WorldWideScience

Sample records for earthen water-development works

  1. Conservation of earthen constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Mattone, Manuela; Bignamini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Earthen constructions, built in many European, American, Asian and African countries, represent an interesting and important architectural heritage, whose conservation is necessary in order to make possible the transmission of a technological culture which keeps values of the uniqueness of the landscape as well as of their history. A study of the conditions of preservation of many unplastered earthen buildings revealed the need to set-up and test out treatments for the protection of the walls...

  2. Use of global navigation satellite systems for monitoring deformations of water-development works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftan, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Geophysical Center (Russian Federation); Ustinov, A. V. [JSC Institut Gidropreoekt (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The feasibility of using global radio-navigation satellite systems (GNSS) to improve functional safety of high-liability water-development works - dams at hydroelectric power plants, and, consequently, the safety of the population in the surrounding areas is examined on the basis of analysis of modern publications. Characteristics for determination of displacements and deformations with use of GNSS, and also in a complex with other types of measurements, are compared. It is demonstrated that combined monitoring of deformations of the ground surface of the region, and engineering and technical structures is required to ensure the functional safety of HPP, and reliable metrologic assurance of measurements is also required to obtain actual characteristics of the accuracy and effectiveness of GNSS observations.

  3. A survey of Danish earthen heritage for sustainable building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eybye, Birgitte Tanderup; Vestergaard, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Earthen buildings were common in Denmark up until circa 1880, after which the number of such buildings declined. Today earthen buildings are considered as examples of sustainable architecture, nevertheless there are only few contemporary Danish earthen buildings. The first part of this paper inve...

  4. Salt for the earthen oven revisited

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2011-06-07

    Jun 7, 2011 ... translated: 'you are the salt of the earthen oven', whilst Luke. 12:49 is ... The Palestinian Arabic word for kiln oven, ̛arsִa, confirms this understanding (De ..... 2000, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other.

  5. Evaluating the authenticity of earthen heritage: The case of Ramses Wissa Wassef Art Centre in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman G. Abdel Tawab

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The authenticity of earthen heritage has long been a challenge to the trials of the under-represented States Parties, to the World Heritage Convention, to identify properties for listing on their Tentative Lists, of potential World Heritage Sites. Many under-represented States Parties and regions, such as Africa and the Arab States, retain a large number of properties representing earthen heritage, yet none of them has been inscribed on the World Heritage List. For such a pattern of cultural heritage to qualify for the World Heritage Site status, nominated properties should enjoy an Outstanding Universal Value and should also meet the conditions of authenticity and integrity. Due to the fragility of its building material, earthen heritage has always been the subject of continuous maintenance works to its material. Consequently, an impression that the material authenticity of such cultural heritage is questionable has evolved. The main purpose of this study was to discuss such perceptions in further depth. The study also aimed at evaluating the contribution of the “materials and substance” attribute versus the contribution of the other attributes of authenticity, toward the evaluation of the authenticity of earthen heritage. The study approached these objectives by evaluating by means of a proposed methodology the authenticity of one case study, which is Ramses Wissa Wassef Art Centre, in Egypt. The adopted evaluation methodology was developed based on the Nara Document’s notion of authenticity. The findings indicated the significant contribution of the non-material attributes, vis-à-vis the contribution of the “materials and substance” attribute, toward the authenticity of the examined property. The results suggest the need to broaden the narrow perception that reduces the authenticity of earthen heritage to its material aspects, so as to embrace all the other non-material attributes of authenticity.

  6. Contemporary earthen architecture in the northen temperate climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge; Eybye, Birgitte Tanderup

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary ecological tendencies are rooted in early experimental houses. The number of experimental houses designed using passive strategies have increased. Earth as material is involved in the construction process. During the last few years new developments towards industrialized earthen...

  7. Advanced Unsupervised Classification Methods to Detect Anomalies on Earthen Levees Using Polarimetric SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakalavathi Marapareddy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fully polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR data analysis has wide applications for terrain and ground cover classification. The dynamics of surface and subsurface water events can lead to slope instability resulting in slough slides on earthen levees. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. We used L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR to screen levees for anomalies. SAR technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice for identifying problematic areas on earthen levees. Using the parameters entropy (H, anisotropy (A, alpha (α, and eigenvalues (λ, λ1, λ2, and λ3, we implemented several unsupervised classification algorithms for the identification of anomalies on the levee. The classification techniques applied are H/α, H/A, A/α, Wishart H/α, Wishart H/A/α, and H/α/λ classification algorithms. In this work, the effectiveness of the algorithms was demonstrated using quad-polarimetric L-band SAR imagery from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s (JPL’s Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR. The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River valley in the Southern USA, where earthen flood control levees are maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers.

  8. Advanced Unsupervised Classification Methods to Detect Anomalies on Earthen Levees Using Polarimetric SAR Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marapareddy, Ramakalavathi; Aanstoos, James V; Younan, Nicolas H

    2016-06-16

    Fully polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR) data analysis has wide applications for terrain and ground cover classification. The dynamics of surface and subsurface water events can lead to slope instability resulting in slough slides on earthen levees. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. We used L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to screen levees for anomalies. SAR technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice for identifying problematic areas on earthen levees. Using the parameters entropy (H), anisotropy (A), alpha (α), and eigenvalues (λ, λ₁, λ₂, and λ₃), we implemented several unsupervised classification algorithms for the identification of anomalies on the levee. The classification techniques applied are H/α, H/A, A/α, Wishart H/α, Wishart H/A/α, and H/α/λ classification algorithms. In this work, the effectiveness of the algorithms was demonstrated using quad-polarimetric L-band SAR imagery from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River valley in the Southern USA, where earthen flood control levees are maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers.

  9. Vernacular Architecture - Earthen Buildings in Central and Easten Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Popescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The revival of earthen architecture in the last thirty years has allowed, finally, a project flowering compelling challenges facing society in the XXI century. This earthen modern architecture is determined by the environmental quality of the material: energetic, economical (material widely available and aesthetical. This new architecture meets also a return to logically reasoned and reasonable by upgrading local resources, not only material available in situ, but also of knowledge and human resources replies architectural and construction in the territories and people they inhabit.

  10. Culture Trials of Gymnarchus niloticus in Earthen and Concrete Ponds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Culture trials of Gymnarchus niloticus in earthen and concrete pond was carried out. A total of 440 fingerlings of G. niloticus from Burutu River, Delta State, were collected. A total of 220 fingerlings were stocked in each of the receptacles. The fingerlings were fed with live artemia for two weeks and commercial feed of size ...

  11. Workshop on Monitoring and Failure Detection in Earthen Embankments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    the sensor (i.e. in sensor processing). Other research possibilities include non-mechanical receivers, such as piezoelectric and fiber optic...sensors, or non-contacting sensors such as laser, radar, and ultrasonic vibrometers . Data Processing: Earthen embankment materials are highly

  12. Contemporary earthen architecture in the northern temperate climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge; Eybye, Birgitte Tanderup

    2017-01-01

    Earth was used as in rural Denmark until about 1860. In the 20th century, some progressive social communities saw earth as one of the answers to their building experiments. Contemporary ecological tendencies are rooted in these early experimental houses. Especially the number of experimental family...... houses designed using passive strategies and renewable materials have increased. Often the earth material, with its low environmental impact, is involved in the construction process. Building qualities include both pleasant living spaces and comfort in terms of better indoor climate. During the last few...... years new developments to-wards industrialized earthen building components can be seen. Hence the research question is: how can earth as a building material contribute to future Danish architecture? The results point out possible future developments in earthen architecture in Denmark. The methodologies...

  13. Nondestructive testing and assessment of consolidation effects of earthen sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Earthen sites are widely distributed throughout China, and most of them belong to archaeological sites with significant values, which not only directly witness the origin, formation and development of Chinese civilization, but also possess important values for conservation and exhibition. Many researches and practices on their conservation and consolidation have been carried out; however, the consolidation effect is mainly judged by visual observation and expert evaluation. Scientific assessment of conservation and consolidation effects is a challenging issue. Many instruments in other fields cannot be directly applied to the conservation of cultural relics due to their peculiarity. In order to assess the effects of field conservation experiments, this paper tries to understand the consolidation effects at Liangzhu site using nondestructive or micro-damage methods, including thermo-physical parameters testing, infrared thermal imaging, high-density microelectrode resistivity testing, portable microscope observation, and hydrophilic and hydrophobic testing, and thereby explores the practicable methods for evaluating the properties of consolidation materials for earthen sites treatment.

  14. DOCUMENTATION FOR EMERGENCY STABILIZATION AND THE INTEGRATED CONSERVATION PLANNING OF EARTHEN ARCHITECTURE SETTLEMENTS: THE KASBAH OF TAOURIRT (OUARZAZATE, MOROCCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ekim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Heritage recording serves as a basis for methodologies regarding diagnosis, treatment and preservation of historic places and contributes to make posterity records of our built cultural heritage. This work is not a stand-alone practice, but a part of the overall conservation of cultural heritage. Recording of heritage places should be directly related to the needs, skills and the technology that are available to the end users that are responsible for the management and care of these sites. They should be selected in a way that the future protectors of these sites can also access and use the data that is collected. This contribution explains an innovative heritage recording approach applied by Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS in the documentation of an earthen complex, the Kasbah of Taourirt in Ouarzazate, Morocco as part of the Earthen Architecture Initiative of the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI. The selected recording techniques used were carried out according to the requirements of the Moroccan team (CERKAS in charge of the study and protection of the chosen site documented.

  15. Water development projects map

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new map showing major water development projects across the United States has been published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The map shows the location, size, and ownership of approximately 2800 of the nation's major multipurpose and flood control dams and virtually all of the reservoir storage and flood control capacity of the country. Other features illustrated on the map include U.S. Bureau of Reclamation surface water irrigation projects; watershed protection projects of the U.S. Soil Conservation Service; hydroelectric power facilities, including both federal plants and nonfederal plants leased by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigation and flood damage reduction projects; and the federal systems of wild and scenic rivers. The map also delineates major rivers and the 21 USGS water resources region boundaries so that users of the map can locate development projects with respect to drainage basins.

  16. Experimental Studies on Earthen Architecture Sites Consolidated with BS Materials in Arid Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes the preservation works on the archaeological sites of Gaochang Ruins, Xinjiang, as background. Based on the soil characteristics analysis on the archaeological sites, experimental studies were conducted on the consolidation effect of the BS-10 consolidation material on the archaeological sites of adobe and rammed earth. The results showed the following:, after consolidation, the wind erosion resistance of the soil on the archaeological sites was substantially increased, and the wind erosion modulus was reduced by 5~8 times; the soil exhibited fine grid structure and significantly reduced degree of permeability, while still maintaining the moisture exchange between inside and outside the soil; there is excellent ageing resistance; the resistance to freezing and thawing was closely related to the soil water content and had little influence in arid regions; the water resistance was improved and could satisfy the requirements for consolidating the sites in arid regions; the unconfined compressive strength was improved moderately, which was the key direction of improvement in the future, and the consolidated soil did not form duricrust on the surface and had good bonding strength with the internal parts. The BS-10 material can meet the consolidation requirements for the earthen archaeological sites in arid regions of northwest China.

  17. Mechanical response of a fibre reinforced earthen material under static and impact loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymerich, Francesco; Fenu, Luigi; Francesconi, Luca; Meloni, Paola

    2015-09-01

    This study examines the improvements provided by the insertion of hemp fibres with different weight fractions and lengths in an earthen material. The structural response of the materials was investigated by means of static and impact bending tests carried out on notched samples. The main focus of the analyses was in the characterization of the structural properties of the materials in terms of fracture resistance, post-cracking performance and energy absorption capability. The results of the study show that hemp fibres improve significantly the mechanical and fracture properties of the earthen material under both static and dynamic bending. It was also found that the structural properties of unreinforced and reinforced earthen materials are highly sensitive to the stress-rate, with higher strength and fracture resistance under impact loading than under static loading.

  18. Screening of Earthen Levees Using Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanstoos, J. V.; O'Hara, C.; Prasad, S.; Dabbiru, L.; Nobrega, R.; Lee, M.

    2009-12-01

    Earthen levees protect large areas of populated and cultivated land in the US from flooding. As shown recently with hurricanes Katrina and Ike and the recent floods in the Midwest, the potential loss of life and property associated with the catastrophic failure of levees can be extremely large. Over the entire US, there are over 100,000 miles of levee structures of varying designs and conditions. Currently, there are limited processes in place to prioritize the monitoring of large numbers of dam and levee structures. Levee managers and federal agencies need to assess levee health rapidly with robust techniques that identify, classify and prioritize levee vulnerabilities with lower costs than traditional soil-boring programs, which can cost many of millions of dollars and provide information about the subsurface only in the immediate vicinity of a small-diameter borehole. This paper reports preliminary results of a project studying the use of airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as an aid to the levee screening process. The SAR sensor being studied is the NASA UAVSAR (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle SAR), a fully polarimetric L-band SAR which is specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track SAR data for differential interferometric measurements. The instrument is capable of sub-meter ground sample distance. NASA has imaged with this instrument 230 km of levees along the lower Mississippi River for use in this study. SAR interferometric mode is capable of identifying vertical displacements on the order of a few millimeters. Its multipolarization measurements can penetrate soil to as much as one meter depth. Thus it is valuable in detecting changes in levees that will be key inputs to a levee vulnerability classification system. Once vulnerable levee reaches have been identified, further actions such as more detailed examination or repairs can be focused on these higher-priority sections. We report on the use of various feature detection algorithms being applied

  19. Slope Instability of the Earthen Levee in Boston, UK: Numerical Simulation and Sensor Data Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melnikova, N.B.; Jordan, D.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a slope stability analysis for a heterogeneous earthen levee in Boston, UK, which is prone to occasional slope failures under tidal loads. Dynamic behavior of the levee under tidal fluctuations was simulated using a finite element model of variably saturated linear elastic

  20. Philosophy for water development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Hendricks, E.L.

    1961-01-01

    There is probably no one in this room who has not had an experience analogous to the one I here describe. You sat at the dinner table next to a nice lady who impressed you with her breadth of interest in community affairs. She said to you "Oh, you work in the field of water resources. That certainly is a major problem facing the United States, isn't it? You know, we have had long discussions about this matter in a club to which I belong. We have made a considerable study of this matter and all of us are convinced that a key element in the survival of America is to find a solution to our water problem."You know," she said, "there are certainly a lot of different kinds of organizations mixing up in the field of water. They all seem to be running off in different directions. It seems to me that one of the things we need most is a national water policy. Don't you think so?”I know how you answered the question. You must have about got started on a discussion of some of the complications when the conversation turned to the question of how long did it take you to get home in that last big snow. So, in effect, you continue to talk about the water problem even if merely as you exchange pleasantries about the day's weather. But then you went home and you thought some more about what the nice lady said and you asked yourself "well, now, truly how do we solve the Nation's water problem? What has a national water policy to do with a solution of this problem?" In the next few minutes I wish to exchange with you some of our thoughts on this matter.

  1. Feeding habits of Solea senegalensis in earthen ponds in Sado estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo Branco, Maria Ana; Arruda, Marco A.; Gamito, Sofia

    2010-11-01

    The senegale sole, Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858, is a commercially valuable fish and it is beginning to be cultured in a semi-intensive way in fish farms in southern European countries. The present study was initiated to investigate the diet of S. senegalensis under semi-extensive conditions. The feeding habits of sole were studied in two earthen ponds of a fish farm in the Sado estuary. In one earthen pond, artificial fish ration was given. S. senegalensis feeds on few prey items, its diet is mainly composed of insect larvae ( Chironomus salinarus) and polychaeta ( Hediste diversicolor). The diet composition of this species suggests feeding specialization, by consuming mainly annelids and insect larvae and by avoiding other items, extremely abundant in the environment, such as gastropods. In the water reservoir where ration was given, some fish consumed simultaneously benthic organism together with ration. However, benthic organisms seem to be the most important component of S. senegalensis diet.

  2. The variation of water quality in the outdoor concrete tank and earthen pond

    OpenAIRE

    Moody, F.O.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reports on the study carried out at the Federal College of Freshwater Fisheries and Technology (Nigeria) and the Hatchery Complex in 1997. The physico-chemical parameters of an earthen fish pond and concrete tank were analysed. The abundance and distribution of phytoplankton and zooplankton were recorded. A total of eight species of phytoplankton were observed. These species can be classified as Chlorophyceae (green algae), Bacillariophyceae (diatom algae) and Cyanophyta (blue-green...

  3. Possible Weakening Processes Imposed on California's Earthen Levees under Protracted Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. D.; Vahedifard, F.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2015-12-01

    California is currently suffering from a multiyear extreme drought and the impacts of the drought are anticipated to worsen in a warming climate. The resilience of critical infrastructure under extreme drought conditions is a major concern which has not been well understood. Thus, there is a crucial need to improve our understanding about the potential threats of drought on infrastructure and take subsequent actions in a timely manner to mitigate these threats and adopt our infrastructure for forthcoming extreme events. The need is more pronounced for earthen levees, since their functionality to protect limited water resources and dryland is more critical during drought. A significant amount of California's levee systems are currently operating under a high risk condition. Protracted drought can further threaten the structural competency of these already at-risk levee systems through several thermo-hydro mechanical weakening processes that undermine their stability. Viable information on the implications of these weakening processes, particularly on California's earthen levees, is relatively incomplete. This article discusses, from a geotechnical engineering perspective, how California's protracted drought might threaten the integrity of levee systems through the imposition of several thermo-hydro mechanical weakening processes. Pertinent facts and statistics regarding the drought in California are presented and discussed. Catastrophic levee failures and major damages resulting from drought-induce weakening processes such as shear strength reduction, desiccation cracking, land subsidence and surface erosion, fissuring and soil softening, and soil carbon oxidation are discussed to illustrate the devastating impacts that the California drought might impose on existing earthen levees. This article calls for further research in light of these potential drought-inducing weakening mechanisms to support mitigation strategies for reducing future catastrophic levee failures.

  4. Remote Sensing and Monitoring of Earthen Flood-Control Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    program , it requires commercial compatible databases to work with the software. The newest version of WinIDP is compatible with Microsoft SQL Server...commercial software users typically have installed on their computers . These external programs provide the desired flexibility and format users require...inversion computer program . Figure 6-3 shows an EM34 being towed, on specially designed nonconductive sleds, along the toe of a levee and programmed to

  5. Sustainable Use of Tepetate Composite in Earthen Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. López-Lara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the best indicators for construction sustainability is the use of earthy local materials which are completely recyclables and savers of energy during their life cycle. Tepetate is an underestimated earth-natural material, vast and economic, used only in a compacted form in backfills for layers of low resistance in pavements and platforms of buildings. This volcanic soil, named in different ways in several countries, is found in the central region of Mexico. Its resistance as compacted material is very low, of the order of 0.08 MPa. In this work, an improved sustainable-tepetate composite, using CaOH, is presented. This research includes the determination of mechanical properties as well as the physicochemical characterization of the sustainable-tepetate composite behavior. It can be concluded that the strength of the proposed composite increases significantly, immediately after treatment and with time. X-Ray Diffraction shows that all the mineralogical phases prevail in the natural tepetate and only a new phase appeared (calcite, which increases with time. This and the reaction of CaOH with clay content are very likely associated with the continuous strength increase of the composite.

  6. Water quality and plankton populations in an earthen polyculture pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LH. Sipaúba-Tavares

    Full Text Available This work was carried out during one year in a fish pond to evaluate the effect of water quality in a plankton community according to the adopted management. High densities of Euglenophyceae, Chlorophyceae and Cyanobacteria were associated with high nitrate levels (1 to 210 mg.L-1. Cell densities of Cyanobacteria over 90 ind.m³ × 10³ (85.5% occurred when nitrate concentrations approximated 210 mg.L-1, total phosphorus less than 160 mg.L-1 and temperature above 25 °C. High density of Rotifera was associated with high density of Cyanobacteria (December. Only Trichocerca sp. among the Rotifera species was constant in all sampled sites, whereas Diaphanosoma birgei, ranging between 4 and 342 ind.L-1 (0.7 and 2.4% during the study period, was the most representative among the Cladocera species. Results show that water quality management in the fish pond had a direct influence on the plankton population due to the shallowness of the environment, large nutrient discharges through feed, fertilizing, fish waste. In fact, they contribute towards the appearance of undesirable plankton organisms.

  7. Survivability of ancient man-made earthen mounds: implications for uranium mill tailings impoundments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.G.; Mishima, J.; King, S.E.; Walters, W.H.

    1983-06-01

    As part of a study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating long-term stabilization techniques for uranium mill impoundments. Part of this investigation involves the design of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of the underlying soil cover, which in turn prevents exposure of the tailings to the environment. However, the need for the armoring blanket, as well as the blanket's effectiveness, depends on the stability of the underlying soil cap (radon suppression cover) and on the tailings themselves. Compelling evidence in archaeological records suggests that large man-made earthen structures can remain sound and intact for time periods comparable to those required for the stabilization of the tailings piles if properly constructed. We present archaeological evidence on the existence and survivability of man-made earthen and rock structures through specific examples of such structures from around the world. We also review factors contributing to their survival or destruction and address the influence of climate, building materials, and construction techniques on survivability.

  8. Effects of season on ecological processes in extensive earthen tilapia ponds in Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, E G P; Sipaúba-Tavares, L H; Milstein, A

    2015-11-01

    In Southeastern Brazil tilapia culture is conducted in extensive and semi-intensive flow-through earthen ponds, being water availability and flow management different in the rainy and dry seasons. In this region lettuce wastes are a potential cheap input for tilapia culture. This study examined the ecological processes developing during the rainy and dry seasons in three extensive flow-through earthen tilapia ponds fertilized with lettuce wastes. Water quality, plankton and sediment parameters were sampled monthly during a year. Factor analysis was used to identify the ecological processes occurring within the ponds and to construct a conceptual graphic model of the pond ecosystem functioning during the rainy and dry seasons. Processes related to nitrogen cycling presented differences between both seasons while processes related to phosphorus cycling did not. Ecological differences among ponds were due to effects of wind protection by surrounding vegetation, organic loading entering, tilapia density and its grazing pressure on zooplankton. Differences in tilapia growth among ponds were related to stocking density and ecological process affecting tilapia food availability and intraspecific competition. Lettuce wastes addition into the ponds did not produce negative effects, thus this practice may be considered a disposal option and a low-cost input source for tilapia, at least at the amounts applied in this study.

  9. Water balance of two earthen landfill caps in a semi-arid climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khire, M.V. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Benson, C.H.; Bosscher, P.J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Water balance data are presented that were obtained from two earthen cap test sections located in a semi-arid region. The test sections were constructed on a municipal solid waste landfill in East Wenatchee, Washington, USA. One test section represents a traditional resistive barrier, and is constructed with a compacted silty clay barrier 60 cm thick and a vegetated silty clay surface layer 15 cm thick. The other test section represents a capillary barrier and has a sand layer 75 cm thick overlain by a 15-cm-thick vegetated surface layer of silt. Extensive hydrological and meteorological data have been collected since November 1992. Unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils, hydrologic parameters, and vegetation have been extensively characterized. Results of the study show that capillary barriers can be effective caps in semi-arid and arid regions. They are also cheaper to construct and can perform better than traditional resistive barriers.

  10. Potential use of calcareous mudstones in low hydraulic conductivity earthen barriers for environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, T B; Francisca, F M; Musso, T B; Musso, T B

    2013-01-01

    Earthen layers play a significant role in isolating contaminants in the subsurface, controlling the migration of contaminant plumes, and as landfill liners and covers. The physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of three calcareous mudstones from the Jagüel and Roca formations in North Patagonia, Argentina, are evaluated to determine their potential for the construction of liners. These mudstones were deposited in a marine environment in the Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene. The tested specimens mainly comprise silt and clay-sized particles, and their mineralogy is dominated by a smectite/illite mixed layer (70-90% Sm) and calcite in smaller proportion. Powdered mudstone samples have little viscosity and swelling potential when suspended in water. The hydraulic conductivity of compacted mudstones and sand-mudstone mixtures is very low (around 1-3 x 10(-10) m/s) and in good agreement with the expected hydraulic behaviour of compacted earthen layers. This behaviour can be attributed to the large amount of fine particles, high specific surface and the close packing of particles as confirmed by scanning electron microscope analysis. The tested materials also show a high cation exchange capacity (50-70 cmol/kg), indicating a high contaminant retardation capability. The calcareous mudstones show satisfactory mineralogical and chemical properties as well as an adequate hydraulic behaviour, demonstrating the potential use of these materials for the construction of compacted liners for the containment of leachate or as covers in landfills. These findings confirm the potential usage of marine calcareous mudstones as a low-cost geomaterial in environmental engineering projects.

  11. A Study of Pattern Prediction in the Monitoring Data of Earthen Ruins with the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Wang, Xin; Eshragh, Faezeh; Wang, Xuanhong; Chen, Xiaojiang; Fang, Dingyi

    2017-05-11

    An understanding of the changes of the rammed earth temperature of earthen ruins is important for protection of such ruins. To predict the rammed earth temperature pattern using the air temperature pattern of the monitoring data of earthen ruins, a pattern prediction method based on interesting pattern mining and correlation, called PPER, is proposed in this paper. PPER first finds the interesting patterns in the air temperature sequence and the rammed earth temperature sequence. To reduce the processing time, two pruning rules and a new data structure based on an R-tree are also proposed. Correlation rules between the air temperature patterns and the rammed earth temperature patterns are then mined. The correlation rules are merged into predictive rules for the rammed earth temperature pattern. Experiments were conducted to show the accuracy of the presented method and the power of the pruning rules. Moreover, the Ming Dynasty Great Wall dataset was used to examine the algorithm, and six predictive rules from the air temperature to rammed earth temperature based on the interesting patterns were obtained, with the average hit rate reaching 89.8%. The PPER and predictive rules will be useful for rammed earth temperature prediction in protection of earthen ruins.

  12. Effect of Feeding Frequency on the Growth of Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus in Earthen Ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouomogne, V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplicate groups of Nile tilapia fingerlings (30.9 g were fed at three different frequencies, i. e. 2, 3 and 6 meals a day, in six 400 m2 earthen ponds. Fish stocked at 22.4 g/m2 (about 60 ind./are was thus fed an experimental diet containing 25 % protein from vegetal origin. The feed was daily distributed, by hand, at equal time intervals between 8 a. m. and 3 p. m. After fifteen weeks trials, significantly (p <0.05 best growth was obtained in the 6 times a day treatment (daily growth rate 1.3 g/day as compared to 0.9 g/day for each of the two other treatments. It could be noticed that increase in the feeding frequency was associated with increase in growth rate and decrease in FGR (from 1.6 to 1.3. In term of fish production, there was an estimated extra tilapia production of 8.7 kg/are/year with the 6 times a day frequency, comparatively to the two other treatments. In an environment where labour is not actually limiting, the study suggests that Nile tilapia in production ponds should be fed six times a day.

  13. Water-quality data from an earthen dam site in southern Westchester County, New York, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Anthony; Noll, Michael L.

    2017-10-11

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, sampled 37 sites in the reservoir area for nutrients, major ions, metals, pesticides and their degradates, volatile organic compounds, temperature, pH, and specific conductance during fall 2015. Data collection was done to characterize the local groundwater-flow system and identify potential sources of seeps from the southern embankment at the Hillview Reservoir. Water-quality samples were collected in accordance with standard U.S. Geological Survey methods at 37 sites in and adjacent to Hillview Reservoir. These 37 sites were sampled to determine (1) baseline water-quality conditions of the saturated, low-permeability sediments that compose the earthen embankment that surrounds the reservoir, (2) water-quality conditions in the southwestern part of the study area in relation to the seeps on the embankment, and (3) temporal variation of water-quality conditions between 2006 and 2015 (not included in this report). The physical parameters and the results of the water-quality analysis from the 37 sites are included in this report and can be downloaded from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System website.

  14. Influence of alum on cyanobacterial blooms and water quality of earthen fish ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawah, Aida; Soliman, Ashraf; Abomohra, Abd El-Fatah; Battah, Mohamed; Anees, Doaa

    2015-11-01

    Eruption of blue-green algal blooms occurs frequently in eutrophic lakes and fish ponds, with associated unpleasant odor and horrid scums. In the present study, we conducted a pre-test experiment in 3 m(3) outdoor concrete ponds to determine the optimum concentration of aluminum sulfate (alum) required for reduction of the cyanobacterial blooms without negative effect on fish growth. As a consequence, 10 mg L(-1) alum was named as the optimum concentration that was applied in 1000 m(3) earthen fish ponds. Obtained results showed that Secchi disc values significantly increased from 10 to 24 cm after 14 days of alum application. Alum-treated ponds showed a reduction in total phytoplankton counts by 94 and 96% compared to the corresponding controls after 10 and 14 days, respectively. Abundance of blue-green algae in the treated ponds was decreased by 98% compared to the corresponding control after 14 days of alum application. Consequently, dissolved oxygen, pH, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and chlorophyll "a" content declined significantly. Our study revealed that using 10 mg L(-1) of alum is an effective way to control cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic waters, especially in fish ponds, without negative effect in water quality.

  15. Effect of use of socially marketed faucet fitted earthen vessel/sodium hypochlorite solution on diarrhea prevention at household level in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Dongre

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of socially marketed faucet fitted to earthen vessel / sodium hypochlorite solution on diarrhea prevention at rural household level as a social intervention for diarrhea prevention under ‘Community Led Initiatives for Child Survival (CLICS program. Methods: Unmatched case-control study was carried out in 10 villages of Primary Health Centre, Anji, located in rural central India. During the study period, 144 households used either faucet fitted earthen vessel to store drinking water or used sodium hypochlorite solution (SH for keeping drinking water safe. These served as case households for the present study. 213 neighborhood control households from same locality who used neither of the methods were also selected. Results: Odds ratio for households who used faucets fitted to earthen vessel was 0.49 (95% CI= 0.25 – 0.95. Odds ratio for households who used sodium hypochlorite solution was 0.55 (95% CI= 0.31 – 0.98. Use of these methods by the community, would prevent about 27 percent and 22 percent cases of the diarrhea (Population attributable risk proportion = 0.25 by faucets fitted to earthen vessels and 0.22 by use of sodium hypochlorite solution respectively. Conclusion: To ensure safe drinking water at household level, the effective and cheap methods like fitting faucet to traditionally used earthen vessel and/or use of sodium hypochlorite solution must be promoted through community participation at household level for cost and culture sensitive rural people in India.

  16. Geophysical and hydrologic analysis of an earthen dam site in southern Westchester County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Anthony; Stumm, Frederick; Joesten, Peter K.; Noll, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Ninety percent of the drinking water for New York City passes through the Hillview Reservoir facility in the City of Yonkers, Westchester County, New York. In the past, several seeps located downslope from the reservoir have flowed out from the side of the steepest slope at the southern end of the earthen embankment. One seep that has been flowing continuously was discovered during an inspection of the embankment in 1999. Efforts were made in 2001 to locate the potential sources of the continuous flowing seep. In 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, began a cooperative study to investigate the relevant hydrogeologic framework to characterize the local groundwater-flow system and to determine possible sources of the seeps. The two agencies used hydrologic and surface geophysical techniques to assess the earthen embankment of the Hillview Reservoir. Between April 1, 2005 and March 1, 2008, water levels were measured manually each month at 46 wells surrounding the reservoir, and flow was measured monthly at three of the five seeps on the embankment. Water levels were measured hourly in the East Basin of the reservoir, at 24 of 46 wells, and discharge was measured hourly at two of the five seeps. Slug tests were performed at 16 wells to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic material surrounding the screened zone. Estimated hydraulic conductivities for 25 wells on the southern embankment ranged from 0.0063 to 1.2 feet per day and averaged 0.17 foot per day. The two-dimensional resistivity surveys indicate a subsurface mound of electrically conductive material (low-resistivity zone) beneath the terrace area (top of dam) surrounding the reservoir with a distinct elevation increase closer to the crest. Two-dimensional shear wave velocity surveys indicate a similar structure of the high shear wave velocity materials (high-velocity zone), increasing in elevation toward the crest and

  17. Improved earthen stoves in coastal areas in Bangladesh: Economic, ecological and socio-cultural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazmul Alam, S.M.; Chowdhury, Sakila Jahan [Department of Social Sciences and Asian Languages, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987 Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2010-12-15

    The study evaluated the economic, ecological and socio-cultural achievements of improved earthen stoves that were provided to the beneficiaries under a project to improve decreasing biomass energy utilization. A questionnaire was developed and a random sampling method was employed for selecting the samples from the population. The region has undergone a significant change with the development of shrimp aquaculture in brackish water on former paddy field. As a result the households have become dependent on the wood resources of the Sundarban (77% as their first choice of daily fuel). The fuel collection rate from the Sundarban has increased by 30% since the change to aquaculture, while the use of agricultural residues has declined by a similar amount. The introduction of the improved stove with two cook stations and a chimney resulted in a reduction of fuel use (as wood) to 540 g caput{sup -1} d{sup -1}, from the previous usage of 810 g caput{sup -1} d{sup -1} using the traditional stove. Households saved 1.5 kg d{sup -1} of fuel (one third), and reduced the cooking time by 45 min d{sup -1} (about 20%). While 85% of men and 65% of women were the major fuel collectors, the improved stove resulted in a small increase (14 taka) in the women's contribution to family income as well as a monthly saving on fuel cost of 45 taka. Respondents utilized saved time and money for household means and other economic activities. (author)

  18. "Earthen constructions" - towards creating a sustainable habitat by minimising the ecological footprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Das

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustenance of the human race has put an immense pressure on our planet Earth in terms of sustainability of natural resources. The greenhouse effect and the ozone hole are the two most threatening effects of pollution. Constructions of buildings as well as materials contribute to a large percentage to this pollution. Again every material used in the building industry has its source in the Earth. In general the low energy materials will be least polluting. The conventionally used building materials like bricks, cement, steel, timber, plastics, glass etc. usually involve huge transportation costs and also manufacturing processes which are detriment al to the environment. On the other hand the demand for new buildings as well as the cost of building construction is growing a tremendous pace. We have to search for alternative materials which are energy efficient, environment friendly and economical like our traditional building materials - mud walls and thatch roofs. Of all the alternatives available to us which lead the way to sustainability, building with earth has been an ancient and accepted practice among communities all over the world. It is estimated that the construction and the operation of buildings is responsible for around half of all glob al C02 emissions, thereby contributing the largest single source attributable to climate change. Earthen construction has been, is and will continue to be a reality. Stabilised rammed earth walls can be used as a building integrated source of passive cooling technique. A huge population in Indi a lives in the rural areas where there has been a growing trend in shifting towards brick and concrete constructions in search for social status. Even a small percentage can lead to massive increase in glob l C02 emissions if the trend is not checked at this point. This papers looks into the current scenario and hence the corresponding responsibility on architects, planners and policy makers to bring in

  19. Bacterial community from gut of white shrimp, Penaeus vannamei, cultured in earthen ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supamattaya, K.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH technique and conventional method were used to analyse the bacterial community in the gut of white shrimp cultured in earthen ponds. Samples were collectedfrom three parts, hepatopancreas, anterior intestine and posterior intestine. Gut bacterial community was enumerated by 15 probes in FISH and 3 bacterial culture technique media. The results showed that bacteriaspecific probes determined bacterial community and Eubacteria as the dominant group of microbial community in the studied gut portions. β-Proteobacteria group (29.53±5.39% and γ-Proteobacteria group (26.18±6.88% were major groups of bacterial flora in the hepatopancreas. In contrast, low G+C gram positive bacteria group (LGC was the most abundant group detected in anterior intestine (36.40±3.53% andposterior intestine (30.32±4.63%. Vibrio spp. were detected very less in hepatopancreas (0.25±0.43% and were present in 3 of 9 samples. In the case of bacterial detection using cultivation method, the number ofbacterial groups verified by TSA, TCBS and MRS showed high variation in every part of the studied digestive tract portions; however, no vibrio or lactic acid bacteria were present in the hepatopancreas ofhealthy shrimp. This study reveals the proportion of bacterial community in the digestive tract of white shrimp which can be used as important database for studying the change of the bacterial community in an abnormal condition including the efficiency of probiotics in the gut (in vivo of white shrimp.

  20. Effect of probiotic and sand filtration treatments on water quality and growth of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and pangas (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) in earthen ponds of southern Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmud, Sultan; Ali, Mohammad Lokman; Alam, Md Ariful

    2016-01-01

    Effects of water treatment by two probiotic products (PondPlus® and AquaPhoto®) and sand filtration were studied on growth performance of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and pangas (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) stocked at tilapia:pangas ratio of 5:3 in traditional earthen ponds in Bangladesh....... The fish were stocked at a density of 20,000 fish ha−1 and reared for 7 months. Compared to untreated ponds, treatments of probiotic products or sand filtration in earthen ponds resulted in a higher O2 content, higher water transparency, less ammonium, and fewer cyanobacteria. Weight gain for individual...

  1. Phenotype and genetic parameters for body measurements, reproductive traits and gut lenght of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) selected for growth in low-input earthen ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charo-Karisa, H.; Bovenhuis, H.; Rezk, M.A.; Ponzoni, R.W.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Komen, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study we present estimates of phenotypic and genetic parameters for body size measurements, reproductive traits, and gut length for Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) selected for growth in fertilized earthen ponds for two generations. Throughout the experiment, ponds were fertilized daily

  2. Moisture transfer and change in strength during the construction of earthen buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder, H.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of rammed earth projects constructed in recent years in Germany and abroad testify to the high level of architectural interest in this material, not only in our country. Rammed earth has been “rediscovered”, in particular by young architects, due to its unique materiality and fascinating and individual surface aesthetics. In connection with the realisation of two rammed earth projects realised in Thuringia, Germany, in 2003/2004 some questions arose concerning the process of moisture transfer and changes in strength properties during construction. The earthen building standards detail only very rough estimates of drying times for rammed earth walls. The idea arose to develop a test programme for investigating the aspect of drying time with regard to the change in material strength in rammed earth walls, as well as for elaborating general aspects of testing procedures for rammed earth in standards. The paper presents results of a laboratory programme that attempts to approach this very complex problem. A series of test specimens were produced and the unconfined compressive strength was determined after different drying times varying from 7 to 90 days. The moisture content of the test specimens also was varied: at OMC (Proctor test and above and below the OMC.

