, we may be able to justify the existence of such phase transitions.

  8. Competing spreading processes on multiplex networks: awareness and epidemics

    CERN Document Server

    Granell, Clara; Arenas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Epidemic-like spreading processes on top of multilayered interconnected complex networks reveal a rich phase diagram of intertwined competition effects. A recent study by the authors [Granell et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 128701 (2013)] presented the analysis of the interrelation between two processes accounting for the spreading of an epidemics, and the spreading of information awareness to prevent its infection, on top of multiplex networks. The results in the case in which awareness implies total immunization to the disease, revealed the existence of a metacritical point at which the critical onset of the epidemics starts depending on the reaching of the awareness process. Here we present a full analysis of these critical properties in the more general scenario where the awareness spreading does not imply total immunization, and where infection does not imply immediate awareness of it. We find the critical relation between both competing processes for a wide spectrum of parameters representing the interacti...

  9. Animal Research Yields Clues to Sexual Spread of Zika

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal Research Yields Clues to Sexual Spread of Zika Researchers think vaginal fluid may be ideal breeding ... in mice may offer insight into how the Zika virus is transmitted sexually and affects a fetus. ...

  10. Improvement of SNR with Chaotic Spreading Sequences for CDMA

    CERN Document Server

    Umeno, K; Umeno, Ken; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    1999-01-01

    We show that chaotic spreading sequences generated by ergodic mappings of Chebyshev orthogonal polynomials have better correlation properties for CDMA(code division multiple access) than the optimal binary sequences (Gold sequences) in the sense of ensemble average.

  11. Epidemic spreading in time-varying community networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Guangming, E-mail: wangxy@dlut.edu.cn, E-mail: ren-guang-ming@163.com [School of Electronic and Information, Guangdong Polytechnic Normal University, Guangzhou 510665 (China); Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Xingyuan, E-mail: wangxy@dlut.edu.cn, E-mail: ren-guang-ming@163.com [Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-06-15

    The spreading processes of many infectious diseases have comparable time scale as the network evolution. Here, we present a simple networks model with time-varying community structure, and investigate susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic spreading processes in this model. By both theoretic analysis and numerical simulations, we show that the efficiency of epidemic spreading in this model depends intensively on the mobility rate q of the individuals among communities. We also find that there exists a mobility rate threshold q{sub c}. The epidemic will survive when q > q{sub c} and die when q < q{sub c}. These results can help understanding the impacts of human travel on the epidemic spreading in complex networks with community structure.

  12. Aquatic invertebrates doubly suspect in spreading duck malady : 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A 1958 news release providing a brief overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's findings regarding the role aquatic invertebrates play in the spread of avian...

  13. Physical Proximity and Spreading in Dynamic Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Most infectious diseases spread on a dynamic network of human interactions. Recent studies of social dynamics have provided evidence that spreading patterns may depend strongly on detailed micro-dynamics of the social system. We have recorded every single interaction within a large population, mapping out---for the first time at scale---the complete proximity network for a densely-connected system. Here we show the striking impact of interaction-distance on the network structure and dynamics of spreading processes. We create networks supporting close (intimate network, up to ~1m) and longer distance (ambient network, up to ~10m) modes of transmission. The intimate network is fragmented, with weak ties bridging densely-connected neighborhoods, whereas the ambient network supports spread driven by random contacts between strangers. While there is no trivial mapping from the micro-dynamics of proximity networks to empirical epidemics, these networks provide a telling approximation of droplet and airborne modes o...

  14. On the influence of trust in the spreading of information

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hongrun; Gómez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The understanding and prediction of information diffusion processes on networks is a major challenge in network theory with many implications in social sciences. Many theoretical advances came at the hand of stochastic spreading models. Nevertheless, these stochastic models overlooked the influence of rational decision on the outcome of the process. For instance, different levels of trust on acquaintances do play a role in the information spreading, and actors may change their spreading decisions during the information diffusion process accordingly. Here, we study an information spreading model where the decision to transmit or not is based on trust. We explore the interplay between the propagation of information and the trust dynamics happening on a two layer multiplex network. Actors' trustable or untrustable states are assimilated as accumulated cooperation or defection behaviors, respectively, in a prisoners' dilemma set up, and controlled by a memory span. The propagation of the information is abstracted...

  15. Knowledge of and misconceptions about the spread and prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-27

    May 27, 2009 ... and misconceptions regarding the spread and prevention of HIV in older women attending the Tshwane District ... in this group.10,11 In such relations, the woman's risk is nine ..... Public media education campaigns targeting.

  16. Traffic-driven epidemic spreading in correlated networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Han-Xin; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the extensive previous efforts on traffic dynamics and epidemic spreading in complex networks, the problem of traffic-driven epidemic spreading on {\\em correlated} networks has not been addressed. Interestingly, we find that the epidemic threshold, a fundamental quantity underlying the spreading dynamics, exhibits a non-monotonic behavior in that it can be minimized for some critical value of the assortativity coefficient, a parameter characterizing the network correlation. To understand this phenomenon, we use the degree-based mean-field theory to calculate the traffic-driven epidemic threshold for correlated networks. The theory predicts that the threshold is inversely proportional to the packet-generation rate and the largest eigenvalue of the betweenness matrix. We obtain consistency between theory and numerics. Our results may provide insights into the important problem of controlling/harnessing real-world epidemic spreading dynamics driven by traffic flows.

  17. Determinants of Commercial Banks' Interest Rate Spread in Namibia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bank, commercial banks, development financial institutions and the non-banking sector which consists of .... its interest rate spread in order to shield itself against the risk. This suggests that the ..... PSG Wealth Management (Namibia). (2013).

  18. Predicted Spatial Spread of Canine Rabies in Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnstone-Robertson, Simon P; Fleming, Peter J. S; Ward, Michael P; Davis, Stephen A

    2017-01-01

    ... for the spread of canine rabies in the currently rabies-free wild dog population of Australia. The introduction of a sub-clinically infected dog from Indonesia is a distinct possibility, as is t...

  19. Competing spreading processes and immunization in multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic spreading on physical contact network will naturally introduce the human awareness information diffusion on virtual contact network, and the awareness diffusion will in turn depress the epidemic spreading, thus forming the competing spreading processes of epidemic and awareness in a multiplex networks. In this paper, we study the competing dynamics of epidemic and awareness, both of which follow the SIR process, in a two-layer networks based on microscopic Markov chain approach and numerical simulations. We find that strong capacities of awareness diffusion and self-protection of individuals could lead to a much higher epidemic threshold and a smaller outbreak size. However, the self-awareness of individuals has no obvious effect on the epidemic threshold and outbreak size. In addition, the immunization of the physical contact network under the interplay between of epidemic and awareness spreading is also investigated. The targeted immunization is found performs much better than random immunization, ...

  20. Influence of periodic traffic congestion on epidemic spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Muhua; Ruan, Zhongyuan; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-11-01

    In the metropolis, traffic congestion has become a very serious problem, especially in rush hours. This congestion causes people to have more chance to contact each other and thus will accelerate epidemic spreading. To explain this observation, we present a reaction-diffusion (RD) model with a periodic varying diffusion rate to represent the daily traveling behaviors of human beings and its influence to epidemic spreading. By extensive numerical simulations, we find that the epidemic spreading can be significantly influenced by traffic congestion where the amplitude, period and duration of diffusion rate are the three key parameters. Furthermore, a brief theory is presented to explain the effects of the three key parameters. These findings suggest that except the normal ways of controlling contagion in working places and long-distance traveling, controlling the contagion in daily traffic congestion may be another effective way to reduce epidemic spreading.

  1. Experimental Measurements of Spreading of Volatile Liquid Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the laser shadowgraphic system used by the first author of the present paper, a simple optical system, which combined the laser shadowgraphy and the direct magnified-photography, has been developed to measure the contact angle, the spreading speed, and the evaporation rate. Additionally, the system can also visualize thermocapillary convection inside of a sessile drop simultaneously. The experimental results show that evaporation/condensation and thermocapillary convection in the sessile drop induced by the evaporation strongly affects the wetting and spreading of the drop. Condensation always promotes the wetting and spreading of the drop. Evaporation may increase or decrease the contact angle of the evaporating sessile drops, depending on the evaporation rate. The thermocapillary convection in the drop induced by the evaporation enhances the effects of evaporation to suppress the spreading.

  2. Little Threat of Zika Spread from Rio Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Little Threat of Zika Spread From Rio Olympics: Study Because it's winter in Brazil, mosquito activity ... HealthDay News) -- Travelers and competitors at the 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil are not likely to contract ...

  3. How to Prevent Spread of The Skin Infection Impetigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How to Prevent Spread of the Skin Infection Impetigo It's a common childhood ailment, but adults can ... 27, 2016 SUNDAY, Nov. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Impetigo is a contagious skin infection that's preventable and ...

  4. Modelling of spreading process: effect from hydrogen bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin; Hu Yuan-Zhong; Jiang Lan

    2008-01-01

    Lubricant spreading on solid substrates has drawn considerable attention not only for the microscopic wetting theory but also for the dramatic application in head-disk interface of magnetic storage drive systems. Molecular dynamic simulation based on a coarse-grained bead-spring model has been used to study such a spreading process.The spreading profiles indicate that the hydrogen bonds among lubricant molecules and the hydrogen bonds between lubricant molecules and polar atoms of solid substrates will complicate the spreading process in a tremendous degree.The hydrogen bonds among lubricant molecules will strengthen the lubricant combination intensity, which may hinder most molecules from flowing down to the substrates and diffusing along the substrates. And the hydrogen bonds between lubricant molecules and polar atoms of solid substrates will confine the lubricant molecules around polar atoms, which may hinder the molecules from diffusing along the substrates and cause precursor film to vanish.

