WorldWideScience

Sample records for earth core

  1. The Earth's Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  2. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  3. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  4. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  5. Helium in Earth's early core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhifd, M. A.; Jephcoat, Andrew P.; Heber, Veronika S.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2013-11-01

    The observed escape of the primordial helium isotope, 3He, from the Earth's interior indicates that primordial helium survived the energetic process of planetary accretion and has been trapped within the Earth to the present day. Two distinct reservoirs in the Earth's interior have been invoked to account for variations in the 3He/4He ratio observed at the surface in ocean basalts: a conventional depleted mantle source and a deep, still enigmatic, source that must have been isolated from processing throughout Earth history. The Earth's iron-based core has not been considered a potential helium source because partitioning of helium into metal liquid has been assumed to be negligible. Here we determine helium partitioning in experiments between molten silicates and iron-rich metal liquids at conditions up to 16GPa and 3,000K. Analyses of the samples by ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry yield metal-silicate helium partition coefficients that range between 4.7×10-3 and 1.7×10-2 and suggest that significant quantities of helium may reside in the core. Based on estimated concentrations of primordial helium, we conclude that the early core could have incorporated enough helium to supply deep-rooted plumes enriched in 3He throughout the age of the Earth.

  6. Earth's core and the geodynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffett

    2000-06-16

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by fluid motion in the liquid iron core. Details of how this occurs are now emerging from numerical simulations that achieve a self-sustaining magnetic field. Early results predict a dominant dipole field outside the core, and some models even reproduce magnetic reversals. The simulations also show how different patterns of flow can produce similar external fields. Efforts to distinguish between the various possibilities appeal to observations of the time-dependent behavior of the field. Important constraints will come from geological records of the magnetic field in the past.

  7. Rotation and magnetism of Earth`s inner core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatzmaier, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Roberts, P.H. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-13

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the geodynamo suggest that a super-rotation of Earth`s solid inner core relative to the mantle is maintained by magnetic coupling between the inner core and an eastward thermal wind in the fluid outer core. This mechanism, which is analogous to a synchronous motor, also plays a fundamental role in the generation of Earth`s magnetic field. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Earth rotation and core topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Clayton, Robert W.; Spieth, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Geodynamics program has as one of its missions highly accurate monitoring of polar motion, including changes in length of day (LOD). These observations place fundamental constraints on processes occurring in the atmosphere, in the mantle, and in the core of the planet. Short-timescale (t less than or approx 1 yr) variations in LOD are mainly the result of interaction between the atmosphere and the solid earth, while variations in LOD on decade timescales result from the exchange of angular momentum between the mantle and the fluid core. One mechanism for this exchange of angular momentum is through topographic coupling between pressure variations associated with flow in the core interacting with topography at the core-mantel boundary (CMB). Work done under another NASA grant addressing the origin of long-wavelength geoid anomalies as well as evidence from seismology, resulted in several models of CMB topography. The purpose of work supported by NAG5-819 was to study further the problem of CMB topography, using geodesy, fluid mechanics, geomagnetics, and seismology. This is a final report.

  9. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  10. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  11. Rotation and Magnetism of Earth's Inner Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzmaier; Roberts

    1996-12-13

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the geodynamo suggest that a super- rotation of Earth's solid inner core relative to the mantle is maintained by magnetic coupling between the inner core and an eastward thermal wind in the fluid outer core. This mechanism, which is analogous to a synchronous motor, also plays a fundamental role in the generation of Earth's magnetic field.

  12. Heterogeneity and anisotropy of Earth's inner core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deuss, Arwen

    2014-01-01

    Seismic observations provide strong evidence that Earth's inner core is anisotropic, with larger velocity in the polar than in the equatorial direction. The top 60-80 km of the inner core is isotropic; evidence for an innermost inner core is less compelling. The anisotropy is most likely due to alig

  13. Heterogeneity and anisotropy of Earth's inner core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deuss, Arwen

    2014-01-01

    Seismic observations provide strong evidence that Earth's inner core is anisotropic, with larger velocity in the polar than in the equatorial direction. The top 60-80 km of the inner core is isotropic; evidence for an innermost inner core is less compelling. The anisotropy is most likely due to

  14. Sediments at the top of Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffett, B A; Garnero, E J; Jeanloz, R

    2000-11-17

    Unusual physical properties at the core-mantle boundary have been inferred from seismic and geodetic observations in recent years. We show how both types of observations can be explained by a layer of silicate sediments, which accumulate at the top of the core as Earth cools. Compaction of the sediments expels most of the liquid iron but leaves behind a small amount of core material, which is entrained in mantle convection and may account for the isotopic signatures of core material in some hot spot plumes. Extraction of light elements from the liquid core also enhances the vigor of convection in the core and may increase the power available to the geodynamo.

  15. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  16. Rapidly changing flows in the Earth's core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Mandea, M.

    2008-01-01

    A large part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by fluid motion in the molten outer core(1). As a result of continuous satellite measurements since 1999, the core magnetic field and its recent variations can now be described with a high resolution in space and time(2). These data have rec...... of future numerical models of the geodynamo....

  17. Viscosity of Earth's Outer Core

    CERN Document Server

    Smylie, D E

    2007-01-01

    A viscosity profile across the entire fluid outer core is found by interpolating between measured boundary values, using a differential form of the Arrhenius law governing pressure and temperature dependence. The discovery that both the retrograde and prograde free core nutations are in free decay (Palmer and Smylie, 2005) allows direct measures of viscosity at the top of the outer core, while the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the inner core allows it to be measured at the bottom. We find 2,371 plus/minus 1,530 Pa.s at the top and 1.247 plus/minus 0.035 x 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom. Following Brazhkin (1998) and Brazhkin and Lyapin (2000) who get 10^2 Pa.s at the top, 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom, by an Arrhenius extrapolation of laboratory experiments, we use a differential form of the Arrhenius law to interpolate along the melting temperature curve to find a viscosity profile across the outer core. We find the variation to be closely log-linear between the meas...

  18. Investigating the translation of Earth's inner core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Elizabeth A; Cormier, Vernon F; Geballe, Zachary M;

    2012-01-01

    The Earth’s inner core provides unique insights into processes that are occurring deep within our Earth today, as well as processes that occurred in the past. The seismic structure of the inner core is complex, and is dominated by anisotropic and isotropic differences between the Eastern...... and Western ‘hemispheres’ of the inner core. Recent geodynamical models suggest that this hemispherical dichotomy can be explained by a fast translation of the inner core. In these models one side of the inner core is freezing, while the other side is melting, leading to the development of different seismic...... properties on either side of the inner core. A simple translating model of the inner core, however, does not seem to easily explain all of the seismically observed features, including the innermost inner core; the observed sharp lateral gradient in seismic properties between the two hemispheres...

  19. Melting of the Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, David; Sreenivasan, Binod; Mound, Jon; Rost, Sebastian

    2011-05-19

    The Earth's magnetic field is generated by a dynamo in the liquid iron core, which convects in response to cooling of the overlying rocky mantle. The core freezes from the innermost surface outward, growing the solid inner core and releasing light elements that drive compositional convection. Mantle convection extracts heat from the core at a rate that has enormous lateral variations. Here we use geodynamo simulations to show that these variations are transferred to the inner-core boundary and can be large enough to cause heat to flow into the inner core. If this were to occur in the Earth, it would cause localized melting. Melting releases heavy liquid that could form the variable-composition layer suggested by an anomaly in seismic velocity in the 150 kilometres immediately above the inner-core boundary. This provides a very simple explanation of the existence of this layer, which otherwise requires additional assumptions such as locking of the inner core to the mantle, translation from its geopotential centre or convection with temperature equal to the solidus but with composition varying from the outer to the inner core. The predominantly narrow downwellings associated with freezing and broad upwellings associated with melting mean that the area of melting could be quite large despite the average dominance of freezing necessary to keep the dynamo going. Localized melting and freezing also provides a strong mechanism for creating seismic anomalies in the inner core itself, much stronger than the effects of variations in heat flow so far considered.

  20. The nature of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the earth's core are overviewed with emphasis on seismologically determined regions and pressures and seismologically measured density, elastic wave velocities, and gravitational acceleration. Attention is given to solid-state convection of the inner core, and it is noted that though seismological results do not conclusively prove that the inner core is convective, the occurrence and magnitude of seismic anisotropy are explained by the effects of solid-state convection. Igneous petrology and geochemistry of the inner core, a layer at the base of the mantle and contact metasomatism at the core-mantle boundary, and evolution of the core-mantle system are discussed. It is pointed out that high-pressure melting experiments indicate that the temperature of the core is ranging from 4500 to 6500 K, and a major implication of such high temperature is that the tectonics and convection of the mantle, as well as the resulting geological processes observed at the surface, are powered by heat from the core. As a result of the high temperatures, along with the compositional contrast between silicates and iron alloy, the core-mantle boundary is considered to be most chemically active region of the earth.

  1. Core Forensics: Earth's Accretion and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.; Siebert, J.; Piet, H.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's accretion and its primitive differentiation are intimately interlinked processes. One way to constrain accretionary processes is by looking at the major differentiation event that took place during accretion: core formation. Understanding core formation and core composition can certainly shed a new light on early and late accretionary processes. On the other hand, testing certain accretionary models and hypothesis (fluxes, chemistries, timing) allows -short of validating them- at the very least to unambiguously refute them, through the 'filter'' of core formation and composition. Earth's core formed during accretion as a result of melting, phase-separation, and segregation of accretionary building blocks (from meteorites to planetesimals). The bulk composition of the core and mantle depends on the evolution (pressure, temperature, composition) of core extraction during accretion. The entire process left a compositional imprint on both reservoirs: (1) in the silicate Earth, in terms of siderophile trace-element (Ni, Co, V, Cr, among others) concentrations and isotopic fractionation (Si, Cu, among others), a record that is observed in present-day mantle rocks; and (2) on the core, in terms of major element composition and light elements dissolved in the metal, a record that is observed by seismology through the core density-deficit. This imprint constitutes actually a fairly impressive set of evidence (siderophile element concentration and fractionation, volatile and siderophile element isotopic fractionation), can be used today to trace back the primordial processes that occurred 4.5 billion years ago. We are seeking to provide an overhaul of the standard core formation/composition models, by using a new rationale that bridges geophysics and geochemistry. The new ingredients are (1) new laser-heated diamond anvil cell partitioning data, dramatically extending the previous P-T conditions for experimental work, (2) ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to

  2. Elastic anisotropy of Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B; Skorodumova, Natalia V; Rosengren, Anders; Johansson, Börje

    2008-02-08

    Earth's solid-iron inner core is elastically anisotropic. Sound waves propagate faster along Earth's spin axis than in the equatorial plane. This anisotropy has previously been explained by a preferred orientation of the iron alloy hexagonal crystals. However, hexagonal iron becomes increasingly isotropic on increasing temperature at pressures of the inner core and is therefore unlikely to cause the anisotropy. An alternative explanation, supported by diamond anvil cell experiments, is that iron adopts a body-centered cubic form in the inner core. We show, by molecular dynamics simulations, that the body-centered cubic iron phase is extremely anisotropic to sound waves despite its high symmetry. Direct simulations of seismic wave propagation reveal an anisotropy of 12%, a value adequate to explain the anisotropy of the inner core.

  3. Timing And Processes Of Earth's Core Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegre, C. J.; Manhes, G.; Gopel, C.

    2004-12-01

    Small 182W abundance excess of terrestrial W relative to W in bulk chondrites has been recently established (Yin et al. 2002, Kleine et al. 2002, Schoenberg et al. 2002). Rapid terrestrial accretion and early core formation, with completion of the bulk metal-silicate separation within less than 30 Myr have been proposed on this basis. These studies underline how much this 182W/182Hf time scale agrees with dynamic accretion models (Wetherill, 1986) that predict a ˜10 Myr interval for the main growth stage of Earth's formation. This W model time scale for terrestrial accretion is shorter than current estimates based on Pb isotope systematics of mantle-derived basalts and terrestrial Xe isotope systematics. The end of metal-silicate differentiation and large scale mantle degassing has been defined ˜100 My after beginning of the accretion. These studies also indicate agreement of this time scale with dynamic accretion models that predict 100 My for the end of Earth's accretion. The Hf-W time scale for accretion and core formation assumes total equilibration of incoming metal and silicate of impactors with the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) during planet's growth. Recently, the assumption of incomplete equilibration of metal and silicate components with BSE has been investigated (Halliday, 2004). It is proposed that impacting core material has not always efficiently mixed with the silicate portions of the Earth before being added to the Earth's core Our approach also considers that equilibration between metal and silicate has not been complete in BSE during Earth's growth, and we argue that early part of the Earth's core has segregated through unmelted silicate material. When the baby Earth was large enough, the increase of the temperature induced Fe-FeS eutectic melting. The liquid metal segregated through the crystalline silicate matrix and formed the early part of the Earth's core. Experimental study (Yoshino et al. 2003) indicates the percolation threshold for molten

  4. Zonal flow formation in the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagoshi, Takehiro; Kageyama, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    2010-02-11

    Zonal jets are very common in nature. Well-known examples are those in the atmospheres of giant planets and the alternating jet streams found in the Earth's world ocean. Zonal flow formation in nuclear fusion devices is also well studied. A common feature of these zonal flows is that they are spontaneously generated in turbulent systems. Because the Earth's outer core is believed to be in a turbulent state, it is possible that there is zonal flow in the liquid iron of the outer core. Here we report an investigation at the current low-viscosity limit of numerical simulations of the geodynamo. We find a previously unknown convection regime of the outer core that has a dual structure comprising inner, sheet-like radial plumes and an outer, westward cylindrical zonal flow. We numerically confirm that the dual-convection structure with such a zonal flow is stable under a strong, self-generated dipole magnetic field.

  5. The iron alloys of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracas, R.; Verstraete, M. J.; Vargas Calderon, A.; Labrosse, S.; Hernlund, J. W.; Gomi, H.; Ohta, K.; Hirose, K.

    2012-12-01

    We estimate the necessary amount of several light elements - C, S, P, O, Si - as major alloying components to match the observed seismic properties of the Earth's inner core. For this we compute the elastic constants tensors and determine the seismic properties of Fe3X compounds, with X = C, S, P, O and Si, using first-principles calculations. Assuming linear relations and similar temperature corrections of velocities, we obtain as most reasonable silicon and oxygen. We perform the same exercise on Fe-Ni alloys and see a minor effect of Ni on the seismic properties of iron. We compute the electrical conductivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions from electron-phonon coupling in the ABINIT implementation. We find an excellent agreement with experimental results for pure hcp iron below 1 mbars. We confidently use our results up to core pressure conditions. We show that the conductivity exhibits saturation at high pressures. We treat in detail the effect of Si on hcp iron and show a marked saturation effect, an increase in anisotropy and a strong dependence with the substitution pattern. The computed values suggest that the outer core should have conductivities in excess of 90 W/K/m, which is considerably larger than current estimates. This implies an inner core younger than 1 bil. years and stratification of the outer core.

  6. Viscosity near Earth's solid inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smylie

    1999-04-16

    Anomalous splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of oscillation of Earth's solid inner core is used to estimate the effective viscosity just outside its boundary. Superconducting gravimeter observations give periods of 3.5822 +/- 0.0012 (retrograde) and 4.0150 +/- 0.0010 (prograde) hours. With the use of Ekman layer theory to estimate viscous drag forces, an inferred single viscosity of 1.22 x 10(11) Pascal seconds gives calculated periods of 3.5839 and 4.0167 hours for the two modes, close to the observed values. The large effective viscosity is consistent with a fluid, solid-liquid mixture surrounding the inner core associated with the "compositional convection" that drives Earth's geodynamo.

  7. When the Earth's Inner Core Shuffles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalcic, H.; Young, M. K.; Bodin, T.; Ngo, S.; Sambridge, M.

    2011-12-01

    Shuffling is a tribal dance recently adapted by teenagers as a street dance. In one of the most popular moves, the so-called "Running Man", a stomp forward on one foot, shifted without being lifted from the ground, is followed by a change of position backwards on the same foot. Here, we present strong observational evidence from a newly observed collection of earthquake doublets that the Earth's inner core "shuffles" exhibiting both prograde and retrograde rotation in the reference frame of the mantle. This discovery is significant on several levels. First, the observed pattern consists of intermittent intervals of quasi-locked and differentially rotating inner core with respect to the Earth's mantle. This means that the angular alignment of the inner core and mantle oscillates in time over the past five decades. Jolting temporal changes are revealed, indicating that during the excursions from the quasi-locked state, the Earth's inner core can rotate both faster and slower than the rest of the planet, thus exhibiting both eastward and westward rotation. According to our results, a short time interval (on the order of one to two years) is needed for the inner core to accelerate to a differential rotation rate of several degrees per year, and typically a slightly longer time is needed to decelerate down to a negligibly small differential rotation rate. These time scales are in agreement with experimental spin-up times obtained when the magnetic torque alone is used to accelerate the inner core. Second, when we integrate the rotation rate over different time intervals, it is possible to explain discrepancies between the body wave and normal modes results for the rate of the inner core differential rotation found by previous authors. We show that the integrated shift in angular alignment and average rotation rates (previously determined to be constant) in normal mode studies are much smaller that those for the body waves. The repeating earthquakes from the South

  8. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  9. How Inge Lehmann Discovered the Inner Core of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    The mathematics behind Inge Lehmann's discovery that the inner core of the Earth is solid is explained using data collected around the Earth on seismic waves and their travel time through the Earth.

  10. The Earth's Inner Core: a Black Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's inner core continues to provoke interest and interaction among various disciplines within the deep Earth scientific community for many reasons, including the following: i) The phase diagram of iron and its alloys at high pressures and temperatures is still in a state of investigation, and several crystalographic phases of iron and/or their aggregates have been proposed to be stable at inner core conditions. Seismological datasets have increased in size, but there is a serious trade-off between isotropic and anisotropic velocity structure. This is further exacerbated by the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem in which travel time data are modeled by volumetric changes in isotropic/anisotropic structure. These datasets are nevertheless invaluable, and their further growth through receiver installations in remote regions will further constrain this problem. ii) Radial and lateral variations in inner core structure have been intensively studied and confirmed, both in terms of velocity and attenuation. Studying the latter is complicated since another trade-off exists - that between the viscoelastic and scattering origin of attenuation. There is an ongoing debate about the existence of the innermost inner core and the geodynamical mechanism responsible for the seismologically observed east-west dichotomy in isotropic velocity. The growing travel time and waveform datasets, both from individual stations and arrays, hold the key to solving these problems. iii) The growth mechanism of the inner core is in dispute; its age is still unknown, and it is not completely understood how its growing front crystallizes. The seismological datasets are arguably less potent in providing direct answers to this question. Nonetheless, there is some potential in studying the texture present in the outermost inner core, the velocity gradient at the bottom of the outer core, and the nature of the inner core boundary using waveform simulations and the coda of the seismic phases

  11. Simulating earth core using high energy lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Brambrink, E.; Nourou, A.; Ravasio, A.; Wei, H. G.; Vinci, T.; Mazevet, S.; Occelli, F.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; De Resseguier, T.; Lescoute, E.

    2010-06-01

    The melting curve and equation of state of iron and iron alloys at the inner core boundary (330 GPa, about 5000 K) are still unknown. This severally limits current modelling of earth constitution and dynamics. In this paper, recent numerical and experimental studies performed using laser generated isentropic ramp compression on iron and aluminium samples are presented. On the experimental side, direct laser ramp compression was achieved on iron. Time-resolved measurements were compared to hydrodynamic computations accounting for the polymorphic phase transformations. Before studying iron that presents a solid-solid phase transition along the isentropic path, we studied the time evolution of the atomic structure of aluminium using molecular dynamics simulations at the same length and time scales as the experiment. Like many metals, aluminium presents an elasto-plastic phase transition and we studied, using this microscopic approach, the effect of plasticity on the backward integration technique used to extract equation of state information from the experimental VISAR signal.

  12. Sulfur in Earth's Mantle and Its Behavior During Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, Nancy L.; Righter,Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The density of Earth's outer core requires that about 5-10% of the outer core be composed of elements lighter than Fe-Ni; proposed choices for the "light element" component of Earth's core include H, C, O, Si, S, and combinations of these elements [e.g. 1]. Though samples of Earth's core are not available, mantle samples contain elemental signatures left behind from the formation of Earth's core. The abundances of siderophile (metal-loving) elements in Earth's mantle have been used to gain insight into the early accretion and differentiation history of Earth, the process by which the core and mantle formed, and the composition of the core [e.g. 2-4]. Similarly, the abundance of potential light elements in Earth's mantle could also provide constraints on Earth's evolution and core composition. The S abundance in Earth's mantle is 250 ( 50) ppm [5]. It has been suggested that 250 ppm S is too high to be due to equilibrium core formation in a high pressure, high temperature magma ocean on early Earth and that the addition of S to the mantle from the subsequent accretion of a late veneer is consequently required [6]. However, this earlier work of Li and Agee [6] did not parameterize the metalsilicate partitioning behavior of S as a function of thermodynamic variables, limiting the different pressure and temperature conditions during core formation that could be explored. Here, the question of explaining the mantle abundance of S is revisited, through parameterizing existing metal-silicate partitioning data for S and applying the parameterization to core formation in Earth.

  13. Core Processes: Earth's eccentric magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause.......Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause....

  14. Alkali elements in the Earth's core: Evidence from enstatite meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodders, K.

    1995-01-01

    The abundances of alkali elements in the Earth's core are predicted by assuming that accretion of the Earth started from material similar in composition to enstatite chondrites and that enstatite achondrites (aubrites) provide a natural laboratory to study core-mantle differentiation under extremely reducing conditions. If core formation on the aubrite parent body is comparable with core formation on the early Earth, it is found that 2600 (+/- 1000) ppm Na, 550 (+/- 260) ppm K, 3.4 (+/- 2.1) ppm Rb, and 0.31 (+/- 0.24) ppm Cs can reside in the Earth's core. The alkali-element abundances are consistent with those predicted by independent estimates based on nebula condensation calculations and heat flow data.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamics and the earth's core selected works by Paul Roberts

    CERN Document Server

    Soward, Andrew M

    2003-01-01

    Paul Roberts'' research contributions are remarkable in their diversity, depth and international appeal. Papers from the Paul Roberts'' Anniversary meeting at the University of Exeter are presented in this volume. Topics include geomagnetism and dynamos, fluid mechanics and MHD, superfluidity, mixed phase regions, mean field electrodynamics and the Earth''s inner core. An incisive commentary of the papers puts the work of Paul Roberts into historical context. Magnetohydrodynamics and the Earth''s Core provides a valuable source of reference for graduates and researchers working in this area of geoscience.

  16. Isotopic evidence of Cr partitioning into Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frederic; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Schauble, Edwin

    2011-03-18

    The distribution of chemical elements in primitive meteorites (chondrites), as building blocks of terrestrial planets, provides insight into the formation and early differentiation of Earth. The processes that resulted in the depletion of some elements [such as chromium (Cr)] in the bulk silicate Earth relative to chondrites, however, remain debated between leading candidate causes: volatility versus core partitioning. We show through high-precision measurements of Cr stable isotopes in a range of meteorites, which deviate by up to ~0.4 per mil from those of the bulk silicate Earth, that Cr depletion resulted from its partitioning into Earth's core, with a preferential enrichment in light isotopes. Ab initio calculations suggest that the isotopic signature was established at mid-mantle magma ocean depth as Earth accreted planetary embryos and progressively became more oxidized.

  17. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzo, Monica; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes, and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing to grow the solid inner core, and on chemical convection due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing. The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat-flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat-flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent difficulties in experimentation and theory. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles- the first directly comp...

  18. A seismologically consistent compositional model of Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, James; Côté, Alexander S; Brodholt, John P

    2014-05-27

    Earth's core is less dense than iron, and therefore it must contain "light elements," such as S, Si, O, or C. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity in liquid metal alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's outer core. We compare the velocity and density for any composition in the (Fe-Ni, C, O, Si, S) system to radial seismological models and find a range of compositional models that fit the seismological data. We find no oxygen-free composition that fits the seismological data, and therefore our results indicate that oxygen is always required in the outer core. An oxygen-rich core is a strong indication of high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of core differentiation in a deep magma ocean with an FeO concentration (oxygen fugacity) higher than that of the present-day mantle.

  19. Geochemical Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John H.; Drake, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    New experimental data on the partitioning of siderophile and chalcophile elements among metallic and silicate phases may be used to constrain hypotheses of core formation in the Earth. Three current hypotheses can explain gross features of mantle geochemistry, but none predicts siderophile and chalcophile element abundances to within a factor of two of observed values. Either our understanding of metal-silicate interactions and/or our understanding of the early Earth requires revision.

  20. Does the thermal wind exist near the Earth's core boundary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolginov, A. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Temperature distribution in the Earth core determines many important processes such as the following: convective motion, magnetic field generation, matter exchange between the core and the mantle, and the thermal flux. This distribution depends on conditions in the core-mantle boundary and on the distribution of the thermal conductivity in the mantle. Seismic tomography shows that large horizontal temperature and compositional gradients exists at the core-mantle boundary. The simple assumption that these inhomogeneities are extended into the top of the core contradicts the common opinion that the horizontal temperature gradient (the thermal wind) wipes them out in a short time. However, this conclusion has been obtained without taking into account that the core volume is closed and the motion, if it is started, can lead to a small redistribution of composition that stops this motion.

  1. Powering Earth's dynamo with magnesium precipitation from the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Joseph G; Stevenson, David J

    2016-01-21

    Earth's global magnetic field arises from vigorous convection within the liquid outer core. Palaeomagnetic evidence reveals that the geodynamo has operated for at least 3.4 billion years, which places constraints on Earth's formation and evolution. Available power sources in standard models include compositional convection (driven by the solidifying inner core's expulsion of light elements), thermal convection (from slow cooling), and perhaps heat from the decay of radioactive isotopes. However, recent first-principles calculations and diamond-anvil cell experiments indicate that the thermal conductivity of iron is two or three times larger than typically assumed in these models. This presents a problem: a large increase in the conductive heat flux along the adiabat (due to the higher conductivity of iron) implies that the inner core is young (less than one billion years old), but thermal convection and radiogenic heating alone may not have been able to sustain the geodynamo during earlier epochs. Here we show that the precipitation of magnesium-bearing minerals from the core could have served as an alternative power source. Equilibration at high temperatures in the aftermath of giant impacts allows a small amount of magnesium (one or two weight per cent) to partition into the core while still producing the observed abundances of siderophile elements in the mantle and avoiding an excess of silicon and oxygen in the core. The transport of magnesium as oxide or silicate from the cooling core to underneath the mantle is an order of magnitude more efficient per unit mass as a source of buoyancy than inner-core growth. We therefore conclude that Earth's dynamo would survive throughout geologic time (from at least 3.4 billion years ago to the present) even if core radiogenic heating were minimal and core cooling were slow.

  2. Thermochemical Evolution of Earth's Core with Magnesium Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, J. G.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Vigorous convection within Earth's outer core drives a dynamo that has sustained a global magnetic field for at least 3.5 Gyr. Traditionally, people invoke three energy sources for the dynamo: thermal convection from cooling and freezing, compositional convection from light elements expelled by the growing inner core, and, perhaps, radiogenic heating from potassium-40. New theoretical and experimental work, however, indicates that the thermal and electrical conductivities of the outer core may be as much as three times higher than previously assumed. The implied increase in the adiabatic heat flux casts doubt on the ability of the usual mechanisms to explain the dynamo's longevity. Here, we present a quantitative model of the crystallization of magnesium-bearing minerals from the cooling core—a plausible candidate for the missing power source. Recent diamond-anvil cell experiments suggest that magnesium can partition into core material if thermodynamic equilibrium is achieved at high temperatures (>5000 K). We develop a model for core/mantle differentiation in which most of the core forms from material equilibrated at the base of a magma ocean as Earth slowly grows, but a small portion (~10%) equilibrated at extreme conditions in the aftermath of a giant impact. We calculate the posterior probability distribution for the original concentrations of magnesium and other light elements (chiefly oxygen and silicon) in the core, constrained by partitioning experiments and the observed depletion of siderophile elements in Earth's mantle. We then simulate the thermochemical evolution of cores with plausible compositions and thermal structures from the end of accretion to the present, focusing on the crystallization of a few percent of the initial core as ferropericlase and bridgmanite. Finally, we compute the associated energy release and verify that our final core compositions are consistent with the available seismological data.

  3. Hydrogen storage in Earth's mantle and core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Two different approaches to explaining how hydrogen might be stored in the mantle are illustrated by a number of papers published over the past 25-30 years, but there has been little attempt to provide objective comparisons of the two. One approach invokes the presence in the mantle of dense hydrous magnesium silicates (DHMS) stable at elevated pressures and temperatures. The other involves nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) that contain hydrogen as a minor constituent on the ppm level. Experimental studies on DHMS indicate these phases may be stable to pressures and temperatures as high at 16 GPa and 1200 C. This temperature is lower than that indicated by a mantle geotherm at 16 GPa, but may be reasonable for a subducting slab. It is possible that other DHMS could be stable to even higher pressures, but little is known about maximum temperature limits. For NAM, small amounts of hydrogen (up to several hundred ppm) have been detected in olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and garnet recovered from xenoliths in kimberlites, eclogites, and alkali basalts; it has been demonstrated that synthetic wadsleyite and perovskite can accommodate significant amounts of hydrogen. A number of problems are associated with each possibility. For NAM originating in the mantle, one would like to assume that the hydrogen measured in samples recovered on Earth's surface was incorporated when the phase-crystallized at high temperatures and pressures, but it could have been introduced during transport to the surface. Major problems for the DHMS proponents are that none of these phases have been found as minerals and little is yet known about their stabilities in systems containing other cations such as Fe, Al, and Ca.

  4. The geochemical constraints on Earth's accretion and core formation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, J. F.; Kleine, T.; Bourdon, B.

    2010-12-01

    There are now a wide range of geochemical observations that can be used to place constraints on Earth's first hundred million years. During this time the Earth accreted through collisions between numerous planetary embryos, and these collisions are thought to have caused significant melting and segregation of metal, forming the Earth's core. Information on the pressure, temperature, and oxygen fugacity conditions of core formation can be obtained from the abundances of siderophile elements in Earth's mantle and high pressure partitioning experiments. Timing information can be obtained from isotopic measurements, notably Hf-W and U-Pb. Here we present a simple geochemical box model that can be used to provide constraints on Earth's accretion and core formation. A key parameter in the model is the degree of equilibration during metal-silicate segregation. Existing models have shown that the siderophile element abundances are consistent with full equilibration in a deep magma ocean, with an increase in oxygen fugacity during accretion. Here we show that the siderophile element abundances are equally consistent with scenarios involving partial equilibration. The Hf-W isotopic observations constrain the degree of equilibration to be at least 36%. The timing constraints depend strongly on the degree of equilibration, but nevertheless bounds can be placed on the timing of Earth's accretion. With full equilibration, the Hf-W observations imply a rapid early accretion stage (at least 80% of Earth accreting within 35 Myr), but with partial equilibration accretion may be much more protracted. If Pb partitions into Earth’s core, the U-Pb observations can be used to constrain the late stages of accretion, and are consistent with the final 10% of Earth’s accretion occurring during the Moon-forming giant impact at ~4.45Ga.

  5. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-04-11

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by the decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing (as the solid inner core grows), and on chemical convection (due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing). The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent experimental and theoretical difficulties. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles--unlike previous estimates, which relied on extrapolations. The mixtures of iron, oxygen, sulphur and silicon are taken from earlier work and fit the seismologically determined core density and inner-core boundary density jump. We find both conductivities to be two to three times higher than estimates in current use. The changes are so large that core thermal histories and power requirements need to be reassessed. New estimates indicate that the adiabatic heat flux is 15 to 16 terawatts at the CMB, higher than present estimates of CMB heat flux based on mantle convection; the top of the core must be thermally stratified and any convection in the upper core must be driven by chemical convection against the adverse thermal buoyancy or lateral variations in CMB heat flow. Power for the geodynamo is greatly restricted, and future models of mantle evolution will need to incorporate a high CMB heat flux and explain the recent formation of the inner core.

  6. Super-Earths as Failed Cores in Orbital Migration Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    I explore whether close-in super-Earths were formed as rocky bodies that failed to grow fast enough to become the cores of gas giants before the natal protostellar disk dispersed. I model the failed cores’ inward orbital migration in the low-mass or type I regime to stopping points at distances where the tidal interaction with the protostellar disk applies zero net torque. The three kinds of migration traps considered are those due to the dead zone's outer edge, the ice line, and the transition from accretion to starlight as the disk's main heat source. As the disk disperses, the traps move toward final positions near or just outside 1 au. Planets at this location exceeding about 3 M ⊕ open a gap, decouple from their host traps, and migrate inward in the high-mass or type II regime to reach the vicinity of the star. I synthesize the population of planets that formed in this scenario, finding that a fraction of the observed super-Earths could have been failed cores. Most super-Earths that formed this way have more than 4 M ⊕, so their orbits when the disks dispersed were governed by type II migration. These planets have solid cores surrounded by gaseous envelopes. Their subsequent photoevaporative mass loss is most effective for masses originally below about 6 M ⊕. The failed core scenario suggests a division of the observed super-Earth mass-radius diagram into five zones according to the inferred formation history.

  7. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  8. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  9. Precessional states in a laboratory model of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, S. A.; Zimmerman, D. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2012-04-01

    A water-filled three-meter diameter spherical shell, geometrically similar to the Earth's core, shows precessionally forced flows. The precessional torque is supplied by the daily rotation of the laboratory by the Earth. We identify the precessionally forced flow to be primarily the spin-over inertial mode, i.e., a uniform vorticity flow whose rotation axis is not aligned with the sphere's rotation axis. A systematic study of the spin-over mode is carried out, showing that the amplitude depends on the ratio of precession to rotation rates (the Poincaré number), in marginal qualitative agreement with Busse's (1968) laminar theory. We find its phase differs significantly though, likely due to topographic effects. At high rotation rates, free shear layers are observed. Comparison with previous computational studies and implications for the Earth's core are discussed.

  10. Little Earth Experiment: an instrument to model planetary cores

    CERN Document Server

    Aujogue, Kelig; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  11. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  12. The ab initio simulation of the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfè, D; Gillan, M J; Vocadlo, L; Brodholt, J; Price, G D

    2002-06-15

    The Earth has a liquid outer and solid inner core. It is predominantly composed of Fe, alloyed with small amounts of light elements, such as S, O and Si. The detailed chemical and thermal structure of the core is poorly constrained, and it is difficult to perform experiments to establish the properties of core-forming phases at the pressures (ca. 300 GPa) and temperatures (ca. 5000-6000 K) to be found in the core. Here we present some major advances that have been made in using quantum mechanical methods to simulate the high-P/T properties of Fe alloys, which have been made possible by recent developments in high-performance computing. Specifically, we outline how we have calculated the Gibbs free energies of the crystalline and liquid forms of Fe alloys, and so conclude that the inner core of the Earth is composed of hexagonal close packed Fe containing ca. 8.5% S (or Si) and 0.2% O in equilibrium at 5600 K at the boundary between the inner and outer cores with a liquid Fe containing ca. 10% S (or Si) and 8% O.

  13. The Earth's Core: How Does It Work? Perspectives in Science. Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC.

    Various research studies designed to enhance knowledge about the earth's core are discussed. Areas addressed include: (1) the discovery of the earth's core; (2) experimental approaches used in studying the earth's core (including shock-wave experiments and experiments at high static pressures), the search for the core's light elements, the…

  14. Is Missing Xenon in the Earth's Inner Core

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Li; Zou, Guangtian; Ma, Yanming

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric studies of Earth have shown that more than 90% of xenon (Xe) is depleted if compared to the abundance of chondritic meteorites1,2. This missing Xe paradox remains a long-standing mystery and has become an extensive debate2-18. Earlier high pressure experimental and theoretical studies3-5 that were unable to find the reaction of Xe with iron (Fe), the main constituent of the Earth's inner core, seemingly excluded the Earth's inner core from the Xe reservoir. Here we report the first evidence on the chemical reaction of Xe with Fe at conditions of Earth's inner core predicted through our developed first-principles structure searching technique unbiased by any known structural knowledge. We find that Xe and Fe form stable inter-metallic compound of XeFe3 stoichiometry by adopting a Cu3Au-type cubic structure. By virtue of an unusual Xe -> Fe charge transfer, Xe loses its chemical inertness by opening up the completed filled 5p electron shell and thereby functions as a 5p-like element, while Fe is neg...

  15. The origin and chemical composition of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. R.; Hall, T.

    1972-01-01

    The process of core formation in the earth is subject to the constraints that it be nearly simultaneous with accretion and yet occur in a manner that the mantle retains radiogenic Xe-129 produced from the extinct radioactivity of I-129 with a half life of 17.6 million y. From these constraints, it appears that the only feasible mechanism is the segregation of an Fe-FeS melt. Trace element abundances in major classes of meteorites and the silicate fractions of the earth show that not only there is a high depletion of sulphur in the crust and the mantle, but that it is even more highly depleted than the rare gases, water and the halogens. From the nature of this depletion pattern and the fact that any model of accretion of the earth will necessarily produce an Fe-FeS melt, it is concluded that the light element in the core is largely sulphur with minor amounts of carbon. A consequence of this mode of core formation is found to be the availability of K-40 radioactive heat production in the liquid core, estimated at about 10 to the 19th power erg/s at the present time.

  16. The origin and chemical composition of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. R.; Hall, T.

    1972-01-01

    The process of core formation in the earth is subject to the constraints that it be nearly simultaneous with accretion and yet occur in a manner that the mantle retains radiogenic Xe-129 produced from the extinct radioactivity of I-129 with a half life of 17.6 million y. From these constraints, it appears that the only feasible mechanism is the segregation of an Fe-FeS melt. Trace element abundances in major classes of meteorites and the silicate fractions of the earth show that not only there is a high depletion of sulphur in the crust and the mantle, but that it is even more highly depleted than the rare gases, water and the halogens. From the nature of this depletion pattern and the fact that any model of accretion of the earth will necessarily produce an Fe-FeS melt, it is concluded that the light element in the core is largely sulphur with minor amounts of carbon. A consequence of this mode of core formation is found to be the availability of K-40 radioactive heat production in the liquid core, estimated at about 10 to the 19th power erg/s at the present time.

  17. Iron-carbonate interaction at Earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Prakapenka, V.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage and flux in the deep Earth are moderated by oxygen fugacity and interactions with iron-bearing phases. The amount of carbon stored in Earth's mantle versus the core depends on carbon-iron chemistry at the core-mantle boundary. Oxidized carbonates subducted from Earth's surface to the lowermost mantle may encounter reduced Fe0 metal from disproportionation of Fe2+ in lower mantle silicates or mixing with the core. To understand the fate of carbonates in the lowermost mantle, we have performed experiments on sandwiches of single-crystal (Ca0.6Mg0.4)CO3 dolomite and Fe foil in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle conditions of 49-110 GPa and 1800-2500 K. Syntheses were conducted with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to identify phase assemblages. After quench to ambient conditions, samples were sectioned with a focused Ga+ ion beam for composition analysis with transmission electron microscopy. At the centers of the heated spots, iron melted and reacted completely with the carbonate to form magnesiowüstite, iron carbide, diamond, magnesium-rich carbonate and calcium carbonate. In samples heated at 49 and 64 GPa, the two carbonates exhibit a eutectoid texture. In the sample heated at 110 GPa, the carbonates form rounded ~150-nm-diameter grains with a higher modal proportion of interspersed diamonds. The presence of reduced iron in the deep lower mantle and core-mantle boundary region will promote the formation of diamonds in carbonate-bearing subducted slabs. The complete reaction of metallic iron to oxides and carbides in the presence of mantle carbonate supports the formation of these phases at the Earth's core-mantle boundary and in ultra-low velocity zones.

  18. Earth's Inner Core dynamics induced by the Lorentz force

    CERN Document Server

    Lasbleis, M; Cardin, P; Labrosse, S

    2015-01-01

    Seismic studies indicate that the Earth's inner core has a complex structure and exhibits a strong elastic anisotropy with a cylindrical symmetry. Among the various models which have been proposed to explain this anisotropy, one class of models considers the effect of the Lorentz force associated with the magnetic field diffused within the inner core. In this paper we extend previous studies and use analytical calculations and numerical simulations to predict the geometry and strength of the flow induced by the poloidal component of the Lorentz force in a neutrally or stably stratified growing inner core, exploring also the effect of different types of boundary conditions at the inner core boundary (ICB). Unlike previous studies, we show that the boundary condition that is most likely to produce a significant deformation and seismic anisotropy is impermeable, with negligible radial flow through the boundary. Exact analytical solutions are found in the case of a negligible effect of buoyancy forces in the inne...

  19. Modelling the core magnetic field of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Carle, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that radial off-center dipoles located within the core of the earth be used instead of spherical harmonics of the magnetic potential in modeling the core magnetic field. The off-center dipoles, in addition to more realistically modeling the physical current systems within the core, are if located deep within the core more effective at removing long wavelength signals of either potential or field. Their disadvantage is that their positions and strengths are more difficult to compute, and such effects as upward and downward continuation are more difficult to manipulate. It is nevertheless agreed with Cox (1975) and Alldredge and Hurwitz (1964) that physical realism in models is more important than mathematical convenience. A radial dipole model is presented which agrees with observations of secular variation and excursions.

  20. Fine-scale heterogeneity in the Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale; Earle

    2000-03-16

    The seismological properties of the Earth's inner core have become of particular interest as we understand more about its composition and thermal state. Observations of anisotropy and velocity heterogeneity in the inner core are beginning to reveal how it has grown and whether it convects. The attenuation of seismic waves in the inner core is strong, and studies of seismic body waves have found that this high attenuation is consistent with either scattering or intrinsic attenuation. The outermost portion of the inner core has been inferred to possess layering and to be less anisotropic than at greater depths. Here we present observations of seismic waves scattered in the inner core which follow the expected arrival time of the body-wave reflection from the inner-core boundary. The amplitude of these scattered waves can be explained by stiffness variations of 1.2% with a scale length of 2 kilometres across the outermost 300 km of the inner core. These variations might be caused by variations in composition, by pods of partial melt in a mostly solid matrix or by variations in the orientation or strength of seismic anisotropy.

  1. New interpretation of data of the Earth's solid core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliyev, H. H.

    2017-06-01

    The commonly accepted scientific opinions on the inner core as the deformable solid globe are based on the solution of the problem on the distribution of elastic parameters in the inner structures of the Earth. The given solution is obtained within the necessary integral conditions on its self-weight, moment of inertia concerning the axes of rotation and periods of free oscillations of the Earth. It is shown that this solution does not satisfy the mechanics of the deformable solid body with sufficient local conditions following from basic principles concerning the strength, stability and actuality of velocities of propagation of elastic waves. The violation of local conditions shows that the inner core cannot exist in the form of the deformable solid body within the commonly accepted elastic parameters.

  2. Electromagnetically driven westward drift and inner-core superrotation in Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Philip W; Hollerbach, Rainer; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A 3D numerical model of the earth's core with a viscosity two orders of magnitude lower than the state of the art suggests a link between the observed westward drift of the magnetic field and superrotation of the inner core. In our model, the axial electromagnetic torque has a dominant influence only at the surface and in the deepest reaches of the core, where it respectively drives a broad westward flow rising to an axisymmetric equatorial jet and imparts an eastward-directed torque on the solid inner core. Subtle changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field may alter not just the magnitude but the direction of these torques. This not only suggests that the quasi-oscillatory nature of inner-core superrotation [Tkalčić H, Young M, Bodin T, Ngo S, Sambridge M (2013) The shuffling rotation of the earth's inner core revealed by earthquake doublets. Nat Geosci 6:497-502.] may be driven by decadal changes in the magnetic field, but further that historical periods in which the field exhibited eastward drift were contemporaneous with a westward inner-core rotation. The model further indicates a strong internal shear layer on the tangent cylinder that may be a source of torsional waves inside the core.

  3. Thermal evolution of Earth with magnesium precipitation in the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Korenaga, Jun; Stevenson, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Vigorous convection in Earth's core powers our global magnetic field, which has survived for over three billion years. In this study, we calculate the rate of entropy production available to drive the dynamo throughout geologic time using one-dimensional parameterizations of the evolution of Earth's core and mantle. To prevent a thermal catastrophe in models with realistic Urey ratios, we avoid the conventional scaling for plate tectonics in favor of one featuring reduced convective vigor for hotter mantle. We present multiple simulations that capture the effects of uncertainties in key parameters like the rheology of the lower mantle and the overall thermal budget. Simple scaling laws imply that the heat flow across the core/mantle boundary was elevated by less than a factor of two in the past relative to the present. Another process like the precipitation of magnesium-bearing minerals is therefore required to sustain convection prior to the nucleation of the inner core roughly one billion years ago, especially given the recent, upward revision to the thermal conductivity of the core. Simulations that include precipitation lack a dramatic increase in entropy production associated with the formation of the inner core, complicating attempts to determine its age using paleomagnetic measurements of field intensity. Because mantle dynamics impose strict limits on the amount of heat extracted from the core, we find that the addition of radioactive isotopes like potassium-40 implies less entropy production today and in the past. On terrestrial planets like Venus with more sluggish mantle convection, even precipitation of elements like magnesium may not sustain a dynamo if cooling rates are too slow.

  4. Super-Earths as Failed Cores in Orbital Migration Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We explore whether close-in super-Earths were formed as rocky bodies that failed to grow fast enough to become the cores of gas giants before the natal protostellar disk dispersed. We model the failed cores' inward orbital migration in the low-mass or type I regime, to stopping points at distances where the tidal interaction with the protostellar disk applies zero net torque. The three kinds of migration traps considered are those due to the dead zone's outer edge, the ice line, and the transition from accretion to starlight as the disk's main heat source. As the disk disperses, the traps move toward final positions near or just outside 1~au. Planets at this location exceeding about 3~M$_\\oplus$ open a gap, decouple from their host trap, and migrate inward in the high-mass or type II regime to reach the vicinity of the star. We synthesize the population of planets formed in this scenario, finding that some fraction of the observed super-Earths can be failed cores. Most super-Earths formed this way have more t...

  5. The abundance of potassium in the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Ohtani, E.; Kamada, S.; Miyahara, M.

    2013-12-01

    Potassium (K) has a radioactive isotope (40K), and it has been proposed that potassium might exist in the Earth's core (e.g., Wasserburg et al., 1964). If a large amount of potassium is in the core, it has a large impact on total heat budget and thermal history of the Earth. To reveal the amount of potassium in the core, many previous studies have been reported on potassium partitioning between metallic melts and silicate melts (e.g., Gessmann and Wood, 2002; Murthy et al., 2003; Hirao et al., 2006; Bouhifd et al., 2007; Corgne et al., 2007). Since there are considerable contradictions on temperature, pressure, and metal compositional dependencies, the potassium abundance in the core is not yet constrained well. In order to reveal the abundance accurately, we studied partitioning of potassium between aluminosilicate (adularia, KAlSi3O8) and metal (pure iron, iron-oxygen alloy, and iron-silicon alloy) up to 50 GPa and 3500 K using a double sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our results revealed following pressure, temperature, and compositional dependencies on the partitioning coefficient of potassium DK (= the potassium contents in metal [wt%] / the potassium contents in silicate [wt%]); the pressure effect is a very weak but positive when the results by Hirao et al. (2006) are included, and the temperature effect is a positive but weaker than those reported previously. Oxygen fugacity has a positive effect, and oxygen in the metallic phase increases the K contents in the metallic phase, whereas silicon in the metallic phase has a negative effect. Based on these results, we estimated that the amount of the potassium in the core was less than 10 ppm and that the amount of 40K was about 1.0 ppb resulting generation of about 0.01 TW heat in the core. This amount of heat is relatively small compared to the heat flux at the core-mantle boundary (5 ~ 15 TW, Lay et al., 2008), therefore the radiogenic energy of potassium is not the major heat source of Earth's core.

  6. Core Formation in the Earth: Constraints from Ni and Co

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, N. L.; Draper, D. S.; Agee, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    Due to their metal-loving nature, Ni and Co were strongly partitioned into the metallic core and were left depleted in the silicate mantle during core formation in the Earth. Based on experimental liquid metal- liquid silicate partition coefficients (D), studies have suggested that core formation in an early magma Ocean can explain the observed mantle depletions of Ni and Co [l-51. However, the conditions proposed by the magma ocean models have ranged from pressures of 24 to 59 GPa and temperatures of 2200 to < 4000 K. Furthermore, the proposed magma Ocean oxygen fugacities have differed by nearly two orders of magnitude.Chabot and Agee noted that the different models predicted contradictory behaviors for D(Ni) and D(Co) as a function of temperature. With the hope of resolving the discrepancies between the magma ocean models, we conducted a systematic experimental study to constrain the effects of temperature on D(Ni) and D(Co).

  7. Combining nutation and surface gravity observations to estimate the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Yann; Lambert, Sébastien; Rosat, Séverine; Nurul Huda, Ibnu; Bizouard, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Nutation time series derived from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and time varying surface gravity data recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SG) have long been used separately to assess the Earth's interior via the estimation of the free core and inner core resonance effects on nutation or tidal gravity. The results obtained from these two techniques have been shown recently to be consistent, making relevant the combination of VLBI and SG observables and the estimation of Earth's interior parameters in a single inversion. We present here the intermediate results of the ongoing project of combining nutation and surface gravity time series to improve estimates of the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies. We use VLBI nutation time series spanning 1984-2016 derived by the International VLBI Service for geodesy and astrometry (IVS) as the result of a combination of inputs from various IVS analysis centers, and surface gravity data from about 15 SG stations. We address here the resonance model used for describing the Earth's interior response to tidal excitation, the data preparation consisting of the error recalibration and amplitude fitting for nutation data, and processing of SG time-varying gravity to remove any gaps, spikes, steps and other disturbances, followed by the tidal analysis with the ETERNA 3.4 software package, the preliminary estimates of the resonant periods, and the correlations between parameters.

  8. Earth's core and inner-core resonances from analysis of VLBI nutation and superconducting gravimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosat, S.; Lambert, S. B.; Gattano, C.; Calvo, M.

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical parameters of the deep Earth's interior can be evaluated through the resonance effects associated with the core and inner-core wobbles on the forced nutations of the Earth's figure axis, as observed by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), or on the diurnal tidal waves, retrieved from the time-varying surface gravity recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SGs). In this paper, we inverse for the rotational mode parameters from both techniques to retrieve geophysical parameters of the deep Earth. We analyse surface gravity data from 15 SG stations and VLBI delays accumulated over the last 35 yr. We show existing correlations between several basic Earth parameters and then decide to inverse for the rotational modes parameters. We employ a Bayesian inversion based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with a Markov-chain Monte Carlo method. We obtain estimates of the free core nutation resonant period and quality factor that are consistent for both techniques. We also attempt an inversion for the free inner-core nutation (FICN) resonant period from gravity data. The most probable solution gives a period close to the annual prograde term (or S1 tide). However the 95 per cent confidence interval extends the possible values between roughly 28 and 725 d for gravity, and from 362 to 414 d from nutation data, depending on the prior bounds. The precisions of the estimated long-period nutation and respective small diurnal tidal constituents are hence not accurate enough for a correct determination of the FICN complex frequency.

  9. Correlation between the Earth's Magnetic Field and the Gravitational Mass of the Outer Core

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2013-01-01

    The theory accepted today for the origin of the Earth's magnetic field is based on convection currents created in the Earth's outer core due to the rotational motion of the planet Earth around its own axis. In this work, we show that the origin of the Earth's magnetic field is related to the gravitational mass of the outer core.