    Una serie de proyectos de tierra apisonada construidos en los últimos años en Alemania y en el extranjero dan testimonio del alto nivel de interés arquitectónico en este material, no solo en nuestro país. La tierra apisonada ha sido “redescubierta”, en particular por los arquitectos jóvenes, debido a su materialidad única y fascinante y la estética singular de su superficie. En relación con la realización de dos proyectos de tierra apisonada realizados en Turingia, Alemania, en el período 2003/2004 surgieron algunas preguntas sobre el proceso de transferencia de la humedad y los cambios en las propiedades de resistencia durante la construcción. Las

  3. Implications of Water Development for Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Rosegrant, M. W.

    2001-05-01

    Water development for agriculture-the major water user worldwide-is one of the most critical factors for food security in many regions of the world. The role of water withdrawals in irrigated agriculture and food security has been receiving substantial attention in recent years. This paper will address key questions regarding implications of water development for food security at both regional and global scale, including what is the current status of water availability for agriculture? How will water availability and water demand evolve over the next three decades, taking into account availability and variability in water resources, the water supply infrastructure, and irrigation and nonagricultural water demands? What is the role of irrigation in food production now and in the future? What risk will be put on regional and global food production, demand and trade if municipal and industrial water demand is high, environmental water requirement is increasing, or groundwater overdraft is phased off? What is the contribution of infrastructure investment in enhancing irrigation water supply capacity, improving water use efficiency, and increasing rainfall harvesting particularly in arid and semi-arid regions and countries? These questions are explored through a global modeling framework, IMPACT-Water, developed in the International Food Policy Research Institute. In general, the results show that, under plausible assumptions on developments in irrigation and water investment, the rapid growth in water demand, particularly for domestic and industrial purposes, coupled with the a continued slowdown in investments, could be a serious threat to future growth in food production, causing negative impacts on low-income developing countries and the poor consumers in these countries. Food production, demand and trade and food prices will be increasingly affected by declining water availibility for irrigation. Developing countries, especially those with arid climates, poor

  4. Assessment of earthen levee stability for management and response: A NASA-DHS-California Dept. Water Resources collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Bekaert, D. P.; Dudas, J.

    2016-12-01

    Radar remote sensing of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the largest estuary in the western U.S. (over 2500 km2), and its levee system provides an opportunity for NASA Applied Science to aid the CA Department of Water Resources (CA-DWR) in monitoring and emergency response. The delta contains over 1,500 km of earthen levees, supports about 2.5 million acres of agricultural land, and serves as a main water supply for 23 million California residents. Many of the reclaimed islands are 10-25 feet below sea level, sit atop compressible peat and organic clay soils, and are surrounded by levees only 1 foot above the once in a century flood elevation threshold. Land subsidence in the delta can be attributed to a variety of factors, including: aerobic oxidation of soils, soil compaction from drainage, wind erosion, anaerobic decomposition, dissolved carbon fluxes, floods, seismic events, and even rodent burrowing. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an established technique to measure surface displacements and has been used to map large-scale subsidence. The demonstration of earthen levee monitoring is a recent development that has been greatly furthered by the emergence of new instruments such as NASA's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). UAVSAR is an L-band airborne sensor with high signal-to-noise ratio, repeat flight track accuracy, and has a high spatial resolution (7 x 7 m) that is necessary for detailed levee monitoring. The adaptability of radar instruments in their ability to see through smoke, haze, and clouds during the day or night, is especially relevant during disaster events, when cloud cover or lack of solar illumination inhibits traditional visual surveys of damage. We demonstrate the advantages of combining InSAR with geographic information systems (GIS) datasets in locating subsidence features along critical levee infrastructure in the Delta for 2009-2016. The ability to efficiently locate potential areas of

  5. Water Development: A Philosophical and Ethical Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, D.

    2015-12-01

    As one reviewer said about John McPhee's Encounters With the Archdruid:"So the real issues relate to what is natural? How should lands be used? What role do humans have in using, caring for, being part of the land and can we do so responsibly?" This quote applies equally to more than just land development -- it applies to water project too. Although Marc Reisner wrote Cadillac Desert in 1986, the lessons it presents about water development are current today. Not much has changed really in the past three decades. People still live in arid places where, perhaps, they should not live. Engineers still redesign nature to meet human needs, only to find out later that there are unintended consequences. About the only thing that has changed is that today the Bureau of Reclamation and other agencies do not spend megabucks to construct huge water projects. And, insignificant by comparison, some restoration and dam removal projects have begun on a limited scale. We developed an exercise, based on selected chapters from Reisner's book and a video derived from the book, to help students develop critical thinking and ethical reasoning skills. As we did so, we realized that there was much more that could be included. The ethical dilemmas associated with water development and related engineering projects are many. So, now, the original exercise has been expanded to 7 units. The original five units are based on Cadillac Desert. The sixth is based on a recent great documentary film, DamNation. The last unit is inspired by a terrific chapter from John McPhee's 1971 book Encounters with the Archdruid. The format is that student read articles and book chapters and then write responses to questions designed to get them to reflect on what they read. So, the exercises may be assigned as homework, but for the most value there must be some significant group discussions. If all units are used, this provides several weeks of homework for students, but instructors may cherry pick the units

  6. A customized resistivity system for monitoring saturation and seepage in earthen levees: installation and validation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diego Arosio; Stefano Munda; Greta Tresoldi; Monica Papini; Laura Longoni; Luigi Zanzi

    2017-01-01

    This work is based on the assumption that a resistivity meter can effectively monitor water saturation in earth levees and can be used as a warning system when saturation exceeds the expected seasonal maxima...

  7. Application of the TDR technique for the detection of changes in the internal structure of an earthen flood levee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Grzegorz; Dawid, Małgorzata; Walczak, Amadeusz; Słowińska-Osypiuk, Joanna; Skierucha, Wojciech; Wilczek, Andrzej; Daniel, Anna

    2017-03-01

    Failures of earthen flood protection structures cause enormous material loss. Despite this, in the majority these are structures that were built decades ago. As an example, in Poland, the time of operation of approximately three quarters of existing levees and embankments is over 40 years. A similar situation exists in many other European countries. In the period 1998-2009 the economic losses caused by floods amounted to over 60 thousand million Euro. This accounts for approximately one third of the total losses caused by environmental factors. Ruptures of embankments or levees occur as a result of long-lasting elevated water levels in rivers, and such events are always preceded by changes in their internal structure. Such changes cannot be detected from the outside. This paper presents a new method, never used before, for the determination of changes in the internal structure of the body of a levee. The dynamics of the displacements is described by means of new mathematical formulae. The input data necessary for their application include the dynamics of changes in the value of volumetric moisture that is measured with a freely selected short time step by means of the time-domain-reflectrometry technique. The formulae were created on the basis of hitherto unnoticed and uninterpreted drops in moisture a moment before and a moment after the saturation of inner spaces of the levee body. The results obtained from calculations were compared with data from measurements on a physical model of a levee. The settlement values calculated using the method proposed are convergent with those of the true settlement. The maximum relative error was as low as 19%. The method proposed permits the location of changes in the internal structure of a levee before its rupture. Its application is the main component of a system of early warning against floods.

  8. Monitoring survivability and infectivity of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv in the infected on-farm earthen manure storages (EMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein Min Tun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv has caused major epidemics, which has been a burden to North America's swine industry. Low infectious dose and high viability in the environment are major challenges in eradicating this virus. To further understand the survivability and infectivity of PEDv in the infected manure, we performed longitudinal monitoring in two open earthen manure storages (EMSs; previously referred to as lagoon from two different infected swine farms identified in the province of Manitoba, Canada. Our study revealed that PEDv could survive up to nine months in the infected EMS after the initial outbreak in the farm. The viral load varied among different layers of the EMS with an average of 1.1 × 105 copies/ml of EMS, independent of EMS temperature and pH. In both studied EMSs, the evidence of viral replication was observed through increased viral load in the later weeks of the samplings while there was no new influx of infected manure into the EMSs, which was suggestive of presence of potential alternative hosts for PEDv within the EMSs. Decreasing infectivity of virus over time irrespective of increased viral load suggested the possibility of PEDv evolution within the EMS and perhaps in the new host that negatively impacted virus infectivity. Viral load in the top layer of the EMS was low and mostly non-infective suggesting that environmental factors, such as UV and sunlight, could diminish the replicability and infectivity of the virus. Thus, frequent agitation of the EMS that could expose virus to UV and sunlight might be a potential strategy for reduction of PEDv load and infectivity in the infected EMSs.

  9. A customized resistivity system for monitoring saturation and seepage in earthen levees: installation and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arosio Diego

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is based on the assumption that a resistivity meter can effectively monitor water saturation in earth levees and can be used as a warning system when saturation exceeds the expected seasonal maxima. We performed time-lapse ERT measurements to assess the capability of this method to detect areas where seepage is critical. These measurements were also very useful to design a prototype monitoring system with remarkable savings by customizing the specifications according to field observations. The prototype consists of a remotely controlled low-power resistivity meter with a spread of 48 stainless steel 20 × 20 cm plate electrodes buried at half-meter depth. We deployed the newly-designed permanent monitoring system on a critical levee segment. A weather station and an ultrasonic water level sensor were also installed in order to analyse the correlation of resistivity with temperature, rainfalls and water level seasonal variations.

  10. A customized resistivity system for monitoring saturation and seepage in earthen levees: installation and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Diego; Munda, Stefano; Tresoldi, Greta; Papini, Monica; Longoni, Laura; Zanzi, Luigi

    2017-10-01

    This work is based on the assumption that a resistivity meter can effectively monitor water saturation in earth levees and can be used as a warning system when saturation exceeds the expected seasonal maxima. We performed time-lapse ERT measurements to assess the capability of this method to detect areas where seepage is critical. These measurements were also very useful to design a prototype monitoring system with remarkable savings by customizing the specifications according to field observations. The prototype consists of a remotely controlled low-power resistivity meter with a spread of 48 stainless steel 20 × 20 cm plate electrodes buried at half-meter depth. We deployed the newly-designed permanent monitoring system on a critical levee segment. A weather station and an ultrasonic water level sensor were also installed in order to analyse the correlation of resistivity with temperature, rainfalls and water level seasonal variations. The preliminary analysis of the monitoring data shows that the resistivity maps follow a very reasonable trend related with the saturation/drying cycle of the levee caused by the seasonal variations of the water level in the irrigation channel. Sharp water level changes cause delayed and smooth resistivity variations. Rainfalls and, to a lesser extent, temperature seem to have an influence on the collected data but effects are apparently negligible beyond 1 m depth. The system is currently operating and results are continuously monitored.

  11. Characterisation of aroma-active and off-odour compounds in German rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Part I: Case of aquaculture water from earthen-ponds farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed Ahmed Abbas; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Comprehensive analyses were accomplished to explore the odorous molecules responsible for off-odour development in earthen-ponds rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) aquaculture farming in Germany. In this part of the study, water odorants were extracted using solvent-assisted flavour evaporation (SAFE); then, extracts were analysed by one- and two- dimensional high resolution gas chromatography coupled with olfactometry and mass spectrometry using two columns with different polarity (DB-FFAP and DB-5). Aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) of the solvent extract samples revealed 54 odorants, and 47 of them were identified. In this study, a series of compounds is described for the first time in German earthen-ponds rainbow trout aquaculture water including, amongst others, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (furaneol), vanillin, (E)-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal, 4-ethyloctanoic acid, 3-methylindole (skatole), 5α-androst-16-en-3-one (androstenone), and 2-(2-butoxyethoxy) ethanol. Moreover, the sensory experiment indicated that (E)-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal, (E,E)-2,4-octadienal, and 1-octen-3-one are the main contributors to the metallic, cucumber, and mushroom notes of the samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The technological analysis of earthen architectural remains: the variability of building techniques and the characterization of burned or cemented daub in polished section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Peinetti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Earthen architectural fragments (burned or cemented are often collected during the excavation in Italian prehistoric and protohistoric sites. The technological characterization of these remains is relevant to recognize the existence of local or regional building traditions and to understand the exploitation of raw materials and, more in general, the ancient production strategies. In addition to the current macroscopic analysis (morphology of fragments and classification of pastes and before the realization of archaeometric analysis, it’s possible to complete the analytical protocol of daub with some observations in polished section. To realize a polished section, the daub sample is cut and the resulting section is polished with sandpaper. The realization of this kind of section allows a better description of the arrangement of the constituents, to identify the processes of transformation and deformation of raw materials during the building activity. The aim of these mesoscopic analysis is to characterize the behavioral chain referred to the processing of raw materials and their installation, linking the observed characteristics to specific actions. It’s possible to obtain some functional data about the original function of the earthen structures or the dynamics of entrance in the archaeological record a well. This paper presents some case-studies and some preliminary keys to understand the features observed in polished section. The use of this analytical technique gives some encouraging results, especially in comparing the number of relevant data to the low cost of production of a polished section.

  13. Trophic status of earthen ponds used for semi-intensive shrimp (Litopenaeus stylirostris, Stimpson, 1874) farming in New Caledonia (Pacific Ocean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusceddu, Antonio; Della Patrona, Luc; Beliaeff, Benoit

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated temporal variability in the quantity and biochemical composition of sediment organic matter along with variables proxies of water eutrophication (e.g., inorganic nutrient and chlorophyll-a) at two shrimp farms located in the Southern coast of New Caledonia and characterised by clear differences in shrimp feeding practices and levels of initial trophic conditions. The results of our study reveal that the trophic status of the water column increased during the rearing cycle at both sites, determining a general, though moderated, eutrophication. However, the water column trophic descriptors did not allow to discriminate differences in the trophic status among the investigated sites or between sites in the same farming plant, even if they were subjected to different feeding practices and largely different initial characteristics of the sediment. Temporal variations in biopolymeric C and phytopigment sedimentary contents (used as proxies of benthic eutrophication) varied inconsistently among sites. The multivariate analyses did not identify significant temporal patterns in the benthic trophic status, but allowed discriminating the four investigated sites. The semi-intensive shrimp farming significantly contributed to changing the water column and sediments trophic status of the earthen ponds, but the extent of those changes was not consistently observed in all ponds. In any of the investigated ponds the trophic status exceeded concerning thresholds over which hypoxia or anoxia could occur. We conclude that the established semi-intensive practices adopted so far for shrimp farming activities in the earthen ponds of New Caledonia are able to maintain the status of the ponds below the eutrophication levels over which dystrophic crises could sharply abate most of the reared biomass. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of water physico-chemical parameters on tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus growth in earthen ponds in Teso North Sub-County, Busia County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agano J. Makori

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small-scale fish farmers in developing countries are faced with challenges owing to their limited information on aquaculture management. Nile tilapia farmers in Teso North Sub-County recorded lower yields than expected in 2009 despite having been provided with required inputs. Water quality was suspected to be the key factor responsible for the low yields. This study sought to assess the effects of earthen pond water physico-chemical parameters on the growth of Nile tilapia in six earthen fish ponds under semi-intensive culture system in Teso North Sub-County. The study was longitudinal in nature with pond water and fish being the units of analysis. Systematic sampling was used to select five ponds while a control pond was purposively selected based on its previously high harvest. Four ponds were fed by surface flow and two by underground water. Each pond was fertilized and stocked with 900 fry of averagely 1.4 g and 4.4 cm. Physico-chemical parameters were measured in-situ using a multi-parameter probe. Sixty fish samples were randomly obtained from each pond fortnightly for four months using a 10 mm mesh size and measured, weighed and returned into the pond. Mean range of physico-chemical parameters were: dissolved oxygen (DO 4.86–10.53 mg/l, temperature 24-26 °C, pH 6.1–8.3, conductivity 35–87 μS/cm and ammonia 0.01–0.3 mg/l. Temperature (p = 0.012 and conductivity (p = 0.0001 levels varied significantly between ponds. Overall Specific Growth Rate ranged between 1.8% (0.1692 g/day and 3.8% (1.9 g/day. Ammonia, DO and pH in the ponds were within the optimal levels for growth of tilapia, while temperature and conductivity were below optimal levels. As temperature and DO increased, growth rate of tilapia increased. However, increase in conductivity, pH and ammonia decreased fish growth rate. Temperature and DO ranging between 27 and 30 °C and 5–23 mg/l, respectively, and SGR of 3.8%/day and above are

  15. Ecological effects of co-culturing the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus with the Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis in an earthen pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shun; Ren, Yichao; Pearce, Christopher M.; Dong, Shuanglin; Tian, Xiangli; Gao, Qinfeng; Wang, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Using net enclosures in an earthen pond, we established three culture treatments with the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus and the Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis: monoculture of sea cucumbers (C), monoculture of shrimp (S), and co-culture of the two species (CS). We measured levels of suspended particulate matter in the water column; total organic matter, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and carbon/nitrogen ratios in both settling particles and the sediment; and chlorophyll a levels in the sediment. We then compared these variables between the three treatments. We also examined growth, survival, and yield of the two species in the different treatments. From June to September, the mean monthly suspended particulate matter sedimentation rates in the CS and S treatments were significantly ( Psea cucumbers in co-culture were all significantly greater than those of sea cucumbers in monoculture. There were no significant differences among any of these variables for shrimp reared in the two systems. The bioturbation of the sediment and fecal production of the shrimp likely supplied natural food for the sea cucumbers. Co-culture of the two species is a viable option for increasing yield per unit area, maximizing use of the water body, and diversifying crop production.

  16. Growth of the purple dye murex, Bolinus brandaris (Gastropoda: Muricidae, marked and released in a semi-intensive fish culture earthen pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vasconcelos

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the growth rate of the purple dye murex, Bolinus brandaris (Gastropoda: Muricidae, estimated from mark-recapture experiments. A total of 1067 specimens (shell length = 43.4±8.1 mm, range = 14.6−78.4 mm were marked with Dymo® tape tags and released in a semi-intensive fish culture earthen pond. After a period at liberty ranging from almost two months to around two years, 288 individuals were recaptured (shell length = 67.4±6.2 mm, range = 45.3−88.6 mm, which corresponded to a recapture rate of 27.0%. At recapture, only one specimen had lost the tag (tag loss rate < 0.1% and all remaining tags were intact and legible. Mean monthly growth rates were 0.9±1.0 mm in shell length, 0.4±0.5 mm in shell width and 0.7±0.7 g in total weight. Growth rates showed high inter-individual variability and an evident decreasing trend with specimen size. Comparison of growth rates with similar information available for other muricids confirmed that B. brandaris is a relatively slow-growing species. This provides valuable information for both fisheries management and for assessing the potential of B. brandaris as a candidate species for molluscan aquaculture.

  17. A Native American View of Western Water Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloria, Sam

    1985-11-01

    This paper presents an individual Native American, or American Indian, view of western water development and not necessarily the view of a particular tribe or its government. A disclaimer of this kind is necessary because there has been a historical tendency in this society to look for a single Indian spokesman and search for that spokesman among the Indians who says what society wants to hear. However, the Indian community, while sharing many characteristics and problems, is culturally and politically diverse, and there are no real shortcuts to dealing with it in all its diversity. Indian water rights, as they relate to western water development, must be seen against the backdrop of the history of the hemisphere. Ever since the arrival of the Europeans on the continent, an important current in the development of the legal system has been to define Indian rights and then develop an orderly process for taking them away. From the formulation of the doctrine of discovery itself, this two-step exercise has served the humanitarian purpose of attempting to accord some fairness to the Indians while providing discipline to the competition among non-Indians for the right to use Indian resources. Recognition of full and natural rights of Indian sovereignty and ownership in the hemisphere is commonly viewed as having been a historical impossibility, just as denying them all rights was not practically and morally feasible. The problem then, was and is to balance the two historical necessities appropriately.

  18. Probabilistic modeling of the corrosion of steel structures in marine water-development works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekker, A. T.; Lyubimov, V. S.; Kovalenko, R. G.; Aleksandrov, A. V.

    2011-09-15

    Considering that corrosion takes place as a random process over time, a a probabilistic approach was utilized in this paper. The corrosion of metallic sheet piling employed in the fascia wall of a bulwerk is considered as an example. A stochastic model is constructed on the base of a modified Weibull distribution function with consideration of parameters of the corrosion process as a function of time. One of the factors defining the corrosion rate of the sheet piling is the degree of access of a section of the wall to the zone of variable water level, or the underwater zone. The type of corrosion-continuous or local-is another factor. The accuracy of corrosion prediction in the underwater zone is higher than that in the zone of variable water level.

  19. Thriving with water: Developments in amphibious architecture in North America

    OpenAIRE

    English Elizabeth; Klink Natasha; Turner Scott

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing awareness worldwide that traditional flood-mitigation strategies that attempt to control the flow of water only increase the likelihood of catastrophic consequences in the long run, when failure inevitably occurs after years of complacency and development behind flood barriers. Amphibious architecture is a non-defensive flood mitigation and climate change adaptation strategy that works in synchrony with a floodprone region’s natural cycles of flooding, allowing water to fl...

  20. Efeito da densidade populacional sobre as curvas de crescimento de Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man em cultivo semi-intensivo (Crustacea, Palaemonidae The effect of stocking density on Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man growth curves in earthen ponds (Crustacea, Palaemonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cotroni Valenti

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the length growth curves of Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man, 1879 held in different population densities were analysed. Postlarvae prawns were stocked into five 0,02 ha earthen ponds at densities of 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 ind./m² during six months. Forthnightly, the mean total length of animals from each pond were obtained by means of random samples. For each population the length growth curves and the instantaneous growth rate expressions were determined. The growth rate and the asymptotic maximum length decreased with the stocking density raised. This effect is greater when the density ranges in low levels. The growth decrease can be due to intraspecific competition for life resources and to negative interactions between individuals, as aggressive or social behavior, that increase with the increase prawns density.

  1. Crescimento relativo do camarão canela Macrobrachium amazonicum (Heller (Crustacea, Decapoda, Palaemonidae em viveiros Relative growth of Amazon river prawn Macrobrachium amazonicum (Heller (Crustacea, Decapoda, Palaemonidae in earthen ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M.C. Moraes-Riodades

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Some morphometric relationships in Macrobrachium amazonicum (Heller, 1862 reared in earthen ponds were studied. A total of 239 individuals were collected, sexed and sorted to juvenile or adult. Total length (Lt, post-orbital length (Lpo, carapace length (Lcp and queliped length (Lql were measured. The relationships Lt/Lpo, Lpo/Lcp and Lt/Lcp are the same for juveniles, males and females, indicating unchanged growth pattern during post-larval ontogenetic development. While Lt/Lpo showed isometric growth, Lpo/Lcp and Lt/Lcp showed negative allometry. On the other hand, for the Lql/Lcp relationship, juveniles showed isometric growth, females slight positive allometry and males a strong positive allometry. It suggests that the importance of chelipeds may be different in these groups. Quelipeds play important role on food capture and on agonistic, social and reproductive behavior. Therefore, inter and intraspecific interactions may change during prawn growth, even after morphological

  2. Further development of landfill sealing systems. Subproject 20: long-term behaviour of earthen layers in landfill liners, moisture conditions under the action of temperature; Weiterentwicklung von Deponieabdichtungssystemen. Teilvorhaben 20: Langzeitverhalten von Erdstoffschichten in Deponiebasisabdichtungen, Feuchtehaushalt unter Temperatureinwirkung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzloehner, U.; Schossig, W.; Wuttke, W.; Ziegler, F.

    1996-12-31

    The sealing properties of the earthen layers in landfill liners depend on water content, which is not constant but changes according to the moisture conditions of the landfill and the adjacent soil. Earthen layers in landfill liners tend to lose water over the course of time and this may result in desiccation cracking. To study the behaviour of soils undergoing desiccation, test devices and methods were developed to evaluate the water transport characteristics of soil samples. Measurement of the temporal and spatial changes in moisture distribution within the cylindrical soil sample was accompanied by a calculation in which diffusion coefficients were iteratively varied so as to reach optimum agreement with the observed moisture distribution. Overburden pressure can to some extent prevent desiccation. Therefore test devices were developed which made it possible to load soil samples simultaneously by vertical stress and by suction. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Die Dichtigkeit von Erdstoffschichten in Deponieabdichtungen haengt vom Wassergehalt ab, der nicht konstant ist, sondern sich entsprechend dem Feuchtehaushalt von Deponie und umgebendem Boden aendert. Die Erdstoffabdichtungssschichten tendieren langfristig zum Trocknerwerden, wodurch es zu Rissen kommen kann. Um das Austrocknungsverhalten zu untersuchen, wurden Versuchsgeraete und -verfahren zur Bestimmung von Wassertransportkennwerten an Bodenproben entwickelt. Die Messung der zeitlichen und oertlichen Aenderung der Feuchteverteilung in der zylindrischen Bodenprobe wurde durch eine Rechnung begleitet, in der die eingegebenen Diffusionskoeffizienten iterativ variiert wurden, bis optimale Uebereinstimmung mit der gemessenen Feuchteverteilung erreicht war. Auflast kann Austrocknung bis zu einem gewissen Grad verhindern. Deshalb wurden Geraete entwickelt, in denen Bodenproben gleichzeitig einer Wasserspannung und einer vertikalen Spannung ausgesetzt werden koennen. (orig./SR)

  3. Thriving with water: Developments in amphibious architecture in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    English Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing awareness worldwide that traditional flood-mitigation strategies that attempt to control the flow of water only increase the likelihood of catastrophic consequences in the long run, when failure inevitably occurs after years of complacency and development behind flood barriers. Amphibious architecture is a non-defensive flood mitigation and climate change adaptation strategy that works in synchrony with a floodprone region’s natural cycles of flooding, allowing water to flow rather than creating an obstruction. Since the height to which an amphibious building rises is not necessarily fixed but adapts to the variable depth of flood water, amphibiation can accommodate rising sea levels and land subsidence as well. Amphibious retrofitting can provide measurable cost savings compared to other flood mitigation strategies, performing well in loss avoidance studies for both flood and wind damage. An amphibious approach to planning and construction recognizes the beneficial aspects of seasonal and occasional flooding, allowing us not merely to live with water, but to thrive with it. This paper reviews case studies of both existing and proposed amphibious buildings, with discussion of their systems and components. It also discusses the limitations of amphibious construction, some of the regulatory obstacles that have discouraged its development, and possible paths forward. The first International Conference on Amphibious Architecture, Design and Engineering, ICAADE 2015, was held in Bangkok, Thailand, in August 2015. The second, ICAADE 2017, will convene at the University of Waterloo in Canada in June 2017.

  4. Characterisation of aroma-active and off-odour compounds in German rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Part II: Case of fish meat and skin from earthen-ponds farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed Ahmed Abbas; Buettner, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Odorous molecules in earthen-ponds rainbow trout aquaculture farming in Germany were investigated with a special focus on musty-earthy off-odorants. To this aim, fish meat and skin were extracted using solvent-assisted flavour evaporation (SAFE) and were mildly concentrated; extracts were subsequently analysed by means of one- and two-dimensional high-resolution gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and olfactometry (GC-MS/O and 2D-HRGC-MS/O). Aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) of the solvent extracts revealed the presence of 76 odorants of which 75 were successfully identified. Thereby, rotundone (black pepper) is described for the first time as an odour-active substance in fish. Moreover, a series of compounds is described for the first time in German aquaculture rainbow trout fish, including, amongst others, (E,Z,Z)-2,4,7-tridecatrienal, (E)-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal, 4-ethyloctanoic acid, 3-methylindole (skatole), d-limonene, and indole. The analytical findings were further compared to sensory evaluation of the samples, and previously obtained data on the respective aquacultural water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Does small-perimeter fencing inhibit mule deer or pronghorn use of water developments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, R.T.; Bissonette, J.A.; Flinders, J.T.; Robinson, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Wildlife water development can be an important habitat management strategy in western North America for many species, including both pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In many areas, water developments are fenced (often with small-perimeter fencing) to exclude domestic livestock and feral horses. Small-perimeter exclosures could limit wild ungulate use of fenced water sources, as exclosures present a barrier pronghorn and mule deer must negotiate to gain access to fenced drinking water. To evaluate the hypothesis that exclosures limit wild ungulate access to water sources, we compared use (photo counts) of fenced versus unfenced water sources for both pronghorn and mule deer between June and October 2002-2008 in western Utah. We used model selection to identify an adequate distribution and best approximating model. We selected a zero-inflated negative binomial distribution for both pronghorn and mule deer photo counts. Both pronghorn and mule deer photo counts were positively associated with sampling time and average daily maximum temperature in top models. A fence effect was present in top models for both pronghorn and mule deer, but mule deer response to small-perimeter fencing was much more pronounced than pronghorn response. For mule deer, we estimated that presence of a fence around water developments reduced photo counts by a factor of 0.25. We suggest eliminating fencing of water developments whenever possible or fencing a big enough area around water sources to avoid inhibiting mule deer. More generally, our results provide additional evidence that water development design and placement influence wildlife use. Failure to account for species-specific preferences will limit effectiveness of management actions and could compromise research results. Copyright ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  6. Quantitative analyses of the bacterial microbiota of rearing environment, tilapia and common carp cultured in earthen ponds and inhibitory activity of its lactic acid bacteria on fish spoilage and pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaktcham, Pierre Marie; Temgoua, Jules-Bocamdé; Ngoufack Zambou, François; Diaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Wacher, Carmen; Pérez-Chabela, María de Lourdes

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the bacterial load of water, Nile Tilapia and common Carp intestines from earthen ponds, isolate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and assess their antimicrobial activity against fish spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. Following enumeration and isolation of microorganisms the antimicrobial activity of the LAB isolates was evaluated. Taxonomic identification of selected antagonistic LAB strains was assessed, followed by partial characterisation of their antimicrobial metabolites. Results showed that high counts (>4 log c.f.u ml-1 or 8 log c.f.u g-1) of total aerobic bacteria were recorded in pond waters and fish intestines. The microbiota were also found to be dominated by Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Escherichia coli. LAB isolates (5.60%) exhibited potent direct and extracellular antimicrobial activity against the host-derived and non host-derived spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. These antagonistic isolates were identified and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis was found as the predominant (42.85%) specie. The strains displayed the ability to produce lactic, acetic, butyric, propionic and valeric acids. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances with activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative (Vibrio spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria were produced by three L. lactis subsp. lactis strains. In this study, the LAB from the microbiota of fish and pond water showed potent antimicrobial activity against fish spoilage or pathogenic bacteria from the same host or ecological niche. The studied Cameroonian aquatic niche is an ideal source of antagonistic LAB that could be appropriate as new fish biopreservatives or disease control agents in aquaculture under tropical conditions in particular or worldwide in general.

  7. Phytobenthic Communities in Earthen Ponds {at Makoba

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zanzibar. Among the zooplankton, rotifer abundance peaked during the rainy period (salinity .... time for all the ponds, thus, the monthly averages ..... ponds and the role of plankton in their survival and growth. Indian J. Fish. 2: 257-313. Bryceson, I. (1977) An ecological study of phytoplankton of the coastal waters of Dar es.

  8. Salt for the earthen oven revisited

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2011-06-07

    Jun 7, 2011 ... for your reward is great in heaven, for so men persecuted the prophets who were before you' (Mt 5:12). Then follows the salt logion. Recall that this culture is agonistic, that is, prone to conflict. It loves arguments, admires insults and honours those who are adept at these indications of mastery of language.

  9. Salt for the earthen oven revisited

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2011-06-07

    Jun 7, 2011 ... ours, but in a roundabout (tortuous?) way. However, we already mentioned why seasoning and conservation are not plausible interpretations in the biblical context. Once again, following De Langhe's (1954) insight, this is how. Luke's logion can be understood: Salt (the catalyst) is good; but if salt has lost its ...

  10. Ways to use the discipline of communication to make a greater contribution to the pace of water development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, N.; Petrova, R.; Narodoslawsky, M.

    2003-04-01

    An evolution of communications methodology that can help accelerate global development began in the first quarter of the 20th century with the use of publicity tools to bring attention to social problems. It grew to a reliance on public relations as a means of identifying stakeholders and creating programs to fit the audience's interests. More recently, social marketing took center stage - where sophisticated marketing and cause related advertising tools were applied to influence individual and societal behaviors. This was followed by development and strategic communications (the latter which rightfully considers communication to be a process rather than as a series of products). A set of networks of professionals across the world (social activists, academics, filmmakers and journalists, electronic communications experts, service providers and professional communicators), who explore new ideas and test innovative communication concepts, committed to a new agenda for global communications: one that is empowering, many-to-many (horizontal versus top-down), one that gives voice to the previously unheard, and that has a bias toward local content and ownership (Gray-Felder &Deane,1998). Modern communication programming has tended to fulfill three roles: to inform and persuade people to adopt certain behaviors and practices that are beneficial to them; to enhance the image and profile of the work of organizations involved in development; to enable community consultation over specific initiatives. All these roles are important within water development domain and are essential for PUB targets, but communication work in the field remains underfunded and undervalued despite there exists certain experience in different countries (Penkova &Petrova, 2001). Especially site-based knowledge transfer, are in the early exploratory stages and will require more study, testing and applications, especially in developing nations with scarce human and financial resources. In the

  11. Health Impact Assessment of Indira Sagar Project: a paramount to studies on Water Development Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anushrita; Nagpal, B N; Kapoor, Neera; Srivastava, Aruna; Saxena, Rekha; Singh, Shailendra; Gupta, Sanjeev; Singh, Sompal; Vikram, Kumar; Valecha, Neena

    2017-01-26

    Very limited studies on Health Impact Assessment (HIA) of Water Development Projects (WDP) in relation to mosquito-borne diseases have been carried out in India. The current study focuses on using HIA as a tool for finding impact of Indira Sagar Project, Madhya Pradesh on human health in relation to mosquito borne diseases, and emphasizing its incorporation as an integral part of any WDP. Screening, scoping, assessment, recommendation, reporting, and evaluation were carried out in selected study areas. Entomological, epidemiological, socio-economic and knowledge, attitudes and practices data related to malaria transmission in three dam components: Submergence (SUB), Command (CMD) and Resettlement and Rehabilitation (RR) colonies were generated for the period of January 2013-December 2014. Statistical analysis was attempted to compare data among dam components and to identify risk factors. Component-specific mitigation measures were suggested based on observations. Anopheles culicifacies was the dominating species in all three dam components and its man-hour density in CMD areas was higher compared to SUB and RR. The odds of finding a positive malaria case was much higher in CMD compared to SUB (OR 1.24, CI 95% 0.71-2.43) and RR (OR 5.48, CI 95% 0.73-40.63). Respondents of CMD stated more previous episodes of malaria (81.8%) compared to RR (61.4%) and SUB (55.7%). The canonical discriminant analysis concluded that distance from reservoir/Indira Sagar canal had the highest discriminating ability of malaria cases in different components followed by treatment-seeking behaviour and malaria history. The analysis identified these risk factors with 70% accuracy. Engineering manipulations may be carried out in CMD areas to control seepage and RR colonies should be established beyond 3 km from reservoir/Indira Sagar canal considering the flight range of A. culicifacies. Strengthening of surveillance with early detection and complete treatment was recommended for CMD areas

  12. Mobility Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    We posit the concept of Mobility Work to describe efforts of moving about people and things as part of accomplishing tasks. Mobility work can be seen as a spatial parallel to the concept of articulation work proposed by the sociologist Anselm Strauss. Articulation work describes efforts...... of coordination necessary in cooperative work, but focuses, we argue, mainly on the temporal aspects of cooperative work. As a supplement, the concept of mobility work focuses on the spatial aspects of cooperative work. Whereas actors seek to diminish the amount of articulation work needed in collaboration...... by constructing Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs), actors minimise mobility work by constructing Standard Operation Configurations (SOCs). We apply the concept of mobility work to the ethnography of hospital work, and argue that mobility arises because of the need to get access to people, places, knowledge and...

  13. Water developments and canids in two North American deserts: a test of the indirect effect of water hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas K Hall

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic modifications to landscapes intended to benefit wildlife may negatively influence wildlife communities. Anthropogenic provisioning of free water (water developments to enhance abundance and distribution of wildlife is a common management practice in arid regions where water is limiting. Despite the long-term and widespread use of water developments, little is known about how they influence native species. Water developments may negatively influence arid-adapted species (e.g., kit fox, Vulpes macrotis by enabling water-dependent competitors (e.g., coyote, Canis latrans to expand distribution in arid landscapes (i.e., indirect effect of water hypothesis. We tested the two predictions of the indirect effect of water hypothesis (i.e., coyotes will visit areas with free water more frequently and kit foxes will spatially and temporally avoid coyotes and evaluated relative use of free water by canids in the Great Basin and Mojave Deserts from 2010 to 2012. We established scent stations in areas with (wet and without (dry free water and monitored visitation by canids to these sites and visitation to water sources using infrared-triggered cameras. There was no difference in the proportions of visits to scent stations in wet or dry areas by coyotes or kit foxes at either study area. We did not detect spatial (no negative correlation between visits to scent stations or temporal (no difference between times when stations were visited segregation between coyotes and kit foxes. Visitation to water sources was not different for coyotes between study areas, but kit foxes visited water sources more in Mojave than Great Basin. Our results did not support the indirect effect of water hypothesis in the Great Basin or Mojave Deserts for these two canids.