  5. Physical properties of fertilizer in relation to handling and spreading.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstee, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of physical properties of fertilizer on the handling and spreading is studied. The reviewed properties are particle size and particle size distribution, coefficient of friction, coefficient of restitution, particle strength and aerodynamic resistance. Further a measuring procedure base

  6. Epidemic spreading behavior in local-world evolving networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyi Xia; Zhongxin Liu; Zengqiang Chen; Shiwen Sun; Zhuzhi Yuan

    2008-01-01

    The susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic model is presented which can be used to study the epidemic spreading behavior in the local-world evolving network model. Local-world evolving model displays a transition from the exponential network to the scale-free network with respect to the connectivity distribution. From theoretical analyses and numerical simulations, we find that the epidemic spreading behavior on local-world networks also takes on some kind of transitional behaviors. The transitional behavior is further verified by comparing the spreading behavior of local-world network with that of random and scale-free networks. Some feasible control strategies are also proposed to keep from the epidemic spreading on networks.

  7. Temporal network sparsity and the slowing down of spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Perotti, Juan Ignacio; Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2014-01-01

    Interactions in time-varying complex systems are often very heterogeneous at the topological level (who interacts with whom) and at the temporal level (when interactions occur and how often). While it is known that temporal heterogeneities often have strong effects on dynamical processes, e.g. the burstiness of contact sequences is associated with slower spreading dynamics, the picture is far from complete. In this paper, we show that temporal heterogeneities result in temporal sparsity} at the time scale of average inter-event times, and that temporal sparsity determines the amount of slowdown of Susceptible-Infectious (SI) spreading dynamics on temporal networks. This result is based on the analysis of several empirical temporal network data sets. An approximate solution for a simple network model confirms the association between temporal sparsity and slowdown of SI spreading dynamics. Since deterministic SI spreading always follows the fastest temporal paths, our results generalize -- paths are slower to t...

  8. Non-isothermal spreading dynamics of self-rewetting droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalis, Dimitris; Sefiane, Khellil; Sahu, Kirti Chandra; Karapetsas, George; Matar, Omar K.

    2015-11-01

    We study the spreading dynamics of droplets on uniformly heated substrates. More specifically, we consider the case of binary alcohol mixtures which exhibit a non-monotonic dependence of the surface tension on temperature; these systems are often referred in the literature as self-rewetting fluids. We show through experiments that the early-stage spreading exponents depend non-monotonically on the substrate temperature in contrast to the monotonic dependence of pure liquids. In addition, we observe through the use of IR thermography visualization the formation of spontaneous travelling waves which develop along and across the free surface of the evaporating droplet and influence the spreading behaviour. Finally, we develop a theoretical model based on lubrication theory and derive an evolution equation for the interface accounting for capillarity and thermocapillarity. Using this model we investigate the effect of varying droplet wettability, which is linked to the temperature of the solid surface, on the spreading dynamics.

  9. Beat Noise Limitation in Coherent Time-Spreading OCDMA Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ken-ichi; Kitayama; Koji; Mutsushima

    2003-01-01

    The BER performance of the coherent time-spreading OCDMA network is analyzed by considering the MAI and beat noises as well as the other additive noises. The influence and solution for the beat noise issue are discussed.

  10. Water Droplet Spreading and Wicking on Nanostructured Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Jiannan; Ouyang, Xiaolong; Song, Yu; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue

    2017-07-11

    Phase-change heat transfer on nanostructured surfaces is an efficient cooling method for high heat flux devices due to its superior wettability. Liquid droplet spreading and wicking effect then dominate the heat transfer. Therefore, this study investigates the flow behavior after a droplet touches a nanostructured surface focusing on the ZnO nanowire surface with three different nanowire sizes and two array types (regular and irregular). The spreading diameter and the wicking diameter are measured against time. The results show that the average spreading and wicking velocities on a regular nanostructured surface are both smaller than those on an irregular nanostructured surface and that the nanowire size affects the liquid spreading and capillary wicking.

  11. Infections Unlikely to be Spread Through Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lice, MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ), and pin worm are unlikely to be spread through the use ... boils) that may be: Mistaken for spider bites Red, swollen, painful, warm to the touch, and have ...

  12. The SIRS Model of Epidemic Spreading in Virtual Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, A.; Kosiński, R.

    2008-09-01

    Dedicated to Professor Dietrich Stauffer on the occasion of his 65th birthday The phenomenon of epidemic spreading in a real social network is described and investigated numerically. On the basis of data concerning amount of time devoted daily to social interactions, the influence of human activity on spreading process is investigated in the frame of SIRS model. It was found that the activity of an individual is positively correlated with its connectivity and the relation has power law form. The influence of control measures on the spreading process is investigated as a function of initial conditions. The cost-effectiveness of mass immunizations campaigns and target vaccinations is compared. It was found that the form of activity distribution has significant influence on the spreading phenomena in the network.

  13. Epidemic spreading in interconnected networks: a continuous time approach

    CERN Document Server

    de Arruda, Guilherme Ferraz; Peixoto, Tiago P; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-01-01

    We present a continuous formulation of epidemic spreading on interconnected networks using a tensorial notation, extending the models of monoplex networks to this context. We derive analytical expressions for the epidemic threshold on the SIS and SIR dynamics, as well as upper and lower bounds for the steady-state. Using the quasi-stationary state (QS) method we show the emergence of two or more phase transitions, and propose an analytical and numerical analysis based on the inverse participation ratio. Furthermore, when mapping the critical epidemic dynamics to the eigenvalue problem, we observe a characteristic transition in the eigenvalue spectra of the supra-contact tensor as a function of the ratio of spreading rates: If the spreading rate within each layer is comparable to the rate across layers, the individual spectra of each layer merge with the coupling between layers. Our formalism provides a mathematical approach to epidemic spreading in multiplex systems and our results reinforce the importance of...

  14. Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance: setting a parameter space

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, José Luis; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens is a relevant problem for human health and one of the few evolution processes amenable to experimental studies. In the present review, we discuss some basic aspects of antibiotic resistance, including mechanisms of resistance, origin of resistance genes, and bottlenecks that modulate the acquisition and spread of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens. In addition, we analyse several parameters that modulate the evol...

  15. A Spread Spectrum Approach to Next Generation Intrusion Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS Spread-Spectrum Message Embedding Capacity, Distortion, Spread Spectrum Steganography , Digital Watermarking 16. PRICE CODE 17...message) in another digital signal (image or audio ) called “cover” or “host.” Two applications of watermarking are a) image/ audio authentication and b... steganography , which is an attempt to establish covert communication between trusting parties. The first step in the design of a watermarking system

  16. Spreading of sediment due to underwater blasting and dredging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard; Bach, Lis; Bollwerk, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    leads to a wider spreading of the organic part of the sediment. Almost all material less than 2 μm, including surficial clay minerals and much organic material, was transported away from the construction site and its vicinity, which could imply mobilization and export of pollutants. Environmental...... or maybe even increasing the spreading of sediment, depending on, e.g., the resilience of the flora and fauna and the surficial sediment and the pollution therein....

  17. Email networks and the spread of computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M. E.; Forrest, Stephanie; Balthrop, Justin

    2002-09-01

    Many computer viruses spread via electronic mail, making use of computer users' email address books as a source for email addresses of new victims. These address books form a directed social network of connections between individuals over which the virus spreads. Here we investigate empirically the structure of this network using data drawn from a large computer installation, and discuss the implications of this structure for the understanding and prevention of computer virus epidemics.

  18. Childhood atypical meningioma with perineural spread: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Feng-Yu.; Wong, Alex Mun-Ching; Wong, Ho-Fai; Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan); Wu, Chieh-Tsai [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan); Lin, Kuang-Lin [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan)

    2005-09-01

    Meningiomas are uncommon in children. When they occur, they are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 2. Childhood meningiomas are generally large and commonly associated with cyst formation and an unusual location. Perineural tumor spread, occasionally associated with head and neck malignancies, is very rare in meningiomas. We present the MR findings of an atypical meningioma with perineural spread in a 4.5-year-old girl. (orig.)

  19. A conceptual device for spreading (good) territorial governance in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Cotella, Giancarlo; Janin Rivolin Yoccoz, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Is it possible to spread good territorial governance in Europe and, if so, in which ways can such aim be achieved? This paper presents a conceptual device, developed within the ESPON project TANGO (Territorial Approaches for New Governance), usable to manage the spread of examples or "features" of good territorial governance in Europe. It is worth clarifying that this paper does not face the issues of defining what is "good" in territorial governance, nor of what can or should be transferred ...

  20. The Effect of Monetary Policy on Credit Spreads

    OpenAIRE

    Tolga Cenesizoglu; Badye Essid

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of monetary policy on credit spreads between yields on corporate bonds with different ratings over changing conditions in the economy. Using futures data on the fed funds rate, we distinguish between expected and unexpected changes in monetary policy. We find that unexpected changes in the fed funds rate do not have a significant effect on changes in credit spreads when we do not control for different conditions in the economy. We then distinguish between ...

  1. The Effect of Monetary Policy on Credit Spreads

    OpenAIRE

    Tolga Cenesizoglu; Badye Essid

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of monetary policy on credit spreads between yields on corporate bonds with different ratings over changing conditions in the economy. Using futures data on the fed funds rate, we distinguish between expected and unexpected changes in monetary policy. We find that unexpected changes in the fed funds rate do not have a significant effect on changes in credit spreads when we do not control for different conditions in the economy. We then distinguish between ...

  2. Spread of H1N1 within Households

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-29

    This podcast describes an investigation into how H1N1 was spreading within households during the initial days of the pandemic in Texas. CDC's Dr. Oliver Morgan discusses what investigators learned about the role that children played in introducing the virus into households and spreading flu.  Created: 3/29/2010 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/29/2010.

  3. Visualization of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruchalla, Kenny; Novacheck, Joshua; Bloom, Aaron

    2016-12-01

    The Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS), explores the operational impacts of the wide spread adoption of wind and solar photovoltaics (PV) resources in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection and Quebec Interconnection (collectively, EI). In order to understand some of the economic and reliability challenges of managing hundreds of gigawatts of wind and PV generation, we developed state of the art tools, data, and models for simulating power system operations using hourly unit commitment and 5-minute economic dispatch over an entire year. Using NREL's high-performance computing capabilities and new methodologies to model operations, we found that the EI, as simulated with evolutionary change in 2026, could balance the variability and uncertainty of wind and PV at a 5-minute level under a variety of conditions. A large-scale display and a combination of multiple coordinated views and small multiples were used to visually analyze the four large highly multivariate scenarios with high spatial and temporal resolutions. state of the art tools, data, and models for simulating power system operations using hourly unit commitment and 5-minute economic dispatch over an entire year. Using NRELs high-performance computing capabilities and new methodologies to model operations, we found that the EI, as simulated with evolutionary change in 2026, could balance the variability and uncertainty of wind and PV at a 5-minute level under a variety of conditions. A large-scale display and a combination of multiple coordinated views and small multiples were used to visually analyze the four large highly multivariate scenarios with high spatial and temporal resolutions.