  10. Stability of earth dam with a vertical core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orekhov Vyacheslav Valentinovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth dam with impervious element in the form of asphaltic concrete core is currently the most promising type of earth dams (due to simple construction technology and universal service properties of asphaltic concrete and is widely used in the world. However, experience in the construction and operation of high dams (above 160 m is not available, and their work is scarcely explored. In this regard, the paper discusses the results of computational prediction of the stress-strain state and stability of a high earth dam (256 m high with the core. The authors considered asphaltic concrete containing 7 % of bitumen as the material of the core. Gravel was considered as the material of resistant prisms. Design characteristics of the rolled asphaltic concrete and gravel were obtained from the processing of the results of triaxial tests. The calculations were performed using finite element method in elastoplastic formulation and basing on the phased construction of the dam and reservoir filling. The research shows, that the work of embankment dam with vertical core during filling of the reservoir is characterized by horizontal displacement of the lower resistant prism in the tailrace and the formation of a hard wedge prism descending along the core in the upper resistant prism. The key issue of the safety assessment is to determine the safety factor of the overall stability of the dam, for calculation of which the destruction of the earth dam is necessary, which can be done by reducing the strength properties of the dam materials. As a results of the calculations, the destruction of the dam occurs with a decrease in the strength characteristics of the materials of the dam by 2.5 times. The dam stability depends on the stability of the lower resistant prism. The destruction of its slope occurs on the classical circular-cylindrical surface. The presence of a potential collapse surface in the upper resistant prism (on the edges of the descending wedge does

  11. Oxygen in the Earth's core a first principles study

    CERN Document Server

    Alfè, D; Gillan, M J; Alfe`, Dario; Gillan, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    First principles electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory have been used to study the thermodynamic, structural and transport properties of solid solutions and liquid alloys of iron and oxygen at Earth's core conditions. Aims of the work are to determine the oxygen concentration needed to account for the inferred density in the outer core, to probe the stability of the liquid against phase separation, to interpret the bonding in the liquid, and to find out whether the viscosity differs significantly from that of pure liquid iron at the same conditions. It is shown that the required concentration of oxygen is in the region 25-30 mol percent, and evidence is presented for phase stability at these conditions. The Fe-O bonding is partly ionic, but with a strong covalent component. The viscosity is lower than that of pure liquid iron at Earth's core conditions. It is shown that earlier first-principles calculations indicating very large enthalpies of formation of solid solutions may nee...

  12. Probing iron at Super-Earth core conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadou, N., E-mail: nourou.amadou@polytechnique.edu [LULI, UMR7605 CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Palaiseau (France); Département de physique, Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, B.P 10662 Niamey (Niger); Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T. [LULI, UMR7605 CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Palaiseau (France); Benuzzi-Mounaix, A. [LULI, UMR7605 CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Palaiseau (France); LUTH, UMR 8102 Observatoire de Paris, CNRS Université Paris Diderot, Meudon (France); Huser, G.; Brygoo, S. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Morard, G.; Guyot, F. [Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux, et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC) Sorbonne Universités - UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR CNRS 7590, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, IRD UMR 206, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Resseguier, T. de [Institut PPrime, CNRS, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Mazevet, S. [LUTH, UMR 8102 Observatoire de Paris, CNRS Université Paris Diderot, Meudon (France); Miyanishi, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Henry, O.; Raffestin, D. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33114 Le Barp (France); Boehly, T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Rd., Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we report on the quasi-isentropic compression of an iron sample using ramp shaped laser irradiation. This technique allows us to quasi-isentropically compress iron up to 700 GPa and 8500 K. To our knowledge, these data are the highest pressures reached on iron in off-Hugoniot conditions and the closest to the thermodynamic states thought to exist in Earth-like planetary cores. The experiment was performed on the Ligne d'Intégration laser facility at CESTA, Bordeaux, France.

  13. Rare Earth core/shell nanobarcodes for multiplexed trace biodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Li, Xiaomin; Shen, Dengke; Zhou, Lei; Zhu, Dan; Fan, Chunhai; Zhang, Fan

    2015-06-02

    Multiplexed detection technology has been attractive for its simultaneous assay of several analytes, which play significant roles in applications such as screening for combinatorial chemistry, genetic analysis, and clinical diagnostics. This work reports a novel and potentially powerful encoding system based upon dispersible suspension arrays of multilayer rare earth core/shell nanoparticles that are capable of multiplexed, high-sensitivity reporting for biomolecule detection by the Z-contrast imaging. These nanobarcode arrays are encoded by nanostructure design based on different atomic numbers. With the well-resolved high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) decoding technique, many thousands of unique nanobarcodes can be identified by multilayer core/shell nanostructure. Their applications to multiplexed biodetection of DNA demonstrated the highly sensitive (picomole) features of this novel nanobarcode system.

  14. Applications of liquid state physics to the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    New results derived for application to the earth's outer core using the modern theory of liquids and the hard-sphere model of liquid structure are presented. An expression derived in terms of the incompressibility and pressure is valid for a high-pressure liquid near its melting point, provided that the pressure is derived from a strongly repulsive pair potential; a relation derived between the melting point and density leads to a melting curve law of essentially the same form as Lindemann's law. Finally, it is shown that the 'core paradox' of Higgins and Kennedy (1971) can occur only if the Gruneisen parameter is smaller than 2/3, and this constant is larger than this value in any liquid for which the pair potential is strongly repulsive.

  15. Experimental earth tidal models in considering nearly diurnal free wobble of the Earth's liquid core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Based on the 28 series of the high precision and high minute sampling tidal gravity observations at 20 stations in Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) network, the resonant parameters of the Earth's nearly diurnal free wobble (including the eigenperiods, resonant strengths and quality factots) are precisely determined. The discrepancy of the eigenperiod between observed and theoretical values is studied, the important conclusion that the real dynamic ellipticity of the liquid core is about 5% larger than the one under the static equilibrium assumption is approved by using our gravity technique. The experimental Earth's tidal gravity models with considering the nearly diurnal free wobble of the Earth's liquid core are constructed in this study. The numerical results show that the difference among three experimental models is less than 0.1%, and the largest discrepancy compared to those widely used nowdays given by Dehant (1999) and Mathews (2001) is only about 0.4%. It can provide with the most recent real experimental tidal gravity models for the global study of the Earth's tides, geodesy and space techniques and so on.

  16. Irregular topography at the Earth's inner core boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhiyang; Wang, Wei; Wen, Lianxing

    2012-05-15

    Compressional seismic wave reflected off the Earth's inner core boundary (ICB) from earthquakes occurring in the Banda Sea and recorded at the Hi-net stations in Japan exhibits significant variations in travel time (from -2 to 2.5 s) and amplitude (with a factor of more than 4) across the seismic array. Such variations indicate that Earth's ICB is irregular, with a combination of at least two scales of topography: a height variation of 14 km changing within a lateral distance of no more than 6 km, and a height variation of 4-8 km with a lateral length scale of 2-4 km. The characteristics of the ICB topography indicate that small-scale variations of temperature and/or core composition exist near the ICB, and/or the ICB topographic surface is being deformed by small-scale forces out of its thermocompositional equilibrium position and is metastable.

  17. Terrestrial magma ocean and core segregation in the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Eiji; Yurimoto, Naoyoshi

    1992-01-01

    According to the recent theories of formation of the earth, the outer layer of the proto-earth was molten and the terrestrial magma ocean was formed when its radius exceeded 3000 km. Core formation should have started in this magma ocean stage, since segregation of metallic iron occurs effectively by melting of the proto-earth. Therefore, interactions between magma, mantle minerals, and metallic iron in the magma ocean stage controlled the geochemistry of the mantle and core. We have studied the partitioning behaviors of elements into the silicate melt, high pressure minerals, and metallic iron under the deep upper mantle and lower mantle conditions. We employed the multi-anvil apparatus for preparing the equilibrating samples in the ranges from 16 to 27 GPa and 1700-2400 C. Both the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) and the Secondary Ion Mass spectrometer (SIMS) were used for analyzing the run products. We obtained the partition coefficients of various trace elements between majorite, Mg-perovskite, and liquid, and magnesiowustite, Mg-perovskite, and metallic iron. The examples of the partition coefficients of some key elements are summarized in figures, together with the previous data. We may be able to assess the origin of the mantle abundances of the elements such as transition metals by using the partitioning data obtained above. The mantle abundances of some transition metals expected by the core-mantle equilibrium under the lower mantle conditions cannot explain the observed abundance of some elements such as Mn and Ge in the mantle. Estimations of the densities of the ultrabasic magma Mg-perovskite at high pressure suggest existence of a density crossover in the deep lower mantle; flotation of Mg-perovskite occurs in the deep magma ocean under the lower mantle conditions. The observed depletion of some transition metals such as V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in the mantle may be explained by the two stage process, the core-mantle equilibrium under the lower

  18. Pressure regimes and core formation in the accreting earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Recent work suggests that a large degree of melting is required to segregate metal from silicates, suggesting a connection with the formation of magma oceans. At low pressures metallic liquids do not wet silicate minerals, preventing the metal from aggregating into large masses that can sink. At high pressures, above 25 GPa, the dihedral angles of grains in contact with oxygen-rich metallic liquids may be reduced enough to allow percolation of metal, but this has not been confirmed. Physical models of core formation and accretion may therefore involve the formation of magma oceans and the segregation of metal at both high and low pressures. Models of core formation involving different pressure regimes are discussed as well as chemical evidence bearing on the models. Available geophysical data is ambiguous. The nature of the 670 km boundary (chemical difference or strictly phase change) between the upper and lower mantle is in doubt. There is some evidence that plumes are derived from the lower mantle, and seismic tomography strongly indicates that penetration of subducting oceanic crust into the lower mantle, but the tomography data also indicates that the 670 km discontinuity is a significant barrier to general mantle convection. The presence of the D' layer at the base of the lower mantle could be a reaction zone between the mantle and core indicating core-mantle disequilibrium, or D' layer could be subducted material. The abundance of the siderophile elements in the mantle could provide clues to the importance of high pressure processes in Earth, but partition coefficients at high pressures are only beginning to be measured.

  19. Core cooling by subsolidus mantle convection. [thermal evolution model of earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although vigorous mantle convection early in the thermal history of the earth is shown to be capable of removing several times the latent heat content of the core, a thermal evolution model of the earth in which the core does not solidify can be constructed. The large amount of energy removed from the model earth's core by mantle convection is supplied by the internal energy of the core which is assumed to cool from an initial high temperature given by the silicate melting temperature at the core-mantle boundary. For the smaller terrestrial planets, the iron and silicate melting temperatures at the core-mantle boundaries are more comparable than for the earth; the models incorporate temperature-dependent mantle viscosity and radiogenic heat sources in the mantle. The earth models are constrained by the present surface heat flux and mantle viscosity and internal heat sources produce only about 55% of the earth model's present surface heat flow.

  20. Earth's Climate History from Glaciers and Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lonnie

    2013-03-01

    Glaciers serve both as recorders and early indicators of climate change. Over the past 35 years our research team has recovered climatic and environmental histories from ice cores drilled in both Polar Regions and from low to mid-latitude, high-elevation ice fields. Those ice core -derived proxy records extending back 25,000 years have made it possible to compare glacial stage conditions in the Tropics with those in the Polar Regions. High-resolution records of δ18O (in part a temperature proxy) demonstrate that the current warming at high elevations in the mid- to lower latitudes is unprecedented for the last two millennia, although at many sites the early Holocene was warmer than today. Remarkable similarities between changes in the highland and coastal cultures of Peru and regional climate variability, especially precipitation, imply a strong connection between prehistoric human activities and regional climate. Ice cores retrieved from shrinking glaciers around the world confirm their continuous existence for periods ranging from hundreds to thousands of years, suggesting that current climatological conditions in those regions today are different from those under which these ice fields originated and have been sustained. The ongoing widespread melting of high-elevation glaciers and ice caps, particularly in low to middle latitudes, provides strong evidence that a large-scale, pervasive and, in some cases, rapid change in Earth's climate system is underway. Observations of glacier shrinkage during the 20th and 21st century girdle the globe from the South American Andes, the Himalayas, Kilimanjaro (Tanzania, Africa) and glaciers near Puncak Jaya, Indonesia (New Guinea). The history and fate of these ice caps, told through the adventure, beauty and the scientific evidence from some of world's most remote mountain tops, provide a global perspective for contemporary climate. NSF Paleoclimate Program

  1. Generation of MAC waves by convection in Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaupart, Etienne; Buffett, Bruce

    2017-05-01

    Convection in Earth's core is a viable mechanism for generating MAC waves when the top of the core is stably stratified. We quantify the generation mechanism by extending the physical description of MAC waves to include a source term due to buoyancy forces in the convecting part of the core. Solutions for the forced motion are obtained using a Green's function, which is constructed from the eigenfunctions for the unforced motion. When the source term is evaluated using the output of a numerical geodynamo model, the largest excitation occurs at even spherical harmonic degrees, corresponding to waves with symmetric azimuthal flow about the equator. We also find that the magnitude of the source term decreases at periods shorter than about 60 yr. As a result most of the wave generation is confined to waves with periods of 60 yr or longer. Quantitative predictions for the wave amplitudes depend on the projection of the source term into the eigenfunction of the waves. Strong stratification limits the penetration of density anomalies into the stratified layer, which means that the source term is confined to the lowermost part of the layer. Overtones of MAC waves with large amplitudes in the lower part of the stratified layer are more effectively generated by convection, even though these waves are heavily damped by magnetic diffusion. Generation of MAC waves by convection establishes a physical link between observable wave motion and deeper convective processes. Detection of changes in the amplitude and phase of MAC waves would constrain the generation processes and offer insights into the nature of the convection.

  2. Turbulent geodynamo simulations: a leap towards Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, N.; Jault, D.; Nataf, H.-C.; Fournier, A.

    2017-10-01

    We present an attempt to reach realistic turbulent regime in direct numerical simulations of the geodynamo. We rely on a sequence of three convection-driven simulations in a rapidly rotating spherical shell. The most extreme case reaches towards the Earth's core regime by lowering viscosity (magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 0.1) while maintaining vigorous convection (magnetic Reynolds number Rm > 500) and rapid rotation (Ekman number E = 10-7) at the limit of what is feasible on today's supercomputers. A detailed and comprehensive analysis highlights several key features matching geomagnetic observations or dynamo theory predictions—all present together in the same simulation—but it also unveils interesting insights relevant for Earth's core dynamics. In this strong-field, dipole-dominated dynamo simulation, the magnetic energy is one order of magnitude larger than the kinetic energy. The spatial distribution of magnetic intensity is highly heterogeneous, and a stark dynamical contrast exists between the interior and the exterior of the tangent cylinder (the cylinder parallel to the axis of rotation that circumscribes the inner core). In the interior, the magnetic field is strongest, and is associated with a vigorous twisted polar vortex, whose dynamics may occasionally lead to the formation of a reverse polar flux patch at the surface of the shell. Furthermore, the strong magnetic field also allows accumulation of light material within the tangent cylinder, leading to stable stratification there. Torsional Alfvén waves are frequently triggered in the vicinity of the tangent cylinder and propagate towards the equator. Outside the tangent cylinder, the magnetic field inhibits the growth of zonal winds and the kinetic energy is mostly non-zonal. Spatio-temporal analysis indicates that the low-frequency, non-zonal flow is quite geostrophic (columnar) and predominantly large-scale: an m = 1 eddy spontaneously emerges in our most extreme simulations, without any

  3. Plumes and Earth's Dynamic History : from Core to Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtillot, V. E.

    2002-12-01

    The last half century has been dominated by the general acceptance of plate tectonics. Although the plume concept emerged early in this story, its role has remained ambiguous. Because plumes are singularities, both in space and time, they tend to lie dangerously close to catastrophism, as opposed to the calm uniformitarian view of plate tectonics. Yet, it has become apparent that singular events and transient phenomena are of great importance, even if by definition they cover only a small fraction of geological time, in diverse observational and theoretical fields such as 1) magnetic reversals and the geodynamo, 2) tomography and mantle convection, 3) continental rifting and collision, and 4) evolution of the fluid envelopes (atmospheric and oceanic "climate"; evolution of species in the biosphere). I will emphasize recent work on different types of plumes and on the correlation between flood basalts and mass extinctions. The origin of mantle plumes remains a controversial topic. We suggest that three types of plumes exist, which originate at the three main discontinuities in the Earth's mantle (base of lithosphere, transition zone and core-mantle boundary). Most of the hotspots are short lived (~ 10Ma) and seem to come from the transition zone or above. Important concentrations occur above the Pacific and African superswells. Less than 10 hotspots have been long lived (~ 100Ma) and may have a very deep origin. In the last 50 Ma, these deep-seated plumes in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres have moved slowly, but motion was much faster prior to that. This change correlates with major episodes of true polar wander. The deeper ("primary") plumes are thought to trace global shifts in quadrupolar convection in the lower mantle. These are the plumes that were born as major flood basalts or oceanic plateaus (designated as large igneous provinces or LIPs). Most have an original volume on the order or in excess of 2.5 Mkm3. In most provinces, volcanism lasted on

  4. Earth Inner Core Periodic Motion due to Pressure Difference Induced by Tidal Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, M

    2013-01-01

    The inner structure of the earth is still a topic of discussion. Seismic measurements showed a structure of solid, liquid, solid which describes the mantle, outer core and inner core with the inner core in the center. The analysis of waveform doublets suggests now that the inner core is out of center and even of faster rotation than the mantel and crust. From the sum of Buoyancy and Gravity on the earth inner core, the position energy is plotted and together with the tangential tidal acceleration, it is derived that Earth Inner Core cannot be in a center position without additional force. The Earth Core System is explained as Hydrodynamic Bearing. The Eccentricities out of nutation due to the effects from the sun and moon are calculated as an approximation.

  5. Seismic Structures in the Earth's Inner Core Below Southeastern Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoshchekov, Dmitry; Kaazik, Petr; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Ovtchinnikov, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    Documenting seismic heterogeneities in the Earth's inner core (IC) is important in terms of getting an insight into its history and dynamics. A valuable means for studying properties and spatial structure of such heterogeneities is provided by measurements of body waves refracted in the vicinity of the inner core boundary (ICB). Here, we investigate eastern hemisphere of the solid core by means of PKPBC-PKPDF differential travel times that sample depths from 140 to 360 km below its boundary. We study 292 polar and 133 equatorial residuals measured over the traces that probe roughly the same volume of the IC in both planes. Equatorial residuals show slight spatial variations in the sampled IC volume mostly below the level of 0.5 %, whereas polar residuals are up to three times as big, direction dependent and can exhibit higher local variations. The measurements reveal fast changes in seismic velocity within a restricted volume of the IC. We interpret the observations in terms of anisotropy and check against several anisotropy models few of which have been found capable of fitting the residuals scatter. We particularly quantify the model where a dipping discontinuity separates fully isotropic roof of the IC from its anisotropic body, whereas the depth of isotropy-anisotropy transition increases in southeast direction from 190 km below Southeastern Asia (off the coast of China) to 350 km beneath Australia. Another acceptable model cast in terms of localized anisotropic heterogeneities is valid if 33 largest polar measurements over the rays sampling a small volume below Southeastern Asia and the rest of polar data are treated separately. This model envisages almost isotropic eastern hemisphere of the IC at least down to the depth of 360 km below the ICB and constrains the anisotropic volume only to the ranges of North latitudes from 18° to 23°, East longitudes from 125° to 135° and depths exceeding 170 km. The anisotropy strength in either model is about 2

  6. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  7. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  8. Inertial waves in a laboratory model of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Santiago Andres

    2011-12-01

    A water-filled three-meter diameter spherical shell built as a model of the Earth's core shows evidence of precessionally forced flows and, when spinning the inner sphere differentially, inertial modes are excited. We identified the precessionally forced flow to be primarily the spin-over inertial mode, i.e., a uniform vorticity flow whose rotation axis is not aligned with the container's rotation axis. A systematic study of the spin-over mode is carried out, showing that the amplitude dependence on the Poincare number is in qualitative agreement with Busse's laminar theory while its phase differs significantly, likely due to topographic effects. At high rotation rates free shear layers concentrating most of the kinetic energy of the spin-over mode have been observed. When spinning the inner sphere differentially, a total of 12 inertial modes have been identified, reproducing and extending previous experimental results. The inertial modes excited appear ordered according to their azimuthal drift speed as the Rossby number is varied.

  9. Evidence for an oxygen-depleted liquid outer core of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haijun; Fei, Yingwei; Cai, Lingcang; Jing, Fuqian; Hu, Xiaojun; Xie, Hongsen; Zhang, Lianmeng; Gong, Zizheng

    2011-11-23

    On the basis of geophysical observations, cosmochemical constraints, and high-pressure experimental data, the Earth's liquid outer core consists of mainly liquid iron alloyed with about ten per cent (by weight) of light elements. Although the concentrations of the light elements are small, they nevertheless affect the Earth's core: its rate of cooling, the growth of the inner core, the dynamics of core convection, and the evolution of the geodynamo. Several light elements-including sulphur, oxygen, silicon, carbon and hydrogen-have been suggested, but the precise identity of the light elements in the Earth's core is still unclear. Oxygen has been proposed as a major light element in the core on the basis of cosmochemical arguments and chemical reactions during accretion. Its presence in the core has direct implications for Earth accretion conditions of oxidation state, pressure and temperature. Here we report new shockwave data in the Fe-S-O system that are directly applicable to the outer core. The data include both density and sound velocity measurements, which we compare with the observed density and velocity profiles of the liquid outer core. The results show that we can rule out oxygen as a major light element in the liquid outer core because adding oxygen into liquid iron would not reproduce simultaneously the observed density and sound velocity profiles of the outer core. An oxygen-depleted core would imply a more reduced environment during early Earth accretion.

  10. The effects of the solid inner core and nonhydrostatic structure on the earth's forced nutations and earth tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Dan; Wahr, John M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper computes the effects of the solid inner core (IC) on the forced nutations and earth tides, and on certain of the earth's rotational normal modes. The theoretical results are extended to include the effects of a solid IC and of nonhydrostatic structure. The presence of the IC is responsible for a new, almost diurnal, prograde normal mode which involves a relative rotation between the IC and fluid outer core about an equatorial axis. It is shown that the small size of the IC's effects on both nutations and tides is a consequence of the fact that the IC's moments of inertia are less than 1/1000 of the entire earth's.

  11. Seismological evidence for a localized mushy zone at the Earth's inner core boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dongdong; Wen, Lianxing

    2017-08-01

    Although existence of a mushy zone in the Earth's inner core has been hypothesized several decades ago, no seismic evidence has ever been reported. Based on waveform modeling of seismic compressional waves that are reflected off the Earth's inner core boundary, here we present seismic evidence for a localized 4-8 km thick zone across the inner core boundary beneath southwest Okhotsk Sea with seismic properties intermediate between those of the inner and outer core and of a mushy zone. Such a localized mushy zone is found to be surrounded by a sharp inner core boundary nearby. These seismic results suggest that, in the current thermo-compositional state of the Earth's core, the outer core composition is close to eutectic in most regions resulting in a sharp inner core boundary, but deviation from the eutectic composition exists in some localized regions resulting in a mushy zone with a thickness of 4-8 km.The existence of a mushy zone in the Earth's inner core has been suggested, but has remained unproven. Here, the authors have discovered a 4-8 km thick mushy zone at the inner core boundary beneath the Okhotsk Sea, indicating that there may be more localized mushy zones at the inner core boundary.

  12. Metal-silicate partitioning during core formation on super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, L. K.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, D. D.; Remo, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Separation of the Earth into a rocky mantle and metallic Fe core is a problem long studied in the planetary science community (e.g. [1]). The timing of core formation influences the abundances of the siderophile elements found in the Earth's mantle, and the mechanism of core formation influences the degree of chemical equilibration between the rocky mantle and the core at the time of metal separation. However, limited work has been done on formation of metallic cores and its effects on mantle chemistry in rocky planets larger than the Earth. Super-Earths, exoplanets with masses up to ~ 5 Earth masses and radii up to ~1.6-1.7 Earth radii, have significantly larger internal pressures and consequently higher internal temperatures than the Earth, therefore conclusions from Earth-centric studies of core formation may be erroneous. Partitioning coefficients for many of the relevant elements (e.g. Fe, Ni, Si, O, etc.) are available in the literature, but only to relatively low pressures. The relevant pressures for super-Earths are significantly larger. However, data on Fe-O-Ni-Si partitioning at pressures (200-500 GPa) and temperatures relevant to super-Earths have been measured by laser-induced shocks with the ZBL laser at Sandia National Laboratory with a method described in [2]. We will present a model which integrates this data with lower pressure partition coefficients from the literature (e.g. [3],[4],[5]), with special emphasis on Fe and O, to describe partitioning behavior at high pressures and discuss its implications for core size and composition on rocky super-Earths. [1] Ringwood, A.E. (1977) Geochem. J. 11, 111-135. [2] Remo, J.L., Petaev, M.I., Jacobsen, S. B. (2008) LPSC abstract, 1420. [3] Frost, D.J. et al. (2010) JGR, B02202. [4] Kombayashi, T. (2014) JGR, 4164-4177. [5] Rubie, D.C. et al. (2011) EPSL, 301, 31-42. [5

  13. Changes in Earth's core-generated magnetic field, as observed by Swarm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide us with a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth....... In this contribution, we will present the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, as seen by ESA's Earth explorer mission Swarm. We will present a new time-dependent geomagnetic field model, called CHAOS-6, derived from satellite data collected by the Swarm constellation, as well as data from...

  14. Sensitivities of Earth's core and mantle compositions to accretion and differentiation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Rebecca A.; Campbell, Andrew J.; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2017-01-01

    The Earth and other terrestrial planets formed through the accretion of smaller bodies, with their core and mantle compositions primarily set by metal-silicate interactions during accretion. The conditions of these interactions are poorly understood, but could provide insight into the mechanisms of planetary core formation and the composition of Earth's core. Here we present modeling of Earth's core formation, combining results of 100 N-body accretion simulations with high pressure-temperature metal-silicate partitioning experiments. We explored how various aspects of accretion and core formation influence the resulting core and mantle chemistry: depth of equilibration, amounts of metal and silicate that equilibrate, initial distribution of oxidation states in the disk, temperature distribution in the planet, and target:impactor ratio of equilibrating silicate. Virtually all sets of model parameters that are able to reproduce the Earth's mantle composition result in at least several weight percent of both silicon and oxygen in the core, with more silicon than oxygen. This implies that the core's light element budget may be dominated by these elements, and is consistent with ≤1-2 wt% of other light elements. Reproducing geochemical and geophysical constraints requires that Earth formed from reduced materials that equilibrated at temperatures near or slightly above the mantle liquidus during accretion. The results indicate a strong tradeoff between the compositional effects of the depth of equilibration and the amounts of metal and silicate that equilibrate, so these aspects should be targeted in future studies aiming to better understand core formation conditions. Over the range of allowed parameter space, core and mantle compositions are most sensitive to these factors as well as stochastic variations in what the planet accreted as a function of time, so tighter constraints on these parameters will lead to an improved understanding of Earth's core composition.

  15. Diagenetic remobilization of rare earth elements in a sediment core from the central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Banakar, V.K.

    Rare earth elements (REE) distribution in a 36 cm long sediment box core from the Central Indian Basin is studied. REE concentration is generally higher in the upper oxic zone than in intermediate suboxic zone suggesting REE diffusion upwards...

  16. An early geodynamo driven by exsolution of mantle components from Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, James; Siebert, Julien; Nimmo, Francis

    2016-08-18

    Recent palaeomagnetic observations report the existence of a magnetic field on Earth that is at least 3.45 billion years old. Compositional buoyancy caused by inner-core growth is the primary driver of Earth's present-day geodynamo, but the inner core is too young to explain the existence of a magnetic field before about one billion years ago. Theoretical models propose that the exsolution of magnesium oxide--the major constituent of Earth's mantle--from the core provided a major source of the energy required to drive an early dynamo, but experimental evidence for the incorporation of mantle components into the core has been lacking. Indeed, terrestrial core formation occurred in the early molten Earth by gravitational segregation of immiscible metal and silicate melts, transporting iron-loving (siderophile) elements from the silicate mantle to the metallic core and leaving rock-loving (lithophile) mantle components behind. Here we present experiments showing that magnesium oxide dissolves in core-forming iron melt at very high temperatures. Using core-formation models, we show that extreme events during Earth's accretion (such as the Moon-forming giant impact) could have contributed large amounts of magnesium to the early core. As the core subsequently cooled, exsolution of buoyant magnesium oxide would have taken place at the core–mantle boundary, generating a substantial amount of gravitational energy as a result of compositional buoyancy. This amount of energy is comparable to, if not more than, that produced by inner-core growth, resolving the conundrum posed by the existence of an ancient magnetic field prior to the formation of the inner core.

  17. Thermal, dynamic and compositional aspects of the core-forming Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Core formation is the most important and singular differentiation event in the history of a terrestrial planet. It almost certainly involved the downward migration of a partially or wholly molten iron alloy through a silicate and oxide mantle, and was contemporaneous with accretion. Several important, unresolved issues which have implications for mantle and core geochemistry, the thermal history of the Earth, and the origin of geomagnetism are addressed: whether the early Earth was molten; whether core formation involved low or high pressure geochemistry, or both; early Earth mantle homogenization; whether equilibration established between core forming material and the mantle through which it migrated; and how much iron is stranded and unable to reach the core.

  18. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  19. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  20. Early Stage of Origin of Earth (interval after Emergence of Sun, Formation of Liquid Core, Formation of Solid Core)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechernikova, G. V.; Sergeev, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    Gravitational collapse of interstellar molecular cloud fragment has led to the formation of the Sun and its surrounding protoplanetary disk, consisting of 5 × 10^5 dust and gas. The collapse continued (1 years. Age of solar system (about 4.57×10^9 years) determine by age calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAI) which are present at samples of some meteorites (chondrites). Subsidence of dust to the central plane of a protoplanetary disk has led to formation of a dust subdisk which as a result of gravitational instability has broken up to condensations. In the process of collisional evolution they turned into dense planetesimals from which the planets formed. The accounting of a role of large bodies in evolution of a protoplanetary swarm in the field of terrestrial planets has allowed to define times of formation of the massive bodies permitting their early differentiation at the expense of short-lived isotopes heating and impacts to the melting temperature of the depths. The total time of Earth's growth is estimated about 10^8 years. Hf geochronometer showed that the core of the Earth has existed for Using W about 3×10^7 Hf geohronometer years since the formation of the CAI. Thus data W point to the formation of the Earth's core during its accretion. The paleomagnetic data indicate the existence of Earth's magnetic field past 3.5×10^9 years. But the age of the solid core, estimated by heat flow at the core-mantle boundary is 1.7×10^9 (0.5 years). Measurements of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron under the conditions that exist in the Earth's core, indicate the absence of the need for a solid core of existence to support the work geodynamo, although electrical resistivity measurements yield the opposite result.

  1. Shear softening of Earth's inner core indicated by its high Poisson's ratio and elastic anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhongqing

    2016-01-01

    Earth's inner core exhibits an unusually high Poisson's ratio and noticeable elastic anisotropy. The mechanisms responsible for these features are critical for understanding the evolution of the Earth but remain unclear. This study indicates that once the correct formula for the shear modulus is used, shear softening can simultaneously explain the high Poisson's ratio and strong anisotropy of the inner core. Body-centred-cubic (bcc) iron shows shear instability at the pressures found in the inner-core and can be dynamically stabilized by temperature and light elements. It is very likely that some combinations of light elements stabilize the bcc iron alloy under inner-core conditions. Such a bcc phase would exhibit significant shear softening and match the geophysical constraints of the inner core. Identifying which light elements and what concentrations of these elements stabilize the bcc phase will provide critical information on the light elements of the inner core.

  2. Planet Within a Planet: Rotation of the Inner Core of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su; Dziewonski; Jeanloz

    1996-12-13

    The time dependence of the orientation of Earth's inner core relative to the mantle was determined using a recently discovered 10-degree tilt in the axis of symmetry of the inner core's seismic-velocity anisotropy. Two methods of analyzing travel-time variations for rays traversing the inner core, on the basis of 29 years of data from the International Seismological Centre (1964-1992), reveal that the inner core appears to rotate about 3 degrees per year faster than the mantle. An anomalous variation in inner-core orientation from 1969 to 1973 coincides in time with a sudden change ("jerk") in the geomagnetic field.

  3. Compressibility and planetary interiors. [solid core theory applicable to Earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    Important confirmations that the Earth's inner core is solid have recently come from analyses of records of free Earth oscillations and from the apparent detection of the seismic phase PKJKP. Corresponding support is given to the theory which supplied the primary evidence for rigidity in the inner core. This theory requires the incompressibility and its gradient with respect to the pressure p to vary fairly smoothly with p inside planets, and supplies a potent restriction on the allowable variations of particular physical properties inside parts of planetary interiors. The theory is at present principally applicable to the Earth and Venus. The paper reviews some of the principal implications.

  4. Earth's deformation due to the dynamical perturbations of the fluid outer core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建桥; 孙和平

    2002-01-01

    The elasto-gravitational deformation response of the Earth's solid parts to the perturbations of the pressure and gravity on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the solid inner core boundary (ICB), due to the dynamical behaviors of the fluid outer core (FOC), is discussed. The internal load Love numbers, which are formulized in a general form in this study, are employed to describe the Earth's deformation. The preliminary reference Earth model (PREM) is used as an example to calculate the internal load Love numbers on the Earth's surface, CMB and ICB, respectively. The characteristics of the Earth's deformation variation with the depth and the perturbation periods on the boundaries of the FOC are also investigated. The numerical results indicate that the internal load Love numbers decrease quickly with the increasing degree of the spherical harmonics of the displacement and depend strongly on the perturbation frequencies, especially on the high frequencies. The results, obtained in this work, can be used to construct the boundary conditions for the core dynamics of the long-period oscillations of the Earth's fluid outer core.

  5. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  6. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  7. Exploratory models of the earth's thermal regime during segregation of the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    Some simple exploratory theoretical models of the thermal effects of core segregation have been investigated, assuming an initially homogeneous earth and including convective heat transport through a 'parameterized convection' approximation. The results indicate that either (1) mantle temperatures 30% or more above present values may have resulted from the gravitational energy released during core segregation, (2) the earth retained very little of its accretional energy, (3) core segregation lasted for one billion years or more, or (4) the earth accreted heterogeneously. Option 3 seems to be precluded by terrestrial lead isotope data, and the alternatives each raise substantial questions concerning the mechanics, chemistry, and petrology of the earth's early history. There is no recognized evidence for the early hot phase of option 1, and option 4 implies, among other things, an analogous early hot phase. Although it has not been favored, option 2 may be viable.

  8. The lead isotopic age of the Earth can be explained by core formation alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bernard J; Halliday, Alex N

    2010-06-10

    The meaning of the age of the Earth defined by lead isotopes has long been unclear. Recently it has been proposed that the age of the Earth deduced from lead isotopes reflects volatile loss to space at the time of the Moon-forming giant impact rather than partitioning into metallic liquids during protracted core formation. Here we show that lead partitioning into liquid iron depends strongly on carbon content and that, given a content of approximately 0.2% carbon, experimental and isotopic data both provide evidence of strong partitioning of lead into the core throughout the Earth's accretion. Earlier conclusions that lead is weakly partitioned into iron arose from the use of carbon-saturated (about 5% C) iron alloys. The lead isotopic age of the Earth is therefore consistent with partitioning into the core and with no significant late losses of moderately volatile elements to space during the giant impact.

  9. Stability of body-centered cubic iron-magnesium alloys in the Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kádas, Krisztina; Vitos, Levente; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2009-09-15

    The composition and the structure of the Earth's solid inner core are still unknown. Iron is accepted to be the main component of the core. Lately, the body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of iron was suggested to be present in the inner core, although its stability at core conditions is still in discussion. The higher density of pure iron compared with that of the Earth's core indicates the presence of light element(s) in this region, which could be responsible for the stability of the bcc phase. However, so far, none of the proposed composition models were in full agreement with seismic observations. The solubility of magnesium in hexagonal Fe has been found to increase significantly with increasing pressure, suggesting that Mg can also be an important element in the core. Here, we report a first-principles density functional study of bcc Fe-Mg alloys at core pressures and temperatures. We show that at core conditions, 5-10 atomic percent Mg stabilizes the bcc Fe both dynamically and thermodynamically. Our calculated density, elastic moduli, and sound velocities of bcc Fe-Mg alloys are consistent with those obtained from seismology, indicating that the bcc-structured Fe-Mg alloy is a possible model for the Earth's inner core.

  10. Advanced Pressure Coring System for Deep Earth Sampling (APRECOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, E.; Rothfuss, M.; Müller, W. H.

    2009-04-01

    Nowadays the recovery of cores from boreholes is a standard operation. However, during that process the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties as well as living conditions for microorganisms are significantly altered. In-situ sampling is one approach to overcome the severe scientific limitations of conventional, depressurized core investigations by recovering, processing, and conducting experiments in the laboratory, while maintaining unchanged environmental parameters. The most successful equipment today is the suite of tools developed within the EU funded projects HYACE (Hydrate Autoclave Coring Equipment) and HYACINTH (Deployment of HYACE tools In New Tests on Hydrates) between 1997 and 2005. Within several DFG (German Research Foundation) projects the Technical University Berlin currently works on concepts to increase the present working pressure of 250 bar as well as to reduce logistical and financial expenses by merging redundant and analogous procedures and scaling down the considerable size of key components. It is also proposed to extend the range of applications for the wireline rotary pressure corer and the sub-sampling and transfer system to all types of soil conditions (soft to highly-consolidated). New modifications enable the tools to be used in other pressure related fields of research, such as unconventional gas exploration (coal-bed methane, tight gas, gas hydrate), CO2 sequestration, and microbiology of the deep biosphere. Expedient enhancement of an overall solution for pressure core retrieval, process and investigation will open the way for a complete on-site, all-purpose, in-situ equipment. The advanced assembly would allow for executing the whole operation sequences of coring, non-destructive measurement, sub-sampling and transfer into storage, measurement and transportation chambers, all in sterile, anaerobic conditions, and without depressurisation in quick succession. Extensive post-cruise handling and interim storage would be

  11. Changes in Earth's core-generated magnetic field, as observed by Swarm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide us with a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth....... In this contribution, we will present the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, as seen by ESA's Earth explorer mission Swarm. We will present a new time-dependent geomagnetic field model, called CHAOS-6, derived from satellite data collected by the Swarm constellation, as well as data from...... of the source region, the core-mantle boundary, we present maps of the detailed structure of the geodynamo, and how this is presently evolving. Both the trend (secular variation) and accelerations in the field changes since the launch of the Swarm mission will be presented. Assuming that field changes...

  12. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts - Experiments relevant to the earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigated at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. Application of the results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed, and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.-

  13. Formation of a solid inner core during the accretion of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar

    2017-05-01

    The formation of an inner core during the accretion of Earth is investigated by using self-gravitating and compressible Earth models formed by accreting a total of 25 or 50 Moon to Mars-sized planetary embryos. The impact of an embryo heats the proto-Earth's interior differentially, more below the impact site than elsewhere. The rotating core dynamically overturns and stratifies shortly after each impact, creating a spherically symmetric and radially increasing temperature distribution relative to an adiabatic profile. Merging of an embryo to the proto-Earth increases the lithostatic pressure that results in compressional temperature increase while further enhances the melting temperature of the core causing solidification. A total of 36 thermal evolution models of the growing proto-Earth's core are calculated to investigate effects of major physical parameters. No solidification is considered in the first 21 models where modified two-body escape velocities are used as the impact velocities of the embryos. At the end of accretion, temperatures in the upper part of the core are significantly different among these models, whereas temperatures in the deeper parts are similar. The core solidification considered in the remaining 15 models, where impact velocities higher than the modified two-body escape velocities are adopted, drastically changes the temperature distribution in the deeper parts of the core. All of the models produce partially solidified stiff inner cores, 1000-2100 km in radius, at the end of accretion, where the solid fraction is larger than 50%. The innermost of the stiff inner cores is completely solidified to radii 250-1500 km.

  14. Slow differential rotation of the Earth's inner core indicated by temporal changes in scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale; Dodge; Earle

    2000-05-25

    The finding that the Earth's inner core might be rotating faster than the mantle has important implications for our understanding of core processes, including the generation of the Earth's magnetic field. But the reported signal is subtle--a change of about 0.01 s per year in the separation of two seismic waves with differing paths through the core. Subsequent studies of such data have generally supported the conclusion that differential rotation exists, but the difficulty of accurately locating historic earthquakes and possible biases induced by strong lateral variations in structure near the core-mantle boundary have raised doubt regarding the proposed inner-core motion. Also, a study of free oscillations constrained the motion to be relatively small compared to previous estimates and it has been proposed that the interaction of inner-core boundary topography and mantle heterogeneity might lock the inner core to the mantle. The recent detection of seismic waves scattered in the inner core suggests a simple test of inner-core motion. Here we compare scattered waves recorded in Montana, USA, from two closely located nuclear tests at Novaya Zemlya, USSR, in 1971 and 1974. The data show small but coherent changes in scattering which point toward an inner-core differential rotation rate of 0.15 degrees per year--consistent with constraints imposed by the free-oscillation data.

  15. Constructing a core framework of visual engine for Digital Earth system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A visual engine is the core of a Digital Earth system.There is a wide variety of functional requirements in Digital Earth system and different requirements correspond to different operations.Based on the development of the visual engine for ChinaStar,a 3D Digital China prototype software platform,and analysis of 3D Digital Earth platforms such as Google Earth,Virtual Earth,Skyline,etc,are discussed.A common core framework for a visual engine is proposed in this paper to construct a visual engine and then with this framework various Digital Earth application systems can be developed efficient.The parametric model of the Earth,scheduling and optimization in visual field,choice of 3D graphics library,and designing component-based visual engine framework of Digital Earth are discussed in detail.In addition,the relationships among these four basic components and the construction of visualization applications of Digital Earth by this method are also discussed.

  16. Possible detection of the earth's free-core nutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D. S.; Carter, W. E.; Wahr, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The 5.5 years of VLBI observations primarily collected under project IRIS are used to search for evidence of the free-core nutation (FCN). The observations are consistent with an irregular excitation process, and a model which assumes a step excitation in the FCN amplitude to about 2.0 milliseconds of arc in late 1985 fits the data well. Theoretical analysis appears to rule out the strong Mexican earthquake of September 19, 1985, as a cause of the excitation.

  17. Saturation of electrical resistivity of solid iron at Earth's core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzo, Monica; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of solid iron at high pressure, up to and including conditions likely to be found at the centre of the Earth. We have extended some of the calculations of the resistivities of pure solid iron we recently performed at Earth's core conditions (Pozzo et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014) to lower temperature. We show that at low temperature the resistivity increases linearly with temperature, and saturates at high temperature. This saturation effect is well known as the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit in metals, but has been largely ignored to estimate the resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions. Recent experiments (Gomi et al. in Phys Earth Planet Int 224:88-103, 2013) coupled new high pressure data and saturation to predict the resitivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions, and reported values up to three times lower than previous estimates, confirming recent first principles calculations (de Koker et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:4070-4073, 2012; Pozzo et al. in Nature 485:355-358, 2012, Phys Rev B 87:014110-10, 2013, Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014; Davies et al. in Nat Geosci 8:678-685, 2015). The present results support the saturation effect idea.

  18. Core formation in the earth and shergottite parent body (SPB) - Chemical evidence from basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.; Drake, M. J.; Janssens, M.-J.; Wolf, R.; Ebihara, M.

    1986-01-01

    Abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the shergottite parental body (SPB) have been compared with those of the earth. To this end, new INAA and RNAA analyses of non-Antarctic meteorites have been performed, and the composition of the shergottite SPB mantle has been inferred from the compositions of the SNC meteorites. The composition of the earth's mantle has been inferred from the compositions of terrestrial basalt. Finally, the effects of volatile depletion, core formation, and mineral/melt fractionation on the abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the SPB and the earth have been taken into consideration. Compared to the earth, the SPB mantle is richer in moderately siderophile elements and more depleted with respect to chalcophile elements. The observed relative abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the SPB and the earth mantles indicate that the SPB underwent accretion and/or differentiation processes which differ from those in the earth.

  19. [Signs of the Impact of the Earth's core on the Planet's Population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshkov, Yu P; Malyshkov, S Yu

    2015-01-01

    When investigating the rhythms of the Earth's electromagnetic noise and seismicity, as well as numerous calls for ambulance, cases of baby births and people death, the authors have found that such rhythms have diurnal, seasonal and annual variations and they are principal for human being's life. The analysis of both main regularities and single peculiarities of diurnal and annual rhythms in the living and non-living nature has led us to assumption that the deep-seated processes relating. to the eccentric rotation of the Earth's core and shell could be a powerful conductor of the life and the death on the Earth. The results obtained in our study not only confirm the existence of deep-seated waves generated by the Earth's core but also make us sure that such constantly circulating waves produce a certain impact on a human being's health, birth and death and even "orchestrate" suicides.

  20. Alkali element depletion by core formation and vaporization on the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodders, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The depletion of Na, K, Rb, and Cs in the Earth's upper mantle and crust relative to their abundances in chondrites is a long standing problem in geochemistry. Here we consider two commonly invoked mechanisms, namely core formation, and vaporization, for producing the observed depletions. Our models predict that a significant percentage of the Earth's bulk alkali element inventory is in the core (30 percent for Na, 52 percent for K, 74 percent for Rb, and 92 percent for Cs). These predictions agree with independent estimates from nebular volatility trends and (for K) from terrestrial heat flow data. Our models also predict that vaporization and thermal escape during planetary accretion are unlikely to produce the observed alkali element depletion pattern. However, loss during the putative giant impact which formed the Moon cannot be ruled out. Experimental, observational, and theoretical tests of our predictions are also described. Alkali element partitioning into the Earth's core was modeled by assuming that alkali element partitioning during core formation on the aubrite parent body (APB) is analogous to that on the early Earth. The analogy is reasonable for three reasons. First, the enstatite meteorites are the only known meteorites with the same oxygen isotope systematics as the Earth-Moon system. Second, the large core size of the Earth and the V depletion in the mantle requires accretion from planetesimals as reduced as the enstatite chondrites. Third, experimental studies of K partitioning between silicate and metal plus sulfide show that more K goes into the metal plus sulfide at higher pressures than at one atmosphere pressure. Thus partitioning in the relatively low pressure natural laboratory of the APB is a good guide to alkali elemental partitioning during the growth of the Earth.

  1. Partitioning of Phosphorus and Molybdenum between the Earth's Mantle and Core and the Conditions of Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuff, K. M.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Lee, C. T.

    2008-01-01

    There are several hypotheses on the specific processes that might have occurred during the formation of the Earth. One hypothesis that has been proposed is that early in the Earth's formation, there was a magma ocean present, and within this body, siderophile elements separated out of the silicate liquid to form the metal core. This study addresses this hypothesis. P and Mo are moderately siderophile elements that are present in both the mantle and the core. The concentrations of P and Mo in silicate vs. metal can be measured and in turn used to determine the temperatures, pressures, oxygen fugacity and melt composition required to achieve the same concentrations as observed in the mantle. The data here include eight experiments examining the partitioning of P and Mo between metallic liquid and silicate liquid. The purpose of the experiments has been to gain a greater understanding of core-mantle separation during the Earth formation process and examines temperature effect on P and Mo, which has not been systematically studied before.

  2. Reactions of xenon with iron and nickel are predicted in the Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Liu, Hanyu; Pickard, Chris J; Zou, Guangtian; Ma, Yanming

    2014-07-01

    Studies of the Earth's atmosphere have shown that more than 90% of the expected amount of Xe is depleted, a finding often referred to as the 'missing Xe paradox'. Although several models for a Xe reservoir have been proposed, whether the missing Xe could be contained in the Earth's inner core has not yet been answered. The key to addressing this issue lies in the reactivity of Xe with Fe/Ni, the main constituents of the Earth's core. Here, we predict, through first-principles calculations and unbiased structure searching techniques, a chemical reaction of Xe with Fe/Ni at the temperatures and pressures found in the Earth's core. We find that, under these conditions, Xe and Fe/Ni can form intermetallic compounds, of which XeFe3 and XeNi3 are energetically the most stable. This shows that the Earth's inner core is a natural reservoir for Xe storage and provides a solution to the missing Xe paradox.

  3. Implication of the lopsided growth for the viscosity of Earth's inner core

    OpenAIRE

    Mizzon, Hugau; Monnereau, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Two main seismic features characterize the Earth's inner core: a North-South polar anisotropy and an East-West asymmetry of P-wave velocity and attenuation. Anisotropy is expected if shear deformation is induced by convective motions. Translation has recently been put forward as an important mode of convection of the inner core. Combined with a simple diffusive grain growth model, this mechanism is able to explain the observed seismic asymmetry, but not the bulk anisotropy. The source of anis...

  4. Gravitational Core-Mantle Coupling and the Acceleration of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David Parry; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational core-mantle coupling may be the cause of the observed variable acceleration of the Earth's rotation on the 1000 year timescale. The idea is that density inhomogeneities which randomly come and go in the liquid outer core gravitationally attract density inhomogeneities in the mantle and crust, torquing the mantle and changing its rotation state. The corresponding torque by the mantle on the core may also explain the westward drift of the magnetic field of 0.2 deg per year. Gravitational core-mantle coupling would stochastically affect the rate of change of the Earth's obliquity by just a few per cent. Its contribution to polar wander would only be about 0.5% the presently observed rate. Tidal friction is slowing down the rotation of the Earth, overwhelming a smaller positive acceleration from postglacial rebound. Coupling between the liquid outer core of the Earth and the mantle has long been a suspected reason for changes in the length-of-day. The present investigation focuses on the gravitational coupling between the density anomalies in the convecting liquid outer core and those in the mantle and crust as a possible cause for the observed nonsecular acceleration on the millenial timescale. The basic idea is as follows. There are density inhomogeneities caused by blobs circulating in the outer core like the blobs in a lava lamp; thus the outer core's gravitational field is not featureless. Moreover, these blobs will form and dissipate somewhat randomly. Thus there will be a time variability to the fields. These density inhomogeneities will gravitationally attract the density anomalies in the mantle.

  5. Quasi-geostrophic modes in the Earth's fluid core with an outer stably stratified layer

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Seismic waves sensitive to the outermost part of the Earth's liquid core seem to be affected by a stably stratified layer at the core-mantle boundary. Such a layer could have an observable signature in both long-term and short-term variations of the magnetic field of the Earth, which are used to probe the flow at the top of the core. Indeed, with the recent SWARM mission, it seems reasonable to be able to identify waves propagating in the core with period of several months, which may play an important role in the large-scale dynamics. In this paper, we characterize the influence of a stratified layer at the top of the core on deep quasi-geostrophic (Rossby) waves. We compute numerically the quasi-geostrophic eigenmodes of a rapidly rotating spherical shell, with a stably stratified layer near the outer boundary. Two simple models of stratification are taken into account, which are scaled with commonly accepted values of the Brunt-V{\\"a}is{\\"a}l{\\"a} frequency in the Earth's core. In the absence of magnetic fi...

  6. Equation of State of Fe3S and Limits on the Sulfur Content of Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A.; Mattillion, A.; Bausch, H.; Tecklenburg, S.; Fischer, R. A.; Chidester, B.; Prakapenka, V.

    2016-12-01

    Sulfur is a common component of protoplanetary cores, as represented by iron meteorites, and it is likely to be a significant alloying component with iron in Earth's core as well, along with silicon, oxygen, and perhaps other light elements. Cosmochemical limits on the sulfur content of Earth's core, based on the relative volatilities of sulfur and other elements, are weakened by the observation that this approach fails to accurately predict the sulfur content in iron meteorite parent bodies. To better understand the geophysical consequences of sulfur addition to Earth's core, we report equation of state measurements of Fe3S to pressures and temperatures exceeding 140 GPa and 2000 K, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a laser heated diamond anvil cell. New room temperature measurements are also reported, improved by the use of a neon pressure medium. With this P-V-T equation of state for Fe3S, along with an assumed 2% density change upon melting and a 4000 K core-mantle boundary temperature, the PREM density in the outer core can be matched with 14 wt% sulfur, which should be considered an upper bound because of the likely additional presence of other light elements.