  14. Water Developments and Canids in Two North American Deserts: A Test of the Indirect Effect of Water Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lucas K.; Larsen, Randy T.; Knight, Robert N.; Bunnell, Kevin D.; McMillan, Brock R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic modifications to landscapes intended to benefit wildlife may negatively influence wildlife communities. Anthropogenic provisioning of free water (water developments) to enhance abundance and distribution of wildlife is a common management practice in arid regions where water is limiting. Despite the long-term and widespread use of water developments, little is known about how they influence native species. Water developments may negatively influence arid-adapted species (e.g., kit fox, Vulpes macrotis) by enabling water-dependent competitors (e.g., coyote, Canis latrans) to expand distribution in arid landscapes (i.e., indirect effect of water hypothesis). We tested the two predictions of the indirect effect of water hypothesis (i.e., coyotes will visit areas with free water more frequently and kit foxes will spatially and temporally avoid coyotes) and evaluated relative use of free water by canids in the Great Basin and Mojave Deserts from 2010 to 2012. We established scent stations in areas with (wet) and without (dry) free water and monitored visitation by canids to these sites and visitation to water sources using infrared-triggered cameras. There was no difference in the proportions of visits to scent stations in wet or dry areas by coyotes or kit foxes at either study area. We did not detect spatial (no negative correlation between visits to scent stations) or temporal (no difference between times when stations were visited) segregation between coyotes and kit foxes. Visitation to water sources was not different for coyotes between study areas, but kit foxes visited water sources more in Mojave than Great Basin. Our results did not support the indirect effect of water hypothesis in the Great Basin or Mojave Deserts for these two canids. PMID:23844097

  15. Observing geoethics in mining and in ground-water development: An Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Daji Limaye

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Two famous quotes from ‘Mahatma Gandhi’, the Indian philosopher, are helpful in describing the foundation of geoethics: (a “God has provided enough resources for everyone’s need but not for everyone’s greed” and (b “Before starting a development project, first think about the effects which the project would have on the poorest of the poor people in the Society”. Geoethics is relatively a new branch in geosciences. It lies at the meeting point of geosciences, sociology and philosophy. Much earlier in the history of sciences such as nuclear physics, biology or chemistry, ethical principles attracted the attention of social leaders and philosophers while using laboratory research for field trials and applications on a large scale. Using the research not for atomic bombs but for atomic energy and not for chemical weapons but for chemical products and drugs was the priority of social leaders. In Italy, geoethics originated with philosophers and later on got the support from geologist. In other countries geoscientists working primarily in mining industry promoted geoethics for ensuring socially responsible behavior on the part of mining companies.

  16. Water development strategy as a driving force for sustained rangeland management by local communities in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamo, Etienne Tedonkeng

    2004-12-01

    Water is the major food component for the maintenance of animals. Although Africa is endowed with diverse agricultural environments, the survival of animals in Sahelian and sub-Sahelian Africa is threatened by the lack of water. Animals need water as an essential nutrient, a component of the body, and for conductive or evaporative cooling. Water needs are met mainly through drinking free water and to a lesser extent by utilising water that forms part of the feed. However during the long dry season, surface water resources dwindle and the water content of available forage decreases, thereby increasing the animals' demand for water. Consequently animals have to walk for long distances to obtain adequate forage and water, which in turn raises the demand for these resources. Water can be used to direct and regulate rangeland management in this open access environment, to maintain range resources and to improve their quality. Water development, which takes into consideration usable forage, despite some intra- or inter-annual variability, plays an important role and its spatial distribution will affect the grazing intensity of forage resources. Sound water development and management strategies integrating local communities in the decision-making will set up a firm basis for sustained range management in the free and open access environment of sub-Saharan Africa where lack of financial input, social and cultural habits and above all the environmental condition do not permit large scale fencing as in other parts of the world.

  17. Developmental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels; Hvid, Helge; Kristensen, Tage Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    Human Deveoplment and Working Life - Work for Welfare explores whether the development of human resources at company level can improve individuals' quality of life, companies' possibilities of development, and welfare and democracy in society. Chapter two discuss the concept "developmental work......" from theoretical and empirical perspectives....

  18. Work Experience and Work Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorence, Jon; Mortimer, Jeylan T.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the interrelations of work experience and psychological involvement in work among male college graduates over a 10-year period. Both the occupational socialization and the occupational selection hypotheses are supported by the data analysis. (Author/JOW)

  19. Projects Work!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  20. Sedentary work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Dorte; Rosthøj, Susanne; Burr, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between five-year changes in occupational sitting and body mass index (BMI) in working adults. METHODS: We analyzed data from The Danish Work Environment Cohort Study (2005 and 2010, n=3.482). Data on occupational sitting, weight...

  1. Case work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Ian Frank

    2016-01-01

    Answers to the question just what is the ?case? partly defined the fields of sociology and social work in early 20th century Chicago. Drawing on the archives of the University of Chicago, I describe and appraise the way the ?case? figured in social work at Chicago and elsewhere. I ask...

  2. Work Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Roeters, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Most of us agree that stress is a growing problem within organizations. We hear about the postal workers who had killed fellow employees and supervisors, and then hear that a major cause of tension is at work. Friends tell us that they are stressed due to increased workload and he has to work overtime because the company is restructured. We read the polls that employees complain about the stress in trying to balance family life with the work. Stress is a dynamic condition in which an individu...

  3. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  4. Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristy J; Brickman, Peggy; Brame, Cynthia J

    2018-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics faculty are increasingly incorporating both formal and informal group work in their courses. Implementing group work can be improved by an understanding of the extensive body of educational research studies on this topic. This essay describes an online, evidence-based teaching guide published by CBE-Life Sciences Education ( LSE ). The guide provides a tour of research studies and resources related to group work (including many articles from LSE ). Instructors who are new to group work, as well as instructors who have experienced difficulties in implementing group work, may value the condensed summaries of key research findings. These summaries are organized by teaching challenges, and actionable advice is provided in a checklist for instructors. Education researchers may value the inclusion of empirical studies, key reviews, and meta-analyses of group-work studies. In addition to describing key features of the guide, this essay also identifies areas in which further empirical studies are warranted. © 2018 K. J. Wilson et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2018 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Working Collaboratively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holder, Anna; Lovett, George

    2009-01-01

    identified as a transformative global force of the last decade, most notably in knowledge and information publishing, communication and creation. This paper presents a structured conversation on changing understandings of collaboration, and the realities of collaborative methodology in architectural work....... Ideas of the platforms and structures necessary to support ‘creative’ collaborations are advanced and tested, and a vocabulary of key terms is developed. The conversation extends to reflect on the role of the architecture profession in supporting or enabling collaboration in architectural works....

  6. Construction work

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Construction work on building 179 will start on the 16th February 2004 and continue until November 2004. The road between buildings 179 and 158 will temporarily become a one way street from Route Democrite towards building 7. The parking places between buildings 179 and 7 will become obsolete. The ISOLDE collaboration would like to apologize for any inconveniences.

  7. Heart Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Sandra R.; Gonzales, Alicia C.

    2017-01-01

    It is not every day that a former student greets a teacher with, "Your course changed my life." The authors are the professor and student of the transformative course. Alicia Gonzales wanted to understand how to work with students to co-construct an environment where persistent problem solving in a technologically rich classroom was the…

  8. Road works

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    From Monday 11 October until Friday 29 October 2010, the flow of traffic will be disrupted by road works at the roundabout in front of Restaurant No. 2; The number of spaces available in the car park in front of Rest. No. 2 will be reduced. Thank you for your understanding during this period. GS/SEM Group

  9. Demolition work

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Because of demolition work inside Bldg. 251, two containers will be placed on the route Démocrite. For security reasons, the part of this road in front of barrack 553 will be closed to circulation from 5 to 12 November. Thank you, in advance for your understanding. PH-SMI

  10. Wetlands Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Linda; Blanchard, Pamela Borne

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how a biology teacher's search for a cross-curricular project in science, math, history, and environmental science, that would help her students connect what they were learning in the classroom to their everyday life, resulted in an ongoing stewardship project. Working together with the Louisiana Sea Grant College Program…

  11. Standardization work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    For several years now, the main civil aircraft manufacturers (Airbus and its partners, Boeing, Fokker, McDonnell Douglas) have been working jointly on the writing of technical recommendations and the drawing up of an international standard. This work concerns the evaluation of the processes and products used to strip aeronautical paint systems. This procedure was initiated on request from the main airlines. In effect, the airlines are faced with situations in which the financial and operational objectives are becoming increasingly important. The need was felt to rationalize and, if possible, harmonize the criteria and technical requirements of the various civil aircraft manufacturers in order to facilitate in-service maintenance of the fleets of airlines operating Airbus, Boeing, Douglas aircraft, etc.

  12. Working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, A

    1992-01-31

    The term working memory refers to a brain system that provides temporary storage and manipulation of the information necessary for such complex cognitive tasks as language comprehension, learning, and reasoning. This definition has evolved from the concept of a unitary short-term memory system. Working memory has been found to require the simultaneous storage and processing of information. It can be divided into the following three subcomponents: (i) the central executive, which is assumed to be an attentional-controlling system, is important in skills such as chess playing and is particularly susceptible to the effects of Alzheimer's disease; and two slave systems, namely (ii) the visuospatial sketch pad, which manipulates visual images and (iii) the phonological loop, which stores and rehearses speech-based information and is necessary for the acquisition of both native and second-language vocabulary.

  13. Works notice

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    We would like to inform you that renovation work on the road lighting equipment will take place on the Meyrin site between 19 October and 18 December 2009. During this period, traffic will be disrupted on the Schrödinger, Perrin and Siegbahn roads, ie from Building 274 to Building 188. We request that you comply with the road signs and thank you for your understanding. GS-SEM Group

  14. RESUMING WORK

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    In application of the Staff Rules and Regulations, every member of the CERN personnel is required to undergo a medical examination on resuming work after sick leave: if the medical absence has been for 21 calendar days or longer, if absent more than 48 hours due to professional accident. It is incumbent upon the member of the personnel himself/herself to contact the Medical Service 73186, without awaiting its summons. Medical Service

  15. RESUMING WORK

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    In application of the Staff Rules and Regulations, every member of the CERN personnel is required to undergo a medical examination on resuming work after sick leave: if the medical absence has been for 21 calendar days or longer, if absent more than 48 hours due to professional accident. It is incumbent upon the member of the personnel himself/herself to contact the Medical Service 73186, without awaiting its summons.

  16. Paid work and unpaid work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens

    Time-use information is preferably obtained from diaries, as this method is considered more reliable than information from questionnaires. The diary-technique seems to be unique in catching the rhythm of every day life and thereby the structuring of work and leisure during a well-defined and memo...

  17. Historical Ground-Water Development in the Salinas Alluvial Fan Area, Salinas, Puerto Rico, 1900-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose M.; Gómez-Gómez, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The Salinas alluvial fan area has historically been one of the most intensively used agricultural areas in the South Coastal Plain of Puerto Rico. Changes in agricultural practices and land use in the Salinas alluvial fan have also caused changes in the geographic distribution of ground-water withdrawals from the alluvial aquifer. As a result, the ground-water balance and ground-water flow pattern have changed throughout the years and may explain the presence of saline ground water along parts of the coast at present. By providing a reconstruction of historical ground-water development in the Salinas alluvial fan area, from the initial years of aquifer development at about 1900 to the most recent conditions existing in 2005, water resources managers and planners can use the results of the analysis for a more complete understanding of aquifer conditions especially pertaining to water quality. This study effort was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources as a contribution in the management of the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. The study area encompasses about 20 mi2 (square miles) of the extensive South Coastal Plain alluvial aquifer system (fig. 1). The study area is bounded to the north by foothills of the Cordillera Central mountain chain, to the south by the Caribbean Sea, and to the east and west by the Rio Nigua de Salinas and the Quebrada Aguas Verdes, respectively. Fan-delta and alluvial deposits contain the principal aquifers in the study area.

  18. RESUMING WORK

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In application of the Staff Rules and Regulations, every member of the CERN personnel is required to undergo a medical examination on resuming work after sick leave: - if the medical absence has been for 21 calendar days or longer - if absent more than 48 hours due to professional accident It is incumbent upon the member of the personnel himself/herself to contact the Medical Service Tel. 73186, without awaiting its summons. The purpose of this exam is not to check on the absenteeism, but to support the professional reinsertion. Medical Service

  19. RESUMING WORK

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    In application of the Staff Rules and Regulations, every member of the CERN personnel is required to undergo a medical examination on resuming work after sick leave: • if the medical absence has been for 21 calendar days or longer • if absent more than 48 hours due to professional accident It is incumbent upon the member of the personnel himself/herself to contact the Medical Service tel. 73186, without awaiting its summons. The purpose of this exam is not to check on the absenteeism, but to support the professional reinsertion. Medical Service

  20. RESUMING WORK

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    In application of the Staff Rules and Regulations, every member of the CERN personnel is required to undergo a medical examination on resuming work after sick leave: - if the medical absence has been for 21 calendar days or longer - if absent more than 48 hours due to professional accident It is incumbent upon the member of the personnel himself/herself to contact the Medical Service tel. 73186, without awaiting its summons. The purpose of this exam is not to check on the absenteeism, but to support the professional reinsertion. Medical Service

  1. Modeling the hydrologic effects of land and water development interventions: a case study of the upper Blue Nile river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haregeweyn, Nigussie; Tsunekawa, Atsushi; Tsubo, Mitsuru; Meshesha, Derege; Adgo, Enyew; Poesen, Jean; Schütt, Brigitta

    2014-05-01

    Over 67% of the Ethiopian landmass has been identified as very vulnerable to climate variability and land degradation. These problems are more prevalent in the Upper Blue Nile (UBN, often called Abay) river basin covering a drainage area of about 199,800 km2. The UBN River runs from Lake Tana (NW Ethiopia) to the Ethiopia-Sudan border. To enhance the adaptive capacity to the high climate variability and land degradation in the basin, different land and water management measures (stone/soil bunds, runoff collector trenches, exclosures) have been extensively implemented, especially since recent years. Moreover, multipurpose water harvesting schemes including the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD, reservoir area of ca. 4000 km2) and 17 other similar projects are being or to be implemented by 2025. However, impact studies on land and water management aspects rarely include detailed hydrological components especially at river basin scale, although it is generally regarded as a major determinant of hydrological processes. The main aim of this study is therefore to model the significance of land and water management interventions in surface runoff response at scale of UBN river basin and to suggest some recommendations. Spatially-distributed annual surface runoff was simulated for both present-day and future (2025) land and water management conditions using calibrated values of the proportional loss model in ArcGIS environment. Average annual rainfall map (1998-2012) was produced from calibrated TRMM satellite source and shows high spatial variability of rainfall ranging between ca. 1000 mm in the Eastern part of the basin to ca. 2000 mm in the southern part of the basin. Present-day land use day condition was obtained from Abay Basin Master Plan study. The future land use map was created taking into account the land and water development interventions to be implemented by 2025. Under present-day conditions, high spatial variability of annual runoff depth was observed

  2. Rabbit droppings as an organic fertilizer in earthen ponds, to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cntaganda

    Preliminary results obtained in Cameroon pointed to the promising effect of rabbit manure as a water fertilizer for Oreochromis niloticus ponds and as a food-source for the catfish Heterobranchus longifilis (Breine et al., 1995). (Franco, 1991), using dried rabbit dung to feed tilapia O. niloticus in mesocosms, reported that the ...

  3. Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: models and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, D.W.; Oster, C.A.; Nelson, R.W.; Gee, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems has been investigated. The purpose of this study is to develop the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and to develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion. This study develops the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion in one, two and three dimensions. The theory has been incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. This report contains a discussion of the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion, a discussion of the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems, and presents the results that have been obtained.

  4. Plankton distribution and diversity: a case study of earthen fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our knowledge of the consumption of plankton by fish is still fragmentary. Trophic links between fish and plankton are often loose because plankton is a changing assemblage of pelagic organisms of valuable nutritional value. The objectives of the study were to determine the distribution and diversity of planktons in the fish ...

  5. Work team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RBE Editorial

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Work Team 2016 (Jan-Jul1. Editorial TeamChief-editorsBayardo Bapstista Torres, Instituto de Química (USP, BrasilEduardo Galembeck, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade de Campinas (Unicamp, Brasil Co-editorsGabriel Gerber Hornink, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade - Federal de Alfenas (Unifal-MG, BrasilVera Maria Treis Trindade, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS, Brasil Editorial BoardAdriana Cassina, Department of Biochemistry, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, UruguayAngel Herráez, Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología molecular, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, SpainAndré Amaral Gonçalves Bianco, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp, BrasilDenise Vaz de Macedo, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, BrasilEneida de Paula, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, BrasilJose Antonio Martinez Oyanedel, Universidad de Concepción, ChileJosep Maria Fernández Novell, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry, Universitat de Barcelona, SpainLeila Maria Beltramini, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo (USP, BrasilManuel João da Costa, Escola de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Minho, PortugalMaria Lucia Bianconi, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, BrasilMaría Noel Alvarez, Department of Biochemistry, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, UruguayMiguel Ángel Medina Torres, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry Faculty of Sciences University of Málaga, SpainNelma Regina Segnini Bossolan, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP, BrasilPaulo De Avila Junior, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas (CCNH Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC

  6. Meaningful work, work engagement and organisational commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Madelyn Geldenhuys; Karolina Łaba; Cornelia M. Venter

    2014-01-01

    Orientation: Meaningful work can yield benefits for organisations and lead to positive work outcomes such as satisfied, engaged and committed employees, individual and organisational fulfilment, productivity, retention and loyalty.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships amongst psychological meaningfulness, work engagement and organisational commitment and to test for a possible mediation effect of work engagement on the relationship between psychological ...

  7. Meaningful work, work engagement and organisational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelyn Geldenhuys

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Meaningful work can yield benefits for organisations and lead to positive work outcomes such as satisfied, engaged and committed employees, individual and organisational fulfilment, productivity, retention and loyalty.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships amongst psychological meaningfulness, work engagement and organisational commitment and to test for a possible mediation effect of work engagement on the relationship between psychological meaningfulness and organisational commitment.Motivation for the study: Managers have to rethink ways of improving productivity and performance at work, due to the diverse, and in some instances escalating, needs of employees (e.g. financial support to uphold their interest in and enjoyment of working.Research approach, design and method: A quantitative approach was employed to gather the data for the study, utilising a cross-sectional survey design. The sample (n = 415 consisted of working employees from various companies and positions in Gauteng, South Africa.Main findings: The results confirmed a positive relationship between psychological meaningfulness, work engagement and organisational commitment. Further, psychological meaningfulness predicts work engagement, whilst psychological meaningfulness and work engagement predict organisational commitment.Practical/managerial implications: Employers identifying their employees’ commitment patterns and mapping out strategies for enhancing those that are relevant to organisational goals will yield positive work outcomes (e.g. employees who are creative, seek growth or challenges for themselves.Contribution/value-add: This study contributes to the literature through highlighting the impact that meaningful work has on sustaining employee commitment to the organisation.

  8. New ways of working and work engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baudewijns, C.; Gerards, R.; de Grip, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates whether New Ways of Working (NWW) are related to employee work engagement in the Netherlands. We test our hypotheses using a sample of 656 employees from 14 industry sectors and 12 occupational fields. Our study reveals that three facets of NWW positively affect work

  9. Passion for work: Work engagement versus workaholism.

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgievski-Duijvesteijn, Marjan; Bakker, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Nothing great in the world has been accomplished without passion. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831) Is passion needed for excellent performance? The question of what predicts outstanding performance at work remains timely and relevant. The term “passion for work” emerged from qualitative research on entrepreneurs’ motivation, and has been defined as a selfish, passionate love for the work (Shane, Locke & Collins, 2003). Passion for work has been proposed as k...

  10. Riding Third: Social Work in Ambulance Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Hilary; Rasmussen, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This research explored the possible role of social work alongside emergency ambulance services. An ethnographic study included semistructured interviews and direct observations collected over 300 hours while riding in ambulances in an urban setting. The data suggest that social work could play a role by providing needed psychosocial care during…

  11. Knowledge work and work-related stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, Christine

    2006-01-01

    . These companies employ highly educated and com-petent people who apply their personal knowledge to generate new knowledge in close relationship with both custom-ers and colleagues. The employees are self-managed and work in networks and decentralised structures around pro-jects. Their working life is described...... tied to the employees. The opportunities are on the other more financially tangible in terms of increased efficiency, decreased sick-leave, extra time for new developments, less mistakes made, increased working capacity, quality, effi-ciency and productivity....

  12. Balancing Machine Work, Comfort Work, and Sentimental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maria Ie; Hansen, Magnus; Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    To improve prehospital care ambulances carry increasingly sophisticated equipment aimed at initiating patient care already at the scene of injury. The competent use of this equipment is central to prehospital care but it also competes for increasing amounts of the ambulance crew’s time and attent......To improve prehospital care ambulances carry increasingly sophisticated equipment aimed at initiating patient care already at the scene of injury. The competent use of this equipment is central to prehospital care but it also competes for increasing amounts of the ambulance crew’s time...... and attention. We investigate ambulance care in three of Denmark’s five healthcare regions, which staff ambulances with emergency medical technicians, paramedics, and physicians. Using the concept of illness trajectory we analyse how the ambulance crews balance machine work, which involves continuously...... monitoring the equipment, comfort work, which is actions taken to relieve the pain or discomfort of the patient, and sentimental work, which is care for the patient’s physical and mental well-being, often verbal in nature. The analysis shows that comfort and sentimental work often takes priority over machine...

  13. Patterns of work injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, Flemming; Nielsen, Kent Jacob; Rasmussen, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    To compare work injuries treated in an emergency department (ED) and injuries reported to the Danish Working Environment Authority (DWEA).......To compare work injuries treated in an emergency department (ED) and injuries reported to the Danish Working Environment Authority (DWEA)....

  14. Struggling at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarsbech, Pernille U; Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Andersen, Malene Friis

    2015-01-01

    with problems at work. Methods: From a survey study on work and mental health in Denmark, we invited participants for in-depth interviews. Using grounded theory, we conducted 13 semi structured interviews with employees, at work, experiencing depressive symptoms. Findings: Work was pivotal for the informants...

  15. CTOs at work

    CERN Document Server

    Donaldson, Scott; Donaldson, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Scott Donaldson, Stanley Siegel and Gary Donaldson interview many of the world's most influential chief technology officers in CTOs at Work, offering a brand-new companion volume to the highly acclaimed elite At Work books including Coders at Work, CIOS at Work and Venture Capitalists at Work. As the words "at work" suggest, the authors focus on how their interviewees tackle the day-to-day work of the CTO while revealing much more: how they got there, how they manage and allocate projects, and how they interact with business units and ensure that their companies take advantage of technologies,

  16. Abstract: Body Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, Lene

    2012-01-01

    This panel will explore the usefulness of the term ‘body work’ in cultural history. Body work is understood as work focusing on the bodies of others as component in a range of occupations in health and social care, as well as in unpaid work in the family. How can the notion of body work inform...... cultural history of health and illness whether through a micro-social focus on the intercorporeal aspects of work in health and social care, or through clarifying our understanding of the times and spaces of work, or through highlighting the relationship between mundane body work and global processes....... The British sociologist Julia Twigg has introduced and explored the term `bodywork', most recently in Body Work in Health and Social Care - Critical Themes, New Agendas (2011). She extends the term body work from applying to the work that individuals undertake on their own bodies, often as part of regimens...

  17. Live to work or love to work: work craving and work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdylo, Kamila; Baumann, Nicola; Fischbach, Lis; Engeser, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    According to the theory of work craving, a workaholic has a craving for self-worth compensatory incentives and an expectation of relief from negative affect experienced through neurotic perfectionism and an obsessive-compulsive style of working. Research has shown that workaholism and work engagement should be considered as two distinct work styles with different health consequences. However, the mechanisms underlying the adoption of these work styles have been neglected. The present study proposes that work craving and work engagement are differentially associated with self-regulatory competencies and health. In particular, we expected that the working styles mediate the relationships between emotional self-regulation and health. In the cross-sectional study, 469 teachers from German schools completed online administered questionnaires. By means of structural equation modeling, we tested two indirect paths: a) from self-relaxation deficits via work craving to poor health and b) from self-motivation competencies via work engagement to good health. As expected, we found evidence that a) the negative relationship of self-relaxation deficits on health was partially mediated by work craving and b) the positive relationship of self-motivation competencies on health was partially mediated by work engagement. The present study emphasizes the importance of self-regulation competencies for healthy or unhealthy work styles. Whereas work craving was associated with a low ability to down-regulate negative emotions and poor health, work engagement was associated with a high ability to up-regulate positive emotions and good health.

  18. Predicting Sustainable Work Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Kim Sundtoft

    2013-01-01

    . Employee characteristics and general attitudes towards safety and work condition are included in the extended model. A survey was handed out to 654 employees in Chinese factories. This research contributes by demonstrating how employee- characteristics and general attitudes towards safety and work...... condition influence their sustainable work behavior. A new definition of sustainable work behavior is proposed.......Sustainable work behavior is an important issue for operations managers – it has implications for most outcomes of OM. This research explores the antecedents of sustainable work behavior. It revisits and extends the sociotechnical model developed by Brown et al. (2000) on predicting safe behavior...

  19. The Ambiguity of Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to the current debate among organizational and work-life researchers on the double-sided nature of knowledge work, which offers great freedom and satisfaction on the one hand and the potential to be overly demanding and stressful on the other. This contribution involves...... drawing on the results of an ethnographic case study of a consultancy house; more specifically, it comprises an exploration of the narrative identity work of consultants as they perform work practice stories of self, work, and the organization negotiating why the work they do is both challenging...

  20. Identity Work and Emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Ingo

    2018-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical literature on identity work and identifies two distinct approaches to incorporating emotion. The majority of empirical studies use emotion to describe the experiences of identity work. In doing so, the authors (a) mention the emotions that people feel in situations...... that trigger identity work, (b) illustrate identity work as an emotional endeavour, and (c) describe the emotional impact of successful and unsuccessful identity work. There is also an emerging literature that examines the mutual constitution of emotions and identity work. These authors address emotional...... labour, affective social identification, emotional attachment and detachment, and humour when studying identity work. This paper suggests that, to understand better the relation between emotions and identity work, future research should examine the role of emotions in problematizing identity...

  1. Eye Injuries at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work. Use machine guarding, work screens or other engineering controls. Use proper eye protection. Wear protective eyewear ... Us About the Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms ...

  2. NCPC Commemorative Works Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — The CWC is a complete list of Washington DC's commemorative works on federal land. Each record includes a work's title, location, a short description of its purpose,...

  3. Ethnography at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    their understanding of their companies' organizational structures, strategies and daily work practices. Asking crucial questions about the role of the anthropologist in the field, "Ethnography at Work" introduces students to ways in which anthropologists study social systems in business....

  4. Work Coordination Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendejas, Silvino; Bui, Tung; Bui, Bach; Malhotra, Shantanu; Chen, Fannie; Kim, Rachel; Allen, Christopher; Luong, Ivy; Chang, George; Sadaqathulla, Syed

    2009-01-01

    The Work Coordination Engine (WCE) is a Java application integrated into the Service Management Database (SMDB), which coordinates the dispatching and monitoring of a work order system. WCE de-queues work orders from SMDB and orchestrates the dispatching of work to a registered set of software worker applications distributed over a set of local, or remote, heterogeneous computing systems. WCE monitors the execution of work orders once dispatched, and accepts the results of the work order by storing to the SMDB persistent store. The software leverages the use of a relational database, Java Messaging System (JMS), and Web Services using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) technologies to implement an efficient work-order dispatching mechanism capable of coordinating the work of multiple computer servers on various platforms working concurrently on different, or similar, types of data or algorithmic processing. Existing (legacy) applications can be wrapped with a proxy object so that no changes to the application are needed to make them available for integration into the work order system as "workers." WCE automatically reschedules work orders that fail to be executed by one server to a different server if available. From initiation to completion, the system manages the execution state of work orders and workers via a well-defined set of events, states, and actions. It allows for configurable work-order execution timeouts by work-order type. This innovation eliminates a current processing bottleneck by providing a highly scalable, distributed work-order system used to quickly generate products needed by the Deep Space Network (DSN) to support space flight operations. WCE is driven by asynchronous messages delivered via JMS indicating the availability of new work or workers. It runs completely unattended in support of the lights-out operations concept in the DSN.

  5. Reasoning=working Memoryattention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehner, M.; Krumm, S.; Pick, M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between attention, components of working memory, and reasoning. Therefore, twenty working memory tests, two attention tests, and nine intelligence subtests were administered to 135 students. Using structural equation modeling, we were able to replicate a functional model of working memory…

  6. Motivational Orientations in Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtonen, Mari; Olkinuora, Erkki; Palonen, Tuire; Hakkarainen, Kai; Lehtinen, Erno

    2008-01-01

    The rapid development in working life during recent decades has changed the structures of work organisations and expectations of employees' work. Differing forms of professional employment and different types of organisational environments likely promote different types of motivational patterns in workers. The aim of this study was to apply a…

  7. Authenticity at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Authenticity at work, loosely defined as the degree to which an individual stays true to their core self, has impact on workers in the workplace. This thesis shows that authenticity at work can be measured with a reliable and valid instrument: the IAM Work. Furthermore, results of this thesis show

  8. Performative Work in Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærenholdt, Jørgen Ole; Jensen, Hanne Louise

    2009-01-01

    performative work. For many workers, the performative aspect has contributed to their personal development, especially where self-control at work contributes to enhancing self-esteem. Second, performative work is also often vulnerable, involving various emotional strategies to cope with its challenges. While...

  9. Working hours and productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collewet, Marion; Sauermann, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the link between working hours and productivity using daily information on working hours and performance of a sample of call centre agents. We exploit variation in the number of hours worked by the same employee across days and weeks due to central scheduling, enabling us to

  10. Work-related stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, I.L.D.

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the content and organisation of work in recent decades have resulted in an intensification of work, which is commonly regarded as a cause of stress. This report presents trends in the risks and consequences of work-related stress, and identifies how these can be prevented. The focus

  11. Does Leave Work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heleen van Luijn; Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2004-01-01

    More and more people have to combine work and care responsibilities, and work part-time or use daycare and after-school care facilities to help them do so. The Work and Care Act, which came into force on 1 December 2001, combined all the existing schemes - such as parental and maternity leave -

  12. The Developmental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels; Hvid, Helge

    2001-01-01

    AbstractIn the nineties, the concept of the developmental work (DW) has become a significant point of orientation for the actors on Danish labour market. The DW has moved the focus of the labour market from wages and working time towards work and production. For employees, the DW promises develop...

  13. Live to work or love to work: work craving and work engagement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Wojdylo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: According to the theory of work craving, a workaholic has a craving for self-worth compensatory incentives and an expectation of relief from negative affect experienced through neurotic perfectionism and an obsessive-compulsive style of working. Research has shown that workaholism and work engagement should be considered as two distinct work styles with different health consequences. However, the mechanisms underlying the adoption of these work styles have been neglected. The present study proposes that work craving and work engagement are differentially associated with self-regulatory competencies and health. In particular, we expected that the working styles mediate the relationships between emotional self-regulation and health. METHODS: In the cross-sectional study, 469 teachers from German schools completed online administered questionnaires. By means of structural equation modeling, we tested two indirect paths: a from self-relaxation deficits via work craving to poor health and b from self-motivation competencies via work engagement to good health. RESULTS: As expected, we found evidence that a the negative relationship of self-relaxation deficits on health was partially mediated by work craving and b the positive relationship of self-motivation competencies on health was partially mediated by work engagement. CONCLUSIONS: The present study emphasizes the importance of self-regulation competencies for healthy or unhealthy work styles. Whereas work craving was associated with a low ability to down-regulate negative emotions and poor health, work engagement was associated with a high ability to up-regulate positive emotions and good health.

  14. Meaning in Work Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

        An important aspect of modern work is the meaning that people find in it. Research on this topic has typically asked respondents to name the elements of their work they see as meaningful (e.g., Meaning of Working International Research Team, 1987).     However, a theory of what makes work...... meaningful is still lacking (Harpaz & Fu, 2002), as are definitions of key terms. Here, I define meaning as the experience that something fits into a wider context or coheres within a larger whole.     I conceptualize meaning in work life as deriving from four factors, each of which helps us contribute...

  15. [Rehabilitation and work participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethge, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Work participation is increasingly seen as a primary outcome of rehabilitation measures. Randomised controlled trials from several different countries and the reviews and meta-analyses based on them show that multidisciplinary rehabilitation programmes improve work participation, return-to-work rates, and reduce sickness absence in patients with back pain, depression, and cancer. In Germany, such programmes were implemented as work-related medical rehabilitation. This intervention targets patients with poor work ability and an increased risk of permanent work disability. Randomised controlled trials have confirmed a reduction of sickness absence and increased rates of sustainable work participation in favour of work-related medical rehabilitation as compared to common medical rehabilitation. Dissemination of these programmes and translation of research evidence into practice progresses. An additional important strategy to support returning to work following rehabilitation is graded return to work. There is emerging evidence of sustainable employment effects in favour of graded return to work. A direct involvement of the workplace and a closer cooperation with employers and occupational health physicians may further improve the outcomes of rehabilitation programmes. Strategies that synergistically integrate safety, health promotion and rehabilitation may achieve more favourable outcomes than separated actions.

  16. The Ambiguity of work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to the current debate among organizational and work-life researchers on the double-sided nature of knowledge work, which offers great freedom and satisfaction on the one hand and the potential to be overly demanding and stressful on the other. This contribution involves...... drawing on the results of an ethnographic case study of a consultancy house; more spe- cifically, it comprises an exploration of the narrative identity work of consultants as they perform work practice stories of self, work, and the organization negotiating why the work they do is both challenging...... and rewarding. The type of knowledge work explored is characterized by its immaterial nature in the sense that the primary input is the competences, knowledge, and commitment of the consultants and the output is the joy, success, and satisfaction of candidates, clients, and collaborators. The article...

  17. Working with Musculoskeletal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne-Jones, Gwenllian; Varnava, Alice; Main, Chris J; Phillips, Ceri J

    2009-01-01

    Pain has a significant impact on work in terms of presenteeism, sickness absence, and long-term incapacity for work A bio-psychosocial approach is required in understanding pain-related disability and incapacity for work Long-term absence from work is associated with a number of negative outcomes including; poverty, social exclusion and poorer physical and psychosocial well-being Return to work can improve recovery for people with musculoskeletal complaints and pain Interventions to reduce the impact of pain on work can operate at clinical, worker, workplace, and wider systems levels A broader whole systems approach to pain management needs to be adopted, with a greater focus on work retention as well as rehabilitation PMID:26527353

  18. The Ambiguity of Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to the current debate among organizational and work-life researchers on the double-sided nature of knowledge work, which offers great freedom and satisfaction on the one hand and the potential to be overly demanding and stressful on the other. This contribution involves...... drawing on the results of an ethnographic case study of a consultancy house; more specifically, it comprises an exploration of the narrative identity work of consultants as they perform work practice stories of self, work, and the organization negotiating why the work they do is both challenging...... and rewarding. The type of knowledge work explored is characterized by its immaterial nature in the sense that the primary input is the competences, knowledge, and commitment of the consultants and the output is the joy, success, and satisfaction of candidates, clients, and collaborators. The article...

  19. The Ambiguity of Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria

    2014-01-01

    drawing on the results of an ethnographic case study of a consultancy house; more specifically, it comprises an exploration of the narrative identity work of consultants as they perform work practice stories of self, work, and the organization negotiating why the work they do is both challenging...... source of empirical material in the examination of how we create meaning in relationship to the work we do and the organizations by which we are employed.......This article contributes to the current debate among organizational and work-life researchers on the double-sided nature of knowledge work, which offers great freedom and satisfaction on the one hand and the potential to be overly demanding and stressful on the other. This contribution involves...

  20. The farrier's work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfqvist, Lotta; Pinzke, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The horse industry in Sweden has rapidly expanded in recent years. This increasing number of horses implies a greater need for more farriers. Shoeing a horse is hard physical work, and includes awkward work postures and repetitive movements. It is well known that hard physical work increases the risk of injuries and musculoskeletal problems. The risk is especially high for musculoskeletal disorders when certain movements are constantly repeated. Heavy or repeated unilateral loads lead to considerable stress on the muscles, which can lead to rupture and fatigue that can cause long term problems. A case study showed that farriers worked 75% of their work time with their backs in bent positions (often more than 70 degrees). Farriers are also exposed to risk factors in their physical environment like dust, noise and poor lighting. Risk of kicks and bites, eye injuries and burns are other factors that make their work environment hazardous. There are only a few studies available that have documented the farriers' working environment and these are not of recent date. A US study from 1984 described kicks and bites from horses, metal splinters in the eyes, heat exhaustion and problematic postures to be perceived as the greatest risks in their work. The back, knees and wrists were the most exposed body regions. There is a need for more current and in-depth studies investigating the farriers' working conditions in order to gain more knowledge of their health and work environment. The aim of the present study is to investigate the physical health and work environment of farriers. The investigation will use questionnaires, work load measurements and workplace analysis. The results will serve as a base for improvements concerning the design of the workplace, equipment, tools and aids as well as supplying recommendations about physical exercise and the correct work technique, etc. The results are planned to be incorporated in the education of farriers.

  1. Extractable Work from Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Perarnau-Llobet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Work and quantum correlations are two fundamental resources in thermodynamics and quantum information theory. In this work, we study how to use correlations among quantum systems to optimally store work. We analyze this question for isolated quantum ensembles, where the work can be naturally divided into two contributions: a local contribution from each system and a global contribution originating from correlations among systems. We focus on the latter and consider quantum systems that are locally thermal, thus from which any extractable work can only come from correlations. We compute the maximum extractable work for general entangled states, separable states, and states with fixed entropy. Our results show that while entanglement gives an advantage for small quantum ensembles, this gain vanishes for a large number of systems.

  2. Working around technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupret, Katia

    2017-01-01

    This study discusses how professionalism and work ethics influence how health care professionals work around new technologies. When people avoid using technologies, they are not necessarily ceasing to engage in their work activities. The workaround strategies presented here are rather practical...... expressions of professionals’ active encounter with the complexity of work situations, and can therefore be important signs of professional ethical judgement. Drawing on science and technology studies and the concept of invisible work, the study discusses workaround situations that arise in health care work...... in Denmark. The aim and contribution of the study is twofold. First, it attempts to revitalise the discussion on technology workaround strategies as responsible professionalism. Second, it will direct attention to and contribute to an understanding of how the normativity embedded in technological development...