  4. A cellular automaton framework for infectious disease spread simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Bernhard; Kugler, Karl; Tejada, Maria M; Baumgartner, Christian; Seger, Michael; Osl, Melanie; Netzer, Michael; Handler, Michael; Dander, Andreas; Wurz, Manfred; Graber, Armin; Tilg, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a cellular automaton framework for processing the spatiotemporal spread of infectious diseases is presented. The developed environment simulates and visualizes how infectious diseases might spread, and hence provides a powerful instrument for health care organizations to generate disease prevention and contingency plans. In this study, the outbreak of an avian flu like virus was modeled in the state of Tyrol, and various scenarios such as quarantine, effect of different medications on viral spread and changes of social behavior were simulated.The proposed framework is implemented using the programming language Java. The set up of the simulation environment requires specification of the disease parameters and the geographical information using a population density colored map, enriched with demographic data.The results of the numerical simulations and the analysis of the computed parameters will be used to get a deeper understanding of how the disease spreading mechanisms work, and how to protect the population from contracting the disease. Strategies for optimization of medical treatment and vaccination regimens will also be investigated using our cellular automaton framework.In this study, six different scenarios were simulated. It showed that geographical barriers may help to slow down the spread of an infectious disease, however, when an aggressive and deadly communicable disease spreads, only quarantine and controlled medical treatment are able to stop the outbreak, if at all.

  5. Directional spread of alphaherpesviruses in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Tal; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-02-11

    Alphaherpesviruses are pathogens that invade the nervous systems of their mammalian hosts. Directional spread of infection in the nervous system is a key component of the viral lifecycle and is critical for the onset of alphaherpesvirus-related diseases. Many alphaherpesvirus infections originate at peripheral sites, such as epithelial tissues, and then enter neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), where lifelong latency is established. Following reactivation from latency and assembly of new viral particles, the infection typically spreads back out towards the periphery. These spread events result in the characteristic lesions (cold sores) commonly associated with herpes simplex virus (HSV) and herpes zoster (shingles) associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV). Occasionally, the infection spreads transsynaptically from the PNS into higher order neurons of the central nervous system (CNS). Spread of infection into the CNS, while rarer in natural hosts, often results in severe consequences, including death. In this review, we discuss the viral and cellular mechanisms that govern directional spread of infection in the nervous system. We focus on the molecular events that mediate long distance directional transport of viral particles in neurons during entry and egress.

  6. Cortical spreading depression impairs oxygen delivery and metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzawa, Izumi; Sakadžić, Sava; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Boas, David A; Ayata, Cenk

    2012-02-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is associated with severe hypoperfusion in mice. Using minimally invasive multimodal optical imaging, we show that severe flow reductions during and after spreading depression are associated with a steep decline in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. Concurrent severe hemoglobin desaturation suggests that the oxygen metabolism becomes at least in part supply limited, and the decrease in cortical blood volume implicates vasoconstriction as the mechanism. In support of oxygen supply-demand mismatch, cortical nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence increases during spreading depression for at least 5 minutes, particularly away from parenchymal arterioles. However, modeling of tissue oxygen delivery shows that cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen drops more than predicted by a purely supply-limited model, raising the possibility of a concurrent reduction in oxygen demand during spreading depression. Importantly, a subsequent spreading depression triggered within 15 minutes evokes a monophasic flow increase superimposed on the oligemic baseline, which markedly differs from the response to the preceding spreading depression triggered in naive cortex. Altogether, these data suggest that CSD is associated with long-lasting oxygen supply-demand mismatch linked to severe vasoconstriction in mice.

  7. Electrically modulated dynamic spreading of drops on soft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Daga, Ashish; DasGupta, Sunando; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-07-01

    The intricate interaction between the deformability of a substrate and the dynamic spreading of a liquid drop on the same, under the application of an electrical voltage, has remained far from being well understood. Here, we demonstrate that electrospreading dynamics on soft substrates is dictated by the combined interplay of electrocapillarity, the wetting line friction, and the viscoelastic energy dissipation at the contact line. Our results reveal that during such electro-elastocapillarity mediated spreading of a sessile drop, the contact radius evolution exhibits a universal power-law in a substrate elasticity based non-dimensional time, with an electrical voltage dependent spreading exponent. Simultaneously, the macroscopic dynamic contact angle variation follows a general power-law in the contact line velocity, normalized by elasticity dependent characteristic velocity scale. These findings will be beneficial for comprehending droplet spreading dynamics stemming from the combination of electrically modulated spreading and "soft wetting." Hence, our results are likely to provide the foundation for the development of a plethora of applications involving droplet manipulations by exploiting the interplay between electrically triggered spreading and substrate-compliance over interfacial scales.

  8. The spreading behaviour of perfluoropolyether droplets on solid surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Xiao-Yan; Li Xin; Hu Yuan-Zhong; Wang Hui

    2008-01-01

    The spread of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) droplets on solid surfaces has been measured from the top-down view through a microscope system. Effects of substrates, molecular weight and end-group functionality on spreading of the PFPE droplets have been studied experimentally and the results were compared with those by molecular dynamics (MD)simulations. Silicon wafer and diamond-like carbon (DLC) substrates were used to study the effect of substrates on spreading. Two types of PFPE, Z-dol and Z-tetraol, with the same chain structure and various molecular weights (2000 and 4000 g/mol) were employed in experiments. Effect of molecular weight has been investigated through comparing the spreading of Z-dol 2000 and Z-dol 4000, and it is found that the increase of molecular weight will decrease the mobility of PFPE. Comparison between spreading of Z-dol and Z-tetraol of the same molecular weight proved that functional end group plays a significant role on the spreading of PFPE, which confirmed the MD simulation results.

  9. Fire spread predictions: Sweeping uncertainty under the rug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benali, Akli; Sá, Ana C L; Ervilha, Ana R; Trigo, Ricardo M; Fernandes, Paulo M; Pereira, José M C

    2017-08-15

    Predicting fire spread and behavior correctly is crucial to minimize the dramatic consequences of wildfires. However, our capability of accurately predicting fire spread is still very limited, undermining the utility of such simulations to support decision-making. Improving fire spread predictions for fire management purposes, by using higher quality input data or enhanced models, can be expensive, unfeasible or even impossible. Fire managers would benefit from fast and inexpensive ways of improving their decision-making. In the present work, we focus on i) understanding if fire spread predictions can be improved through model parameter calibration based on information collected from a set of large historical wildfires in Portugal; and ii) understanding to what extent decreasing parametric uncertainty can counterbalance the impact of input data uncertainty. Our results obtained with the Fire Area Simulator (FARSITE) modeling system show that fire spread predictions can be continuously improved by 'learning' from past wildfires. The uncertainty contained in the major input variables (wind speed and direction, ignition location and fuel models) can be 'swept under the rug' through the use of more appropriate parameter sets. The proposed framework has a large potential to improve future fire spread predictions, increasing their reliability and usefulness to support fire management and decision making processes, thus potentially reducing the negative impacts of wildfires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Understanding the spreading patterns of mobile phone viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Gonzalez, Marta; Hidalgo, Cesar; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2009-03-01

    Mobile viruses are little more than a nuisance today, but given our increased reliance on wireless communication, in the near future they could pose more risk than their PC based counterparts. Despite of the more than three hundred mobile viruses known so far, little is known about their spreading pattern, partly due to a lack of data on the communication and travel patterns of mobile phone users. Starting from the traffic and the communication pattern of six million mobile phone users, we model the vulnerability of mobile communications against potential virus outbreaks. We show that viruses exploiting Bluetooth and multimedia messaging services (MMS) follow markedly different spreading patterns. The Bluetooth virus can reach all susceptible handsets, but spreads relatively slowly, as its spread is driven by human mobility. In contrast, an MMS virus can spread rapidly, but because the underlying social network is fragmented, it can reach only a small fraction of all susceptible users. This difference affects both their spreading rate, the number of infected users, as well as the defense measures one needs to take to protect the system against potential viral outbreak.

  11. Ensemble data assimilation with an adjusted forecast spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Rainwater

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble data assimilation typically evolves an ensemble of model states whose spread is intended to represent the algorithm's uncertainty about the state of the physical system that produces the data. The analysis phase treats the forecast ensemble as a random sample from a background distribution, and it transforms the ensemble according to the background and observation error statistics to provide an appropriate sample for the next forecast phase. We find that in the presence of model nonlinearity and model error, it can be fruitful to rescale the ensemble spread prior to the forecast and then reverse this rescaling after the forecast. We call this approach forecast spread adjustment, which we discuss and test in this article using an ensemble Kalman filter and a 2005 model due to Lorenz. We argue that forecast spread adjustment provides a tunable parameter, that is, complementary to covariance inflation, which cumulatively increases ensemble spread to compensate for underestimation of uncertainty. We also show that as the adjustment parameter approaches zero, the filter approaches the extended Kalman filter if the ensemble size is sufficiently large. We find that varying the adjustment parameter can significantly reduce analysis and forecast errors in some cases. We evaluate how the improvement provided by forecast spread adjustment depends on ensemble size, observation error and model error. Our results indicate that the technique is most effective for small ensembles, small observation error and large model error, though the effectiveness depends significantly on the nature of the model error.