  7. Anisotropy of Earth's inner core intrinsic attenuation from seismic normal mode models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkinen, Anna M.; Deuss, Arwen; Redfern, Simon A T

    2014-01-01

    The Earth's inner core, the slowly growing sphere of solid iron alloy at the centre of our planet, is known to exhibit seismic anisotropy. Both normal mode and body wave studies have established that, when the global average is taken, compressional waves propagate faster in the North-South direction

  8. Anisotropy of Earth's inner core intrinsic attenuation from seismic normal mode models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkinen, Anna M.; Deuss, Arwen; Redfern, Simon A T

    2014-01-01

    The Earth's inner core, the slowly growing sphere of solid iron alloy at the centre of our planet, is known to exhibit seismic anisotropy. Both normal mode and body wave studies have established that, when the global average is taken, compressional waves propagate faster in the North-South direction

  9. Partitioning of oxygen during core formation on the Earth and Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie, David C; Gessmann, Christine K; Frost, Daniel J

    2004-05-01

    Core formation on the Earth and Mars involved the physical separation of metal and silicate, most probably in deep magma oceans. Although core-formation models explain many aspects of mantle geochemistry, they have not accounted for the large differences observed between the compositions of the mantles of the Earth (approximately 8 wt% FeO) and Mars (approximately 18 wt% FeO) or the smaller mass fraction of the martian core. Here we explain these differences as a consequence of the solubility of oxygen in liquid iron-alloy increasing with increasing temperature. We assume that the Earth and Mars both accreted from oxidized chondritic material. In a terrestrial magma ocean, 1,200-2,000 km deep, high temperatures resulted in the extraction of FeO from the silicate magma ocean owing to high solubility of oxygen in the metal. Lower temperatures of a martian magma ocean resulted in little or no extraction of FeO from the mantle, which thus remains FeO-rich. The FeO extracted from the Earth's magma ocean may have contributed to chemical heterogeneities in the lowermost mantle, a FeO-rich D" layer and the light element budget of the core.

  10. Implication of the lopsided growth for the viscosity of Earth's inner core

    CERN Document Server

    Mizzon, Hugau

    2012-01-01

    Two main seismic features characterize the Earth's inner core: a North-South polar anisotropy and an East-West asymmetry of P-wave velocity and attenuation. Anisotropy is expected if shear deformation is induced by convective motions. Translation has recently been put forward as an important mode of convection of the inner core. Combined with a simple diffusive grain growth model, this mechanism is able to explain the observed seismic asymmetry, but not the bulk anisotropy. The source of anisotropy has therefore to be sought in the shear motions caused by higher modes of convection. Using a hybrid finite-difference spherical harmonics Navier-Stokes solver, we investigate the interplay between translation and convection in a 3D spherical model with permeable boundary conditions at the inner core boundary. Three parameters act independently: viscosity, internal heating and convection velocity in the outer core. Our numerical simulations show the dominance of pure translation for viscosities of the inner core hi...

  11. Development of Dynamic Ellipsometry for Measurements or Iron Conductivity at Earth's Core Conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Sean Campbell [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Ao, Tommy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davis, Jean-Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dolan, Daniel H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Seagle, Christopher T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Jung-Fu [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bernstein, Aaron [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The CHEDS researchers are engaged in a collaborative research project to study the properties of iron and iron alloys under Earth’s core conditions. The Earth’s core, inner and outer, is composed primarily of iron, thus studying iron and iron alloys at high pressure and temperature conditions will give the best estimate of its properties. Also, comparing studies of iron alloys with known properties of the core can constrain the potential light element compositions found within the core, such as fitting sound speeds and densities of iron alloys to established inner- Earth models. One of the lesser established properties of the core is the thermal conductivity, where current estimates vary by a factor of three. Therefore, one of the primary goals of this collaboration is to make relevant measurements to elucidate this conductivity.

  12. The earth's C21 and S21 gravity coefficients and the rotation of the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahr, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Observational results for the earth's C21 and S21 gravity coefficients can be used to constrain the mean equatorial rotation of the core with respect to the mantle. Current satellite gravity solutions suggest the equatorial rotation rate is no larger than 1 x 10 to the -7th times the earth's diurnal spin rate, a limit more than one order of magnitude smaller than the polar rotation rate inferred from the westward drift of the earth's magnetic field. The next generation gravity solutions should improve this constraint by more than one order of magnitude. Implications for the fluid pressure at the core-mantle boundary and for the shape of that boundary are discussed.

  13. Formation, stratification, and mixing of the cores of Earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Rubie, David C.; Hernlund, John; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-09-01

    Earth possesses a persistent, internally-generated magnetic field, whereas no trace of a dynamo has been detected on Venus, at present or in the past, although a high surface temperature and recent resurfacing events may have removed paleomagnetic evidence. Whether or not a terrestrial body can sustain an internally generated magnetic field by convection inside its metallic fluid core is determined in part by its initial thermodynamic state and its compositional structure, both of which are in turn set by the processes of accretion and differentiation. Here we show that the cores of Earth- and Venus-like planets should grow with stable compositional stratification unless disturbed by late energetic impacts. They do so because higher abundances of light elements are incorporated into the liquid metal that sinks to form the core as the temperatures and pressures of metal-silicate equilibration increase during accretion. We model this process and determine that this establishes a stable stratification that resists convection and inhibits the onset of a geodynamo. However, if a late energetic impact occurs, it could mechanically stir the core creating a single homogenous region within which a long-lasting geodynamo would operate. While Earth's accretion has been punctuated by a late giant impact with likely enough energy to mix the core (e.g. the impact that formed the Moon), we hypothesize that the accretion of Venus is characterized by the absence of such energetic giant impacts and the preservation of its primordial stratifications.

  14. Inner-Most Inner Core: Distinct Region at the Center of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, M.; Dziewoński, A. M.

    2002-12-01

    Although the presence of anisotropy in the inner core is widely accepted, inferences of its strength and depth dependence vary considerably from model to model. We have recently shown that a significant fraction of inner-core sensitive (normal-mode and absolute/differential travel-time) data is reconciled by a model in which anisotropy does not vary with radius. This model predicts an almost linear dependence of travel-time residuals on cos2 ξ , where ξ is the angle between the ray path and the symmetry axis. The simple anisotropy model fits the absolute travel-time data well at all distance ranges except between 173° and 180°, where a strong dependence on (cos2 ξ )2 is observed. This distance range corresponds to the innermost 300~km of the Earth, where mode constraints are weak (because eigenfunctions must vanish at the center of the Earth), and where constraints from differential travel times ({ {PKP}} {AB}}-{ {PKP}}{ {DF}) are likely contaminated due to unmodelled mantle structure. We refer to this new region as the inner-most inner core. The (cos2 ξ )2 signal that indicates the existence of a distinct inner-most inner core is even more evident when effects due to anisotropy in the upper 920~km of the inner core are removed. Furthermore, division of the data into various subsets consistently reveals the anomalous dependence on (cos2 ξ )2, suggesting that it is a robust feature unique to this distance range. When the travel times are inverted for anisotropic parameters, we obtain a model with a slow direction orientered ~45° from the equator, in contrast to the bulk inner core where the slowest wave propagation occurs when the rays are parallel to the equatorial plane. The existence of the inner-most inner core has significant consequences in our understanding of the Earth's evolution. This region may represent fossil evidence of two episodes of inner core development or changes in the pattern of convection in the outer core. Furthermore, if the inner

  15. The Earth's core formation and development: evidence from evolution of tectonomagmatic processes and paleomagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkov, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    Many geologists confident that the core provides modern tectonic and magmatic activity on the Earth, which explains our interest in this topic, and vice versa we can use evolution of tectonomagmatic processes throughout the Earth's (and other terrestrial planetary bodies) history for reconstruction of the core formation and evolution. Most researchers, follow to V. Safronov (1972) and A. Ringwood (1979), confident that the Earth has occurred due to accumulation of hypothetical chemically homogeneous planetesimals, composed by chondrite material, ie, as a result of homogeneous accretion. However, this single-stage chondrite model of accretion is inconsistent with fact of cardinal change of tectonomagmatic processes on the terrestrial planets in the middle stages of their development. For example, the critical irreversible change of the Earth's tectonomagmatic evolution occurred in range 2.35-2.0 Ga, when geochemical-enriched Fe-Ti picrites and basalts firstly appeared in large quantities and first geological evidence of plate tectonics showed up (Sharkov, Bogatikov, 2010). We suggest that these changes were linked with ascending of mantle superplumes of the second generation (thermochemical), originated at the the boundary of liquid iron core and silicate mantle, in similar way as the modern plumes. All terrestrial planetary bodies (Earth, Venus, Mars, Mercury, and the Moon) have a similar structure, consist of iron core and silicate envelope, and developed at the same scenario, which provide for drastic irreversible change in character of tectonomagmatic processes at the middle stages of their evolution (Sharkov, Bogatikov, 2009). Such a situation can be realized only in case: (1) the terrestrial planetary bodies originally had heterogeneous structure, and (2) their heating occurred from the top down accompanied by cooling of outer shells. As a result, material of the primordial cores, where enriched material survived, were remained a long time untouched. It

  16. Thermochemical flows couple the Earth's inner core growth to mantle heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Julien; Amit, Hagay; Hulot, Gauthier; Olson, Peter

    2008-08-07

    Seismic waves sampling the top 100 km of the Earth's inner core reveal that the eastern hemisphere (40 degrees E-180 degrees E) is seismically faster, more isotropic and more attenuating than the western hemisphere. The origin of this hemispherical dichotomy is a challenging problem for our understanding of the Earth as a system of dynamically coupled layers. Previously, laboratory experiments have established that thermal control from the lower mantle can drastically affect fluid flow in the outer core, which in turn can induce textural heterogeneity on the inner core solidification front. The resulting texture should be consistent with other expected manifestations of thermal mantle control on the geodynamo, specifically magnetic flux concentrations in the time-average palaeomagnetic field over the past 5 Myr, and preferred eddy locations in flows imaged below the core-mantle boundary by the analysis of historical geomagnetic secular variation. Here we show that a single model of thermochemical convection and dynamo action can account for all these effects by producing a large-scale, long-term outer core flow that couples the heterogeneity of the inner core with that of the lower mantle. The main feature of this thermochemical 'wind' is a cyclonic circulation below Asia, which concentrates magnetic field on the core-mantle boundary at the observed location and locally agrees with core flow images. This wind also causes anomalously high rates of light element release in the eastern hemisphere of the inner core boundary, suggesting that lateral seismic anomalies at the top of the inner core result from mantle-induced variations in its freezing rate.

  17. A uranium core for the Earth; Un coeur d'uranium pour la terre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouat, S

    2003-06-01

    According to the theory of M. Herndon, a US independent geophysicist, the center of the Earth's core should be made of a uranium sphere of about 8 km of diameter. This natural reactor, or 'geo-reactor', should be at the origin of the internal heat and of the magnetic field of the Earth. M. Herndon has extended his theory to the other planets of the solar system. This theory contradicts the one adopted since the 1940's by the community of geophysicists and which involves a crystallized iron and nickel internal core inside a liquid iron external core. Herndon's theory can explain also the geomagnetic field reversals. (J.S.)

  18. On the tidal oscillations of the liquid core of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musen, P.

    1978-01-01

    An important goal of a tidal theory is the improvement of nutational amplitude and of the parameters of the earth's elastic response. A theory of tidal oscillations inside a rotating elliptical earth was developed, with special emphasis on tides in the liquid core. The Molodensky and Kramer theory of the resonance effect, as caused by the proximity of the frequency of the free diurnal wobble of the liquid core to the frequency of K sub 1 astronomical tide, was amended to include the effect of the possible deviation of the liquid core from the state of neutral stability. Coupling effects between the toroidal and spheroidal oscillations, as caused by the Coriolis force, were taken into consideration.

  19. Crystallization of silicon dioxide and compositional evolution of the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Kei; Morard, Guillaume; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Umemoto, Koichio; Hernlund, John; Helffrich, George; Labrosse, Stéphane

    2017-03-02

    The Earth's core is about ten per cent less dense than pure iron (Fe), suggesting that it contains light elements as well as iron. Modelling of core formation at high pressure (around 40-60 gigapascals) and high temperature (about 3,500 kelvin) in a deep magma ocean predicts that both silicon (Si) and oxygen (O) are among the impurities in the liquid outer core. However, only the binary systems Fe-Si and Fe-O have been studied in detail at high pressures, and little is known about the compositional evolution of the Fe-Si-O ternary alloy under core conditions. Here we performed melting experiments on liquid Fe-Si-O alloy at core pressures in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our results demonstrate that the liquidus field of silicon dioxide (SiO2) is unexpectedly wide at the iron-rich portion of the Fe-Si-O ternary, such that an initial Fe-Si-O core crystallizes SiO2 as it cools. If crystallization proceeds on top of the core, the buoyancy released should have been more than sufficient to power core convection and a dynamo, in spite of high thermal conductivity, from as early on as the Hadean eon. SiO2 saturation also sets limits on silicon and oxygen concentrations in the present-day outer core.

  20. Core Formation in the Earth and Moon: New Constraints From V, Cr, and Mn Partitioning Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, N. L.; Agee, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    The mantles of the Earth and Moon are similarly depleted in V, Cr, and Mn relative to the concentrations of these elements in chondritic meteorites [1,2]. The similar depletions have been suggested to be due to a common genesis of the Earth and Moon, with the Moon inheriting its mantle, complete with V, Cr, and Mn depletions, from the Earth during the impact-induced formation of the Moon. We have conducted multi-anvil experiments that systematically examined the effects of pressure, temperature, and silicate and metallic compositions on liquid metal-liquid silicate partitioning of V, Cr, and Mn. Increasing temperature is found to significantly increase the metal-silicate partition coefficients for all three elements. Increasing the S or C content of the metallic liquid also causes the partition coefficients to increase. Silicate composition has an effect consistent with Cr and Mn being divalent and V being trivalent. Over our experimental range of 3-14 GPa, the partitioning behavior of V, Cr, and Mn did not vary with pressure. With the effects of oxygen fugacity, metallic and silicate compositions, temperature and pressure understood, the partition coefficient for each element was expressed as a function of these thermodynamic variables and applied to different core formation scenarios. Our new metal-silicate experimental partitioning data can explain the mantle depletions of V, Cr, and Mn by core formation in a high temperature magma ocean under oxygen fugacity conditions two log units below the iron-wuestite buffer, conditions similar to those proposed by [3] from their metal-magnesiowuestite study. In contrast, more oxidizing conditions proposed in recent core formation models [4] cannot account for the V, Cr, and Mn depletions. Additionally, because we observe little or no pressure effect on V, Cr, and Mn partitioning in our experiments, we conclude that the mantle depletions of these elements during core formation are not dependent on planet size. Accordingly

  1. Bottom-up control of geomagnetic secular variation by the Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Julien; Finlay, Christopher C; Fournier, Alexandre

    2013-10-10

    Temporal changes in the Earth's magnetic field, known as geomagnetic secular variation, occur most prominently at low latitudes in the Atlantic hemisphere (that is, from -90 degrees east to 90 degrees east), whereas in the Pacific hemisphere there is comparatively little activity. This is a consequence of the geographical localization of intense, westward drifting, equatorial magnetic flux patches at the core surface. Despite successes in explaining the morphology of the geomagnetic field, numerical models of the geodynamo have so far failed to account systematically for this striking pattern of geomagnetic secular variation. Here we show that it can be reproduced provided that two mechanisms relying on the inner core are jointly considered. First, gravitational coupling aligns the inner core with the mantle, forcing the flow of liquid metal in the outer core into a giant, westward drifting, sheet-like gyre. The resulting shear concentrates azimuthal magnetic flux at low latitudes close to the core-mantle boundary, where it is expelled by core convection and subsequently transported westward. Second, differential inner-core growth, fastest below Indonesia, causes an asymmetric buoyancy release in the outer core which in turn distorts the gyre, forcing it to become eccentric, in agreement with recent core flow inversions. This bottom-up heterogeneous driving of core convection dominates top-down driving from mantle thermal heterogeneities, and localizes magnetic variations in a longitudinal sector centred beneath the Atlantic, where the eccentric gyre reaches the core surface. To match the observed pattern of geomagnetic secular variation, the solid material forming the inner core must now be in a state of differential growth rather than one of growth and melting induced by convective translation.

  2. Earth's core-mantle boundary - Results of experiments at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments document that liquid iron reacts chemically with silicates at high pressures (above 2.4 x 10 to the 10th Pa) and temperatures. In particular, (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite, the most abundant mineral of earth's lower mantle, is expected to react with liquid iron to produce metallic alloys (FeO and FeSi) and nonmetallic silicates (SiO2 stishovite and MgSiO3 perovskite) at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, 14 x 10 to the 10th Pa. The experimental observations, in conjunction with seismological data, suggest that the lowermost 200 to 300 km of earth's mantle, the D-double-prime layer, may be an extremely heterogeneous region as a result of chemical reactions between the silicate mantle and the liquid iron alloy of earth's core. The combined thermal-chemical-electrical boundary layer resulting from such reactions offers a plausible explanation for the complex behavior of seismic waves near the core-mantle boundary and could influence earth's magnetic field observed at the surface.

  3. Pole-strength of the earth from Magsat and magnetic determination of the core radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, G. V.; Benton, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A model based on two days of Magsat data is used to numerically evaluate the unsigned magnetic flux linking the earth's surface, and a comparison of the 16.054 GWb value calculated with values from earlier geomagnetic field models reveals a smooth, monotonic, and recently-accelerating decrease in the earth's pole strength at a 50-year average rate of 8.3 MWb, or 0.052%/year. Hide's (1978) magnetic technique for determining the radius of the earth's electrically-conducting core is tested by (1) extrapolating main field models for 1960 and 1965 downward through the nearly-insulating mantle, and then separately comparing them to equivalent, extrapolated models of Magsat data. The two unsigned fluxes are found to equal the Magsat values at a radius which is within 2% of the core radius; and (2) the 1960 main field and secular variation and acceleration coefficients are used to derive models of 1930, 1940 and 1950. The same core magnetic radius value, within 2% of the seismic value, is obtained. It is concluded that the mantle is a nearly-perfect insulator, while the core is a perfect conductor, on the decade time scale.

  4. Heterogeneous Earth Accretion and Incomplete Metal-Silicate Reequilibration at High Pressure During Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie, D. C.; Mann, U.; Frost, D. J.; Kegler, P.; Holzheid, A.; Palme, H.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new model of core formation, based on the partitioning of siderophile elements, that involves accreting the Earth through a series of collisions with smaller bodies that had already differentiated at low pressure. Each impact results in a magma ocean in which the core of the impactor reequilibrates with silicate liquid at high pressure before merging with the Earth's protocore. The oxygen contents of the chondritic compositions of the proto-Earth and impactors can be varied. The compositions of coexisting metal and silicate are determined through mass balance combined with partitioning equations for Ni, FeO, Si and other siderophile elements. The oxygen fugacity is fixed by the partitioning of FeO and is a function of P, T and bulk oxygen content. An important constraint for core formation is that core-mantle partition coefficients for Ni and Co must both converge to values of 23-28. Based on a recent study of the partitioning of Ni and Co over a wide P-T range (Kegler et al., EPSL, submitted) together with other published data, this constraint is not satisfied by a single- stage core formation model at any conditions because the partition coefficients converge at values that are much too low. In the present multi-stage model, the correct values can be reached if only part of each impactor core reequilibrates with silicate liquid in the magma ocean (as proposed by previous models based on Hf-W isotope studies). Physically, this would mean that impactor cores fail to emulsify completely as they sink through the magma ocean. Incorporating other elements (e.g. V and Cr) in the model requires, in addition, that the bulk composition of the impactors changes during accretion from reduced (FeO-poor) to oxidised FeO-rich). Then, with the resulting increase in fO2, incomplete reequilibration of the cores during the final 20-30% of Earth accretion is required to satisfy the Ni-Co constraint. In addition, this model enables the concentrations of O and Si in the

  5. Phase transition of FeO and stratification in Earth's outer core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Haruka; Takahashi, Futoshi; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo; Hirao, Naohisa

    2011-11-11

    Light elements such as oxygen in Earth's core influence the physical properties of the iron alloys that exist in this region. Describing the high-pressure behavior of these materials at core conditions constrains models of core structure and dynamics. From x-ray diffraction measurements of iron monoxide (FeO) at high pressure and temperature, we show that sodium chloride (NaCl)-type (B1) FeO transforms to a cesium chloride (CsCl)-type (B2) phase above 240 gigapascals at 4000 kelvin with 2% density increase. The oxygen-bearing liquid in the middle of the outer core therefore has a modified Fe-O bonding environment that, according to our numerical simulations, suppresses convection. The phase-induced stratification is seismologically invisible but strongly affects the geodynamo.

  6. On the consequences of strong stable stratification at the top of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy

    1990-01-01

    The consequences of strong stable stratification at the top of the earth's fluid outer core are considered, concentrating on the generation of the geomagnetic secular variation. It is assumed that the core near the core-mantle boundary is both strongly stably stratified and free of Lorentz forces: it is found that this set of assumptions severely limits the class of possible motions, none of which is compatible with the geomagnetic secular variation. Relaxing either assumption is adequate: tangentially geostrophic flows are consistent with the secular variation if the assumption that the core is strongly stably stratified is relaxed (while retaining the assumption that Lorentz forces are negligible); purely toroidal flows may explain the secular variation if Lorentz forces are included.

  7. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derom, S; Berthelot, A; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Colas des Francs, G

    2013-12-13

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) is achieved by tuning either the dipolar or the quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ion's excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  8. The source of the Earth's long wavelength geoid anomalies: Implications for mantle and core dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, B. H.; Richards, M. A.; Oconnell, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The long wavelength components of the Earth's gravity field result mainly from density contrasts associated with convection in the mantle. Direct interpretation of the geoid for mantle convection is complicated by the fact that convective flow results in dynamically maintained deformation of the surface of the Earth, the core mantle boundary (CMB), and any interior chemical boundaries which might exist. These boundary deformations effect the geoid opposite in sign and are comparable in magnitude to those of the interior density contrasts driving the flow. The total difference of two relatively large quantities.

  9. Towards magnetic sounding of the Earth's core by an adjoint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K.; Jackson, A.; Livermore, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated and sustained by the so called geodynamo system in the core. Measurements of the geomagnetic field taken at the surface, downwards continued through the electrically insulating mantle to the core-mantle boundary (CMB), provide important constraints on the time evolution of the velocity, magnetic field and temperature anomaly in the fluid outer core. The aim of any study in data assimilation applied to the Earth's core is to produce a time-dependent model consistent with these observations [1]. Snapshots of these ``tuned" models provide a window through which the inner workings of the Earth's core, usually hidden from view, can be probed. We apply a variational data assimilation framework to an inertia-free magnetohydrodynamic system (MHD) [2]. Such a model is close to magnetostrophic balance [3], to which we have added viscosity to the dominant forces of Coriolis, pressure, Lorentz and buoyancy, believed to be a good approximation of the Earth's dynamo in the convective time scale. We chose to study the MHD system driven by a static temperature anomaly to mimic the actual inner working of Earth's dynamo system, avoiding at this stage the further complication of solving for the time dependent temperature field. At the heart of the models is a time-dependent magnetic field to which the core-flow is enslaved. In previous work we laid the foundation of the adjoint methodology, applied to a subset of the full equations [4]. As an intermediate step towards our ultimate vision of applying the techniques to a fully dynamic mode of the Earth's core tuned to geomagnetic observations, we present the intermediate step of applying the adjoint technique to the inertia-free Navier-Stokes equation in continuous form. We use synthetic observations derived from evolving a geophysically-reasonable magnetic field profile as the initial condition of our MHD system. Based on our study, we also propose several different strategies for accurately

  10. Excitation of travelling torsional normal modes in an Earth's core model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Canet, E.

    2017-09-01

    The proximity between the 6 yr recurrence time of the torsional Alfvén waves that have been inferred in the Earth's outer core over 1940-2010 and their 4 yr traveltime across the fluid core is nicely explained if these travelling waves are to be considered as normal modes. We discuss to what extent the emergence of free torsional modes from a stochastic forcing in the fluid core is compatible with some dissipation, specifically with an electromagnetic torque strong enough to account for the observed length of day variations of 6 yr period. In a spherical cavity enclosed by an insulating mantle, torsional normal modes consist of standing waves. In the presence of a conducting mantle, they transform into outward travelling waves very similar to the torsional waves that have been detected in the Earth's outer core. With such a resonant response a periodic forcing is not required to explain the regular recurrence of torsional waves; neither is the search for a source of motions in the vicinity of the cylindrical surface tangent to the inner core, where travelling waves seem to emerge. We discuss these results in the light of the reflection properties of torsional waves at the equator. We are able to reproduce the properties found for geophysical time-series of geostrophic flows (detection of a normal mode, almost total absorption at the equator) if the conductance of the lowermost mantle is 3 × 107 to 108 S.

  11. Light matter in the core of the Earth: its identity, quantity and temperature using tricritical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Aitta, A

    2008-01-01

    Light elements in the iron-rich core of the Earth are important indicators for the evolution of our planet. Their amount and distribution, and the temperature in the core, are essential for understanding how the core and the mantle interact and for modelling the geodynamo which generates the planetary magnetic field. However, there is a longstanding controversy surrounding the identity and quantity of the light elements. Here, the theory of tricritical phenomena is employed as a precise theoretical framework to study solidification at the high pressures and temperatures where both experimental and numerical methods are complicated to implement and have large uncertainties in their results. Combining the theory with the most reliable iron melting data and the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) seismic data, one obtains the solidification temperature at the inner core boundary (ICB) for both pure iron and for the alloy of iron and light elements in the actual core melt. One also finds a value of about 2.5...

  12. Metal-silicate Partitioning and Its Role in Core Formation and Composition on Super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Laura; Jacobsen, Stein B.; Remo, John L.; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2017-02-01

    We use a thermodynamic framework for silicate-metal partitioning to determine the possible compositions of metallic cores on super-Earths. We compare results using literature values of the partition coefficients of Si and Ni, as well as new partition coefficients calculated using results from laser shock-induced melting of powdered metal-dunite targets at pressures up to 276 GPa, which approaches those found within the deep mantles of super-Earths. We find that larger planets may have little to no light elements in their cores because the Si partition coefficient decreases at high pressures. The planet mass at which this occurs will depend on the metal-silicate equilibration depth. We also extrapolate the equations of state (EOS) of FeO and FeSi alloys to high pressures, and present mass–radius diagrams using self-consistent planet compositions assuming equilibrated mantles and cores. We confirm the results of previous studies that the distribution of elements between mantle and core will not be detectable from mass and radius measurements alone. While observations may be insensitive to interior structure, further modeling is sensitive to compositionally dependent properties, such as mantle viscosity and core freeze-out properties. We therefore emphasize the need for additional high pressure measurements of partitioning as well as EOSs, and highlight the utility of the Sandia Z-facilities for this type of work.

  13. High-pressure metallization of FeO and implications for the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO has been experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock-wave and diamond-cell techniques. A metallic phase of FeO is observed at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood (1977 and 1979). The high pressures necessary for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the earth's accretion. Direct experimental observations at elevated pressures and temperatures indicate that core-forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  14. Differentiation of crusts and cores of the terrestrial planets - Lessons for the early earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The extent and mechanisms of global differentiation and the early thermal and tectonic histories of the terrestrial planets are surveyed in order to provide constraints on the first billion years of earth history. Indirect and direct seismic evidence for crusts on the moon, Mars and Venus is presented, and it is pointed out that substantial portions of these crusts have been in place since the cessation of heavy bombardment of the inner solar system four billion years ago. Evidence for sizable cores on Mars and Mercury and a small core on the moon is also discussed, and the heat involved in core formation is pointed out. Examination of the volcanic and tectonic histories of planets lacking plate tectonics indicates that core formation was not closely linked to crust formation on the moon or Mars, with chemical differentiation restricted to shallow regions, and was much more extensive on Mercury. Extension of these considerations to the earth results in a model of a hot and vigorously convecting mantle with an easily deformable crust immediately following core formation, and the gradual development of a lithosphere and plates.

  15. Fast torsional waves and strong magnetic field within the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Jault, Dominique; Canet, Elisabeth; Fournier, Alexandre

    2010-05-06

    The magnetic field inside the Earth's fluid and electrically conducting outer core cannot be directly probed. The root-mean-squared (r.m.s.) intensity for the resolved part of the radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary is 0.3 mT, but further assumptions are needed to infer the strength of the field inside the core. Recent diagnostics obtained from numerical geodynamo models indicate that the magnitude of the dipole field at the surface of a fluid dynamo is about ten times weaker than the r.m.s. field strength in its interior, which would yield an intensity of the order of several millitesla within the Earth's core. However, a 60-year signal found in the variation in the length of day has long been associated with magneto-hydrodynamic torsional waves carried by a much weaker internal field. According to these studies, the r.m.s. strength of the field in the cylindrical radial direction (calculated for all length scales) is only 0.2 mT, a figure even smaller than the r.m.s. strength of the large-scale (spherical harmonic degree n geodynamo models with studies of geostrophic motions in the Earth's core that rely on geomagnetic data. From an ensemble inversion of core flow models, we find a torsional wave recurring every six years, the angular momentum of which accounts well for both the phase and the amplitude of the six-year signal for change in length of day detected over the second half of the twentieth century. It takes about four years for the wave to propagate throughout the fluid outer core, and this travel time translates into a slowness for Alfvén waves that corresponds to a r.m.s. field strength in the cylindrical radial direction of approximately 2 mT. Assuming isotropy, this yields a r.m.s. field strength of 4 mT inside the Earth's core.

  16. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation

    OpenAIRE

    Alboussiere, Thierry; Deguen, Renaud; Melzani, Mickael

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In addition to its global North-South anisotropy(1), there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres(2-6) and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core(6-12). This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements(13). Here we show that this layer can be generated by simult...

  17. The Ramsey phase-change hypothesis. [for development of earth core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Ramsey's (1948, 1949, 1950, 1954) arguments for the phase-change interpretation of the nature of the terrestrial core are summarized. Some of the successes of the phase-change theory in accounting for hitherto unexplained properties of earth's interior are discussed. Evidence in favor of the phase-change theory is reviewed, and calculations are examined which indicate that the liquid-core material is far more compressible at any relevant pressure than is the mantle material. Implications of the phase-change theory for Venus, Mars, Mercury, and the moon are considered.

  18. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboussière, Thierry; Deguen, Renaud; Melzani, Mickaël

    2010-08-05

    In addition to its global North-South anisotropy, there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core. This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements. Here we show that this layer can be generated by simultaneous crystallization and melting at the surface of the inner core, and that a translational mode of thermal convection in the inner core can produce enough melting and crystallization on each hemisphere respectively for the dense layer to develop. The dynamical model we propose introduces a clear asymmetry between a melting and a crystallizing hemisphere which forms a basis for also explaining the East-West asymmetry. The present translation rate is found to be typically 100 million years for the inner core to be entirely renewed, which is one to two orders of magnitude faster than the growth rate of the inner core's radius. The resulting strong asymmetry of buoyancy flux caused by light elements is anticipated to have an impact on the dynamics of the outer core and on the geodynamo.

  19. Steady state toroidal magnetic field at earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Eugene H.; Pearce, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the dc electrical potential near the top of earth's mantle have been extrapolated into the deep mantle in order to estimate the strength of the toroidal magnetic field component at the core-mantle interface. Recent measurements have been interpreted as indicating that at the core-mantle interface, the magnetic toroidal and poloidal field components are approximately equal in magnitude. A motivation for such measurements is to obtain an estimate of the strength of the toroidal magnetic field in the core, a quantity important to our understanding of the geomagnetic field's dynamo generation. Through the use of several simple and idealized calculation, this paper discusses the theoretical relationship between the amplitude of the toroidal magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary and the actual amplitude within the core. Even with a very low inferred value of the toroidal field amplitude at the core-mantle boundary, (a few gauss), the toroidal field amplitude within the core could be consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo dominated by nonuniform rotation and having a strong toroidal magnetic field.

  20. Steady state toroidal magnetic field at earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Eugene H.; Pearce, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the dc electrical potential near the top of earth's mantle have been extrapolated into the deep mantle in order to estimate the strength of the toroidal magnetic field component at the core-mantle interface. Recent measurements have been interpreted as indicating that at the core-mantle interface, the magnetic toroidal and poloidal field components are approximately equal in magnitude. A motivation for such measurements is to obtain an estimate of the strength of the toroidal magnetic field in the core, a quantity important to our understanding of the geomagnetic field's dynamo generation. Through the use of several simple and idealized calculation, this paper discusses the theoretical relationship between the amplitude of the toroidal magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary and the actual amplitude within the core. Even with a very low inferred value of the toroidal field amplitude at the core-mantle boundary, (a few gauss), the toroidal field amplitude within the core could be consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo dominated by nonuniform rotation and having a strong toroidal magnetic field.

  1. Investigation of geomagnetic field forecasting and fluid dynamics of the core. [determination of the bundary between the core and mantle of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the use of MAGSAT data to confirm that the radius of the Earth's core-mantle boundary can be accurately determined magnetically is reported. The MAGSAT data was used in conjunction with a high quality manfield model for epoch 1965. The unsigned flux linking the core and mantle of the Earth is considered to be a legitimate invariant for a span of time. The value from MAGSAT of this constant is 16.056 GWb (gigawebers).

  2. Body-centered cubic iron-nickel alloy in Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Narygina, O; Kantor, I; Kuznetzov, A; Prakapenka, V B; Vitos, L; Johansson, B; Mikhaylushkin, A S; Simak, S I; Abrikosov, I A

    2007-06-29

    Cosmochemical, geochemical, and geophysical studies provide evidence that Earth's core contains iron with substantial (5 to 15%) amounts of nickel. The iron-nickel alloy Fe(0.9)Ni(0.1) has been studied in situ by means of angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction in internally heated diamond anvil cells (DACs), and its resistance has been measured as a function of pressure and temperature. At pressures above 225 gigapascals and temperatures over 3400 kelvin, Fe(0.9)Ni(0.1) adopts a body-centered cubic structure. Our experimental and theoretical results not only support the interpretation of shockwave data on pure iron as showing a solid-solid phase transition above about 200 gigapascals, but also suggest that iron alloys with geochemically reasonable compositions (that is, with substantial nickel, sulfur, or silicon content) adopt the bcc structure in Earth's inner core.

  3. Constraints on Earth's inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth's inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density-sound velocity data of Earth's core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (V P) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch's law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the V P of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth's inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller V P than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth's core are required to explain Earth's core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth's core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect.

  4. Melting and metallization of silica in the cores of gas giants, ice giants and super Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Mazevet, S; Taniuchi, T; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Guyot, F

    2014-01-01

    The physical state and properties of silicates at conditions encountered in the cores of gas giants, ice giants and of Earth like exoplanets now discovered with masses up to several times the mass of the Earth remains mostly unknown. Here, we report on theoretical predictions of the properties of silica, SiO$_2$, up to 4 TPa and about 20,000K using first principle molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory. For conditions found in the Super-Earths and in ice giants, we show that silica remains a poor electrical conductor up to 10 Mbar due to an increase in the Si-O coordination with pressure. For Jupiter and Saturn cores, we find that MgSiO$_3$ silicate has not only dissociated into MgO and SiO$_2$, as shown in previous studies, but that these two phases have likely differentiated to lead to a core made of liquid SiO$_2$ and solid (Mg,Fe)O.

  5. Hot super-Earths and giant planet cores from different migration histories

    CERN Document Server

    Cossou, Christophe; Hersant, Franck; Pierens, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Planetary embryos embedded in gaseous protoplanetary disks undergo Type I orbital migration. Migration can be inward or outward depending on the local disk properties but, in general, only planets more massive than several $M_\\oplus$ can migrate outward. Here we propose that an embryo's migration history determines whether it becomes a hot super-Earth or the core of a giant planet. Systems of hot super-Earths (or mini-Neptunes) form when embryos migrate inward and pile up at the inner edge of the disk. Giant planet cores form when inward-migrating embryos become massive enough to switch direction and migrate outward. We present simulations of this process using a modified N-body code, starting from a swarm of planetary embryos. Systems of hot super-Earths form in resonant chains with the innermost planet at or interior to the disk inner edge. Resonant chains are disrupted by late dynamical instabilities triggered by the dispersal of the gaseous disk. Giant planet cores migrate outward toward zero-torque zones...

  6. Possible generation of heat from nuclear fusion in Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Mikio

    2016-11-23

    The cause and source of the heat released from Earth's interior have not yet been determined. Some research groups have proposed that the heat is supplied by radioactive decay or by a nuclear georeactor. Here we postulate that the generation of heat is the result of three-body nuclear fusion of deuterons confined in hexagonal FeDx core-centre crystals; the reaction rate is enhanced by the combined attraction effects of high-pressure (~364 GPa) and high-temperature (~5700 K) and by the physical catalysis of neutral pions: (2)D + (2)D + (2)D → 2(1)H + (4)He + 2  + 20.85 MeV. The possible heat generation rate can be calculated as 8.12 × 10(12) J/m(3), based on the assumption that Earth's primitive heat supply has already been exhausted. The H and He atoms produced and the anti-neutrino are incorporated as Fe-H based alloys in the H-rich portion of inner core, are released from Earth's interior to the universe, and pass through Earth, respectively.

  7. Correction and update to 'The earth's C21 and S21 gravity coefficients and the rotation of the core'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahr, John

    1990-01-01

    Wahr (1987) used satellite constraints on C21 and S21 (the spherical harmonic coefficients of the earth's external gravitational potential) to infer certain properties of the core and core/mantle boundary. It is shown here, contrary to the claim by Wahr, that it is not possible to use C21 and S21 to placed bounds on the core's products of inertia. As a result, Wahr's constraints on the l = 2, m = 1 components of the core/mantle boundary topography and on the angular orientation of the inner core with respect to the earth's rotation vector are not justified. On the other hand, Wahr's conclusions about the time-averaged torque between the core and mantle and the resulting implications for the l = 2, m = 1 components of fluid pressure at the top of the core can be strengthened. Wahr's conclusions about the mean rotational flow in the core are unaltered.

  8. Magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfers at the top of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Amit, Hagay; Alboussière, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    We develop the theory for the magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer between different spherical harmonic degrees due to the interaction of fluid flow and radial magnetic field at the top of the Earth's core. We show that non-zero secular variation of the total magnetic energy could be significant and may provide evidence for the existence of stretching secular variation, which suggests the existence of radial motions at the top of the Earth's core-whole core convection or MAC waves. However, the uncertainties of the small scales of the geomagnetic field prevent a definite conclusion. Combining core field and flow models we calculate the detailed magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer matrices. The magnetic to magnetic energy transfer shows a complex behaviour with local and non-local transfers. The spectra of magnetic to magnetic energy transfers show clear maxima and minima, suggesting an energy cascade. The kinetic to magnetic energy transfers, which are much weaker due to the weak poloidal flow, are either local or non-local between degree one and higher degrees. The patterns observed in the matrices resemble energy transfer patterns that are typically found in 3-D MHD numerical simulations.

  9. The axial ratio of hcp iron at the conditions of the Earth's inner core

    CERN Document Server

    Gannarelli, C M S; Gillian, M J

    2004-01-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the high-temperature axial c/a ratio of hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) iron at Earth's core pressures, in order to help interpret the observed seismic anisotropy of the inner core. The calculations are based on density functional theory, which is known to predict the properties of high-pressure iron with good accuracy. The temperature dependence of c/a is determined by minimising the Helmholtz free energy at fixed volume and temperature, with thermal contributions due to lattice vibrations calculated using harmonic theory. Anharmonic corrections to the harmonic predictions are estimated from calculations of the thermal average stress obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hcp iron at the conditions of the inner core. We find a very gradual increase of axial ratio with temperature. This increase is much smaller than found in earlier calculations, but is in reasonable agreement with recent high-pressure, high-temperature diffraction measurements. This result...

  10. Sonochemical synthesis and photoluminescence properties of rare-earth phosphate core/shell nanorods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余文媛; 李冠涞; 周利

    2010-01-01

    Rare earth phosphate core/shell nanostructures were synthesized via facile ultrasound irradiation method.XRD and TEM were em-ployed to characterize the structure and morphology properties.The photoluminescence(PL) properties of TbPO4/CePO4 and CePO4/TbPO4 core/shell nanorods were studied to explore the energy transfers from Ce3+ to Tb3+.In the Ce0.9Tb0.1PO4/LaPO4 core/shell nanorods,the PL intensity of Ce0.9Tb0.1PO4 nanorods was enhanced when the LaPO4 shells were coated.

  11. On effect of precession-induced flows in the liquid core for early Earth's history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Shalimov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary and tertiary flow patterns seen in experiments simulating flow in the Earth's liquid core induced by luni-solar precession of the solid mantle (Vanyo et al., 1995 hint at the development of non-axisymmetric columnar periodic structures. A simple interpretation of the structure formation is presented in a hydrodynamic approach. It is suggested that if similar flow patterns can occur in the Earth's liquid core enclosed into precessing and rotating mantle then kinematic of the flows may be regarded as a possible geodynamo mechanism for early Earth's history (before the solid core formation.

  12. Role of the Earth degassing (the core emission) for the global tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenkova, Ninel

    2014-05-01

    source of the deep fluids advection and the resulting Earth degassing is the Earth's core with the high content of hydrogen and helium. The regular system of rifts and of the global rings of the earthquake epicenters may be a result of the Earth expansion generated by strong core emission. This system is traced now as zones of the higher hydrogen degassing. The data on the movement of paleomagnetic poles was explained in the fluids-rotation model by rotation of the whole mantle around the liquid core. Such interpretation, however, is too problematic. It is more reliable to propose that there were no any large movements of the continents or of the whole mantle and the mobile magnetic fields were created by the irregular convection in the core.

  13. Rare-earth-doped optical-fiber core deposition using full vapor-phase SPCVD process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnini, A.; Robin, T.; Cadier, B.; Aka, G.; Caurant, D.; Gotter, T.; Guyon, C.; Pinsard, E.; Guitton, P.; Laurent, A.; Montron, R.

    2017-02-01

    One key parameter in the race toward ever-higher power fiber lasers remains the rare earth doped optical core quality. Modern Large Mode Area (LMA) fibers require a fine radial control of the core refractive index (RI) close to the silica level. These low RI are achieved with multi-component materials that cannot be readily obtained using conventional solution doping based Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition (MCVD) technology. This paper presents a study of such optical material obtained through a full-vapor phase Surface Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (SPCVD). The SPCVD process generates straight glassy films on the inner surface of a thermally regulated synthetic silica tube under vacuum. The first part of the presented results points out the feasibility of ytterbium-doped aluminosilicate fibers by this process. In the second part we describe the challenge controlling the refractive index throughout the core diameter when using volatile fluorine to create efficient LMA fiber profiles. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to counter-act the loss of fluorine at the center of the core by adjusting the core composition locally. Our materials yielded, when used in optical fibers with numerical apertures ranging from 0.07 to 0.09, power conversion efficiency up to 76% and low background losses below 20 dB/km at 1100nm. Photodarkening has been measured to be similar to equivalent MCVD based fibers. The use of cerium as a co-dopant allowed for a complete mitigation of this laser lifetime detrimental effect. The SPCVD process enables high capacity preforms and is particularly versatile when it comes to radial tailoring of both rare earth doping level and RI. Large core diameter preforms - up to 4mm - were successfully produced.

  14. Elliptical instabilities of stratified, hydromagnetic waves and the Earth's outer core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerswell, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The streamlines of the basic rotating flow within the Earth's outer core are thought to be slightly elliptical due to tidal and precessional effects. Such a 2-dimensional elliptical flow is inertially unstable to 3-dimensional disturbances. This thesis assesses the relevance of this elliptical instability for the Earth's outer core and discusses possible implications for the geodynamo. Elliptical instability arises through a triad-type resonance of two linear waves with the underlying distorted state. When the fluid is stratified and carries a magnetic field, three different sets of waves, categorized by their dominant restoring mechanism, can exist and may potentially excite each other through the elliptical distortion. Simple cylindrical models are constructed to examine these various couplings using Earth-like parameters. It is estimated that resonances between fast (frequency comparable to the basic rotation) hydromagnetic waves can produce growth with an e-folding time of 100,000 years in the outer core, comparing favorably with typical geomagnetic inter-reversal times of O(10[sup 5]/10[sup 6]) years. Extension is made to the more geophysically-relevant, elliptically-distorted spheroidal container, in which an upper bound of 9/16 [beta] is deduced for the exponential growth rate ([beta] is the ratio of strain to rotation rate for the elliptical flow). The breakdown of a slightly distorted, rotating spheroid through an elliptical instability in commonplace. The effect of an orbiting moon is discussed and connection made between the well known middle-moment-of-inertia instability of rotating, rigid bodies and the elliptical instability. To assess the effect of ohmic and viscous dissipations upon these instabilities, a boundary layer analysis is undertaken to calculate hydromagnetic decay rates for the relevant fast waves in the outer core. The elliptical excitation of these fast hydromagnetic waves is just insufficient to overcome dissipative processes.

  15. Carbon isotope heterogeneities in deep Earth: Recycling of surface carbon or from core?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish-Kumar, Madhusoodhan

    2017-04-01

    Subduction of crustal materials, mantle melting and upwelling of deep mantle, in addition to a potential source from the core, largely controls the Earth's deep carbon cycle. Large variations in carbon isotopic composition between different reservoirs have been used widely to differentiate the source of carbon and to understand the carbon inventories and its recycling processes. However, how far high-temperature and hign-pressure conditions can affect the carbon isotope distribution, is a question still unanswered to clearly address the deep carbon cycle. I present here a review on carbon isotope fractionation processes in deep Earth and critically evaluate whether we can easily differentiate between surface carbon and deep carbon based on isotope characteristics. Recent experimental carbon isotope fractionation studies in the Fe-C system suggests that light carbon is selectively partition into metallic core during early magma ocean environment (Satish-Kumar et al., 2011). Furthermore, carbonate melts can be a medium for efficient crystallisation of diamonds in Earth's mantle (Palyanov et al., 2013). Rayleigh fractionation modelling based on fractionation suggests that core can be a reservoir of 12C enriched carbon and can itself form a reservoir which can cause heterogeneity in mantle carbon (Wood et al., 2013). In addition, high pressure experiments in the carbon-saturated model harzburgite system (Enstatite-Magnesite-Olivine-Graphite), carbonated silicate melting resulted in 13C enrichment in the carbon dissolved in the silicate melt relative to elemental graphite (Mizutani et al., 2014). 13C enrichment in carbonate melt were further confirmed in experiments where redox melting between olivine and graphite produced a carbonate melt as well as carbonate reduction experiments to form graphite. A third factor, still unconquered is the effect of pressure on isotope fractionation process. Theoretical studies as well as preliminary experimental studies have suggested

  16. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation

    CERN Document Server

    Alboussiere, Thierry; Melzani, Mickael; 10.1038/nature09257

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its global North-South anisotropy(1), there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres(2-6) and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core(6-12). This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements(13). Here we show that this layer can be generated by simultaneous crystallization and melting at the surface of the inner core, and that a translational mode of thermal convection in the inner core can produce enough melting and crystallization on each hemisphere respectively for the dense layer to develop. The dynamical model we propose introduces a clear asymmetry between a melting and a crystallizing hemisphere which forms a basis for also explaining the East-West asymmetry. The present translation rate is found to be typically 100 million years for the inner core to be entirely renewed, which is one...

  17. Runaway Growth of Mars and Implications for Core Formation Relative to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, A. N.; Wood, B. J.; Kleine, T.

    2005-12-01

    Martian meteorites are relatively young objects widely considered to reflect melting of the mantle of Mars over the past 1.4 Gyr. As such, their trace element compositions partly reflect the complex history of melting in the martian mantle. Hafnium (Hf) and tungsten (W) having different bulk distribution coefficients during mantle melting and thus may be fractionated by such processes. This explains why Hf/W, as measured in martian meteorites, is decoupled from W isotopic compositions, which would have been produced by 182Hf decay during the first 50 Myrs of the solar system. In contrast, little fractionation is expected among Ba, Th, and W, all of which have a similar incompatibility during melting in Earth's mantle. Assuming this is also true for the martian mantle, Ba/W and Th/W may be used as a proxy for the degree of metal segregation. The W isotopic compositions indeed show some relationship with the degree of mantle W depletion predicted to have been caused by core formation, as deduced from measured Ba/W or Th/W. These indices, as well as the W isotopic variations themselves, provide evidence of heterogeneity probably caused by early core formation, which can be compared with the effects generated by early partial melting as recorded by the 146Sm-142Nd system. Shergottites such as Zagami with no Nd isotopic effect and hence no indication of Hf/W fractionation from partial melting appear to define rapid timescales for accretion and core formation of about one million years, implying a runaway growth mechanism of accretion for Mars. This is consistent with certain dynamical models and argues against early migration of Jupiter-sized objects through the inner solar system. Melting and core formation on Mars appears to have continued for at least 10 Myrs as recorded in the W and Nd isotopic compositions of some other martian meteorites. This accretion and core formation history is strikingly different from that of the Earth. The last major stage of Earth

  18. Sound velocities of Fe and Fe-Si alloy in the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhu; Lin, Jung-Fu; Liu, Jin; Alatas, Ahmet; Gao, Lili; Zhao, Jiyong; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2012-06-26

    Compressional wave velocity-density (V(P)--ρ) relations of candidate Fe alloys at relevant pressure-temperature conditions of the Earth's core are critically needed to evaluate the composition, seismic signatures, and geodynamics of the planet's remotest region. Specifically, comparison between seismic V(P)--ρ profiles of the core and candidate Fe alloys provides first-order information on the amount and type of potential light elements--including H, C, O, Si, and/or S-needed to compensate the density deficit of the core. To address this issue, here we have surveyed and analyzed the literature results in conjunction with newly measured V(P)--ρ results of hexagonal closest-packed (hcp) Fe and hcp-Fe(0.85)Si(0.15) alloy using in situ high-energy resolution inelastic X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction. The nature of the Fe-Si alloy where Si is readily soluble in Fe represents an ideal solid-solution case to better understand the light-element alloying effects. Our results show that high temperature significantly decreases the V(P) of hcp-Fe at high pressures, and the Fe-Si alloy exhibits similar high-pressure V(P)--ρ behavior to hcp-Fe via a constant density offset. These V(P)--ρ data at a given temperature can be better described by an empirical power-law function with a concave behavior at higher densities than with a linear approximation. Our new datasets, together with literature results, allow us to build new V(P)--ρ models of Fe alloys in order to determine the chemical composition of the core. Our models show that the V(P)--ρ profile of Fe with 8 wt % Si at 6,000 K matches well with the Preliminary Reference Earth Model of the inner core.

  19. Assessing the feasibility and consequences of nuclear georeactors in the Earths core mantle boundary

    CERN Document Server

    De Meijer, R J

    2008-01-01

    We assess the likelihood and geochemical consequences of the presence of nuclear georeactors in the core mantle boundary region (CMB) between Earths silicate mantle and metallic core. Current geochemical models for the Earths interior predict that U and Th in the CMB are concentrated exclusively in the mineral calcium silicate perovskite (CaPv), leading to predicted concentration levels of approximately 12 ppm combined U and Th, 4.5 Ga ago if CaPv is distributed evenly throughout the CMB. Assuming a similar behaviour for primordial 244Pu provides a considerable flux of neutrons from spontaneous fission. We show that an additional concentration factor of only an order of magnitude is required to both ignite and maintain self sustaining georeactors based on fast fission. Continuously operating georeactors with a power of 5 TW can explain the observed isotopic compositions of helium and xenon in the Earths mantle. Our hypothesis requires the presence of elevated concentrations of U and Th in the CMB, and is amen...