  3. Unhappy expatriates at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    While some expatriates could feel deeply unhappy trying to deal with the challenges of living and working abroad, few rigorous academic studies have presented evidence of the association between unhappiness among expatriates and their work outcomes. That is surprising since unhappiness could well...... have a substantial effect on performing certain work tasks which is the reason for the foreign assignment. Based on the survey responses of 428 expatriate academics, results of this exploratory study show that unhappiness conceptualised as Subjective Ill-Being (SIB) had a strong negative association...... with work adjustment, work performance, work effectiveness, and job satisfaction as well as a strong positive relationship with time to proficiency. These results are discussed in detail and their implications are drawn....

  4. Organizing Independent Student Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhadyra T. Zhumasheva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses issues in organizing independent student work. The author defines the term “independence”, discusses the concepts of independent learner work and independent learner work under the guidance of an instructor, proposes a classification of assignments to be done independently, and provides methodological recommendations as to the organization of independent student work. The article discusses the need for turning the student from a passive consumer of knowledge into an active creator of it, capable of formulating a problem, analyzing the ways of solving it, coming up with an optimum outcome, and proving its correctness. The preparation of highly qualified human resources is the primary condition for boosting Kazakhstan’s competitiveness. Independent student work is a means of fostering the professional competence of future specialists. The primary form of self-education is independent work.

  5. Back pain - returning to work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonspecific back pain - work; Backache - work; Lumbar pain - work; Pain - back - chronic; Low back pain - work; Lumbago - work ... strong. If walking is too hard for you, work with a physical therapist to develop an exercise ...

  6. Predicting sustainable work behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Sundtoft Hald, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable work behavior is an important issue for operations managers – it has implications for most outcomes of OM. This research explores the antecedents of sustainable work behavior. It revisits and extends the sociotechnical model developed by Brown et al. (2000) on predicting safe behavior. Employee characteristics and general attitudes towards safety and work condition are included in the extended model. A survey was handed out to 654 employees in Chinese factories. This research ...

  7. Analysis of Undesignated Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    jobs . So, while they may be cost-effective in producing more months of total work, there may be significant requirements for undesignated work that...able to forecast undesignated work requirements through 2025. We took into account variances in 3 data for Navy platforms contained in the...accessions, and the constant 45 report on board churn that doubles and triples the on-the- job -training (OJT) requirements for ship’s crew

  8. [The chronobiology of work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellotti, E

    1982-06-16

    The arrival of the industrial age and the availability of artificial light, which lengthens the working day and makes night work possible, have created the problem of man's changing biological functions and rhythms. After a brief note on experimental chronobiology (which permits regulated manipulation of experimental environmental conditions and the study of responses), chronopathology is defined and its implications for man are considered. At present there is no legislation regulating shift work, but it is hoped that the law will take chronobiological methods into account. In this context the basic aspects of shift work are discussed and the two main types - semi-continuous and continuous - are analysed. Firms' experience of shift work is compared with reports in the literature. Present hygiene and environmental conditions, ergonomics and automation combine to make work less and less physically demanding and increase adaptability to shift work. It is therefore hoped that research chronobiology, psychology and psychosociology will provide increasingly precise information about ways of using shift work in the hope of constructing an ecology of the working man.

  9. KAROSHI (WORK TO DEATH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Toriqul Chaer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available When the tide of unemployment hit the USA and Europe, in Japan the opposite phenomenon occurs. In 2002, in Japan deaths were recorded because of excessive works. In this country, the phenomenon of death because of excessive works is called Karoshi. Karoshi is common in Japan.  It becomes deadly syndrome as a consequence of long hours works. The debate about deaths from excessive work already sticking out in Japan since the 70s. The first official case of Karoshi was reported in 1969 when a 29-year-old male worker died because of stroke. It is estimated over ten thousand workers died each year due to death by brain and stroke caused by an overload work. Karoshi often happen to male workers dominantly. The main cause of karoshi is stress due to high pressure in the work environment, and work habits of exceeding a  standard of normal working time (8 hours. In addition, their extra time to work is imbalance with and the salary they earn. In its development, the phenomenon of karoshi contributes to the term salaryman and workaholic.

  10. Working with RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Working with RNA is not a special discipline in molecular biology. However, RNA is chemically and structurally different from DNA and a few simple work rules have to be implemented to maintain the integrity of the RNA. Alkaline pH, high temperatures, and heavy metal ions should be avoided when...... possible and ribonucleases kept in check. The chapter outlines the specific precautions recommended for work with RNA and describes some of the modifications to standard protocols in molecular biology that are relevant to RNA work. The methods are applicable to all types of RNA and require a minimum...

  11. Working or shirking?

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Bloom; James Liang; John Roberts; Zhichun Jenny Ying

    2012-01-01

    Over 10% of US employees now regularly work from home (WFH), but there is widespread skepticism over its impact highlighted by phrases like "shirking from home". We report the results of a WFH experiment at Ctrip, a 13,000 employee NASDAQ listed Chinese multinational. Call center employees who volunteered to WFH were randomly assigned to work from home or in the office for 9 months. Work from home led to a 13% performance increase, of which about 9.5% is from working more minutes per shift (f...

  12. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume....... The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability...

  13. Work and Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Amartya

    2000-01-01

    Examines four conceptual features of decent work essential to its achievement in a context of globalization: (1) an inclusive approach, (2) rights-based thinking, (3) placing work within a broad economic, political, and social context, and (4) extension of thinking from international to truly global. Contains 17 references. (JOW)

  14. Successful aging at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    The expression successful aging at work and related terms such as active, healthy, and productive aging at work are frequently used by organizational researchers and practitioners. However, there are no concrete definitions or theoretical frameworks that explain their meaning, assumptions, and

  15. Work Values across Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Leuty, Melanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Mainstream publication discussions of differences in generational cohorts in the workplace suggest that individuals of more recent generations, such as Generation X and Y, have different work values than do individuals of the Silent and Baby Boom generations. Although extant research suggests that age may influence work values, few of the…

  16. Work injuries and disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tüchsen, Finn; Christensen, Karl Bang; Feveile, Helene

    2009-01-01

    PROBLEM: This study estimated the hazard ratio for disability pension retirement (DPR) for persons who have experienced a work injury causing absence lasting at least one day after the accidental injury occurred and to estimate the fraction of DPR attributable to work injuries. METHODS: A total...

  17. How Does Fluoride Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading How Does Fluoride Work? Is ... There's fluoride in your toothpaste and even in your water. But how does it work to keep teeth ...

  18. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability...

  19. Working environment committees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheller, Vibeke Kristine; Hansen, Agnete Meldgaard; Nielsen, Klaus T.

    In Denmark, a new Working Environment Act was passed in 2010. The assumptions behind the act are that increased flexibility in the organization of OHS work will: 1) enable a more systematic approach, 2) elevate OHS issues to a strategic level within the company, and 3) integrate these concerns...

  20. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume...

  1. COMMUNICATION OF WORK METHODS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KONZ, STEPHAN A.; AND OTHERS

    THE ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION FOR WORK TRAINING UNDER CONTROLLED CONDITIONS WERE INVESTIGATED. "WORK TRAINING" REQUIRED THE MEMORIZATION OF PROCEDURES DURING THE TRAINING PERIOD. ONE EXPERIMENT UTILIZED 20 UNSKILLED FEMALES WHO COMPLETED A LAYERED ASSEMBLY BY REFERRING TO A TYPED LIST OR SLIDES OF THE ASSEMBLY WHICH WERE…

  2. European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2003-01-01

    The theme adressed by this paper is the opportunities for European Works Councils (EWCs) of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies.......The theme adressed by this paper is the opportunities for European Works Councils (EWCs) of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies....

  3. European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2004-01-01

    The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies.......The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies....

  4. Mothers, work and childcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingrid Ooms; Evelien Eggink; Edwin van Gameren

    2007-01-01

    Original title: Moeders, werk en kinderopvang in model. The government wants women to go out to work more. The choices made by women between working and looking after children are accordingly receiving a great deal of attention. This report describes which factors influence these choices by

  5. Back to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The economic downturn hit working America particularly hard, as agricultural, automotive, manufacturing, and retail jobs in many corners of the country all but evaporated. Consumers continue to cut back, and jobless rates in many states have eclipsed levels not seen in decades. Out of work and under pressure, many Americans are turning to the…

  6. Social Work and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Interest has grown in the past few years about the place of social work in science. Questions remain, such as whether social work should be considered a science, and if so, where it fits into the constellation of sciences. This article attempts to shed light on these questions. After briefly considering past and present constructions of science…

  7. Group Work. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  8. Work based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Entry submitted for publication in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Action Research. Provides a full definition of Work based learning, including origins, historical context, significant characteristics, the relationship between work based learning and action research and their shared foundations, and future prospects.

  9. Drafting Work Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's interest in and to screen interested students into a training program in basic mechanical drawing. (The course is based on the entry level of an assistant drafter.) Section 1 describes the assessment, correlates the work performed and worker traits required for…

  10. COLD-WORKED HARDWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Strizhak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The different types of cold-worked accessory are examined in the article. The necessity of development of such type of accessory in the Republic of Belarus due to requirements of market is shown. High emphasis is placed on the methods of increase of plasticity of cold-worked accessory from usual mill of RUP and CIS countries.

  11. Too old to work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Erik Solem

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews Norwegian and international research on aging and work; causes of early exit,attitudes towards older workers, aging and work performance, and trends of changes in working life.Workers seem to have become too old to work at increasingly younger ages. Recent and futuredemographic changes call for initiatives to keep older workers in the work force. In many countriesfavourable early retirement arrangements are reversed in order to stop pulling older workers prematurelyout of work. The other main group of factors causing early exit, the push factors in the work environment,have until recently attracted less attention. Even if older workers in general seem to be no less effectivethan younger workers, employers prefer to recruit younger workers, and to dismiss older workers whenreducing the staff. However, employers’ cognitions of older workes’ performance is quite nuanced. Thereseems to be an emotional ambivalence where negative feelings are less openly expressed, still they seemto have a strong influence on decisions. Ways of influencing attitudes towards older workers arediscussed. Companies creating working conditions to stimulate, include and motivate middle-aged andolder workers may get an advantage in the market. This may even benefit workers of all ages.

  12. How Lungs Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Quit Help Someone Quit Join Freedom From Smoking GET INVOLVED Events Become An Advocate Volunteer Ways To Give www.lung.org > Lung Health and Diseases > How Lungs Work How Lungs Work The Respiratory System Your lungs are part of the respiratory system, ...

  13. Work zone safety analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  14. Negotiating work identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamsen Saayman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The study explored the dynamics of work identity negotiation and construction.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate identity tensions and demands that mobilise identity work in the work environment.Motivation for the study: The study hoped to improve the understanding of the dynamics of identity construction and negotiation.Research design, approach and method: Using grounded theory methodology in the context of qualitative field research, the researchers conducted two unstructured interviews with 28 employees of a South African manufacturing company.Main findings: The five primary dimensions the data yielded were personal identity, individual agency, social identity, social practice and job.Practical/managerial implications: This study has implications for organisations that want to improve productivity through understanding work identity.Contribution/value-add: The article presents a conceptual model of the demands and tensions that influence work identity.

  15. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability......This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  16. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume. ......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications........ The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability...

  17. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume....... The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  18. [Lifestyle interventions at work?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Carel T J

    2013-01-01

    So far many worksite lifestyle or health promotion programmes have shown only moderate evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. However, participation in work is in itself an important determinant of health. For this reason ensuring of fitting work and sustained workability should be an aspect of health policy. Workers' health is not only determined by their working environment but also by health practices and lifestyle factors. Under certain preconditions (e.g. on a voluntary basis, confidentiality, integration with health protection) lifestyle interventions during work time can contribute to a healthier working population. As such programmes may result in financial and social benefits for employers, they should be partly responsible for paying the costs. From a societal perspective, governmental commitment to a preventive policy and the involvement of health and income insurance companies are also required.

  19. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    stories. We argue that meaning by story making is not always created by coherence and causality; meaning is created by different types of fragmentation: discontinuities, tensions and editing. The objective of this article is to develop and advance antenarrative practice analysis of work stories......Following a strand of narrative studies pointing to the living conditions of storytelling and the micro-level implications of working within fragmented narrative perspectives, this article contributes to narrative research on work stories by focusing on how meaning is created from fragmented...... by exploring how different types of fragmentation create meanings. This is done by studying the work stories of job and personnel consultants and by drawing on the results of a narrative, ethnographic study of a consultancy. The analysis demonstrates how work stories are social practices negotiated, retold...

  20. Working in virtual knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonijević, Smiljana; Dormans, Stefan; Wyatt, Sally

    2012-01-01

    of routine, often rather lonely activity contrasts sharply with the much more exciting one of teams of scientists working together in a laboratory, collecting samples, analyzing data and sharing ideas. But the reality of scholarly work in the humanities and social sciences has always been otherwise. Scholars...... possibilities for augmenting or disrupting such collaborative work, by shifting the boundaries between visible and invisible tasks, influencing the division of labor within teams, as well as by bringing to light various affective underpinnings of scholarly practice. In this chapter, we focus on such affective......Scholarly work, especially in the humanities and social sciences, is often seen as solitary. The lone, creative individual, reading and writing while sitting on a chair and gazing out a window, is a powerful image even as it draws attention to the very unglamorous nature of such work. This image...

  1. Hospital nurses' work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge surrounding nurses' work motivation is currently insufficient, and previous studies have rarely taken into account the role of many influential background factors. This study investigates the motivation of Estonian nurses in hospitals, and how individual and organisational background factors influence their motivation to work. The study is quantitative and cross-sectional. An electronically self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection. The sample comprised of 201 Registered Nurses working in various hospital settings in Estonia. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test, Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test and Spearman's correlation. Both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were noted among hospital nurses. Nurses were moderately externally motivated (M = 3.63, SD = 0.89) and intrinsically strongly motivated (M = 4.98, SD = 1.03). A nurses' age and the duration of service were positively correlated with one particular area of extrinsic work motivation, namely introjected regulation (p extrinsic motivation (p = 0.016) and intrinsic work motivation (p = 0.004). The findings expand current knowledge of nurses' work motivation by describing the amount and orientation of work motivation among hospital nurses and highlighting background factors which should be taken into account in order to sustain and increase their intrinsic work motivation. The instrument used in the study can be an effective tool for nurse managers to determine a nurse's reasons to work and to choose a proper motivational strategy. Further research and testing of the instrument in different countries and in different contexts of nursing is however required. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Making motherhood work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Thomson

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Motherhood can be a critical moment in the making of gendered biographies, and in the negotiation of a gendered division of labour within a household. This paper draws on the 'Making of Modern Motherhoods' study, which combined interviews with a diverse group of expectant first time mothers and family case studies in order to build an intergenerational and longitudinal perspective on contemporary mothering situations within the UK. In this paper, the category 'work' is used as a lens through which to encounter new motherhood. After contextualising working motherhood in relation to a sociological literature the paper draws on interviews undertaken with women towards the end of their pregnancy with their first child to reveal something of the emergent collision of working and maternal identities, women's experiences of being pregnant at work including the anticipation and managing of maternity leave. The second part presents a case study, which animates the personal drama involved in reconciling working and maternal commitments, tracing how a woman's feelings about work change over time in negotiation with partner, family and the market. As Sue Sharpe observed in her 1984 book on working mothers, 'full-time mothering has never been accessible to all women in the same way at the same time' (1984: 22. Social class, locality and migration shape a range of cultures of mothering within which work features very differently. Divisions exist between women who share a generational location as well as between women of different generations. This complexity is revealed through a juxtaposition of the voices of mothers and grandmothers, which show how work may both, divide and unite women in the project of motherhood.

  3. Work environment quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman; Busck, Ole Gunni; Lind, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The article explores how employee participation influences the quality of the work environment and workers’ well-being at 11 Danish workplaces from within six different industries. Both direct participation and representative forms of participation at the workplace level were studied. Statistical...... as well as qualitative comparative analyses reveal that work environment quality and high levels of participation go hand in hand. Within a typology of participation models the highest level of participation, including strong elements of collective participation, and also the best work environment...

  4. Ethnography at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    that of a rival firm. "Ethnography at Work" follows the experiences of the author as a participant observer in the day-to-day running of a Japanese advertising agency. The book reveals the intricate behind-the-scenes planning, discussion, negotiations and strategies needed to ensure that the agency's presentation...... their understanding of their companies' organizational structures, strategies and daily work practices. Asking crucial questions about the role of the anthropologist in the field, "Ethnography at Work" introduces students to ways in which anthropologists study social systems in business....

  5. Learned helplessness at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerlöf, L

    1988-01-01

    The development of theory and research on learned helplessness is reviewed and criticized on some points, e.g., for its reliance on artificial laboratory experiments. Some empirical findings are presented, indicating a connection between certain work characteristics and learned helplessness. Other research traditions have emphasized the importance of job qualifications, freedom of action, and development possibilities for well-being and health. There is, however, hardly and research on learned helplessness at work. Learned helplessness hypotheses should be tested on data from real life; if applied to work environment research, the theory of learned helplessness could generate important results.

  6. Apparel at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerck, Mari

    project called Uni-Form funded by the Research Council of Norway. The dissertation presents findings from ethnographic fieldwork in six male-dominated occupations; construction, skilled manual work, industrial production, off- and onshore gas and oil production, industrial fishing and the Navy. It also...... analyses the project Uni-Form’s product development process and seeks to show how work research can benefit from employing more materiality-based studies. Work clothes and uniforms for women in male-dominated occupations have come in the form of men’s clothes or feminized copies of men's clothes where form......This dissertation is concerned with work uniforms for women in male-dominated manual occupations. As such, it has analysed parts of the gender-segregated labour market in light of material conditions that dress workers every day. This has been done on the background of a research and development...

  7. Work Practice Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Jens Kaaber; Simonsen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    investigation of how groupware is employed to support new ways of working in a large European financial organisation are analysed to illustrate situations with high and low integration of groupware. The framework of work practice characteristics is discussed in the light of these findings and implications......Integrating groupware in work practices poses a range of interrelated problems comprising organisational and technological issues. These are complex issues, since they derive from the combined influence of a range of heterogeneous elements and emergent phenomena in the intersection of groupware...... supported cooperative work (CSCW) the paper argues that the interrelations of heterogeneous elements and emergent phenomena arising from the integration of groupware in practice should be made visible from a perspective encompassing both the social and the technical. Two cases from an empirical...

  8. Audit of public work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valtencir Godinho de Camargo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The municipal public works, especially the reform and small constructions, with mobilization of manpower with up to 20 employees, where it is not mandatory elaboration of Program Conditions and Work Environment in the Construction Industry, are conducted without meeting the regulatory norm, which are motivated by the deficiency in the elaboration of the budget, the bidding documents, in the contract and supervision. The unfamiliarity specialized in the area of the Engineering of Safety of the Work adds to the factors that lead the public agency take unnecessary risks, as the objective responsibility, the labor charges and indemnities for illnesses, accidents or deaths. This article aims to indicate the guidelines for the program to health and safety is applied effectively in public works.

  9. Social Work Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Social work research has gathered a greater transparency and clarity of identity in North American and parts of Europe. Furthermore, the rapid emergence of social work research in other European countries, China, India, Japan and elsewhere in Asia and Pacific Rim countries, and gradually in South...... America, has created a need for a collection that can contribute to both shaping and making accessible key and sometimes hard-to-access sources. This four-volume collection answers this need, bringing together key literature in a single resource and structuring it into thematic volumes to enable clear...... understanding of the different aspects involved in the research. Volume One: Historical Trajectories, Purposes and Key Concepts Volume Two: Key Decisions about Research Strategy Volume Three: The Practice of Social Work Research Volume Four: The Contexts of Social Work Research...

  10. Work finishes on CNGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Construction work on the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) project is completed. These views are of the l km long CNGS vacuum tube, where particles decay to produce neutrinos, just before it is sealed.

  11. Play at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier Sørensen, Bent; Spoelstra, Sverre

    2012-01-01

    The interest in organizational play is growing, both in popular business discourse and organization studies. As the presumption that play is dysfunctional for organizations is increasingly discarded, the existing positions may be divided into two camps; one proposes ‘serious play’ as an engine...... for business and the other insists that work and play are largely indistinguishable in the postindustrial organization. Our field study of a design and communications company in Denmark shows that organizational play can be much more than just functional to the organization. We identify three ways in which...... workplaces engage in play: play as a (serious) continuation of work, play as a (critical) intervention into work and play as an (uninvited) usurpation of work....

  12. Coordinating Work with Groupware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Jens Kaaber; Simonsen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    One important goal of employing groupware is to make possible complex collaboration between geographically distributed groups. This requires a dual transformation of both technology and work practice. The challenge is to re­duce the complexity of the coordination work by successfully inte......­grating the protocol stipulating the collaboration and the ar­te­fact, in form of the groupware application, mediating the col­laboration. This paper analyses a generic groupware application that was deployed in a large financial organisation in order to support working groups distributed throughout four countries....... Using the CSCW frame­work of coordination mechanisms, we have elicited six general factors influencing the integration of the groupware application in two situations....

  13. Ticket To Work

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Captures information on disability beneficiaries that are participating in one of the "the return to work initiative"; to help become self sufficient, and to limit...

  14. HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS AND WORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by elimination or redesign of processes and use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age, and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  15. Patterns of Work Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebden, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The paper examines ways in which the concept of work identification may provide a useful means of delineating the boundaries of occupational groups. Two kinds of identification are discussed: identification with employing organizations and identification with occupation.

  16. Refugees’ rights to work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily E Arnold-Fernández

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Host economies benefit when refugees work. Nations seeking economic growth and political stability should allow refugees to access employment and to enjoy employment-related rights.

  17. Pregnancy and work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000609.htm Pregnancy and work To use the sharing features on this page, ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  18. Work and Inertial Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Richard

    2017-12-01

    A fairly recent paper resolves a large discrepancy in the internal energy utilized to fire a cannon as calculated by two inertial observers. Earth and its small reaction velocity must be considered in the system so that the change in kinetic energy is calculated correctly. This paper uses a car in a similar scenario, but considers the work done by forces acting over distances. An analysis of the system must include all energy interactions, including the work done on the car and especially the (negative) work done on Earth in a moving reference frame. This shows the importance of considering the force on Earth and the distance Earth travels. For calculation of work in inertial reference frames, the center of mass perspective is shown to be useful. We also consider the energy requirements to efficiently accelerate a mass among interacting masses.

  19. Aeromobility and work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Claus

    2006-01-01

    . The boundary between work and tourism is not distinct and there is a very complex connection between travel, work, tourism, and play. He shows that actually, there is a strong ‘material' impact from supposedly ‘immaterial' organisations and this ‘materiality' is particularly linked to the extension of forms......In this paper, the hypothesis is that there is a connection between international aeromobility, knowledge organisations, and environmental impacts. The object is therefore to examine the driving forces, mechanisms, and patterns of meaning behind the increase in international long-distance work...... mobility. The author will draw on a case study which involves two Danish examples of ‘knowledge organisations'. He argues that it is necessary to rethink central concepts of travel, tourism, and working life, in order to understand and describe this kind of international mobility in these organisations...

  20. Sustainable Commuting @Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Castellani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Local governments are seeking effective ways to promote sustainable commuting for reducing energy consumption and improving commuters’ experience. They often use so-called “Workplace Travel Plans” as policy interventions to engage work organizations as active players, promoting sustainable commuting amongst their employees. However, it remains difficult to systematically engage work organizations and commuters in such efforts for a number of reasons, ranging from preferences to constraints that they have to deal with. We aim at providing commuters, work organizations, and public administrators with tools that facilitate this engagement. In this paper, we discuss the requirements for the design of technology supporting corresponding services for commuters and work organizations and we shortly illustrate the infrastructure that we are developing to provide such services.

  1. RadWorks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For the first two years of the project (FY12-13), the RadWorks project has consisted of two top-level elements. The first element involved the prototype and...

  2. Evolution of working memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter Carruthers

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is fundamental to many aspects of human life, including learning, speech and text comprehension, prospection and future planning, and explicit "system 2" forms of reasoning, as well as overlapping...

  3. How the Body Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight for Me? What Is an Intellectual Disability? Movie: Endocrine System How the Body Works Main ... consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  4. Work and Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willig, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    individual and collective identity formation and has led to an increase in social pathological illnesses such as stress and depression. By juxtaposing these analyses with Honneth’s theory on recognition, we conclude that the contemporary logic of work is unable to provide adequate forms of recognition......The article deals with the relationship between work and recognition, taking Axel Honneth’s social-philosophical theory of the struggle for recognition as its point of departure. In order to give sociological substance to Honneth’s theory, we turn to three contemporary social theorists - Jean......-Pierre Le Goff, Christophe Dejours and Emmanuel Renault. In spite of many differences, their work is united by a critical description of the logic of work and its consequences for individual individuation. These theorists agree that the growth of autonomy, flexibility and mobility has destabilised...

  5. Analysis of Undesignated Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    CNP Chief of Naval Personnel CNSF Commander, Naval Surface Forces (COMNAVSURFOR) CREO Career Reenlistment Objective CS Culinary Specialist EC...section, we define undesignated work and review the history of the demand for undesignated work over time. Since the standup of the All-Volunteer Force...Further, when transitioning BA from ratings to PACT, they overestimated sailors’ propensity for the Culinary Specialist (CS) and Mineman (MN

  6. Multicultural group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds.......Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds....

  7. Work related shoulder disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mathiassen, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To determine quantitative exposure-response relations between work with highly elevated arms and supraspinatus tendinitis, shoulder pain with disability, and shoulder pain without disability. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in a historical cohort of 1886 males from three occu...... between current work with highly elevated arms and clinically verified shoulder disorders. Substantial long term cumulative effects were not shown. A potential for primary prevention was revealed....

  8. Work at Building 513

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2006-01-01

    As part of IT's preparations to meet the challenge of LHC computing, a new chilled water production unit is being constructed for the Computer Centre. The air conditioning work will start in mid-January and last until June 2006. During this period access to the car park of Building 513 will be restricted. Please consult the plan for details of the area affected by the work. With apologies for the inconvenience, IT Department

  9. Quality of work life

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal, Anshul

    2014-01-01

    Although studies on the Quality of work Life (QWL) have been conducted since the early 20th century, there is no consensus about the real meaning of this term. Over the last years, QWL has been understood as the dynamic and comprehensive management of physical, technological, social and psychological factors that affect culture and renew the organizational environment. Quality of work life (QWL) and employee job satisfaction are increasingly being identified as progressive indicators related ...

  10. Existential Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald F. Krill

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The existential impact upon social work began in the 1960’s with the emphasis upon freedom, responsibility and a sense of the absurd. It affirmed human potential while faulting the deterministic thinking that was popular with psychological theorists at that time. It was open to the prospects of spirituality, but was less than optimistic concerning great progress among social institutions. It was a forerunner to the strengths-based social work programs of our present day.

  11. Language Works. Linguistic Journal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Anna Sofie; Nørreby, Thomas Rørbeck; Skovse, Astrid Ravn

    2016-01-01

    Language works! – and with this initiative and this journal we want to give the opportunity to many more students to present their linguistic research to each other, to the scientific community and to all interested.......Language works! – and with this initiative and this journal we want to give the opportunity to many more students to present their linguistic research to each other, to the scientific community and to all interested....

  12. Work at Building 513

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2006-01-01

    As part of IT's preparations to meet the challenge of LHC computing, a new chilled water production unit is being constructed for the Computer Centre. The air conditioning work will start in mid-January and last until June 2006. During this period, access to the car park of Building 513 will be restricted. Please consult the plan for details of the area affected by the work. With apologies for the inconvenience. IT Department

  13. Insomnia in shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Annie; Azaiez, Aïda; Moreau, Vincent; LeBlanc, Mélanie; Morin, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    Shift work disorder involves insomnia and/or excessive sleepiness associated with the work schedule. The present study examined the impact of insomnia on the perceived physical and psychological health of adults working on night and rotating shift schedules compared to day workers. A total of 418 adults (51% women, mean age 41.4 years), including 51 night workers, 158 rotating shift workers, and 209 day workers were selected from an epidemiological study. An algorithm was used to classify each participant of the two groups (working night or rotating shifts) according to the presence or absence of insomnia symptoms. Each of these individuals was paired with a day worker according to gender, age, and income. Participants completed several questionnaires measuring sleep, health, and psychological variables. Night and rotating shift workers with insomnia presented a sleep profile similar to that of day workers with insomnia. Sleep time was more strongly related to insomnia than to shift work per se. Participants with insomnia in the three groups complained of anxiety, depression, and fatigue, and reported consuming equal amounts of sleep-aid medication. Insomnia also contributed to chronic pain and otorhinolaryngology problems, especially among rotating shift workers. Work productivity and absenteeism were more strongly related to insomnia. The present study highlights insomnia as an important component of the sleep difficulties experienced by shift workers. Insomnia may exacerbate certain physical and mental health problems of shift workers, and impair their quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Measuring return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiak, Radoslaw; Young, Amanda E; Roessler, Richard T; McPherson, Kathryn M; van Poppel, Mireille N M; Anema, Johannes R

    2007-12-01

    It is argued that one of the factors limiting the understanding of return to work (RTW) following work disability is the use of measurement tools that do not capture a complete picture of workers' RTW experiences. To facilitate the investigation of RTW, the current authors proposed a developmental conceptualization of RTW, which argues for an expanded awareness that encompasses four phases: off work, work reintegration, work maintenance and advancement. This paper reports on work undertaken with the aim of operationalizing the conceptualization. A review of the RTW and related literature, with databases searched including PubMed, EconLit, and PsycInfo. We began by extracting details of RTW instruments used by previous researchers. We then interpreted these within the context of the phases of RTW. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) to inform our thinking and coding structure, we conceptualized phase-based RTW outcomes and categorized them as 'tasks and actions', 'contextual' or 'process driven'. Iteratively, we reviewed existing instruments for their use as measures of RTW. Where gaps in instrumentation were found, the wider vocational and career assessment literature was searched for instruments that could be adapted for use in RTW research. Results indicate that, although numerous research instruments have been used to assess RTW, within the scientific literature some important dimensions of RTW lack instrumentation. In particular, we found that outcomes such as goal setting, motivation, expectation, job seeking, work maintenance, and career advancement require operationalization. Amongst the outcomes had been operationalized, we found considerable variation in conceptual development and application. The lack of consistency and comprehensiveness of RTW measurement is one of the factors compromising the advancement of the field of RTW research. It is suggested that a more complete and psychometrically sound array of

  15. Bike 2 Work

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Are you a CERN cyclist? If so, join the Bike 2 Work competition that has just started! The more kilometres you travel by bike, the closer you’ll get to winning…   Yngve Inntjore Levinsen works at CERN, in the BE Department, and is one of the many people who travel to work by bike. Convinced by the benefits and the well-being that this mode of transport brings, he decided to promote it by running a competition. “Everyone working at CERN can participate,” says Yngve. “They just need to sign up on the competition website, or via their Facebook login. Then, participants simply have to report regularly the number of kilometres they cover by bike, travelling between home and work, or during the day between different points at CERN. ” The competition began on 1 March and will last all year long. The 2012 results will be announced at the end of the year. Of course, the winner will be the cyclist who has travelled the most kilometres during the ...

  16. ALARA and work management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, C. [Centre d`etude sur l`Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Perin, M. [Environmental Radiation Protection and Security Dept., Saint-Denis (France); Saumon, P. [Framatome, Lyon (France)

    1995-03-01

    At the request of Electricite de France (EDF) and Framatome, the Nuclear Protection Evaluation Centre (CEPN) developed a three-year research project, between 1991 and 1993, to evaluate the impact of various work management factors that can influence occupational exposures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and to assess the effectiveness of protective actions implemented to reduce them. Three different categories of factors have been delineated: those linked to working conditions (such as ergonomic of work areas and protective suits), those characterizing the operators (qualification, experience level, motivation, etc.). In order to quantify the impact of these factors, a detailed survey was carried out in five French NPPs, focusing on three types of operations: primary valves maintenance, decontamination of reactor cavity, and specialized maintenance operations on the steam generator. This survey was augmented by a literature review on the influence of {open_quotes}hostile{close_quotes} environment on working conditions. Finally, a specific study was performed in order to quantify the impact of various types of protective suits used in French nuclear installations according to the type of work to be done. All of these factors have been included in a model aiming at quantifying the effectiveness of protection actions, both from dosimetric and economic point of views.

  17. Working Memory and Neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    YuLeung To, Eric; Abbott, Kathy; Foster, Dale S; Helmer, D'Arcy

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in working memory are typically associated with impairments in other cognitive faculties such as attentional processes and short-term memory. This paper briefly introduces neurofeedback as a treatment modality in general, and, more specifically, we review several of the current modalities successfully used in neurofeedback (NF) for the treatment of working memory deficits. Two case studies are presented to illustrate how neurofeedback is applied in treatment. The development of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) and its application in neurofeedback now makes it possible to specifically target deep cortical/subcortical brain structures. Developments in neuroscience concerning neural networks, combined with highly specific yet practical NF technologies, makes neurofeedback of particular interest to neuropsychological practice, including the emergence of specific methodologies for treating very difficult working memory (WM) problems.

  18. Ethnography at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    to a potential client will be preferred over that of a rival firm. The book shows how detailed ethnography can lead to an understanding of numerous different, but interlocking, theoretical issues. It demonstrates how ethnography can travel beyond the academic realm and be used by business personnel to heighten...... their understanding of their companies' organizational structures, strategies and daily work practices. Asking crucial questions about the role of the anthropologist in the field, "Ethnography at Work" introduces students to ways in which anthropologists study social systems in business....... that of a rival firm. "Ethnography at Work" follows the experiences of the author as a participant observer in the day-to-day running of a Japanese advertising agency. The book reveals the intricate behind-the-scenes planning, discussion, negotiations and strategies needed to ensure that the agency's presentation...

  19. Reconfigurable assembly work station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yhu-Tin; Abell, Jeffrey A.; Spicer, John Patrick

    2017-11-14

    A reconfigurable autonomous workstation includes a multi-faced superstructure including a horizontally-arranged frame section supported on a plurality of posts. The posts form a plurality of vertical faces arranged between adjacent pairs of the posts, the faces including first and second faces and a power distribution and position reference face. A controllable robotic arm suspends from the rectangular frame section, and a work table fixedly couples to the power distribution and position reference face. A plurality of conveyor tables are fixedly coupled to the work table including a first conveyor table through the first face and a second conveyor table through the second face. A vision system monitors the work table and each of the conveyor tables. A programmable controller monitors signal inputs from the vision system to identify and determine orientation of the component on the first conveyor table and control the robotic arm to execute an assembly task.

  20. Connecting work and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the interplay between learning in school and learning in the workplace - and its problems. Historically, education and work have become separated and each developed its own rationale – a school rationale and a production rationale, both of which may form...... the foundation for interplay. Concurrently with this, the learners apply a subjective rationale based on their personal expectations and interests in education and work in the course of their lives. Using the three players, school, work place and employee as a starting point, three different rationales upon...... which to base interplay can be deduced. Since viable interplay may not be established based on one rationale alone, we need an institutional framework to mediate between them. This article proposes that a modernized version of the Dual System of vocational education may be best to provide...

  1. Distributed Project Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Kirkegaard, B.; Knudsen, Morten

    1998-01-01

    for information exchange in the traditional project environment is performed. A group of teachers and a student group using small project examples test the method. The first test group used a prototype for testing and found the new activity synchronization difficult to adapt, so the method was finally adjusted...... to be very precises and with success used on the second test group. Distributed project work is coming pretty soon and with little improvement in server tools, projects in different topics with a large and inhomogeneous profile of users are realistic.......Project work has been used for many years at Aalborg University to improve learning of theory and methods given in courses. In a closed environment where the students are forming a group in a single room, the interaction behaviour is more or less given from the natural life. Group work...

  2. Work environment factors and work sustainability in Norwegian cooks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Svedahl, Sindre Rabben; Svendsen, Kristin; Romundstad, Pål R; Qvenild, Torgunn; Strømholm, Tonje; Aas, Oddfrid; Hilt, Bjørn

    .... We aimed to elucidate work environment and work sustainability in Norwegian cooks. A questionnaire inquiring about working conditions and work participation was sent to 2082 cooks who had qualified from 1988 onwards...

  3. Organizing design work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of the kind of understanding of organizing that is implied by design theories for project managers' understanding and organizing of design work. Five theories and their organizing consequences for project managers organizing of design work...... are analyzed. The paper contributes to design research and organization studies by putting the organizing of design projects on the research agenda. It also contributes by demonstrating the importance of being aware of the ontological and epistemological assumptions and organizing consequences of different...

  4. Work breakdown structure guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-06

    Utilization of the work breakdown structure (WBS) technique is an effective aid in managing Department of Energy (DOE) programs and projects. The technique provides a framework for project management by focusing on the products that are being developed or constructed to solve technical problems. It assists both DOE and contractors in fulfilling their management responsibilities. This document provides guidance for use of the WBS technique for product oriented work identification and definition. It is one in a series of policy and guidance documents supporting DOE's project manaagement system.

  5. Distributed Project Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Kirkegaard, B.; Knudsen, Morten

    1998-01-01

    for information exchange in the traditional project environment is performed. A group of teachers and a student group using small project examples test the method. The first test group used a prototype for testing and found the new activity synchronization difficult to adapt, so the method was finally adjusted......Project work has been used for many years at Aalborg University to improve learning of theory and methods given in courses. In a closed environment where the students are forming a group in a single room, the interaction behaviour is more or less given from the natural life. Group work...