  12. New PN Even Balanced Sequences for Spread-Spectrum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inácio JAL

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A new class of pseudonoise even balanced (PN-EB binary spreading sequences is derived from existing classical odd-length families of maximum-length sequences, such as those proposed by Gold, by appending or inserting one extra-zero element (chip to the original sequences. The incentive to generate large families of PN-EB spreading sequences is motivated by analyzing the spreading effect of these sequences from a natural sampling point of view. From this analysis a new definition for PG is established, from which it becomes clear that very high processing gains (PGs can be achieved in band-limited direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS applications by using spreading sequences with zero mean, given that certain conditions regarding spectral aliasing are met. To obtain large families of even balanced (i.e., equal number of ones and zeros sequences, two design criteria are proposed, namely the ranging criterion (RC and the generating ranging criterion (GRC. PN-EB sequences in the polynomial range are derived using these criteria, and it is shown that they exhibit secondary autocorrelation and cross-correlation peaks comparable to the sequences they are derived from. The methods proposed not only facilitate the generation of large numbers of new PN-EB spreading sequences required for CDMA applications, but simultaneously offer high processing gains and good despreading characteristics in multiuser SS scenarios with band-limited noise and interference spectra. Simulation results are presented to confirm the respective claims made.

  13. An Improved Adaptive model for Information Recommending and Spreading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Duan-Bing; GAO Hui

    2012-01-01

    People in the Internet era have to cope with information overload and expend great effort on finding what they need.Recent experiments indicate that recommendations based on users' past activities are usually less favored than those based on social relationships,and thus many researchers have proposed adaptive algorithms on social recommendation.However,in those methods,quite a number of users have little chance to recommend information,which might prevent valuable information from spreading.We present an improved algorithm that allows more users to have enough followers to spread information.Experimental results demonstrate that both recommendation precision and spreading effectiveness of our method can be improved significantly.%People in the Internet era have to cope with information overload and expend great effort on finding what they need. Recent experiments indicate that recommendations based on users' past activities are usually less favored than those based on social relationships, and thus many researchers have proposed adaptive algorithms on social recommendation. However, in those methods, quite a number of users have little chance to recommend information, which might prevent valuable information from spreading. We present an improved algorithm that allows more users to have enough followers to spread information. Experimental results demonstrate that both recommendation precision and spreading effectiveness of our method can be improved significantly.

  14. Modeling universal dynamics of cell spreading on elastic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Houfu; Li, Shaofan

    2015-11-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) multiscale moving contact line model is combined with a soft matter cell model to study the universal dynamics of cell spreading over elastic substrates. We have studied both the early stage and the late stage cell spreading by taking into account the actin tension effect. In this work, the cell is modeled as an active nematic droplet, and the substrate is modeled as a St. Venant Kirchhoff elastic medium. A complete 3D simulation of cell spreading has been carried out. The simulation results show that the spreading area versus spreading time at different stages obeys specific power laws, which is in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical prediction reported in the literature. Moreover, the simulation results show that the substrate elasticity may affect force dipole distribution inside the cell. The advantage of this approach is that it combines the hydrodynamics of actin retrograde flow with moving contact line model so that it can naturally include actin tension effect resulting from actin polymerization and actomyosin contraction, and thus it might be capable of simulating complex cellular scale phenomenon, such as cell spreading or even crawling.

  15. Asymmetric Spreading of a Drop upon Impact onto a Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohammadi, H; Amirfazli, A

    2017-06-13

    Study of the spreading of an impacting drop onto a surface has gained importance recently due to applications in printing, coating, and icing. Limited studies are conducted to understand asymmetric spreading of a drop seen upon drop impact onto a moving surface; there is no relation to describe such spreading. Here, we experimentally studied the spreading of a drop over a moving surface; such study also provides insights for systems where a drop impacts at an angle relative to a surface, i.e., drop has both normal and tangential velocities relative to the surface. We developed a model that for the first time allows prediction of time evolution for the asymmetric shape of the lamella during spreading. The developed model is demonstrated to be valid for a range of liquids and surface wettabilities as well as drop and surface velocities, making this study a comprehensive examination of the topic. We also found out how surface wettability can affect the recoil of the drop after spreading and explained the role of contact angle hysteresis and receding contact angle in delaying the recoil process.

  16. Directional Spread of Alphaherpesviruses in the Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn W. Enquist

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Alphaherpesviruses are pathogens that invade the nervous systems of their mammalian hosts. Directional spread of infection in the nervous system is a key component of the viral lifecycle and is critical for the onset of alphaherpesvirus-related diseases. Many alphaherpesvirus infections originate at peripheral sites, such as epithelial tissues, and then enter neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS, where lifelong latency is established. Following reactivation from latency and assembly of new viral particles, the infection typically spreads back out towards the periphery. These spread events result in the characteristic lesions (cold sores commonly associated with herpes simplex virus (HSV and herpes zoster (shingles associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV. Occasionally, the infection spreads transsynaptically from the PNS into higher order neurons of the central nervous system (CNS. Spread of infection into the CNS, while rarer in natural hosts, often results in severe consequences, including death. In this review, we discuss the viral and cellular mechanisms that govern directional spread of infection in the nervous system. We focus on the molecular events that mediate long distance directional transport of viral particles in neurons during entry and egress.

  17. A case study on fractal simulation of forest fire spread

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱启疆; 戎太宗; 孙睿

    2000-01-01

    This paper relates to the semi-empirical model based on fire field energy balance and the physical model based on land temperature, aiming to provide a practical way of describing fire spread. Fire spread is determined by the characteristics of combustible materials and the agency of meteorological factors and terrains. Combustible materials, such as surface area, have no featured scale, yet the process of forest fire spread contains the self-replicating feature, both of which contribute to the self-similarity of fire spread. Consequently, fire behavior can be described by fractal geometry. In this research, we select Wuchagou forest in Da Hinggan Mountains as the experimental site where a forest fire took place three years ago. The forest fire was detected on low-resolution NOAA-AVHRR images, and fire spread was simulated on high-resolution TM images as another attempt to merge information. Based on remote sensing and GIS, we adopted the method of limited spreading lumping (DLA) to describe growing phe

  18. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Townsend, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Palchak, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Novacheck, Joshua [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, Jack [RePPAE LLC, Wexford, PA (United States); Barrows, Clayton [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibanez, Eduardo [GE Energy, Denver, CO (United States); O' Connell, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jordan, Gary [GE Energy, Denver, CO (United States); Roberts, Billy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Draxl, Caroline [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Eastern Interconnection (EI) is one of the largest power systems in the world, and its size and complexity have historically made it difficult to study in high levels of detail in a modeling environment. In order to understand how this system might be impacted by high penetrations (30% of total annual generation) of wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) during steady state operations, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS). This study investigates certain aspects of the reliability and economic efficiency problem faced by power system operators and planners. Specifically, the study models the ability to meet electricity demand at a 5-minute time interval by scheduling resources for known ramping events, while maintaining adequate reserves to meet random variation in supply and demand, and contingency events. To measure the ability to meet these requirements, a unit commitment and economic dispatch (UC&ED) model is employed to simulate power system operations. The economic costs of managing this system are presented using production costs, a traditional UC&ED metric that does not include any consideration of long-term fixed costs. ERGIS simulated one year of power system operations to understand regional and sub-hourly impacts of wind and PV by developing a comprehensive UC&ED model of the EI. In the analysis, it is shown that, under the study assumptions, generation from approximately 400 GW of combined wind and PV capacity can be balanced on the transmission system at a 5-minute level. In order to address the significant computational burdens associated with a model of this detail we apply novel computing techniques to dramatically reduce simulation solve time while simultaneously increasing the resolution and fidelity of the analysis. Our results also indicate that high penetrations of wind and PV (collectively variable generation (VG

  19. Decadal variability in the occurrence of wintertime haze in central eastern China tied to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sen; Li, Jianping; Sun, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Haze is a serious issue in China with increasing concerns, and understanding the factors driving decadal-scale variations in haze occurrence is relevant for government policymaking. Using a comprehensive observational haze dataset, we demonstrate notable decadal fluctuations in the number of haze days (HD) during winter in central eastern China, showing a decline since the mid-1980s. The leading mode of the wintertime HD features an increasing trend for 1959-2012 in eastern China, highly correlated with China’s gross domestic product (GDP) that represents increasing trend of pollutant emissions, and to a lesser extent meteorological factors. The second mode shows decadal variations in central eastern China associated with Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Observations and numerical simulations suggest that Mongolia High and corresponding descending motion tend to be enhanced (weakened) in central eastern China during the positive (negative) phase of PDO. With PDO shifting towards a negative phase, the weakened Mongolia High and ascending anomalies make the air unstable and conduce to the spread of pollutants, leading to the decline in the wintertime HD over central eastern China since the mid-1980s. Based on above physical mechanisms, a linear model based on PDO and GDP metrics provided a good fit to the observed HD.

  20. Decadal variability in the occurrence of wintertime haze in central eastern China tied to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sen; Li, Jianping; Sun, Cheng

    2016-06-10

    Haze is a serious issue in China with increasing concerns, and understanding the factors driving decadal-scale variations in haze occurrence is relevant for government policymaking. Using a comprehensive observational haze dataset, we demonstrate notable decadal fluctuations in the number of haze days (HD) during winter in central eastern China, showing a decline since the mid-1980s. The leading mode of the wintertime HD features an increasing trend for 1959-2012 in eastern China, highly correlated with China's gross domestic product (GDP) that represents increasing trend of pollutant emissions, and to a lesser extent meteorological factors. The second mode shows decadal variations in central eastern China associated with Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Observations and numerical simulations suggest that Mongolia High and corresponding descending motion tend to be enhanced (weakened) in central eastern China during the positive (negative) phase of PDO. With PDO shifting towards a negative phase, the weakened Mongolia High and ascending anomalies make the air unstable and conduce to the spread of pollutants, leading to the decline in the wintertime HD over central eastern China since the mid-1980s. Based on above physical mechanisms, a linear model based on PDO and GDP metrics provided a good fit to the observed HD.