  20. Melting of iron close to Earth's inner core boundary conditions and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Harmand, M; Mazevet, S; Bouchet, J; Denoeud, A; Dorchies, F; Feng, Y; Fourment, C; Galtier, E; Gaudin, J; Guyot, F; Kodama, R; Koenig, M; Lee, H J; Miyanishi, K; Morard, G; Musella, R; Nagler, B; Nakatsutsumi, M; Ozaki, N; Recoules, V; Toleikis, S; Vinci, T; Zastrau, U; Zhu, D; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A

    2014-01-01

    Several important geophysical features such as heat flux at the Core-Mantle Boundary or geodynamo production are intimately related with the temperature profile in the Earth's core. However, measuring the melting curve of iron at conditions corresponding to the Earth inner core boundary under pressure of 330 GPa has eluded scientists for several decades. Significant discrepancies in previously reported iron melting temperatures at high pressure have called into question the validity of dynamic measurements. We report measurements made with a novel approach using X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser source coupled to a laser shock experiment. We determine the state of iron along the shock Hugoniot up to 420 GPa (+/- 50) and 10800 K (+/- 1390) and find an upper boundary for the melting curve of iron by detecting solid iron at 130 GPa and molten at 260, 380 and 420 GPa along the shock Hugoniot. Our result establishes unambiguous agreement between dynamic measurement and recent extrapo...

  1. On the flow magnitude and field-flow alignment at Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Amit, H.

    We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models. An expr......We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models....... An expression linking the core surface flow magnitude tospherical harmonic spectra of the MF and SV is derived from the magneticinduction equation. This involves the angle gamma between the flowand the horizontal gradient of the radial field. We study gamma in asuite of numerical dynamo models and discuss...... that the amount of field-flow alignment depends primarily on amagnetic modified Rayleigh number Raeta = alpha g0 Delta T D / eta Omega , which measures the vigorof convective driving relative to the strength of magnetic dissipation.Synthetic tests of the flow magnitude estimation scheme are encouraging...

  2. Partitioning experiments in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell: volatile content in the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jephcoat, Andrew P; Bouhifd, M Ali; Porcelli, Don

    2008-11-28

    The present state of the Earth evolved from energetic events that were determined early in the history of the Solar System. A key process in reconciling this state and the observable mantle composition with models of the original formation relies on understanding the planetary processing that has taken place over the past 4.5Ga. Planetary size plays a key role and ultimately determines the pressure and temperature conditions at which the materials of the early solar nebular segregated. We summarize recent developments with the laser-heated diamond anvil cell that have made possible extension of the conventional pressure limit for partitioning experiments as well as the study of volatile trace elements. In particular, we discuss liquid-liquid, metal-silicate (M-Sil) partitioning results for several elements in a synthetic chondritic mixture, spanning a wide range of atomic number-helium to iodine. We examine the role of the core as a possible host of both siderophile and trace elements and the implications that early segregation processes at deep magma ocean conditions have for current mantle signatures, both compositional and isotopic. The results provide some of the first experimental evidence that the core is the obvious replacement for the long-sought, deep mantle reservoir. If so, they also indicate the need to understand the detailed nature and scale of core-mantle exchange processes, from atomic to macroscopic, throughout the age of the Earth to the present day.

  3. On the flow magnitude and field-flow alignment at Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Amit, H.

    We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models. An expr......We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models....... An expression linking the core surface flow magnitude tospherical harmonic spectra of the MF and SV is derived from the magneticinduction equation. This involves the angle gamma between the flowand the horizontal gradient of the radial field. We study gamma in asuite of numerical dynamo models and discuss...... that the amount of field-flow alignment depends primarily on amagnetic modified Rayleigh number Raeta = alpha g0 Delta T D / eta Omega , which measures the vigorof convective driving relative to the strength of magnetic dissipation.Synthetic tests of the flow magnitude estimation scheme are encouraging...

  4. Thermal Equation of State of Iron: Constraint on the Density Deficit of Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Y.; Murphy, C. A.; Shibazaki, Y.; Huang, H.

    2013-12-01

    The seismically inferred densities of Earth's solid inner core and the liquid outer core are smaller than the measured densities of solid hcp-iron and liquid iron, respectively. The inner core density deficit is significantly smaller than the outer core density deficit, implying different amounts and/or identities of light-elements incorporated in the inner and outer cores. Accurate measurements of the thermal equation-of-state of iron over a wide pressure and temperature range are required to precisely quantify the core density deficits, which are essential for developing a quantitative composition model for the core. The challenge has been evaluating the experimental uncertainties related to the choice of pressure scales and the sample environment, such as hydrostaticity at multi-megabar pressures and extreme temperatures. We have conducted high-pressure experiments on iron in MgO, NaCl, and Ne pressure media and obtained in-situ X-ray diffraction data up to 200 GPa at room temperature. Using inter-calibrated pressure scales including the MgO, NaCl, Ne, and Pt scales, we have produced a consistent compression curve of hcp-Fe at room temperature. We have also performed laser-heated diamond-anvil cell experiments on both Fe and Pt in a Ne pressure medium. The experiment was designed to quantitatively compare the thermal expansion of Fe and Pt in the same sample environment using Ne as the pressure medium. The thermal expansion data of hcp-Fe at high pressure were derived based on the thermal equation of state of Pt. Using the 300-K isothermal compression curve of iron derived from our static experiments as a constraint, we have developed a thermal equation of state of hcp-Fe that is consistent with the static P-V-T data of iron and also reproduces the shock wave Hugoniot data for pure iron. The thermodynamic model, based on both static and dynamic data, is further used to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity of liquid iron. Our results define the solid

  5. Evolution of planetary cores and the Earth-Moon system from Nb/Ta systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münker, Carsten; Pfänder, Jörg A; Weyer, Stefan; Büchl, Anette; Kleine, Thorsten; Mezger, Klaus

    2003-07-04

    It has been assumed that Nb and Ta are not fractionated during differentiation processes on terrestrial planets and that both elements are lithophile. High-precision measurements of Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf reveal that Nb is moderately siderophile at high pressures. Nb/Ta values in the bulk silicate Earth (14.0 +/- 0.3) and the Moon (17.0 +/- 0.8) are below the chondritic ratio of 19.9 +/- 0.6, in contrast to Mars and asteroids. The lunar Nb/Ta constrains the mass fraction of impactor material in the Moon to less than 65%. Moreover, the Moon-forming impact can be linked in time with the final core-mantle equilibration on Earth 4.533 billion years ago.

  6. Chemical bonding and the incorporation of potassium into the Earth's core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, D.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-05-01

    It has been argued that most of the Earth's potassium was segregated into the outer core and that the radioactive decay of {sup 40}K provided the heat source for the geodynamo. This idea rests on the assumption that the affinity of potassium for sulfur or metallic iron is enhanced at high pressure. In this paper, the high pressure electronic structures of K in sulfide, iron sulfide and metallic iron coordination environments were determined from molecular orbital (SCF-X{alpha}-SW) calculations on (KS{sub 8}){sup 15{minus}}, (KS{sub 8}Fe{sub 6}){sup 3{minus}} and KFe{sub 14} clusters. It is shown that, even at high pressure, potassium cannot alloy with metallic iron. Although a high-pressure electronic transition may enhance the potassium-sulfur chemical bond, the electronic structure of the KS{sub 8}Fe{sub 6} cluster shows that this electronic transition cannot happen in an iron sulfide melt. Consequently, potassium will not have an enhanced affinity for sulfur in planetary interiors. If the lower mantle were more reducing, potassium might be excluded from the silicate phases by more strongly lithophile elements and segregated into a metal sulfide phase in the outer core (cf. the phase assemblages in enstatite chondrites). Given the oxidation state of the Earth, however, it is unlikely that significant quantities of potassium have been incorporated into the outer core. The Earth, like the moon and the eucrite parent body, is depleted in potassium. An alternative heat source (e.g., the radioactive decay of U and Th) must be invoked to explain the geodynamo.

  7. Implications for Core Formation of the Earth from High Pressure-Temperature Au Partitioning Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, L. R.; Sharp, T. G.; Hervig, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Siderophile elements in the Earth.s mantle are depleted relative to chondrites. This is most pronounced for the highly siderophile elements (HSEs), which are approximately 400x lower than chondrites. Also remarkable is the relative chondritic abundances of the HSEs. This signature has been interpreted as representing their sequestration into an iron-rich core during the separation of metal from silicate liquids early in the Earth's history, followed by a late addition of chondritic material. Alternative efforts to explain this trace element signature have centered on element partitioning experiments at varying pressures, temperatures, and compositions (P-T-X). However, first results from experiments conducted at 1 bar did not match the observed mantle abundances, which motivated the model described above, a "late veneer" of chondritic material deposited on the earth and mixed into the upper mantle. Alternatively, the mantle trace element signature could be the result of equilibrium partitioning between metal and silicate in the deep mantle, under P-T-X conditions which are not yet completely identified. An earlier model determined that equilibrium between metal and silicate liquids could occur at a depth of approximately 700 km, 27(plus or minus 6) GPa and approximately 2000 (plus or minus 200) C, based on an extrapolation of partitioning data for a variety of moderately siderophile elements obtained at lower pressures and temperatures. Based on Ni-Co partitioning, the magma ocean may have been as deep as 1450 km. At present, only a small range of possible P-T-X trace element partitioning conditions has been explored, necessitating large extrapolations from experimental to mantle conditions for tests of equilibrium models. Our primary objective was to reduce or remove the additional uncertainty introduced by extrapolation by testing the equilibrium core formation hypothesis at P-T-X conditions appropriate to the mantle.

  8. Properties of liquid iron along the melting line up to Earth-core pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Yu D; Ryzhov, V N; Brazhkin, V V

    2013-07-17

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the transport coefficients and the infinite frequency shear modulus of liquid iron at high temperatures and high pressures. We observe a simultaneous rise of both the shear viscosity and the diffusion coefficient along the melting line and estimate whether liquid iron can vitrify under Earth-core conditions. We show that in the conditions of the model studied in our work iron demonstrates a moderate increase of viscosity along the melting line. It is also demonstrated that at the limit of high temperatures and high pressures the liquid iron behaves similarly to the soft sphere system with exponent n ≈ 4.6.

  9. A study of the earth's free core nutation using international deployment of accelerometers gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Phil R.; Wahr, John M.

    1993-01-01

    In this study we consider the influence of the earth's free core nutation (FCN) on diurnal tidal admittance estimates for 11 stations of the globally distributed International Deployment of Accelerometers network. The FCN causes a resonant enhancement of the diurnal admittances which can be used to estimate some properties of the FCN. Estimations of the parameters describing the FCN (period, Q, and resonance strength) are made using data from individual stations and many stations simultaneously. These yield a result for the period of 423-452 sidereal days, which is shorter than theory predicts but is in agreement with many previous studies and suggests that the dynamical ellipticity of the core may be greater than its hydrostatic value.

  10. Power scaling estimate of crystalline fiber waveguides with rare earth doped YAG cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling analysis based on the model by Dawson et al. [1,2] for circular core fibers has been applied to estimating power scaling of crystalline fiber waveguides (CFWs) with RE3+ doped single crystalline or ceramic YAG (RE=rare earth: Yb, Er, Tm and Ho). Power scaling limits include stimulated Brillouin scattering, thermal lensing effect, and limits to coupling of pump light into CFWs. The CFW designs we have considered consist, in general, of a square doped RE3+:YAG core, an inner cladding of either undoped or laser-inactive-ion-doped YAG and an outer cladding of sapphire. The presented data have been developed for the structures fabricated using the Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®) technique, but the results should be essentially independent of fabrication technique, assuming perfect core/inner cladding/outer cladding interfaces. Hard power scaling limits exist for a specific CFW design and are strongly based on the physical constants of the material and its spectroscopic specifics. For example, power scaling limit was determined as ~16 kW for 2.5% ceramic Yb:YAG/YAG (core material/inner cladding material) at fiber length of 1.7 m and core diameter of 69 μm. Considering the present manufacturing limit for CFW length to be, e.g., 0.5 m, the actual maximum output power will be limited to ~4.4 kW for a Yb:YAG/YAG CFW. Power limit estimates have also been computed for Er3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+doped core based CFWs.

  11. A NEW NON-INVASIVE DEVICE TO MONITOR CORE TEMPERATURE ON EARTH AND IN SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanns-Christian Gunga

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of the core body temperature (cbt is fundamental to the study of human temperature regulation. As standard sites for the placement of cbt measurement sensors have been used: the rectum, the bladder, the esophagus, the nasopharynx and the acoustic meatus. Nevertheless those measurement sites exhibit limited applicability under field conditions, in rescue operations or during peri- and postoperative long-term core temperature monitoring. There is, indeed, a high demand for a reliable, non-invasive, easy to handle telemetric device. But the ideal non-invasive measurement of core temperature has to meet requirements such as i a convenient measurement site, ii no bias through environmental conditions, and iii a high sensitivity of the sensor regarding time shift and absolute temperature value. Recently, together with the Draegerwerke AG we have developed a new heat flux measurement device (so-called "Double Sensor" as a non-invasive cbt sensor aiming to meet the requirements described above. Four recent studies in humans will be summarized and discussed to show the applicability of this new non-invasive method to monitor core temperature under different environmental and clinical settings on Earth and in space.

  12. Phosphate glass core/silica clad fibres with a high concentration of active rare-earth ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, O. N.; Galagan, B. I.; Denker, B. I.; Sverchkov, S. E.; Semjonov, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    We report a study of silica-clad composite optical fibres having a phosphate glass core doped with active rare-earth elements. The phosphate glass core allows a high concentration of active rare-earth ions to be obtained, and the silica cladding ensures high mechanical strength and facilitates fusion splicing of such fibres to silica fibres. Owing to the high concentration of active rare-earth ions, this type of fibre is potentially attractive for applications where a small cavity length and high lasing efficiency are needed.

  13. Core-Mantle Partitioning of Volatile Elements and the Origin of Volatile Elements in Earth and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.; Nickodem, K.

    2014-01-01

    Depletions of siderophile elements in mantles have placed constraints on the conditions on core segregation and differentiation in bodies such as Earth, Earth's Moon, Mars, and asteroid 4 Vesta. Among the siderophile elements there are a sub-set that are also volatile (volatile siderophile elements or VSE; Ga, Ge, In, As, Sb, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cu, Cd), and thus can help to constrain the origin of volatile elements in these bodies, and in particular the Earth and Moon. One of the fundamental observations of the geochemistry of the Moon is the overall depletion of volatile elements relative to the Earth, but a satisfactory explanation has remained elusive. Hypotheses for Earth include addition during accretion and core formation and mobilized into the metallic core, multiple stage origin, or addition after the core formed. Any explanation for volatile elements in the Earth's mantle must also be linked to an explanation of these elements in the lunar mantle. New metal-silicate partitioning data will be applied to the origin of volatile elements in both the Earth and Moon, and will evaluate theories for exogenous versus endogenous origin of volatile elements.

  14. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important.

  15. What does determine the sign of core in Magnetic Flux Rope structures of the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper primarily examines the key factors being involved in precisely determining the sign of the core field in a magnetic flux rope (MFR like structure embedded in the tailward plasma flow associated with the Earth's magnetotail. Magnetic flux ropes are frequently detected by satellites moving smoothly northwards (upwards or southwards (downwards and crossing almost the whole plasma sheet; the sign of the rope's core is associated with the local tail's motion: If the tail is bending to an upward or downward direction, then the sign of the rope's core, being essentially an intense By deviation, will be positive or negative correspondingly. On the basis of this observational finding, a major question concerns the mechanism by which the tail's motion is dictated. The reconnection process acting in the tail will obviously produce symmetric structures of MFRs (with respect to the neutral sheet plane; therefore, the detected organized asymmetry may be an additional indication in the whole magnetotail' s dynamics. Moreover, we discuss the issue of the core's sign in cases without any significant magnetotail's motion. A model interpreting the diagnosed behavior is introduced: Once a tailward ion jet is produced in a thinned plasma sheet, it might form clockwise or counterclockwise ion vortices (i.e., loop-like ion currents providing the "magnetic core" with the appropriate sign. The crucial role of the interplanetary By deviation of the magnetic field (IMF is scrutinized and taken into account. The whole model is tested under the condition of long-lasting extraordinary events characterized by a persistent-intense By deviation with a duration up to 34 min. This work, based on Geotail single-satellite measurements, is not a statistical one; it is a first approach allowing the reconstruction of measurements in the whole range of the magnetotail's deflections, from negligible up to stronger significant magnetotail movements, and should be therefore

  16. Complex inner core of the Earth: The last frontier of global seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2015-03-01

    The days when the Earth's inner core (IC) was viewed as a homogeneous solid sphere surrounded by the liquid outer core (OC) are now behind us. Due to a limited number of data sampling the IC and a lack of experimentally controlled conditions in the deep Earth studies, it has been difficult to scrutinize competitive hypotheses in this active area of research. However, a number of new concepts linking IC structure and dynamics has been proposed lately to explain different types of seismological observations. A common denominator of recent observational work on the IC is increased complexity seen in IC physical properties such as its isotropic and anisotropic structure, attenuation, inner core boundary (ICB) topography, and its rotational dynamics. For example, small-scale features have been observed to exist as a widespread phenomenon in the uppermost inner core, probably superimposed on much longer-scale features. The characterization of small-scale features sheds light on the nature of the solidification process and helps in understanding seismologically observed hemispherical dichotomy of the IC. The existence of variations in the rate and level of solidification is a plausible physical outcome in an environment where vigorous compositional convection in the OC and variations in heat exchange across the ICB may control the process of crystal growth. However, further progress is hindered by the fact that the current traveltime data of PKIKP waves traversing the IC do not allow discriminating between variations in isotropic P wave velocity and velocity anisotropy. Future studies of attenuation in the IC might provide crucial information about IC structure, although another trade-off exists—that of the relative contribution of scattering versus viscoelastic attenuation and the connection with the material properties. Future installations of dense arrays, cross paths of waves that sample the IC, and corresponding array studies will be a powerful tool to image and

  17. Geomagnetic secular variation as a window on the dynamics of Earth's core (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A.

    2010-12-01

    One of the forefront questions of planetary geophysics is to understand how magnetic fields can be spontaneously created by so-called dynamo action. Giant strides have been taken in recent years in understanding the theory of convectively driven dynamos; yet equally important is the marriage between theory and observation. I will argue that we are on the cusp of a new level of understanding brought about by new methods for incorporating observations and theory. In 1950 Sir Edward Bullard wrote an influential paper entitled "The westward drift of the Earth's magnetic field", with coauthors C Freedman, H Gellman and J Nixon. A comprehensive study of observations was tied together with the then nascent dynamo theory to infer properties of the dynamics of the core. Sixty years on, we have a much enriched understanding of the theory of convectively driven dynamos, and an even more comprehensive database of observations stretching back several centuries. Equally important are the new satellite observations that provide global coverage with unprecedented accuracy over the last decade. In this talk I will try to show how the interplay between theory and observation can lead to understanding of force balances in the core, and interactions between the core and the overlying mantle.

  18. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of liquid Fe alloys at high P and T, and heat flux in Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koker, Nico; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd; Vlcek, Vojtech

    2012-03-13

    Earth's magnetic field is sustained by magnetohydrodynamic convection within the metallic liquid core. In a thermally advecting core, the fraction of heat available to drive the geodynamo is reduced by heat conducted along the core geotherm, which depends sensitively on the thermal conductivity of liquid iron and its alloys with candidate light elements. The thermal conductivity for Earth's core is very poorly constrained, with current estimates based on a set of scaling relations that were not previously tested at high pressures. We perform first-principles electronic structure computations to determine the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity for Fe, Fe-Si, and Fe-O liquid alloys. Computed resistivity agrees very well with existing shock compression measurements and shows strong dependence on light element concentration and type. Thermal conductivity at pressure and temperature conditions characteristic of Earth's core is higher than previous extrapolations. Conductive heat flux near the core-mantle boundary is comparable to estimates of the total heat flux from the core but decreases with depth, so that thermally driven flow would be constrained to greater depths in the absence of an inner core.

  19. Mass-Radius Relations and Core-Envelope Decompositions of Super-Earths and Sub-Neptunes

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, Alex R; Verne, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Many exoplanets have been discovered with radii of 1-4 Earth radii, between that of Earth and Neptune. A number of these are known to have densities consistent with solid compositions, while others are "sub-Neptunes" likely to have significant hydrogen-helium envelopes. Future surveys will no doubt significantly expand these populations. In order to understand how the measured masses and radii of such planets can inform their structures and compositions, we construct models both for solid layered planets and for planets with solid cores and gaseous envelopes, exploring a range of core masses, hydrogen-helium envelope masses, and associated envelope entropies. For planets in the super-Earth/sub-Neptune regime for which both radius and mass are measured, we estimate how each is partitioned into a solid core and gaseous envelope, associating a specific core mass and envelope mass with a given exoplanet. We perform this decomposition for both "Earth-like" rock-iron cores and pure ice cores, and find that the nece...

  20. Seismic parameters of hcp-Fe alloyed with Ni and Si in the Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu; Alatas, Ahmet; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-02-01

    Iron alloyed with Ni and Si has been suggested to be a major component of the Earth's inner core. High-pressure results on the combined alloying effects of Ni and Si on seismic parameters of iron are thus essential for establishing satisfactory geophysical and geochemical models of the region. Here we have investigated the compressional (VP) and shear (Vs) wave velocity-density (ρ) relations, Poisson's ratio (ν), and seismic heterogeneity ratios (dlnρ/dlnVP, dlnρ/dlnVS, and dlnVP/dlnVS) of hcp-Fe and hcp-Fe86.8Ni8.6Si4.6 alloy up to 206 GPa and 136 GPa, respectively, using multiple complementary techniques. Compared with the literature velocity values for hcp-Fe and Fe-Ni-Si alloys, our results show that the combined addition of 9.0 wt % Ni and 2.3 wt % Si slightly increases the VP but significantly decreases the VS of hcp-Fe at a given density relevant to the inner core. Such distinct alloying effects on velocities of hcp-Fe produce a high ν of about 0.40 for the alloy at inner core densities, which is approximately 20% higher than that for hcp-Fe. Analysis of the literature high P-T results on VP and VS of Fe alloyed with light elements shows that high temperature can further enhance the ν of hcp-Fe alloyed with Ni and Si. Most significantly, the derived seismic heterogeneity ratios of this hcp alloy present a better match with global seismic observations. Our results provide a multifactored geophysical constraint on the compositional model of the inner core which is consistent with silicon being a major light element alloyed with Fe and 5 wt % Ni.

  1. Structure of a mushy layer under hypergravity with implications for Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Alboussière, Thierry; Bergman, Michael I.; Deguen, Renaud; Labrosse, Stéphane; Lesœur, Germain

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization experiments in the dendritic regime have been carried out in hypergravity conditions (from 1 to 1300 g) from an ammonium chloride solution (NH4Cl and H2O). A commercial centrifuge was equipped with a slip ring so that electric power (needed for a Peltier device and a heating element), temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. Ultrasound measurements (2-6 MHz) were used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. Temperature measurements were used to control a Peltier element extracting heat from the bottom of the setup and to monitor the evolution of crystallization in the mush and in the liquid. A significant increase of solid fraction and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core. This has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in

  2. A thermodynamic recipe for baking the Earth's lower mantle and core as a whole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirone, Max; Faak, Kathi

    2016-04-01

    A rigorous understanding of the thermal and dynamic evolution of the core and the interaction with the silicate mantle cannot preclude a non-empirical petrological description of the problem which takes the form of a thermodynamic model. Because the Earth's core is predominantly made of iron such model may seem relatively straightforward, simply delivering a representation of the phase transformations in the P,T space. However due to well known geophysical considerations, a certain amount of light elements should be added. With the Occam's razor principle in mind, potential candidates could be the most abundant and easily accessible elements in the mantle, O, Si and Mg. Given these premises, the challenging problems on developing this type of model are: - a thermodynamic formulation should not simply describe phase equilibrium relations at least in the Fe-Si-O system (a formidable task itself) but should be also consistently applicable to evaluate thermophysical properties of liquid components and solids phases at extreme conditions (P=500-2000 kbar, T=1000-5000 K). Presently these properties are unknown for certain mineral and liquid components or partially available from scattered sources. - experimental data on the phase relations for iron rich liquid are extremely difficult to obtain and could not cover the entire P,T,X spectrum. - interaction of the outer core with the silicate mantle requires a melt model that is capable of describing a vast range of compositions ranging from metal-rich liquids to silicate liquids. The compound energy formalism for liquids with variable tendency to ionization developed by Hillert and coworkers is a sublattice model with varying stoichiometry that includes vacancies and neutral species in one site. It represents the ideal candidate for the task in hand. The thermodynamic model unfortunately is rather complex and a detailed description of the formulation for practical applications like chemical equilibrium calculations is

  3. Local magnetic moments in iron and nickel at ambient and Earth's core conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausoel, A.; Karolak, M.; Şaşɩoğlu, E.; Lichtenstein, A.; Held, K.; Katanin, A.; Toschi, A.; Sangiovanni, G.

    2017-07-01

    Some Bravais lattices have a particular geometry that can slow down the motion of Bloch electrons by pre-localization due to the band-structure properties. Another known source of electronic localization in solids is the Coulomb repulsion in partially filled d or f orbitals, which leads to the formation of local magnetic moments. The combination of these two effects is usually considered of little relevance to strongly correlated materials. Here we show that it represents, instead, the underlying physical mechanism in two of the most important ferromagnets: nickel and iron. In nickel, the van Hove singularity has an unexpected impact on the magnetism. As a result, the electron-electron scattering rate is linear in temperature, in violation of the conventional Landau theory of metals. This is true even at Earth's core pressures, at which iron is instead a good Fermi liquid. The importance of nickel in models of geomagnetism may have therefore to be reconsidered.

  4. Is there a connection between Earth's core and climate at multidecadal time scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Sébastien; Marcus, Steven; de Viron, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The length-of-day (LOD) undergoes multidecadal variations of several milliseconds (ms) attributed to changes in the fluid outer core angular momentum. These variations resemble a quasi-periodic oscillation of duration 60 to 70 years, although the periodicity (and its accurate length) are disputable because of the relatively short observational time span and the lower quality of the observations before the 20th century. Interestingly, similar variations show up in various measured or reconstructed climate indices including the sea surface (SST) and surface air (SAT) temperatures. It has been shown in several studies that LOD variations lead SST and SAT variations by a few years. No clear scenarios have been raised so far to explain the link between external, astronomical forcing (e.g., Solar wind), Earth's rotation (core-driven torsional) oscillations, and Earth's surface processes (climate variations) at these time scales. Accumulating evidence, however, suggests the centrifugal tides generated by multidecadal LOD variations as a 'valve' to control the transfer of thermal energy from the lithosphere to the surface via geothermal fluxes. This hypothesis is supported by recent studies reporting significant correlations between tidal and rotational excitation and seafloor and surface volcanism. In this study, we extend recent works from us and other independent authors by re-assessing the correlations between multidecadal LOD, climate indices, Solar and magnetic activities, as well as gridded data including SST, SAT, and cloud cover. We pay a special attention to the time lags: when a significant correlation is found, the value of the lag may help to discriminate between various possible scenarios. We locate some `hot spots', particularly in the Atlantic ocean and along the trajectory of the upper branch of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), where the 70-yr oscillation is strongly marked. In addition, we discuss the possibility for centrifugal

  5. Core-Mantle Partitioning of Volatile Siderophile Elements and the Origin of Volatile Elements in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickodem, K.; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Lee, C.

    2012-01-01

    There are currently several hypotheses on the origin of volatile siderophile elements in the Earth. One hypothesis is that they were added during Earth s accretion and core formation and mobilized into the metallic core [1], others claim multiple stage origin [2], while some hypothesize that volatiles were added after the core already formed [3]. Several volatile siderophile elements are depleted in Earth s mantle relative to the chondrites, something which continues to puzzle many scientists. This depletion is likely due to a combination of volatility and core formation. The Earth s core is composed of Fe and some lighter constituents, although the abundances of these lighter elements are unknown [4]. Si is one of these potential light elements [5] although few studies have analyzed the effect of Si on metal-silicate partitioning, in particular the volatile elements. As, In, Ge, and Sb are trace volatile siderophile elements which are depleted in the mantle but have yet to be extensively studied. The metal-silicate partition coefficients of these elements will be measured to determine the effect of Si. Partition coefficients depend on temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and metal and silicate composition and can constrain the concentrations of volatile, siderophile elements found in the mantle. Reported here are the results from 13 experiments examining the partitioning of As, In, Ge, and Sb between metallic and silicate liquid. These experiments will examine the effect of temperature, and metal-composition (i.e., Si content) on these elements in or-der to gain a greater understanding of the core-mantle separation which occurred during the Earth s early stages. The data can then be applied to the origin of volatile elements in the Earth.

  6. Can Core Flows inferred from Geomagnetic Field Models explain the Earth's Dynamo?

    CERN Document Server

    Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Pais, Maria Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    We test the ability of velocity fields inferred from geomagnetic secular variation data to produce the global magnetic field of the Earth. Our kinematic dynamo calculations use quasi-geostrophic (QG) flows inverted from geomagnetic field models which, as such, incorporate flow structures that are Earth-like and may be important for the geodynamo. Furthermore, the QG hypothesis allows straightforward prolongation of the flow from the core surface to the bulk. As expected from previous studies, we check that a simple quasi-geostrophic flow is not able to sustain the magnetic field against ohmic decay. Additional complexity is then introduced in the flow, inspired by the action of the Lorentz force. Indeed, on centenial timescales, the Lorentz force can balance the Coriolis force and strict quasi-geostrophy may not be the best ansatz. When the columnar flow is modified to account for the action of the Lorentz force, magnetic field is generated for Elsasser numbers larger than 0.25 and magnetic Reynolds numbers l...

  7. The problem of the Earth's CO2 content and the iron core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devore, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    The near absence of metallic iron and the presence of magnetite and FeS in the C-1 chondrites imply that metallic iron was a minor phase present during the accretion process that formed the C-1 chondrites. If the C-1 chondrites provided the bulk of the initial planetary growth materials, the carbon reduction model is favored. The above estimates suggest that some 1240 to 227 times as much CO2 may have been produced during the formation of the core than can be accounted for in the crust and mantle. This discrepancy taken to the extreme suggests either that: (1) the Earth has lost more than 99 percent of its initial CO2 during early differentiation (this is highly unlikely) or: (2) the Earth has acquired some 90 percent of its present mass by the accretion of debris from previously reduced and differentiated but subsequently disrupted planetary bodies whereby the associated CO2 would not be captured, or: (3) the C-1 chondrites represent only a trivial fraction of the initial accretion materials present in the nebular cloud or: (4) condensed iron and anhydrous silicate phases were preferentially accreted during the initial formation of the planetary bodies.

  8. Time-dependent heat transfer in the spherical Earth: Implications on the power and thermal evolution of the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, A. M.; Criss, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    We quantitatively investigate the time-dependence of heat conduction for a post-core, spherical Earth that is not convecting, due to compositional layering, based on hundreds of measurements of thermal diffusivity (D) for insulators and metals. Consistency of our solutions for widely ranging input parameters indicates how additional heat transfer mechanisms (mantle magmatism and convection) affect thermal evolution of the core. We consider 1) interior starting temperatures (T) of 273-5000 K, which represent variations in primordial heat, 2) different distributions and decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes, 3) additional heat sources in the core (primordial or latent heat), and 4) variable depth-T dependence of D. Our new analytical solution for cooling of a constant D sphere validates our numerical results. The bottom line is that the thermally insulating nature of minerals, combined with constraints of spherical geometry, limits steep thermal gradients to the upper mantle, consistent with the short length scale (x ~700 km) of cooling over t = 4.5 Ga indicated by dimensional analysis [x2 ~ 4Dt], and with plate tectonics. Consequently, interior temperatures vary little so the core has remained hot and is possibly warming. Findings include: 1) Constant vs. variable D affects thermal profiles only in detail, with D for the metallic core being inconsequential. 2) The hottest zone in Earth may lie in the uppermost lower mantle; 3) Most radiogenic heat is released in Earth's outermost 1000 km thereby driving an active outer shell; 4) Earth's core is essentially isothermal and is thus best described by the liquid-solid phase boundary; 5) Deeply sequestered radioactivity or other heat will melt the core rather than by run the dynamo (note that the heat needed to have melted the outer core is 10% of radiogenic heat generated over Earth's history); 6) Inefficient cooling of an Earth-sized mass means that heat essentially remains where it is generated, until it is removed

  9. Variation of thermal conductivity and heat flux at the Earth's core mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Michael W.; Walker, Andrew M.; Stackhouse, Stephen; Wookey, James; Forte, Alessandro M.; Brodholt, John P.; Dobson, David P.

    2014-03-01

    The two convective systems that dominate Earth's internal dynamics meet at the boundary between the rocky mantle and metallic liquid core. Energy transfer between processes driving plate tectonics and the geodynamo is controlled by thermal conduction in the lowermost mantle (D″). We use atomic scale simulations to determine the thermal conductivity of MgSiO3 perovskite and post-perovskite under D″ conditions and probe how these two convective systems interact. We show that the thermal conductivity of post-perovskite (∼12 W/mK) is 50% larger than that of perovskite under the same conditions (∼8.5 W/mK) and is anisotropic, with conductivity along the a-axis being 40% higher than conductivity along the c-axis. This enhances the high heat flux into cold regions of D″ where post-perovskite is stable, strengthening the feedback between convection in the core and mantle. Reminiscent of the situation in the lithosphere, there is potential for deformation induced texturing associated with mantle convection to modify how the mantle is heated from below. We test this by coupling our atomic scale results to models of texture in D″ and suggest that anisotropic thermal conductivity may help to stabilise the roots of mantle plumes over their protracted lifetime.

  10. On observation of local strong heterogeneity in the Earth's inner core below southeastern Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoshchekov, D. N.; Kaazik, P. B.; Ovtchinnikov, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    The dimensions and nature of multi-scale structural heterogeneities in the Earth's inner core (IC) provide important constraints on its mineralogy and formation history. Teleseismic body waves with turn points close to the inner core boundary (ICB) provide a unique tool for imaging the fine structure of the upper IC. In this study, we invoke differential travel times and amplitudes of PKPBC and PKPDF waveforms observed in crossing polar and equatorial paths to provide more constraints on the heterogeneity previously located in the quasi-eastern hemisphere of the IC (Kaazik et al., 2015; Krasnoshchekov et al., 2016). A more refined analysis of quasi-polar PKPBC/PKPDF amplitude ratios measured within the heterogeneity indicates that seismic attenuation is both frequency and depth dependent, and its relatively low Q-factor at 1 Hz of approximately 118 tends to grow with depth. Outside the heterogeneity, no pronounced polar-equatorial differences are observed; the estimated Q factor is about twice as large and not directionally dependent. We also analyse new differential travel times of rays that enable sampling of the anomaly at greater depths. The analysis exhibits the polar - equatorial contrasts observed in the heterogeneity terminate at approximately 520 km below the ICB, which we interpret to be its bottom. The earlier interpretation of the heterogeneity in terms of strong anisotropic volume amidst the almost isotropic eastern hemisphere of the IC can be retained, and the lower bound of anisotropy strength within the anomaly is determined to be 2%.

  11. Transport coefficients and entropy-scaling law in liquid iron up to Earth-core pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi-Long; Wang, Pan-Pan; Huang, Duo-Hui; Yang, Jun-Sheng; Wan, Ming-Jie; Wang, Fan-Hou

    2014-03-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to study the structural and transport properties, including the pair distribution function, the structure factor, the pair correlation entropy, self-diffusion coefficient, and viscosity, of liquid iron under high temperature and high pressure conditions. Our calculated results reproduced experimentally determined structure factors of liquid iron, and the calculated self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity agree well with previous simulation results. We show that there is a moderate increase of self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity along the melting curve up to the Earth-core pressure. Furthermore, the temperature dependencies of the pair correlation entropy, self-diffusion, and viscosity under high pressure condition have been investigated. Our results suggest that the temperature dependence of the pair correlation entropy is well described by T(-1) scaling, while the Arrhenius law well describes the temperature dependencies of self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity under high pressure. In particular, we find that the entropy-scaling laws, proposed by Rosenfeld [Phys. Rev. A 15, 2545 (1977)] and Dzugutov [Nature (London) 381, 137 (1996)] for self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity in liquid metals under ambient pressure, still hold well for liquid iron under high temperature and high pressure conditions. Using the entropy-scaling laws, we can obtain transport properties from structural properties under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The results provide a useful ingredient in understanding transport properties of planet's cores.

  12. Deep mantle heat flow and thermal evolution of the Earth's core based on thermo-chemical mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T.; Tackley, P.; Buffett, B.

    2004-12-01

    A coupled core-mantle evolution model that combines the global heat balance in the core with a fully-dynamical thermo-chemical mantle convection [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004 published in EPSL] is used to investigate the deep mantle heat flow that is required to sustain the magnetic field generated by the geodynamo process. Effects of a radioactive heat source due to potassium in the core are also included in the global heat balance in the Earth??s core. Two important parameters are checked in this study; (1) density variation between depleted hartzbergite and basaltic material (0 to 3 percent) and (2) concentration of radioactive potassium in the core alloy (0ppm to 400ppm). The parameter set that most closely satisfies the criteria of size of the inner core (1220km at present time) is around 2 percent of density difference in a convecting mantle and 200ppm of radioactive heat source in the core. The concentration of potassium in the core is consistent with the geochemical approach [Murthy et al., 2003] but smaller than other successful thermal evolution models [Labrosse, 2003; Nimmo et al., 2004]. Heat flow through the core-mantle boundary and the contribution of radioactive heat sources in the core are consistent with theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002] and geochemical constraints [Gessmann and Wood, 2002]. The power available to the geodynamo, based on the predicted heat flow through the core-mantle boundary, is approximately four times greater than the value predicted by numerical models of the geodynamo [Christensen and Kutzner, 2004] but closer to theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002].

  13. Theoretical prediction of new mineral phases in Earth's mantle and core (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganov, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    After theoretical-experimental discovery of MgSiO3 post-perovskite [1,2], many other important mineral phases have been proposed in the deep Earth’s interior. We have developed [3] and further enhanced [4] an evolutionary method for predicting the most stable crystal structure at given thermodynamic conditions. Here, I will illustrate several examples from our recent works. For example, we have predicted new phases of CaCO3, MgCO3 and CO2 at Earth’s mantle pressures, and many of these phases have already found experimental support [5-7]. These results shed new light on the behavior of carbon in the Earth’s mantle [7]. More recently, we have studied the behavior of methane at high pressures and temperatures [8], and we confirm that indeed CH4 should break down under pressure - first, into hydrocarbons (ethane, butane) and hydrogen, and then into diamond and hydrogen. Crucial role here is played by lattice vibrations (zero-point vibrations and entropic factor). These vibrational effects are frequently neglected, but we have demonstrated that without them the decomposition into diamond and hydrogen would not be possible. Considering variable-composition systems, we have demonstrated [9] that FeSi with the CsCl-type structure is the only iron silicide stable at pressures of the Earth’s inner core. Similar studies can be performed also for Fe-O, Fe-S, Fe-O and Fe-H systems, addressing the common assumptions on their behavior at ultrahigh pressures of the inner core. REFERENCES: [1] Murakami M., et al., Science 304, 855-858 (2004). [2] Oganov A.R., Ono S., Nature 430, 445-448 (2004). [3] Oganov A.R., Glass C.W., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 244704 (2006). [4] Lyakhov A.O., Oganov A.R., Valle M. Comp. Phys. Comm. 181, 1623-1632 (2010). [5] Oganov A.R., Glass C.W., Ono S., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 241, 95-103 (2006). [6] Ono S., Kikegawa T., Ohishi Y. Am. Mineral. 92, 1246-1249 (2007). [7] Oganov A.R., et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 273, 38-47 (2008). [8] Gao G., Oganov A

  14. MIGRATION AND GROWTH OF PROTOPLANETARY EMBRYOS. II. EMERGENCE OF PROTO-GAS-GIANT CORES VERSUS SUPER EARTH PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Beibei [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Xiaojia [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lin, Douglas N. C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Aarseth, Sverre J., E-mail: bbliu1208@gmail.com [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 15%-20% of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planets. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses 10 times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gases and solids in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that (1) there is no shortage of planetary building block material, (2) a gas giant's growth barrier is probably associated with whether it can merge into super-critical cores, and (3) super Earths are probably failed cores that did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a prescription for the embryo-disk tidal interaction. This code is used to simulate the convergent migration of embryos, and their close encounters and coagulation. Around the progenitors of solar-type stars, the progenitor super-critical-mass cores of gas giant planets primarily form in protostellar disks with relatively high (≳ 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) mass accretion rates, whereas systems of super Earths (failed cores) are more likely to emerge out of natal disks with modest mass accretion rates, due to the mean motion resonance barrier and retention efficiency.

  15. Narrow Scale Flow and a Weak Field by the Top of Earth's Core: Evidence from Orsted, Magsat and Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    As Earth's main magnetic field weakens, our magnetic shield against the onslaught of the solar wind thins. And the field strength needed to fend off battering by solar coronal mass ejections is decreasing, just when the delicate complexity of modem, vulnerable, electro-technological systems is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Recently, a working group of distinguished scientist from across the nation has asked NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards program a key question: What are the dynamics of Earth s magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system? Paleomagnetic studies of crustal rocks magnetized in the geologic past reveal that polarity reversals have occurred many times during Earth s history. Networked super-computer simulations of core field and flow, including effects of gravitational, pressure, rotational Coriolis, magnetic and viscous forces, suggest how this might happen in detail. And space-based measurements of the real, time-varying magnetic field help constrain estimates of the speed and direction of fluid iron flowing near the top of the core and enable tests of some hypotheses about such flow. Now scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have developed and applied methods to test the hypotheses of narrow scale flow and of a dynamically weak magnetic field near the top of Earth s core. Using two completely different methods, C. V. Voorhies has shown these hypotheses lead to specific theoretical forms for the "spectrum" of Earth s main magnetic field and the spectrum of its rate of change. Much as solar physicists use a prism to separate sunlight into its spectrum, from long wavelength red to short wavelength blue light, geophysicists use a digital prism, spherical harmonic analysis, to separate the measured geomagnetic field into its spectrum, from long to short wavelength fields. They do this for the rate of change of the field as well.

  16. ISO, FGDC, DIF and Dublin Core - Making Sense of Metadata Standards for Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. R.; Ritchey, N. A.; Peng, G.; Toner, V. A.; Brown, H.

    2014-12-01

    Metadata standards provide common definitions of metadata fields for information exchange across user communities. Despite the broad adoption of metadata standards for Earth science data, there are still heterogeneous and incompatible representations of information due to differences between the many standards in use and how each standard is applied. Federal agencies are required to manage and publish metadata in different metadata standards and formats for various data catalogs. In 2014, the NOAA National Climatic data Center (NCDC) managed metadata for its scientific datasets in ISO 19115-2 in XML, GCMD Directory Interchange Format (DIF) in XML, DataCite Schema in XML, Dublin Core in XML, and Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT) in JSON, with more standards and profiles of standards planned. Of these standards, the ISO 19115-series metadata is the most complete and feature-rich, and for this reason it is used by NCDC as the source for the other metadata standards. We will discuss the capabilities of metadata standards and how these standards are being implemented to document datasets. Successful implementations include developing translations and displays using XSLTs, creating links to related data and resources, documenting dataset lineage, and establishing best practices. Benefits, gaps, and challenges will be highlighted with suggestions for improved approaches to metadata storage and maintenance.

  17. Rare earth element geochemistry of outcrop and core samples from the Marcellus Shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Clinton W; Jain, Jinesh C; Stegmeier, John; Hakala, J Alexandra; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the geochemistry of the rare earth elements (REE) was studied in eleven outcrop samples and six, depth-interval samples of a core from the Marcellus Shale. The REE are classically applied analytes for investigating depositional environments and inferring geochemical processes, making them of interest as potential, naturally occurring indicators of fluid sources as well as indicators of geochemical processes in solid waste disposal. However, little is known of the REE occurrence in the Marcellus Shale or its produced waters, and this study represents one of the first, thorough characterizations of the REE in the Marcellus Shale. In these samples, the abundance of REE and the fractionation of REE profiles were correlated with different mineral components of the shale. Namely, samples with a larger clay component were inferred to have higher absolute concentrations of REE but have less distinctive patterns. Conversely, samples with larger carbonate fractions exhibited a greater degree of fractionation, albeit with lower total abundance. Further study is necessary to determine release mechanisms, as well as REE fate-and-transport, however these results have implications for future brine and solid waste management applications.

  18. Environmental geochemistry reflected by rare earth elements in Bohai Bay (North China) core sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ya-Yan; Song, Jin-Ming; Duan, Li-Qin; Li, Xue-Gang; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Pei-Yan

    2010-08-05

    In Bohai Bay sediment, two cores were collected to estimate the source of sediments, and assess the environmental changes. Sequential extractions were carried out in this study. Rare earth elements (REE) were leached out from four labile fractions: Exchangeable (L1), Bound to carbonates (L2), Bound to Fe-Mn oxides (L3), Bound to organic matter (L4), and the remainder was Residual (R5). The percentages of REE in different fractions follow the order: R5 > L3 > L2 > L4 > L1. With heavy REE depletion and no pronounced REE fractionation, NASC-normalized REE patterns of Bohai Bay sediments are quite consistent with that of Haihe River sediment, which is the key river of Bohai Bay. Y/Ho ratios of total contents are all much lower than the average value of continental crust, while Y/Ho ratios of L2 are higher than those of other fractions. Based on the patterns of REE and Y/Ho ratios of samples, sediments of Bohai Bay mainly come from terrigenous matters, which are mainly brought by Haihe River. And REE combined with carbonates may be partly inherited from anthropogenic matter. Moreover, environmental changes exert significant influences on the patterns and fractionations of REE, and they can be deduced from the characteristics of REE. Our results on the patterns and burial fluxes of REE reflect two environmental changes: Bohai Bay has been shifting towards more reducing conditions in the last one hundred years, and there was a large flood in 1939.

  19. Migration and Growth of Protoplanetary Embryos II: Emergence of Proto-Gas-Giants Cores versus Super Earths' Progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Beibei; Lin, Douglas N C; Aarseth, Sverre J

    2014-01-01

    Nearly $15-20%$ of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planet. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses ten times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gas and solid in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that 1) there is no shortage of planetary building-block material, 2) gas giants' growth barrier is probably associated with whether they can merge into super-critical cores, and 3) super Earths are probably failed cores which did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a...

  20. The high-pressure phase diagram of Fe(0.94)O - A possible constituent of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements to pressures of 83 GPa and temperatures ranging from 300 K to 4300 K confirm the presence of both crystalline and liquid metallic phases of FeO at pressures above 60-70 GPa and temperatures above 1000 K. By experimentally determinig the melting temperature of FeO to 100 GPa and of a model-core composition at 83 GPa, it is found that the solid-melt equilibria can be described by complete solid solution across the Fe-FeO system at pressures above 70 GPa. The results indicate that oxygen is a viable and likely candidate for the major light alloying element of the earth's liquid outer core. The data suggest that the temperature at the core-mantle boundary is close to 4800 K and that heat lost out of the core accounts for more than 20 percent of the heat flux observed at the surface.

  1. Evidence for MAC waves at the top of Earth's core and implications for variations in length of day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffett, Bruce; Knezek, Nicholas; Holme, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Earth's liquid core hosts a diverse set of waves with periods ranging from days to thousands of years. One class of waves with periods of several decades is known to arise from an interplay between magnetic, Archimedes and Coriolis forces. These so-called MAC waves are thought to be relevant for interpreting historical fluctuations in the geomagnetic field. In this study, we show that MAC waves provide a good description of time-dependent zonal flow at the top of the core. The same collection of waves also offers a simple explanation for observed fluctuations in the dipole field. Both of these predictions require a stratified layer at the top of the core with a thickness of 130-140 km and a buoyancy frequency comparable to Earth's rotation rate. We extend these predictions to include changes in the length of day (LOD) and find that MAC waves can account for about half of the observed fluctuation at decadal periods. Larger fluctuations are possible when electromagnetic stresses couple MAC waves to flow in the interior of the core. In fact, an idealized model for the coupled motion overestimates the LOD fluctuations, probably reflecting limitations in this idealized model. Our results offer support for stable stratification at the top of the core and suggest a common origin for decadal fluctuations in the geomagnetic field and the LOD.

  2. Mineral Physics Research on Earth's Core and UTeach Outreach Activities at UT Austin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Wheat, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Comprehension of the alloying effects of major candidate light elements on the phase diagram and elasticity of iron addresses pressing issues on the composition, thermal structures, and seismic features of the Earth's core. Integrating this mineral physics research with the educational objectives of the CAREER award was facilitated by collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin's premier teaching program, UTeach. The UTeach summer outreach program hosts three one-week summer camps every year exposing K-12th graders to university level academia, emphasizing math and science initiatives and research. Each week of the camp either focuses on math, chemistry, or geology. Many of the students were underrepresented minorities and some required simultaneous translation; this is an effect of the demographics of the region, and caused some language barrier challenges. The students' opportunity to see first-hand what it is like to be on a university campus, as well as being in a research environment, such as the mineral physics lab, helps them to visualize themselves in academia in the future. A collection of displayable materials with information about deep-Earth research were made available to participating students and teachers to disseminate accurate scientific knowledge and enthusiasm. These items included a diamond anvil cell and diagrams of the diamond crystal structure, the layers of the Earth, and the phases of carbon to show that one element can have very different physical properties purely based on differences in structure. The students learned how advanced X-ray and optical laser spectroscopies are used to study properties of planetary materials in the diamond anvil cell. Stress was greatly placed on the basic mathematical relationship between force, area, and pressure, the fundamental principle involved with diamond anvil cell research. Undergraduate researchers from the lab participated in the presentations and hands-on experiments, and answered any

  3. Prevalence of anisotropic shell growth in rare earth core-shell upconversion nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Lee, Jim Yang

    2013-05-28

    Through a series of carefully executed experiments, we discovered the prevalence of anisotropic shell growth in many upconversion NaREF4 systems caused by a combination of factors: selective adsorption of ligands on the core surface due to the core crystal structure, ligand etching, and the lattice mismatch between core and shell components. This could lead to incomplete shell formation in core-shell nanocrystals under certain conditions. Shell growth is always faster in the a and b crystallographic directions than in the c direction. In the case of a larger lattice mismatch between the core and shell, shell growth only occurs in the a and b directions resulting in an oblong core-shell structure. These findings are useful for rationalizing shell-dependent emission properties, understanding the emission mechanisms in complex core-shell nanostructures, and for creating accurate models of core-shell designs for multifunctionality and optimal performance in applications.

  4. Make Super-Earths, Not Jupiters: Accreting Nebular Gas onto Solid Cores at 0.1 AU and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene; Ormel, Chris W.