  6. Motorway maintenance work

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Built 20 years ago, the airport section of the Geneva motorway bypass is now in need of maintenance work and alterations to bring it into line with the new standards. Two-lane traffic will be maintained in both directions during the work, which will be carried out in 2006 and 2007, but there will be various temporary special traffic arrangements in force. We should like to thank you in advance for your understanding. Civil Engineering Department, DAEL, State of Geneva More information: tel. 163 or www.autoroute-aeroport.ch Fewer cars, fewer traffic jams, with www.covoiturage.ch

  7. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, Frederica; Campos, Pedro; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID frame-work, and a sample of 54 papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009-2014. We group the papers into six topical groups, and then at....... Furthermore, much focus has been on studying design sketching or implemented systems-in-use, while little attention has been paid to mature design (prototypes) or early implementation (content templates). In conclusion, we recommend an update to the framework so that it can be also useful for research...

  8. 30 CFR 75.332 - Working sections and working places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Working sections and working places. 75.332... and working places. (a)(1) Each working section and each area where mechanized mining equipment is... simultaneously engaged in cutting, mining, or loading coal or rock from working places within the same working...

  9. Working With New Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visholm, Steen; Beck, Ulla Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the learning concept of group relations conferences are discussed. The authors have worked with group relations conferences (GRC) in different contexts for many years-mainly as a part of educational programmes for managers and consultants (OPU at IGA Copenhagen, MPO at Roskilde...

  10. Outsourcing of experimental work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    With the development of new technologies for simultaneous analysis of many genes, transcripts, or proteins (the "omics" revolution), it has become common to outsource parts of the experimental work. In order to maintain the integrity of the research projects, it is important that the interphase...

  11. Creatvity in Project Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas; Kofoed, Lise B.; Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram

    2012-01-01

    that they are creative during all stages in the project work. However, it is also significant that the Medialogy students believe that they are more creative in the beginning of their projects and during the design and implementation stages, whereas the analysis is a less creative part. In general, the Medialogy...

  12. Why Wheels Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses how the wheel works. The inherent mechanical advantage of wheel-and-axle system is that it reduced the distance the load-bearing surfaces have to slip relative to one another when the whole apparatus advances some given distance reducing (with leverage) the force needed to propel the system. (Author/JN)

  13. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P. [et al.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  14. Information for working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Kristen S

    2002-01-01

    Women are entering, staying, or returning to the workforce following childbirth in increasing numbers. They report various amounts of success in the workplace after they become mothers. This column presents a review of five Web sites that provide useful resources to working Moms.

  15. Information for Working Mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Kristen S.

    2002-01-01

    Women are entering, staying, or returning to the workforce following childbirth in increasing numbers. They report various amounts of success in the workplace after they become mothers. This column presents a review of five Web sites that provide useful resources to working Moms.

  16. City of open works

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riesto, Svava; Søberg, Martin; Braae, Ellen Marie

    2012-01-01

    . These contemporary approaches are closely con-nected to challenges following the transformation of existing urban structures – the re-use of metropolis. And the resulting projects are often created as more or less open works; they challenge existing typologies through a particularly inclusive and hetero...

  17. Empathy in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Karl; Englander, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    A dominant conceptualization of empathy in social work practice and education, provided by Karen Gerdes and Elizabeth Segal, relies heavily on the simulation theory adopted directly from the cognitive neurosciences. The aim was to critically challenge such a view by reporting on some recent empirical findings from the field in which professional…

  18. Heterogeneity and Work Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyaram, Lata; Kamalanabhan, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to extend and contribute to the domestic diversity literature by presenting a comprehensive model that takes into consideration the Indian work set up. It proposes to examine the effects of the composition of information systems development teams in Indian firms. Besides the conventional demographics which were studied…

  19. Working Effectively with Interpreters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellitti, Anarella

    2010-01-01

    The United States is becoming increasingly diverse, so early childhood educators are often among the first to work with families whose primary languages are other than English. Many parents, guardians, and family members do speak English but not fluently enough to feel comfortable communicating with teachers or administrators. When educators and…

  20. Writers at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Louise A.

    1979-01-01

    Argues that educators need to demystify the writing process so that students can approach the world of literature realistically. Suggests that exposure to how writers work and to the kinds of situations from which they draw inspiration can provide insights into what is required of a would-be writer. (FL)

  1. Working Model Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite student interest, the heart is often a poorly understood topic in biology. To help students understand this vital organ's physiology, the author created this investigation activity involving the mammalian heart and its role in the circulatory system. Students design, build, and demonstrate working artificial "hearts" to exhibit what they…

  2. Podcasting as Transformative Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Vivian Maria

    2015-01-01

    Although technology is most often heralded an intrinsic efficiency, the process of using technology to create a text is full of opportunities to learn new information, create and distribute knowledge, and engage in identity work. This article explores how the production of 1 such technological text, a podcast, offered students opportunities to…

  3. Temptation at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucciol, A.; Houser, D.; Piovesan, M.

    2011-01-01

    To encourage worker productivity offices prohibit Internet use. Consequently, many employees delay Internet activity to the end of the workday. Recent work in social psychology, however, suggests that using willpower to delay gratification can negatively impact performance. We report data from an

  4. NASA@Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA@work is an agency-wide website designed to increase innovation and access to ideas and knowledge from within the NASA community. Individuals (challenge owners) post their specific problem or "challenge." Anyone in the community (solvers) can contribute to the interactive discussions and submit proposed solutions with the opportunity to win an award.

  5. Ways into Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrice, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Refugees with higher qualifications often find themselves under-utilised in the only jobs they can get. A project at the University of Sussex explored refugees' own perceptions of the barriers they face and designed a course to address them. This article discusses the research project which was specifically designed to work with refugees who had…

  6. Gender Inequality at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jerry A., Ed.

    These 14 papers address many dimensions of gender inequality at work. The empirical studies include examinations of original surveys, secondary analyses of large data sets, and historical reports assaying the significance of personal, family, and structural factors with regard to gender in the workplace. An introduction (Jacobs) sketches how sex…

  7. The work of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heifetz, R A; Laurie, D L

    1997-01-01

    More and more companies today are facing adaptive challenges: changes in societies, markets, and technology around the globe are forcing them to clarify their values, develop new strategies, and learn new ways of operating. And the most important task for leaders in the face of such challenges is mobilizing people throughout the organization to do adaptive work. Yet for many senior executives, providing such leadership is difficult. Why? One reason is that they are accustomed to solving problems themselves. Another is that adaptive change is distressing for the people going through it. They need to take on new roles, relationships, values, and approaches to work. Many employees are ambivalent about the sacrifices required of them and look to senior executives to take problems off their shoulders. But both sets of expectations have to be unlearned. Rather than providing answers, leaders have to ask tough questions. Rather than protecting people from outside threats, leaders should let the pinch of reality stimulate them to adapt. Instead of orienting people to their current roles, leaders must disorient them so that new relationships can develop. Instead of quelling conflict, leaders should draw the issues out. Instead of maintaining norms, leaders must challenge "the way we do business" and help others distinguish immutable values from the historical practices that have become obsolete. The authors offer six principles for leading adaptive work: "getting on the balcony," identifying the adaptive challenge, regulating distress, maintaining disciplined attention, giving the work back to people, and protecting voices of leadership from below.

  8. Better Work Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Looks at equipment, process, and training aspects of backpack vacuum cleaners that facilitate good ergonomics and high productivity levels, focusing on: designing new equipment for bodies and productivity; creating comfortable backpack harnesses; improving the work process via team training; and providing ergonomic training to ensure that backpack…

  9. Working on the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruepert, Angela Maria

    2016-01-01

    Organizations increasingly recognize that environmental problems will reduce if their employees would act more pro-environmentally, but struggle with the question how to realise this. This PhD project shows that employees act more pro-environmentally at work when they care about the environment, and

  10. High Performance Work Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.P.E.F. Boselie (Paul); A. van der Wiele (Ton)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractResearch, summarized and classified in the work of Delery and Doty (1996), Guest (1997), Paauwe and Richardson (1997) and Boselie et al. (2001), suggests significant impact of Human Resources Management (HRM) on the competitive advantage of organizations. The mainstream research on this

  11. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-08

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.  Created: 2/8/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 2/8/2016.

  12. Third Year work

    OpenAIRE

    Durrant, Adam

    2008-01-01

    A pavilion based in Reaseheath College's woodland walk. Built for the discussion and exhibition of work involving combination of organic 'grow your own architecture' materials with man-made synthetic materials which may offer some benefits organics cannot such as u-values etc... The subject matter falls under 'living architecture'.

  13. Work and leisure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Veal, Anthony James; Haworth, John Trevor

    2004-01-01

    ... and quality of life in the spotlight. Profound transformations in the nature and organisation of work are occurring, with potentially far-reaching social and economic consequences. Increasingly, organisations demand greater flexibility from their workforces and are introducing new technologies and practices in response to global competitive pres...

  14. Working Women: Indian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra MEHTA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In India, due to unprecedented rise in the cost of living, ris-ing prices of commodities, growing expenses on children ed-ucation, huge rate of unemployment, and increasing cost of housing properties compel every Indian family to explore all the possible ways and means to increase the household income. It is also witnessed that after globalization Indian women are able to get more jobs but the work they get is more casual in nature or is the one that men do not prefer to do or is left by them to move to higher or better jobs. Working women refers to those in paid employment. They work as lawyers, nurses, doctors, teachers and secretaries etc. There is no profession today where women are not employed. University of Oxford’s Professor Linda Scott recently coined the term the Double X Economy to describe the global economy of women. The present paper makes an attempt to discuss issues and challenges that are being faced by Indian working women at their respective workstations.

  15. Change through Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllan, Les; Friedman, Amy; Spears, Evans

    Perhaps the most well known treatment modalities in the field of prevention and treatment of addiction are groups. Group settings serve to bring individuals with addictions together at one time in one place to work on relevant issues together. Groups may serve as a safe environment for learning new social and relationship skills, gaining…

  16. Doing Home Works

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelund, Sidsel

    2013-01-01

    of aesthetic analysis of artworks and ethnographic fieldwork (Georgina Born); and 3) the use of generative ethnographic stories as a writing tool (Helen Verran). The latter two, especially, are then employed in analysing the Beirut-based extended exhibition, ‘Home Works: A Forum on Cultural Practices...

  17. Working during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weekend to recover. Talk to your manager about working at home some days, if possible. You can spend less time commuting and rest when you need to. Let your boss know your treatment schedule ... out if you have to be out of the office. Consider talking first to one or two people ...

  18. Quantifiers and working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanik, J.; Zajenkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a study examining the role of working memory in quantifier verification. We created situations similar to the span task to compare numerical quantifiers of low and high rank, parity quantifiers and proportional quantifiers. The results enrich and support the data obtained

  19. Academic Work and Performativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, John

    2017-01-01

    Neoliberal reforms in higher education have resulted in corporate managerial practices in universities and a drive for efficiency and productivity in teaching and research. As a result, there has been an intensification of academic work, increased stress for academics and an emphasis on accountability and performativity in universities. This paper…

  20. The Work Ethic Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kate

    1992-01-01

    Describes the development of "The Work Ethic Game" that focuses on integrity in the workplace. Explains that the game is divided into three categories: legal, judgment, and policy issues. Discusses different personality types in the typical employee population. Includes possibilities for use at different education levels. (DK)

  1. Stay Safe at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over again, like typing or working on an assembly line. This can lead to a type of ... Privacy Policy Site Map Viewers & Players Contact Us Language Assistance Available Español 繁體中文 Tiếng Việt 한국어 Français ...

  2. Farm Women and Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, William

    1986-01-01

    The participation by farm women in on-farm and off-farm work is estimated and the effects of female earnings on farm family income are measured. It is shown that farm women make significant contributions to income and help manage income instability. (Author/CH)

  3. Measuring innovative work behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; den Hartog, D.

    2010-01-01

    Both scientists and practitioners emphasize the importance of innovative work behaviour (IWB) of individual employees for organizational success, but the measurement of IWB is still at an evolutionary stage. This article is concerned with developed a measure of IWB with four potential dimensions:

  4. IPD-Work consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    underestimation of the population attributable risk (PAR) of job strain for CHD, and policy implications arising from the findings of the IPD-Work consortium; and (iii) outline general principles for designing evidence-based policy and prevention from good-quality evidence, including future directions...

  5. Academic Work and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Reading current accounts of higher education demonstrates the flux and damage of rapid neoliberal changes to the type and conduct of academic work. Opening the Times Higher Education magazine on the 28 April 2011 shows articles about cuts in staffing and undergraduate provision in England, concerns about the quality of for-profit higher education…

  6. Situated Literacies at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Gathered data about work practices related to three motels and two eco-tourism sites. Findings suggest that actual workplace practices involve socially constructed literacies depending on the user's ability to make judgments on using the text or obtaining information from the text. (SLD)

  7. Working as a Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    In most STEM industries, teamwork is essential. Engineers, scientists, statisticians, and medical professionals, for example, must communicate with one another and work together. Someday, students may enter the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) workforce, where they also will need to collaborate effectively. This article describes…

  8. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  9. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  10. The Director's Work on Himself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Annelis

    2008-01-01

    A reading of Stanislavsky's major works about the actor's work on himself from the viewpoint of the director's work on himself.......A reading of Stanislavsky's major works about the actor's work on himself from the viewpoint of the director's work on himself....

  11. While working around security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Niels Raabjerg; Bødker, Susanne; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    This paper describes our work at two levels. First of all the paper discusses how users of IT deal with issues of IT security in their everyday life. Secondly, we discuss how the kind of understanding of IT security that comes out of careful analyses of use confronts the ways in which usable...... IT security is established in the literature. Recent literature has called for better conceptual models as a starting point for improving IT security. In contrast to such models we propose to dress up designers by helping them better understand the work that goes into everyday security. The result...... is a methodological toolbox that helps address and design for usable and useful IT security. We deploy examples of analyses and design, carried out by ourselves and by others to fine-tune our design perspective; in particular we use examples from three current research projects....

  12. Progression in work readiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sophie Danneris

    2013-01-01

    in social work programs (amongst others Boaz & Blewett 2010 and Koivisto 2008). Initially there will be a short presentation of the research topic of my Ph.D. and the central research question related to the project. Following this is a methodological discussion in two levels - the first discussion......This paper is based partly on literature concerning the construction of identities in social work settings (especially Juhila & Abrams 2011, Eskelinen & Olesen 2010) and partly on literature that addresses the dilemmas and challenges in providing evidence about the effectiveness of interventions...... at a meta level, where the problems concerning evidence, measurements of effects and how to improve interventions and practice will be addressed. At the second, micro level, the discussion will be about the specific data collection methods in the project and how the identities of the clients can...

  13. "We work on experiments"

    CERN Multimedia

    BBC

    1975-01-01

    Short BBC (?) report on CERN. Emphasis on international collaboration, with Soviets and Chinese highlighted. At end, interview with Danish physicist (our of sync) who talks about working on Sundays and how experiments have 25 people, therefore it is a long way to glory. ISR. Comments: Film scratched and dirty. Colour pink. Looses sync at the end. Video transfer ends before the end of the film.

  14. Tram works (TCMC)

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    In order to allow the final switchover of traffic, as part of the on-going Tram works (TCMC), please note that the traffic lights at Entrance B will be out of service from 7 to 14 February. In order to ensure traffic safety and allow CERN employees to exit the site, a temporary roundabout will be installed during this week. Department of General Infrastructure Services (GS) GS-SE Group

  15. Multibunch working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this working group was to foment discussions about the use and limitations of multi-bunch, representatives from most operating or in-project synchrotron radiation sources (ALS, SPEAR, BESSY-2, SPRING-8, ANKA, DELTA, PEP-2, DIAMOND, ESRF...) have presented their experience. The discussions have been led around 3 topics: 1) resistive wall instabilities and ion instabilities, 2) higher harmonic cavities, and 3) multibunch feedback systems.

  16. WORK AND LEARNER IDENTITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to suggest a theoretical framework than can assess to how people’s engagement in specific historical and social work practices are significant to their development, maintenance or transformation of a learner identity. Such a framework is crucial in order to grasp how di...... different groups have distinctive conditions for meeting the obligation of forming a proactive learner identity and engage in lifelong learning prevalent in both national and transnational policies on lifelong learning....

  17. Abandoning wells working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  18. Gender and Working Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapio Bergholm

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of occupational segregation by sex and gendered practices in the workplace are complex, multidimensional and contested fields of research and academic discourse. Since the 1960s, we have seen a rapid growth in both quantity and quality of academic work in this field. Earlier simplistic main (male stream as well as straightforward feminist explanations has been roundly criticised and deconstructed. It is now clear that the study of gender relations in working life is far more complicated than it was believed decades ago. The central question in gender research is how gendered structures – in which men in general have more power, more prestigious positions and higher pay – are reproduced in a world in which demography, economy, production, education and therefore society and family have changed over time. Nordic countries represents an interesting geographical arena to examine gender relations in working life, because many factors, which have been seen in other countries as causes for female subordination, appear in other forms. At present, the labour force participation rate of women in Nordic countries is nearly equal to that of men, but there are still substantial differences. Women are better educated than men, and also, to a large extent unionised. Although these factors make Nordic women stand out globally, gender equality at work or at home has not yet been achieved. The male breadwinner is still a societal norm and a construct, which conditions the behaviour of organisations and individuals in many circumstances in working life. This influence can be obvious or obscure. From the 1990s, research has turned to focus also on the fate of the male workforce during deindustrialisation and global restructuring. Participation rate of men in gainful employment have diminished in all industrialised countries (Crouch; 1999, Walby; 1997. Nordic countries are not an exception to this trend. Men’s difficulties to adapt to a new service

  19. NASA Work Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2015-01-01

    I have had the opportunity to support the analytical laboratories in chemical analysis of unknown samples, using Optical Microscopy (OM), Polarizing Light Microscopy (PLM), Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEMEDS), and X-ray Powder Diffraction (XPD). I have assisted in characterizing fibers pulled from a spacecraft, a white fibrous residue discovered in a jet refueler truck, brown residue from a plant habitat slated for delivery to the ISS (International Space Station), corrosion on a pipe from a sprinkler, and air filtration material brought back from the ISS. I also conducted my own fiber study in order to practice techniques and further my understanding of background concepts. Furthermore, I had the opportunity to participate in diverse work assignments, where I was assigned to work with other branches of the engineering department for 1-2 days each. The first was in the Materials Science branch where I participated in the construction of the plant habitat intended for use in research aboard the ISS. The second was in the Testing Design branch where I assisted with tensile and hardness testing of over 40 samples. In addition, I have had the privilege to attend multiple tours of the NASA KSC campus, including to the Astronaut Crew Quarters, the VAB (the main area, the Columbia room, and the catwalk), the Visitor Center housing the shuttle Atlantis, the Saturn-V exhibit, the Prototype laboratory, SWAMP WORKS, the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Crawler, and the Booster Fabrication Facility (BFF). Lastly, much of my coursework prepared me for this experience, including numerous laboratory courses with topics diverse as chemistry, physics, and biology.

  20. The works of archimedes

    CERN Document Server

    Archimedes

    2002-01-01

    The complete works of antiquity's great geometer appear here in a highly accessible English translation by a distinguished scholar. Remarkable for his range of thought and his mastery of treatment, Archimedes addressed such topics as the famous problems of the ratio of the areas of a cylinder and an inscribed sphere; the measurement of a circle; the properties of conoids, spheroids, and spirals; and the quadrature of the parabola. This edition offers an informative introduction with many valuable insights into the ancient mathematician's life and thought as well as the views of his contemporar

  1. MPD work at MIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel

    1991-01-01

    MPD work at MIT is presented in the form of the view-graphs. The following subject areas are covered: the MIT program, its goals, achievements, and roadblocks; quasi one-dimensional modeling; two-dimensional modeling - transport effects and Hall effect; microscopic instabilities in MPD flows and modified two stream instability; electrothermal stability theory; separation of onset and anode depletion; exit plane spectroscopic measurements; phenomena of onset as performance limiter; explanations of onset; geometry effects on onset; onset at full ionization and its consequences; relationship to anode depletion; summary on self-field MPD; applied field MPD - the logical growth path; the case for AF; the challenges of AF MPD; and recommendations.

  2. Art/Net/Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik; Lindstrøm, Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The seminar Art|Net|Work deals with two important changes in our culture. On one side, the network has become essential in the latest technological development. The Internet has entered a new phase, Web 2.0, including the occurrence of as ‘Wiki’s’, ‘Peer-2-Peer’ distribution, user controlled...... the praxis of the artist. We see different kinds of interventions and activism (including ‘hacktivism’) using the network as a way of questioning the invisible rules that govern public and semi-public spaces. Who ‘owns’ them? What kind of social relationships do they generate? On what principle...

  3. Outsourcing of experimental work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    With the development of new technologies for simultaneous analysis of many genes, transcripts, or proteins (the "omics" revolution), it has become common to outsource parts of the experimental work. In order to maintain the integrity of the research projects, it is important that the interphase between the researcher and the service is further developed. This involves robust protocols for sample preparation, an informed choice of analytical tool, development of standards for individual technologies, and transparent data analysis. This chapter introduces some of the problems related to analysis of RNA samples in the "omics" context and gives a few hints and key references related to sample preparation for the non-specialist.

  4. Fit for work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorholt, Grete

    "Fit for work - Attraktiv sundhed og sikkerhed på en hospitalsafdeling i Region Hovedstaden" undersøger hvorledes sundhedsvæsenets forandringer påvirker medarbejdere, ledere og organisation. Udgangspunktet for afhandlingen er en interesse for psykisk arbejdsmiljø, og hvordan reformerne i kølvandet...... vidensvirksomhed i konkurrencestaten. Afhandlingen undersøger, hvordan disse policy-forandringer peger i retning af et bestemt styringsrationale — en ‘sundhedsorden’— som fremskriver en bestemt medarbejder- figur, hvori medarbejdere og ledere forventes at engagere og udfolde sig i et udfordrende og attraktivt, men...

  5. Temptation at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Houser, Daniel; Piovesan, Marco

    2013-01-01

    To encourage worker productivity, companies routinely adopt policies requiring employees to delay gratification. For example, offices might prohibit use of the internet for personal purposes during regular business hours. Recent work in social psychology, however, suggests that using willpower...... to delay gratification can negatively impact performance. We report data from an experiment where subjects in a Willpower Treatment are asked to resist the temptation to join others in watching a humorous video for 10 minutes. In relation to a baseline treatment that does not require willpower, we show...

  6. Mac at Work

    CERN Document Server

    Sparks, David

    2011-01-01

    Bridge the gap between using a Mac at home and at the office. Now that you love your Mac at home, you want to use one at the office without missing a beat of productivity or professionalism. This unique guide shows you how.  You'll find best Mac business practices for handling word processing, spreadsheet and presentation creation, task and project management, and graphics. The book also explores topics such as hardware maintenance, how to synchronize with multiple computers, data backup, and communication with Windows networks.: Covers the nuts and bolts of using a Mac at work, including sync

  7. Working Women: Indian Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmendra MEHTA; Naveen K MEHTA; Rajesh Kumar MEHTA

    2014-01-01

    In India, due to unprecedented rise in the cost of living, ris-ing prices of commodities, growing expenses on children ed-ucation, huge rate of unemployment, and increasing cost of housing properties compel every Indian family to explore all the possible ways and means to increase the household income. It is also witnessed that after globalization Indian women are able to get more jobs but the work they get is more casual in nature or is the one that men do not prefer to do or is left by them...

  8. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, Frederica; Campos, Pedro; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID framework, and a sample of 54 HWID related papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009–2014. We group the papers into six topical groups....... Furthermore, much focus has been on studying design sketching or implemented systems-in-use, while little attention has been paid to mature design (prototypes) or early implementation (content templates). In conclusion, we recommend an update to the framework so that it can be also useful for research...

  9. Temptation at work.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bucciol

    Full Text Available To encourage worker productivity, companies routinely adopt policies requiring employees to delay gratification. For example, offices might prohibit use of the internet for personal purposes during regular business hours. Recent work in social psychology, however, suggests that using willpower to delay gratification can negatively impact performance. We report data from an experiment where subjects in a Willpower Treatment are asked to resist the temptation to join others in watching a humorous video for 10 minutes. In relation to a baseline treatment that does not require willpower, we show that resisting this temptation detrimentally impacts economic productivity on a subsequent task.

  10. A working Christmas

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The repair of faulty elements in the cryogenic distribution line is making great progress in building 927 at CERN. While many of us were relaxing over the two-week Christmas break, the team repairing elements of the LHC cryogenic distribution line - or QRL - continued working, keeping the repair schedule on course for completion by the end of March. Pipe elements with faulty sliding tables are being repaired by the ICS consortium, in charge of installing the cryo-magnets in their cryostats. This team began repairs at the beginning of November, fixing 10 elements a week (See Bulletin 42/2004 from 11 October 2004). However, during the five-week winter shutdown of the magnet test facility they are being assisted by 20 personnel who normally work on magnet testing. With the extra help a repair rate of five pipe elements a day has been reached - 25 elements a week - thanks to the remarkable effort of the ICS personnel led by Patrick Voisin, the DBS personnel assuring the transport and handling of the elements, an...

  11. Automatization of lexicographic work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iztok Kosem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to lexicographic work, in which the lexicographer is seen more as a validator of the choices made by computer, was recently envisaged by Rundell and Kilgarriff (2011. In this paper, we describe an experiment using such an approach during the creation of Slovene Lexical Database (Gantar, Krek, 2011. The corpus data, i.e. grammatical relations, collocations, examples, and grammatical labels, were automatically extracted from 1,18-billion-word Gigafida corpus of Slovene. The evaluation of the extracted data consisted of making a comparison between the time spent writing a manual entry and a (semi-automatic entry, and identifying potential improvements in the extraction algorithm and in the presentation of data. An important finding was that the automatic approach was far more effective than the manual approach, without any significant loss of information. Based on our experience, we would propose a slightly revised version of the approach envisaged by Rundell and Kilgarriff in which the validation of data is left to lower-level linguists or crowd-sourcing, whereas high-level tasks such as meaning description remain the domain of lexicographers. Such an approach indeed reduces the scope of lexicographer’s work, however it also results in the ability of bringing the content to the users more quickly.

  12. While Working Around Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Niels Raabjerg

    Users of technology encounter various IT security mechanisms in their everyday lives. If these mechanisms fail to support everyday activities, they either get in the way, or the users find a way to work around them. Even though users manage to carry out everyday activities by using substandard...... IT security mechanisms or via workarounds, it will influence their experience of security. If researchers and designers only focus on IT security artifacts and fail to take the user experience into account, incorrect processes or workarounds will occur. Accordingly, to get users to follow the correct process...... may seem to be a criterion of success, even though it may yield a less appropriate experience of security. This dissertation deals with an improved understanding of IT security sensitive IT artifacts and presents three design methods, and a framework for addressing the complexities and contingencies...

  13. Swamp Works- Multiple Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Jonathan M.; Schuler, Jason M.; Chandler, Meredith L.

    2013-01-01

    My Surface Systems internship over the summer 2013 session covered a broad range of projects that utilized multiple fields of engineering and technology. This internship included a project to create a command center for a 120 ton regolith bin, for the design and assembly of a blast shield to add further protection for the Surface Systems engineers, for the design and assembly of a portable four monitor hyper wall strip that could extend as large as needed, research and programming a nano drill that could be utilized on a next generation robot or rover, and social media tasks including the making of videos, posting to social networking websites and creation of a new outreach program to help spread the word about the Swamp Works laboratory.

  14. Aggression at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Annie

    response in victims. It was also an aim of the thesis to study whether aspects of the work environment, social climate and personal dispositions would mediate potential relationships between exposure to bullying, nasty teasing or violence and different health effects and stress reactions.      The study...... symptoms and a lower physiological stress response. Gender differences in health effects were focused on specifically and reported for exposure to nasty teasing. The results are discussed and different explanations are suggested.      Victims of bullying and nasty teasing reported lower support from co...... as a mediator of the relationships between violence and different stress-reactions. Negative affectivity acted as a partial mediator between being bullied and different health effects.      Thus, the longitudinal studies showed that exposure to nasty teasing predicted fatigue in women five years later...

  15. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  16. On the Work Itself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikkelsø, Signe

    ’ of organizational life. A widespread argument for this decreased significance holds that it is no longer relevant to speak in terms of overarching purposes as organizations manoeuvre in rapidly changing environments where tasks and purposes are multiple, ambiguous and in flux. Another is that the definition...... and illustrate the problems of bewilderment and fragmentation arising from neglecting the issue. A bewilderment and fragmentation that also characterises contemporary organization theory as a discipline, I argue. Employing the notion of ‘reality device’ I conclude that understanding the core tasks...... of an organization is an indispensable means to register and evaluate the empirical reality of organizations and the work to be done in order to accomplish those tasks....

  17. Working environment interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Limborg, Hans Jørgen; Nielsen, Klaus T.

    2014-01-01

    is paid to why and how public and private organisations subsequently are to improve their working environment. This paper suggests a model which can bridge this gap. It is based on a combination of theories about basic policy instruments (regulation, incentives and information) with realistic analysis...... analysis of the case shows how various actors, including the authorities, employers, unions and bi-partite committees, developed a programme combining the policy instruments over a considerable period of time and that all three institutional mechanisms affected the outcome. This integration of various......, and the importance of joint messages from employers and unions. The model thus provides new insights into the relationship between policy instruments and workplace health and safety outcomes...

  18. Humboldt's works on Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Leitner

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Article in English, Abstracts in Spanish and English. Humboldt wrote about Mexico from the perspective of a scientific explorer and naturalist. His works include his diaries, the Essai politique sur le royaume de la Nouvelle-Espagne, the Tablas géograficas, the Vues des Cordillères and a geographic atlas. Concerning the scientific aspect, the lack of a section on Mexico in the Relation historique is not a real deficit, since this can be found in the Essai. But only the diaries and letters from the journey, both published by the Alexander-von-Humboldt Research Centre, Berlin, can be considered an adequate substitute.The following will show the origin of Humboldt's writings on Mexico, offer historical and bibliographical facts and present the publications "Beiträge zur Alexander von Humboldt-Forschung", as well as Humboldt’s handwritten estate as far as they are available to us.

  19. Working Environment and Technological Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian; Nielsen, Klaus T.; Jensen, Per Langaa

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes the purpose, themes, overarching research questions and specific projects of the programme: Working Environment and Technological Development. The major research themes are:1) Management concepts and the working environment, which considers the visions...... and their and their concept of working environment2) Technology renewal, which considers the role of the working environment in connection with the development and use of concrete technologies3) Working environment planning, which considers the existing efforts to place the working environment in a planning process....

  20. Decent Work: A Psychological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    David eBlustein; Chad eOlle; Alice eConnors-Kellgren; AJ eDiamonti

    2016-01-01

    This contribution, which serves as the lead article for the Research Section entitled From Meaning of Working to Meaningful Lives: The Challenges of Expanding Decent Work, explores current challenges in the development and operationalization of decent work. Based on an initiative from the International Labor Organization (ILO; 1999), decent work represents an aspirational statement about the quality of work that should be available to all people who seek to work around the globe. Within rece...

  1. Work Zone Data Collection Trailer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Work Zone Data Collection Trailer was designed and constructed to enhance data collection and analysis capabilities for the "Evaluating Roadway Construction Work...

  2. Exploring Work Values: Helping Students Articulate Their Good (Work) Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstrom, Aaron H.; Hughey, Kenneth F.

    2014-01-01

    The current article builds on "Living the Good (Work) Life: Implications of General Values for Work Values" (Carlstrom, 2011) by presenting ways to address work values in career advising. The following questions are addressed in the current article: When should students explore work values in career advising? What career development and…

  3. Work family conflict in its relations to perceived working situation and work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Bernburg, Monika; Groneberg, David A; Klapp, Burghard F; Danzer, Gerhard

    2016-02-15

    These days physicians' work is characterized by an increase in economic demands, pressure and challenges in establishing a balance between work and family life. The current study investigates the relationship between physicians' job demands and resources, perceived job stress, work-family conflict, work engagement and job satisfaction. 564 clinicians specialising in different medical fields participated in the cross-sectional study. Self-administered questionnaires, including the COPSOQ and the UWES- Scale were administered. Our results illustrated significant relationships between physicians' work engagement and their job satisfaction as well as between job stress and work family conflict. Moreover, perceived job stress moderated the effect of high job demands on work family conflict. In addition, significant gender differences have been found in perceived stress levels, work family conflict and work engagement. This study proves and verified associations between work engagement, work-family conflict, job demands and resources that may influence employees' satisfaction. Implications for both working physicians and hospital management are given.

  4. Blended working: for whom it may (not work.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico W Van Yperen

    Full Text Available Similarly to related developments such as blended learning and blended care, blended working is a pervasive and booming trend in modern societies. Blended working combines on-site and off-site working in an optimal way to improve workers' and organizations' outcomes. In this paper, we examine the degree to which workers feel that the two defining features of blended working (i.e., time-independent working and location-independent working enhance their own functioning in their jobs. Blended working, enabled through the continuing advance and improvement of high-tech ICT software, devices, and infrastructure, may be considered beneficial for workers' perceived effectiveness because it increases their job autonomy. However, because blended working may have downsides as well, it is important to know for whom blended working may (not work. As hypothesized, in a sample of 348 workers (51.7% women, representing a wide range of occupations and organizations, we found that the perceived personal effectiveness of blended working was contingent upon workers' psychological need strength. Specifically, the perceived effectiveness of both time-independent working and location-independent working was positively related to individuals' need for autonomy at work, and negatively related to their need for relatedness and need for structure at work.

  5. Blended working: for whom it may (not) work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Yperen, Nico W; Rietzschel, Eric F; De Jonge, Kiki M M

    2014-01-01

    Similarly to related developments such as blended learning and blended care, blended working is a pervasive and booming trend in modern societies. Blended working combines on-site and off-site working in an optimal way to improve workers' and organizations' outcomes. In this paper, we examine the degree to which workers feel that the two defining features of blended working (i.e., time-independent working and location-independent working) enhance their own functioning in their jobs. Blended working, enabled through the continuing advance and improvement of high-tech ICT software, devices, and infrastructure, may be considered beneficial for workers' perceived effectiveness because it increases their job autonomy. However, because blended working may have downsides as well, it is important to know for whom blended working may (not) work. As hypothesized, in a sample of 348 workers (51.7% women), representing a wide range of occupations and organizations, we found that the perceived personal effectiveness of blended working was contingent upon workers' psychological need strength. Specifically, the perceived effectiveness of both time-independent working and location-independent working was positively related to individuals' need for autonomy at work, and negatively related to their need for relatedness and need for structure at work.

  6. Working Together in Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pateşan Marioara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The scores obtained by the military students are very important as a lot of opportunities depend on them: the choice of the branch, selection for different in and off-campus activities, the appointment to the workplace and so on. A qualifier, regardless of its form of effective expression, can make a difference in a given context of issuing a value judgment, in relation to the student's performance assessment. In our research we tried to find out what motives students, what determines them to get actively involved in the tasks they are given and the ways we can improve their participation in classes and assignments. In order to have an educated generation we need to have not only well prepared teachers but ones that are open-minded, flexible and in pace with the methodological novelties that can improve the teaching learning process in class. Along the years we have noticed that in classes where students constituted a cohesive group with an increasing degree of interaction between members, the results were better than in a group that did not appreciate team-work. In this article we want to highlight the fact that a teacher can bring to class the appropriate methods and procedures can contribute decisively to the strengthening of the group cohesion and high scores.

  7. Maritime Work and Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Andersen

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents findings from the project "Elastic Systems" under the Danish Center for Human Machine Interaction. The project aims at developing methods for analyzing dynamic maritime work processes and for designing flexible instrument interfaces that will support changing work environments. Here I only address the former issue, the design issues being published elsewhere, e.g. in Andersen(1999 and Andersen & May (2001. More data can be found in Andersen(2000. The purpose of the present paper is twofold: (1 to present characteristics of maritime work and communication, and (2 to suggest a conceptual framework that covers communicative as well as non-communicative acts. The latter purpose is motivated in two ways. Theoretical motivation: we know that language is self-referential, so that it can speak of non-linguistic entities like ships and waves as well as its own properties, such as the correct wording or style. The easiest way to accomplish this is for language to treat both domains in a similar way. The other motivation is more practical: it is a fact that communication and physical actions are interwoven in maritime work, and a theory that builds on a sharp distinction between these two kinds of behaviors will miss this basic characteristic. The data is from a voyage aboard Sally Maersk from Algeciras to Goteborg and back to Rotterdam. We recorded 60 hours of high quality video, and the paper builds upon a 16 hours trip from Felixstowe to Rotterdam, supplemented by data from simulated voyages in the simulator at the Danish Maritime Institute. The conceptual framework is based on Lind 1994 and Lind 2000 and distinguishes between the following types of action types: (1 Prevent(suppress, avoid: if I hadn't done it, then an undesirable state would have developed. Prevent drifting by using auxiliary rudder. (2 Maintain: if I hadn't done it, then a desirable state would have disappeared. Maintain course. (3 Help: a positive state would have

  8. Working the Dark Side

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjering, Jens Christian Borrebye

    A few days after the terror attacks of 9/11, then Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on television with a call for “working the dark side.” While still unclear what this expression entailed at the time, Cheney's comment appears in retrospect to almost have been prophetic for the years to come...... – years where parts of the U.S. Army and intelligence community set up a rampant torture regime all across the world. Yet, the connection between a so-called “dark side,” “working” this “dark side,” and the torture that followed is not a given, but, instead, a consequence of a set of very specific legal......, political, and personal choices in the early years after 9/11. This dissertation is an investigation into how the notion of a “dark side” took form, and of how and why the specific make-up of this“dark side” ended up creating a torture regime which already today seems almost unreal. The dissertation's first...

  9. Ansel Adams: early works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, Jodi

    2010-02-01

    Ansel Adams (1902-1984), photographer, musician, naturalist, explorer, critic, and teacher, was a giant in the field of landscape photography. In his images of the unspoiled Western landscape, he strove to capture the sublime: the transcendentalist concept that nature can generate the experience of awe for the viewer. Many viewers are familiar with the heroic, high-contrast prints on high-gloss paper that Adams made to order beginning in the 1970s; much less well known are the intimate prints that the artist crafted earlier in his career. This exhibition focuses on these masterful small prints from the 1920s into the 1950s. During this time period, Adams's printing style changed dramatically. The painterly, soft-focus, warm-toned style of the Parmelian Prints of the High Sierras from the 1920s evolved into the sharp-focus style of the f/64 school of photography that Adams co-founded in the 1930s with Edward Weston and Imogen Cunningham. After World War II, Adams opted for a cooler, higher-contrast look for his prints. Throughout the various styles in which he chose to work, Adams explored the power of nature and succeeded in establishing landscape photography as a legitimate form of modern art.