  1. Eastern Canada natural gas developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, A. [Engage Energy Canada, L.P., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This power point presentation addressed the following topics regarding development of natural gas in eastern Canada: (1) the 18 Tcf of proven natural gas reserves at Sable Island, (2) Canadian markets benefiting from the Maritimes and Northeast Pipeline (M and NP), (3) a 20 year franchise agreement between Enbridge Gas and the government of New Brunswick, (4) the 25 year provincial franchise agreement by Sempra Atlantic Gas, and (5) Sable Island's influence on central Canada. The Sable Offshore Energy Project (SOEP) is now producing about 540,000 MMBtu/day from 6 fields. Plans for Tier 2 expansion are underway. Firm contracts for the M and NP are scheduled to transport gas from the SOEP to markets in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Maine and New Hampshire. Sable gas is also a potential supply for the Quebec market. Gaz Metropolitain and Enbridge have proposed to build the Cartier Pipeline from the Quebec/New Brunswick border to Quebec City. It is unlikely that Sable Island supply will directly serve the Ontario market. Canadian customers for Sable gas and M and NP service include pulp and paper companies, oil refineries, power generators and local distribution companies (LDC), with the majority of demand coming form the electric power industry. tabs., figs.

  2. Eastern Pacific Ocean Purse-seine Fishery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vessel logbook and landings data sets from U.S.A.-flagged purse-seine vessels fishing in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO). These purse seiners...

  3. Palaemon pacijicus (Stimpson) in eastern Cape tidal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1984-09-25

    Sep 25, 1984 ... pools, estuaries and in near -shore waters of the eastern Cape ... growth, ~ Wt is the increase in shrimp mean mass over time .... females were plotted to show changes in population structure ..... Monthly plankton tows in.

  4. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review (EASSRR) is a bi-annual ... Dynamics of fresh produce marketing in small-scale irrigation schemes: challenges ... Analysis of media role in bridging the information gap for environmentally ...

  5. System Protection Schemes in Eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joana

    The Ph.D. project investigates different aspects of voltage stability in the power system of Eastern Denmark taking into account the large amount of wind power. In the project, a simple System Protection Scheme (SPS) against voltage instability in Eastern Denmark is developed. The SPS design...... outages in the southern part of the 132-kV system introduce further stress in the power system, eventually leading to a voltage collapse. The local System Protection Scheme against voltage collapse is designed as a response-based scheme, which is dependent on local indication of reactive and active power...... for the Eastern Danish power system, such as wind farm rejection, cascading line outages and power oscillations. E.g. Nordic inter-area oscillation modes and damping were easily detected from phasor data during the outage of the 400 kV tie-line between Eastern Denmark and Sweden. It is concluded that recording...

  6. Active spreading processes at ultraslow mid-ocean ridges: The 1999-2001 seismo-volcanic episode at 85°E Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten; Korger, Edith; Läderach, Christine

    2010-05-01

    The rate of magma and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges is thought to decrease with decreasing spreading rate. At ultraslow spreading rates below 10-20 mm/y full rate, heat loss by conduction greatly reduces melt production with less melt produced at increasingly greater depths. Gakkel Ridge, the actively spreading mid-ocean ridge in the Arctic Ocean, opens at rates of 14 mm/y in the west decreasing to less than 6 mm/y at its eastern termination and demonstrates that magma production is not only a function of spreading rate. Whereas amagmatic spreading takes place at rates of about 12-10 mm/y, focussed melt production occurs at even lower spreading rates in long-lived discrete volcanic centres. One such centre is the 85°E volcanic complex at eastern Gakkel ridge where in 1999 a teleseismically recorded earthquake swarm consisting of more than 250 earthquakes over 9 months signalled the onset of an active spreading episode. The earthquake swarm is believed to be associated with volcanic activity although no concurrent lava effusion was found. We analysed the teleseismic earthquake swarm together with visual observation and microseismic data recorded at this site in 2001 and 2007 and noted the following characteristics which may be indicative for volcanic spreading events at the still poorly explored ultraslow spreading ridges: - unusual duration: The 1999 earthquake swarm lasted over 9 months rather than a few weeks as observed on faster spreading ridges. In addition, in 2001 seismoacoustic sounds which we interpret as gas discharge in Strombolian eruptions and a giant event plume maintained over more than one year indicate waxing and waning volcanic activity since 1999. - unusual strength: The earthquake swarm was detected at teleseismic distances of more than 1000 km and included 11 events with a magnitude >5. No other confirmed mid-ocean ridge eruption released a comparable seismic moment. Rather than focussing in a narrow area or showing pronounced

  7. Trace elements in coals of eastern Donbas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranushich, F.F. [All Russian Research & Geological Prospecting Institute for Coal Deposits, Rostov Na Donu (Russian Federation)

    2003-02-01

    Peculiarities of trace element (TE) distribution in coals of the eastern Donets Basin (Donbas) are discussed. The correlation of TE distribution with specific features of the geological setting of the region can testify to the hydrothermal introduction of trace elements or their redistribution in fluid-active zones. The geochemical regionalization of eastern Donbas is based on TE distribution. Strontium-gold-base metal, tungsten, and selenium geochemical belts and a rare metal geochemical block are outlined.

  8. Midwifery education in Central-Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mivšek, Polona; Baškova, Martina; Wilhelmova, Radka

    2016-02-01

    Problems in midwifery in many Central-Eastern European countries are very similar; it is possible to speak about the evolving Central-Eastern model of midwifery care. The educational models of this region have a relatively strong theoretical part; however, there is an insufficient practical dimension. Theoretical part of midwifery education in the universities is relatively autonomous and is slowly changing the professional identity of graduates.

  9. An analytical study of the improved nonlinear tolerance of DFT-spread OFDM and its unitary-spread OFDM generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulkind, Gal; Nazarathy, Moshe

    2012-11-05

    DFT-spread (DFT-S) coherent optical OFDM was numerically and experimentally shown to provide improved nonlinear tolerance over an optically amplified dispersion uncompensated fiber link, relative to both conventional coherent OFDM and single-carrier transmission. Here we provide an analytic model rigorously accounting for this numerical result and precisely predicting the optimal bandwidth per DFT-S sub-band (or equivalently the optimal number of sub-bands per optical channel) required in order to maximize the link non-linear tolerance (NLT). The NLT advantage of DFT-S OFDM is traced to the particular statistical dependency introduced among the OFDM sub-carriers by means of the DFT spreading operation. We further extend DFT-S to a unitary-spread generalized modulation format which includes as special cases the DFT-S scheme as well as a new format which we refer to as wavelet-spread (WAV-S) OFDM, replacing the spreading DFTs by Hadamard matrices which have elements +/-1 hence are multiplier-free. The extra complexity incurred in the spreading operation is almost negligible, however the performance improvement with WAV-S relative to plain OFDM is more modest than that achieved by DFT-S, which remains the preferred format for nonlinear tolerance improvement, outperforming both plain OFDM and single-carrier schemes.

  10. Using a network model to assess risk of forest pest spread via recreational travel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank H Koch

    Full Text Available Long-distance dispersal pathways, which frequently relate to human activities, facilitate the spread of alien species. One pathway of concern in North America is the possible spread of forest pests in firewood carried by visitors to campgrounds or recreational facilities. We present a network model depicting the movement of campers and, by extension, potentially infested firewood. We constructed the model from US National Recreation Reservation Service data documenting more than seven million visitor reservations (including visitors from Canada at campgrounds nationwide. This bi-directional model can be used to identify likely origin and destination locations for a camper-transported pest. To support broad-scale decision making, we used the model to generate summary maps for 48 US states and seven Canadian provinces that depict the most likely origins of campers traveling from outside the target state or province. The maps generally showed one of two basic spatial patterns of out-of-state (or out-of-province origin risk. In the eastern United States, the riskiest out-of-state origin locations were usually found in a localized region restricted to portions of adjacent states. In the western United States, the riskiest out-of-state origin locations were typically associated with major urban areas located far from the state of interest. A few states and the Canadian provinces showed characteristics of both patterns. These model outputs can guide deployment of resources for surveillance, firewood inspections, or other activities. Significantly, the contrasting map patterns indicate that no single response strategy is appropriate for all states and provinces. If most out-of-state campers are traveling from distant areas, it may be effective to deploy resources at key points along major roads (e.g., interstate highways, since these locations could effectively represent bottlenecks of camper movement. If most campers are from nearby areas, they may

  11. Epidemiological models for the spread of anti-malarial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antia R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance is making malaria control increasingly difficult. Mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of drug sensitive and resistant strains can be a useful tool to help to understand the factors that influence the spread of drug resistance, and they can therefore help in the design of rational strategies for the control of drug resistance. Methods We present an epidemiological framework to investigate the spread of anti-malarial resistance. Several mathematical models, based on the familiar Macdonald-Ross model of malaria transmission, enable us to examine the processes and parameters that are critical in determining the spread of resistance. Results In our simplest model, resistance does not spread if the fraction of infected individuals treated is less than a threshold value; if drug treatment exceeds this threshold, resistance will eventually become fixed in the population. The threshold value is determined only by the rates of infection and the infectious periods of resistant and sensitive parasites in untreated and treated hosts, whereas the intensity of transmission has no influence on the threshold value. In more complex models, where hosts can be infected by multiple parasite strains or where treatment varies spatially, resistance is generally not fixed, but rather some level of sensitivity is often maintained in the population. Conclusions The models developed in this paper are a first step in understanding the epidemiology of anti-malarial resistance and evaluating strategies to reduce the spread of resistance. However, specific recommendations for the management of resistance need to wait until we have more data on the critical parameters underlying the spread of resistance: drug use, spatial variability of treatment and parasite migration among areas, and perhaps most importantly, cost of resistance.