    2014-12-01

    Close-in super-Earths having radii 1-4 R ⊕ may possess hydrogen atmospheres comprising a few percent by mass of their rocky cores. We determine the conditions under which such atmospheres can be accreted by cores from their parent circumstellar disks. Accretion from the nebula is problematic because it is too efficient: we find that 10 M ⊕ cores embedded in solar metallicity disks tend to undergo runaway gas accretion and explode into Jupiters, irrespective of orbital location. The threat of runaway is especially dire at ~0.1 AU, where solids may coagulate on timescales orders of magnitude shorter than gas clearing times; thus nascent atmospheres on close-in orbits are unlikely to be supported against collapse by planetesimal accretion. The time to runaway accretion is well approximated by the cooling time of the atmosphere's innermost convective zone, whose extent is controlled by where H2 dissociates. Insofar as the temperatures characterizing H2 dissociation are universal, timescales for core instability tend not to vary with orbital distance—and to be alarmingly short for 10 M ⊕ cores. Nevertheless, in the thicket of parameter space, we identify two scenarios, not mutually exclusive, that can reproduce the preponderance of percent-by-mass atmospheres for super-Earths at ~0.1 AU, while still ensuring the formation of Jupiters at >~ 1 AU. Scenario (a): planets form in disks with dust-to-gas ratios that range from ~20× solar at 0.1 AU to ~2× solar at 5 AU. Scenario (b): the final assembly of super-Earth cores from mergers of proto-cores—a process that completes quickly at ~0.1 AU once begun—is delayed by gas dynamical friction until just before disk gas dissipates completely. Both scenarios predict that the occurrence rate for super-Earths versus orbital distance, and the corresponding rate for Jupiters, should trend in opposite directions, as the former population is transformed into the latter: as gas giants become more frequent from ~1 to 10 AU

  5. High-P,T Elasticity of Hcp Iron: Reinvestigation of the Applicability of Hcp Iron to the Earth's Inner Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Kawai, K.; Kuwayama, Y.; Ohsumi, M.; Ishii, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's inner core (329~364 GPa and 5000~6000 K) is thought to be composed of hexagonal closed pack (hcp) structured solid Fe-Ni alloy (e.g., Mao et al., 1998; Kuwayama et al., 2008; Sha & Cohen, 2010). Thermoelasticity of hcp (ɛ) iron is therefore a key to interpreting seismological information of the inner core: density, seismic wave velocities, and their anisotropy. However, several studies reported that hcp iron has a shear modulus distinctly larger than that of the inner core (e.g., Mao et al., 1998; Vocadlo et al., 2009). This large Poisson ratio of the inner core is one of the remaining inexplicable features of the deep Earth, and it suggests the presence of mechanisms to lower the S-wave velocity in the inner core, such as a low-velocity component (Prescher et al., 2015), pre-melting effect (Martorell et al., 2013), anelasticity, and so on. In this study, we perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulations employing a supercell larger than in previous calculations (Vocadlo et al., 2009; Martorell et al., 2013). Also computations are conducted in a wide P,T range including, but not limited to, the inner core conditions to clarify the P,T effects on the elasticity of the hcp iron more comprehensively, and to provide an internally-consistent thermoelastic model. In addition to checking the validity of the Birch's law, the obtained Poisson ratio and aggregate anisotropy, with and without the pre-melting effect, are compared against seismological constraints to reinvestigate the viability of hcp iron in the inner core. Research supported by KAKENHI (JSPS) and the X-ray Free Electron Laser Priority Strategy Program (MEXT).

  6. The existence of radial anisotropy in Earth's upper inner core revealed from seismic normal mode observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, Karen H.; Deuss, Arwen

    2015-01-01

    As we strive to understand the most remote region of our planet, one critical area of investigation is the uppermost inner core since its structure is related to solidification of outer core material at the inner core boundary (ICB). Previous seismic studies have used body waves to show that the top

  7. The existence of radial anisotropy in Earth's upper inner core revealed from seismic normal mode observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, Karen H.; Deuss, Arwen

    2015-01-01

    As we strive to understand the most remote region of our planet, one critical area of investigation is the uppermost inner core since its structure is related to solidification of outer core material at the inner core boundary (ICB). Previous seismic studies have used body waves to show that the top

  8. A Mercury-like component of early Earth yields uranium in the core and high mantle (142)Nd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlers, Anke; Wood, Bernard J

    2015-04-16

    Recent (142)Nd isotope data indicate that the silicate Earth (its crust plus the mantle) has a samarium to neodymium elemental ratio (Sm/Nd) that is greater than that of the supposed chondritic building blocks of the planet. This elevated Sm/Nd has been ascribed either to a 'hidden' reservoir in the Earth or to loss of an early-formed terrestrial crust by impact ablation. Since removal of crust by ablation would also remove the heat-producing elements--potassium, uranium and thorium--such removal would make it extremely difficult to balance terrestrial heat production with the observed heat flow. In the 'hidden' reservoir alternative, a complementary low-Sm/Nd layer is usually considered to reside unobserved in the silicate lower mantle. We have previously shown, however, that the core is a likely reservoir for some lithophile elements such as niobium. We therefore address the question of whether core formation could have fractionated Nd from Sm and also acted as a sink for heat-producing elements. We show here that addition of a reduced Mercury-like body (or, alternatively, an enstatite-chondrite-like body) rich in sulfur to the early Earth would generate a superchondritic Sm/Nd in the mantle and an (142)Nd/(144)Nd anomaly of approximately +14 parts per million relative to chondrite. In addition, the sulfur-rich core would partition uranium strongly and thorium slightly, supplying a substantial part of the 'missing' heat source for the geodynamo.

  9. First-principles prediction of Si-doped Fe carbide as one of the possible constituents of Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tilak; Chatterjee, Swastika; Ghosh, Sujoy; Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri

    2017-09-01

    We perform a computational study based on first-principles calculations to investigate the relative stability and elastic properties of the doped and undoped Fe carbide compounds at 200-364 GPa. We find that upon doping a few weight percent of Si impurities at the carbon sites in Fe7C3 carbide phases, the values of Poisson's ratio and density increase while VP, and VS decrease compared to their undoped counterparts. This leads to marked improvement in the agreement of seismic parameters such as P wave and S wave velocity, Poisson's ratio, and density with the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) data. The agreement with PREM data is found to be better for the orthorhombic phase of iron carbide (o-Fe7C3) compared to hexagonal phase (h-Fe7C3). Our theoretical analysis indicates that Fe carbide containing Si impurities can be a possible constituent of the Earth's inner core. Since the density of undoped Fe7C3 is low compared to that of inner core, as discussed in a recent theoretical study, our proposal of Si-doped Fe7C3 can provide an alternative solution as an important component of the Earth's inner core.

  10. Recent progress on the spectroscopy of rare earth ions in core-shells, nanowires, nanotubes, and other novel nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyuan; Liu, Liqin; Liu, Guokui

    2008-03-01

    Research and development of nanoscale luminescent and laser materials are part of the rapidly advancing nanoscience and nanotechnology. Because of unique spectroscopic properties and luminescent dynamics of f-electron states, doping luminescent rare earth ions into nano-hosts has been demonstrated as an optimistic approach to developing highly efficient and stable nanophosphors for various applications. In this article, we review the most recent progress in spectroscopic measurements of rare earth ion-activated low-dimensional nanostructures including nanolayers, core-shells, nanowires, nanotubes, and nanodisks. Among a large volume of work reported in the literature on many members of the rare earth series including Ce3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Eu3+, and Er3+, we focus on recent findings in the spectroscopic and luminescence properties of Eu3+ doped nanolayers, core-shells, and nanotubes, because Eu3+ ions have been extensively studied and widely used as an ideal probe for fundamental understanding of nano-phenomena. Specifically, the dependence of the optical properties of rare earth ions on nanostructures is discussed in detail.

  11. Studies of the Core Conditions of the Earth and Super-Earths Using Intense Ion Beams at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Borm, B.; Piriz, A. R.; Shutov, A.; Neumayer, P.; Bagnoud, V.; Piriz, S. A.

    2017-09-01

    Using detailed numerical simulations, we present the design of an experiment that will generate samples of iron under extreme conditions of density and pressure believed to exist in the interior of the Earth and interior of extrasolar Earth-like planets. In the proposed experiment design, an intense uranium beam is used to implode a multilayered cylindrical target that consists of a thin Fe cylinder enclosed in a thick massive W shell. Such intense uranium beams will be available at the heavy-ion synchrotron, SIS100, at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR), at Darmstadt, which is under construction and will become operational in the next few years. It is expected that the beam intensity will increase gradually over a couple of years to its maximum design value. Therefore, in our studies, we have considered a wide range of beam parameters, from the initial beam intensity (“Day One”) to the maximum specified value. It is also worth noting that two different focal spot geometries have been used. In one case, a circular focal spot with a Gaussian transverse intensity distribution is considered, whereas in the other case, an annular focal spot is used. With these two beam geometries, one can access different parts of the Fe phase diagram. For example, heating the sample with a circular focal spot generates a hot liquid state, while an annular focal spot can produce a highly compressed liquid or a highly compressed solid phase depending on the beam intensity.

  12. On the correlation between air temperature and the core Earth processes: Further investigations using a continuous wavelet analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sello, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    In a recent article by Dickey, J. O., Marcus, S.L. and O. de Viron, 2011, the authors show evidences for correlations in the multi-decadal variability of Earth's rotation rate [i.e., length of day (LOD)], the angular momentum of the core (CAM), and natural surface air temperature (SAT). Previous investigators have already found that the LOD fluctuations are largely attributed to core-mantle interactions and that the SAT appears strongly anti-correlated with the decadal LOD. As the above authors note, the cause of this common variability needs to be further investigated and studied. In fact, "since temperature cannot affect the CAM or LOD to a sufficient extent, the results favor either a direct effect of Earth's core-generated magnetic field (e.g., through the modulation of charged-particle fluxes, which may impact cloud formation) or a more indirect effect of some other core process on the climate-or yet another process that affects both". The main aim of the present research note is to further support the a...

  13. Make Super-Earths, Not Jupiters: Accreting Nebular Gas onto Solid Cores at 0.1 AU and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Eve J; Ormel, Chris W

    2014-01-01

    Close-in super-Earths discovered by Kepler may possess hydrogen atmospheres comprising a few percent by mass of their rocky cores. We determine the conditions under which such atmospheres can be accreted by cores from their parent circumstellar disks. Accretion from the nebula is problematic because it is too efficient: we find that 10-$M_\\oplus$ cores embedded in solar metallicity disks tend to undergo runaway gas accretion and explode into Jupiters, irrespective of orbital location. The threat of runaway is especially dire at $\\sim$0.1 AU, where solids may coagulate on timescales orders of magnitude shorter than gas clearing times; thus nascent atmospheres on close-in orbits are unlikely to be supported against collapse by planetesimal accretion. The time to runaway accretion is well approximated by the cooling time of the atmosphere's innermost convective zone, whose extent is controlled by where H$_2$ dissociates. Insofar as the temperatures characterizing H$_2$ dissociation are universal, timescales for ...

  14. Element Partitioning Constraints on Formation and Composition of the Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Agee, C. B.; Fei, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Element partitioning study provides a number of constraints on the formation and composition of the core. First, partitioning of siderophile elements between the core and mantle should explain the "excess" siderophile elements in the mantle. Second, partitioning of light element(s) between the core and mantle should supply the core with the right amount of light element(s) to account for the density deficit in the core. Third, partitioning of light element(s) between the inner and outer core should be consistent with the observed difference in density deficits (relative to pure Fe) between these two reservoirs. In this study, high-pressure and high-temperature experiments have been conducted to investigate the pressure, temperature, and composition effects on partitioning of siderophile elements Ni and Co between core-forming Fe alloy and mantle silicate melt and minerals, partitioning of light elements S, O, and Si between core-forming Fe alloy and mantle silicate melt and minerals, and partitioning of light elements S and C between solid and liquid Fe. The implications of these results for mechanism of core formation and the composition of the core are discussed.

  15. The melting curve of Ni to 125 GPa: implications for Earth's Fe rich core alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, O. T.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D. P.; Vocadlo, L.; Thomson, A. R.; Wann, E.; Wang, W.; Edgington, A.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, N.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments and two melting criteria: the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions [1]. Our melting curve (Fig. 1) is in good agreement with most theoretical studies [e.g. 2] and the available shock wave data (Fig. 2). It is, however, dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which the determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method [e.g. 3]. We estimate the melting point of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB; 330 GPa) to be 5800±700 K (2σ), ~2500 K higher than the estimate based on the laser speckle method [3] and within error of Fe (6230±500 K) as determined in a similar in situ LH-DAC study [4]. We find that laser speckle based melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as melt convection. Our new melting curve suggests that the reduction in ICB temperature due to the alloying of Ni with Fe is likely to be significantly smaller than would be expected had the earlier experimental Ni melting studies been correct. We have applied our methodology to a range of other transition metals (Mo, Ti, V, Cu). In the case of Mo, Ti and V the melting curves are in good agreement with the shock compression and theoretical melting studies but hotter and steeper than those based on the laser speckle method, as with Ni. Cu is an exception in which all studies agree, including those employing the laser speckle method. These results go a long way toward resolving the the long-standing controversy over the phase diagrams of the transition metals as determined from static LH-DAC studies on the one hand, and theoretical and dynamic compression studies on the other

  16. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Columbia University Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) Lamont-Doherty Core Repository (LDCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Lamont-Doherty Core Repository (LDCR), operated by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia University is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  17. Thermal convection in Earth's inner core with phase change at its boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Deguen, Renaud; Cardin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Inner core translation, with solidification on one hemisphere and melting on the other, provides a promising basis for understanding the hemispherical dichotomy of the inner core, as well as the anomalous stable layer observed at the base of the outer core - the F-layer - which might be sustained by continuous melting of inner core material. In this paper, we study in details the dynamics of inner core thermal convection when dynamically induced melting and freezing of the inner core boundary (ICB) are taken into account. If the inner core is unstably stratified, linear stability analysis and numerical simulations consistently show that the translation mode dominates only if the viscosity $\\eta$ is large enough, with a critical viscosity value, of order $3 10^{18}$ Pas, depending on the ability of outer core convection to supply or remove the latent heat of melting or solidification. If $\\eta$ is smaller, the dynamical effect of melting and freezing is small. Convection takes a more classical form, with a one...

  18. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940–2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely, the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields. T...

  19. Complete synthetic seismograms based on a spherical self-gravitating Earth model with an atmosphere-ocean-mantle-core structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongjiang; Heimann, Sebastian; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Hansheng; Dahm, Torsten

    2017-09-01

    A hybrid method is proposed to calculate complete synthetic seismograms based on a spherically symmetric and self-gravitating Earth with a multilayered structure of atmosphere, ocean, mantle, liquid core and solid core. For large wavelengths, a numerical scheme is used to solve the geodynamic boundary-value problem without any approximation on the deformation and gravity coupling. With decreasing wavelength, the gravity effect on the deformation becomes negligible and the analytical propagator scheme can be used. Many useful approaches are used to overcome the numerical problems that may arise in both analytical and numerical schemes. Some of these approaches have been established in the seismological community and the others are developed for the first time. Based on the stable and efficient hybrid algorithm, an all-in-one code QSSP is implemented to cover the complete spectrum of seismological interests. The performance of the code is demonstrated by various tests including the curvature effect on teleseismic body and surface waves, the appearance of multiple reflected, teleseismic core phases, the gravity effect on long period surface waves and free oscillations, the simulation of near-field displacement seismograms with the static offset, the coupling of tsunami and infrasound waves, and free oscillations of the solid Earth, the atmosphere and the ocean. QSSP is open source software that can be used as a stand-alone FORTRAN code or may be applied in combination with a Python toolbox to calculate and handle Green's function databases for efficient coding of source inversion problems.

  20. Telluric currents have no significant effect on the Earth's core seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernogor, L. F.

    2017-01-01

    We show that telluric currents have no effect on the formation of macrofaults in the Earth's crust or on implementation of the intensification regime. This is mainly associated with the weakness of telluric currents and induction of the geomagnetic field.

  1. Core-decomposition-facilitated fabrication of hollow rare-earth silicate nanowalnuts from core-shell structures via the Kirkendall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenli; Zou, Rui; Yang, Xianfeng; Huang, Ningyu; Huang, Junjian; Liang, Hongbin; Wang, Jing

    2015-08-28

    Hollow micro-/nanostructures have been widely applied in the fields of lithium ion batteries, catalysis, biosensing, biomedicine, and so forth. The Kirkendall effect, which involves a non-equilibrium mutual diffusion process, is one of many important fabrication strategies for the formation of hollow nanomaterials. Accordingly, full understanding of the interdiffusion process at the nanoscale is very important for the development of novel multifunctional hollow materials. In this work, hollow Y2SiO5 nanowalnuts have been fabricated from the conversion of YOHCO3@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres via the Kirkendall effect. More importantly, it was found that in the conversion process, the decomposition of YOHCO3 core imposes on the formation of the Y2SiO5 interlayer by facilitating the initial nucleation of the Kirkendall nanovoids and accelerating the interfacial diffusion of Y2O3@SiO2 core@shell. The simple concept developed herein can be employed as a general Kirkendall effect strategy without the assistance of any catalytically active Pt nanocrystals or gold motion for future fabrication of novel hollow nanostructures. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of rare-earth ion doped hollow Y2SiO5 nanoparticles are researched.

  2. Core Angular Momentum and the IERS Sub-Centers Activity for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids. Part 1; Core Angular Momentum and Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xia-Dong; Chao, Benjamin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The part of the grant was to use recordings of seismic waves travelling through the earth's core (PKP waves) to study the inner core rotation and constraints on possible density anomalies in the fluid core. The shapes and relative arrival times of such waves associated with a common source were used to reduce the uncertainties in source location and excitation and the effect of unknown mantle structure. The major effort of the project is to assemble historical seismograms with long observing base lines. We have found original paper records of SSI earthquakes at COL between 1951 and 1966 in a warehouse of the U.S. Geological Survey office in Golden, Colorado, extending the previous measurements at COL by Song and Richards [1996] further back 15 years. Also in Alaska, the University of Alaska, Fairbanks Geophysical Institute (UAFGI) has been operating the Alaskan Seismic Network with over 100 stations since the late 1960s. Virtually complete archives of seismograms are still available at UAFGI. Unfortunately, most of the archives are in microchip form (develocorders), for which the use of waveforms is impossible. Paper seismograms (helicorders) are available for a limited number of stations, and digital recordings of analog signals started around 1989. Of the paper records obtained, stations at Gilmore Dome (GLM, very close to COL), Yukon (FYU), McKinley (MCK), and Sheep Creek Mountain (SCM) have the most complete continuous recordings.

  3. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  4. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940–2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely, the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields....... Temporal correlations of these uncertainties are accounted for. The covariance matrix for the flow coefficients is also obtained recursively from the dispersion of an ensemble of solutions. Maps of the flow at the core surface show, upon a planetary-scale gyre, time-dependent large-scale eddies...... between the magnetic field and subdecadal nonzonal motions within the fluid outer core. Both the zonal and the more energetic nonzonal interannual motions were particularly intense close to the equator (below 10∘ latitude) between 1995 and 2010. We revise down the amplitude of the decade fluctuations...

  5. Phase relations in iron-rich systems and implications for the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William W.; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental data concerning the properties of iron, iron sulfide, and iron oxide at high pressures are combined with theoretical arguments to constrain the probable behavior of the Fe-rich portions of the Fe-O and Fe-S phase diagrams. Phase diagrams are constructed for the Fe-S-O system at core pressures and temperatures. These properties are used to evaluate the current temperature distribution and composition of the core.

  6. Distribution of Sb, As, Ge, and In between metal and silicate during accretion and core formation in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Nickodem, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.; Boujibar, A.; Righter, M.; Lapen, T. J.

    2017-02-01

    A large number of siderophile (iron-loving) elements are also volatile, thus offering constraints on the origin of volatile elements in differentiated bodies such as Earth, Moon, Mars and Vesta. Metal-silicate partitioning data for many of these elements is lacking, making their overall mantle concentrations in these bodies difficult to model and origin difficult to distinguish between core formation and volatile depletion. To address this gap in understanding, we have undertaken systematic studies of four volatile siderophile elements - Sb, As, Ge and In - at variable temperature and variable Si content of metal. Several series were carried out at 1 GPa, and between 1500 and 1900 °C, for both C saturated and C-free conditions. The results show that temperature causes a decrease in the metal/silicate partition coefficient for all four elements. In addition, activity coefficients for each element have been determined and show a very strong dependence on Si content of Fe alloy. Si dissolved in metal significantly decreases the metal/silicate partition coefficients, at both 1600 and 1800 °C. The combination of temperature and Si content of the metal causes reduction of the metal-silicate partition coefficient to values that are close to those required for an origin of mantle As, Sb, Ge, and In concentrations by metal-silicate equilibrium processes. Combining these new results with previous studies on As, Sb, Ge, and In, allowed derivation of predictive expressions for metal/silicate partition coefficients for these elements which can then be applied to Earth. The expressions are applied to two scenarios for continuous accretion of Earth; specifically for constant and increasing fO2 during accretion. The results indicate that mantle concentrations of As, Sb, Ge, and In can be explained by metal-silicate equilibrium during an accretion scenario. The modeling is not especially sensitive to either scenario, although all element concentrations are explained better by a

  7. Siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in oceanic basalts, Pb isotope evolution and growth of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, H. E.; White, W. M.; Jochum, K. P.; Hofmann, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that the mantle Pb isotope ratios reflect continued extraction of Pb into the earth's core over geologic time is evaluated by studying the depeletion of chalcophile and siderophile elements in the mantle. Oceanic basalt samples are analyzed in order to determine the Pb, Sr, and Nd isotropic compositions and the abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements and incompatible lithophile elements. The data reveal that there is no systematic variation of siderophile or chalcophile element abundances relative to abundances of lithophile elements and the Pb/Ce ratio of the mantle is constant. It is suggested that the crust formation involves nonmagmatic and magmatic processes.

  8. The particle-in-cell model for ab initio thermodynamics: implications for the elastic anisotropy of the Earth's inner core

    CERN Document Server

    Gannarelli, C M S; Gillan, M J

    2003-01-01

    We assess the quantitative accuracy of the particle-in-cell (PIC) approximation used in recent ab initio predictions of the thermodynamic properties of hexagonal-close-packed iron at the conditions of the Earth's inner core. The assessment is made by comparing PIC predictions for a range of thermodynamic properties with the results of more exact calculations that avoid the PIC approximation. It is shown that PIC gives very accurate results for some properties, but that it gives an incorrect treatment of anharmonic lattice vibrations. In addition, our assessment does not support recent PIC-based predictions that the hexagonal c/a ratio increases strongly with increasing temperature, and we point out that this casts doubt on a proposed re-interpretation of the elastic anisotropy of the inner core.

  9. The elastic properties of hcp-Fe1 - xSix at Earth's inner-core conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Benjamí; Wood, Ian G.; Brodholt, John; Vočadlo, Lidunka

    2016-10-01

    The density of the Earth's inner core is less than that of pure iron and the P-wave velocities and, particularly, the S-wave velocities in the inner core observed from seismology are lower than those generally obtained from mineral physics. On the basis of measurements of compressional sound velocities to ∼100 GPa in diamond-anvil cells, extrapolated to inner-core pressures, it has been suggested that both the inner-core density and P-wave velocity can be matched simultaneously by the properties of a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Fe-Si or Fe-Ni-Si alloy. In this paper we present the results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hcp-Fe-Si alloys at 360 GPa and at temperatures up to melting. We find that although the inner-core density can be readily matched by an Fe-Si alloy, the same is not true for the wave velocities. At inner-core temperatures, the P-wave velocity in hcp-Fe-Si remains equal to, or slightly above, that of hcp-Fe and shows little change with silicon content. The S-wave velocity is reduced with respect to that of pure hcp-iron, except for temperatures immediately prior to melting, where the velocities are almost equal; this is a consequence of the fact that the strong temperature dependence of the shear modulus that was seen in similar simulations of hcp-Fe just prior to melting was not found in hcp-Fe-Si, and so in this temperature range the reduced S-wave velocity of pure iron closely matches that of the alloy. Our results show that for an hcp-Fe-Si alloy matching the inner-core density, both the P-wave and the S-wave velocities will be higher than those observed by seismology and we conclude, therefore, that our calculations indicate that inner core velocities cannot be explained by an hcp-Fe-Si alloy. The opposite conclusion, obtained previously from experimental data measured at lower pressures, is a consequence of: (i) the necessarily large extrapolation in pressure and temperature required to extend the experimental results to

  10. Dynamic Responses of the Earth's Outer Core to Assimilation of Observed Geomagnetic Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Assimilation of surface geomagnetic observations and geodynamo models has advanced very quickly in recent years. However, compared to advanced data assimilation systems in meteorology, geomagnetic data assimilation (GDAS) is still in an early stage. Among many challenges ranging from data to models is the disparity between the short observation records and the long time scales of the core dynamics. To better utilize available observational information, we have made an effort in this study to directly assimilate the Gauss coefficients of both the core field and its secular variation (SV) obtained via global geomagnetic field modeling, aiming at understanding the dynamical responses of the core fluid to these additional observational constraints. Our studies show that the SV assimilation helps significantly to shorten the dynamo model spin-up process. The flow beneath the core-mantle boundary (CMB) responds significantly to the observed field and its SV. The strongest responses occur in the relatively small scale flow (of the degrees L is approx. 30 in spherical harmonic expansions). This part of the flow includes the axisymmetric toroidal flow (of order m = 0) and non-axisymmetric poloidal flow with m (is) greater than 5. These responses can be used to better understand the core flow and, in particular, to improve accuracies of predicting geomagnetic variability in future.

  11. Air-Cored Linear Induction Motor for Earth-to-Orbit Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabar, Zivan; Levi, Enrico; Birenbaum, Leo

    1996-01-01

    The need for lowering the cost of Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) launches has prompted consideration of electromagnetic launchers. A preliminary design based on the experience gained in an advanced type of coilgun and on innovative ideas shows that such a launcher is technically feasible with almost off-the-shelf components.

  12. A new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid modified core-shell silica phase for chelation ion chromatography of alkaline earth, transition and rare earth elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillicuddy, Nicola; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Stack, Elaine M; Omamogho, Jesse O; Glennon, Jeremy D; Paull, Brett

    2013-12-20

    Bare core-shell silica (1.7μm) has been modified with iminodiacetic acid functional groups via standard silane chemistry, forming a new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) functionalised core-shell stationary phase. The column was applied in high-performance chelation ion chromatography and evaluated for the retention of alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal cations. The influence of nitric acid eluent concentration, addition of complexing agent dipicolinic acid, eluent pH and column temperature on the column performance was investigated. The efficiencies obtained for transition and heavy metal cations (and resultant separations) were comparable or better than those previously obtained for alternative fully porous silica based chelation stationary phases, and a similarly modified monolithic silica column, ranging from ∼15 to 56μm HETP. Increasing the ionic strength of the eluent with the addition of KNO3 (0.75M) and increasing the column temperature (70°C) facilitated the isocratic separation of a mixture of 14 lanthanides and yttrium in under 12min, with HETP averaging 18μm (7μm for Ce(III)). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Observation of magnetic diffusion in the Earth's outer core from Magsat, Orsted, and CHAMP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chulliat, A.; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    , Orsted, and CHAMP satellites. A detectable change of magnetic fluxes through patches delimited by curves of zero radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary is associated with a failure of the frozen flux assumption. For each epoch (1980 and 2005), we calculate spatially regularized models...... increase of the global misfit. However, applying the constraint leads to a detectable increase of the scalar residuals at satellite altitude in the region of St. Helena, strongly suggesting a local failure of the frozen flux assumption. The observed flux expulsion within the St. Helena patch could result...... from the formation of a pair of "core spots," as predicted by numerical simulations of the geodynamo....

  14. Geoantineutrino Spectrum and Slow Nuclear Burning on the Boundary of the Liquid and Solid Phases of the Earth's core

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V D; Khotyaintseva, E N; Kosenko, S I; Litvinov, D A; Pavlovich, V N; Tarasov, V A; Vaschenko, V N; Zelentsova, T N

    2004-01-01

    The problem of the geoantineutrino deficit and the experimental results of the interaction of uranium dioxide and carbide with iron-nickel and silica-alumina melts at high pressure (5-10 GPa) and temperature (1600- 22000 C) have induced us to consider the possible consequences of made by V. Anisichkin and A. Ershov supposition that there is an actinoid shell on boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core. We have shown that the activation of a natural nuclear reactor operating as the solitary waves of nuclear burning in 238U- and/or 232Th-medium (in particular, the neutron-fission progressive wave of Feoktistov and/or Teller-Ishikawa-Wood) such physical consequent can be. The simplified model of the kinetics of accumulation and burnup in U-Pu fuel cycle of Feoktistov is developed. The results of the numerical simulation of neutron-fission wave in two-phase UO2/Fe medium on a surface of the Earth's solid core are presented. On the basis of O'Nions-Ivensen-Hamilton model of the geochemical evolution...

  15. Habitable evaporated cores: transforming mini-Neptunes into super-Earths in the habitable zones of M dwarfs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, R; Barnes, R; Lopez, E; Fortney, J; Jackson, B; Meadows, V

    2015-01-01

    We show that photoevaporation of small gaseous exoplanets ("mini-Neptunes") in the habitable zones of M dwarfs can remove several Earth masses of hydrogen and helium from these planets and transform them into potentially habitable worlds. We couple X-ray/extreme ultraviolet (XUV)-driven escape, thermal evolution, tidal evolution, and orbital migration to explore the types of systems that may harbor such "habitable evaporated cores" (HECs). We find that HECs are most likely to form from planets with ∼1 M⊕ solid cores with up to about 50% H/He by mass, though whether or not a given mini-Neptune forms a HEC is highly dependent on the early XUV evolution of the host star. As terrestrial planet formation around M dwarfs by accumulation of local material is likely to form planets that are small and dry, evaporation of small migrating mini-Neptunes could be one of the dominant formation mechanisms for volatile-rich Earths around these stars.

  16. Habitable Evaporated Cores: Transforming Mini-Neptunes into Super-Earths in the Habitable Zones of M Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Luger, Rodrigo; Lopez, Eric; Fortney, Jonathan; Jackson, Brian; Meadows, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    We show that photoevaporation of small gaseous exoplanets ("mini-Neptunes") in the habitable zones of M dwarfs can remove several Earth masses of hydrogen and helium from these planets and transform them into potentially habitable worlds. We couple X-ray/extreme ultraviolet (XUV)-driven escape, thermal evolution, tidal evolution and orbital migration to explore the types of systems that may harbor such "habitable evaporated cores" (HECs). We find that HECs are most likely to form from planets with $\\sim 1 M_\\oplus$ solid cores with up to about 50% H/He by mass, though whether or not a given mini-Neptune forms a HEC is highly dependent on the early XUV evolution of the host star. As terrestrial planet formation around M dwarfs by accumulation of local material is likely to form planets that are small and dry, evaporation of small migrating mini-Neptunes could be one of the dominant formation mechanisms for volatile-rich Earths around these stars.

  17. Core-decomposition-facilitated fabrication of hollow rare-earth silicate nanowalnuts from core-shell structures via the Kirkendall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenli; Zou, Rui; Yang, Xianfeng; Huang, Ningyu; Huang, Junjian; Liang, Hongbin; Wang, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Hollow micro-/nanostructures have been widely applied in the fields of lithium ion batteries, catalysis, biosensing, biomedicine, and so forth. The Kirkendall effect, which involves a non-equilibrium mutual diffusion process, is one of many important fabrication strategies for the formation of hollow nanomaterials. Accordingly, full understanding of the interdiffusion process at the nanoscale is very important for the development of novel multifunctional hollow materials. In this work, hollow Y2SiO5 nanowalnuts have been fabricated from the conversion of YOHCO3@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres via the Kirkendall effect. More importantly, it was found that in the conversion process, the decomposition of YOHCO3 core imposes on the formation of the Y2SiO5 interlayer by facilitating the initial nucleation of the Kirkendall nanovoids and accelerating the interfacial diffusion of Y2O3@SiO2 core@shell. The simple concept developed herein can be employed as a general Kirkendall effect strategy without the assistance of any catalytically active Pt nanocrystals or gold motion for future fabrication of novel hollow nanostructures. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of rare-earth ion doped hollow Y2SiO5 nanoparticles are researched.Hollow micro-/nanostructures have been widely applied in the fields of lithium ion batteries, catalysis, biosensing, biomedicine, and so forth. The Kirkendall effect, which involves a non-equilibrium mutual diffusion process, is one of many important fabrication strategies for the formation of hollow nanomaterials. Accordingly, full understanding of the interdiffusion process at the nanoscale is very important for the development of novel multifunctional hollow materials. In this work, hollow Y2SiO5 nanowalnuts have been fabricated from the conversion of YOHCO3@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres via the Kirkendall effect. More importantly, it was found that in the conversion process, the decomposition of YOHCO3 core imposes on the formation of the Y2Si

  18. Elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation of Zn between metal and silicate and geochemical estimation of the S content of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Brandon; Siebert, Julien; Pringle, Emily A.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Zinc metal-silicate fractionation provides experimental access to the conditions of core formation and Zn has been used to estimate the S contents of the Earth's core and of the bulk Earth, assuming that they share similar volatility and that Zn was not partitioned into the Earth's core. Therefore, Zn provides both direct and indirect information into the origin and eventual fate of volatile and siderophile elements on Earth. However, the partitioning of Zn between metal and silicate - as well as the associated isotopic fractionation - is not well known. We have conducted a suite of partitioning experiments to characterize Zn elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation between metal and silicate as a function of time, temperature, and composition. Experiments were conducted at 2 GPa and temperatures from 1473 K to 2273 K in a piston cylinder apparatus, with run durations from 5 to 240 min for four distinct starting materials. Chemical and isotopic equilibrium is achieved within 10 min of experimental outset. Zinc metal-silicate isotopic fractionation displays no resolvable dependence on temperature, composition, or oxygen fugacity within the data set. Therefore, the Zn isotopic composition of silicate phases can be used as a proxy for bulk telluric bodies. Partitioning results from this study and data from literature were used to robustly parameterize Zn metal-silicate partitioning as a function of temperature, pressure, and redox state. Using this parametric characterization and viable formation conditions, we have estimated a range of Zn contents in the cores of iron meteorite parent bodies (i.e. iron meteorites) of ∼0.1-150 ppm, in good agreement with natural observations. We have also calculated the first geochemical estimates for the Zn contents of the Earth's core and of the bulk Earth, at 242 ± 107 ppm and 114 ± 34 ppm (respectively), that consider the slightly siderophile behavior of Zn. These estimates of the Zn contents of the Earth's core and

  19. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    CERN Document Server

    Gillet, N; Finlay, C C

    2016-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940-2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields. Temporal correlations of these uncertainties are accounted for. The covariance matrix for the flow coefficients is also obtained recursively from the dispersion of an ensemble of solutions. Maps of the flow at the core surface show, upon a planetary-scale gyre, time-dependent large-scale eddies at mid-latitudes and vigorous azimuthal jets in the equatorial belt. The stationary part of the flow predominates on all the spatial scales that we can resolve. We retrieve torsional waves that explain the length-of-day changes at 4 to 9.5 years periods. These waves may be triggered by the nonlinear interaction between the magnetic field and sub-decadal non-zonal motions within the fluid outer core. Both the zonal and the more en...

  20. Detection of the translational oscillations of the Earth's solid inner core based on the international superconducting gravimeter observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Heping; XU Jianqiao; B.Ducarme

    2004-01-01

    Based on the 21 series of the high precision tidal gravity observations recorded using superconducting gravimeters (SG) at 14 stations distributed globally (in totally about 86 years), the translational oscillations of the Earth's solid inner core (ESIC) is detected in this paper. All observations are divided into two groups with G-Ⅰ group (8 relatively longer observational series) and G-Ⅱ group (13 relatively shorter observational series). The detailed corrections to minute original observations for each station are carried out, the error data due to the earthquakes, power supply impulses and some perturbations as change in atmospheric pressure and so on are carefully deleted for the first step, the gravity residuals are obtained after removing further synthetic tidal gravity signals. The Fast Fourier Transform analysis is carried out for each residual series, the estimations of the product spectral densities in the sub-tidal band are obtained by using a multi-station staking technique. The 8 common peaks are found after further removing the remaining frequency dependent pressure signals. The eigenperiods, quality factors and resonant strengths for these peaks are simulated. The numerical results show that the discrepancies of the eigenperiods for 3 of 8 peaks, compared to those of theoretical computation given by Smith, are only 0.4%, -0.4% and 1.0%. This coincidence signifies that the dynamical phenomenon of the Earth's solid inner core can be detected by using high precision ground gravity observations. The reliability of the numerical computation is also checked, the spectral peak splitting phenomenon induced by Earth's rotation and ellipticity is preliminary discussed in this paper.

  1. Resonant tidal excitation of internal waves in the Earth's fluid core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Robert H.; Kuang, Weijia

    2014-07-01

    It has long been speculated that there is a stably stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary, and two recent studies have improved the constraints on the parameters describing this stratification. Here we consider the dynamical implications of this layer using a simplified model. We first show that the stratification in this surface layer has sensitive control over the rate at which tidal energy is transferred to the core. We then show that when the stratification parameters from the recent studies are used in this model, a resonant configuration arrives whereby tidal forces perform elevated rates of work in exciting core flow. Specifically, the internal wave speed derived from the two independent studies (150 and 155 m/s) are in remarkable agreement with the speed (152 m/s) required for excitation of the primary normal mode of oscillation as calculated from full solutions of the Laplace Tidal Equations applied to a reduced-gravity idealized model representing the stratified layer. In evaluating this agreement it is noteworthy that the idealized model assumed may be regarded as the most reduced representation of the stratified dynamics of the layer, in that there are no non-essential dynamical terms in the governing equations assumed. While it is certainly possible that a more realistic treatment may require additional dynamical terms or coupling, it is also clear that this reduced representation includes no freedom for coercing the correlation described. This suggests that one must accept either (1) that tidal forces resonantly excite core flow and this is predicted by a simple model or (2) that either the independent estimates or the dynamical model does not accurately portray the core surface layer and there has simply been an unlikely coincidence between three estimates of a stratification parameter which would otherwise have a broad plausible range.

  2. Resonant Tidal Excitation of Internal Waves in the Earth's Fluid Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Robert H.; Kuang, Weijia

    2014-01-01

    It has long been speculated that there is a stably stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary, and two recent studies have improved the constraints on the parameters describing this stratification. Here we consider the dynamical implications of this layer using a simplified model. We first show that the stratification in this surface layer has sensitive control over the rate at which tidal energy is transferred to the core. We then show that when the stratification parameters from the recent studies are used in this model, a resonant configuration arrives whereby tidal forces perform elevated rates of work in exciting core flow. Specifically, the internal wave speed derived from the two independent studies (150 and 155 m/s) are in remarkable agreement with the speed (152 m/s) required for excitation of the primary normal mode of oscillation as calculated from full solutions of the Laplace Tidal Equations applied to a reduced-gravity idealized model representing the stratified layer. In evaluating this agreement it is noteworthy that the idealized model assumed may be regarded as the most reduced representation of the stratified dynamics of the layer, in that there are no non-essential dynamical terms in the governing equations assumed. While it is certainly possible that a more realistic treatment may require additional dynamical terms or coupling, it is also clear that this reduced representation includes no freedom for coercing the correlation described. This suggests that one must accept either (1) that tidal forces resonantly excite core flow and this is predicted by a simple model or (2) that either the independent estimates or the dynamical model does not accurately portray the core surface layer and there has simply been an unlikely coincidence between three estimates of a stratification parameter which would otherwise have a broad plausible range.

  3. Resonant Tidal Excitation of Internal Waves in the Earth's Fluid Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Robert H.; Kuang, Weijia

    2014-01-01

    It has long been speculated that there is a stably stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary, and two recent studies have improved the constraints on the parameters describing this stratification. Here we consider the dynamical implications of this layer using a simplified model. We first show that the stratification in this surface layer has sensitive control over the rate at which tidal energy is transferred to the core. We then show that when the stratification parameters from the recent studies are used in this model, a resonant configuration arrives whereby tidal forces perform elevated rates of work in exciting core flow. Specifically, the internal wave speed derived from the two independent studies (150 and 155 m/s) are in remarkable agreement with the speed (152 m/s) required for excitation of the primary normal mode of oscillation as calculated from full solutions of the Laplace Tidal Equations applied to a reduced-gravity idealized model representing the stratified layer. In evaluating this agreement it is noteworthy that the idealized model assumed may be regarded as the most reduced representation of the stratified dynamics of the layer, in that there are no non-essential dynamical terms in the governing equations assumed. While it is certainly possible that a more realistic treatment may require additional dynamical terms or coupling, it is also clear that this reduced representation includes no freedom for coercing the correlation described. This suggests that one must accept either (1) that tidal forces resonantly excite core flow and this is predicted by a simple model or (2) that either the independent estimates or the dynamical model does not accurately portray the core surface layer and there has simply been an unlikely coincidence between three estimates of a stratification parameter which would otherwise have a broad plausible range.

  4. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  5. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  6. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1-4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Weiss, Lauren M; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-09-02

    Small planets, 1-4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1-2 R⊕ planets that receive 1-4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth-Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ = 2:32 + 3:19 R=R ⊕ [g cm(-3)]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5-4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ''mini-Neptunes.'' The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life's biochemical origins.

  7. On the existence and structure of a mush at the inner core boundary of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Deguen, Renaud; Brito, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested about 20 years ago that the liquid close to the inner core boundary (ICB) is supercooled and that a sizable mushy layer has developed during the growth of the inner core. The morphological instability of the liquid-solid interface which usually results in the formation of a mushy zone has been intensively studied in metallurgy, but the freezing of the inner core occurs in very unusual conditions: the growth rate is very small, and the pressure gradient has a key role, the newly formed solid being hotter than the adjacent liquid. We investigate the linear stability of a solidification front under such conditions, pointing out the destabilizing role of the thermal and solutal fields, and the stabilizing role of the pressure gradient. The main consequence of the very small solidification rate is the importance of advective transport of solute in liquid, which tends to remove light solute from the vicinity of the ICB and to suppress supercooling, thus acting against the destabilization of th...

  8. Bottom-up control of geomagnetic secular variation by the Earth's inner core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubert, Julien; Finlay, Chris; Fournier, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Temporal changes in the Earth’s magnetic field, known as geomagnetic secular variation, occur most prominently at low latitudes in the Atlantic hemisphere1, 2 (that is, from −90 degrees east to 90 degrees east), whereas in the Pacific hemisphere there is comparatively little activity. This is a c......Temporal changes in the Earth’s magnetic field, known as geomagnetic secular variation, occur most prominently at low latitudes in the Atlantic hemisphere1, 2 (that is, from −90 degrees east to 90 degrees east), whereas in the Pacific hemisphere there is comparatively little activity....... This is a consequence of the geographical localization of intense, westward drifting, equatorial magnetic flux patches at the core surface3. Despite successes in explaining the morphology of the geomagnetic field4, numerical models of the geodynamo have so far failed to account systematically for this striking pattern......-like gyre6. The resulting shear concentrates azimuthal magnetic flux at low latitudes close to the core–mantle boundary, where it is expelled by core convection and subsequently transported westward. Second, differential inner-core growth7, 8, fastest below Indonesia6, 9, causes an asymmetric buoyancy...

  9. Source tracing of rare earth elements: A case study of core 07 on the southern coast of Laizhou Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Guo; Maosheng, Gao; Guohua, Hou; Sen, Liu; Jing, Wang

    2017-03-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have proven to be useful indicators of sediment sources. To identify the group of elements most suitable for provenance identification, coastal sediment samples collected from core 07 in Laizhou Bay were analyzed for the presence of REEs. In addition, a corresponding analysis of contributions that different source made to multi-source sedimentary system and provenance discrimination study were undertaken, with the twofold purpose of assessing the effectiveness of REEs as source indicators, and evaluating relative inputs to the sedimentary system on the southern coast of Laizhou Bay from near source and distant origin rivers (i.e. the Bailang River and Yellow River, respectively). The study revealed that various REEs displayed similar cyclic variation in the vertical direction in core 07, with obvious changes at marine-continental stratigraphic boundaries, which could be used as stratigraphic division index. According to chondrite-normalized REE distribution patterns, the Bailang River and Yellow River comprise the main provenance of sediments in core 07. REE discrimination diagrams and the Provenance Index (PI) reveal that the sediments in early stage (Qp33 Qp31, 49.15-80.00 m) were primarily derived from Yellow River, and the sediments in late stage (Qh3 Qp33,5.80-49.15 m) were stemmed from Bailang River. Following extensive analysis, it was concluded that the main provenance of core 07 was the Bailang River, which has played an important role in the sedimentary system of the southern coast of Laizhou Bay since the early Late Pleistocene. Sediment from the Yellow River, rechannelled frequently in geological history, had limited influence in this area.

  10. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  11. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  12. Elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation of Zn between metal and silicate and geochemical estimation of the S content of the Earth's core

    CERN Document Server

    Mahan, B; Pringle, E A; Moynier, F

    2016-01-01

    Zinc metal-silicate fractionation provides experimental access to the conditions of core formation and Zn has been used to estimate the S contents of the Earth's core and of the bulk Earth, assuming that they share similar volatility and that Zn was not partitioned into the Earth's core. We have conducted a suite of partitioning experiments to characterize Zn metal-silicate elemental and isotopic fractionation as a function of time, temperature, and composition. Experiments were conducted at temperatures from 1473-2273K, with run durations from 5-240 minutes for four starting materials. Chemical and isotopic equilibrium is achieved within 10 minutes. Zinc metal-silicate isotopic fractionation displays no resolvable dependence on temperature, composition, or oxygen fugacity. Thus, the Zn isotopic composition of silicate phases can be used as a proxy for bulk telluric bodies. Results from this study and literature data were used to parameterize Zn metal-silicate partitioning as a function of temperature, pressu...

  13. Steady flows at the top of earth's core derived from geomagnetic field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1986-01-01

    Select models of the main geomagnetic field and its secular variation are extrapolated to the base of an insulating mantle and used to estimate the adjacent fluid motion of a perfectly conducting outer core. The assumption of steady motion provides formally unique solutions and is tested along with that of no upwelling. The hypothesis of no upwelling is found to be substantially worse than that of steady motion. Although the actual motion is not thought to be steady, the large-scale secular variation at the top of the core can be adequately described by a large-scale, combined toroidal-poloidal circulation which is steady for intervals of at least a decade or two. The derived flows include a bulk westward drift but are complicated by superimposed jets, gyres, and surface divergence indicative of vigorous vertical motion at depth. The circulation pattern and key global properties including rms speed, upwelling, and westward drift are found to be fairly insensitive to variations in modeling parameters.

  14. Rare earth elements in core marine sediments of coastal East Malaysia by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Ahmadreza; Saion, Elias; Gharibshahi, Elham; Mohamed Kamari, Halimah; Chee Kong, Yap; Suhaimi Hamzah, Mohd; Suhaimi Elias, Md

    2016-01-01

    A study was carried out on the concentration of REEs (Dy, Sm, Eu,Yb, Lu, La and Ce) that are present in the core marine sediments of East Malaysia from three locations at South China Sea and one location each at Sulu Sea and Sulawesi Sea. The sediment samples were collected at a depth of between 49 and 109 m, dried, and crushed to powdery form. The entire core sediments prepared for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) were weighted approximately 0.0500 g to 0.1000 g for short irradiation and 0.1500 g to 0.2000 g for long irradiation. The samples were irradiated with a thermal neutron flux of 4.0×10(12) cm(-2) s(-1) in a TRIGA Mark II research reactor operated at 750 kW. Blank samples and standard reference materials SL-1 were also irradiated for calibration and quality control purposes. It was found that the concentration of REEs varies in the range from 0.11 to 36.84 mg/kg. The chondrite-normalized REEs for different stations suggest that all the REEs are from similar origins. There was no significant REEs contamination as the enrichment factors normalized for Fe fall in the range of 0.42-2.82. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Localized temporal variation of Earth's inner-core boundary from high-quality waveform doublets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Danhua

    2016-04-01

    The accurate determination of the topography of an Earth's internal boundary is difficult because of the possible trade-off with the velocity of the media above it. Here we use waveform-doublet method to map the ICB topography. A waveform doublet is a pair of earthquakes occurring at essentially the same spatial position and received by the same station with high similarity in their waveforms (Poupinet et al. 1984), which make the exact detection of the ICB topography possible. In this study, we used this method to detect temporal change of the ICB using doublets from the Western Pacific (WP) area to increase global coverage of the ICB. Compared with previous study using doublets from South Sandwich Islands (SSI) (Song and Dai, 2008), the new samples showed negligible temporal change of the ICB.

  16. The Earth's free core nutation: Formulation of dynamics and estimation of eigenperiod from the very-long-baseline interferometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B. F.; Hsieh, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The free-core nutation (FCN) is a rotational normal mode of the Earth's outer core. We derive the equations of motion for FCN w.r.t. both the inertia space F0 and the uniformly rotating frame FΩ, and show that the two sets of equations are invariant in form under the reference frame transformation, as required by physics. The frequency-domain formulation describes the FCN resonance (to nearby tidal signals), which has been exploited to estimate the complex eigenfrequency of FCN, or its eigenperiod P and quality factor Q. On the other hand, our time-domain formulation in terms of temporal convolution describes the response of the free FCN under a (continual) excitation. The convolution well explains the dynamic behaviors of FCN in the observed very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) data (in F0), including the undulation of the FCN amplitude and the apparent fluctuations in the period and phase over time, as well as the temporal concurrence of a large phase jump with the near-zero amplitude during ∼ 1998- 2000, in complete analogy to the observed behavior of the Chandler wobble (in FΩ). The reverse, deconvolution process is further exploited to yield optimal estimates for FCN's eigenfrequency using the VLBI data, following the approach of Furuya and Chao (1996) of locating minimum excitation power. While this method is found to be insensitive to Q owing to the short timespan of the data, we obtain the estimate of P = 441 ± 4.5 sidereal days (sd) where the 1-sigma uncertainty is assessed via extensive Monte Carlo simulations. This value is closer to the theoretical value of ∼460 sd predicted by Earth models assuming hydrostatic equilibrium than do the prior estimates (425-435 sd) by the resonance method. The deconvolution process also yields the excitation function as a by-product, the physical sources of which await further studies.

  17. The tungsten isotopic composition of Eoarchean rocks: Implications for early silicate differentiation and core-mantle interaction on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Nakai, Shun'ichi; Sahoo, Yu Vin; Takamasa, Asako; Hirata, Takafumi; Maruyama, Shigenori

    2010-03-01

    We have measured 182W/ 184W for Eoarchean rocks from the Itsaq Gneiss Complex (3.8-3.7 Ga pillow meta-basalts, a meta-tonalite, and meta-sediments) and Acasta Gneiss Complex (4.0-3.6 Ga felsic orthogneisses) to assess possible W isotopic heterogeneity within the silicate Earth and to constrain W isotopic evolution of the mantle. The data reveal that 182W/ 184W values in the Eoarchean samples are uniform within the analytical error and indistinguishable from the modern accessible mantle signature, suggesting that the W isotopic composition of the upper mantle has not changed significantly since the Eoarchean era. The results imply either that chemical communication between the mantle and core has been insignificant in post-Hadean times, or that a lowermost mantle with a distinctive W isotope signature has been isolated from mantle convective cycling. Most terrestrial rock samples have a 0.2 ɛ142Nd/ 144Nd higher than the chondrite average. This requires either the presence of a hidden enriched reservoir formed within the first 30 Ma of the Solar System, or the bulk Earth having a ˜ 5% higher Sm/Nd than the chondrite average. We explored the relevance of the 182Hf- 182W isotope system to the 146Sm- 142Nd isotope system during early silicate differentiation events on Earth. In this context, we demonstrate that the lack of resolvable 182W excesses in the Itsaq rocks, despite 142Nd excesses compared to the modern accessible mantle, is more consistent with the view that the bulk Earth has a non-chondritic Sm/Nd. In the non-chondritic Sm/Nd Earth model, the 182W- 142Nd chronometry constrains the age of the source mantle depletion for the Itsaq samples to more than ˜ 40 Ma after the Solar System origin. Our results cannot confirm the previous report of 182W anomalies in the Eoarchean Itsaq meta-sediments, which were interpreted as reflecting an impact-derived meteoritic component.