  10. Proposal Improvements That Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, F.

    1998-01-01

    Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, an operating location of Boeing in Canoga Park, California is under contract with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama for design, development, production, and mission support of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs). The contract was restructured in 1996 to emphasize a mission contracting environment under which Rocketdyne supports the Space Transportation System launch manifest of seven flights a year without the need for a detailed list of contract deliverables such as nozzles, turbopumps, and combustion devices. This contract structure is in line with the overall Space Shuttle program goals established by the NASA to fly safely, meet the flight manifest, and reduce cost. Rocketdyne's Contracts, Pricing, and Estimating team has worked for the past several years with representatives from MSFC, the local Defense Contract Management Command, and the DCAA to improve the quality of cost proposals to MSFC for contract changes on the SSME. The contract changes on the program result primarily from engineering change proposals for product enhancements to improve safety, maintainability, or operability in the space environment. This continuous improvement team effort has been successful in improving proposal quality, reducing cycle time, and reducing cost. Some of the principal lessons learned are highlighted here to show how proposal improvements can be implemented to enhance customer satisfaction and ensure cost proposals can be evaluated easily by external customers.

  11. Social strategies that work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorski, Mikołaj Jan

    2011-11-01

    Although most companies have collected lots of friends and followers on social platforms such as Facebook, few have succeeded in generating profits there. That's because they merely port their digital strategies into social environments by broadcasting their commercial messages or seeking customer feedback. To succeed on social platforms, says Harvard Business School's Piskorski, businesses need to devise social strategies that are consistent with users' expectations and behavior in these venues--namely, people want to connect with other people, not with companies. The author defines successful social strategies as those that reduce costs or increase customers' willingness to pay by helping people establish or strengthen relationships through doing free work on a company's behalf. Citing successes at Zynga, eBay, American Express, and Yelp, Piskorski shows that social strategies can generate profits by helping people connect in exchange for tasks that benefit the company such as customer acquisition, marketing, and content creation. He lays out a systematic way to build a social strategy and shows how a major credit card company he advised used the method to roll out its own strategy.

  12. [Work, cardiopathy, and sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assanelli, D; Cottarelli, C; Salvadori, G; Rubino, F; Fernando, F; Biffi, A

    2004-01-01

    Heart disease is the main cause of early disability and premature death in Europe. Regular physical activity may prevent heart disease, diabetes, ictus, and obesity. Nevertheless, a certain resistance to a dynamic lifestyle, lack of free time, lack of motivation and other factors are frequently encountered. To stress the importance of physical activity in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. A literature review of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease was carried out. It has been shown that physical exercise is beneficial to the cardiovascular apparatus and to the bones and joints, by improving some metabolic parameters. Recent studies have shown that a personalized, moderate physical activity should be suggested for primary and secondary prevention, in particular for subjects with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. An increase in sports activity and physical exercise at work and at school is recommended so as to improve quality of life and promote home rehabilitation. Some promising experience has already been made among workers and their families with excellent results, as shown by a follow-up period of three years.

  13. Cleaning of work clothing

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    As of March 2007, the laundry service (TS/FM) will introduce a new procedure for the collection of work clothing and its redistribution when returned to CERN from the laundry. Clothes will no longer be collected from and distributed to the usual points, but will have to be deposited and exchanged at a pre-defined location and at specific times, as follows: For Meyrin site: in Bldg. 2/ R-402 Each second Thursday between 8-00 and 9-30. Starting on Thursday, March 22, 2007. For Prévessin site and SM18: in Bldg. 933/ R-007. Each second Thursday between 10-00 and 11-30. Starting on Thursday, March 22, 2007. Notices explaining the procedure to be followed will be posted at the collection points used until now. No change in present practice is foreseen, however, for LHC Points 2 and 5. If you require any further information please call the laundry service on 16 2056 or 16 0053.

  14. Cleaning of work clothing

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    As of March 2007, the laundry service (TS/FM) will introduce a new procedure for the collection of work clothing and its redistribution when returned to CERN from the laundry. Clothes will no longer be collected from and distributed to the usual points, but will have to be deposited and exchanged at a pre-defined location and specific time, as specified below: For Meyrin site: Bldg. 2/ R-402 Every second Thursday between 8-00 and 9-30. Starting on Thursday, March 22, 2007. For Prévessin site and SM18: Bldg. 933/ R-007. Every second Thursday between 10-00 and 11-30. Starting on Thursday, March 22, 2007. Notices explaining the procedure to be followed will be posted at the collection points used until now. No change in present practice is foreseen, however, for LHC Points 2 and 5. If you require any further information please call the laundry service on 16 2056 or 16 0053.

  15. Cleaning of work clothing

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    As of March 2007, the laundry service (TS/FM) will introduce a new procedure for the collection of work clothing and its redistribution when returned to CERN from the laundry. Clothes will no longer be collected from and distributed to the usual points, but will have to be deposited and exchanged at a pre-defined location and specific time, as specified below: For Meyrin site: Bldg. 2/ R-402 Every second Thursday between 8.00 a.m. and 9.30 a.m. Starting on Thursday, March 22, 2007. For Prévessin site and SM18: Bldg. 933/ R-007. Every second Thursday between 10.00 a.m. and 11.30 a.m. Starting on Thursday, March 22, 2007. Notices explaining the procedure to be followed will be posted at the collection points used until now. No change in present practice is foreseen, however, for LHC Points 2 and 5. If you require any further information please call the laundry service on 16 2056 or 16 0053.

  16. Pregnant and other works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinor Carucci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I have been photographing my children, Eden and Emmanuelle since I got pregnant in 2003. I photograph as a mother, from a mother's point of view, showing the different aspects of motherhood as I see them; the beautiful and the ugly, the magic and the frustration, the extremes that live side by side when you are a mother. I try to photograph them all. Crying, sadness, anxiety, mourning the body I will never have again, the woman I will never be again. The strong physical connection to the children, erotic at times, something I found out many mothers experience but do not talk about much. With my images I try to sing a love song to my children, they are my inspiration. Their love, sadness, joy and neediness are for me the most meaningful moments of my life, the moments I want to photograph and preserve. Those images are taken from my life, they are very personal, they are about being a mother, being a child, the intensity of raising a child. This work is about the essence of being human.

  17. How Google works

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Eric; Eagle, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Google Executive Chairman and ex-CEO Eric Schmidt and former SVP of Products Jonathan Rosenberg came to Google over a decade ago as proven technology executives. At the time, the company was already well-known for doing things differently, reflecting the visionary--and frequently contrarian--principles of founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. If Eric and Jonathan were going to succeed, they realized they would have to relearn everything they thought they knew about management and business. Today, Google is a global icon that regularly pushes the boundaries of innovation in a variety of fields. HOW GOOGLE WORKS is an entertaining, page-turning primer containing lessons that Eric and Jonathan learned as they helped build the company. The authors explain how technology has shifted the balance of power from companies to consumers, and that the only way to succeed in this ever-changing landscape is to create superior products and attract a new breed of multifaceted employees whom Eric and Jonathan dub "smart creat...

  18. Reincentivizing – a new theory of work and work absence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulesius Hans O

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work capacity correlates weakly to disease concepts, which in turn are insufficient to explain sick leave behavior. With data mainly from Sweden, a welfare state with high sickness absence rates, our aim was to develop an explanatory theory of how to understand and deal with work absence and sick leave. Methods We used classic grounded theory for analyzing data from >130 interviews with people working or on sick leave, physicians, social security officers, and literature. Several hundreds of typed and handwritten memos were the basis for writing up the theory. Results In this paper we present a theory of work incentives and how to deal with work absence. We suggest that work disability can be seen as hurt work drivers or people caught in mode traps. Work drivers are specified as work capacities + work incentives, monetary and non-monetary. Also, people can get trapped in certain modes of behavior through changed capacities or incentives, or by inertia. Different modes have different drivers and these can trap the individual from reincentivizing, ie from going back to work or go on working. Hurt drivers and mode traps are recognized by driver assessments done on several different levels. Mode driver calculations are done by the worker. Then follows employer, physician, and social insurance officer assessments. Also, driver assessments are done on the macro level by legislators and other stakeholders. Reincentivizing is done by different repair strategies for hurt work drivers such as body repair, self repair, work-place repair, rehumanizing, controlling sick leave insurance, and strengthening monetary work incentives. Combinations of these driver repair strategies also do release people from mode traps. Conclusion Reincentivizing is about recognizing hurt work drivers and mode traps followed by repairing and releasing the same drivers and traps. Reincentivizing aims at explaining what is going on when work absence is dealt

  19. A Relational Theory of Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blustein, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Building on diverse influences from critical perspectives in vocational psychology and the relational movement in contemporary psychological discourse, this article introduces the relational theory of working. Attending to the full array of people who work and who want to work, the relational theory conceptualizes working as an inherently…

  20. Social Work Education in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The development of the social work education and the education for social educators in Denmark. The undergraduate programs and the possibilities for further study within social work in Denmark.......The development of the social work education and the education for social educators in Denmark. The undergraduate programs and the possibilities for further study within social work in Denmark....

  1. Desert Pathfinder at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) project celebrates the inauguration of its outstanding 12-m telescope, located on the 5100m high Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert (Chile). The APEX telescope, designed to work at sub-millimetre wavelengths, in the 0.2 to 1.5 mm range, passed successfully its Science Verification phase in July, and since then is performing regular science observations. This new front-line facility provides access to the "Cold Universe" with unprecedented sensitivity and image quality. After months of careful efforts to set up the telescope to work at the best possible technical level, those involved in the project are looking with satisfaction at the fruit of their labour: APEX is not only fully operational, it has already provided important scientific results. "The superb sensitivity of our detectors together with the excellence of the site allow fantastic observations that would not be possible with any other telescope in the world," said Karl Menten, Director of the group for Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Astronomy at the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) and Principal Investigator of the APEX project. ESO PR Photo 30/05 ESO PR Photo 30/05 Sub-Millimetre Image of a Stellar Cradle [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 627 pix - 200k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1254 pix - 503k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1539 x 2413 pix - 1.3M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 30/05 is an image of the giant molecular cloud G327 taken with APEX. More than 5000 spectra were taken in the J=3-2 line of the carbon monoxide molecule (CO), one of the best tracers of molecular clouds, in which star formation takes place. The bright peak in the north of the cloud is an evolved star forming region, where the gas is heated by a cluster of new stars. The most interesting region in the image is totally inconspicuous in CO: the G327 hot core, as seen in methanol contours. It is a truly exceptional source, and is one of the richest sources of emission from complex organic molecules in the

  2. [Working under supervision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafko, P; Mach, J

    2013-08-01

    A graduate from a medical school who has obtained only, so called, adequate competence/ expertise must work under a supervision of a doctor who has the relevant specialised competence certification in order for the graduate to obtain this specialised competence as well. It is recommended to determine in writing which activities the doctor in training can perform alone during that time, which need to be supervised by the responsible doctor, and which treatment he is not yet prepared to perform at all. The head doctor or the head of the clinic is responsible for ensuring a full-time supervision of the doctor trainee by a certified specialist. If the trainee has obtained a certificate of completion of the basic level training of the relevant specialised module then he can serve during emergency hours under the condition that the presence of a specialised doctor is ensured to be within 20 minutes if needed. The head doctor, the head of the clinic or the specialised medical supervisor have no universal responsibility for any possible misconduct of the trainee. Everyone is responsible for his own conduct. The responsibility of the head doctor and the head of the clinic may be relevant if they did not fulfil the duties of being a supervising doctor. The responsibility may also be relevant if the supervising was neglected. Responsibility for the trainee may arise if he did not respect the orders from the supervisor or if the misconduct was such that it would be unacceptable even for a doctor without the relevant professional competence. If it is the case that the misconduct happens despite the supervising being absolutely correct, and under the conditions that the misconduct was unavoidable, the supervising attested professional doctor cannot be responsible for the consequences. Manual misconduct during a surgery is usually regarded to be accepted risk not violation of the rules of medical science.

  3. FOR MUSEUM WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of museums in society has expanded significantly in the last decades: from temples of knowledge to forums for debate and discussion, from repositories of objects to people-centred institutions with social responsibilities and functions. This shift reflects an ongoing trend to democratise museums and make them more accessible to wider audiences and responsive to the public’s changing needs, in particular the interests of local communities, whose composition has changed in recent years to include migrants and people of different ethnic backgrounds. With annual migration flows to the EU as a whole projected to increase from about 1 043 000 people in 2010 to 1 332 500 by 2020, the question of how cultural institutions can contribute to effective integration and dialogue has become more relevant than ever. Funders and society at large expect museums to play their part in facilitating the integration and peaceful coexistence of newcomers, with financial resources being made available, also at the EU level, to support them in this effort. Many questions can be raised as to whether it is right and appropriate to charge museums with these responsibilities and whether this would push the boundaries of their work too far and give the social function an exceedingly prominent role over the traditional conservation and educational tasks museums already fulfil. But this discussion seems to be already obsolete in the light of the growing body of evidence on good practices available at the European level. This essay aims to illustrate some of them, as well as to discuss some underpinning theoretical issues and methodological approaches.

  4. How venture capital works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zider, B

    1998-01-01

    The popular mythology surrounding the U.S. venture-capital industry derives from a previous era. Venture capitalists who nurtured the computer industry in its infancy were legendary both for their risk taking and for their hands-on operating experience. But today things are different, and separating the myths from the realities is crucial to understanding this important piece of the U.S. economy. Today's venture capitalists are more like conservative bankers than the risk takers of days past. They have carved out a specialized niche in the capital markets, filling a void that other institutions cannot serve. They are the linch-pins in an efficient system for meeting the needs of institutional investors looking for high returns, of entrepreneurs seeking funding, and of investment bankers looking for companies to sell. Venture capitalists must earn a consistently superior return on investments in inherently risky businesses. The myth is that they do so by investing in good ideas and good plans. In reality, they invest in good industries--that is, industries that are more competitively forgiving than the market as a whole. And they structure their deals in a way that minimizes their risk and maximizes their returns. Although many entrepreneurs expect venture capitalists to provide them with sage guidance as well as capital, that expectation is unrealistic. Given a typical portfolio of ten companies and a 2,000-hour work year, a venture capital partner spends on average less than two hours per week on any given company. In addition to analyzing the current venture-capital system, the author offers practical advice to entrepreneurs thinking about venture funding.

  5. Work engagement: drivers and effects

    OpenAIRE

    Bakhuys Roozeboom, M.M.C.; Schelvis, R.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of work engagement fits into the tradition of positive psychology, a recent paradigm shift in psychology which focuses on mental health rather than mental illness. This article gives an introduction to the concept of work engagement. Different definitions and viewpoints of the work engagement concept are discussed. This article will discuss the drivers of work engagement, as well as the associated effects that work engagement has on the health and wellbeing of workers and organisa...

  6. Supporting clinician educators to achieve “work-work balance”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry M Maniate

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinician Educators (CE have numerous responsibilities in different professional domains, including clinical, education, research, and administration. Many CEs face tensions trying to manage these often competing professional responsibilities and achieve “work-work balance.” Rich discussions of techniques for work-work balance amongst CEs at a medical education conference inspired the authors to gather, analyze, and summarize these techniques to share with others. In this paper we present the CE’s “Four Ps”; these are practice points that support both the aspiring and established CE to help improve their performance and productivity as CEs, and allow them to approach work-work balance.

  7. Restructuring Teachers' Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Kirtman

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite repeated attempts to reform schools, teachers' work has remained surprisingly stable. The purpose of this study was to investigate implementation of a state-funded restructuring initiative that intended broad changes in teachers' professional roles. Sponsors of the founding legislation reasoned that changes in teachers' roles would contribute to higher student achievement. This study examined the question of whether and how this program of comprehensive whole-school change promoted changes in teachers' roles in school governance, collegial relations, and the classroom. Further, the study traced the relationship of these changes to one another, and weighed the likelihood that they had the capacity to affect core educational practices. Theoretically, this study is situated in the available literature on teachers' collegial relations; participation in shared decision making; and classroom roles, relationships and practice. Three elementary schools served as the sites for intensive qualitative data collection completed over a two-year period. The schools differed in geographic location (two urban, one rural, but all enrolled a racially, ethnically and linguistically diverse population of students, and more than half of the students in each school qualified for free or reduced price lunch. The study resulted in multiple types and sources of data on teachers' professional roles, including: observations in classrooms, collegial interactions, and governance situations; interviews with teachers (including teacher leaders, parents, administrators, and students; and documents pertaining to the restructuring plans and process. Findings show that changes in the three areas were achieved unevenly in the three schools. All three schools introduced changes in classroom practice and roles, ranging from the adoption of multi-age classrooms to more modest innovations in curriculum or instruction. In only one case were changes in professional roles outside

  8. Work-Family Facilitation and Conflict, Working Fathers and Mothers, Work-Family Stressors and Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E. Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Work-family research frequently focuses on the conflict experienced by working mothers. Using data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce (N = 1,314), this study also examined work-family facilitation and working fathers. Ecological systems, family stress, family resilience, and sex role theories were used to organize the data and…

  9. The effects of work alienation on organisational commitment, work effort and work-to-family enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, Lars G; Den Dulk, Laura

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of work alienation on organisational commitment, work effort and work-to-family enrichment. There is substantial research on the effects of work alienation on passive job performance, such as organisational commitment. However, studies analysing work alienation on active performance, such as work effort, and outside work, such as work-to-family enrichment, are scarce. Two dimensions of work alienation are considered: powerlessness and meaninglessness. Hypotheses are tested using surveys collected among a national sample of midwives in the Netherlands (respondents: 790, response rate 61%). the findings indicate that work alienation (powerlessness and meaninglessness) influence organisational commitment, work effort and--to a lesser extent--work-to-family enrichment. High work meaninglessness, in particular, has negative effects on these outcomes. When people feel that they have no influence in their work (hence, when they feel 'powerless') and especially when the feel that their work is not worthwhile (when they feel 'meaningless') this has substantial negative effects. Managers should increase the meaningfulness that people attach to their work, thereby maintaining a high-quality workforce. Possible strategies include: (1) improving person-job fit, (2) developing high-quality relationships, (3) better communicating the results people help to deliver. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. "Work Gave Me a Lot of Confianza": Chicanas' Work Commitment and Work Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesquera, Beatriz M.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive interviews with 24 married Chicana workers with children examined socialization to work in family of origin, early employment, educational attainment, and familial and employment factors influencing levels of work commitment and work identity. Professional, clerical, and blue-collar workers all had strong work commitment but differed in…

  11. The effects of work alienation on organizational commitment, work effort and work-to-family enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Tummers (Lars); L. den Dulk (Laura)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAim: The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of work alienation on organizational commitment, work effort and work-to-family enrichment. Background: There is substantial research on the effects of work alienation on passive job performance, such as organizational commitment.

  12. Decent Work: A Psychological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eBlustein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution, which serves as the lead article for the Research Section entitled From Meaning of Working to Meaningful Lives: The Challenges of Expanding Decent Work, explores current challenges in the development and operationalization of decent work. Based on an initiative from the International Labor Organization (ILO; 1999, decent work represents an aspirational statement about the quality of work that should be available to all people who seek to work around the globe. Within recent years, several critiques have been raised about decent work from various disciplines, highlighting concerns about a retreat from the social justice ethos that had initially defined the concept. In addition, other scholars have observed that decent work has not included a focus on the role of meaning and purpose at work. To address these concerns, we propose that a psychological perspective can help to revitalize the decent work agenda by infusing a more specific focus on individual experiences and by reconnecting decent work to its social justice origins. As an illustration of the advantages of a psychological perspective, we explore the rise of precarious work and also connect the decent work agenda to the Psychology-of-Working Framework and Theory (Blustein, 2006; Duffy, Blustein, Diemer, and Autin, in press.

  13. Decent Work: A Psychological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blustein, David L; Olle, Chad; Connors-Kellgren, Alice; Diamonti, A J

    2016-01-01

    This contribution, which serves as the lead article for the Research Topic entitled "From Meaning of Working to Meaningful Lives: The Challenges of Expanding Decent Work," explores current challenges in the development and operationalization of decent work. Based on an initiative from the International Labor Organization [ILO] (1999) decent work represents an aspirational statement about the quality of work that should be available to all people who seek to work around the globe. Within recent years, several critiques have been raised about decent work from various disciplines, highlighting concerns about a retreat from the social justice ethos that had initially defined the concept. In addition, other scholars have observed that decent work has not included a focus on the role of meaning and purpose at work. To address these concerns, we propose that a psychological perspective can help to revitalize the decent work agenda by infusing a more specific focus on individual experiences and by reconnecting decent work to its social justice origins. As an illustration of the advantages of a psychological perspective, we explore the rise of precarious work and also connect the decent work agenda to the Psychology-of-Working Framework and Theory (Blustein, 2006; Duffy et al., 2016).

  14. Work-Life Balance and Work Satisfaction in Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Soo, Chin Hock

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether the workplace environment in an ICT organizations are conducive for the employees to use work-life balance and secondary investigation will involving whether the ability to have work-life balance will increase the happiness and this job satisfaction and leads to higher productivity. A questionnaire which consisted of all the work-life balance activities in the ICT organization were sent out and a total of 94 respondents whom worked in ICT organizations h...

  15. Impact of working hours on work-life balance

    OpenAIRE

    Holly, Sarah; Mohnen, Alwine

    2012-01-01

    To examine the influence of working hours on employees' satisfaction, this article uses a large, representative set of panel data from German households (GSOEP). The results show that high working hours and overtime in general do not lead to decreased satisfaction. Rather, increasing working hours and overtime have positive effects on life and job satisfaction, whereas the desire to reduce working hours has a negative impact on satisfaction. In 2009, nearly 60% of employees wanted to reduce t...

  16. Poor working conditions and work stress among Canadian sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, P; Sou, J; Chapman, J; Dobrer, S; Braschel, M; Goldenberg, S; Shannon, K

    2017-10-01

    While sex work is often considered the world's oldest profession, there remains a dearth of research on work stress among sex workers (SWs) in occupational health epidemiological literature. A better understanding of the drivers of work stress among SWs is needed to inform sex work policy, workplace models and standards. To examine the factors that influence work stress among SWs in Metro Vancouver. Analyses drew from a longitudinal cohort of SWs, known as An Evaluation of Sex Workers' Health Access (AESHA) (2010-14). A modified standardized 'work stress' scale, multivariable linear regression with generalized estimating equations was used to longitudinally examine the factors associated with work stress. In multivariable analysis, poor working conditions were associated with increased work stress and included workplace physical/sexual violence (β = 0.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06, 0.29), displacement due to police (β = 0.26; 95% CI 0.14, 0.38), working in public spaces (β = 0.73; 95% CI 0.61, 0.84). Older (β = -0.02; 95% CI -0.03, -0.01) and Indigenous SWs experienced lower work stress (β = -0.25; 95% CI -0.43, -0.08), whereas non-injection (β = 0.32; 95% CI 0.14, 0.49) and injection drug users (β = 0.17; 95% CI 0.03, 0.31) had higher work stress. Vancouver-based SWs' work stress was largely shaped by poor work conditions, such as violence, policing, lack of safe workspaces. There is a need to move away from criminalized approaches which shape unsafe work conditions and increase work stress for SWs. Policies that promote SWs' access to the same occupational health, safety and human rights standards as workers in other labour sectors are also needed.

  17. Work pressure is major cause of accidents at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, P.

    2004-01-01

    The work-related accident rate in the Netherlands is 6.4%. The highest rates were found in the construction and agricultural sectors and in the police force. Workers subject to heavy work and work pressure are shown to have an accident rate up to five times greater than for workers who seldom or

  18. The Process of Identity Work: Negotiating a Work Identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crafford, A.; Adams, B.G.; Saayman, T.; Vinkenburg, C.J.; Jansen, P.G.W.; Roodt, G.

    2015-01-01

    Identity work is an important process in negotiating, regulating and maintaining a coherent sense of self-(identity). In this chapter we discuss how identity work is particularly useful in establishing a work identity. The crux of the discussion in this chapter is based on the qualitative phase of

  19. Work Ethic Characteristics: Perceived Work Ethics of Supervisors and Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Gregory C.; Hill, Roger B.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the work ethics of supervisors with that of the employees they manage. The study investigated the occupational work ethics of both workers and their supervisors in a variety of businesses and industries to determine if there was a significant difference in the work ethics of these two groups as measured by…

  20. Military Social Work: Opportunities and Challenges for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Nikki R.

    2015-01-01

    Military social work is a specialized field of practice spanning the micro-macro continuum and requiring advanced social work knowledge and skills. The complex behavioral health problems and service needs of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans highlight the need for highly trained social work professionals who can provide militarily relevant and…

  1. Work teams and psychosocial risks and work stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.; Kraan, K.O.; Dhondt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Teamworking is a ‘double-edged sword’. On the one hand, teamworking has been recognised as a way of reducing work-related stress work-related stress by enhancing employees’ job autonomy. Conversely, there is a risk that teamworking could increase employee stress levels by enhancing work pressure.

  2. Identity at work: Exploring strategies for Identity Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron G. Adams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This study explored strategies for identity work that are central to the negotiation and regulation of employee work identity.Research purpose: The main aim of this study was to explore employee narratives and identify the strategies available to them in the process of identity work, as they defined themselves at work.Motivation for the study: As there is a scarcity of research on identity work in South Africa, this study wanted to advance knowledge about identity work and the strategies used for regulating and negotiating an identity at work by exploring these constructs in this context.Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research process formed the basis for this study. Nineteen employees from a global manufacturing company participated in two semi-structured in-depth interviews. Grounded theory was applied to analyse and interpret the data.Main findings: Nine strategies for identity work were identified and categorised into four broad themes (personal philosophies; relationships; career management and negotiating balance.Practical/managerial implications: Employees followed various strategies for defining themselves at work and this may have some implications for employee work engagement and productivity.Contribution/value-add: This study expands on current theoretical knowledge of identity work, and provides insights into the strategies people use to regulate and negotiate their identities at work

  3. Social Work Learning Spaces: The Social Work Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufferey, Carole; King, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the contribution of a physical learning space to student engagement in social work education. Drawing on a constructivist methodology, this paper examines the findings of a survey conducted with students and staff in a social work and human service programme about their experiences of a Social Work Studio learning space. The…

  4. Work outcomes of unhappy expatriates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    While some expatriates could feel deeply unhappy trying to deal with the challenges of living and working abroad, few rigorous academic studies have presented evidence of the association between unhappiness among expatriates and their work outcomes. That is surprising since performing certain work...... tasks is the reason for the foreign assignment. Based on the survey responses of 428 expatriate academics, results of this exploratory study show that subjective ill-being had a strong negative association with work adjustment, work performance, work effectiveness, job satisfaction as well as a strong...

  5. Long-term stability of earthen materials in contact with acidic tailings solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-11-01

    The objectives of the studies documented in this report were to use experimental and geochemical computer modeling tools to assess the long-term environmental impact of leachate movement from acidic uranium mill tailings. Liner failure (i.e., an increase in the permeability of the liner material) was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 years. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The high clay materials tested appear suitable for lining tailings impoundment ponds. The decreases in permeability are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. In conclusion the same mineralogical changes and contaminant reactions predicted by geochemical modeling and observed in laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 4 year history of acid attack.

  6. Constructed wetlands for water pollution management of aquaculture farms conducting earthen pond culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan; Chang, Yih-Feng; Sui, Hsuan-Yu

    2010-08-01

    This study established farm-scale constructed wetlands integrated to shrimp ponds, using existing earthern pond areas, with a wetland-to-pond ratio of only 0.086 for shrimp culture. The constructed wetlands were used as practice for aquaculture water and wastewater treatment, to regulate the water quality of shrimp ponds and manage pollution from pond effluents. The results of water quality monitoring for influent and effluent showed that constructed wetlands significantly reduced total suspended solids (59 to 72%), turbidity (55 to 65%), chlorophyll a (58 to 72%), 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (29 to 40%), and chemical oxygen demand (13 to 24%) from pond water. The wetland treatment sufficiently regulated water quality of the recirculating shrimp pond, which was significantly (p aquaculture farms (R.O.C. Environmental Protection Administration, 2007). Accordingly, wetland treatment applications were proposed to implement the best management practices to reduce pollution from aquaculture farms in Taiwan.

  7. Effect of municipal solid waste ash on the strength of earthen bricks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different amounts of Municipal Solid Waste Ash (MSWA) on the strength characteristics of the walls subjected to compressive loads. The soil used for making the bricks was stabilized using MSWA applied at the rate of 0%, 2%, 5% and 10% of the weight of soil.

  8. Performance of L. vannamei under different stocking strategies for producing marketable shrimp in earthen ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The availability of brackish ground water in non-coastal regions provides an opportunity to culture marine species able to adapt to reduced salinity. Ratios of major ions in low-salinity ground water may serve as indicators of the suitability of brackish ground water for aquaculture....

  9. Work environment factors and work sustainability in Norwegian cooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedahl, Sindre Rabben; Svendsen, Kristin; Romundstad, Pål R; Qvenild, Torgunn; Strømholm, Tonje; Aas, Oddfrid; Hilt, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Cooks have increased morbidity and mortality. A high turnover has also been reported. We aimed to elucidate work environment and work sustainability in Norwegian cooks. A questionnaire inquiring about working conditions and work participation was sent to 2082 cooks who had qualified from 1988 onwards. Of these, 894 responded. Time at work was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier plots and possible determinants for quitting work as a cook was analyzed with Cox regression. The median time at work was 16.6 years. There were differences in sustainability between types of kitchens for both sexes (p = 0.00). The median time in the profession was 9.2 years for the cooks in restaurants, while the cooks in institutions and canteens showed a substantially higher sustainability with 75.4% still at work after 10 years, and 57% still at work after 20 years in the profession. Of those still at work as a cook, 91.4% reported a good or very good contentment, and the 67.4% who expected to stay in the profession the next 5 years frequently answered that excitement of cooking, the social working environment, and the creative features of cooking were reasons to continue. Musculoskeletal complaints were the most common health-related reason for leaving work as a cook, while working hours was the most common non-health-related reason. There are significant differences in work sustainability between the cooks in the different types of kitchens. The identified determinants for length of time in the occupation can be used for preventive purposes. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  10. How Piercings and Tattooing Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About skin: Your body's largest organ Piercings and tattoos: Cool or dangerous? How piercings and tattooing work "); ( ... bite and sting Eczema: Itchy skin Piercings and tattoos: Cool or dangerous? How piercings and tattooing work ...

  11. [Working conditions in operating rooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułagowska, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to get acquainted with the opinions of the nursing staff on working conditions at their workplace. The study was carried out in a group of 398 nurses working in various kinds of operating rooms at 11 public hospitals. A questionnaire was used as a major tool of this study. The questionnaires were filled in by 259 operating room nurses (circulating nurses) and 139 nurse-anesthetists. The collected data show that working conditions in operating rooms do not ensure safety of the nursing staff at work. The main sources of problems are: work organization, technical factors, work equipment, work space, knowledge of hazards and strenuous factors among nurses, ways of preventing and/or limiting them. These elements are serious occupational risk factors influencing the work process and health status of nurses.

  12. How Does a Pacemaker Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does a Pacemaker Work? A pacemaker consists of a battery, a computerized ... these recordings to adjust your pacemaker so it works better for you. Your doctor can program the ...

  13. Implementing New Ways of Working

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granlien, Maren Sander; Hertzum, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Successful deployment of information technology (IT) involves implementation of new ways of working. Under-recognition of this organizational element of implementation entails considerable risk of not attaining the benefits that motivated deployment, yet knowledge of how to work systematically...

  14. Working mothers: Family-work conflict, job performance and family/work variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J Patel

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the relationship between family-work conflict, job performance and selected work and family characteristics in a sample of working mothers employed at a large retail organization. The hypothesis of a negative relationship between family-work conflict and job performance was rejected. Married women reported significantly higher family-work conflict than unmarried women, while women in the highest work category gained the highest job performance rating. More than half the sample indicated that paid work was more important than their housework and reported that their working had a positive impact on their families. The findings are discussed in relation to the changing work and family identities of non-career women.

  15. Human Work Interaction Design. Work Analysis and HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume. ......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications.......This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume....... The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability...

  16. Biopsychosocial correlates of work motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Liesienė, Justina; Endriulaitienė, Auksė

    2008-01-01

    Background, purpose. Work motivation is a potential predictor of employee turnover, job satisfaction, commitment, job performance and psychological wellbeing. Researchers argue that motivated employees work more effectively. The purpose of the current study was to identify biological (gender, age and health), psychological (personality traits) and social (marital status, children, work sector and position) factors related to employees’ work motivation. It was also predicted that subjectively...

  17. Biopsychosocial correlates of work motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Gaubė, Justina; Endriulaitienė, Auksė

    2008-01-01

    Work motivation is a potential predictor of employee turnover, job satisfaction, commitment, job performance and psychological wellbeing. Researchers argue that motivated employees work more effectively. The purpose of the current study was to identify biological (gender, age and health), psychological (personality traits) and social (marital status, children, work sector and position) factors related to employees’ work motivation. It was also predicted that subjectively perceived job effecti...

  18. Special working conditions of juveniles

    OpenAIRE

    Tomek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Resumé: In my rigorous work I dealt with the legal arrangement of the special working conditions of juveniles and minors. These conditions are being legally arranged since over two centuries. One of the characteristical signs in the development of this legal arrangement is enlarging the legal protection of working minors as well as of juveniles resulting namely in shortening the working hours for minors, determinations of the minimal age for taking a job, determinations of the obligatory scho...

  19. Work Engagement of Kindergarten Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Nick, Riika

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the factors of work engagement of kindergarten teachers and the elements of these factors. Work engagement is one part of work well-being. This final thesis was a qualitative study. The method for collecting data was theme interview, which is a qualitative study method. For this study I interviewed five kindergarten teachers. The data were analyzed by thematic analysis. As a theoretical framework I used work engagement, which is divided into three...

  20. Work environment factors and work sustainability in Norwegian cooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindre Rabben Svedahl

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cooks have increased morbidity and mortality. A high turnover has also been reported. We aimed to elucidate work environment and work sustainability in Norwegian cooks. Material and Methods: A questionnaire inquiring about working conditions and work participation was sent to 2082 cooks who had qualified from 1988 onwards. Of these, 894 responded. Time at work was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier plots and possible determinants for quitting work as a cook was analyzed with Cox regression. Results: The median time at work was 16.6 years. There were differences in sustainability between types of kitchens for both sexes (p = 0.00. The median time in the profession was 9.2 years for the cooks in restaurants, while the cooks in institutions and canteens showed a substantially higher sustainability with 75.4% still at work after 10 years, and 57% still at work after 20 years in the profession. Of those still at work as a cook, 91.4% reported a good or very good contentment, and the 67.4% who expected to stay in the profession the next 5 years frequently answered that excitement of cooking, the social working environment, and the creative features of cooking were reasons to continue. Musculoskeletal complaints were the most common health-related reason for leaving work as a cook, while working hours was the most common non-health-related reason. Conclusions: There are significant differences in work sustainability between the cooks in the different types of kitchens. The identified determinants for length of time in the occupation can be used for preventive purposes.

  1. Work, organisational practices, and margin of manoeuver during work reintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Fergal

    2017-09-29

    Many individuals of working age experience cardiovascular disease and are disabled from work as a result. The majority of research in cardiac work disability has focused on individual biological and psychological factors influencing work disability despite evidence of the importance of social context in work disability. In this article, the focus is on work and organisational features influencing the leeway (margin of manoeuvre) workers are afforded during work reintegration. A qualitative method was used. A large auto manufacturing plant was selected owing to work, organisational, and worker characteristics. Workplace context was assessed through site visits and meetings with stakeholders including occupational health, human resources and union personnel and a review of collective agreement provisions relating to seniority, benefits and accommodation. Worker experience was assessed using a series of in-depth interviews with workers (n = 12) returning to work at the plant following disabling cardiac illness. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. Workers demonstrated variable levels of adjustment to the workplace that could be related to production expectations and work design. Policies and practices around electronic rate monitoring, seniority and accommodation, and disability management practices affected the buffer available to workers to adjust to the workplace. Work qualities and organisational resources establish a margin of manoeuver for work reintegration efforts. Practitioners need to inform themselves of the constraints on work accommodation imposed by work organisation and collective agreements. Organisations and labour need to reconsider policies and practices that creates unequal accommodation conditions for disabled workers. Implications for rehabilitation Margin of manoeuvre offers a framework for evaluating and structuring work reintegration programmes. Assessing initial conditions for productivity expectations, context and ways

  2. Youth Work Experience and Employability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Stephen F.; And Others

    This paper examines the effects of youth work experience on subsequent employability. The paper begins with a speculative consideration of the ways in which work experience might affect later employability. Three types of research literature are then reviewed: (1) economic studies of the relation between youth work and subsequent employment and…

  3. Professors' Observations on Their Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Betty; Mager, Gerald M.

    Previous studies of professors of education have noted what activities comprised the work of being a professor, how professors allocated time to the various work tasks, how they would have preferred to allocate time, and insights they had about their work. In this study, parallel data were gathered on the broader education professoriate. Survey…

  4. Toward a Youth Work Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, Michael

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in the professionalization of the youth work field in Australia and the United States. In this article I draw on relevant literature from the sociology of professions to explore the appeal of professionalization for youth work. The interest in professionalism is examined along with the strategies youth work practitioners…

  5. Systematic Quality Work in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Sonja; Williams, Pia; Sandberg, Anette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the meaning that Swedish preschool teachers ascribe to systematic quality work. In Sweden, all preschools are required to work systematically with quality issues. This involves several interdependent steps that follow each other in a specific order. Although the concept of systematic quality work might…

  6. Work shifts in Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Recupero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency Medicine is known as a high stress specialty. The adverse effect of constantly rotating shifts is the single most important reason given for premature attrition from the field. In this work problems tied with night shift work will be taken into account and some solutions to reduce the impact of night work on the emergency physicians will be proposed.