  12. Characteristics of Hydrothermal Mineralization in Ultraslow Spreading Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H.; Yang, Q.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity is a major component of the processes that shape the composition and structure of the ocean crust, providing a major pathway for the exchange of heat and elements between the Earth's crust and oceans, and a locus for intense biological activity on the seafloor and underlying crust. In other hand, the structure and composition of hydrothermal systems are the result of complex interactions between heat sources, fluids, wall rocks, tectonic controls and even biological processes. Ultraslow spreading ridges, including the Southwest Indian Ridge, the Gakkel Ridge, are most remarkable end member in plate-boundary structures (Dick et al., 2003), featured with extensive tectonic amagmatic spreading and frequent exposure of peridotite and gabbro. With intensive surveys in last decades, it is suggested that ultraslow ridges are several times more effective than faster-spreading ridges in sustaining hydrothermal activities. This increased efficiency could attributed to deep mining of heat and even exothermic serpentinisation (Baker et al., 2004). Distinct from in faster spreading ridges, one characteristics of hydrothermal mineralization on seafloor in ultraslow spreading ridges, including the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field at 49.6 degree of the Southwest Indian Ridge, is abundant and pervasive distribution of lower temperature precipitated minerals ( such as Fe-silica or silica, Mn (Fe) oxides, sepiolite, pyrite, marcasite etc. ) in hydrothermal fields. Structures formed by lower temperature activities in active and dead hydrothermal fields are also obviously. High temperature precipitated minerals such as chalcopyrite etc. are rare or very limited in hydrothermal chimneys. Distribution of diverse low temperature hydrothermal activities is consistence with the deep heating mechanisms and hydrothermal circulations in the complex background of ultraslow spreading tectonics. Meanwhile, deeper and larger mineralization at certain locations along the

  13. Acceleration of evolutionary spread by long-range dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Oskar; Fisher, Daniel S

    2014-11-18

    The spreading of evolutionary novelties across populations is the central element of adaptation. Unless populations are well mixed (like bacteria in a shaken test tube), the spreading dynamics depend not only on fitness differences but also on the dispersal behavior of the species. Spreading at a constant speed is generally predicted when dispersal is sufficiently short ranged, specifically when the dispersal kernel falls off exponentially or faster. However, the case of long-range dispersal is unresolved: Although it is clear that even rare long-range jumps can lead to a drastic speedup--as air-traffic-mediated epidemics show--it has been difficult to quantify the ensuing stochastic dynamical process. However, such knowledge is indispensable for a predictive understanding of many spreading processes in natural populations. We present a simple iterative scaling approximation supported by simulations and rigorous bounds that accurately predicts evolutionary spread, which is determined by a trade-off between frequency and potential effectiveness of long-distance jumps. In contrast to the exponential laws predicted by deterministic "mean-field" approximations, we show that the asymptotic spatial growth is according to either a power law or a stretched exponential, depending on the tails of the dispersal kernel. More importantly, we provide a full time-dependent description of the convergence to the asymptotic behavior, which can be anomalously slow and is relevant even for long times. Our results also apply to spreading dynamics on networks with a spectrum of long-range links under certain conditions on the probabilities of long-distance travel: These are relevant for the spread of epidemics.

  14. Environmental change and Rift Valley fever in eastern Africa: projecting beyond HEALTHY FUTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David; Hagenlocher, Michael; Jones, Anne E; Kienberger, Stefan; Leedale, Joseph; Morse, Andrew P

    2016-03-31

    Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a relatively recently emerged zoonosis endemic to large parts of sub-Saharan Africa that has the potential to spread beyond the continent, have profound health and socio-economic impacts, particularly in communities where resilience is already low. Here output from a new, dynamic disease model [the Liverpool RVF (LRVF) model], driven by downscaled, bias-corrected climate change data from an ensemble of global circulation models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project run according to two radiative forcing scenarios [representative concentration pathway (RCP)4.5 and RCP8.5], is combined with results of a spatial assessment of social vulnerability to the disease in eastern Africa. The combined approach allowed for analyses of spatial and temporal variations in the risk of RVF to the end of the current century. Results for both scenarios highlight the high-risk of future RVF outbreaks, including in parts of eastern Africa to date unaffected by the disease. The results also highlight the risk of spread from/to countries adjacent to the study area, and possibly farther afield, and the value of considering the geography of future projections of disease risk. Based on the results, there is a clear need to remain vigilant and to invest not only in surveillance and early warning systems, but also in addressing the socio-economic factors that underpin social vulnerability in order to mitigate, effectively, future impacts.

  15. Eastern slopes grizzly bear project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    The cumulative effects of human activities on the grizzly bears in the central Canadian Rockies are not well known. As a result, a project was initiated in 1994 to address the urgent requirement for accurate scientific information on the habitat and populations of grizzly bears in the area of the Banff National Park and Kananaskis Country. This area is probably the most heavily used and developed area where the grizzly still survives. The information gathered throughout the course of this study will be used to better protect and manage the bears and other sensitive carnivores in the region. Using telemetry, researchers are monitoring 25 grizzly bears which were radio-collared in a 22,000 square-kilometer area in the upper Bow Valley drainage of the eastern Alberta slopes. The researchers involved in the project are working with representatives from Husky Oil and Talisman Energy on the sound development of the Moose Mountain oil and gas field without adversely affecting the grizzly bear population. Information collected over seven years indicated that the grizzly bears have few and infrequent offspring. Using the information gathered so far, the location of the Moose Mountain to Jumping Pound pipeline was carefully selected, since the bears recover very slowly from high mortality, and also considering that the food and cover had already been compromised by the high number of roads, trails and other human activities in the area. The status of the population and habitat of the grizzly bear will be assessed upon the conclusion of the field research phase in 2001. Models will be updated using the data obtained during eight years and will assist in the understanding of complex variables that affect grizzly bears.

  16. Angular spreading measurements using MeV ion microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlow, Harry J., E-mail: harry.whitlow@he-arc.ch [Institut des Microtechnologies Appliquées, Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie, Eplatures-Gris 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Ren, Minqin; Chen, Xiao; Osipowicz, Thomas; Kan, Jeroen A. van; Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2013-07-01

    The sharpness of MeV ion microscope images is governed by small-angle scattering and associated lateral spreading of the ion beam in the sample. We have investigated measurement of the half-angle of the angular spreading distribution by characterising the image blurring in direct-Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (direct-STIM). In these tests Mylar™ foils of 0.5–6 μm were used to induce angular spreading. Images were taken of an electron microscope grid using 2 MeV protons with, and without, the foils in the beam path. The blurring was measured by fitting the width of a circular Gaussian point spread function to the images with and without the foil in position. The results show the half-angle width of the spreading has a square root dependence on foil thickness that lies intermediate between SRIM predictions and the theoretical estimates (Bird and Williams fits to the Sigmund and Winterbon data and Amsel et al.)

  17. Textural and sensory properties of spreads with sucrose and maltitol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šoronja-Simović Dragana M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spreads are confectionery products based on sugar, vegetable fat, cocoa powder, milk powder and other ingredients. Basic properties of these products are good spreadability in wide temperature range (from ambience to fridge temperature, rich creamy chocolate taste, and homogenous smooth structure without oil phase migration. Undesirable attribute of these products is their relatively high energy value (2300 kJ/100 g. In recent years, cocoa cream products with reduced energy values have become very popular among consumers and today they are present in the assortment of many confectionery manufacturers. One way to produce spreads with reduced energy value is the replacement of sugar (sucrose with adequate sweetener. Maltitol is a low-energy poliol capable to qualitatively and quantitatively replace sucrose. Cocoa spreads with maltitol and with the combination of maltitol and sucrose (produced at different temperatures and mixer rotation speeds have similar texture and rheological properties compared to the spreads with sucrose. The spreads with maltitol have about 15% lower energy value in comparison to the same product with sucrose.

  18. Phosphorylation of actopaxin regulates cell spreading and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Dominic M.; Brown, Michael C.; LaLonde, David P.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    Actopaxin is an actin and paxillin binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. It regulates cell spreading and is phosphorylated during mitosis. Herein, we identify a role for actopaxin phosphorylation in cell spreading and migration. Stable clones of U2OS cells expressing actopaxin wild-type (WT), nonphosphorylatable, and phosphomimetic mutants were developed to evaluate actopaxin function. All proteins targeted to focal adhesions, however the nonphosphorylatable mutant inhibited spreading whereas the phosphomimetic mutant cells spread more efficiently than WT cells. Endogenous and WT actopaxin, but not the nonphosphorylatable mutant, were phosphorylated in vivo during cell adhesion/spreading. Expression of the nonphosphorylatable actopaxin mutant significantly reduced cell migration, whereas expression of the phosphomimetic increased cell migration in scrape wound and Boyden chamber migration assays. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylates actopaxin, and treatment of U2OS cells with the MEK1 inhibitor UO126 inhibited adhesion-induced phosphorylation of actopaxin and also inhibited cell migration. PMID:15353548

  19. Analysis of Finite Field Spreading for Multiple-Access Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Guanghui; Cheng, Jun; Watanabe, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Finite field spreading scheme is proposed for a synchronous multiple-access channel with Gaussian noise and equal-power users. For each user, $s$ information bits are spread \\emph{jointly} into a length-$sL$ vector by $L$ multiplications on GF($2^s$). Thus, each information bit is dispersed into $sL$ transmitted symbols, and the finite field despreading (FF-DES) of each bit can take advantage of $sL$ independent receiving observations. To show the performance gain of joint spreading quantitatively, an extrinsic information transfer (EXIT) function analysis of the FF-DES is given. It shows that the asymptotic slope of this EXIT function increases as $s$ increases and is in fact the absolute slope of the bit error rate (BER) curve at the low BER region. This means that by increasing the length $s$ of information bits for joint spreading, a larger absolute slope of the BER curve is achieved. For $s, L\\geq 2$, the BER curve of the finite field spreading has a larger absolute slope than that of the single-user tra...

  20. Numerical Simulation of Microgravity Flame Spread Over Solid Combustibles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGXi; FANWeicheng

    1995-01-01

    A computational model of three-dimensional,time-dependent flame spread in microgravity environment is presented.THe solid is assumed to be a thermally-thin,pyrolysing cellulosic sheet.The gas phase model includes the full Navier-Stokes equations with density and pressure variations and six-flus model of radiation heat transfer,The solid phase model consists of continuity and energy equations whose solution provides boundary conditions for the gas phase equatons.In the numerical procedure,the gas-and solid -phase equations are solved separately and iteratively at each time step.Predictions have been made of flame spreas in slow forced flow under gravitational acceleration normal to fuel surface and flame spread in a quiescent environment in an enclosed chamber under gravitational acceleration parallel to fuel surface.Numerical simulations show that,under microgravity,slow-flow conditions,flame spread process is highly unsteady with the upstream flame spreads faster than the downstream flame after a period of ignition,It has also been shown that the level of microgravity has a significant effect on the flame spread process.