  18. Core Analysis Combining MT (TIPPER) and Dielectric Sensors (Sans EC) in Earth and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mound, Michael C.; Dudley, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    On terrestrial planets and moons of our solar system cores reveal details about a geological structure's formation, content, and history. The strategy for the search for life is focused first on finding water which serves as a universal solvent, and identifying the rocks which such solvent act upon to release the constituent salts, minerals, ferrites, and organic compounds and chemicals necessary for life. Dielectric spectroscopy measures the dielectric properties of a medium as a function of frequency. Reflection measurements in the frequency range from 300 kHz to 300 MHz were carried out using RF and microwave network analyzers interrogating SansEC Sensors placed on clean geological core samples. These were conducted to prove the concept feasibility of a new geology instrument useful in the field and laboratory. The results show that unique complex frequency spectra can be acquired for a variety of rock core samples. Using a combination of dielectric spectroscopy and computer simulation techniques the magnitude and phase information of the frequency spectra can be converted to dielectric spectra. These low-frequency dielectric properties of natural rock are unique, easily determined, and useful in characterizing geology. TIPPER is an Electro-Magnetic Passive-Source Geophysical Method for Detecting and Mapping Geothermal Reservoirs and Mineral Resources. This geophysical method uses distant lightning and solar wind activity as its energy source. The most interesting deflections are caused by the funneling of electrons into more electrically conductive areas like mineralized faults, water or geothermal reservoirs. We propose TIPPER to be used with SansEC for determining terrain/ocean chemistry, ocean depth, geomorphology of fracture structures, and other subsurface topography characteristics below the ice crust of Jovian moons. NASA envisions lander concepts for exploration of these extraterrestrial icy surfaces and the oceans beneath. One such concept would use a

  19. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  20. Constraints on geomagnetic secular variation modeling from electromagnetism and fluid dynamics of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    A spherical harmonic representation of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation for epoch 1980, designated GSFC(9/84), is derived and evaluated. At three epochs (1977.5, 1980.0, 1982.5) this model incorporates conservation of magnetic flux through five selected patches of area on the core/mantle boundary bounded by the zero contours of vertical magnetic field. These fifteen nonlinear constraints are included like data in an iterative least squares parameter estimation procedure that starts with the recently derived unconstrained field model GSFC (12/83). Convergence is approached within three iterations. The constrained model is evaluated by comparing its predictive capability outside the time span of its data, in terms of residuals at magnetic observatories, with that for the unconstrained model.

  1. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1–4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Weiss, Lauren M.; Petigura, Erik A.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Buchhave, Lars A.

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1–4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1–2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1–2 R⊕ planets that receive 1–4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth–Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1–4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ=2.32+3.19R/R⊕ [g cm−3]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5–4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ‘‘mini-Neptunes.’’ The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life’s biochemical origins. PMID:24912169

  2. Seismic evidence for the depression of the D″ discontinuity beneath the Caribbean: Implication for slab heating from the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Justin Yen-Ting; Hung, Shu-Huei; Kuo, Ban-Yuan; Zhao, Li

    2017-06-01

    The lowermost 100-300 km of the Earth's mantle commonly regarded as the thermal boundary layer (TBL) of mantle circulation is characterized by its complex physical properties. Beneath the Caribbean this so-called D″ layer features relatively high velocities and abrupt impedance increase at the top (designated as the D″ discontinuity). These seismic characteristics have been attributed to the accumulation of ancient subducted slab material and the phase transition in the major lower mantle mineral of pervoskite. Geodynamic models predict that the blanketing cold slabs may trap enough heat from core to be buoyantly destabilized, and eventually broken apart and entrained into the bottom of the convection cell. Here we explore the D″ structure with unprecedented resolution through modeling traveltimes, amplitudes, and waveform shapes from the USArray. We find an east-to-west asymmetrical undulation of the D″ discontinuity with a V-shaped depression of ∼70-160 km over a lateral distance of 600 km beneath northern South America. The shear velocity perturbations vary in the same trend showing the most pronounced reduction of ∼3-4% below the thinnest D″ layer in close proximity to an intermittently undetected discontinuity. The strong correlation between the D″ topography and velocity variations indicates the phase transition boundary has been perturbed or even disrupted by the large lateral temperature gradient of slab material which has been reheated from the core over extended periods of time.

  3. Parallel numerical simulation of the thermal convection in the Earth's outer core on the cubed-sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liang; Yang, Chao; Ma, Shi-Zhuang; Huang, Ji-Zu; Cai, Ying

    2017-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the thermal convection in a rotating spherical shell play an important role in dynamo simulations. In this paper, we present a highly scalable parallel solver for the Earth's outer core convection. The solver uses a second-order cell-centred finite volume spatial discretization based on the cubed-sphere grid instead of the traditional latitude-longitude grid to avoid grid singularity and enhance the parallel scalability. A second-order approximate factorization method combined with the Crank-Nicolson scheme is employed for splitting temporal integration. The two resultant sparse linear systems are solved by the Krylov subspace iterative method pre-conditioned with a restricted additive Schwarz pre-conditioner based on the domain decomposition of the cubed-sphere. The numerical results are in good agreement with the benchmark solutions and more accurate than the existing finite volume results. The solvers scale to over 10 000 processor cores with nearly linear scalability on the Sunway TaihuLight supercomputer.

  4. Sound Velocity Measurements in Textured hcp-Iron and the Anisotropy and Structure of Earth's Inner Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangeli, D.; Occelli, F.; Badro, J.; Requardt, H.; Fiquet, G.; Krisch, M.

    2003-12-01

    Seismological studies show that the Earth's inner core is elastically anisotropic. The anisotropy has an axial symmetry and an amplitude of about 3-4%, with the fast direction oriented parallel to the Earth's rotation axis. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this feature, but the lack of evidence from mineral physics does not allow to address them. Indeed, the experimental determination of sound velocity anisotropy in hcp-iron, the main constituent of the inner core, is of primary importance. Studies include first-principle calculations [1-5] and x-ray radial diffraction measurements [6], but the results show general disagreement, not only in magnitude, but in direction as well. We will report new inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) data on polycrystalline hcp-iron as a function of pressure, complementing and extending previous IXS data [7]. The derived longitudinal and transverse sound velocities will be compared with the calculations and the experimental results present in literature. Furthermore, the issue of elastic anisotropy will be addressed. Taking advantage of the texturing developed by uniaxially compressed hcp-metals [8], and making use of a properly designed diamond anvil cell characterized by an angular aperture of more than \\begin{math} 90^{o} , we measured the sound velocity at 22 and 112 GPa in two different geometries with respect to the compression axis, probing the longitudinal sound propagation at \\begin{math} 50^{o} and \\begin{math} 90^{o} with respect to it. A difference in acoustic sound velocity of about 5% has been detected at the highest pressure. This effective anisotropy on a textured polycrystalline sample is comparable with the one observed in the Earth, further relaxing the requirement of a nearly perfect alignment of iron crystal grains sustained by previous theoretical investigations [1,4]. [1] L. Stixrude, R.E. Cohen, Science 267, 1972 (1995). [2] P. Soderlind et al., Phys. Rev. B 53, 14063 (1996). [3] R. E. Cohen et

  5. On the reflection of Alfv\\'en waves and its implication for Earth's core modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Cardin, Philippe; Marie, Drouard

    2011-01-01

    Alfv\\'en waves propagate in electrically conducting fluids in the presence of a magnetic field. Their reflection properties depend on the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the magnetic diffusivity of the fluid, also known as the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. In the special case Pm=1, there is no reflection on an insulating, no-slip boundary, and the wave energy is entirely dissipated in the boundary layer. We investigate the consequences of this remarkable behaviour for the numerical modeling of torsional Alfv\\'en waves (also known as torsional oscillations), which represent a special class of Alfv\\'en waves, in rapidly rotating spherical shells. They consist of geostrophic motions and are thought to exist in the fluid cores of planets with internal magnetic field. In the geophysical limit Pm 0.3, which is the range of values for which geodynamo numerical models operate. As a result, geodynamo models with no-slip boundary conditions cannot exhibit torsional oscillation normal modes.

  6. The Akp-Btk value method and the results for the retrieval of the parameters of the Earth's free core nutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The rotation of the Earth's liquid core creates the Nearly Diurnal Free Wobble (NDFW). It is one of the problems of researching the Earth's liquid core for us to retrieve the parameters of the Earth's Free Core Nutation (FCN), from the Earth's liquid core resonance of gravity tide waves on the diurnal frequency band. Since 1987, some scientists in many different countries have come to calculate the parameters of FCN by using the observational data of gravity tide waves on the diurnal frequency band. They basically followed the Stacking method, which needed five diurnal waves for the resolution. In this paper, authors introduced the Akp-Btk value method with clearly geometrical meaning as a new method, which only requires three very high signal-noise-ratio waves O1, K1 and P1 for the resolution. Authors chose the observational data of the three superconducting gravimeter stations respectively located in Cantley of Canada, Wuhan of China and Brussels of Belgium, to compute the parameters of FCN. It was the first time that the observational results of the parameters of FCN obtained from gravitational tide were in accord with the parameters of FCN gained from VLBI since 1987.

  7. The Topographic Torque on a Bounding Surface of a Rotating Gravitating Fluid and the Excitation by Core Motions of Decadal Fluctuations in the Earth's Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond

    1995-01-01

    General expressions (with potential applications in several areas of geophysical fluid dynamics) are derived for all three components of the contribution made by the geostrophic part of the pressure field associated with flow in a rotating gravitating fluid to the topographic torque exerted by the fluid on a rigid impermeable bounding surface of any shape. When applied to the Earth's liquid metallic core, which is bounded by nearly spherical surfaces and can be divided into two main regions, the "torosphere" and "polosphere," the expressions reduce to formulae given previously by the author, thereby providing further support for his work and that of others on the role of topographic coupling at the core-mantle boundary in the excitation by core motions of Earth rotation fluctuations on decadal time scales. They also show that recent criticisms of that work are vitiated by mathematical and physical errors. Contrary to these criticisms, the author's scheme for exploiting Earth rotation and other geophysical data (either real or simulated in computer models) in quantitative studies of the topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) by intercomparing various models of (a) motions in the core based on geomagnetic secular variation data and (b) CMB topography based on seismological and gravity data has a sound theoretical basis. The practical scope of the scheme is of course limited by the accuracy of real data, but this is a matter for investigation, not a priori assessment.

  8. Tri-frequency spectrum method and results for resolving the parameters of Earth's liquid core free nutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI; Xiange(雷湘鄂); XU; Houze(许厚泽)

    2002-01-01

    The parameters of Earth free core nutation (FCN) are two relatively significant geophysical parameters. Sasao et al. (1980) and Wahr and Bergen (1986) provided the theoretical estimation values of FCN parameters. Gwinn, Herring and Shapiro (1987) first obtained the observational values of FCN parameters by very long base Interference (VLBI) at Cambridge University. In the same year, Neuberg and Zürn in former West Germany and Hinderer in France began to retrieve FCN parameters by the observation of gravity tides and introduced the stacking method. The other scholars who researched into the same geophysical problems by applying the data of gravity tides basically followed the stacking method. The results they reached were similar to the observational result of FCN parameters given by Neuberg et al. in 1987. But the observational results of FCN parameters gained from gravity tides were not identical with those from VLBI, mainly because of the large difference of quality of FCN. So there was not an affirmative observational result of FCN parameters since then. In this paper, The authors firstly introduce the tri-frequency spectrum method with clearly geometrical and geophysical meaning for the resolution of FCN parameters, and the observational results of FCN parameters obtained from tide data at three superconducting gravity stations were accordant with those from VLBI, which will be relatively important to arriving at a certain observational result of FCN parameters.

  9. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of hcp Fe-Ni alloys under high pressure: Implications for thermal convection in the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomi, Hitoshi; Hirose, Kei

    2015-10-01

    We measured the electrical resistivity of Fe-Ni alloys (iron with 5, 10, and 15 wt.% nickel) using four-terminal method in a diamond-anvil cell up to 70 GPa at 300 K. The results demonstrate that measured resistivity increases linearly with increasing nickel impurity concentration, as predicted by the Matthiessen's rule. The impurity resistivity is predominant at ambient temperature; the incorporation of 5 wt.% nickel into iron doubles the electrical resistivity at 60 GPa. Such impurity effect becomes minor at high temperature of the Earth's core because of the resistivity "saturation". We also calculated that >0.9 TW heat flow is necessary at the top of the inner core for thermal convection in the inner core. It requires the CMB heat flow of ∼30 TW, which is much higher than recent estimates of 5-15 TW. This means that purely thermal convection does not occur in the inner core.

  10. Equation of state and phase diagram of Fe-16Si alloy as a candidate component of Earth's core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Rebecca A.; Campbell, Andrew J.; Caracas, Razvan; Reaman, Daniel M.; Dera, Przymyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B. (Ecole); (UC)

    2016-07-29

    The outer core of the Earth contains several weight percent of one or more unknown light elements, which may include silicon. Therefore it is critical to understand the high pressure–temperature properties and behavior of an iron–silicon alloy with a geophysically relevant composition (16 wt% silicon). We experimentally determined the melting curve, subsolidus phase diagram, and equations of state of all phases of Fe–16 wt%Si to 140 GPa, finding a conversion from the D03 crystal structure to a B2+hcp mixture at high pressures. The melting curve implies that 3520 K is a minimum temperature for the Earth's outer core, if it consists solely of Fe–Si alloy, and that the eutectic composition in the Fe–Si system is less than 16 wt% silicon at core–mantle boundary conditions. Comparing our new equation of state to that of iron and the density of the core, we find that for an Fe–Ni–Si outer core, 11.3±1.5 wt% silicon would be required to match the core's observed density at the core–mantle boundary. We have also performed first-principles calculations of the equations of state of Fe3Si with the D03 structure, hcp iron, and FeSi with the B2 structure using density-functional theory.

  11. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF DEFORMATION OF THE CONTINENTAL AND OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AS A RESULT OF THE EARTH CORE NORTHERN DRIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Goncharov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drifting and submeridional compression of the continental and oceanic lithosphere, both with the northward vector (Figure 1 are revealed at the background of various directions of horizontal displacement combined with deformations of horizontal extension, compression and shear of the lithosphere (Figures 7–14. Among various structural forms and their paragenezises, indicators of such compression, the north vergence thrusts play the leading role (Figures 15–17, 19, and 22–24. This process was discontinuous, manifested discretely in time, and superimposed on processes of collisional orogenesis and platform deformations of the continental lithosphere and accretion of the oceanic lithosphere in spreading zones. Three main stages of submeridional compression of the oceanic lithosphere are distinguished as follows: Late Jurassic-Late Cretaceous, Late Miocene, and the contemporary stages.Based on the concept of balanced tectonic flow in the Earth’s body, a model of meridional convection (Figure 25 is proposed. In this case, meridional convection is considered as an integral element of the overglobal convective geodynamic system of the largest-scale rank, which also includes the western component of the lithosphere drift (Figure 6 and the Earth’s ‘wrenching’. At the background of this system, geodynamic systems of smaller scale ranks are functioning (Table 1; Figures 2, and 3. The latters are responsible for the periodic creation and break-up of supercontinents, plate tectonics and regional geodynamical processes; they also produce the ‘structural background’, in the presence of which it is challenging to reveal the above mentioned submeridional compression structures. Formation of such structures is caused by the upper horizontal flow of meridional convection.Meridional convection occurs due to drifting of the Earth core towards the North Pole (which is detected by a number of independent methods and resistance of the mantle to

  12. Accurate Predictions of Mean Geomagnetic Dipole Excursion and Reversal Frequencies, Mean Paleomagnetic Field Intensity, and the Radius of Earth's Core Using McLeod's Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Conrad, Joy

    1996-01-01

    The geomagnetic spatial power spectrum R(sub n)(r) is the mean square magnetic induction represented by degree n spherical harmonic coefficients of the internal scalar potential averaged over the geocentric sphere of radius r. McLeod's Rule for the magnetic field generated by Earth's core geodynamo says that the expected core surface power spectrum (R(sub nc)(c)) is inversely proportional to (2n + 1) for 1 less than n less than or equal to N(sub E). McLeod's Rule is verified by locating Earth's core with main field models of Magsat data; the estimated core radius of 3485 kn is close to the seismologic value for c of 3480 km. McLeod's Rule and similar forms are then calibrated with the model values of R(sub n) for 3 less than or = n less than or = 12. Extrapolation to the degree 1 dipole predicts the expectation value of Earth's dipole moment to be about 5.89 x 10(exp 22) Am(exp 2)rms (74.5% of the 1980 value) and the expected geomagnetic intensity to be about 35.6 (mu)T rms at Earth's surface. Archeo- and paleomagnetic field intensity data show these and related predictions to be reasonably accurate. The probability distribution chi(exp 2) with 2n+1 degrees of freedom is assigned to (2n + 1)R(sub nc)/(R(sub nc). Extending this to the dipole implies that an exceptionally weak absolute dipole moment (less than or = 20% of the 1980 value) will exist during 2.5% of geologic time. The mean duration for such major geomagnetic dipole power excursions, one quarter of which feature durable axial dipole reversal, is estimated from the modern dipole power time-scale and the statistical model of excursions. The resulting mean excursion duration of 2767 years forces us to predict an average of 9.04 excursions per million years, 2.26 axial dipole reversals per million years, and a mean reversal duration of 5533 years. Paleomagnetic data show these predictions to be quite accurate. McLeod's Rule led to accurate predictions of Earth's core radius, mean paleomagnetic field

  13. Forced nutations of the earth: Influence of inner core dynamics. I - Theory. II - Numerical results and comparisons. III - Very long interferometry data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, P. M.; Buffett, Bruce A.; Herring, Thomas A.; Shapiro, Irwin I.

    1991-01-01

    A treatment is presented of the nutation problem for an oceanless, elastic, spheroidally stratified earth, with the dynamical role of the inner core explicitly included in the formulation. Solving the enlarged system of equations shows that a new almost diurnal eigenfrequency emerges. A rough estimate places it not far from the prograde annual tidal excitation frequency, so that possible resonance effects on nutation amplitudes need careful consideration. Tables are provided that exhibit the sensitivities of various relevant quantities, the eigenfrequencies and the coefficients which appear in the resonance expansion, as well as the nutation amplitudes at important tidal frequencies, to possible errors in the earth parameters which enter the theory set forth. Finally, the analysis of 798 VLBI experiments performed between July 1980 and February 1989 and the determination from this analysis of corrections to selected coefficients in the International Astronomical Union 1980 theory of the nutations of the earth are discussed.

  14. Seismic anisotropy; a window on how the Earth works: multiple mechanisms and sites, from shallow mantle to inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmaston, Miles

    2013-04-01

    Since the seismic anisotropy (SA) in the uppermost oceanic mantle was discovered [1] and attributed to the shearing of olivine by an MOR-divergent flow velocity gradient, rheological mobility interpretations of this type have dominated studies of SA there and elsewhere in the Earth. Here I describe two other SA-generating mechanisms. I will reason that one of these, the anisotropic crystallization from melt, bids fair largely to replace the shearing one and be present in even larger volumes of the Earth, both within its outer 100km and in the Inner Core. The other, the layered deposition of disparate substances, offers to explain the ULVZs and SA in D''. We start with the Upper Mantle. New constraints on its rheological properties and dynamical behaviour have come from two directions. Firstly, contrary to the seismologists' rule-book, the oceanic LVZ is no longer to be thought of as mobile because the presence of interstitial melt strips out the water-weakening of the mineral structure [2, 3]. So we require a substitute for the divergent-flow model for MORs. In fact it also has three other, apparently unrecognized, dynamical inconsistencies. One of these [4] is that there are in the record many rapid changes of spreading rate and direction, and ridge jumps. This cannot happen with a process driven by slow-to-change body forces. Secondly, during the past decade, my work on the global dynamics for the past 150Ma (I will show examples) has shown [4 - 7] that the tectospheres of cratons must extend to very close to the bottom of the upper mantle. And that East Antarctica's 'keel' must actually reach it, because its CW rotation [7] suggests it has been picking up an electromagnetic torque from the CMB via the lower mantle. Xenoliths suggest that the reason for this downwards extent of 'keels' is the same as [3]. To meet these two sets of constraints I will demonstrate my now not-so-new MOR model, which has a narrow, wall-accreting subaxial crack. Among its many features

  15. Distribution of U and Th and Their Nuclear Fission in the Outer Core of the Earth and Their effects on the Geodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Xuezhao

    2009-01-01

    Here we propose that there is a lot of heat producing elements U and Th in the outer core of the Earth. The heat released from them is the major energy source for driving the material movement within the interior of Earth, including plate motion. According to seismic tomography, the hottest area is the mantle under the central Pacific Ocean. Combined with geomagnetic data, it is derived that the magnetic and heat convection centers deviate from the geographic center to the Pacific direction for 400 km. Therefore, U and Th are more concentrated in a position close to the equator in the lower outer core under the central Pacific Ocean, and have formed a large U, Th-rich center there. Another small U, Th-rich center is located in a position close to the equator in the lower outer core under Africa, which is directly opposite of the large U, Th-rich center past the solid inner core. The two U, Th-rich centers may have led to the formation of the Pacific and Africa super-plumes and are offering energy to run the p...

  16. Electrical resistivity of substitutionally disordered hcp Fe-Si and Fe-Ni alloys: Chemically-induced resistivity saturation in the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomi, Hitoshi; Hirose, Kei; Akai, Hisazumi; Fei, Yingwei

    2016-10-01

    The thermal conductivity of the Earth's core can be estimated from its electrical resistivity via the Wiedemann-Franz law. However, previously reported resistivity values are rather scattered, mainly due to the lack of knowledge with regard to resistivity saturation (violations of the Bloch-Grüneisen law and the Matthiessen's rule). Here we conducted high-pressure experiments and first-principles calculations in order to clarify the relationship between the resistivity saturation and the impurity resistivity of substitutional silicon in hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) iron. We measured the electrical resistivity of Fe-Si alloys (iron with 1, 2, 4, 6.5, and 9 wt.% silicon) using four-terminal method in a diamond-anvil cell up to 90 GPa at 300 K. We also computed the electronic band structure of substitutionally disordered hcp Fe-Si and Fe-Ni alloy systems by means of Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method with coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA). The electrical resistivity was then calculated from the Kubo-Greenwood formula. These experimental and theoretical results show excellent agreement with each other, and the first principles results show the saturation behavior at high silicon concentration. We further calculated the resistivity of Fe-Ni-Si ternary alloys and found the violation of the Matthiessen's rule as a consequence of the resistivity saturation. Such resistivity saturation has important implications for core dynamics. The saturation effect places the upper limit of the resistivity, resulting in that the total resistivity value has almost no temperature dependence. As a consequence, the core thermal conductivity has a lower bound and exhibits a linear temperature dependence. We predict the electrical resistivity at the top of the Earth's core to be 1.12 ×10-6 Ωm, which corresponds to the thermal conductivity of 87.1 W/m/K. Such high thermal conductivity suggests high isentropic heat flow, leading to young inner core age (<0.85 Gyr old) and high initial

  17. Potassium-bearing Iron-Nickel Sulfides in Nature and High-Pressure Experiments: Geochemical Consequences of Potassium in the Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshav, S.; Corgne, A.; McDonough, W. F.; Fei, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Potassium (K) as a large ion lithophile element has dominantly been concentrated in the Earth s crust and the mantle through differentiation, and in the form of K-40 contributes to the planet s heat budget. However, whether or not K also enters core-forming phases, has been debated for over three decades. Arguments favoring entry of K in the core are based on: (1) K-sulfide (with Fe, Ni, Cu, Na, and Cl; djerfisherite) found in highly reduced enstatite chondrites (or aubrites, enstatite achondrites); (2) demonstration that K, owing to an s-d electronic switch at high-pressure, exhibits transition- element like character, (3) solubility of measurable K in Fe-Ni-S liquids at high pressure, temperature conditions, and (4) models of cooling of the core that seem to require, besides convection, some form of radioactivity, and thus lending support to the experimental work. In this contribution, we assess the effect of sequestering K in the core, as it is perhaps an element that is a key to reconciling geochemistry, paleomagnetism, accretion, and thermal evolution models for the planet.

  18. ‘Building Core Knowledge - Reconstructing Earth History’: Transforming Undergraduate Instruction by Bringing Ocean Drilling Science on Earth History and Global Climate Change into the Classroom (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, K.; Leckie, R. M.; Jones, M. H.; Pound, K. S.; Pyle, E.; Krissek, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    This NSF-funded, Phase 1 CCLI project effectively integrates scientific ocean drilling data and research (DSDP-ODP-IODP-ANDRILL) with education. We have developed, and are currently testing, a suite of data-rich inquiry-based classroom learning materials based on sediment core archives. These materials are suitable for use in introductory geoscience courses that serve general education students, early geoscience majors, and pre-service teachers. 'Science made accessible' is the essence of this goal. Our team consists of research and education specialists from institutions ranging from R1 research to public liberal arts to community college. We address relevant and timely ‘Big Ideas’ with foundational geoscience concepts and climate change case studies, as well transferable skills valued in professional settings. The exercises are divided into separate but inter-related modules including: introduction to cores, seafloor sediments, microfossils and biostratigraphy, paleomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy, climate rhythms, oxygen-isotope changes in the Cenozoic, past Arctic and Antarctic climates, drill site selection, interpreting Arctic and Antarctic sediment cores, onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation, onset of Antarctic glaciation, and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Each module has several parts, and each is designed to be used in the classroom, laboratory, or assigned as homework. All exercises utilize authentic data. Students work with scientific uncertainty, practice quantitative and problem-solving skills, and expand their basic geologic and geographic knowledge. Students have the opportunity to work individually and in groups, evaluate real-world problems, and formulate hypotheses. Initial exercises in each module are useful to introduce a topic, gauge prior knowledge, and flag possible areas of student misconception. Comprehensive instructor guides provide essential background information, detailed answer keys, and alternative implementation

  19. Energy from the Earth's core. Using geothermal power efficiently; Heisse Energiequellen. Erdwaerme effizient nutzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2013-09-01

    The heat stored and flowing beneath the surface of the Earth is an endless source of natural energy. It powers volcanoes, hot springs and geysers - and could supply the world with warmth and power. Linde engineers are using innovative technologies to help capture this geothermal energy efficiently. (orig.)

  20. Geoantineutrino Spectrum, 3He/4He - ratio radial distribution and Slow Nuclear Burning on the Boundary of the Liquid and Solid Phases of the Earth's core

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V D; Vaschenko, V N; Tarasov, V A; Zelentsova, T N; Bolshakov, V N; Litvinov, D A; Kosenko, S I; Byegunova, O A

    2006-01-01

    The problem of the geoantineutrino deficit and the experimental results of the interaction of uranium dioxide and carbide with iron-nickel and silica-alumina melts at high pressure (5-10 Gpa) and temperature (1600-22000 C) have motivated us to consider the possible consequences of the assumption made by V.Anisichkin and coauthors that there is an actinid shell on boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core. We have shown that the activation of a natural nuclear reactor operating as the solitary waves of nuclear burning in 238U- and/or 232Th-medium (in particular, the neutron-fission progressive wave of Feoktistov and/or Teller-Ishikawa-Wood) can be such a physical consequence. The simplified model of the kinetics of accumulation and burnup in U-Pu fuel cycle of Feoktistov is developed. The results of the numerical simulation of neutron-fission wave in two-phase UO2/Fe medium on a surface of the Earth's solid core are presented. The georeactor model of 3He origin and the 3He/4He-ratio distribution ...

  1. Grain growth of ε-iron: Implications to grain size and its evolution in the Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Daisuke; Tsujino, Noriyoshi; Yoneda, Akira; Ito, Eiji; Yoshino, Takashi; Tange, Yoshinori; Higo, Yuji

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of grain growth rate of ε-iron can put constraint on estimation of the grain size in the inner core. We determined grain growth rate of ε-iron at ∼55 GPa and 1200-1500 K by means of in-situ X-ray diffraction observation to be Gn - G0n = kt, where G (m) is the grain size at time t (s), G0 (m) is the initial grain size, n is growth exponent (fixed to 2) and k is the growth constant expressed as k =k0 exp ⁡ (-H* / RT) with log k0 (mn /s) = - 5.8 (± 2.4) and activation enthalpy H* = 221 (± 61) kJ /mol, and R is the gas constant and T is the absolute temperature. Extrapolation of the grain growth law of ε-iron to the inner core conditions suggests that the grain size in the inner core is in a range from several hundred meters to several kilometers, which is intermediate among the previous estimations, and hence the dominant deformation mechanism is considered to be Harper-Dorn creep rather than diffusion creep as pointed out by the previous work. This indicates the relatively uniform viscosity in the entire inner core.

  2. A Down-to-Earth Educational Operating System for Up-in-the-Cloud Many-Core Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziwisky, Michael; Persohn, Kyle; Brylow, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    We present "Xipx," the first port of a major educational operating system to a processor in the emerging class of many-core architectures. Through extensions to the proven Embedded Xinu operating system, Xipx gives students hands-on experience with system programming in a distributed message-passing environment. We expose the software primitives…

  3. A Down-to-Earth Educational Operating System for Up-in-the-Cloud Many-Core Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziwisky, Michael; Persohn, Kyle; Brylow, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    We present "Xipx," the first port of a major educational operating system to a processor in the emerging class of many-core architectures. Through extensions to the proven Embedded Xinu operating system, Xipx gives students hands-on experience with system programming in a distributed message-passing environment. We expose the software primitives…

  4. A young Moon-forming giant impact at 70-110 million years accompanied by late-stage mixing, core formation and degassing of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Alex N

    2008-11-28

    New W isotope data for lunar metals demonstrate that the Moon formed late in isotopic equilibrium with the bulk silicate Earth (BSE). On this basis, lunar Sr isotope data are used to define the former composition of the Earth and hence the Rb-Sr age of the Moon, which is 4.48+/-0.02Ga, or 70-110Ma (million years) after the start of the Solar System. This age is significantly later than had been deduced from W isotopes based on model assumptions or isotopic effects now known to be cosmogenic. The Sr age is in excellent agreement with earlier estimates based on the time of lunar Pb loss and the age of the early lunar crust (4.46+/-0.04Ga). Similar ages for the BSE are recorded by xenon and lead-lead, providing evidence of catastrophic terrestrial degassing, atmospheric blow-off and significant late core formation accompanying the ca 100Ma giant impact. Agreement between the age of the Moon based on the Earth's Rb/Sr and the lead-lead age of the Moon is consistent with no major losses of moderately volatile elements from the Earth during the giant impact. The W isotopic composition of the BSE can be explained by end member models of (i) gradual accretion with a mean life of roughly 35Ma or (ii) rapid growth with a mean life of roughly 10Ma, followed by a significant hiatus prior to the giant impact. The former assumes that approximately 60 per cent of the incoming metal from impactors is added directly to the core during accretion. The latter includes complete mixing of all the impactor material into the BSE during accretion. The identical W isotopic composition of the Moon and the BSE limits the amount of material that can be added as a late veneer to the Earth after the giant impact to less than 0.3+/-0.3 per cent of ordinary chondrite or less than 0.5+/-0.6 per cent CI carbonaceous chondrite based on their known W isotopic compositions. Neither of these on their own is sufficient to explain the inventories of both refractory siderophiles such as platinum group

  5. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1--4x Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1-4x the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R_e planets with orbital periods under 100 days, and 11% have 1-2 R_e planets that receive 1-4x the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 AU, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R_e show that the smallest of them, R < 1.5 R_e, have the density expected for rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: rho = 2.32 + 3.19 R/R_e [g/cc]. ...

  6. Photofunctional hybrids of rare earth complexes covalently bonded to ZnO core-shell nanoparticle substrate through polymer linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yan-Fei; Yan, Bing

    2012-06-28

    A novel series of multi-component hybrids are assembled based on rare earth coordinated to rare earth ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Sm(3+), Dy(3+)) complex systems and ZnO nanocomposites through three different ester units (ethyl methacrylate (EMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 2,2,3,4,4,4-hexafluorobutyl methacrylate (HFMA)) as functional polymer linkages. Methacrylic-group-modified ZnO nanoparticles (designated ZnO-MAA) are synthesized based on the reaction between zinc methacrylate and LiOH with the molar ratio 1 : 3.5 via sol-gel process. The final hybrid materials are prepared by introducing rare earth complexes into ZnO-MAA matrix via addition polymerization reaction in the presence of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as the initiator. The detailed characterization and luminescence of these hybrid materials are discussed. It is found that ZnO-MAA-HEMA/EMA/HFBMA-RE-phen hybrid systems have effective intramolecular energy transfer process and exhibit longer lifetime and higher quantum efficiency.

  7. Coordinating earth observation data validation for RE-analysis for CLIMAte ServiceS - CORE-CLIMAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhongbo; Timmermans, Wim; Zeng, Yijian; Timmermans, Joris

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the CORE-CLIMAX project is to coordinate the identification of available physical measurements, which can be reconciled with previously existing data records, to form long time series. In this way the project contributes to monitoring the climate system; detect and attribute climate change; and assess impacts of, and support adaptation to, climate variability and change. As such the project will help to substantiate how COPERNICUS observations and products can contribute to climate change analyses, by establishing the extent to which COPERNICUS observations complement existing Climate Data Records. Since reanalyses are important for improving and synthesizing historical climate records, and for providing regional detail in a global context necessary for policy development and implementation, CORE-CLIMAX will identify the integration of Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) into the reanalysis chain by proposing a feedback mechanism ensuring that the results of the re-analysis process get appropriately reflected into updates of the ECVs. Together with inter-comparing different reanalyses, CORE-CLIMAX will eventually contribute to establish a European truly coupled gridded re-analysis which incorporates full exchanges and interactions between atmosphere, ocean and land, including the hydrological cycle. The CORE-CLIMAX project coordinates the identification of available and future physical measurements, which can be reconciled with previously existing data records, to form long time series. One of the major objectives of the CORE-CLIMAX project is the identification of the capability of ongoing activities, contribute to the formulation of the Copernicus climate service (http://www.copernicus.eu/) and lay the observational basis for service activities. Therefore the project consortium has developed the System Maturity Matrix (SMM); a metric to analyze the so called maturity of the ECV production systems considering the scientific, engineering, information

  8. Partitioning of Moderately Siderophile Elements Among Olivine, Silicate Melt, and Sulfide Melt: Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.; Grove, Timothy L.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Variations in the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur on the partitioning of first series transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni. and Cu) and W among coexisting sulfide melt, silicate melt, and olivine. Experiments were performed at 1 atm pressure, 1350 C, with the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur controlled by mixing CO2, CO, and SO2 gases. Starting compositions consisted of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO-Na2O analog for a barred olivine chondrule from an ordinary chondrite and a synthetic komatiite. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2), conditions ranged from log of f(sub O2) = -7.9 to - 10.6, with log of f(sub S2) values ranging from - 1.0 to -2.5. Our experimental results demonstrate that the f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies of sulfide melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for the first series transition metals arc proportional to their valence states. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies for the partitioning of Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu are weaker than predicted on the basis of their valence states. Variations in conditions have no significant effect on olivine/melt partitioning other than those resulting from f(sub O2)-induced changes in the valence state of a given element. The strong f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependence for the olivine/silicate melt partitioning of V is attributable to a change of valence state, from 4+ to 3+, with decreasing f(sub O2). Our experimentally determined partition coefficients are used to develop models for the segregation of sulfide and metal from the silicate portion of the early Earth and the Shergottite parent body (Mars). We find that the influence of S is not sufficient to explain the overabundance of siderophile and chalcophile elements that remained in the mantle of the Earth following core formation. Important constraints on core formation in Mars are provided by our experimental determination of the partitioning of Cu between silicate and sulfide melts. When combined with existing estimates for siderophile

  9. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time-integrated synchrotron Mössbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the γ-ɛ-l triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5GPa, 3345 ± 120K and 116 ± 5GPa, 3260 ± 120K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core-mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core-mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  10. Thermal evolution of Earth's mantle and core: Influence of reference viscosity and concentration of radioactive elements in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    In a series of studies on the thermal evolution of Earth’s mantle and core [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004; 2005; 2010], we have assumed a reference viscosity (at T=1600 K and P=0) of 1022 Pa.s and a concentration of radioactive elements based on the surface heat flux of the Earth’s mantle (6x10-12 W/kg). In addition, the initial mantle temperature in these studies was also based on the mantle adiabat estimated from present potential temperature (1600 K). Problems with these models are that (1) the average mantle temperature increases in the initial phase of the calculation and (2) the final (present-day) surface heat flux is a factor of two lower than expected from observational constraints (46 TW [Jaupart et al., 2007]), which means the Urey ratio is higher than the expected value (~0.3) [Jaupert et al., 2007; Korenaga, 2007]. Here we present results of a coupled model of thermo-chemical mantle convection in a 2-D spherical annulus and parameterized core heat balance, in which we vary (i) the reference viscosity down to 1020 Pa.s, giving a "surface" Rayleigh number of 109, (ii) the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the mantle are tried (either a theoretical estimate [Schubert et al., 2001; 25 TW], geochemical estimate [McDonough and Sun, 1995; 20 TW] and modified geochemical estimate [Lyubetskaya and Korenaga, 2006; 16 TW]) and (iii) the initial mantle adiabat (up to 2500 K at the surface). Preliminary results indicate a preference for an initial mantle adiabat of more than 2500 K and the modified geochemical estimate of radioactive element concentration, in order to understand the current thermal state of Earth’s mantle when the reference viscosity is 1022 Pa s. Results with lower reference viscosity will be presented.

  11. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy study of fcc iron hydride FeH at high pressures and implications for the composition of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narygina, Olga; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S.; McCammon, Catherine A.; Kurnosov, Alexander; Kantor, Innokenty Yu.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia A.

    2011-07-01

    The phase fcc FeH x (x ~ 1) was synthesized at pressures over 30 GPa and temperatures over 1600(50) K. At room temperature this iron hydride is stable at pressures from 19(1) GPa up to at least 68(2) GPa (the highest pressure achieved in this study). A fit of the PV data collected for fcc FeH x at room temperature gives the following parameters for the equation of state: V 0 = 53.8(3) Å 3, K 0 = 99(5) GPa, K' = 11.7(5). Using this data the amount of H required to match the density of the Earth's core was estimated to be 0.5-1 wt.% hydrogen in the outer core and 0.08-0.16 wt.% hydrogen in the inner core. Our results also suggest that hydrogen and carbon do not occur together in the Earth's core.

  12. High-pressure polymorphism of Fe[subscript 2]P and its implications for meteorites and Earth's core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dera, P.; Lavina, B.; Borkowski, L.A.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Downs, R.T.; Boctor, N.Z.; Prewitt, C.T. (UNLV); (UofC); (Univ of AZ); (CIW)

    2008-05-19

    Minerals with composition (Fe,Ni){sub 2}P, are rare, though important accessory phases in iron and chondritic meteorites. The occurrence of these minerals in meteorites is believed to originate either from the equilibrium condensation of protoplanetary materials in solar nebulae or from the later accretion and condensation processes in the cores of parent bodies. Fe-Ni phosphides are considered a possible candidate for a minor phase present in the Earth's core, and at least partially responsible for the observed density deficit with respect to pure iron. We report results of high-pressure high-temperature X-ray diffraction experiments with synthetic barringerite (Fe{sub 2}P) up to 40 GPa and 1400 K. A new phase transition to the Co{sub 2}Si-type structure has been found at 8.0 GPa, upon heating. The high-pressure phase can be metastably quenched to ambient conditions at room temperature, and then, if heated again, transforms back to barringerite, providing an important constraint on the thermodynamic history of meteorite.

  13. Thermochemical properties of some alkaline-earth silicates and zirconates. Fission product behaviour during molten core-concrete interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntelaar, M.E.

    1996-06-19

    This thesis aims to make a contribution to a better understanding of the chemical processes occurring during an ex-vessel MCCI accident with a western-type of nuclear reactor. Chosen is for a detailed thermochemical study of the silicates and zirconates of barium and strontium. In Chapter one a short introduction in the history of (research in) nuclear safety is given, followed by the state-of-the-art of molten core-concrete interactions in Chapter two. In both Chapters the role of chemical thermodynamics on this particular subject is dealt with. The experimental work on the silicates and zirconates of barium and strontium performed for this thesis, is described in the Chapters three, four, five, six, and parts of eight. In Chapter three the basis for all thermochemical measurements, the sample preparation is given. Because the sample preparation effects the accuracy of the thermodynamic measurements, a great deal of effort is spent in optimizing the synthesis of the silicates which resulted in the TEOS-method widely employed here. In the next Chapters the different thermochemical techniques used, are described: The low-temperature heat capacity measurements and the enthalpy increment measurements in Chapter four, the enthalpy-of-solution measurements in Chapter five, and measurements to determine the crystal structures in Chapter six. (orig.).

  14. Geochemical characteristics and their significances of rare-earth elements in deep-water well core at the Lingnan Low Uplift Area of the Qiongdongnan Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhipeng; ZHAI Shikui; XIU Chun; LIU Xinyu; ZONG Tong; LUO Wei; LIU Xiaofeng; CHEN Kui; LI Na

    2014-01-01

    A geochemical analysis of rare-earth elements (REEs) in 97 samples collected from the core of deep-water Well LS-A located at the Lingnan Low Uplift Area of the Qiongdongnan Basin is conducted, with the pur-pose of revealing the changes of sedimentary source and environment in the study region since Oligocene and evaluating the response of geochemical characteristics of REEs to the tectonic evolution. In the core samples, both∑REE and∑LREE (LREE is short for light-group REEs) fluctuate in a relatively wide range, while∑HREE (HREE is short for heavy-group REEs) maintains a relatively stable level. With the stratigraphic chronology becoming newer, both∑REE and∑LREE show a gradually rising trend overall. The∑REE of the core is relatively high from the bottom of Yacheng Formation (at a well depth of 4 207 m) to the top of Ledong Formation, and the REEs show partitioning characteristics of the enrichment of LREE, the stable content of HREE, and the negative anomaly of Eu to varying degrees. Overall the geochemical characteristics of REEs are relatively approximate to those of China’s neritic sediments and loess, with significant “continental ori-entation”. The∑REE of the core is relatively low in the lower part of Yacheng Formation (at a well depth of 4 207–4 330 m), as shown by the REEs partitioning characteristics of the depletion of LREE, the relative enrich-ment of HREE, and the positive anomaly of Eu; the geochemical characteristics of REEs are approximate to those of oceanic crust and basalt overall, indicating that the provenance is primarily composed of volcanic eruption matters. As shown by the analyses based on sequence stratigraphy and mineralogy, the provenance in study region in the early Oligocene mainly resulted from the volcanic materials of the peripheral uplift ar-eas; the continental margin materials from the north contributed only insignificantly; the provenance devel-oped to a certain extent in the late Oligocene. Since the

  15. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  16. A Comparison Of New Calculations Of The Yearly 10Be Production In The Earths Polar Atmosphere By Cosmic Rays With Yearly 10Be Measurements In Multiple Greenland Ice Cores Between 1939 And 1994 - A Troubling Lack Of Concordance Paper #2

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R; Webber, C W

    2010-01-01

    We have compared the yearly production rates of 10Be by cosmic rays in the Earths polar atmosphere over the last 50-70 years with 10Be measurements from two separate ice cores in Greenland. These ice cores provide measurements of the annual 10Be concentration and 10Be flux levels during this time. The scatter in the ice core yearly data vs. the production data is larger than the average solar 11 year production variations that are being measured. The cross correlation coefficients between the yearly 10Be production and the ice core 10Be measurements for this time period are <0.4 in all comparisons between ice core data and 10Be production, including 10Be concentrations, 10Be fluxes and in comparing the two separate ice core measurements. In fact, the cross correlation between the two ice core measurements, which should be measuring the same source, is the lowest of all, only ~0.2. These values for the correlation coefficient are all indicative of a "poor" correlation. The regression line slopes for the bes...

  17. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  18. Inner core structure behind the PKP core phase triplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Nienke A.; Deuss, Arwen; Paulssen, Hanneke; Waszek, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the Earth's inner core is not well known between depths of ∼100–200 km beneath the inner core boundary. This is a result of the PKP core phase triplication and the existence of strong precursors to PKP phases, which hinder the measurement of inner core compressional PKIKP waves at e

  19. Inner core structure behind the PKP core phase triplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Nienke A.; Deuss, Arwen; Paulssen, Hanneke; Waszek, Lauren

    The structure of the Earth's inner core is not well known between depths of ∼100–200 km beneath the inner core boundary. This is a result of the PKP core phase triplication and the existence of strong precursors to PKP phases, which hinder the measurement of inner core compressional PKIKP waves at

  20. About the article by M.A. Goncharov, Yu.N. Raznitsin, Yu.V. Barkin «SPECIFIC FEATURES OF DEFORMATION OF THE CONTINENTAL AND OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AS A RESULT OF THE EARTH CORE NORTHERN DRIFT»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri G. Leonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The review summary states that studies of the hierarchical subordination of geodynamic systems is top in the scientific agenda, and researches of orientation of the Earth’s surface deformation structures in relation to the elements of the stress field are important. It is noted that the proposed classification of geological objects by ranks is ambiguous, and there is a need for a geodynamic model to provide a basis for studying relationships between the fields of forces, stresses and strains on the surface and processes which take place deep in the core and mantle of the Earth.

  1. Deformation-aided segregation of Fe-S liquid from olivine under deep Earth conditions: Implications for core formation in the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Madeleine T. L.; Bromiley, Geoffrey D.; Butler, Ian B.; Frost, Mungo; Bradley, Robert; Carr, James; Le Godec, Yann; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Zhu, Wenlu; Miller, Kevin; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Mariani, Elisabetta; Tatham, Daniel; Redfern, Simon A. T.

    2017-02-01

    The planets and larger rocky bodies of the inner solar system are differentiated, and consist of metallic, iron-rich cores surrounded by thick shells of silicate. Core formation in these bodies, i.e. the segregation of metal from silicate, was a key process in the early solar system, and one which left a lasting geochemical signature. It is commonly assumed that extensive silicate melting and formation of deep magma oceans was required to initiate core formation, due to the inability of iron-rich melts to segregate from a solid silicate matrix. Here we assess the role of deformation in aiding segregation of core-forming melts from solid silicate under conditions of planetary deep interiors. Low-strain rate, high-pressure/temperature deformation experiments and high-resolution 2-D and 3-D textural analysis demonstrate that deformation fundamentally alters iron-rich melt geometry, promoting wetting of silicate grain boundaries and formation of extensive micron to sub-micron width Fe-rich melt bands. Deformation-aided Fe-S melt networks noted here contrast those observed in higher finite strain experiments conducted at lower pressure, and may reveal either an alternative mechanism for melt segregation at higher pressures, or an early stage process of melt segregation. Results suggest, however, that core-mantle chemical equilibration cannot be assumed in models of planetary formation, and that instead, the chemistry of rocky planets may record a complex, multi-stage process of core formation.

  2. Thermal equation of state of hcp-iron: Constraint on the density deficit of Earth's solid inner core: THERMAL EQUATION OF STATE OF HCP-IRON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fei, Yingwei [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington District of Columbia USA; Murphy, Caitlin [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington District of Columbia USA; Shibazaki, Yuki [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington District of Columbia USA; Now at Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai Japan; Shahar, Anat [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington District of Columbia USA; Huang, Haijun [School of Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan China

    2016-07-04

    We conducted high-pressure experiments on hexagonal close packed iron (hcp-Fe) in MgO, NaCl, and Ne pressure-transmitting media and found general agreement among the experimental data at 300 K that yield the best fitted values of the bulk modulus K0 = 172.7(±1.4) GPa and its pressure derivative K0'= 4.79(±0.05) for hcp-Fe, using the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. Using the derived thermal pressures for hcp-Fe up to 100 GPa and 1800 K and previous shockwave Hugoniot data, we developed a thermal equation of state of hcp-Fe. The thermal equation of state of hcp-Fe is further used to calculate the densities of iron along adiabatic geotherms to define the density deficit of the inner core, which serves as the basis for developing quantitative composition models of the Earth's inner core. We determine the density deficit at the inner core boundary to be 3.6%, assuming an inner core boundary temperature of 6000 K.

  3. Does asteroid 4 Vesta, with watery 1 Ceres and the Galilean moons, record the Ringwood-mode iron core construction now predicated for Earth and even apply to the other terrestrial planets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmaston, M. F.

    2014-04-01

    I reason that Vesta, the source of HED but too small for appreciable magmatic resurfacing after accretion had ended, preserves valuable clues as to how the Earth and the other terrestrials were built. Setting the scene. Core formation in the terrestrial planets has long been attributed to the percolation of molten iron accreted from the solar nebula, either inward from the surface or from a magma ocean at depth. But it has been found [1,2] that the 56Fe/54Fe ratio in Earth peridotites still has a chondritic ratio, which rules out that Fe percolation has occurred. So we must revert now to Ringwood's model (1960-1978) e.g.[3] for core formation. This uses the nebula to reduce hot FeO in lavas erupted in volcanoes at the protoplanet's surface. The Fe, which then drains to the bottom of the magma chamber and solidifies, is subsequently 'loadsubducted' rapidly to form the core. For Earth's core alone this would generate ~400 earth-ocean volumes of reaction water, a Solar System benefit already foreseen by Ringwood, water being low in star-forming clouds. The heat for the volcanism is internal (accretion, gravitation, radiogenic) so orbital distance in the presence of nebular opacity is immaterial; and important for making the cores in the Galilean moons, otherwise labelled as being at the 'snowline' in the disc. In order to work, prior iron accretion to form the body must have been in oxide form. Thermodynamically this is correct if the nebula is cool (deep. Current flows in this, presumably below a frozen lid, appear to have carved early deep channels in the uncoherent regolith, well seen as a.m.- conserving spiral channels (5.3hr rotationperiod) outboard of the later southern impact. Circum-equatorial similar grooves all seem to predate the impact cratering, made possible by loss of the water/ice. Character of an RM volcano interior. We can construct a vertical section from the meteoritic record, with eucrites at the top, diogenites in-between, pallasites (stonyiron

  4. Fe-FeO and Fe-Fe3C melting relations at Earth's core-mantle boundary conditions: Implications for a volatile-rich or oxygen-rich core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Nakajima, Y.; Auzende, A. L.; Boulard, E.; Cervera, S.; Clark, A.; Lord, O. T.; Siebert, J.; Svitlyk, V.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.

    2017-09-01

    Eutectic melting temperatures in the Fe-FeO and Fe-Fe3C systems have been determined up to 150 GPa. Melting criteria include observation of a diffuse scattering signal by in situ X-Ray diffraction, and textural characterisation of recovered samples. In addition, compositions of eutectic liquids have been established by combining in situ Rietveld analyses with ex situ chemical analyses. Gathering these new results together with previous reports on Fe-S and Fe-Si systems allow us to discuss the specific effect of each light element (Si, S, O, C) on the melting properties of the outer core. Crystallization temperatures of Si-rich core compositional models are too high to be compatible with the absence of extensive mantle melting at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and significant amounts of volatile elements such as S and/or C (>5 at%, corresponding to >2 wt%), or a large amount of O (>15 at% corresponding to ∼5 wt%) are required to reduce the crystallisation temperature of the core material below that of a peridotitic lower mantle.

  5. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  6. Equations of state of iron nitrides ɛ-Fe3Nx and γ-Fe4Ny to 30 GPa and 1200 K and implication for nitrogen in the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litasov, K. D.; Shatskiy, A.; Ponomarev, D. S.; Gavryushkin, P. N.