  7. How Do Asthma Medicines Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Kid Who's Bullied? How Do Asthma Medicines Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Do Asthma Medicines Work? Print A A A en español ¿Cómo funcionan ... control medicines (also called controller or maintenance medicines) work over a long period of time by keeping ...

  8. Sectoral profiles of working conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, I.L.D.; Andries, F.; Berg, R. van den; Dhondt, S.

    2002-01-01

    This report looks at trends in working conditions across different sectors Over the period 1995-2000. Basing its findings on the Third European Survey on Working Conditions (2000) in the 15 EU Member States and Norway, it examines the quality of working life in eighteen different sectors. It

  9. Sectoral profiles of working conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, I.L.D.; Parent-Thirion, A.

    2003-01-01

    This report looks at trends in working conditions across different sectors over a five-year period 1995-2000. Basing its findings on the Third European Survey on Working Conditions carried out by the Foundation in 2000 in the 15 EU Member States and Norway, it examines the quality of working life in

  10. Breastfeeding and returning to work

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet aims to encourage breastfeeding mothers to continue breastfeeding after they have returned to work. It highlights the benefits of continuing to breastfeed, sets out the options for combining breastfeeding and work, explains the rights breastfeeding mothers have to support from their employer, and outlines what facilities and equipment mothers will need to express milk at work.

  11. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Good daytime sleep is possible, though, if shift work is a necessary part of your work life. To promote better sleep during the day: ... Take naps. Napping late in the day before work might help you make up your sleep debt. ...

  12. Work engagement: drivers and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakhuys Roozeboom, M.M.C.; Schelvis, R.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of work engagement fits into the tradition of positive psychology, a recent paradigm shift in psychology which focuses on mental health rather than mental illness. This article gives an introduction to the concept of work engagement. Different definitions and viewpoints of the work

  13. Action research and Care Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Anette

    The paper is a about planning and empowerment in care work at public nursing homes and the role of action research. It is based on ongoing work in the “Center for Demokratisk Samfundsudvikling og Aktionsforskning” at Roskilde University and the transnational research network KATARSIS, which works...

  14. Explorations in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie'er, Shi

    2013-01-01

    Social work education leans toward the applied approach emphasizing the practical and experiential. At present, many schools still offer social work education in the traditional academic model emphasizing textual learning. This approach is not suitable to the knowledge, student or teacher orientation in social work, and its pedagogy. To develop…

  15. Psychological context of work meaningfulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Paulík

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant shift of approach to the management of organizations and workers in recent decades. This shift in management philosophy is characterized by converting from traditional, conventional (rather bureaucratic management models to rather humanistic/existential oriented models. This transition comes partly from the understanding that human resources are the most promising and effective way for organization development, partly from a shift in the understanding of the role of organizations in society. The key point of these approaches has become a "meaning" or "meaningfulness" in relation to the work and organization. The importance of work meaningfulness is not only in its potential to increase the competitiveness of organizations, but especially in its major (mostly positive impacts on the employee himself and his work (and by that the organization and its performance. Work meaningfulness is strongly connected to the work engagement, which represents the active personal participation in the work process, manifested by vigor, active cooperation, willingness to contribute to the company's success and dedication to work. Work engagement seems to be next important factor affecting work attitudes and achievements of employees. The paper gives an overview of various approaches to work meaningfulness and work engagement, on the basis of which authors propose new model of work meaningfulness with overlap to work engagement. The work meaningfulness is not seen as one-dimensional variable, but consists of complex of interacting factors and processes that define an individual perceived meaning and importance of the work. Meaningful work is influenced by three areas. The first is the organizational culture. This is defined as a specific pattern of values, norms, beliefs, attitudes and assumptions that are often not clearly expressed, but affect the way individuals behave in an organization and how things are done. The second area is the work

  16. SolidWorks Administration Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Lombard, Matt

    2009-01-01

    What you need to prepare, install, and maintain SolidWorks. It's not enough to know how to use SolidWorks, if your job also requires you to install or maintain it, train new users, and implement standards. This in-depth guide was written for those of you who have to actually manage your company's SolidWorks system. From hardware selection to helping users to licensing and more, this is the everyday, bread-and-butter SolidWorks administration resource that IT and CAD managers have been seeking.:; SolidWorks is a powerful 3D solid modeling system that is popular with CAD users everywhere, but of

  17. Neurocognitive architecture of working memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Johan; Vogel, Edward K.; Lansner, Anders; Bergström, Fredrik; Nyberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The crucial role of working memory for temporary information processing and guidance of complex behavior has been recognized for many decades. There is emerging consensus that working memory maintenance results from the interactions among long-term memory representations and basic processes, including attention, that are instantiated as reentrant loops between frontal and posterior cortical areas, as well as subcortical structures. The nature of such interactions can account for capacity limitations, lifespan changes, and restricted transfer after working-memory training. Recent data and models indicate that working memory may also be based on synaptic plasticity, and that working memory can operate on non-consciously perceived information. PMID:26447571

  18. [Working conditions of community nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułagowska, Ewa; Kosińska, Maria

    2010-01-01

    To ensure the most efficient workplace health promotion it is essential to identify and monitor health conditions of employees and all components of the work process, as well as to recognize their cause-effect relationships. Community nurses form an occupational group with a specific type of workplace that is usually located in the patient's place of residence and thus not inspected in terms of safety and hygiene. The aim of the study was to identify working conditions of community nurses with special reference to occupational hazards. An anonymous questionnaire was used as a major tool of this survey. It contained 33 questions, concerning the work process, working conditions, work loads and arduousness, hazards and work-related complaints. The questionnaire was completed by 86 community nurses working in the Upper Silesia region. Community nurses generally assessed their work as hard. A more thorough analysis revealed that nursing and curative care, nursing and hygienic care and rehabilitation were regarded by community nurses as hard, whereas social diagnostics and curative diagnostics were assessed as much easier tasks. Excessive physical load, forced position at work, aggressive patients, patients' aggressive family members, dangerous domestic animals, low quality of technical devices in patients' homes were reported as the greatest hazards. The obtained results reveal that working conditions of community nurses do not ensure their safety at work.

  19. Beyond Work-Life "Integration".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joan C; Berdahl, Jennifer L; Vandello, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Research on the work-family interface began in the 1960s and has grown exponentially ever since. This vast amount of research, however, has had relatively little impact on workplace practice, and work-family conflict is at an all-time high. We review the work-family research to date and propose that a shift of attention is required, away from the individual experience of work and family and toward understanding how identity and status are defined at work. Several factors enshrine cherished identities around current workplace norms. The work devotion schema demands that those who are truly committed to their work will make it the central or sole focus of their lives, without family demands to distract them. Importantly, the work devotion schema underwrites valued class and gender identities: Work devotion is a key way of enacting elite class status and functions as the measure of a man--the longer the work hours and higher the demand for his attention, the better. Advocating change in the way work is done and life is lived meets resistance because it places these cherished identities at risk. Resistance to these identity threats keeps current workplace norms in place. This is why even the business case-which shows that current practices are not economically efficient-fails to persuade organizations to enact change. What is needed now is sustained attention to the implicit psychological infrastructure that cements the mismatch between today's workplace and today's workforce.

  20. Work activities within sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Duarte

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main results of a Franco-Brazilian Research project entitled "Work, Innovation and Development". The aim is to conceptually consider work activity within sustainable development, and to contribute methodologically towards developing strategies for designing sustainable work systems. After a brief description of the factors and the dimensions that have contributed to the creation of ideas on sustainable development, we will put forward two main approaches for understanding work activity within the context of sustainability, these being: the durability of work activity and the development of work activities for sustainable development. Both approaches are presented and examples are given. This is followed by a discussion of the design of sustainable work systems that focuses particularly on the political and technical dimensions of project management.

  1. Increasing work-time influence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, Anne Helene; Aust, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated how an intervention aiming at increasing eldercare workers' influence on their working hours affected the flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability of the working hours. We used baseline (n = 296) and follow-up (n = 274) questionnaire data......-operation with colleagues. In subgroup B and C, the participants ended up discussing the potential consequences of more work-time influence without actually implementing any changes. PRACTITIONER SUMMARY: Employee work-time influence may buffer the adverse effects of shift work. However, our intervention study suggested...... that while increasing the individual flexibility, increasing work-time influence may also result in decreased regularity of the working hours and less continuity in the care of clients and co-operation with colleagues....

  2. Work environment and school dropout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus D.; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Lund, Thomas

    Aim The aim of this presentation is to examine the possible impact of work environment (and especially psychosocial work environment) on school dropout. The questions raised are: to what extent do psychosocial work environment and especially the social relations between young apprentices...... and their colleagues and managers play a role in dropping out of upper secondary education? Methods A cohort of 3058 adolescents born in 1989 and a cohort of approximately 2000 young adults born in 1983 are used to examine the associations between work environment and subsequent dropout in upper secondary educational...... indicated that ‘being treated badly by superior’ was part of the reason for doing so. Further analyses show that reporting repetitive and monotonous work tasks increases the risk of dropping out (OR: 1.74) and that reporting bad working climate at ones work place increases the risk of considering...

  3. Unskilled Work and Learner Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines how unskilled work forms conditions for meeting the obligation to position oneself as an educable subject and engage in formal learning activities. Sensitivity to peoples’ work-life-experiences is necessary to understand their orientation toward different learning activities...... a critical theoretical approach inspired by Salling-Olesen’s and Archer’s concepts of identity and concerns can contribute to an understanding of the relationship between work and learner identity. Through narrative work-life interviews I examine how engagement in unskilled work in small and medium sized....... The main argument is that participation research must abandon the notion of motivation as an individual attribute and apply a dialectic concept of learner identity acknowledging work-life as a pivotal space for learning and formation of identity. I outline how a work-life-historical approach combining...

  4. Unskilled Work and Learner Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    The paper examines how unskilled work forms conditions for meeting the obligation to position oneself as an educable subject and engage in formal learning activities. Sensitivity to peoples’ work-life-experiences is necessary to understand their orientation toward different learning activities...... a critical theoretical approach inspired by Salling- Olesen’s and Archer’s concepts of identity and concerns can contribute to an understanding of the relationship between work and learner identity. Through narrative work-life interviews I examine how engagement in unskilled work in small and medium sized....... The main argument is that participation research must abandon the notion of motivation as an individual attribute and apply a dialectic concept of learner identity acknowledging work-life as a pivotal space for learning and formation of identity. I outline how a work-life-historical approach combining...

  5. Shift work, long working hours, and later risk of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, AH; Ishtiak-Ahmed, K

    2017-01-01

    –1971 and 1985–1986), long working hours defined as >45 hours per week (collected in 1970–1971), socioeconomic status, sleep, stress, and cardiovascular risk factors. Information about dementia diagnoses was obtained from registers. Participants were followed until 2014 (mean length of follow-up was 17.8 years......Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shift work and long working hours in midlife on the risk of dementia in old age. Methods: The present study comprised 4766 participants from the Copenhagen Male Study. We used information on shift work (collected in 1970......). We employed Poisson regression for the survival analyses and estimated incidence rate ratios (IRR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: We found no statistically significant association between shift work (IRR 0.86, 95% CI 0.70–1.05) or long working hours (IRR 0.97, 95% CI 0...

  6. Work engagement and meaningful work across generational cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Hoole

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Engaging employees and providing employees with a sense of meaning at work is not a one-size-fits-all approach. Although research has shown that differences between work engagement and meaningful work amongst generational cohorts exist, results are still inconclusive. With age becoming increasingly more important as a diversity factor, a better understanding of the dynamics between work engagement and meaningful work across different generational cohorts is necessary to design the right strategy for each organisation’s unique parameters.Research purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between work engagement and meaningful work and whether there are significant variances between the levels of work engagement and meaningful work between different generational cohorts.Motivation for study: Work engagement has consistently been highlighted by researchers and human resources experts as a recommended solution to provide companies with the upper hand when it comes to creating a competitive edge. Yet, levels of work engagement are far from ideal, requiring intensified efforts to identify solutions towards raising overall engagement levels. In recent years, much of the focus in terms of generating engagement has been aimed in the direction of financial rewards and other benefits; some organisational experts are of the opinion that a shift is occurring towards meaningful work instead of monetary rewards as the driver of engagement. The changing nature of the work landscape also suggests that generational cohorts experience work engagement and meaningful work differently. Understanding these complexities is mandatory in creating solutions towards improving levels of engagement and meaningful work.Research approach, design and method: A cross-sectional quantitative research approach has been followed. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and Psychological Meaningful Scale (PMS were administered to

  7. Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Oakes, J. Michael; Fan, Wen; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Davis, Kelly D.; Hammer, Leslie; Kossek, Ellen; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Hanson, Ginger; Mierzwa, Frank; Casper, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expecta...

  8. Human Work Interaction Design. Work Analysis and HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume. ......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  9. Military Social Work: Opportunities and Challenges for Social Work Education

    OpenAIRE

    Wooten, Nikki R.

    2015-01-01

    Military social work is a specialized field of practice spanning the micro-macro continuum and requiring advanced social work knowledge and skills. The complex behavioral health problems and service needs of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans highlight the need for highly trained social work professionals who can provide militarily-relevant and culturally-responsive evidence-informed services. Responding to the military behavioral health workforce and service needs of recently returned veterans pr...

  10. Working hours and Work-Life Balance Satisfaction in Couples

    OpenAIRE

    Georges, Nathalie; Méda, Dominique; Trancart, Danièle

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years, many studies have highlighted the strategic nature of working hours, the way they are determined, their regularity and their predictability to judge the qualities of a job and how family life and work life are reconciled. Our results confirm those obtained by previous studies and clarify them, while also showing that both the working hours of the persons questioned and those of their spouse constitute a central variable. We will first review the results from the a...

  11. Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Bloom; James Liang; John Roberts; Zhichun Jenny Ying

    2013-01-01

    A rising share of employees now regularly engage in working from home (WFH), but there are concerns this can lead to "shirking from home". We report the results of a WFH experiment at Ctrip, a 16,000-employee, NASDAQ-listed Chinese travel agency. Call center employees who volunteered to WFH were randomly assigned either to work from home or in the office for nine months. Home working led to a 13% performance increase, of which 9% was from working more minutes per shift (fewer breaks and sick ...

  12. Work, work-life conflict and health in an industrial work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmig, O; Bauer, G F

    2014-01-01

    Work-life conflict has been poorly studied as a cause of ill-health in occupational medicine. To study associations between physical and psychosocial working conditions, including work-life conflict on the one hand and general, physical and mental health outcomes on the other. Cross-sectional data were used from an employee survey among the workforces of four medium-sized and large companies in Switzerland. Physical work factors included five demands and exposures such as heavy loads, repetitive work and poor posture. Psychosocial factors included 14 demands and limited resources such as time pressure, overtime, monotonous work, job insecurity, low job autonomy, low social support and work-life conflict. Health outcomes studied were self-rated health, sickness absence, musculoskeletal disorders, sleep disorders, stress and burnout. There was a response rate of 49%; 2014 employees participated. All adverse working conditions were positively associated with several poor health outcomes in both men and women. After mutual adjustment for all work factors and additional covariates, only a few, mainly psychosocial work factors remained significant as risk factors for health. Work-life conflict, a largely neglected work-related psychosocial factor in occupational medicine, turned out to be the only factor that was significantly and strongly associated with all studied health outcomes and was consistently found to be the strongest or second strongest of all the studied risk factors. Even in an industrial work environment, psychosocial work factors, and particularly work-life conflict, play a key role and need to be taken into consideration in research and workplace health promotion.

  13. Impact of work pressure, work stress and work-family conflict on firefighter burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Todd D; DeJoy, David M; Dyal, Mari-Amanda Aimee; Huang, Gaojian

    2017-10-25

    Little research has explored burnout and its causes in the American fire service. Data were collected from career firefighters in the southeastern United States (n = 208) to explore these relationships. A hierarchical regression model was tested to examine predictors of burnout including sociodemographic characteristics (model 1), work pressure (model 2), work stress and work-family conflict (model 3) and interaction terms (model 4). The main findings suggest that perceived work stress and work-family conflict emerged as the significant predictors of burnout (both p burnout among firefighters.

  14. [Difficulties at work and work motivation of ulcerative colitis suffers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, Ayami; Yamada, Kazuko; Morioka, Ikuharu

    2015-01-01

    Because ulcerative colitis (UC) repeats remission and relapse, it is necessary to keep the condition at the relapse time in mind when considering support to provide UC suffers with at the workplace. The aim of this survey was to clarify the difficulties at work and work motivation that UC suffers feel at present and experience at the worsening time, and the factors for maintaining work motivation. We carried out an anonymous questionnaire survey of patients with present or past work experience. The difficulties at work (17 items) and work motivation (4 items) in the past week and at the time when the symptoms were most intensive during work were investigated using a newly designed questionnaire. We regarded the time in the past week as the present, and the time when the symptoms were most intensive during work as the worsening time. There were 70 respondents (response rate 32.0%). Their mean age was 43.8 years, and their mean age at onset was 33.8 years. All subjects, except 2 subjects after surgery, took medicine. Fifty-three (75.7%) of the subjects were in remission at the present, and most of them (91.4%) managed their physical condition well. Difficulties at work that many subjects worried about at the present were relevant to work conditions, such as "Others at workplace do not understand having an intractable and relapsing disease" (41.4%) or "Feel delayed or lack of chance of promotion or career advancement due to the disease" (38.6%). At the worsening time, the management of physical condition went wrong, and the frequency of hospital visits was increased, but few subjects consulted with superiors or colleagues at workplace. Difficulties at work that many subjects underwent at the worsening time were relevant to symptoms, such as "Feel physically tired" (80.0%) or "Decline foods or alcoholic beverages offered at business parties" (72.9%). Those who maintained work motivation even at the worsening time received no work-related consideration and had an

  15. Women's work and health in Iran: a comparison of working and non-working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad-Nia, Shirin

    2002-03-01

    This paper analyses research on the impact of work on mothers' health in Tehran (Iran) within a role analytic framework. A survey was conducted of a representative sample of working and non-working mothers in Tehran in 1998 (N = 1065, 710 working mothers, and 355 non-working mothers). Three main explanatory factors were examined (socio-demographic, work and work-related, and social-life context variables) alongside a range of mental and physical health outcome variables. Unlike in the West, where women's paid work is generally associated with better health, statistically significant differences between working and non-working women were not found in Tehran. It is argued that this is a result of the counter-balance of the positive and negative factors associated with paid work, such as increased stress on one hand and self-esteem on the other. Iranian society's particular socio-cultural climate has contributed to this finding, with its dominant gender-role ideology; the priority and extra weight placed on women's traditional roles as wives and mothers, and the remarkably influential impact of husbands' attitudes on women's health.

  16. Work Attitudes and Work Ethic as Predictors of Work Engagement among Polish Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czerw Agnieszka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between work engagement and the psychological traits of employees, such as attitudes towards work and work ethic. Additionally, the study included demographic characteristics of employees and organizational characteristics. Research was conducted using the Polish adaptations of two well known methods: Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile and Utrecht Work Enagagement Scale, as well as the Work Attitude Questionnaire (WAQ - a new Polish method. 360 adult employees of two large Polish regions took part in the study. The analysis showed a significant influence of hedonic-autotelic attitude, as well as four dimensions of work ethic on work engagement. It seems to be an important conclusion that work engagement turned out to be far more determined by the subject’s psychological traits than demographic and organizational ones. These results, indicating the special role of the perception of work as a central value, can be used only in the area of attitudes towards work formed during adolescence (e.g., at school, in career counseling but also in the area of motivating the employees by the organization.

  17. Working at Getting to Work: Negotiating Transportation and Low-Wage Work in Rural Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Brooke Kelly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the efforts that low-income mothers go through to get to work in two rural Michigan county contexts. The author relies on qualitative, in-depth interview data with one group of Latina mothers, who worked in agricultural labor often migrating with their families, and another group of white settled mothers in a county dominated by service jobs. Their accounts reveal the backstage labor needed to get to low-wage jobs in rural areas. Commuting, moving, and/or migrating necessitate much effort and planning. Without public transportation, mothers often "scramble" with unreliable, and often unsafe, vehicles. They also rely on friends and family members, negotiate with employers, coordinate their journey to work with the schedules of family members, and take risks to get to work. Programs and policies that provide assistance with reliable transportation, child care, and work and family balance should reduce the work of getting to work.

  18. Work for Passion or Money?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Løyland, Knut; Holm, Anders

    2017-01-01

    adds to the literature by estimating the significance of these various income sources on the time allocated to arts work, non-arts work, and leisure. The results provide convincing evidence for the work-preference model, and ad hoc evidence shows that art grants have a significant positive effect......This paper assesses the relative impact of work for money or work for passion on Norwegian artists by examining artists’ labor supply. Our contribution is twofold. The first is to test the work-preference model and the second is to investigate the impact of arts grants on artists’ labor supply....... The empirical specification draws two distinctions: between arts and non-arts income and between labor and non-labor income. Non-labor income is divided into three different sources: (1) spouse's income, (2) income from financial assets and social benefits, and (3) arts grants and subsidies. Our contribution...

  19. [Work-Related Medical Rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethge, M

    2017-02-01

    Work-related medical rehabilitation (WMR) is a strategy to improve work participation in patients with poor work ability. This review summarizes the state of knowledge on WMR. The prevalence of poor work ability and corresponding need for WMR is high (musculoskeletal disorders: 43%; mental disorders: 57%). The meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in patients with musculoskeletal disorders shows better return to work outcomes after one year in favor of WMR patients than compared to patients participating in usual medical rehabilitation. The amount of work-related measures in rehabilitation was clearly increased during recent years. A direct involvement of the workplace and a closer cooperation with employers and occupational health physicians may further improve the outcomes of WMR. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. It Worked There. Will It Work Here? Researching Teaching Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    "It worked there. Will it work here?" We have to be able to identify the "it" in that aphoristic question. Classifications of teaching methods belong in the social realm, where human intentions play a fundamental role in how phenomena are categorized. The social realm is characterized with the help of John Searle. Social…

  1. Globalization and working time: working hours and flexibility in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgoon, B.; Raess, D.

    2009-01-01

    This article challenges popular wisdom that economic globalization uniformly increases working time in industrialized countries. International investment and trade, they argue, have uneven effects for workplace bargaining over standard hours and over work-time flexibility, such as use of temporary

  2. Een internationale bachelor Social Work : eindrapportage internationale bachelor Social Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank Salemans

    2006-01-01

    Vergelijkende Europese studie in opdracht van Kees van Aken, toenmalig directeur van de opleiding Social Work i.o. van de Hogeschool Zuyd, naar welke verschillende varianten er mogelijk zijn als er gesproken wordt over een Internationale Bachelor Social Work - Maastricht. Op welke manieren zijn er

  3. Callings, work role fit, psychological meaningfulness and work ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our aim in this study was to investigate the relationships among a calling orientation, work role fit, psychological meaningfulness and work engagement of teachers in Zambia. A quantitative approach was followed and a cross-sectional survey was used. The sample (n = 150) included 75 basic and 75 secondary school ...

  4. Mobile work: Ergonomics in a rapidly changing work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honan, Meg

    2015-01-01

    Places of work have been completely transformed by innovations in mobile work tools and ever-present access to internet data. This article characterizes use patterns and provides preliminary considerations for productive and comfortable use of common mobile devices. Two surveys described trends in mobile work. In the first, ergonomics professionals who oversee programs reported common mobile devices, their users and what data is accessed. The second, an end user survey, explored common activities performed on mobile devices, duration of use and locations where mobile work is common. The survey results provide a baseline data point for the status of mobile work in early 2014. Research indicates that additional risks have been introduced to the neck, thumbs and hands when using mobile devices. Possible trends regarding device use and work locations emerge. Intervention studies provide some direction for the practitioner. Practical strategies are outlined to reduce exposure intensity and duration. Contemporary mobile work presents tremendous change and opportunity for ergonomists and researchers to keep pace with fitting the changing models of work to the person. Continued research is needed on current mobile device use patterns to better understand ergonomic risk exposure in this rapidly changing realm.

  5. Human Work Interaction Design. Work Analysis and HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume. ...

  6. What's Working in Working Memory Training? An Educational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redick, Thomas S.; Shipstead, Zach; Wiemers, Elizabeth A.; Melby-Lervåg, Monica; Hulme, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Working memory training programs have generated great interest, with claims that the training interventions can have profound beneficial effects on children's academic and intellectual attainment. We describe the criteria by which to evaluate evidence for or against the benefit of working memory training. Despite the promising results of initial…

  7. ASSESSMENT OF WORK-SPACE AND WORK-METHOD DESIGNS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related injuries among its workforce. This research assessed work-space (WsD) and work-method designs (WmD), level of compliance with recommended standards (RSs) and effects on workers' wellbeing. Clearances for services in 55 supine ...

  8. Renovation work at Restaurant 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Due to the age of the present kitchen and freeflow installations in Restaurant 1, essential renovation work is due to be carried out. The work is scheduled to last from September 2006 to May 2007. Work on the self-service area of the restaurant will commence in November. Every effort will be made to minimise the inconvenience caused to users of the restaurant and we thank you in advance for your co-operation during this period.

  9. Equality Work in Finnish Ministries

    OpenAIRE

    Tanhua, Inkeri

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to knowledge about the equality work in public sector organisations. Especially, my aim is to bring light into everyday experiences of doing equality work. This is achieved through interviewing equality workers in Finnish ministries. The study draws also on my personal experiences as an equality consultant. The main question I ask is: Which issues influence the content of equality work? According to feminist research, promoting equality is always a poli...

  10. Human Work Interaction Design. Work Analysis and HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    . The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability......This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  11. Human Work Interaction Design. Work Analysis and HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    . The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability......This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  12. Work flow analysis: eliminating non-value-added work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Terry; Bokovoy, Joanna; Halkins, Deborah; Hitchings, Kim

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of implemented work environment changes on nursing and support staff roles. In 1999, the authors identified key drivers of unnecessary work associated with the day-to-day delivery of patient care in their institution and implemented changes based on their results. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Work sampling and focus groups were used to evaluate work flow. Activity categories were identified and clearly defined by advanced practice nurses. All compiled data were subsequently synthesized and cross-checked with the information acquired through independent, multidisciplinary validation studies. There were significant changes (P <.0001) noted in overall distribution of observed activities for nurses and all support staff. The significant changes noted in overall distribution of observed activities reflect the important adjustments made in both job descriptions and the environment to eliminate key drivers of unnecessary work in the delivery of patient care.

  13. Staggered Bargaining and Hours Worked

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Danthine; Stephane Auray

    2004-01-01

    A matching model with labor/leisure choice and staggered bargaining is used to explain (i)differences in GDP per hour and GDP per capita, (ii) differences in employment, (iii) differences in the proportion of part-time work across countries. The model predicts that the higher the level of rigidity in wages and hours the lower are GDP per capita, employment, part-time work and hours worked, but the higher is GDP per hours worked. In addition, it predicts that a country with a high level of rig...

  14. Bargaining frictions and hours worked

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane AURAY; Danthine, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    A matching model with labor/leisure choice and bargaining frictions is used to explain (i) differences in GDP per hour and GDP per capita, (ii) differences in employment, (iii) differences in the proportion of part-time work across countries. The model predicts that the higher the level of rigidity in wages and hours the lower are GDP per capita, employment, part-time work and hours worked, but the higher is GDP per hours worked. In addition, it predicts that a country with a high level of ri...

  15. Working Conditions, Lifestyles and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cottini, Elena; Ghinetti, Paolo

    The aim of this paper is to investigate whether employee health is affected by the environment in which the individual works - in terms of both physical and psychosocial working conditions - and by his or her lifestyle. Health measures are computed from Danish data, and refer to both self assessed...... general health and two more objective health measures: mental health specific to work-related problems, and physical health. We find that both bad working conditions and bad lifestyles reduce health, especially in its self-assessed component. The impact of lifetsyle indicators have a more modest health...

  16. [Work-related stress urticaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landex, Nadia Lander

    2016-12-12

    A medical doctor occasionally experienced itching papular exanthema during work hours. Careful history taking and a diary of symptoms demonstrated an association between the urticaria and stressful work situations. Urticaria can have many triggers, and stress is among the well-known triggers. The usual treatment of urticaria consists of avoiding triggers and, if necessary, antihistamines. Whereas it might be difficult to follow these recommendations in the case of work-related urticaria, the disorder may be perceived as a reminder of work situations which are going awry.

  17. Interprofessional Cooperation as Collective Ethics Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    François Gillet; dr Ed de Jonge

    2015-01-01

    Sarah Banks (2012) describes ethics work mainly as the effort people put into developing themselves as good practitioners. She discerns six aspects of ethics work: identity work, framing work, reason work, emotion work, role work and performance work. Although ethics work focuses on the ethical

  18. [Investigating work, age, health and work participation in the ageing work force in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebener, M; Hasselhorn, H M

    2015-04-01

    Working life in Germany is changing. The work force is ageing and the number of people available to the labour market will - from now on - shrink considerably. Prospectively, people will have to work longer; but still today, most people leave employment long before reaching official retirement age. What are the reasons for this? In this report, a conceptual framework and the German lidA Cohort Study are presented. The "lidA conceptual framework on work, age, health and work participation" visualises determinants of employment (11 "domains") in higher working age, e. g., "work", "health", "social status" and "life style". The framework reveals 4 key characteristics of withdrawal from work: leaving working life is the result of an interplay of different domains (complexity); (early) retirement is a process with in part early determinants in the life course (processual character); retirement has a strong individual component (individuality); retirement is embedded in a strong structural frame (structure). On the basis of this framework, the "lidA Cohort Study on work, age, health and work participation" (www.lida-studie.de) investigates long-term effects of work on health and work participation in the ageing work force in Germany. It is the only large study in Germany operationalising the concept of employability in a broad interdisciplinary approach. Employees subject to social security and born in 1959 or in 1965 will be interviewed (CAPI) every 3 years (N[wave 1]=6 585, N[wave 2]=4 244) and their data will be linked (where consented) with social security data covering employment history and with health insurance data. The study design ("Schaie's most efficient design") allows for a tri-factor model that isolates the impact of age, cohort and time. In 2014, the second wave was completed. In the coming years lidA will analyse the association of work, health and work participation, and identify age as well as generation differences. lidA will investigate the

  19. The profound precariousness of work through temporary work agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela-Emilia Marica

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the number of atypical work contracts in the field of industry relationships, as part of a major European trend towards gaining more flexibility in the labour market, is significant and cannot be overlooked in most member countries of the European Union. This finding is corroborated by the recent surveys conducted across Europe, that reveal the prevalence of these flexible ways of organizing work, over the archetypal template of the individual work contract. However, this range of atypical contractual arrangements and the great number of versions and subcategories they include, are describing a number of negative features that seem to characterize these new forms of employment. Since the field of atypical employment is complex and we cannot analyse the incidence of these negative effects for all the atypical methods of employment, in the following article we will limit ourselves to explore the pressing issues related to the system of temporary work through work agencies. As we shall see, all aspects of the salary field, of health and safety at work and the level of insecurity and instability of labour through temporary work agency reveals a strong character associated with this kind of precarious employment.

  20. Strategies for Successful Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipp, Mary Beth; Palenque, Stephanie Maher

    2017-01-01

    The thought of group work, or CLC Groups often strikes fear and loathing in the hearts and minds of both students and instructors. According to Swan, Shen, and Hiltz (2006) collaborative work presents the possibilities of many difficulties including a largely unequal contribution of group participants, an inability of the students to manage the…

  1. Work, environment and reproductive health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Snijder (Claudia)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWith the increasing labour force participation among women in Western countries, many women will work during their reproductive years. This will increase the likelihood that women during their reproductive years will be exposed to a variety of risk factors at work that may

  2. FY 1994 Annual Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This is the third Office of Inspector General (OIG)Annual Work Plan. Its purpose is to summarize work completed in Fiscal Year (FY) 1993, identify ongoing projects from previous fiscal years which the OIG intends to continue into FY 1994, and announce planned projects which the OIG intends to begin in FY 19994.

  3. Work, Experience and Adult Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    A presentation and discussion of the theories of work, experience and adult education developed by the German philosopher and sociologist Oskar Negt.......A presentation and discussion of the theories of work, experience and adult education developed by the German philosopher and sociologist Oskar Negt....

  4. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  5. Working with the News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovensky, Pat; Marx, Gary

    This booklet provides advice on how schools can forge useful working relationships with the news media. Nineteen ground rules for working with print or broadcast media are outlined. The most important rule for all occasions is to make sure that your information is true. Strategies are described for using various tools of the trade, such as the…

  6. Personality, Sex, and Work Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Loyde; Hartman, Timothy

    1978-01-01

    The Vocational Preference Inventory (VPA) and the Ohio Work Values Inventory (OWVI) were administered to 115 undergraduates. A two-factor MANOVA was performed with personality types (VPI) and sex as independent variables and work values (OWVI) as dependent variables. The F-ratios for main effects were significant. (Author/SJL)

  7. Working postures: prediction and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    To date, workstation designers cannot see the effects of a design on working posture before a mock-up/prototype is available. At that moment, usually the margin for creating the conditions required for adopting favourable working postures is still very limited. Posture prediction at an early design

  8. Counseling for Work and Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mary Sue

    2012-01-01

    Counseling for work and relationship is a social constructionist perspective, informed by feminist and social justice values, and responsive to radical changes in contemporary lives, that fosters a shift in vocational psychology from helping people develop careers to helping people construct lives through work and relationship. The first and major…

  9. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The participants of the QCD working sub-group are: Rahul Basu, D Indumathi,. E Laenen, Swapan Majhi, Prakash Mathews, Anuradha Misra, Asmita Mukherjee,. R Ratabole, V Ravindran and W Vogelsang. The main focus of this working group had been to concentrate on some issues in resummation which are essential to ...

  10. Work orientations of female returners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorewaard, H.; Hendrickx, J.; Verschuren, P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Hakim's Preference Theory on the heterogeneity of the work-life preferences of women, and in particular its implicit assumption that a woman's preference to work or to stay at home is based on her personal choices, has frequently been criticized. Other researchers emphasize the constraining

  11. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  12. Working group report: Neutrino physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Working group report: Neutrino physics. Coordinators: SANDHYA CHOUBEY1,∗ and D INDUMATHI2. Working group members: S Agarwalla1, A Bandyopadhyay1, G Bhattacharyya3,. E J Chun4, B Dasgupta5, A Dighe5, P Ghoshal5, A K Giri6, S Goswami1,. M Hirsch7, T Kajita8, M Kaplinghat9, H S Mani10, R Mohanta11,.

  13. Quantum chromodynamics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is the report of the QCD working group at WHEPP-6. Discussions and work on heavy ion collisions, polarized scattering, and collider phenomenology are reported. Keywords. QCD; polarized scattering; light front field theory; heavy ion physics; non-equilibrium field theory; parton distributions at LHC; fragmentation ...

  14. African Journal of Social Work

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Social Work is an international refereed journal that serves as a forum for exchanging ideas and knowledge and discussing issues relevant to social work practice, education and research in the African region. Producing 2 issues a year, the Journal is published by the National Association of Social ...

  15. Challenges Facing Group Work Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo; Kang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Online group work can be complicated because of its asynchronous characteristics and lack of physical presence, and its requirements for skills in handling technology, human relationships, and content-related tasks. This study focuses on the administrative, logistical and relationship-related challenges in online group work. Challenges in areas…

  16. Motivational Issues in Knowledge Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca BOGDAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the place of emotions in modern theories of motivation, and the influence of the knowledge-oriented paradigm on redefining motivation and rethinking ways of rendering work, knowledge work, in particular, more efficient, in a society in which human participation and deployment of intellectual capital become key factors of success, replacing traditional, tangible-focused, factors of production.

  17. Social Symbolic Work in Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Benedikte

    This paper reports on a research project that explores social symbolic work. The social symbolic work in question seeks to introduce education in entrepreneurship into the school curriculum in a remote part of Greenland – in order to contribute to regional development. The paper investigates how ...... and agility (MMA)....

  18. How it works with children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wil Portegijs; Mariëlle Cloïn; Ingrid Ooms; Evelien Eggink

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Hoe het werkt met kinderen. More and more women find motherhood alone too restricting, and attach great value to having a paid job. If they have children, therefore, most women carry on working, though virtually all of them drastically reduce the number of hours they work.

  19. Defining criminal justice social work

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fundamental objective of this article is to urge a change in the conventional paradigms used to define the practice of social work in the field of criminal justice, and to set in motion a conversion to a unified paradigm of criminal justice social work. A unified paradigm is used here to refer to the multidimensional and ...

  20. Safety at Work : Research Methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, van K. (Karin); Boer, de J. (Johannes); Brinks, G. (Ger); Goering-Zaburnenko, T. (Tatiana); Houten, van Y. (Ynze); Teeuw, W. (Wouter)

    2012-01-01

    In this document, we provide the methodological background for the Safety atWork project. This document combines several project deliverables as defined inthe overall project plan: validation techniques and methods (D5.1.1), performanceindicators for safety at work (D5.1.2), personal protection

  1. CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES : WORKING WITH CHILDREN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is followed by a description of the intervention, and its elements of debriefing (of the child and the entire family), assessment and work with the child in question. The importance of working with and supporting the caregivers is also discussed. Finally, important aspects of the intervention are highlighted. Throughout ...

  2. Recontextualising work into academic practices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    what happens in higher education classrooms, and there are inherent difficulties in integrating the two in any productive way. ... Keywords: Higher education; work integrated learning; new work order competencies; recontextualisation; globalisation ..... real; learners were not necessarily sensing reality out there in the.

  3. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is the report of the subgroup QCD of Working Group-4 at WHEPP-9. We present the activities that had taken place in the subgroup and report some of the partial results arrived at following the discussion at the working group meetings. Keywords. Quantum chromodynamics; resummation; extra dimensions; multi-leg.