  1. Spreading dynamics of droplet on an inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chaoqun; Yu, Cheng; Chen, Yongping

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional unsteady theoretical model of droplet spreading process on an inclined surface is developed and numerically analyzed to investigate the droplet spreading dynamics via the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The contact line motion and morphology evolution for the droplet spreading on an inclined surface, which are, respectively, represented by the advancing/receding spreading factor and droplet wetted length, are evaluated and analyzed. The effects of surface wettability and inclination on the droplet spreading behaviors are examined. The results indicate that, dominated by gravity and capillarity, the droplet experiences a complex asymmetric deformation and sliding motion after the droplet comes into contact with the inclined surfaces. The droplet firstly deforms near the solid surface and mainly exhibits a radial expansion flow in the start-up stage. An evident sliding-down motion along the inclination is observed in the middle stage. And the surface-tension-driven retraction occurs during the retract stage. Increases in inclination angle and equilibrium contact angle lead to a faster droplet motion and a smaller wetted area. In addition, increases in equilibrium contact angle lead to a shorter duration time of the middle stage and an earlier entry into the retract stage.

  2. Cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning in the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping-ping Shen; Shuai Hou; Di Ma; Ming-ming Zhao; Ming-qin Zhu; Jing-dian Zhang; Liang-shu Feng; Li Cui; Jia-chun Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a technique used to depolarize neurons. During focal or global ischemia, cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning can enhance tolerance of further injury. Howev-er, the underlying mechanism for this phenomenon remains relatively unclear. To date, numerous issues exist regarding the experimental model used to precondition the brain with cortical spreading depression, such as the administration route, concentration of potassium chloride, induction time, duration of the protection provided by the treatment, the regional distribution of the protective effect, and the types of neurons responsible for the greater tolerance. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying cor-tical spreading depression-induced tolerance in the brain, considering excitatory neurotransmission and metabolism, nitric oxide, genomic reprogramming, inlfammation, neurotropic factors, and cellular stress response. Speciifcally, we clarify the procedures and detailed information regarding cortical spreading de-pression-induced preconditioning and build a foundation for more comprehensive investigations in the ifeld of neural regeneration and clinical application in the future.

  3. Epidemic spreading on dual-structure networks with mobile agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yiyang; Zhou, Yinzuo

    2017-02-01

    The rapid development of modern society continually transforms the social structure which leads to an increasingly distinct dual structure of higher population density in urban areas and lower density in rural areas. Such structure may induce distinctive spreading behavior of epidemics which does not happen in a single type structure. In this paper, we study the epidemic spreading of mobile agents on dual structure networks based on SIRS model. First, beyond the well known epidemic threshold for generic epidemic model that when the infection rate is below the threshold a pertinent infectious disease will die out, we find the other epidemic threshold which appears when the infection rate of a disease is relatively high. This feature of two thresholds for the SIRS model may lead to the elimination of infectious disease when social network has either high population density or low population density. Interestingly, however, we find that when a high density area is connected to a low density may cause persistent spreading of the infectious disease, even though the same disease will die out when it spreads in each single area. This phenomenon indicates the critical role of the connection between the two areas which could radically change the behavior of spreading dynamics. Our findings, therefore, provide new understanding of epidemiology pertinent to the characteristic modern social structure and have potential to develop controlling strategies accordingly.

  4. [SPREADING OF NCTC CLONE 929 CELLS AFTER RESEEDING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu P; Negulyaev, Yu A; Tsupkina, N V

    2015-01-01

    The period (1 h after reseeding) of behaviour of mouse NCTC clone 929 cells to the conditions of artificial cultivation was studied. The time-lapse imaging followed the processing of the cells with ImageJ program was applied. To characterize the parametres cell status we used the cell area (projection of the cell on substrate) and Rp/Ra ratio introduced earlier as a spreading coefficient (Kuz'minykh, Petrov, 2004). After attaching a substratum, cells have a form of sphere (the phase "sphere") as the daughter cells after a mitosis. We revealed however that after this phase the reseeded cells do not start usual spreading and migration along substratum. They pass a phase of equally spreading in all directions and shaping their area as a circle (phase "circle"). This phase is absent of the daughter cells spreading after mitosis. We assume that the phase "circle" is a result of adaptation of the cells to reseedings at artificial cultivation. It is necessary for formation of a substrate composed of own extracellular matrix components (ECM) of the cells. Own ECM facilitates transition of the cells to their usual spreading and migration along substratum.

  5. Drop spreading and penetration into pre-wetted powders

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2013-05-01

    We present results from an experimental study of the impact of liquid drops onto powder beds which are pre-wetted with the impacting liquid. Using high-speed video imaging, we study both the dynamics of the initial spreading regime and drainage times once the drop has reached its maximum spread on the surface. During the initial spreading stage, we compare our experimental data to a previously developed model which incorporates imbibition into the spreading dynamics and observe reasonable agreement. We find that the maximum spread is a strong function of the moisture content in the powder bed and that the total time from impact to complete drainage is always shorter than that for dry powder. Our results indicate that there is an optimum moisture content (or saturation) which leads to the fastest penetration. We use simple scaling arguments which also identify an optimum moisture content for fastest penetration, which agrees very well with the experimental result. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Developments in Ground-Motion Modeling in Eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, G. M.; Boore, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent well-recorded earthquakes in Eastern North America (ENA) have led us to re-evaluate concepts that have been "standard fare" in the development of ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for ENA for decades, including all published GMPEs that are used in current practice (e.g. Atkinson and Boore, 2011, 2006, 1995; Pezeshk et al., 2011; Campbell, 2003; Toro et al., 1997, etc.). Assumptions common to all ENA GMPEs that may not be true include the following. (1) Typical ENA stress drops, in the context of a Brune model representation of the source spectrum, are in the range of 150-300 bars, with the exception of occasional high-stress events like the 1988 Saguenay earthquake. (2) Attenuation of ground motions can be modeled with a frequency-independent geometric spreading function, either bilinear or trilinear in shape (e.g. Street and Turcotte, 1975; Herrmann and Kijko, 1983; Atkinson and Mereu, 1992; Atkinson, 2004; Boatwright and Seekins, 2011), and an associated frequency-dependent anelastic attenuation term related to the regional Quality factor. The use of a bilinear or trilinear form models the transition from geometric spreading of body waves at close distances to slower surface-wave-type spreading at regional distances. We use ground-motion recordings from recent ENA events to re-examine these basic tenets of GMPE development, in light of constraints on the problem provided at low frequencies by seismic moment, and at high frequencies by stresses inferred from Empirical Greens Function (EGF) analysis. We find strong evidence, in both ground-motion data and from the constraints, that geometric attenuation may be frequency dependent. Moreover, EGF stress drops may be very high (>500 bars) - but they do not lead to particularly large high-frequency ground motions, at least at distances for which we have observations. More complex models of ENA source and attenuation processes appear to be required in order to reconcile our growing ground-motion database

  7. How do detachment faults root into the deep lithosphere of slow spreading mid-ocean ridges ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickert, Manon; Cannat, Mathilde; Tommasi, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Large offset normal faults (also called detachment faults) that exhume mantle-derived peridotites play a significant role in plate divergence at slow-spreading ridges. They are also key for structures accommodating extension at distal continental margins. Metamorphic reactions involving hydrated minerals have been shown to control strain localization in the upper, hydrothermally altered part of the slow-spread axial lithosphere. Very little is known by contrast of the deformation mechanisms that operate in the lower levels of the lithosphere, in non-hydrothermally altered peridotites. The Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) to the east of the Melville Fracture Zone has a particularly low magmatic supply, and magma there is focused along-axis at discrete volcanic centers, leaving corridors in which nearly all the divergence of the plates is accommodated by detachment faults. This end-member setting is a natural laboratory to study melt-starved plate divergence mechanisms, at mid-ocean ridges but also at the continent-ocean transition of divergent margins. For the study reported here, we have selected 50 samples of moderately serpentinized peridotites from a set of 270 samples dredged in the eastern SWIR nearly amagmatic corridors (Sauter et al., 2013). Olivines and pyroxenes in these samples have porphyroclastic to mylonitic textures. Optical and electronic microscopy and the study of mineral preferred orientations by EBSD reveal complex relations between ductile and brittle deformation mechanisms. Microfracturation and kinks are locally accompanied by partial recrystallization of the primary minerals. Microprobe data provide constraints on the temperatures prevailing during deformation. We interpret these textures as due to deformation of the mantle at increasing deviatoric stress at and just below the rooting zone of axial detachments. The intensity of this high stress brittle-ductile deformation varies between samples, but it can be detected in all of our SWIR samples

  8. Weather Effects on Crop Diseases in Eastern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1970s there are several long-term monitoring programmes for plant diseases and pests in Germany. Within the framework of a national research project, some otherwise confidential databases comprising 77 111 samples from numerous sites accross Eastern Germany could be accessed and analysed. The pest data covered leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) in winter wheat, aphids (Aphididae, four genera) on wheat and other cereal crops, late blight (Phytophthora infestans) in potatoes, and pollen beetles (Brassicogethes aeneus) on rape. These data were complemented by daily weather observations from the German Weather Service (DWD). In a first step, Pearson correlations between weather variables and pest frequencies were calculated for seasonal time periods of different start months and durations and ordered into so-called correlograms. This revealed principal weather effects on disease spread - e. g. that wind is favourable for mildew throughout the year or that rape pollen beetles like it warm, but not during wintertime. Secondly, the pest frequency samples were found to resemble gamma distributions, and a generalised linear model was fitted to describe their parameter shift depending on end-of-winter temperatures for aphids on cereals. The method clearly shows potential for systematic pest risk assessments regarding climate change.