    2017-05-01

    Nitrogen abundance is one of the most uncertain among all elements in the Earth's interior. Recent data indicate an affinity between Fe-nitrides and Fe-carbides in the Earth's mantle and inner core. In this work P-V-T equations of state of ɛ-Fe3N0.8 and ɛ-Fe3N1.26 (which is close to Fe7N3) have been determined using a combination of multianvil and synchrotron radiation techniques at pressures up to 30 GPa and temperatures up to 1473 K. A fit of the P-V-T data to the Vinet-Rydberg and Mie-Grüneisen-Debye equations of state yields the following thermoelastic parameters for the ɛ-Fe3N0.8: V0 = 81.44(2) Å3, KT0 = 157(3) GPa, KT' = 5.3 (fixed), θ0 = 555 K (fixed), γ0 = 1.83(1), and q = 1.34(18). For ɛ-Fe3N1.26 we obtained V0 = 86.18(2) Å3, KT0 = 163(2) GPa, KT' = 5.3(2), θ0 = 562(90) K, γ0 = 1.85(2), and q = 0.55(24). It is likely that all presumably paramagnetic ɛ-Fe3Nx with x = 0.75-1.5 have similar thermoelastic properties with a minor increase of the bulk modulus with increasing N content. The melting temperature of ɛ-Fe3Nx increases from approximately 1473 to 1573 K in the pressure range from 5 to 30 GPa. We also determined a preliminary equation of state for γ-Fe4Ny and calculated y = 0.35(2) from the data at 20-30 GPa. Combining the results with a recent experimental study on the stability of β-Fe7N3, isostructural with Fe7C3, and a theoretical study of the magnetic transitions in ɛ-Fe3Nx, we estimate the density of Fe-nitrides at the Earth's inner core conditions. Our results indicate that at 5000-6000 K, 2.0-3.2 wt % N can explain the density deficit in Earth's inner core.

  7. Controls on the distribution and fractionation of yttrium and rare earth elements in core sediments from the Mandovi estuary, western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prajith, A.; Rao, V.P.; Kessarkar, P.M.

    distribution. The accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) ages of total organic carbon indicated modern age for the sediments of the upper estuary and, maximum mean ages of 1588 years AD and 539 years AD for the bottom sediments of the cores in the lower estuary...

  8. Influence of surface displacement on solid state flow induced by horizontally heterogeneous Joule heating in the inner core of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehiro, Shin-ichi

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the influence of surface displacement on fluid motions induced by horizontally heterogeneous Joule heating in the inner core. The difference between the governing equations and those of Takehiro (2011) is the boundary conditions at the inner core boundary (ICB). The temperature disturbance at the ICB coincides with the melting temperature, which varies depending on the surface displacement. The normal component of stress equalizes with the buoyancy induced by the surface displacement. The toroidal magnetic field and surface displacement with the horizontal structure of Y20 spherical harmonics is given. The flow fields are calculated numerically for various amplitudes of surface displacement with the expected values of the parameters of the core. Further, by considering the heat balance at the ICB, the surface displacement amplitude is related to the turbulent velocity amplitude in the outer core, near the ICB. The results show that when the turbulent velocity is on the order of 10-1 -10-2 m/s, the flow and stress fields are similar to those of Takehiro (2011), where the surface displacement vanishes. As the amplitude of the turbulent velocity decreases, the amplitude of the surface displacement increases, and counter flows from the polar to equatorial regions emerge around the ICB, while flow in the inner regions is directed from the equatorial to polar regions, and the non-zero radial component of velocity at the ICB remains. When the turbulent velocity is on the order of 10-4 -10-5 m/s, the radial component of velocity at the ICB vanishes, the surface counter flows become stronger than the flow in the inner region, and the amplitude of the stress field near the ICB dominates the inner region, which might be unsuitable for explaining the elastic anisotropy in the inner core.

  9. A Mission to Earth's Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, P.

    2016-12-01

    The last few decades have witnessed extraordinary progress on Earth's deep interior, particularly for Earth's core. Notable examples include seismic detection of fine structure and heterogeneity from the CMB to the depths of the inner core; improved constraints on the thermal regime and critical physical properties; direct experimental access to core pressures and temperatures; partial resolution of geomagnetic history into the deep past, new cosmochemical constraints on core formation, plus a first-order solution of the dynamo problem. Nevertheless, many fundamental questions about Earth's core remain unanswered, representing significant impediments to further understanding, not just of the Earth system, but also the interiors of other planets. A partial list of unsolved problems includes the composition of the core especially its light element inventory, the nature of heterogeneity in the core and its dynamical significance, quantifying heat and mass exchanges between core and mantle, the record of core evolution exemplified by inner core nucleation and the magnetic superchron cycle, and the role of core formation in governing Earth history. A more concerted and better-focused interdisciplinary effort is needed to resolve these long-standing problems, one that is comparable in its scale and structure to a planetary exploration mission. Such a Mission to Earth's Center would foster technological developments aimed specifically at these questions, such as seismic arrays designed for imaging the core, experimental capability for determining the phase diagram of the core, resolution of geomagnetic history into the deep past, plus next-generation dynamical models for the mantle, the core, and their interaction.

  10. Mars' core and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  11. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time integrated synchrotron Mfissbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the gamma-is an element of-1 triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5 GPa, 3345 ± 120 K and 116 ± 5 GPa, 3260 ± 120 K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200 K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core -mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200 K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core -mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  12. The Double Sensor-A non-invasive device to continuously monitor core temperature in humans on earth and in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunga, H-C; Werner, A; Stahn, A; Steinach, M; Schlabs, T; Koralewski, E; Kunz, D; Belavý, D L; Felsenberg, D; Sattler, F; Koch, J

    2009-10-01

    The objective of our study was to establish whether rectal temperature recordings in humans could be replaced by a non-invasive skin temperature sensor combined with a heat flux sensor (Double Sensor) located at the forehead to monitor core body temperature changes due to circadian rhythms. Rectal and Double Sensor data were collected continuously for 24h in seven men undertaking strict head-down tilt bed-rest. Individual differences between the two techniques varied between -0.72 and +0.55 degrees C. Nonetheless, when temperature data were approximated by cosinor analysis in order to compare circadian rhythm profiles between methods, it was observed that there were no significant differences between mesor, amplitude, and acrophase (P>0.310). It was therefore concluded that the Double Sensor technology is presently not accurate enough for performing single individual core body temperature measurements under resting conditions at normal ambient room temperature. Yet, it seems to be a valid, non-invasive alternative for monitoring circadian rhythm profiles.

  13. Study and Detection on the Geodynamic Effects of the Earth's Fluid Outer Core%地球液核动力学效应的研究和检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建桥; 孙和平

    2003-01-01

    The long-term, continuous gravity data, recorded with superconducting gravimeters (SCG) at the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) observatories including one at Wuhan, and the corresponding station atmospheric pressure records have been comprehensively processed and analyzed in order to study and detect the geodynamical effects of the Earth's fluid outer core (FOC). The elasto-gravitational deformation responses of the Earth to thesolar-luni tidal forces, surface tractions and the perturbations of the pressure and gravity on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the solid inner core boundary (ICB) due to the dynamical behaviors of the FOC, are systematically discussed. Based on the resonance enhancement in diurnal tidal gravity observations, the Earth's free core nutation (FCN) is studied by stacking the tidal gravity data obtained with the international SCG. As a result, the FCN parameters are determined accurately. The free oscillations of the FOC are theoretically investigated by using a variational approach of the displacement field. And the corresponding eigenvalue-eigenvector problem for the finite element computation is deduced. By simultaneouslyusing the long-term, continuous and high-quality gravity data observed with the SCG at the GGP observatories, the translational oscillations of the solid inner core is studied.%综合分析处理了包括武汉台在内的全球地球动力学(GGP)台站超导重力仪长期、连续重力观测资料,研究和检测了地球液核的动力学效应.系统讨论了在日月引潮力、表面负荷和液核动力学行为引起的核幔边界及内核边界上,压力和重力扰动等不同驱动力作用下,地球的弹性引力形变响应.基于周日重力潮汐观测中的共振放大特征,通过国际超导重力仪观测资料的迭积,研究了地球的自由和章动(FCN),精密确定了FCN参数.采用位移场的变分方法研究了液核的自由振荡,严密推导获得了用于有限元数值计算的本

  14. A comparison of new calculations of 10be production in the earths polar atmosphere by cosmic rays with 10be concentration measurements in polar ice cores between 1939-2005 - a troubling lack of concordance paper #1

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R

    2010-01-01

    Using new calculations of 10Be production in the Earths atmosphere which are based on direct measurements of the 11-year solar modulation effects on galactic cosmic rays and spacecraft measurements of the cosmic ray energy spectrum, we have calculated the yearly average production of 10Be in the Earths atmosphere by galactic and solar cosmic rays since 1939. During the last six 11-year cycles the average amplitude of these production changes is 36%. These predictions are compared with measurements of 10Be concentration in polar ice cores in both the Northern and Southern hemisphere over the same time period. We find a large scatter between the predicted and measured yearly average data sets and a low cross correlation ~0.30. Also the normalized regression line slope between 10Be production changes and 10Be concentration changes is found to be only 0.4-0.6; much less than the value of 1.0 expected for a simple proportionality between these quantities, as is typically used for historical projections of the rela...

  15. Structure and behavior of the barringerite Ni end-member, Ni[subscript 2]P, at deep Earth conditions and implications for natural Fe-Ni phosphides in planetary cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dera, P.; Lavina, B.; Borkowski, L.A.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Downs, R.T.; Boctor, N.Z.; Prewitt, C.T.; (UNLV); (CIW); (UC); (Ariz)

    2009-06-01

    High pressure and high temperature behavior of synthetic Ni{sub 2}P has been studied in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell up to 50 GPA and 2200 K. Incongruent melting associated with formation of pyrite-type NiP{sub 2} and amorphous Ni-P alloy was found at an intermediate pressure range, between 6.5 and 40 GPa. Above GPa, Ni{sub 2}P melts congruently. At room conditions, Ni{sub 2}P has hexagonal C22-type structure, and without heating it remains in this structure to at least 50 GPa. With a bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 201(8) GPa and K' = 4.2(6), Ni{sub 2}P is noticeable less compressible than hcp Fe, as well as all previously described iron phosphides, and its presence in the Earth core would favorable lower the core density. In contrast to Fe{sub 2}P, the c/a ratio in Ni{sub 2}P decreases on compression because of the lack of ferromagnetic interaction along the c direction. Lack of the C22{yields}C23 transition in the Ni{sub 2}P rules out a stabilizing effect of Ni on the orthorhombic phase of natural (Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}){sub 2}P allabogdanite.

  16. Rare-earth metal methylidene complexes with Ln3(μ3-CH2)(μ3-Me)(μ2-Me)3 core structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädle, Dorothea; Meermann-Zimmermann, Melanie; Maichle-Mössmer, Cäcilia; Schädle, Christoph; Törnroos, Karl W; Anwander, Reiner

    2015-11-07

    Trinuclear rare-earth metal methylidene complexes with a Ln3(μ3-CH2)(μ3-Me)(μ2-Me)3 structural motif were synthesized by applying three protocols. Polymeric [LuMe3]n (1-Lu) reacts with the sterically demanding amine H[NSiMe3(Ar)] (Ar = C6H3iPr2-2,6) in tetrahydrofuran via methane elimination to afford isolable monomeric [NSiMe3(Ar)]LuMe2(thf)2 (4-Lu). The formation of trinuclear rare-earth metal tetramethyl methylidene complexes [NSiMe3(Ar)]3Ln3(μ3-CH2)(μ3-Me)(μ2-Me)3(thf)3 (7-Ln; Ln = Y, Ho, Lu) via reaction of [LnMe3]n (1-Ln; Ln = Y, Ho, Lu) with H[NSiMe3(Ar)] is proposed to occur via an "intermediate" species of the type [NSiMe3(Ar)]LnMe2(thf)x and subsequent C-H bond activation. Applying Lappert's concept of Lewis base-induced methylaluminate cleavage, compounds [NSiMe3(Ar)]Ln(AlMe4)2 (5-Ln; Ln = Y, La, Nd, Ho) were converted into methylidene complexes 7-Ln (Ln = Y, Nd, Ho) in the presence of tetrahydrofuran. Similarly, tetramethylgallate complex [NSiMe3(Ar)]Y(GaMe4)2 (6-Y) could be employed as a synthesis precursor for 7-Y. The molecular composition of complexes 4-Ln, 5-Ln, 6-Y and 7-Ln was confirmed by elemental analyses, FTIR spectroscopy, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy (except for holmium derivatives) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The Tebbe-like reactivity of methylidene complex 7-Nd with 9-fluorenone was assessed affording oxo complex [NSiMe3(Ar)]3Nd3(μ3-O)(μ2-Me)4(thf)3 (8-Nd). The synthesis of 5-Ln yielded [NSiMe3(Ar)]2Ln(AlMe4) (9-Ln; Ln = La, Nd) as minor side-products, which could be obtained in moderate yields when homoleptic Ln(AlMe4)3 were treated with two equivalents of K[NSiMe3(Ar)].

  17. 钱塘江河口区晚第四纪古环境演化及其元素地球化学特征%PALEOENVIRONMENT EVOLUTION DURING THE LATE QUATERNARY IN THE QIANTANG RIVER MOUTH AREA: EVIDENCE FROM THE SE2 CORE SEDIMENT AND ITS RARE EARTH ELEMENTS GEOCHEMISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳丽; 林春明; 张霞; 周健; 曲长伟; 潘峰; 姚玉来

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a 51. 5-m-long core SE2 was drilled at 120°21'57" E, 30°12'38" N, from the Kanshan town, Hangzhou city, in the south bank of the Qiantang River. The ground surface elevation of the core is 6. Om above mean sea level. Core SE2,10. 8cm in diameter,was obtained by rotary drilling with a 96% recovery. A total of 294 samples were collected at 10 ~20cm intervals along the cored succession for grain size analysis,93 samples at 20 ~ 80cm intervals for foraminifera identification, and 27 samples at 200cm intervals for rare earth elements analysis. The lithology, grain size, sedimentary structure, foraminifera, and rare earth elements of Late Quaternary sediments in the borehole SE2 were analyzed to research the sedimentary environment evolution, and the associated distribution variation of rare earth elements in the Qiantang River mouth area. The results indicate that five sedimentary facies, including fluvial channel,floodplain,tidal flat,shallow marine,and estuarine sand bar,can be distinguished,and the rare earth elements distribution is closely related to sedimentary environment. Fluvial channel facies consists of sandy gravel,gravelly sand, and fine sand, with high content of rolling and saltation population. Foraminifera are absent. The sediments have the lowest total rare earth elements content in all sedimentary facies,and high light rare earth elements concentration. The fractionation degree of light and heavy rare earth elements, and fractionation degree of heavy rare earth elements are positively related with the total rare earth elements content. The fractionation of light rare earth elements shows negative correlation with the total rare earth elements content, heavy rare earth elements concentration, the fractionation of light and heavy rare earth elements, and fractionation in heavy rare earth elements. Floodplain facies are dominated by clay, with foraminifera and rolling population absent. Total rare earth elements content is the highest. The

  18. The rare earth element geochemistry on surface sediments, shallow cores and lithological units of Lake Acıgöl basin, Denizli, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budakoglu, Murat; Abdelnasser, Amr; Karaman, Muhittin; Kumral, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    The sediments in Lake Acıgöl, located in SW Anatolia, Turkey, were formed under tectono-sedimentary events. REE geochemical investigations of the Lake Acıgöl sediments, from surface and shallow core sediments at different depths (0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-30 cm) are presented to clarify the characteristics of REE and the nature of source rocks in the lake sediments' and to deduce their paleoenvironmental proxies. The chondrite-normalized REE patterns of these sediments are shown as light enrichment in LREE and flat HREE with a negative Eu anomaly that is close to the continental collision basin (CCB) in its profile; this is not comparable with PAAS and UCC. Inorganic detrital materials control the REE characteristics of the Lake Acıgöl sediments and these sediments were accumulated in oxic and dysoxic depositional conditions and/or at passive margins derived from oceanic island arc rocks. They were affected by low chemical weathering, either at the original source or during transport, before deposition under arid or subtropical humid climatic conditions. In addition, we used GIS techniques (such as Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) and Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR)) to investigate the spatial interpolation and spatial correlation of the REEs from the lake surface sediments in Lake Acıgöl and its surrounding lithological units. GIS techniques showed that the lithological units (e.g., Hayrettin Formation) north of Lake Acıgöl have high REE contents; however, Eu/Eu∗ values were higher in some lake surface sediments than in lithological units, and that refers to a negative Eu-anomaly. Therefore, Lake Acıgöl sediments are derived from the weathered products, mainly from local, highly basic bedrock around the lake from the Archean crust. The chronology of Lake Acıgöl sediment was conducted using the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) model. Using the CRS methods for the calculation of sedimentation rate, we obtained a 0.012 g/cm2/year value which is an

  19. NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Program has evolved over the last two decades, and currently has several core and community components. Core components provide the basic operational capabilities to process, archive, manage and distribute data from NASA missions. Community components provide a path for peer-reviewed research in Earth Science Informatics to feed into the evolution of the core components. The Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a core component consisting of twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) and eight Science Investigator-led Processing Systems spread across the U.S. The presentation covers how the ESDS Program continues to evolve and benefits from as well as contributes to advances in Earth Science Informatics.

  20. New constraints on the Paleoarchean meteorite bombardment of the Earth - Geochemistry and Re-Os isotope signatures of spherule layers in the BARB5 ICDP drill core from the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Toni; Koeberl, Christian; Luguet, Ambre; van Acken, David; Mohr-Westheide, Tanja; Ozdemir, Seda; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2017-08-01

    Archean spherule layers, resulting from impacts by large extraterrestrial objects, to date represent the only remnants of the early meteorite, asteroid, and comet bombardment of the Earth. Only few Archean impact debris layers have been documented, all of them embedded in the 3.23-3.47 billion year old successions of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB) in South Africa and the Pilbara Craton in Western Australia. Some of them might be correlated with each other. Given the scarcity of Archean spherule deposits, four spherule layer intersections from the recently recovered BARB5 drill core from the central Barberton Greenstone Belt, analyzed in this study, provide an opportunity to gain new insight into the early terrestrial impact bombardment. Despite being hydrothermally overprinted, siderophile element abundance signatures of spherule-rich samples from the BARB5 drill core, at least in part, retained a meteoritic fingerprint. The impact hypothesis for the generation of the BARB5 spherule layers is supported by correlations between the abundances of moderately (Cr, Co, Ni) and highly siderophile (Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Ru and Pd) elements, whose peak concentrations and interelement ratios are within the range of those for chondrites. Rhenium-Osmium isotope evidence further support the impact hypothesis. Collectively, this study provides evidence for extraterrestrial admixtures ranging between ∼40 and up to 100% to three of the four analyzed BARB5 spherule layers, and a scenario for their genesis involving (i) impact of a chondritic bolide into a sedimentary target, (ii) varying admixtures of meteoritic components to target materials, (iii) spherule formation via condensation in an impact vapor plume, (iv) transportation of the spherules and sedimentation under submarine conditions, followed by (v) moderate post-impact remobilization of transition metals and highly siderophile elements.

  1. Waves in the core and mechanical core-mantle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    the motions in the direction parallel to the Earth'srotation axis. This property accounts for the signicance of the core-mantle topography.In addition, the stiening of the uid in the direction parallel to the rotation axis gives riseto a magnetic diusion layer attached to the core-mantle boundary, which would...

  2. Expanding earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, S.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arguments in favor of an expanding earth are presented. The author believes that the theory of plate tectonics is a classic error in the history of geology. The case for the expanding earth is organized in the following way: introductory review - face of the earth, development of expanding earth concept, necessity for expansion, the subduction myth, and definitions; some principles - scale of tectonic phenomena, non-uniformitarianism, tectonic profile, paleomagnetism, asymmetry of the earth, rotation of the earth, and modes of crustal extension; regional studies - western North America, Central America, South-East Asia, and the rift oceans; tests and cause of expansion. 824 references, 197 figures, 11 tables. (RWR)

  3. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  4. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  5. Spectrometry of the Earth using neutrino oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, Akimichi; Rott, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Neutrinos have favorable properties for measuring the elemental composition deep inside the earth's interior. First, they propagate a long distance almost undisturbed through the earth due to their weak interactions with matter. Secondly, neutrino oscillations in matter are sensitive to the electron density of the medium traversed by them. Therefore, neutrinos can be used for a probe to determine the average atomic mass ratio Z/A of the earth's core by comparing with the earth's nucleus density distribution that is inferred from seismic observations. There is a little uncertainty in densities of the earth's core, but our knowledge of its main light element is still not fixed. With the advent of the new-generation megaton neutrino detectors, neutrino oscillation mass spectrometry will allow us to constrain directly the light elements in the earth's outer core. We report the detail of this novel technic and the sensitivity study.

  6. Earth\\'s Mass Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Mawad, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    The perturbation of the Earth caused by variability of mass of Earth as additional reason with gravity of celestial bodies and shape of the Earth. The Earth eating and collecting matters from space and loss or eject matters to space through its flying in the space around the Sun. The source of the rising in the global sea level is not closed in global warming and icebergs, but the outer space is the additional important source for this rising. The Earth eats waters from space in unknown mechanism. The mass of the Earth become greater in November i.e. before transit apoapsis two months, and become latter in February i.e. after transit apoapsis to two months.

  7. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  8. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  9. Heat transport within the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to interpret Earth's dynamic processes based upon heat transport concepts derived from ordinary experience. But, ordinary experience can be misleading, especially when underlain by false assumptions. Geodynamic considerations traditionally have embraced three modes of heat transport: conduction, convection, and radiation. Recently, I introduced a fourth, "mantle decompression thermal tsunami" that, I submit, is responsible for emplacing heat at the base of the Earth's crust. Here, I review thermal transport within the Earth and speculate that there might be a fifth mode: "heat channeling", involving heat transport from the core to "hot-spots" such as those that power the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland.

  10. The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

  11. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  12. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  13. Snowball Earth

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In the ongoing quest to better understand where life may exist elsewhere in the Universe, important lessons may be gained from our own planet. In particular, much can be learned from planetary glaciation events that Earth suffered ∼600 million years ago, so-called `Snowball Earth' episodes. I begin with an overview of how the climate works. This helps to explain how the ice-albedo feedback effect can destabilise a planet's climate. The process relies on lower temperatures causing more ice to ...

  14. China's rare-earth industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  15. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  16. Thermodynamics of the Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Frank D [CSIRO Exploration and Mining, PO Box 883, Kenmore, Qld. 4069 (Australia)], E-mail: Frank.Stacey@csiro.au

    2010-04-15

    Applications of elementary thermodynamic principles to the dynamics of the Earth lead to robust, quantitative conclusions about the tectonic effects that arise from convection. The grand pattern of motion conveys deep heat to the surface, generating mechanical energy with a thermodynamic efficiency corresponding to that of a Carnot engine operating over the adiabatic temperature gradient between the heat source and sink. Referred to the total heat flux derived from the Earth's silicate mantle, the efficiency is 24% and the power generated, 7.7 x 10{sup 12} W, causes all the material deformation apparent as plate tectonics and the consequent geological processes. About 3.5% of this is released in seismic zones but little more than 0.2% as seismic waves. Even major earthquakes are only localized hiccups in this motion. Complications that arise from mineral phase transitions can be used to illuminate details of the motion. There are two superimposed patterns of convection, plate subduction and deep mantle plumes, driven by sources of buoyancy, negative and positive respectively, at the top and bottom of the mantle. The patterns of motion are controlled by the viscosity contrasts (>10{sup 4} : 1) at these boundaries and are self-selected as the least dissipative mechanisms of heat transfer for convection in a body with very strong viscosity variation. Both are subjects of the thermodynamic efficiency argument. Convection also drives the motion in the fluid outer core that generates the geomagnetic field, although in that case there is an important energy contribution by compositional separation, as light solute is rejected by the solidifying inner core and mixed into the outer core, a process referred to as compositional convection. Uncertainty persists over the core energy balance because thermal conduction is a drain on core energy that has been a subject of diverse estimates, with attendant debate over the need for radiogenic heat in the core. The geophysical

  17. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  18. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...... formally with WS-BPEL, as one, without loss of generality, need only consider the much simpler Core BPEL. This report may also be viewed as an addendum to the WS-BPEL standard specification, which clarifies the WS-BPEL syntax and presents the essential elements of the language in a more concise way...

  19. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...... formally with WS-BPEL, as one, without loss of generality, need only consider the much simpler Core BPEL. This report may also be viewed as an addendum to the WS-BPEL standard specification, which clarifies the WS-BPEL syntax and presents the essential elements of the language in a more concise way...

  20. Core benefits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith, Brian W

    2010-01-01

    This SPEC Kit explores the core employment benefits of retirement, and life, health, and other insurance -benefits that are typically decided by the parent institution and often have significant governmental regulation...

  1. Spectrometry of the Earth using Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Rott, Carsten; Bose, Debanjan

    2015-01-01

    The unknown constituents of the interior of our home planet have provoked the human imagination and driven scientific exploration. We herein demonstrate that large neutrino detectors could be used in the near future to significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's inner chemical composition. Neutrinos, which are naturally produced in the atmosphere, traverse the Earth and undergo oscillations that depend on the Earth's electron density. The Earth's chemical composition can be determined by combining observations from large neutrino detectors with seismic measurements of the Earth's matter density. We present a method that will allow us to perform a measurement that can distinguish between composition models of the outer core. We show that the next-generation large-volume neutrino detectors can provide sufficient sensitivity to reject outer core models with large hydrogen content and thereby demonstrate the potential of this novel method. In the future, dedicated instruments could be capable of distin...

  2. The Active Solid Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebinger, Cynthia

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic processes in Earth's crust, mantle and core shape Earth's surface and magnetic field over time scales of seconds to millennia, and even longer time scales as recorded in the ca. 4 Ga rock record. Our focus is the earthquake-volcano deformation cycles that occur over human time scales, and their comparison with time-averaged deformation studies, with emphasis on mantle plume provinces where magma and volatile release and vertical tectonics are readily detectable. Active deformation processes at continental and oceanic rift and back arc zones provide critical constraints on mantle dynamics, the role of fluids (volatiles, magma, water), and plate rheology. For example, recent studies of the East African rift zone, which formed above one of Earth's largest mantle upwellings reveal that magma production and volatile release rates are comparable to those of magmatic arcs, the archetypal zones of continental crustal creation. Finite-length faults achieve some plate deformation, but magma intrusion in the form of dikes accommodates extension in continental, back-arc, and oceanic rifts, and intrusion as sills causes permanent uplift that modulates the local time-space scales of earthquakes and volcanoes. Volatile release from magma intrusion may reduce fault friction and permeability, facilitating aseismic slip and creating magma pathways. We explore the implications of active deformation studies to models of the time-averaged structure of plume and extensional provinces in continental and oceanic plate settings.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic Convection in the Outer Core and its Geodynamic Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2004-01-01

    The Earth's fluid outer core is in vigorous convection through much of the Earth's history. In addition to generating and maintaining Earth s time-varying magnetic field (geodynamo), the core convection also generates mass redistribution in the core and a dynamical pressure field on the core-mantle boundary (CMB). All these shall result in various core-mantle interactions, and contribute to surface geodynamic observables. For example, electromagnetic core-mantle coupling arises from finite electrically conducting lower mantle; gravitational interaction occurs between the cores and the heterogeneous mantle; mechanical coupling may also occur when the CMB topography is aspherical. Besides changing the mantle rotation via the coupling torques, the mass-redistribution in the core shall produce a spatial-temporal gravity anomaly. Numerical modeling of the core dynamical processes contributes in several geophysical disciplines. It helps explain the physical causes of surface geodynamic observables via space geodetic techniques and other means, e.g. Earth's rotation variation on decadal time scales, and secular time-variable gravity. Conversely, identification of the sources of the observables can provide additional insights on the dynamics of the fluid core, leading to better constraints on the physics in the numerical modeling. In the past few years, our core dynamics modeling efforts, with respect to our MoSST model, have made significant progress in understanding individual geophysical consequences. However, integrated studies are desirable, not only because of more mature numerical core dynamics models, but also because of inter-correlation among the geophysical phenomena, e.g. mass redistribution in the outer core produces not only time-variable gravity, but also gravitational core-mantle coupling and thus the Earth's rotation variation. They are expected to further facilitate multidisciplinary studies of core dynamics and interactions of the core with other

  4. Superiority of DFT+U with non-linear core correction for open-shell binary rare-earth metal oxides: a case study of native point defects in cerium oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bolong

    2014-09-01

    We successfully proposed a newly corrected density functional theory plus Hubbard U parameter (DFT + U) based on partial core correction on the orbitals within norm-conserving lanthanide atomic pseudopotentials. A related and comprehensive investigation of native point defects in cerium oxides has also been performed as an examine by practice.

  5. PRcore_locations: Locations and information for 38 cores (27 from U.S. Geological Survey cruise 2008-008-FA and 11 cores from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory) from offshore Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2008, as a collaborative effort between Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the U.S. Geological Survey, 20 giant gravity cores were collected from areas...

  6. Magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  7. NASA's Earth Science Data Systems - Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2010-01-01

    In order to meet the increasing demand for Earth Science data, NASA has significantly improved the Earth Science Data Systems over the last two decades. This improvement is reviewed in this slide presentation. Many Earth Science disciplines have been able to access the data that is held in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) at the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) that forms the core of the data system.

  8. Crustal concealing of small-scale core-field secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulot, G.; Olsen, Nils; Thebault, E.;

    2009-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is mainly produced within the Earth's liquid and electrically conducting core, as a result of a process known as the geodynamo. Many other sources also contribute to the magnetic signal accessible to observation at the Earth's surface, partly obscuring the main core...

  9. The Nitrogen Budget of Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We comprehensively compile and review N content in geologic materials to calculate a new N budget for Earth. Using analyses of rocks and minerals in conjunction with N-Ar geochemistry demonstrates that the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) contains \\sim7\\pm4 times present atmospheric N (4\\times10^18 kg N, PAN), with 27\\pm16\\times10^18 kg N. Comparison to chondritic composition, after subtracting N sequestered into the core, yields a consistent result, with BSE N between 17\\pm13\\times10^18 kg to 31\\pm24\\times10^18 kg N. In the chondritic comparison we calculate a N mass in Earth's core (180\\pm110 to 300\\pm180\\times10^18 kg) and discuss the Moon as a proxy for the early mantle. Significantly, we find the majority of the planetary budget of N is in the solid Earth. The N estimate herein precludes the need for a "missing N" reservoir. Nitrogen-Ar systematics in mantle rocks and basalts identify two mantle reservoirs: MORB-source like (MSL) and high-N. High-N mantle is composed of young, N-rich material subducted from the...

  10. NASA Earth Science Education Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, T. G.; Callery, S.; Chambers, L. H.; Riebeek Kohl, H.; Taylor, J.; Martin, A. M.; Ferrell, T.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Earth Science Education Collaborative (NESEC) is led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies with partners at three NASA Earth science Centers: Goddard Space Flight Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Langley Research Center. This cross-organization team enables the project to draw from the diverse skills, strengths, and expertise of each partner to develop fresh and innovative approaches for building pathways between NASA's Earth-related STEM assets to large, diverse audiences in order to enhance STEM teaching, learning and opportunities for learners throughout their lifetimes. These STEM assets include subject matter experts (scientists, engineers, and education specialists), science and engineering content, and authentic participatory and experiential opportunities. Specific project activities include authentic STEM experiences through NASA Earth science themed field campaigns and citizen science as part of international GLOBE program (for elementary and secondary school audiences) and GLOBE Observer (non-school audiences of all ages); direct connections to learners through innovative collaborations with partners like Odyssey of the Mind, an international creative problem-solving and design competition; and organizing thematic core content and strategically working with external partners and collaborators to adapt and disseminate core content to support the needs of education audiences (e.g., libraries and maker spaces, student research projects, etc.). A scaffolded evaluation is being conducted that 1) assesses processes and implementation, 2) answers formative evaluation questions in order to continuously improve the project; 3) monitors progress and 4) measures outcomes.

  11. Core Java

    CERN Document Server

    Horstmann, Cay S

    2013-01-01

    Fully updated to reflect Java SE 7 language changes, Core Java™, Volume I—Fundamentals, Ninth Edition, is the definitive guide to the Java platform. Designed for serious programmers, this reliable, unbiased, no-nonsense tutorial illuminates key Java language and library features with thoroughly tested code examples. As in previous editions, all code is easy to understand, reflects modern best practices, and is specifically designed to help jumpstart your projects. Volume I quickly brings you up-to-speed on Java SE 7 core language enhancements, including the diamond operator, improved resource handling, and catching of multiple exceptions. All of the code examples have been updated to reflect these enhancements, and complete descriptions of new SE 7 features are integrated with insightful explanations of fundamental Java concepts.

  12. Numerical models of the Earth’s thermal history: Effects of inner-core solidification and core potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S. L.; Peltier, W. R.; Costin, S. O.

    2005-09-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in the evolution of the inner core and in the possibility that radioactive potassium might be found in significant quantities in the core. The arguments for core potassium come from considerations of the age of the inner core and the energy required to sustain the geodynamo [Nimmo, F., Price, G.D., Brodholt, J., Gubbins, D., 2004. The influence of potassium on core and geodynamo evolution. Geophys. J. Int. 156, 363-376; Labrosse, S., Poirier, J.-P., Le Mouël, J.-L., 2001. The age of the inner core. Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 190, 111-123; Labrosse, S., 2003. Thermal and magnetic evolution of the Earth's core. Phys. Earth Planet Int. 140, 127-143; Buffett, B.A., 2003. The thermal state of Earth's core. Science 299, 1675-1677] and from new high pressure physics analyses [Lee, K., Jeanloz, R., 2003. High-pressure alloying of potassium and iron: radioactivity in the Earth's core? Geophys. Res. Lett. 30 (23); Murthy, V.M., van Westrenen, W., Fei, Y.W., 2003. Experimental evidence that potassium is a substantial radioactive heat source in planetary cores. Nature 423, 163-165; Gessmann, C.K., Wood, B.J., 2002. Potassium in the Earth's core? Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 200, 63-78]. The Earth's core is also located at the lower boundary of the convecting mantle and the presence of radioactive heat sources in the core will affect the flux of heat between these two regions and will, as a result, have a significant impact on the Earth's thermal history. In this paper, we present Earth thermal history simulations in which we calculate fluid flow in a spherical shell representing the mantle, coupled with a core of a given heat capacity with varying degrees of internal heating in the form of K40 and varying initial core temperatures. The mantle model includes the effects of the temperature dependence of viscosity, decaying radioactive heat sources, and mantle phase transitions. The core model includes the thermal effects of inner core

  13. Core merging and stratification following giant impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeau, Maylis; Olson, Peter; Deguen, Renaud; Hirsh, Benjamin H.

    2016-10-01

    A stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary has long been suspected on the basis of geomagnetic and seismic observations. It has been suggested that the outermost core has a stratified layer about 100 km thick that could be due to the diffusion of light elements. Recent seismological evidence, however, supports a layer exceeding 300 km in thickness of enigmatic origin. Here we show from turbulent mixing experiments that merging between projectile and planetary core following a giant impact can lead to a stratified layer at the top of the core. Scaling relationships between post-impact core structure and projectile properties suggest that merging between Earth's protocore and a projectile core that is enriched in light elements and 20 times less massive can produce the thick stratification inferred from seismic data. Our experiments favour Moon-forming impact scenarios involving a projectile smaller than the proto-Earth and suggest that entrainment of mantle silicates into the protocore led to metal-silicate equilibration under extreme pressure-temperature conditions. We conclude that the thick stratified layer detected at the top of Earth's core can be explained as a vestige of the Moon-forming giant impact during the late stages of planetary accretion.

  14. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rubie, David C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so m...

  15. Creating Next Generation Teacher Preparation Programs to Support Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards in K-12 Schools: An Opportunity for the Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, E. E.; Egger, A. E.; Julin, S.; Ronca, R.; Vokos, S.; Ebert, E.; Clark-Blickenstaff, J.; Nollmeyer, G.

    2015-12-01

    A consortium of two and four year Washington State Colleges and Universities in partnership with Washington's Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), the Teachers of Teachers of Science, and Teachers of Teachers of Mathematics, and other key stakeholders, is currently working to improve science and mathematics learning for all Washington State students by creating a new vision for STEM teacher preparation in Washington State aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics and Language Arts. Specific objectives include: (1) strengthening elementary and secondary STEM Teacher Preparation courses and curricula, (2) alignment of STEM teacher preparation programs across Washington State with the NGSS and CCSS, (3) development of action plans to support implementation of STEM Teacher Preparation program improvement at Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) across the state, (4) stronger collaborations between HEIs, K-12 schools, government agencies, Non-Governmental Organizations, and STEM businesses, involved in the preparation of preservice STEM teachers, (5) new teacher endorsements in Computer Science and Engineering, and (6) development of a proto-type model for rapid, adaptable, and continuous improvement of STEM teacher preparation programs. A 2015 NGSS gap analysis of teacher preparation programs across Washington State indicates relatively good alignment of courses and curricula with NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas and Scientific practices, but minimal alignment with NGSS Engineering practices and Cross Cutting Concepts. Likewise, Computer Science and Sustainability ideas and practices are not well represented in current courses and curricula. During the coming year teams of STEM faculty, education faculty and administrators will work collaboratively to develop unique action plans for aligning and improving STEM teacher preparation courses and curricula at their institutions.

  16. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynmcal hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothes pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at lentgh-scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core- mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order l20 years is pseudo-scale-invarient. Magnetic spectra of other

  17. Geoneutrinos and the Earth inner parts structure

    CERN Document Server

    Sinev, V V

    2010-01-01

    The connection between geoneutrino registration and the Earth theory test is discussed. We compare standard theory of lithosphere plates and hypothesis of hydride Earth. Last hypothesis adds additional neutrino source $-$ planet core in which the initial Earth composition is conserved. Large volume scintillation detector is supposed to install at Baksan neutrino observatory INR RAS at Caucasus. The detector will register all possible neutrino fluxes, but mainly geo-neutrinos. So kind a detector (or detector net) placed in a number of sites on the Earth surface can measure all radioactivity from $^{238}$U and $^{232}$Th, because their neutrino energy exceeds the inverse beta-decay reaction threshold. By this way it will it possible to understand if there are any more neutrino sources in the Earth other than the crust and mantle.

  18. Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Oversupply of rare earths led to the significant price drop of rare earth mineral products and separated products in Chinese domestic market. To stabilize the price, prevent waste of resources, further improve regulation capability on domestic rare earth market and rare earth price and maintain sustaining and healthy development of rare earth industry, partial rare earth producers in Baotou and Jiangxi province projected to cease the production for one month.

  19. Magnetic, fluorescent, and thermo-responsive Fe(3)O(4)/rare earth incorporated poly(St-NIPAM) core-shell colloidal nanoparticles in multimodal optical/magnetic resonance imaging probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haie; Tao, Juan; Wang, Wenhao; Zhou, Yingjie; Li, Penghui; Li, Zheng; Yan, Kai; Wu, Shuilin; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Xu, Zushun; Xu, Haibo; Chu, Paul K

    2013-03-01

    Multifunctional colloidal nanoparticles which exhibit fluorescence, superparamagnetism, and thermosensitivity are produced by two step seed emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization in the presence of oleic acid (OA) and sodium undecylenate (NaUA) modified Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. In the first step, St and NIPAM polymerize the NaUA on the surface of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles to form Fe(3)O(4)/poly(St-NIPAM) nanoparticles which act as seeds for the polymerization of Eu(AA)(3)Phen with the remaining St and NIPAM in the second step to form an outer fluorescent layer. The core-shell composite nanoparticles show reversible dimensional changes in response to external temperature stimuli. Fluorescence spectra acquired from the composites exhibit characteristic emission peaks of Eu(3+) at 594 and 619 nm and vivid red luminescence can be observed by 2-photon confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM). In vitro cytotoxicity tests based on the MTT assay demonstrate good cytocompatibility and the composites also possess paramagnetic properties with a maximum saturation magnetization of 6.45 emu/g and high transverse relaxivity rates (r(2)) of 411.78 mM(-1) s(-1). In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies show significant liver and spleen contrast with relative signal intensity reduction of about 86% 10 min after intravenous injection of the composites. These intriguing properties suggest that these nanocarriers have large clinical potential as multimodal optical/MRI probes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnectic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth s core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypotheses pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth s core, this yields a JGR-PI, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change.In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length- scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto- geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core- source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order 120 years is pseudo-scale-invariant. Magnetic spectra of other planets may differ; however, if a transition to non

  1. Other Worlds, Other Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunbury, Susan; Gould, R. R.

    2011-05-01

    The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics is developing a two-to-three week NSF-funded program for middle and high school students using telescope-based investigations of real world cutting edge scientific questions. The goal is to reveal and enhance students' understanding of core concepts in the physical sciences as well as to develop their proficiency in the practice of scientific inquiry. Specifically, students and teachers are joining scientists in the search for habitable worlds by exploring transiting exoplanets. Using robotic telescopes, image processing software and simulations, students take images and then measure the brightness of their target star to create a portrait of a transiting planet including how large it is; the tilt of its orbit; how far it is from its star and what its environment might be like. Once classes collect and analyze their own data, they can begin to compare, combine, and communicate their findings with others in the community. Interactive models help students predict what they might expect to find and interpret what they do find. During the past two years, the Center for Astrophysics has tested the concept in fifty middle-and high-school classrooms, enrichment classes and after school science clubs in 13 states across the United States. To date, astronomy, earth science, and physics students have successfully detected Jupiter-sized planets transiting stars such as TRES-3, HATP-10, and HATP-12. Preliminary results indicate that learning of core concept did occur. Gains in content were most significant in middle school students as this project delivered new information to them while it served primarily as a review of concepts and application of skills for advanced placement classes. A significant change also occurred in students’ self reported knowledge of exoplanets. There was also an increase in students’ awareness of exoplanets and attitudes about science after participating in this project.

  2. Earth from Above

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahley, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Google Earth is a free online software that provides a virtual view of Earth. Using Google Earth, students can view Earth by hovering over features and locations they preselect or by serendipitously exploring locations that catch their fascination. Going beyond hovering, they can swoop forward and even tilt images to make more detailed…

  3. Rare Earth Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    BEFORE the early 1970s, China had no rare earth exports, and the world rare earth market was dominated by the United States, Europe and Japan. In the 1970s, China began to enter the world rare earth market and its share has picked up sharply in the following decades. Today, having the monopoly over global rare earth production, China must improve the benefits from rare earth production, not only from producing individual rare earth products, but also from mastering the intensive processing of rare earth products.

  4. Ancient and Medieval Earth in Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.

    2015-07-01

    Humankind has always sought to recognize the nature of various sky related phenomena and tried to give them explanations. The purpose of this study is to identify ancient Armenians' pantheistic and cosmological perceptions, world view, notions and beliefs related to the Earth. The paper focuses on the structure of the Earth and many other phenomena of nature that have always been on a major influence on ancient Armenians thinking. In this paper we have compared the term Earth in 31 languages. By discussing and comparing Universe structure in various regional traditions, myths, folk songs and phraseological units we very often came across to "Seven Heavens" (Seven heavens is a part of religious cosmology found in many major religions such as Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Christianity (namely Catholicism) and "Seven Earths". Armenians in their turn divided Earth and Heavens into seven layers. And in science too, both the Earth and the Heavens have 7 layers. The Seven Heavens refer to the layers of our atmosphere. The Seven Earths refer to the layers of the Earth (from core to crust), as well as seven continents. We conclude that the perception of celestial objects varies from culture to culture and preastronomy had a significant impact on humankind, particularly on cultural diversities.

  5. The BIOMASS mission — An ESA Earth Explorer candidate to measure the BIOMASS of the earth's forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scipal, K.; Arcioni, M.; Chave, J.

    2010-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) released a Call for Proposals for the next Earth Explorer Core Mission in March 2005, with the aim to select the 7th Earth Explorer (EE-7) mission for launch in the next decade. Twenty-four proposals were received and subject to scientific and technical assessment....

  6. Core science: Stratified by a sunken impactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Miki

    2016-10-01

    There is potential evidence for a stratified layer at the top of the Earth's core, but its origin is not well understood. Laboratory experiments suggest that the stratified layer could be a sunken remnant of the giant impact that formed the Moon.

  7. Core formation in silicate bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    -equilibration is also suggested by mantle siderophile abundances [13], though simple partitioning models do not capture the likely complex P,T evolution during successive giant impacts. The timescale of Martian core formation is currently uncertain (0-10 My) [14], though it is clear that Martian core formation ended before that of the Earth. [1] Stevenson, in Origin of the Earth, 1990. [2] Groebner and Kohlstedt, EPSL 2006. [3] Rubie et al., Treatise Geophys. 2007. [4] Kleine et al., GCA submitted. [5] Weiss et al., LPSC 39, 2008. [6] Keil and Wilson, EPSL 1993 [7] Wanke and Dreibus, PTRSL, 1984. [8] Agnor et al. Icarus 1999 [9] Canup and Asphaug, Nature 2001 [10] Nimmo and Agnor, EPSL 2006. [11] Rubie et al., EPSL 2003 [12] O'Brien et al, Icarus 2006 [13] Righter, AREPS 2003. [14] Nimmo and Kleine, Icarus 2007.

  8. 库什塔依水电站冬季施工的碾压式土石坝沥青混凝土心墙配合比试验研究%Experimental Study on the Mix Proportion of the Asphalt Concrete Core Wall of Rolled Earth-rock Dam in Winter Construction of Cush Kobita Bea Hydropower Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆春

    2014-01-01

    库什塔依水电站位于寒冷地区,沥青混凝土心墙施工期较短,为加快工程施工进度,提前发挥发电效益,对其沥青混凝土心墙冬季低温施工的配合比进行了试验研究,并通过模拟试验验证了-25℃低温条件下的施工工艺。主要包括确定适合冬季低温施工的配合比,冬季施工沥青混凝土的分离度、层间结合性能、压实效果、接合面渗透性及沥青混凝土的力学特性。试验成果表明,沥青混凝土的各项性能均满足设计要求。%Cush Kobita Bea Hydropower Station is located in cold region of Xinjiang ,which leaves shorter time for the construction of asphalt concrete core wall of the rolled earth-rock dam .In order to shorten the construction time and make it possible for the station to operate in advance ,the mix propotion of asphalt concrete core wall were studied for winter low temperature construction .The construction process were simulated at -25℃ to test for resolution ,performance be-tween the layers ,compaction effect ,permeability of contact face and physical-mechanical properties of the asphalt con-crete .The results indicate that the properties of the asphalt concrete can meet the design requirements .

  9. Earth Science Imagery Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Morisette, Jeffrey; Cole-Rhodes, Arlene; Johnson, Kisha; Netanyahu, Nathan S.; Eastman, Roger; Stone, Harold; Zavorin, Ilya

    2003-01-01

    The study of global environmental changes involves the comparison, fusion, and integration of multiple types of remotely-sensed data at various temporal, radiometric, and spatial resolutions. Results of this integration may be utilized for global change analysis, as well as for the validation of new instruments or for new data analysis. Furthermore, future multiple satellite missions will include many different sensors carried on separate platforms, and the amount of remote sensing data to be combined is increasing tremendously. For all of these applications, the first required step is fast and automatic image registration, and as this need for automating registration techniques is being recognized, it becomes necessary to survey all the registration methods which may be applicable to Earth and space science problems and to evaluate their performances on a large variety of existing remote sensing data as well as on simulated data of soon-to-be-flown instruments. In this paper we present one of the first steps toward such an exhaustive quantitative evaluation. First, the different components of image registration algorithms are reviewed, and different choices for each of these components are described. Then, the results of the evaluation of the corresponding algorithms combining these components are presented o n several datasets. The algorithms are based on gray levels or wavelet features and compute rigid transformations (including scale, rotation, and shifts). Test datasets include synthetic data as well as data acquired over several EOS Land Validation Core Sites with the IKONOS and the Landsat-7 sensors.

  10. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  11. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters.

  12. On the genesis of the Earth's magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Paul H; King, Eric M

    2013-09-01

    Few areas of geophysics are today progressing as rapidly as basic geomagnetism, which seeks to understand the origin of the Earth's magnetism. Data about the present geomagnetic field pours in from orbiting satellites, and supplements the ever growing body of information about the field in the remote past, derived from the magnetism of rocks. The first of the three parts of this review summarizes the available geomagnetic data and makes significant inferences about the large scale structure of the geomagnetic field at the surface of the Earth's electrically conducting fluid core, within which the field originates. In it, we recognize the first major obstacle to progress: because of the Earth's mantle, only the broad, slowly varying features of the magnetic field within the core can be directly observed. The second (and main) part of the review commences with the geodynamo hypothesis: the geomagnetic field is induced by core flow as a self-excited dynamo. Its electrodynamics define 'kinematic dynamo theory'. Key processes involving the motion of magnetic field lines, their diffusion through the conducting fluid, and their reconnection are described in detail. Four kinematic models are presented that are basic to a later section on successful dynamo experiments. The fluid dynamics of the core is considered next, the fluid being driven into motion by buoyancy created by the cooling of the Earth from its primordial state. The resulting flow is strongly affected by the rotation of the Earth and by the Lorentz force, which alters fluid motion by the interaction of the electric current and magnetic field. A section on 'magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo theory' is devoted to this rotating magnetoconvection. Theoretical treatment of the MHD responsible for geomagnetism culminates with numerical solutions of its governing equations. These simulations help overcome the first major obstacle to progress, but quickly meet the second: the dynamics of Earth's core are too complex

  13. Guided mode cutoff in rare-earth doped rod-type PCFs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poli, F.; Cucinotta, A.; Passaro, D.

    2008-01-01

    Guided mode properties of rare-earth doped photonic crystal fibers are investigated as a function of the core refractive index, showing the possibility to obtain cutoff at low normalized wavelength.......Guided mode properties of rare-earth doped photonic crystal fibers are investigated as a function of the core refractive index, showing the possibility to obtain cutoff at low normalized wavelength....

  14. Volatile accretion history of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B J; Halliday, A N; Rehkämper, M

    2010-10-28

    It has long been thought that the Earth had a protracted and complex history of volatile accretion and loss. Albarède paints a different picture, proposing that the Earth first formed as a dry planet which, like the Moon, was devoid of volatile constituents. He suggests that the Earth's complement of volatile elements was only established later, by the addition of a small veneer of volatile-rich material at ∼100 Myr (here and elsewhere, ages are relative to the origin of the Solar System). Here we argue that the Earth's mass balance of moderately volatile elements is inconsistent with Albarède's hypothesis but is well explained by the standard model of accretion from partially volatile-depleted material, accompanied by core formation.

  15. Quantitative Modeling of Earth Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    This textbook describes some of the most effective and straightforward quantitative techniques for modeling Earth surface processes. By emphasizing a core set of equations and solution techniques, the book presents state-of-the-art models currently employed in Earth surface process research, as well as a set of simple but practical research tools. Detailed case studies demonstrate application of the methods to a wide variety of processes including hillslope, fluvial, aeolian, glacial, tectonic, and climatic systems. Exercises at the end of each chapter begin with simple calculations and then progress to more sophisticated problems that require computer programming. All the necessary computer codes are available online at www.cambridge.org/9780521855976. Assuming some knowledge of calculus and basic programming experience, this quantitative textbook is designed for advanced geomorphology courses and as a reference book for professional researchers in Earth and planetary science looking for a quantitative approach to Earth surface processes. More details...