  4. Reawakening Your Passion for Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard; McKee, Annie; Goleman, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Five strategies can help people find meaning in work and renew their passion: (1) taking a short- or long-term break; (2) finding a development program; (3) creating reflective structures (spiritual, meditative, or other); (4) working with a coach; and (5) seeking new meaning in familiar territory. (SK)

  5. Training Implications of Work Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerison, C. J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    An important factor in job choice, both at the start of and during one's career, is one's psychological makeup, which must be taken into account in training and development programs. The authors relate the Jungian introvert-extrovert, judgment-perception theories to work and management, presenting data from a management work preferences sampling.…

  6. Paid care work and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Aust, Birgit; Burr, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that employees in paid care work (e.g., child, health, and elderly care) have increased rates of hospitalization with depression and treatment with antidepressants. It is unclear, however, whether these findings reflect a causal effect of the work on employee mental...

  7. The didactics of group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    will take its point of departure in pedagogical textbook introductions where group work is often presented as a means to learning social skills and co-workability. However, as most students and teachers know, this is not always the case. Observations of long-term group work show that this can be a tough...

  8. Group Work in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Debbie; Tolmie, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article considers how students might work together in small groups, from two to eight, in either a primary or secondary science classroom. The nature of group work can vary widely and could include, for example, a pair carrying out an illustrative experiment, a trio or quad debating climate change, or six or seven rehearsing how they will…

  9. The Social Work Practice Doctorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartocollis, Lina; Cnaan, Ram A.; Ledwith, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the emerging practice doctorate in social work. Based on the experience of the first such Doctor of Social Work (DSW) program, we provide information regarding the program origins and rationale, development, current structure, and future direction. Such information will enrich the discussion on the role…

  10. The Granting of Work Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, William E.; Humphrey, John A.

    1981-01-01

    Analyzed the process of granting work release. Administrative data on a 10 percent random sample of incarcerated males provided the basis for a path analysis. High custody grade was found to have a very strong direct path with granting of work releases. Other variables had weaker paths. (Author)

  11. Work-related consumption drivers and consumption at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2004-01-01

    The main message in this paper is that the discussion on sustainable consumption should also incorporate the consumption that occurs in relation to work and, more generally, the relationship between consumption at work and consumption at home. I start by considering how domestic consumption...... is encouraged by work-related factors and continue to consider how consumption activities occur in the workplace, so illustrating that production and consumption are intertwined. The main part of the paper deals in detail with the conceptual distinction between production and consumption. Inspiration is drawn...

  12. Individual features, working conditions and work injuries are associated with work ability among nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Frida Marina; Martinez, Maria Carmen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate factors associated with work ability among nursing professionals. They comprised 514 nursing professionals (83.8% of the total number of workers) from a hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. In 2009, we conducted a cross-sectional study that was a part of a 5-year planned cohort study initiated in 2008. We administered a comprehensive questionnaire to the participants in order to obtain data on their sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyles, and working conditions. The questionnaire also contained the Brazilian versions of the following: the Job Stress Scale (JSS), Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Questionnaire, Work-Related Activities That May Contribute To Job-Related Pain and/or Injury (WRAPI), and Work Ability Index (WAI). The results were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate linear regression analyses. On the WAI, 74.9% of the workers obtained a score of over 40 points (score range 7-49); the mean score was 42.3 points (SD=4.5). The final multivariate model showed that lower WAI scores were related to the work-related outcome, which was work injury, and the following individual characteristics and working conditions: body mass index (p=0.001), sex (female; p=0.002), sedentariness (p social support at work (p=0.003), effort-reward ratio (p=0.001), violence at work (p=0.005), WRAPI score (p work injuries (yes; p=0.001). Various factors were associated with work ability. The results showed that a number of variables should be considered when planning and implementing actions to maintain or improve work ability among nursing professionals.

  13. Encountering social work through STS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    this by examining the materials and types of knowledge that participate in shaping local community work practices and encounters between local community workers and residents in marginalized housing areas. Through this analysis, I argue that social work research can benefit from orienting itself more concretely......Encountering social work through STS: Marginalization, materials and knowledge In this presentation, I attempt to produce an encounter between STS and social work. Concretely, I focus on the subset of social work called “local community work”, which in Denmark is used to intervene on marginalized...... housing areas. The Danish state and its municipalities diligently track and monitor the statistics of social housing areas. Using “parameters of marginalization” such as ethnicity, income, unemployment and education, topographical depictions of social issues in certain areas are constituted and used...

  14. Radiological Work Planning and Procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Kurtz, J E

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In add...

  15. Informal work and formal plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsted, Rikke Juul; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2012-01-01

    trajectories. METHODS AND THEORY: An in-depth case study of patient trajectories at a Danish hospital and surrounding municipality using individual interviews with patients. Theory about trajectory and work by Strauss was included. RESULTS: Patients continuously took initiatives to organize their treatment...... and care. They initiated processes in the trajectories, and acquired information, which they used to form their trajectories. Patients presented problems to the healthcare professionals in order to get proper help when needed. DISCUSSION: Work done by patients was invisible and not perceived as work....... The patients' requests were not sufficiently supported in the professional organisation of work or formal planning. Patients' insertion and use of information in their trajectories challenged professional views and working processes. And the design of the formal pathway models limits the patients' active...

  16. [Sleep, work, and study: sleep duration in working and non-working students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erico Felden; Bernardo, Maria Perpeto Socorro Leite; D'Almeida, Vânia; Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the duration of sleep and associated factors in working and non-working students. Data were analyzed on the sleep-wake cycle in 863 teenage students in São Paulo, Brazil. Adjusted analyses were performed to compare sleep duration in working and non-working students. 18.4% of the group worked, and 52% of the working students slept eight hours or less per night. Prevalence of short sleep duration was higher in working students of both sexes (males, p = 0.017; females, p students showed short sleep duration in the analysis adjusted for socioeconomic status, but short sleep was more frequent in older adolescents (p = 0.004) and in lower (p = 0.001) and middle (p = 0.011) socioeconomic classes. Although more working students were in night school, in the model adjusted for gender and socioeconomic status, working students in afternoon courses showed higher prevalence of short sleep duration (PR = 2.53; 95%CI: 1.68-4.12).

  17. Depressed mood in the working population: associations with work schedules and working hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driesen, Karolien; Jansen, Nicole W H; Kant, Ijmert; Mohren, Danielle C L; van Amelsvoort, Ludovic G P M

    2010-07-01

    The impact of working time arrangements (WTA) on health has been studied extensively. Still, little is known about the interrelation between work schedules, working hours, and depressed mood. For work schedules, the underlying assumptions regarding depressed mood refer to a disturbance of social and biological rhythms, whereas for working hours, the assumptions relate to workload and work capacity. Conversely, depressed mood may urge an employee to adjust his/her work schedule and/or number of working hours/week (h/wk). The aim of this study was to assess the association between work schedule and working hours with depressed mood. Using baseline data from the Maastricht Cohort Study, depressed mood in day work was compared with depressed mood in different shiftwork schedules (n = 8843). Within day work, several categories of working h/wk were studied in association with depressed mood (n = 7217). The association between depressed mood and several aspects of overtime was assessed separately. Depressed mood was measured with a dichotomous item: "Did you feel down every day over the last two weeks?" Separate logistic regression analyses were conducted for men and women, with adjustments for potential confounders. The odds ratio (OR) for depressed mood was greater for men involved in shiftwork than for men only involved in day work (three-shift OR = 2.05 [95% confidence interval, CI 1.52-2.77]; five-shift OR = 1.34 [95% CI 1.00-1.80]; irregular-shift OR = 1.79 [95% CI 1.27-2.53]). In female employees, five-shift work was associated with a higher prevalence of depressed mood (OR = 5.96 [95% CI 2.83-12.56]). Regarding the number of working h/wk, men working working 36-40 h/wk (OR = 2.73 [95% CI 1.35-5.52]). After conducting trend analyses, a significant decreasing trend was found in men, whereas an increasing trend was found in women working a high number of hours. Furthermore, a dose-response relationship was present in men regarding the number of overtime h/wk. This

  18. [Shift work and night work: what effect on blood pressure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassat, M; Wuerzner, G; Burnier, M

    2015-09-09

    Shift work has become more and more common for the last thirty years. By definition, shift work disturbs the circadian rhythm and the internal clock. Even if the pathophysiological mechanisms are not well understood, a greater cardiovascular risk has been attributed to shift work. Cross-sectional and cohort studies have identified an association between shift work and an elevated blood pressure. Shift workers also present a higher incidence of hypertension and progression than day workers. Unfortunately, the heterogeneity of the studies, the multiple confounding factors, as well as the complexity to achieve a suitable comparison group make it impossible to draw firm clinical evidence. Nevertheless, this population needs a medical follow-up focused on the cardiovascular risks and blood pressure.

  19. Health workers' perception on the work, working conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The respondents' positive perception on the work and work load as being reasonable were 90.4% (OR 88.67, 95%CI 47.08 – 168.99, P<0.001) and 52.4% (OR 1.21, ... However, the respondents' positive perception on being satisfied with the amount of training offered for advancement was 32% (OR 0.22, 95%CI 0.15-0.33, ...

  20. Development and Working Life – Work for Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Helge; Hasle, Peter

    A study of a large number of company cases with focus on development of both production and working life. A number of management oriented concepts as well as employee oriented concepts for development are analysed.......A study of a large number of company cases with focus on development of both production and working life. A number of management oriented concepts as well as employee oriented concepts for development are analysed....

  1. [Night work, shift work: Breast cancer risk factor?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabu, J-C; Stoll, F; Gonzalez, M; Mathelin, C

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review was to determine the link between night/shift work and breast cancer. The analysed articles were taken from the PUBMED database between 1996 and 2015. The keywords used were "breast cancer risk", "night work" and "shift work". In total, 25 articles were selected. Night/shift workers are more at risk to develop a breast cancer (relative risk (RR) between 1.09; 95% CI: 1.02-1.20 and 1.48; 95% CI: 1.36-1.61 in the meta-analyses). However, this risk is not found by some cohort and case-control studies. The circadian rhythm disruption, responsible of disorderliness of melatonin secretion, could be one of the mechanisms involved in the increase of that risk. Hormonal status of night/shift workers, their geographic origin, their lifestyle and their vitamin D deficiency appear as other mechanisms potentially responsible for increased risk of cancer in this professional population. Moreover, a dose-effect connection may exist, with an increase of the risk with the number of years of night/shift work. Night/shift work is associated with a moderate increased risk of breast cancer, especially among women who worked over 20 years. Recommendations concerning the breast monitoring in this population could be diffused. The benefit of melatonin supplementation remains to be assessed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. Applications of cognitive work analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bisantz, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the Application of Cognitive Work Analysis, C.M. Burns and A.M. BisantzFrom Work Domains to Worker Competencies: A Five-Phase CWA for Air Traffic Control, R.M. Kilgore, O. St-Cyr, and G.A. JamiesonWork Domain Analysis using the Abstraction Hierarchy: Two Contrasting Cases, A.M. Bisantz and N. MazaevaBeyond the Design of Ecological Interfaces: Applications of Work Domain Analysis and Control Task Analysis to the Evaluation of Design Proposals, Team Design, and Training, N. NaikarControl Task Analysis: Methodologies for Eliciting and Applying Decision Ladder Models for Command and Control, T.M. Lamoureux and B. ChalmersUnderstanding Cognitive Strategies for Shared Situation Awareness Across a Distributed System: An Example of Strategies Analysis, E.M. RothA Cognitive Work Analysis of Cardiac Care Nurses Performing Teletriage, C.M. Burns and Y. EnomotoMethods for the Analysis of Social and Organizational Aspects of the Work Domain, J. Pfautz and S. PfautzTask Analysis and Cognitive Work Analysis: One...

  3. Hepatitis C and Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Heather; Paylor, Ian

    2016-06-01

    It is now a full decade since Paylor and Orgel (2004) called for social work to 'wake up' to hepatitis C (HCV). In that time, a small but significant body of social research has developed which has highlighted the far-reaching social consequences of living with HCV. Using this as a foundation, Paylor and Mack (2010) expanded arguments on the role of social work and identified specific areas where social work might become involved, arguing that the profession is uniquely placed and skilled, to respond and provide support. This article draws on qualitative in-depth interviews with twenty-one people who (had) lived with HCV in the UK, to strengthen and broaden the argument that social work and social care need to urgently take a bigger role in working with people with HCV, given the cross-cutting and wide range of issues that arise. This is the first study which uses participant data to argue for the need for social work involvement and in that it highlights a number of points in the experience where social work support is needed including pre and post diagnosis, whilst on treatment and after treatment.

  4. Nontraditional work schedules for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, Lynnae; Sanborn, Michael; Alexander, Emily

    2008-11-15

    Nontraditional work schedules for pharmacists at three institutions are described. The demand for pharmacists and health care in general continues to increase, yet significant material changes are occurring in the pharmacy work force. These changing demographics, coupled with historical vacancy rates and turnover trends for pharmacy staff, require an increased emphasis on workplace changes that can improve staff recruitment and retention. At William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Affairs Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin, creative pharmacist work schedules and roles are now mainstays to the recruitment and retention of staff. The major challenge that such scheduling presents is the 8 hours needed to prepare a six-week schedule. Baylor Medical Center at Grapevine in Dallas, Texas, has a total of 45 pharmacy employees, and slightly less than half of the 24.5 full-time-equivalent staff work full-time, with most preferring to work one, two, or three days per week. As long as the coverage needs of the facility are met, Envision Telepharmacy in Alpine, Texas, allows almost any scheduling arrangement preferred by individual pharmacists or the pharmacist group covering the facility. Staffing involves a great variety of shift lengths and intervals, with shifts ranging from 2 to 10 hours. Pharmacy leaders must be increasingly aware of opportunities to provide staff with unique scheduling and operational enhancements that can provide for a better work-life balance. Compressed workweeks, job-sharing, and team scheduling were the most common types of alternative work schedules implemented at three different institutions.

  5. Work-Ed. A Guide to the Changing World of Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraleigh, Virginia A.

    A description of the project, its development process, evaluation results, and exportability are included in this overview of WORK-ED (World of Related Knowledge and Educational Development), a program to provide ninth grade students both basic skills in communication and exposure to twelve career clusters. Introductory sections describe the…

  6. Conceptualising e-working: exploring innovative work practices for optimising work and travel efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, J.; Walrave, M.; van Wee, B.; van der Hoorn, T.

    2009-01-01

    The inception of 'third wave' Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) has the potential of enabling innovative e-working practices in organisations beyond the traditional home teleworking. This paper conceptualises the new e-working practices adopted by 'lead users' through grounded theory

  7. Working overtime hours: Relations with fatigue, work motivation, and the quality of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, D.G.J.; Linden, D. van der; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Veldhoven, M.J.P.M. van; Yperen, N.W. van

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to better understand the relationship between overtime and mental fatigue by taking into account work motivation and the quality of overtime work and studying theoretically derived subgroups. Methods: We conducted a survey-study among a representative sample of the Dutch

  8. Working Overtime Hours: Relations with fatigue, work motivation, and the quality of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, D.G.J.; Linden, D. van der; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Veldhoven, M.J.P.M. van; Yperen, N.W. van

    2004-01-01

    Objectives - We sought to better understand the relationship between overtime and mental fatigue by taking into account work motivation and the quality of overtime work and studying theoretically derived subgroups. Methods - We conducted a survey-study among a representative sample of the Dutch

  9. Spiritual Working Ethos as a Forming Foundation for Working Commitment and Perception of Employees Working Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinoto

    2016-01-01

    This research is dealing with spiritual working ethos which is organizational behavior issues that become the critical concern to do since the literacy rate in Indonesia is still very low. Working ethos literacy became one of the problems of organizational behavior that required for both profit and non-profit organizations because it has a linkage…

  10. Interests, Work Values, and Occupations: Predicting Work Outcomes with the WorkKeys Fit Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaney, Kyle B.; Allen, Jeff; Casillas, Alex; Hanson, Mary Ann; Robbins, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether a measure of person-environment (P-E) fit predicted worker ratings of work attitudes and supervisor ratings of performance. After combining extant data elements and expert ratings of interest and work value characteristics for each occupation in the O*NET system, the authors generated a "Fit Index"--involving profile…

  11. iWork portable genius

    CERN Document Server

    Hart-Davis, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Maximize your use of Apple's unique office productivity suite Dedicated Mac fans love the convenience and practicality of Numbers spreadsheets, Pages word processing, and Keynote presentations, the components of the iWork suite. This guide cuts to the chase, packed with tips and advice for getting the most from the newest version of these applications. It provides the basics on each application and how they work together, intermediate information, and cool ways to enhance your presentations and documents and create reports that analyze and interpret your data.The iWork productivity suite provi

  12. Changing concepts of working memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei Ji; Husain, Masud; Bays, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Working memory is widely considered to be limited in capacity, holding a fixed, small number of items, such as Miller's ‘magical number’ seven or Cowan's four. It has recently been proposed that working memory might better be conceptualized as a limited resource that is distributed flexibly among all items to be maintained in memory. According to this view, the quality rather than the quantity of working memory representations determines performance. Here we consider behavioral and emerging neural evidence for this proposal. PMID:24569831

  13. Informal work and formal plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsted, Rikke Juul; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Formal pathways models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer...... and care. They initiated processes in the trajectories, and acquired information, which they used to form their trajectories. Patients presented problems to the healthcare professionals in order to get proper help when needed. DISCUSSION: Work done by patients was invisible and not perceived as work....... The patients' requests were not sufficiently supported in the professional organisation of work or formal planning. Patients' insertion and use of information in their trajectories challenged professional views and working processes. And the design of the formal pathway models limits the patients' active...

  14. SYNERGY EFFECTS IN WORK TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca C. ZOLTAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s organization increasingly utilizes all kind of teams in order to surpass their competitors through flexibility, adaptability and innovation, features which are seen to characterize the teams. For this purpose, the concept of synergy in teams’ activity is often mentioned as the prime reason for which collective work is considered to be superior comparative with individual work. But what exactly does it mean? The present paper aims to shed some light on the concept of synergy in work teams and its positive effects, namely, the social consequences of collective work such as social compensation, social indispensability, social comparison, social identity, but also its negative effects, such as free-riding, social loafing and sucker effect. These are important group phenomena that managers should be aware of because they have a major impact on team performance, and consequently, on organization performance.

  15. Unskilled work and learner identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    The main argument in this paper is: In order to comprehend the ‘invisible’ conditions for forming motivation to participate in different kinds of learning activities (formal, non-formal and informal) in relation to work-life it is crucial to develop a dialectic concept of learner identity....... A concept enabling researcher in the field of work and learning to examine how the orientation toward learning activities are situated in and conditioned by specific work-life experiences. Based on a qualitative research-project (Kondrup 2012) the paper outlines how unskilled work forms a specific condition...... for engaging in learning. The aim of the project was to examine the challenges in order to fulfil the Danish national strategy on Lifelong learning and training for all. Danish as well as international research reveals that low skilled workers and workers in small and medium sized private companies tend...

  16. Attachment at work and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neustadt, Elizabeth A; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Furnham, Adrian

    2011-09-01

    This paper examines the relations between self-reported attachment orientation at work and personality, self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence (aka emotional self-efficacy), and independently assessed career potential and job performance. Self-report data were collected from 211 managers in an international business in the hospitality industry; independent assessments of these managers' job performance and career potential were separately obtained from the organization. A self-report measure of romantic attachment was adapted for application in the work context; a two-factor solution was found for this measure. Secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work was positively related to self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence, extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and also to job performance. Not only was secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work statistically predictive of job performance, but the new measure also made a distinct contribution, beyond conscientiousness, to this prediction.

  17. Learning, Work, and Language Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    research into a retraining program for unskilled workers, exposing a very conflictual subjective experience of a traineeship, is presented and commented. The worker's experience is interpreted focusing on the gender aspects of the conflicts, seeing the learning process in the context of a work identity...... process, which is related to a career shift enforced by labor market transition requiring male workers to retrain for a social work profession which used to be female, and more widely to a reconfiguration of the societal relation between work and gender. The final section discusses the methodological......The article provides an example of psycho-societal analysis of work related learning. Initially a conceptual framework of learning and life experience is established drawing on Alfred Lorenzer and Oskar Negt, and the interactional development of psychoanalysis. A case of learning experience from...

  18. Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group promotes metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as advancement in the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

  19. Hard work in soft regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnen, Pernille; Hasle, Peter; Helbo Jespersen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    on ‘softer’ psychosocial areas of the working environment – has been questioned (Hohnen & Hasle 2011; Walters and Frick 2000; Hasle & Zwetsloot 2011). This has resulted in recent British attempts to develop new publically available guidelines (PAS 1010) to be used together with OHSAS 18001 focusing...... specifically on psychosocial risk management attempting to guide and control not only management systems and related procedures but also the concrete work domain in which psychosocial risks are produced, experienced and monitored (Leka 2011). Based on an analysis of OHSAS 18001 and PAS 1010 the present paper...... analyses these attempts and discusses why the new guidelines – particularly focusing on regulating the psychosocial working environment – only partly succeed in solving the shortcomings of OHSAS 18001. The paper shows how the problems of addressing contemporary complex and psychosocial working environment...

  20. Work environments for employee creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dul, Jan; Ceylan, Canan

    2011-01-01

    Innovative organisations need creative employees who generate new ideas for product or process innovation. This paper presents a conceptual framework for the effect of personal, social-organisational and physical factors on employee creativity. Based on this framework, an instrument to analyse the extent to which the work environment enhances creativity is developed. This instrument was applied to a sample of 409 employees and support was found for the hypothesis that a creative work environment enhances creative performance. This paper illustrates how the instrument can be used in companies to select and implement improvements. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The ergonomics discipline addresses the work environment mainly for improving health and safety and sometimes productivity and quality. This paper opens a new area for ergonomics: designing work environments for enhancing employee creativity in order to strengthen an organisation's capability for product and process innovation and, consequently, its competitiveness.

  1. Visual working memory contaminates perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Suk; Hong, Sang Wook; Blake, Randolph; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2011-10-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that the contents of visual working memory may be maintained within sensory areas early in the visual hierarchy. We tested this possibility using a well-studied motion repulsion phenomenon in which perception of one direction of motion is distorted when another direction of motion is viewed simultaneously. We found that observers misperceived the actual direction of motion of a single motion stimulus if, while viewing that stimulus, they were holding a different motion direction in visual working memory. Control experiments showed that none of a variety of alternative explanations could account for this repulsion effect induced by working memory. Our findings provide compelling evidence that visual working memory representations directly interact with the same neural mechanisms as those involved in processing basic sensory events.

  2. FY 1994 Annual Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    In accordance with the Inspector General`s Strategic Planning Policy directive, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) annually updates its Strategic Plan with budgetary and program guidance for the next fiscal year. The program guidance identifies and establishes priorities for OIG coverage of important DOE issues and operations, provides the basis for assigning OIG resources, and is the source for issues covered in Assistant Inspectors General annual work plans. The Office of the Assistant Inspector General for Audits (AIGA) publishes an Annual Work Plan in September of each year. The plan includes the OIG program guidance and shows the commitment of resources necessary to accomplish the assigned work and meet our goals. The program guidance provides the framework within which the AIGA work will be planned and accomplished. Audits included in this plan are designed to help insure that the requirements of our stakeholders have been considered and blended into a well balanced audit program.

  3. Response to work activity guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memorandum is concerning the request from the FY95 Platte-Kansas Rivers Ecosystem Work Activity Guidance for refuge managers to review the purposes of refuges...

  4. Approaching work and learning indirectly

    OpenAIRE

    Macintyre, Ronald; Thomson, Joan

    2013-01-01

    This paper approaches work and learning indirectly. It is part of a mixed method longitudinal study that looks at the articulation from Higher National (HN) to part time Higher Education (HE). Since 2003 the Open University in Scotland (OU) has been collecting quantitative and qualitative data on students who have HN qualifications. This paper looks at the experiences of those students and the central place of work in those journeys. \\ud \\ud The paper beings with a statistical overview. HN St...

  5. Competition, Work Rules and Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Bridgman

    2011-01-01

    More competitive markets are associated with higher productivity. However, changes in competition complicate productivity measurement since changing mark-ups may shift factor shares. This paper examines productivity measurement in markets with market power and restrictive work rules: rules that induce wages to be paid for non-productive labor hours. It develops a theoretical model to explain why workers would want restrictive work rules and how competition leads to their reduction. I model a ...

  6. Work Motivation: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    job design and the management of work was most clearly and convincingly presented by Frederick Taylor in 1911 and which he called scientific...from Herzberg , Mausner, and Snyderman (1959) who were mainly concerned with satis- faction in the work setting. Herzberg et al. postulated the idea...conditions, and job security. In 1966 Herzberg extended this proposition one step further and claimed that job satisfaction is ony caused by the

  7. Protect Your Hearing at Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common work-related illnesses. This podcast features information from CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health on how to protect yourself from work-related noise-induced hearing loss.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  8. What works in auditory working memory? A neural oscillations perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsch, Anna; Obleser, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Working memory is a limited resource: brains can only maintain small amounts of sensory input (memory load) over a brief period of time (memory decay). The dynamics of slow neural oscillations as recorded using magneto- and electroencephalography (M/EEG) provide a window into the neural mechanics of these limitations. Especially oscillations in the alpha range (8-13Hz) are a sensitive marker for memory load. Moreover, according to current models, the resultant working memory load is determined by the relative noise in the neural representation of maintained information. The auditory domain allows memory researchers to apply and test the concept of noise quite literally: Employing degraded stimulus acoustics increases memory load and, at the same time, allows assessing the cognitive resources required to process speech in noise in an ecologically valid and clinically relevant way. The present review first summarizes recent findings on neural oscillations, especially alpha power, and how they reflect memory load and memory decay in auditory working memory. The focus is specifically on memory load resulting from acoustic degradation. These findings are then contrasted with contextual factors that benefit neural as well as behavioral markers of memory performance, by reducing representational noise. We end on discussing the functional role of alpha power in auditory working memory and suggest extensions of the current methodological toolkit. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Sex work: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Bill; Benoit, Cecilia; Jansson, Mikael

    2014-10-01

    Explanations of adult involvement in sex work typically adopt one of two approaches. One perspective highlights a variety of negative experiences in childhood and adolescence, including physical and sexual abuse, family instability, poverty, associations with "pimps" and other exploiters, homelessness, and drug use. An alternative account recognizes that some of these factors may be involved, but underscores the contribution of more immediate circumstances, such as current economic needs, human capital, and employment opportunities. Prior research offers a limited assessment of these contrasting claims: most studies have focused exclusively on people working in the sex industry and they have not assessed the independent effects of life course variables central to these two perspectives. We add to this literature with an analysis that drew on insights from life course and life-span development theories and considered the contributions of factors from childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Our comparative approach examined predictors of employment in sex work relative to two other low-income service or care work occupations: food and beverage serving and barbering and hairstyling. Using data from a study of almost 600 workers from two cities, one in Canada and the other in the United States, we found that both immediate circumstances and negative experiences from early life are related to current sex work involvement: childhood poverty, abuse, and family instability were independently associated with adult sex work, as were limited education and employment experience, adult drug use, and marital status.

  10. Work-related voice disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo Przysiezny

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dysphonia is the main symptom of the disorders of oral communication. However, voice disorders also present with other symptoms such as difficulty in maintaining the voice (asthenia, vocal fatigue, variation in habitual vocal fundamental frequency, hoarseness, lack of vocal volume and projection, loss of vocal efficiency, and weakness when speaking. There are several proposals for the etiologic classification of dysphonia: functional, organofunctional, organic, and work-related voice disorder (WRVD.OBJECTIVE: To conduct a literature review on WRVD and on the current Brazilian labor legislation.METHODS: This was a review article with bibliographical research conducted on the PubMed and Bireme databases, using the terms "work-related voice disorder", "occupational dysphonia", "dysphonia and labor legislation", and a review of labor and social security relevant laws.CONCLUSION: WRVD is a situation that frequently is listed as a reason for work absenteeism, functional rehabilitation, or for prolonged absence from work. Currently, forensic physicians have no comparative parameters to help with the analysis of vocal disorders. In certain situations WRVD may cause, work disability. This disorder may be labor-related, or be an adjuvant factor to work-related diseases.

  11. Photography as a copyright work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brankov Boba M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The original holder of copyright has moral rights and property rights according to the law. Photograph can be regarded as copyright work, if it meets the criteria stipulated by the legal definition of copyright work: a photo must be created by a human being, it must have a spiritual content, spiritual content above must have the appropriate form and must be an original work. Committee on Constitutional and Legislative Affairs in January 2016 submitted to the National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia a proposal to adopt authentic interpretation of the provisions of article 2, paragraph 2 of Copyright Law. The purpose of this proposal is that each routinely made photo, which is downloaded in digital form, can not be considered as a copyright work. The proposal of the authentic interpretation above is the motive of this article. This work is focused on the elements of photograph as copyright work, copyright infringement due to unauthorized use of photographs, with special reference to the infringement of copyright through social networks.

  12. Work of gravediggers and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Fernando; Fischer, Frida Marina; Cobianchi, Claudio José

    2012-01-01

    Gravediggers have death as object of their work. Their activities are painful, physically and mental demanding, as well as unhealthy. Literature is scarce about this theme. The aim of this study is to evaluate gravediggers' work activities and health consequences. The methodological frame which guided this study was Dejours' psychic suffering and its association with the psychodynamic aspects of work. Data collection took place in April-May 2011 in one public and one private cemetery of São Paulo, Brazil. Four male workers, aged between 45 to 60 years old were interviewed. Their work activities were observed during a workday. Participants reported their life dreams, defense mechanisms and frustration. The discourse of gravediggers showed serious problems associated to physical and mental demands, public invisibility and/ or social devaluation of work. The most important physical symptom was body pain. In spite this is a preliminary study, it was possible to raise a number of work stressors and health outcomes of gravediggers, an "invisible" worker of our society.

  13. Monitoring Technology Meets Care Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bygholm, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring technology, especially sensor-based technology, is increasingly taken into use in care work. Despite the simplicity of these technologies – aimed to automate what appear as mundane monitoring tasks – recent research has identified major challenges primarily related to the technology's ...... wet beds at a nursing home. The analysis identifies the multifaceted nature of monitoring work and the intricacy of integrating sensor technology into the complex knowledge system of monitoring work.......Monitoring technology, especially sensor-based technology, is increasingly taken into use in care work. Despite the simplicity of these technologies – aimed to automate what appear as mundane monitoring tasks – recent research has identified major challenges primarily related to the technology......'s ability to meet the complexity of care work. Understanding intersectional challenges between these care technologies and care work is fundamental to improve design and use of health informatics. In this paper we present an analysis of interaction challenges between a wet-sensor at the task of monitoring...

  14. Work right to right work: An automythology of chronic illness and work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasingham, Lavanya

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Chronic illness is known to disrupt and redirect the usual course of work trajectories. This article aims to portray the longitudinal course of negotiating work after multiple sclerosis. Methods Using therapy and personal journals to reconstruct memories and experience, an autoethnography is produced and narrated within Campbell's "Hero's Journey" automythology framework. Results The narrative highlights the intrasubjectivity of illness meaning-the changing internal meaning-making and external behavior and decision-making dynamics. The journey of being inhibited to "Work Right", to "Looking for the Right" and ultimately, finding "Right Work" is charted; portrayed as a bittersweet maneuver to achieve work-illness equilibrium. Discussion This journey traverses a spectrum of negative coping-the exhibition of deviant work behaviors, disengagement and depression; to recalibration and renewal; culminating in living the "new normal", and finding moral and meaningful work engagements. Life trajectories with chronic illness are often skewed and redirected; but longitudinal narratives of normalization and coping also highlight the pursuits to secure and maintain a life of meaning and value.

  15. Insights into nurses' work: Exploring relationships among work attitudes and work-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreira, Tyrone; Berta, Whitney; Ginsburg, Liane; Barnsley, Jan; Herbert, Monique

    2017-01-25

    Work attitudes have been associated with work productivity. In health care, poor work attitudes have been linked to poor performance, decreased patient safety, and quality care. Hence, the importance, ascribed in the literature, of work that clearly identifies the relationships between and among work attitudes and work behaviors linked to performance. The purpose of this study is to better understand the relationships between work attitudes-perceived organizational justice, perceived organizational support (POS), affective commitment-consistently associated with a key type of performance outcome among nurses' organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). A survey was developed and administered to frontline nurses working in the province of Ontario, Canada. Data analysis used path analytic techniques. Direct associations were identified between interpersonal justice and POS, procedural justice and POS, and POS and affective commitment to both one's supervisor and one's co-workers. Affective commitment to patients and career was directly associated with OCBs. Affective commitment to one's co-worker was directly associated with OCBs directed toward individuals, as affective commitment to one's organization was with OCBs directed toward the organization. Finally, OCBIs and OCBs were directly associated. Examining the relationships of these constructs in a single model is novel and provides new information regarding their complexity. Findings suggest that prior approaches to studying these relationships may have been undernuanced, and conceptualizations may have led to somewhat inaccurate conclusions regarding their associations. With limited resources, knowledge of nurse work attitudes can inform human resource practices and operational policies involving training programs in employee communication, transparency, interaction, support, and performance evaluation.

  16. Working conditions, work style, and job satisfaction among Albanian teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloep, Marion; Tarifa, Fatos

    1994-03-01

    For the first time in Albania, a large-scale study investigating teachers' working conditions was conducted. 349 teachers from many parts of the country and from all school levels answered an extensive questionnaire, providing a comprehensive description of their working situation. As data for parts of the study exist from the USA, Germany, Singapore, England, and Poland, results could be discussed in comparison to the conditions in these countries, showing that self-reported job satisfaction and engagement in effective classroom practices is relatively high among Albanian teachers, while the economic and physical conditions are bad. Stepwise regression analyses reveal that the items measuring professional autonomy account for a considerable part of the variance of the job satisfaction measure; while work efficiency is mainly predicted by items measuring social support and, again, professional autonomy.

  17. Learning/work: Turning work and lifelong learning inside out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Shirley; Cooper, Linda

    2011-08-01

    CONFINTEA VI took place against the background of an uneven and contradictory social and economic impact of globalisation. This impact registered globally and locally, in both the political North and South, drawing new lines of inequality between "core" and "periphery", between insiders and outsiders of contemporary society. Financial turmoil in the world has exacerbated levels of poverty and insecurity. The question is how work-related education and conceptions of learning might promote greater inclusion and security for those whose livelihoods are most severely affected by globalisation. The Belém Framework for Action implicitly recognises that lifelong learning and work cannot be discussed outside broader socio-economic and political contexts. The authors of this article draw substantially on research from around the world and argue for the re-insertion of "politics and power" into both the theory and practice of "lifelong learning" and "work".

  18. Work Integrated Learning - a Marriage Between Academia and Working Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gellerstedt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a demand for increased cooperation between higher education institutes and surrounding society, and different frameworks for such cooperation have been developed. University West in Sweden has a profile called work-integrated learning which could be regarded as a systematical approach for combining theory and practice. Actually work-integrated learning has become an ideology for the University which permeates all activities, i.e. education, research and cooperation with surrounding society. This article is a review, explaining and exemplifying our approach. We will also discuss strategies and challenges for bringing the relationship between theory and practice into a prospering marriage.

  19. Work motivation among healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellström, Sofia; Avby, Gunilla; Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina; Andersson Gäre, Boel; Andersson Bäck, Monica

    2017-06-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore work motivation among professionals at well-functioning primary healthcare centers subject to a national healthcare reform which include financial incentives. Design/methodology/approach Five primary healthcare centers in Sweden were purposively selected for being well-operated and representing public/private and small/large units. In total, 43 interviews were completed with different medical professions and qualitative deductive content analysis was conducted. Findings Work motivation exists for professionals when their individual goals are aligned with the organizational goals and the design of the reform. The centers' positive management was due to a unique combination of factors, such as clear direction of goals, a culture of non-hierarchical collaboration, and systematic quality improvement work. The financial incentives need to be translated in terms of quality patient care to provide clear direction for the professionals. Social processes where professionals work together as cohesive groups, and provided space for quality improvement work is pivotal in addressing how alignment is created. Practical implications Leaders need to consistently translate and integrate reforms with the professionals' drives and values. This is done by encouraging participation through teamwork, time for structured reflection, and quality improvement work. Social implications The design of the reforms and leadership are essential preconditions for work motivation. Originality/value The study offers a more complete picture of how reforms are managed at primary healthcare centers, as different medical professionals are included. The value also consists of showing how a range of aspects combine for primary healthcare professionals to successfully manage external reforms.

  20. Working spectacles for sorting mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphälä, Hillevi; Dahlqvist, Camilla; Nordander, Catarina; Gao, Chuansi; Kuklane, Kalev; Nylén, Per; Hansson, Gert-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Sorting mail into racks for postmen is visually demanding work. This can result in backward inclination of their heads, especially more pronounced for those who use progressive addition lenses. To evaluate the effects of customized working spectacles on the physical workload of postmen. Twelve male postmen sorted mail on two occasions: once using their private progressive spectacles and once using customized sorting spectacles with inverted progressive lenses. Postures and movements of the head, upper back, neck, and upper arms were measured by inclinometry. The muscular load of the trapezius was measured by surface electromyography. With the customized sorting spectacles, both the backward inclination of the head and backward flexion of the neck were reduced (3°), as well as the muscular load of the right upper trapezius, compared to sorting with private spectacles. However, with the sorting spectacles, there was a tendency for increased neck forward flexion, and increased sorting time. The reduction in work load may reduce the risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders due to the positive reduction of the backward inclination of the head. But the tendency for increased neck forward flexion may reduce the positive effects. However, the magnitude of the possible reduction is difficult to predict, especially since quantitative data on exposure-response relationships are unknown. Alternative working spectacles with inverted near progressive lenses ought to be evaluated. They should still result in a positive reduced backward inclination of the head and may not cause any increased forward flexion.