  9. Crustal structure of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwafor, Emeka

    The Gulf of Mexico initiated in the Late Triassic as South America and Africa separated from North America during the break up of Pangea. Previous studies indicate three models for the opening of the GOM. These include counter clockwise rotation of the Yucatan Block, rotation of the Yucatan Block about the same pole of rotation as those describing seafloor spreading in the central North Atlantic, and clockwise rotation of the Yucatan Block. There is much debate about the margin type and the crustal structure of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico (EGOM), especially below the depth of 6 km where crustal structure is poorly imaged on seismic reflection data. Two 2.5-D forward gravity and magnetic models across the margin are presented. These are constrained by basement picks from sparse seismic reflection and refraction data, spectral analysis of gravity data to determine the depth to source, magnetic susceptibility derived from results from other margins, the empirical relationship between P-wave velocity and density, and crustal scale isostatic modeling. The models, combined with a kinematic reconstruction of the GOM, show that: 1) it is a rifted margin; 2) the point where the Moho deepens downward from ˜17 km to ˜32 km is approximately 50 km outboard of the topographic shelf edge; 3) the carbonate bank retreated by several kilometers from its original termination due to the action of contourite currents; 4) extension and subsidence was accommodated with little shallow brittle faulting; 5) oceanic lithosphere is possibly outboard of the EGOM continental slope.

  10. Spread of the invasive alga Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea (Caulerpales, Chlorophyta along the Mediterranean Coast of the Murcia region (SE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz, J. M.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to document the appearance and spread of the green alga Caulerpa racemosa along the coast of Murcia in south-eastern Spain. It was found for the first time in the area in 2005 and over the next two years the number of new sightings increased almost exponentially. In the period 2005-2007 the total surface area colonised by the alga in the region was estimated to be at least 265 ha. Benthic assemblages colonised by the alga were rocky bottoms with photophilic algae, dead P. oceanica rhizomes, infralittoral and circalittoral soft bottoms and maerl beds. No penetration of the alga was observed in P. oceanica meadows, except in one locality. Biometric analysis indicated high vegetative development in the established colonies in comparison to those described in other Mediterranean areas. Rapid spreading dynamics observed in the Murcia region is a potential threat for native benthic communities.

  11. Phenolic content of strawberry spreads during processing and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivec, Mirta; Bornšek, Špela Može; Polak, Tomaž; Demšar, Lea; Hribar, Janez; Požrl, Tomaž

    2013-09-25

    This study provides a comprehensive and systematic evaluation of phenolics in strawberry spreads processed according to different industrial procedures and stored under several storage conditions for up to 19 weeks. Total phenolics were determined spectrophotometrically, and individual phenolics were determined by combined liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry: six anthocyanins, four phenolic acids, two flavonols, one flavanol, and one flavone. During storage, the phenolics were modified. The total anthocyanins, vanillic acid, kaempferol, and luteolin decreased, while salicylic and gallic acids increased. Total phenolics, cyanidin 3-(6″-succinyl-glucoside) (here observed for the first time), protocatechuic acid, quercetin, and catechin remained stable. The best phenolic retention was observed in spreads stored at 4 °C. Therefore, the proposed storage process (use of a cold chain) indicates good retention of phenolics in strawberry spreads, which maintain high nutritional and sensorial quality.

  12. Predicting the global spread range via small subnetworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiachen; Dong, Junyou; Ma, Xiao; Feng, Ling; Hu, Yanqing

    2017-04-01

    Modern online social network platforms are replacing traditional media due to their effectiveness in both spreading information and communicating opinions. One of the key problems in these online platforms is to predict the global spread range of any given information. Due to its gigantic size as well as time-varying dynamics, an online social network's global structure, however, is usually inaccessible to most researchers. Thus, it raises the very important issue of how to use solely small subnetworks to predict the global influence. In this paper, based on percolation theory, we show that the global spread range can be predicted well from only two small subnetworks. We test our methods in an artificial network and three empirical online social networks, such as the full Sina Weibo network with 99546027 nodes.

  13. Conditions for viral influence spreading through correlated multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yanqing; Makse, Hernán A

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in network science is to predict how certain individuals are able to initiate new networks to spring up ``new ideas''. Frequently, these changes in trends are triggered by a few innovators who rapidly impose their ideas through ``viral'' influence spreading producing cascades of followers fragmenting an old network to create a new one. Typical examples include the raise of scientific ideas or abrupt changes in social media, like the raise of Facebook.com to the detriment of Myspace.com. How this process arises in practice has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we show that a condition for sustaining a viral spreading process is the existence of a multiplex correlated graph with hidden ``influence links''. Analytical solutions predict percolation phase transitions, either abrupt or continuous, where networks are disintegrated through viral cascades of followers as in empirical data. Our modeling predicts the strict conditions to sustain a large viral spreading via a scaling form of...

  14. Origins and spread of pfdhfr mutant alleles in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Toshihiro

    2010-06-01

    The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum parasite resistant to sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine (SP) poses a serious public health problem. Resistance is caused by point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps), the two key enzymes in the folate biosynthetic pathway. The use of microsatellite markers flanking pfdhfr has recently shown that the invasion of limited resistant lineages may explain the widespread SP resistance in many endemic regions. In Africa, however, multiple indigenous origins of pfdhfr triple mutants have been demonstrated. More new independent lineages and routes of geographical spread of resistance may be found by further molecular evolutionary analyses using samples from various endemic regions. Here, I review recent studies about the history of SP usage and the evolution and spread of resistant lineages while addressing the technical issue of microsatellite analysis.

  15. Collecting Autonomous Spreading Malware Using High-Interaction Honeypots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Jianwei; Holz, Thorsten; Han, Xinhui; Song, Chengyu; Zou, Wei

    Autonomous spreading malware in the form of worms or bots has become a severe threat in today's Internet. Collecting the sample as early as possible is a necessary precondition for the further treatment of the spreading malware, e.g., to develop antivirus signatures. In this paper, we present an integrated toolkit called HoneyBow, which is able to collect autonomous spreading malware in an automated manner using high-interaction honeypots. Compared to low-interaction honeypots, HoneyBow has several advantages due to a wider range of captured samples and the capability of collecting malware which propagates by exploiting new vulnerabilities. We validate the properties of HoneyBow with experimental data collected during a period of about nine months, in which we collected thousands of malware binaries. Furthermore, we demonstrate the capability of collecting new malware via a case study of a certain bot.

  16. Explosive spreading on complex networks: the role of synergy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Quan-Hui; Tang, Ming; Zhou, Tao; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the vast literature on spreading dynamics on complex networks, the role of local synergy, i.e., the interaction of elements that when combined produce a total effect greater than the sum of the individualelements, has been studied but only for irreversible spreading dynamics. Reversible spreading dynamics are ubiquitous but their interplay with synergy has remained unknown. To fill this knowledge gap, we articulate a model to incorporate local synergistic effect into the classical susceptible-infected-susceptible process, in which the probability for a susceptible node to become infected through an infected neighbor is enhanced when the neighborhood of the latter contains a number of infected nodes. We derive master equations incorporating the synergistic effect, with predictions that agree well with the numerical results. A striking finding is that, when a parameter characterizing the strength of the synergy reinforcement effect is above a critical value, the steady state density of the infected ...

  17. Laboratory tests of oil spreading under the ice cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rytkoenen, J.; Liukkonen, S.; Riipi, T. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-07-01

    A laboratory study on oil spreading and drifting under ice was conducted by VTT Manufacturing Technology, Finland. The aim of the study was to find out threshold conditions for the oil movement under ice. The oil was released under ice in calm water and the spreading of the oil slick under the bottom of the ice was investigated. In the oil drifting part, oil drifting velocities under level ice in steady water flow, water flow velocities making oil to submerge from open water to under ice and water velocities making oil to escape from under ice ridges were studied. This paper describes the oil spreading part of the study. The study included four types of oil, namely the fresh and pre-altered North Sea Brent crude oil, lubrication oil and diesel fuel oil. All the measurements were taken in water under ice, thus at the temperature of zero Celcius. In the level ice studies, three different ice bottom roughnesses were tested. (author)

  18. The continuum of spreading depolarizations in acute cortical lesion development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Shuttleworth, C William; Kirov, Sergei A;

    2017-01-01

    A modern understanding of how cerebral cortical lesions develop after acute brain injury is based on Aristides Leão's historic discoveries of spreading depression and asphyxial/anoxic depolarization. Treated as separate entities for decades, we now appreciate that these events define a continuum...... of spreading mass depolarizations, a concept that is central to understanding their pathologic effects. Within minutes of acute severe ischemia, the onset of persistent depolarization triggers the breakdown of ion homeostasis and development of cytotoxic edema. These persistent changes are diagnosed....... The causal role of these waves in lesion development has been proven by real-time monitoring of electrophysiology, blood flow, and cytotoxic edema. The spreading depolarization continuum further applies to other models of acute cortical lesions, suggesting that it is a universal principle of cortical lesion...

  19. Spreading depolarizations in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbok, Raimund; Schiefecker, Alois Josef; Friberg, Christian;

    2017-01-01

    Pathophysiologic mechanisms of secondary brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage and in particular mechanisms of perihematomal-edema progression remain incompletely understood. Recently, the role of spreading depolarizations in secondary brain injury was established in ischemic stroke......, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury patients. Its role in intracerebral hemorrhage patients and in particular the association with perihematomal-edema is not known. A total of 27 comatose intracerebral hemorrhage patients in whom hematoma evacuation and subdural electrocorticography...... patients (67%), a total of 650 spreading depolarizations were observed. Spreading depolarizations were more common in the initial days with a peak incidence on day 2. Median electrocorticography depression time was longer than previously reported (14.7 min, IQR, 9-22 min). Postoperative perihematomal-edema...

  20. Analyses of corium spreading in Mark I containment geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Chu, C.C.; Farmer, M.T.

    1991-12-31

    An assessment of melt spreading in the Mark I system has been carried out using the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code together with supporting analyses. Application of MELTSPREAD-1 confirms the calculation of shell survival in a wet containment for the most probable melt release conditions from NUREG/CR-5423. According to MELTSPREAD-1, a dry containment also may not be threatened by melt spreading. This reflects the heat losses undergone by the melt in the process of spreading to the shell conservatively neglected in NUREG/CR-5423. However, there exist parameter ranges outside the most probable set where shell failure may be calculated. Accounting for the breakup and quenching of melt relocating through a deep layer of subcooled water also conservatively neglected in NUREG/CR-5423 can reduce the set of parameter variations for which containment failure is calculated in the wet case.