  16. Early Earth(s) Across Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojzsis, S.

    2014-04-01

    The geochemical and cosmochemical record of our solar system is the baseline for exploring the question: "when could life appear on a world similar to our own?" Data arising from direct analysis of the oldest terrestrial rocks and minerals from the first 500 Myr of Earth history - termed the Hadean Eon - inform us about the timing for the establishment of a habitable silicate world. Liquid water is the key medium for life. The origin of water, and its interaction with the crust as revealed in the geologic record, guides our exploration for a cosmochemically Earth-like planets. From the time of primary planetary accretion to the start of the continuous rock record on Earth at ca. 3850 million years ago, our planet experienced a waning bolide flux that partially or entirely wiped out surface rocks, vaporized oceans, and created transient serpentinizing atmospheres. Arguably, "Early Earths" across the galaxy may start off as ice planets due to feeble insolation from their young stars, occasionally punctuated by steam atmospheres generated by cataclysmic impacts. Alternatively, early global environments conducive to life spanned from a benign surface zone to deep into crustal rocks and sediments. In some scenarios, nascent biospheres benefit from the exogenous delivery of essential bio-elements via leftovers of accretion, and the subsequent establishment of planetary-scale hydrothermal systems. If what is now known about the early dynamical regime of the Earth serves as any measure of the potential habitability of worlds across space and time, several key boundary conditions emerge. These are: (i) availability and long-term stability of liquid water; (ii) presence of energy resources; (iii) accessibility of organic raw materials; (iv) adequate inventory of radioisotopes to drive internal heating; (v) gross compositional parameters such as mantle/core mass ratio, and (vi) P-T conditions at or near the surface suitable for sustaining biological activity. Life could

  17. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  18. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  19. Geochemistry: how well can Pb isotopes date core formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, Balz S; Kramers, Jan D

    2006-11-02

    Timescale and the physics of planetary core formation are essential constraints for models of Earth's accretion and early differentiation. Wood and Halliday use the apparent mismatch in core-formation dates determined from tungsten (W) and lead (Pb) chrono-meters to argue for a two-stage core formation, involving an early phase of metal segregation followed by a protracted episode of sulphide melt addition. However, we show here that crust-;mantle Pb isotope systematics do not require diachronous core formation. Our observations indicate that very early (< or = 35 Myr) core formation and planet accretion remain the most plausible scenario.

  20. Journey to the Center of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, David

    2014-03-01

    The center of Earth is at about the temperature of the surface of the Sun (about 6000K) but frozen because of the extreme pressure. I will place the Earth in a more general context of planets (including exoplanets) and explain how it is that the materials deep in Earth can behave differently from the same composition at low pressure.I will describe the sequence of layers and materials and conditions as one travels in a hypothetical probe from the surface to the center, emphasizing the things we do not understand well. I will talk about he extent to which Earth's mantle is imperfectly mixed and may have a bottom layer above the core that is different in composition. I will discuss the Urey number puzzle (what explains Earth's heat flow?). I will focus on the puzzle that Earth's magnetic field presents: How is it generated and how has this worked for billions of years? It seems that we need another energy source. I will talk about how Earth has a memory of how it formed, in particulate the high temperatures resulting from events such as the giant impact that led to our Moon. I will end with a discussion of what to do about the remaining puzzles, in particular the possible value of the geoneutrino experiment and attempts to directly probe the interior.

  1. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  2. EarthKAM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sponsored by NASA, EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students) is an educational outreach program allowing middle school students to take pictures...

  3. Earth on the Move.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on the layers of the earth, the relationship between changes on the surface of the earth and its insides, and plate tectonics. Teaching activities are included, with some containing reproducible worksheets and handouts to accompany them. (TW)

  4. NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) represents a new platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing....

  5. Anisotropy in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, Barbara; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2017-08-01

    Seismic anisotropy has been found in many regions of the Earth's interior. Its presence in the Earth's crust has been known since the 19th century, and is due in part to the alignment of anisotropic crystals in rocks, and in part to patterns in the distribution of fractures and pores. In the upper mantle, seismic anisotropy was discovered 50 years ago, and can be attributed for the most part, to the alignment of intrinsically anisotropic olivine crystals during large scale deformation associated with convection. There is some indication for anisotropy in the transition zone, particularly in the vicinity of subducted slabs. Here we focus on the deep Earth - the lower mantle and core, where anisotropy is not yet mapped in detail, nor is there consensus on its origin. Most of the lower mantle appears largely isotropic, except in the last 200-300 km, in the D″ region, where evidence for seismic anisotropy has been accumulating since the late 1980s, mostly from shear wave splitting measurements. Recently, a picture has been emerging, where strong anisotropy is associated with high shear velocities at the edges of the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the central Pacific and under Africa. These observations are consistent with being due to the presence of highly anisotropic MgSiO3 post-perovskite crystals, aligned during the deformation of slabs impinging on the core-mantle boundary, and upwelling flow within the LLSVPs. We also discuss mineral physics aspects such as ultrahigh pressure deformation experiments, first principles calculations to obtain information about elastic properties, and derivation of dislocation activity based on bonding characteristics. Polycrystal plasticity simulations can predict anisotropy but models are still highly idealized and neglect the complex microstructure of polyphase aggregates with strong and weak components. A promising direction for future progress in understanding the origin of seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle

  6. Capturing Near Earth Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Baoyin, Hexi; CHEN Yang; Li, Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have been attracting great attention, and thousands of NEOs have been found to date. This paper examines the NEOs' orbital dynamics using the framework of an accurate solar system model and a Sun-Earth-NEO three-body system when the NEOs are close to Earth to search for NEOs with low-energy orbits. It is possible for such an NEO to be temporarily captured by Earth; its orbit would thereby be changed and it would become an Earth-orbiting object after a small...

  7. Our Sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Raymond L.

    2013-03-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that the Earth has been warming monotonically since 1980. Transient to equilibrium temperature changes take centuries to develop, as the upper levels of the ocean are slow to respond to atmospheric temperature changes. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations, from ice core and observatory measurements, display consistent increases from historical averages, beginning in about 1880. They can be associated with the use of coal ecause of the spread of the industrial revolution from Great Britain to the European continent and beyond. The climactic consequence of this human-dominated increase in atmospheric CO2 has been suggested to define a geologic epoch, termed the ``Anthropocene.'' This could be a short term, relatively minor change in global climate, or an extreme deviation that lasts for thousands of years. In order to stabilize global temperatures, sharp reductions in CO2 emissions are required: an 80% reduction beginning in 2050. U.S. emissions have declined sharply recently because of market conditions leading to the substitution of natural gas for coal for electricity generation. Whether this is the best use for this resource may be questioned, but it nevertheless reduces CO2 production by 67% from a coal-fired power plant, well on the way to the 80% reduction required for global temperature stabilization. Current methods for CO2 capture and storage are not cost effective, and have been slow (if not absent) to introduce at scale. This paper describes research into some potentially economically feasible approaches: cost-effective capture and storage of CO2 from injection of flue gas into subterranean methane-saturated aquifers at the surface; fuels from sunlight without CO2 production; and large-scale electrical energy storage for intermittent (and even constant) electricity generating sources.

  8. Analysis and Processing of a Multi-point Earthing Fault in the Magnetic Core of the Main Transformer at a 66kV Substation%一起66 kV变电站主变铁心多点接地故障的分析与处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李钢; 戚革庆; 柳尚一; 潘超; 刘建国

    2016-01-01

    针对一起66 kV变电站主变铁心多点接地故障实例,详细阐述并分析了主变从投入系统到油色谱例行试验发现异常,再到跟踪监测、带电诊断性试验,最后停电检查、返厂吊罩定位故障点的全过程。通过这起主变故障原因的分析及处理,电网企业对厂家监造、设备运输、验收试验及在线监测等环节提出了更高的要求。%With regards to the multi-point earthing fault example of the magnetic core of the main transformer at a 66kV substation,this paper explains and analyzes the whole process from input of the main transformer into the system,detection of abnormal result of regular oil chromatograph test,tracking monitoring and live diagnostic test,up to inspection after power cut,and localization of fault point after hang cover transportation back to the factory.Through the analysis of the causes and the processing of the fault of the main transformer,the grid enterprise presents higher standards for manufacturer monitoring,equipment transportation,acceptance test and online monitoring.

  9. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  10. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  11. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  12. Lightweight Low Force Rotary Percussive Coring Tool for Planetary Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironaka, Ross; Stanley, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A prototype low-force rotary-percussive rock coring tool for use in acquiring samples for geological surveys in future planetary missions was developed. The coring tool could eventually enable a lightweight robotic system to operate from a relatively small (less than 200 kg) mobile or fixed platform to acquire and cache Mars or other planetary rock samples for eventual return to Earth for analysis. To gain insight needed to design an integrated coring tool, the coring ability of commercially available coring bits was evaluated for effectiveness of varying key parameters: weight-on-bit, rotation speed, percussive rate and force. Trade studies were performed for different methods of breaking a core at its base and for retaining the core in a sleeve to facilitate sample transfer. This led to a custom coring tool design which incorporated coring, core breakage, core retention, and core extraction functions. The coring tool was tested on several types of rock and demonstrated the overall feasibility of this approach for robotic rock sample acquisition.

  13. Protoplanetary Earth Formation: Further Evidence and Geophysical Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2004-01-01

    Recently, I showed that the "standard model" of solar system formation is wrong,yielding the contradiction of terrestrial planets having insufficiently massive cores, and showed instead the consistency of Eucken's 1944 concept of planets raining out in the central regions of hot, gaseous protoplanets. Planets generally consist of concentric shells of matter, but there has been no adequate geophysical explanation to account for the Earth's non-contiguous crustal continental rock layer, except by assuming that the Earth in the distant past was smaller and subsequently expanded. Here, I show that formation of Earth, from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet, will account for the compression of the rocky Earth to about 64 percent of its current radius, yielding a closed, contiguous continental shell with concomitant Earth expansion commencing upon the subsequent removal of its protoplanetary gaseous shell. I now propose that Earth expansion progresses, not from spreading at mid-oceanic ridges as usually assumed, but...

  14. Silicon isotope evidence against an enstatite chondrite Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitoussi, Caroline; Bourdon, Bernard

    2012-03-23

    The compositions of Earth materials are strikingly similar to those of enstatite chondrite meteorites in many isotope systems. Although this suggests that Earth largely accreted from enstatite chondrites, definitive proof of this model has been lacking. By comparing the silicon (Si) isotope signatures of several extraterrestrial materials with terrestrial samples, we show that they cannot be explained by core-formation scenarios involving a bulk Earth of enstatite chondrite composition. Si isotope similarities between the bulk silicate Earth and the Moon preclude the existence of a hidden reservoir in the lower mantle, a necessary condition of the enstatite chondrite model, and require an equilibrium process after the Moon-forming impact. A three-end-member chondritic mixing model for Earth reconciles the Si isotope similarities between enstatite chondrites and Earth.

  15. Galactic Cosmic Rays - Clouds Effect and Bifurcation Model of the Earth Global Climate. Part 2. Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V; Vaschenko, V; Mihalys, O; Kosenko, S; Mavrodiev, S; Vachev, B

    2008-01-01

    The solution of the energy-balance model of the Earth's global climate proposed in Ref. [1] is compared with well-known experimental data on the palaeotemperature evolution of Earth's surface over past 420 kyr and 740 kyr obtained in the framework of Antarctic projects the EPICA Dome C and Vostok. The Solar-Earth mechanism of anomalous temperature jumps observed in the EPICA Dome C and Vostok experiments and its relation with the "order-chaos" transitions in convection evolution in the liquid Earth core responsible to the mechanism of the Earth magnetic field inversions was discussed. The stabilizing role of the slow nuclear burning on the boundary of the liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core (georeactor with power of 30 TW) for convection evolution in the liquid Earth's core and hence in the Earth's magnetic field evolution is pointed out.

  16. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations for Earth tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of a few percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  17. Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations for Earth Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can robustly measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of 4-5 percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  18. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations for Earth tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Walter, E-mail: walter.winter@desy.de

    2016-07-15

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of a few percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  19. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations for earth tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Walter

    2016-04-05

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of a few percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  20. Water in the Earth's Interior: Distribution and Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Schönbächler, Maria; Busemann, Henner; Karato, Shun-Ichiro

    2017-08-01

    The concentration and distribution of water in the Earth has influenced its evolution throughout its history. Even at the trace levels contained in the planet's deep interior (mantle and core), water affects Earth's thermal, deformational, melting, electrical and seismic properties, that control differentiation, plate tectonics and volcanism. These in turn influenced the development of Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and life. In addition to the ubiquitous presence of water in the hydrosphere, most of Earth's "water" actually occurs as trace amounts of hydrogen incorporated in the rock-forming silicate minerals that constitute the planet's crust and mantle, and may also be stored in the metallic core. The heterogeneous distribution of water in the Earth is the result of early planetary differentiation into crust, mantle and core, followed by remixing of lithosphere into the mantle after plate-tectonics started. The Earth's total water content is estimated at 18_{-15}^{+81} times the equivalent mass of the oceans (or a concentration of 3900_{-3300}^{+32700} ppm weight H2O). Uncertainties in this estimate arise primarily from the less-well-known concentrations for the lower mantle and core, since samples for water analyses are only available from the crust, the upper mantle and very rarely from the mantle transition zone (410-670 km depth). For the lower mantle (670-2900 km) and core (2900-4500 km), the estimates rely on laboratory experiments and indirect geophysical techniques (electrical conductivity and seismology). The Earth's accretion likely started relatively dry because it mainly acquired material from the inner part of the proto-planetary disk, where temperatures were too high for the formation and accretion of water ice. Combined evidence from several radionuclide systems (Pd-Ag, Mn-Cr, Rb-Sr, U-Pb) suggests that water was not incorporated in the Earth in significant quantities until the planet had grown to ˜60-90% of its current size, while core formation

  1. Physical Properties of Iron in the Inner Core

    CERN Document Server

    Steinle-Neumann, G; Cohen, R E; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd; Stixrude, Lars

    2002-01-01

    The Earth's inner core plays a vital role in the dynamics of our planet and is itself strongly exposed to dynamic processes as evidenced by a complex pattern of elastic structure. To gain deeper insight into the nature of these processes we rely on a characterization of the physical properties of the inner core which are governed by the material physics of its main constituent, iron. Here we review recent research on structure and dynamics of the inner core, focusing on advances in mineral physics. We will discuss results on core composition, crystalline structure, temperature,and various aspects of elasticity. Based on recent computational results, we will show that aggregate seismic properties of the inner core can be explained by temperature and compression effects on the elasticity of pure iron, and use single crystal anisotropy to develop a speculative textural model of the inner core that can explain major aspects of inner core anisotropy.

  2. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Edda Lína Gunnarsdóttir 1988

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is essential for life on Earth, as we know it, to exist. It forms a magnetic shield around the planet, protecting it from high energy particles and radiation from the Sun, which can cause damage to life, power systems, orbiting satellites, astronauts and spacecrafts. This report contains a general overview of the Earth's magnetic field. The different sources that contribute to the total magnetic field are presented and the diverse variations in the field are describ...

  3. Uderstanding Snowball Earth Deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, a normally clement planet comfortably in its star's habitable zone, suffered global or nearly global glaciation at least twice during the Neoproterozoic era (at about 635 and 710 million years ago). Viewed in the context of planetary evolution, these pan-global glaciations (Snowball Earth events) were extremely rapid, lasting only a few million years. The dramatic effect of the Snowball Earth events on the development of the planet can be seen through their link to rises in atmospheric oxygen and evolutionary innovations. These potential catastrophes on an otherwise clement planet can be used to gain insight into planetary habitability more generally. Since Earth is not currently a Snowball, a sound deglaciation mechanism is crucial for the viability of the Snowball Earth hypothesis. The traditional deglaciation mechanism is a massive build up of CO2 due to reduced weathering during Snowball Earth events until tropical surface temperatures reach the melting point. Once initiated, such a deglaciation might happen on a timescale of only dozens of thousands of years and would thrust Earth from the coldest climate in its history to the warmest. Therefore embedded in Snowball Earth events is an even more rapid and dramatic environmental change. Early global climate model simulations raised doubt about whether Snowball Earth deglaciation could be achieved at a CO2 concentration low enough to be consistent with geochemical data, which represented a potential challenge to the Snowball Earth hypothesis. Over the past few years dust and clouds have emerged as the essential missing additional processes that would allow Snowball Earth deglaciation at a low enough CO2 concentration. I will discuss the dust and cloud mechanisms and the modeling behind these ideas. This effort is critical for the broader implications of Snowball Earth events because understanding the specific deglaciation mechanism determines whether similar processes could happen on other planets.

  4. A study by computer simulation of the generation and evolution of the Earth`s magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Hollerbach, R.; Roberts, P.H.

    1995-12-31

    Until recently very little has been known about the maintenance of the Earth`s magnetic field. The general consensus was that some type of convective motion edits in the Earth`s liquid iron alloy core that is affected by rotational forces in a way that continually generates new magnetic field to replace that which diffuses away. Magnetic-field reversals and secular variation have long been measured but no theory existed to explain these phenomena. To gain an understanding of the basic physical mechanisms of the ``geodynamo,`` we produced the first self-consistent computer simulation of convection and magnetic field generation in a rotating three-dimensional spherical fluid shell as an anologue to the Earth`s convective dynamo. This is a final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  5. Towards a living earth simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, M.; Kossman, D.; Conte, R.; Lukowicz, P.; Argyrakis, P.; Blandford, A.; Bonelli, G.; Anderson, S.; de Freitas, S.; Edmonds, B.; Gilbert, N.; Gross, M.; Kohlhammer, J.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Krause, A.; Linnér, B.-O.; Slusallek, P.; Sorkine, O.; Sumner, R. W.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    The Living Earth Simulator (LES) is one of the core components of the FuturICT architecture. It will work as a federation of methods, tools, techniques and facilities supporting all of the FuturICT simulation-related activities to allow and encourage interactive exploration and understanding of societal issues. Society-relevant problems will be targeted by leaning on approaches based on complex systems theories and data science in tight interaction with the other components of FuturICT. The LES will evaluate and provide answers to real-world questions by taking into account multiple scenarios. It will build on present approaches such as agent-based simulation and modeling, multiscale modelling, statistical inference, and data mining, moving beyond disciplinary borders to achieve a new perspective on complex social systems.

  6. Towards a living earth simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Paolucci, M; Conte, R; Lukowicz, P; Argyrakis, P; Blandford, A; Bonelli, G; Anderson, S; de Freitas, S; Edmonds, B; Gilbert, N; Gross, M; Kohlhammer, J; Koumoutsakos, P; Krause, A; Linnér, B -O; Slusallek, P; Sorkine, O; Sumner, R W; Helbing, D; 10.1140/epjst/e2012-01689-8

    2013-01-01

    The Living Earth Simulator (LES) is one of the core components of the FuturICT architecture. It will work as a federation of methods, tools, techniques and facilities supporting all of the FuturICT simulation-related activities to allow and encourage interactive exploration and understanding of societal issues. Society-relevant problems will be targeted by leaning on approaches based on complex systems theories and data science in tight interaction with the other components of FuturICT. The LES will evaluate and provide answers to real-world questions by taking into account multiple scenarios. It will build on present approaches such as agent-based simulation and modeling, multiscale modelling, statistical inference, and data mining, moving beyond disciplinary borders to achieve a new perspective on complex social systems.

  7. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew E.; Behnke, Jeanne; Lowe, Dawn; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been a central component of NASA Earth observation program for over 10 years. It is one of the largest civilian science information system in the US, performing ingest, archive and distribution of over 3 terabytes of data per day much of which is from NASA s flagship missions Terra, Aqua and Aura. The system supports a variety of science disciplines including polar processes, land cover change, radiation budget, and most especially global climate change. The EOSDIS data centers, collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, archive and distribute standard data products produced by science investigator-led processing systems. Key to the success of EOSDIS is the concept of core versus community requirements. EOSDIS supports a core set of services to meet specific NASA needs and relies on community-developed services to meet specific user needs. EOSDIS offers a metadata registry, ECHO (Earth Observing System Clearinghouse), through which the scientific community can easily discover and exchange NASA s Earth science data and services. Users can search, manage, and access the contents of ECHO s registries (data and services) through user-developed and community-tailored interfaces or clients. The ECHO framework has become the primary access point for cross-Data Center search-and-order of EOSDIS and other Earth Science data holdings archived at the EOSDIS data centers. ECHO s Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST) is the primary web-based client for discovering and ordering cross-discipline data from the EOSDIS data centers. The architecture of the EOSDIS provides a platform for the publication, discovery, understanding and access to NASA s Earth Observation resources and allows for easy integration of new datasets. The EOSDIS also has developed several methods for incorporating socioeconomic data into its data collection. Over the years, we have developed several methods for determining

  8. The Earth's early evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowring, S A; Housh, T

    1995-09-15

    The Archean crust contains direct geochemical information of the Earth's early planetary differentiation. A major outstanding question in the Earth sciences is whether the volume of continental crust today represents nearly all that formed over Earth's history or whether its rates of creation and destruction have been approximately balanced since the Archean. Analysis of neodymium isotopic data from the oldest remnants of Archean crust suggests that crustal recycling is important and that preserved continental crust comprises fragments of crust that escaped recycling. Furthermore, the data suggest that the isotopic evolution of Earth's mantle reflects progressive eradication of primordial heterogeneities related to early differentiation.

  9. Near Earth Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    , Near Earth Objects: Asteroids and comets following paths that bring them near the Earth. NEOs have collided with the Earth since its formation, some causing local devastation, some causing global climate changes, yet the threat from a collision with a near Earth object has only recently been recognised...... of starlight by the Sun, and therefore directly observe the structure of space-time. This thesis explores several aspects of the observation of NEOs with Gaia, emphasising detection of NEOs and the quality of orbits computed from Gaia observations. The main contribution is the work on motion detection...

  10. Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Zaki; Lamb, Christopher A.; Ross, Shane D.

    2012-12-01

    The list of detected near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is constantly growing. NEAs are likely targets for resources to support space industrialization, as they may be the least expensive source of certain needed raw materials. The limited supply of precious metals and semiconducting elements on Earth may be supplemented or even replaced by the reserves floating in the form of asteroids around the solar system. Precious metals make up a significant fraction NEAs by mass, and even one metallic asteroid of ˜1km size and fair enrichment in platinum-group metals would contain twice the tonnage of such metals already harvested on Earth. There are ˜1000 NEAs with a diameter of greater than 1 km. Capturing these asteroids around the Earth would expand the mining industry into an entirely new dimension. Having such resources within easy reach in Earth's orbit could provide an off-world environmentally friendly remedy for impending terrestrial shortages, especially given the need for raw materials in developing nations. In this paper, we develop and implement a conceptually simple algorithm to determine trajectory characteristics necessary to move NEAs into capture orbits around the Earth. Altered trajectories of asteroids are calculated using an ephemeris model. Only asteroids of eccentricity less than 0.1 have been studied and the model is restricted to the ecliptic plane for simplicity. We constrain the time of retrieval to be 10 years or less, based on considerations of the time to return on investment. For the heliocentric phase, constant acceleration is assumed. The acceleration required for transporting these asteroids from their undisturbed orbits to the sphere of influence of the Earth is the primary output, along with the impulse or acceleration necessary to effect capture to a bound orbit once the Earth's sphere of influence is reached. The initial guess for the constant acceleration is provided by a new estimation method, similar in spirit to Edelbaum's. Based on the

  11. Secular variation and core-flow modelling with stable strafication at the top of the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Richard; Buffett, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Observed geomagnetic secular variation has been used for many years to provide an observational constraint on the dynamics of the core through the modelling of its surface flow. Recent results in both seismology and mineral physics provide strong evidence of a stably stratified layer at the top of the core, which has substantial implications for the calculation of such flows. It has been assumed for many years that the dynamic state at the core surface is close to tangentially geostrophic, and pure stable stratification also requires a flow to be toroidal. Combining these two conditions requires variations in flow that are completely zonal toroidal, which are known not to provide an adequate explanation of the observed secular variation. However, a stably stratified layer can support flow instabilities of a more general character. Buffett (2014) has recently provided a model in which zonal toroidal motions are associated with the excitation of a zonal poloidal instability. This model is able to explain the broad variation of the axial dipole over the past 100 years, and also to explain feature of geomagnetic jerks that cannot be explained by purely torsional motions. This model has inspired a new generation of core-flow models, with a substantial time-varying zonal poloidal component, something that is absent from most models of core surface flow. Here, we present these new models, and consider to what extent this flow structure can explain the details of secular variation. We also consider the implications for the connection between core-surface flow and length-of-day variation - a stably stratified layer has implications for the interpretation of core flow and the Earth's angular momentum budget. Finally, we consider the ability of core-surface flow models to probe the structure of the stably- stratified layer. Buffett (2014). Geomagnetic fluctuations reveal stable stratification at the top of the Earth's core, Nature 507, 484-487, doi:10.1038/nature13122

  12. Palaeointensity, core thermal conductivity and the unknown age of the inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Aleksey V.; Tarduno, John A.; Kulakov, Evgeniy V.; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Bono, Richard K.

    2016-05-01

    Data on the evolution of Earth's magnetic field intensity are important for understanding the geodynamo and planetary evolution. However, the paleomagnetic record in rocks may be adversely affected by many physical processes, which must be taken into account when analysing the palaeointensity database. This is especially important in the light of an ongoing debate regarding core thermal conductivity values, and how these relate to the Precambrian geodynamo. Here, we demonstrate that several data sets in the Precambrian palaeointensity database overestimate the true paleofield strength due to the presence of non-ideal carriers of palaeointensity signals and/or viscous re-magnetizations. When the palaeointensity overestimates are removed, the Precambrian database does not indicate a robust change in geomagnetic field intensity during the Mesoproterozoic. These findings call into question the recent claim that the solid inner core formed in the Mesoproterozoic, hence constraining the thermal conductivity in the core to `moderate' values. Instead, our analyses indicate that the presently available palaeointensity data are insufficient in number and quality to constrain the timing of solid inner core formation, or the outstanding problem of core thermal conductivity. Very young or very old inner core ages (and attendant high or low core thermal conductivity values) are consistent with the presently known history of Earth's field strength. More promising available data sets that reflect long-term core structure are geomagnetic reversal rate and field morphology. The latter suggests changes that may reflect differences in Archean to Proterozoic core stratification, whereas the former suggest an interval of geodynamo hyperactivity at ca. 550 Ma.

  13. Comodules over semiperfect corings

    CERN Document Server

    Caenepeel, S

    2011-01-01

    We discuss when the Rat functor associated to a coring satisfying the left $\\alpha$-condition is exact. We study the category of comodules over a semiperfect coring. We characterize semiperfect corings over artinian rings and over qF-rings.

  14. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  15. Fourteen Times the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    careful observation strategy to reduce the "seismic noise" of the star. These new data confirmed both the amplitude and the periodicity of the radial velocity variations found during the 8 nights in June. The astronomers were left with only one convincing explanation to this periodic signal: a second planet orbits mu Arae and accomplishes a full revolution in 9.5 days. But this was not the only surprise: from the radial velocity amplitude, that is the size of the wobble induced by the gravitational pull of the planet on the star, the astronomers derived a mass for the planet of only 14 times the mass of the Earth! This is about the mass of Uranus, the smallest of the giant planets in the solar system. The newly found exoplanet therefore sets a new record in the smallest planet discovered around a solar type star. At the boundary The mass of this planet places it at the boundary between the very large earth-like (rocky) planets and giant planets. As current planetary formation models are still far from being able to account for all the amazing diversity observed amongst the extrasolar planets discovered, astronomers can only speculate on the true nature of the present object. In the current paradigm of giant planet formation, a core is formed first through the accretion of solid "planetesimals". Once this core reaches a critical mass, gas accumulates in a "runaway" fashion and the mass of the planet increases rapidly. In the present case, this later phase is unlikely to have happened for otherwise the planet would have become much more massive. Furthermore, recent models having shown that migration shortens the formation time, it is unlikely that the present object has migrated over large distances and remained of such small mass. This object is therefore likely to be a planet with a rocky (not an icy) core surrounded by a small (of the order of a tenth of the total mass) gaseous envelope and would therefore qualify as a "super-Earth". Further Prospects The HARPS

  16. Rare Earth-Activated Silica-Based Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Armellini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different kinds of rare earth-activated glass-based nanocomposite photonic materials, which allow to tailor the spectroscopic properties of rare-earth ions: (i Er3+-activated SiO2-HfO2 waveguide glass ceramic, and (ii core-shell-like structures of Er3+-activated silica spheres obtained by a seed growth method, are presented.

  17. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  18. Solid Earth: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, R.

    1991-10-01

    The principles of the solid Earth program are introduced. When considering the study of solid Earth from space, satellites are used as beacons, inertial references, free fall probes and carrying platforms. The phenomenon measured by these satellites and the processes which can be studied as a result of these measurements are tabulated. The NASA solid Earth program focusses on research into surface kinematics, Earth rotation, land, ice, and ocean monitoring. The ESA solid Earth program identifies as its priority the Aristoteles mission for determining the gravity and magnetic field globally, with high spatial resolution and high accuracy. The Aristoteles mission characteristics and goals are listed. The benefits of the improved gravity information that will be provided by this mission are highlighted. This information will help in the following research: geodesy, orbit mechanics, geodynamics, oceanography, climate sea level, and the atmosphere.

  19. Core and Geodynamo Evolution and the Influence of Potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; Price, G. D.; Brodholt, J.

    2002-12-01

    In his penultimate paragraph, Birch (1952) notes that the growth of the inner core is controlled by its melting curve, which ``. . . has implications for the `hydromagnetic' theories of the Earth's magnetism''. Although the terminology has changed, the relationship between the growth of the inner core and the geodynamo is still an area of active research, and is still limited by our imperfect understanding of core properties. The ability of the Earth's core to sustain a geodynamo depends on the entropy produced by core cooling and/or solidification [1,2]. The rate of cooling depends on the rate at which the mantle extracts heat from the core. In this contribution we model the coupled thermal evolution of the core and mantle [3,4,5] to investigate the circumstances under which the geodynamo can have been sustained for at least 3~Ga. In particular, we use improved estimates of core properties [6], and examine the effect of potassium in the core, as suggested by recent theoretical [7] and experimental [8] studies. Models without potassium in the core and with realistic present-day temperature and viscosity structures can sustain a geodynamo. However, for the nominal core parameters these models produce an inner core which is too large. For reasonable mantle viscosities, the core cools too rapidly; a reduced cooling rate produces a smaller inner core but requires unreasonable viscosities. The robustness of this result depends mainly on uncertainties in the solidus temperature of the core and the mean thermal expansivity of the mantle. Introducing potassium into the core retards the rate of core growth [7] and provides an additional source of entropy [1]. For a core potassium content of 100-400ppm [8], the criteria of mantle and core temperature and viscosity structure, inner core radius and geodynamo generation can all be satisfied. [1] Gubbins, D. et al., GJRAS 59, 57-99, 1979. [2] Buffett, B.A. et al., JGR 101, 7989-8006, 1996. [3] Mollett, S., GJRAS 76, 653

  20. Banded transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  1. Final Report - BRER Core Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan B. Douple

    2007-01-09

    This contract provided core support for activities of the advisory committee of experts comprising the Board on Radiation Effects Research (BRER), in The National Academies' Division on Earth and Life Studies. That committee met two times during the funding period. The committee members provided oversight and advice regarding ongoing BRER projects and also assisted in the identification of potential committee members for new studies and the development of proposals for projects in the radiation sciences worthy for future study. In addition, funding provided support for the planning, advertisement, and invited speakers' travel-expense reimbursement for the Third and Fourth Gilbert W. Beebe Symposia held at The National Academies on December 1, 2004 and on November 30, 2005, respectively.

  2. Dynamical Models to Infer the Core Mass Fraction of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Barclay, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The uncompressed density of Venus is just a few percent lower than Earth's, however the nature of the interior core structure of Venus remains unclear. Employing state-of-the-art dynamical formation models that allow both accretion and collisional fragmentation, we perform hundreds of simulations of terrestrial planet growth around the Sun in the presence of the giant planets. For both Earth and Venus analogs, we quantify the iron-silicate ratios, water/volatile abundances and specific impact energies of all collisions that lead to their formation. Preliminary results suggest that the distributions of core mass fraction and water content are comparable among the Earth and Venus analogs, suggesting that Earth and Venus may indeed have formed with similar structures and compositions.

  3. Core and shallow-core d- to f-shell excitations in rare-earth metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J. A.; Moore, K. T.; van der Laan, G.; Bradley, J. P.; Gordon, R. A.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the results of probing the light lanthanide metals Ce, Pr, and Nd with inelastic x-ray and electron scattering. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope-based electron spectroscopy and nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering are shown to be in a high degree of accord and here serve as complementary probes of electronic structure. The high resolution and high signal-to-noise electron technique allows for the measurement of the complex and subtle excitation spectra in the lanthanide metals, validating the applicability of the screened trivalent atomic model used for these materials. In addition, the momentum transfer dependence of the x-ray scattering is extracted and compared against atomic calculations for the most tightly bound excitonic resonances, which provides a direct test of the predicted atomic radial wave functions.

  4. From DeepCore to PINGU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yáñez J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Very large volume neutrino telescopes (VLVNTs observe atmospheric neutrinos over a wide energy range (GeV to TeV, after they travel distances as large as the Earth's diameter. DeepCore, the low energy extension of IceCube, has started making meaningful measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters θ23 and | Δm232| by analyzing the atmospheric flux at energies above 10 GeV. PINGU, a proposed project to lower DeepCore's energy threshold, aims to use the same flux to further increase the precision with which these parameters are known, and eventually determine the sign of Δm232. The latest results from DeepCore, and the planned transition to PINGU, are discussed here.

  5. The Oxford Companion to the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Paul L.

    2001-06-01

    Here is a wealth of information on planet Earth, ranging from the heights of the ionsphere down to the red-hot molten core. Written by some 200 expert contributors, and illustrated with over 600 pictures, including 16 pages of color plates, The Oxford Companion to the Earth offers 900 alphabetically arranged entries that cover everything from deserts and wetlands to mountains, caves, glaciers, and coral reefs. There are articles on natural phenomena such as tornadoes and tsunamis, volcanoes and earthquakes, jet streams and weather fronts; on the history of Earth, including the origin of life, Burgess Shale fauna, dinosaurs, and the Ice Ages; on key figures, such as Agassiz, Cuvier, Darwin, and Lamarck; and on such important ecological concerns as acid rain, the ozone layer, industrial waste disposal, and the greenhouse effect. The Companion also examines the great sources of wealth to be found in the Earth, from coal and oil to gold, silver, and diamonds, and many curious land formations, from sinkholes and fiords to yardangs and quicksand. There are brief entries on rock types, from amber to travertine, and extensive essays on cutting-edge aspects of the earth sciences, such as seismology and marine geology. The Companion includes extensive cross-references, suggested further reading, an index, and many useful appendices, with a geological timescale, facts and figures about the Earth, and a table of chemical elements. The Oxford Companion to the Earth is a unique reference work, offering unrivaled coverage of our home planet. Generously illustrated and vividly written, it is a treasure house of information for all lovers of natural history, geology, and ecology, whether professional or amateur.

  6. The Earth effects on the supernova neutrino spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, K

    2001-01-01

    The Earth effects on the energy spectra supernova neutrinos are studied. We analyse numerically the time-integrated energy spectra of neutrino in a mantle-core-mantle step function model of the Earth's matter density profile. We consider a realistic frame-work in which there are three active neutrinos whose mass squared differences and mixings are constrained by the present understanding of solar and atmospheric neutrinos. We find that the energy spectra change for some allowed mixing parameters. We show that observation of the Earth effect allow us to identify the solar neutrino solution and to probe the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$.

  7. Earth as art three

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  8. Sun-Earth Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  9. Accretion of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canup, Robin M

    2008-11-28

    The origin of the Earth and its Moon has been the focus of an enormous body of research. In this paper I review some of the current models of terrestrial planet accretion, and discuss assumptions common to most works that may require re-examination. Density-wave interactions between growing planets and the gas nebula may help to explain the current near-circular orbits of the Earth and Venus, and may result in large-scale radial migration of proto-planetary embryos. Migration would weaken the link between the present locations of the planets and the original provenance of the material that formed them. Fragmentation can potentially lead to faster accretion and could also damp final planet orbital eccentricities. The Moon-forming impact is believed to be the final major event in the Earth's accretion. Successful simulations of lunar-forming impacts involve a differentiated impactor containing between 0.1 and 0.2 Earth masses, an impact angle near 45 degrees and an impact speed within 10 per cent of the Earth's escape velocity. All successful impacts-with or without pre-impact rotation-imply that the Moon formed primarily from material originating from the impactor rather than from the proto-Earth. This must ultimately be reconciled with compositional similarities between the Earth and the Moon.

  10. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.

  11. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  12. Was core formation violent enough to homogenize the early mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, S. A.; Kaula, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of iron, its thermal state and its phase in the accreting Earth probably played a major role in the Earth's early thermal evolution. Plausible impact thermal histories make it possible that pure iron was molten in the accreting Earth after it was about 10% grown. Hence, iron eutectic alloys (FeS, FeO) certainly were. Additionally, the initial temperature of the core is an important constraint on the secular cooling of the early Earth and on the strength of the early geodynamo. Whether iron is solid or molten would influence geochemical equilibria in the upper and lower mantle; the mode of core formation, by spherical or near-spherical blobs, stalk-like instabilities, or something more catastrophic would influence the partitioning of siderophiles between silicate and iron phases. Early descent of iron (during accretion) favors partitioning according to low-pressure phase equilibria, whereas late descent favors higher pressure. The later core formation occurs, the greater the heat pulse, due to the strong dependence of gravitational potential energy on planetary radius. The heat may homogenize the mantle if core formation is global; otherwise, heterogeneity of iron differentiation may leave some of the pre-archean mantle unaffected. The larger the chunks of proto-core (and hence smaller surface/volume ratios) the greater the heterogeneity.

  13. Earth before life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzban, Caren; Viswanathan, Raju; Yurtsever, Ulvi

    2014-01-09

    A recent study argued, based on data on functional genome size of major phyla, that there is evidence life may have originated significantly prior to the formation of the Earth. Here a more refined regression analysis is performed in which 1) measurement error is systematically taken into account, and 2) interval estimates (e.g., confidence or prediction intervals) are produced. It is shown that such models for which the interval estimate for the time origin of the genome includes the age of the Earth are consistent with observed data. The appearance of life after the formation of the Earth is consistent with the data set under examination.

  14. Earth science big data at users' fingertips: the EarthServer Science Gateway Mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Roberto; Bruno, Riccardo; Calanducci, Antonio; Fargetta, Marco; Pappalardo, Marco; Rundo, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The EarthServer project (www.earthserver.eu), funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Program, aims at establishing open access and ad-hoc analytics on extreme-size Earth Science data, based on and extending leading-edge Array Database technology. The core idea is to use database query languages as client/server interface to achieve barrier-free "mix & match" access to multi-source, any-size, multi-dimensional space-time data -- in short: "Big Earth Data Analytics" - based on the open standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Coverage Processing Service (OGC WCPS) and the W3C XQuery. EarthServer combines both, thereby achieving a tight data/metadata integration. Further, the rasdaman Array Database System (www.rasdaman.com) is extended with further space-time coverage data types. On server side, highly effective optimizations - such as parallel and distributed query processing - ensure scalability to Exabyte volumes. In this contribution we will report on the EarthServer Science Gateway Mobile, an app for both iOS and Android-based devices that allows users to seamlessly access some of the EarthServer applications using SAML-based federated authentication and fine-grained authorisation mechanisms.

  15. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-02

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  16. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2005-01-01

    The principles of Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics are disclosed leading to a new way to interpret whole-Earth dynamics. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics incorporates elements of and unifies the two seemingly divergent dominant theories of continential displacement, plate tectonics theory and Earth expansion theory. Whole-Earth decompression is the consequence of Earth formation from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet with subsequent loss of gases and ices and concomitant rebounding. The i...

  17. Earth rotation and geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Brzezinski, Aleksander; Kosek, Wieslaw; Nastula, Jolanta

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the summary of research activities carried out in Poland in 2011-2014 in the field of Earth rotation and geodynamics by several Polish research institutions. It contains a summary of works on Earth rotation, including evaluation and prediction of its parameters and analysis of the related excitation data as well as research on associated geodynamic phenomena such as geocentre motion, global sea level change and hydrological processes. The second part of the paper deals with monitoring of geodynamic phenomena. It contains analysis of geodynamic networks of local, and regional scale using space (GNSS and SLR) techniques, Earth tides monitoring with gravimeters and water-tube hydrostatic clinometer, and the determination of secular variation of the Earth' magnetic field.

  18. Earth science: Extraordinary world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James M. D.

    2016-09-01

    The isotopic compositions of objects that formed early in the evolution of the Solar System have been found to be similar to Earth's composition -- overturning notions of our planet's chemical distinctiveness. See Letters p.394 & p.399

  19. Gambling with the earth

    CERN Multimedia

    Muir, H

    2000-01-01

    The probability that dangerous Earth-devouring particles will be born at a new accelerator in the US may be tiny, but scientists have played down the devastating potential costs in their risk assessments according to a physicist (1 page).

  20. Astronomy: Earth's seven sisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snellen, Ignas A. G.

    2017-02-01

    Seven small planets whose surfaces could harbour liquid water have been spotted around a nearby dwarf star. If such a configuration is common in planetary systems, our Galaxy could be teeming with Earth-like planets. See Letter p.456

  1. Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ July 20~31 Rare earth market still went downward, which was mainly led by sluggish demand for didymium products. Weak demand by domestic NdFeB market was attributed to continuous price falling of didymium mischmetal.

  2. Analyzing earth's surface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D. J.; Elifrits, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Manual discusses simple inexpensive image analysis technique used to interpret photographs and scanner of data of Earth's surface. Manual is designed for those who have no need for sophisticated computer-automated analysis procedures.

  3. Managing Planet Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the human use of the planet earth. Describes the global patterns and the regional aspects of change. Four requirements for the cultivation of leadership and institutional competence are suggested. Lists five references for further reading. (YP)

  4. Earliest life on earth

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Suzanne D

    2010-01-01

    This volume integrates the latest findings on earliest life forms, identified and characterized in some of the oldest rocks on Earth. It places emphasis on the integration of analytical methods with observational techniques and experimental simulations.

  5. K-core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander L. Wolman

    2011-01-01

    K-core inflation is a new class of underlying inflation measures. The two most popular measures of underlying inflation are core inflation and trimmed mean inflation. The former removes fixed categories of goods and services (food and energy) from the inflation calculation, and the latter removes fixed percentiles of the weighted distribution of price changes. In contrast, k-core inflation specifies a size of relative price change to be removed from the inflation calculation. Thus, the catego...

  6. Earth/Lands

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Earth is an essentially original and misunderstood raw material with great potential, from the positive environmental and energy ratio, to its admirable capacity to integrate other materials such as stone, wood, brick, lime, vegetable fibres, etc., capable also of constituting the sole material for whole buildings in climactical and geographically extreme situations. Earth offers a great capacity to respond to the housing needs of millions of human beings, not only quantitative needs compa...

  7. Earth rotation and geodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bogusz Janusz; Brzezinski Aleksander; Kosek Wieslaw; Nastula Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the summary of research activities carried out in Poland in 2011-2014 in the field of Earth rotation and geodynamics by several Polish research institutions. It contains a summary of works on Earth rotation, including evaluation and prediction of its parameters and analysis of the related excitation data as well as research on associated geodynamic phenomena such as geocentre motion, global sea level change and hydrological processes. The second part of the paper deals wit...

  8. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments. DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  9. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  10. Toward other Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzes, Artie P.

    2016-04-01

    How common are habitable Earth-like planets? This is a key question that drives much of current research in exoplanets. To date, we have discovered over one thousand exoplanets, mostly through the transit method. Among these are Earth-size planets, but these orbit very close to the star (semi-major axis approximately 0.01 Astronomical Units). Potentially rocky planets have also been discovered in a star's habitable zone, but these have approximately twice the radius of the Earth. These certainly do not qualify as Earth "twins". Several hundreds of multi-planet systems have also been discovered, but these are mostly ultra-compact systems with up to seven planets all with orbital distances less than that of Mercury in our solar system. The detection of a planetary system that is the direct analog of our solar system still eludes us. After an overview of the current status of exoplanet discoveries I will discuss the prospects and challenges of finding such Earth analogs from the ground and from future space missions like PLATO. After over two decades of searching, we may well be on the brink of finding other Earths.

  11. Uncovering the Chemistry of Earth-like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Sasselov, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    We propose to use the evidence from our solar system to understand exoplanets, and in particular, to predict their surface chemistry and thereby the possibility of life. An Earth-like planet, born from the same nebula as its host star, is composed primarily of silicate rocks and an iron-nickel metal core, and depleted in volatile content in a systematic manner. The more volatile (easier to vaporize or dissociate into gas form) an element is in an Earth-like planet, the more depleted the element is compared to its host star. After depletion, an Earth-like planet would go through the process of core formation due to heat from radioactive decay and collisions. Core formation depletes a planet's rocky mantle of siderophile (iron-loving) elements, in addition to the volatile depletion. After that, Earth-like planets likely accrete some volatile-rich materials, called "late veneer". The late veneer could be essential to the origins of life on Earth and Earth-like planets, as it also delivers the volatiles such as nitrogen, sulfur, carbon and water to the planet's surface, which are crucial for life to occur. Here we build an integrative model of Earth-like planets from the bottom up. Thus the chemical compositions of Earth-like planets could be inferred from their mass-radius relations and their host stars' elemental abundances, and the origins of volatile contents (especially water) on their surfaces could be understood, and thereby shed light on the origins of life on them. This elemental abundance model could be applied to other rocky exoplanets in exoplanet systems.

  12. INTRODUCTION All earth dams in their natural state experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Earth Dam constructed within the Precambrian Basement Complex terrain of Southwestern Nigeria. The study was aimed at ... The 2-D resistivity structure revealed that the core of the dam embankment is .... within the rain forest region of Nigeria. The ..... (citrus Sinensis Osbeck) Stored at Ambient Tropical Condition. 251.

  13. Contextualizing Earth Science Professional Development Courses for Geoscience Teachers in Boston: Earth Science II (Solid Earth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, M. S.; Kamerer, B.; Vugrin, M.; Miller, M.

    2009-12-01

    Earth Science II: The Solid Earth -- Earth History and Planetary Science -- is the second of two Earth Science courses, and one of eleven graduate level science Contextualized Content Courses (CCC), that have been developed by the Boston Science Partnership as part of an NSF-funded Math Science Partnership program. A core goal of these courses is to provide high level science content to middle and high school teachers while modeling good instructional practices directly tied to the Boston Public Schools and Massachusetts science curriculum frameworks. All of these courses emphasize hands-on, lab-based, inquiry-driven, student-centered lessons. The Earth Science II team aimed to strictly adhere to ABC (Activity Before Concept) and 5E/7E models of instruction, and limited lecture or teacher-centered instruction to the later “Explanation” stages of all lessons. We also introduced McNeill and Krajick’s Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER) model of scientific explanation for middle school classroom discourse, both as a powerful scaffold leading to higher levels of accountable talk in the classroom, and to model science as a social construct. Daily evaluations, dutifully filled out by the course participants and diligently read by the course instructors, were quite useful in adapting instruction to the needs of the class on a real-time basis. We find the structure of the CCC teaching teams - university-based faculty providing expert content knowledge, K-12-based faculty providing age appropriate pedagogies and specific links to the K-12 curriculum - quite a fruitful, two-way collaboration. From the students’ perspective, one of the most useful takeaways from the university-based faculty was “listening to experts model out loud how they reason,” whereas some of the more practical takeaways (i.e., lesson components directly portable to the classroom?) came from the K-12-based faculty. The main takeaways from the course as a whole were the promise to bring more hands

  14. An integral approach to investigate planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The same core-mantle differentiation process was in operation during the early formation of the terrestrial planets, but it led to unique cores for the Earth, Venus, Mars, and Mercury, with different magnetic fields, reflecting their different dynamic, physical, and chemical states. Assuming all terrestrial planets shared the same materials of the building block, the differences must be resulted from the different conditions of the early accretion and the subsequent planetary evolution unique to each planet. The pressures at the core-mantle boundary of the terrestrial planets range from as low as 7 GPa to 136 GPa. The physical state (liquid or solid) for each planetary core is closely tied to the melting and chemical composition of the cores. In order to determine the minimal temperature of a liquid core or the maximal temperature of a solid core, we have systematically investigated melting relations in the binary systems Fe-FeS, Fe-C, and Fe-FeSi, move toward unravelling the crystallization sequence and element partitioning between solid and liquid metal in the ternary and quaternary systems up to 25 GPa, using multi-anvil apparatus. We have developed new techniques to analyze the quenched samples recovered from laser-heating diamond-anvil cell experiments using combination of focus ion beam (FIB) milling, high-resolution SEM imaging, and quantitative chemical analysis with silicon drift detector EDS. With precision milling of the laser-heating spot, we determined melting using quenching texture criteria imaged with high-resolution SEM and the sulfur partitioning between solid and liquid at submicron spatial resolution. We have also re-constructed 3D image of the laser-heating spot at multi-megabar pressures to better constrain melting point and understanding melting process. The new techniques allow us to extend precise measurements of melting relations to core pressures in the laser-heating diamond-anvil cell. In addition to the static experiments, we also used

  15. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  16. Making an Ice Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  17. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  18. Iowa Core Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  19. Mercury's core evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  20. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  1. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  2. Hydrogenation of iron in the early stage of Earth's evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka-Oku, Riko; Yagi, Takehiko; Gotou, Hirotada; Okuchi, Takuo; Hattori, Takanori; Sano-Furukawa, Asami

    2017-01-01

    Density of the Earth's core is lower than that of pure iron and the light element(s) in the core is a long-standing problem. Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the solar system and thus one of the important candidates. However, the dissolution process of hydrogen into iron remained unclear. Here we carry out high-pressure and high-temperature in situ neutron diffraction experiments and clarify that when the mixture of iron and hydrous minerals are heated, iron is hydrogenized soon after the hydrous mineral is dehydrated. This implies that early in the Earth's evolution, as the accumulated primordial material became hotter, the dissolution of hydrogen into iron occurred before any other materials melted. This suggests that hydrogen is likely the first light element dissolved into iron during the Earth's evolution and it may affect the behaviour of the other light elements in the later processes.

  3. Thermonuclear Processes as a Principal Source of the Earth's Internal Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terez, E. I.; Terez, I. E.

    2011-12-01

    A cosmological model of the formation of the Solar System is presented. It is shown that the main source of the Earth's energy is delivered from the thermonuclear processes in the inner Earth's core consisting of metallic hydrides. Several theoretical studies showed that under low temperature (Tspringerlink.com/content/jn2576q7727q0034

  4. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near-Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field...

  5. Rare earth element records from core sediments of southern Pearl River Delta: Geochemical response to palaeoenvironmental changes during the Late Quaternary%珠江三角洲南部晚第四纪环境变化的稀土元素记录

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春莲; 吴洁; 杨婷婷; Franz T Fürsich; 张素青

    2011-01-01

    The rare earth element (BEE) distribution in Core PRD05 is closely related to sedimentary environmental changes during the Late Quaternary in the southern Pearl River Delta. Before approximately 31 000 cai a BP, a fluvial setting developed in the study area. The sediments have a lower ∑REE concentration and show HREE enrichment, which are effects of grain size and heavy mineral concentration. The sediments dated to 31 000 to 16 600 cai a BP were possibly deposited in a brackish-water environment, with a high ∑REE and a clear enrichment of LREE relative to HREE. The upper part of these sediments underwent subaerial weathering and erosion during the last glacial maximum. Their REE pattern is subparallel to that of the lower part of sediments, with a slightly higher enrichment of LREE. During the first phase of the postglacial sea-level rise (from around 16600 to 10300 cal a BP), a swamp environment developed in the study area. Organic-rich conditions resulted in high ∑REE concentrations.Since 10 300 cai a BP, an estuarine environment with short-term fluctuations developed and persisted until 5600 cai a BP. Correspondingly, the sediments generally exhibit an enrichment of ∑REE, particularly LREE. A fluvial environment developed at around 5600 cai a BP, and was succeeded by an alluvial plain setting with occasional tidal influence. REE concentrations strikingly decreased and frequently fluctuated.%珠江三角洲南部平原PRD05孔稀土元素(REE)的分布特征与晚第四纪沉积环境变化密切相关.随着不同时期沉积环境的波动,稀土元素分布也发生相应的变化.约31 000 cal a BP以前,研究区发育河流环境,受矿物组成和沉积物粒度的影响,∑REE含量偏低,且重稀土元素(HREE)相对富集.31 000-16600cal a BP期间,∑REE含量明显高于前一阶段,并显示轻稀土元素(LREE)富集;稀土元素分布模式表现为河口半咸水环境特征;其上部沉积物经历了末次冰盛期的风化作用,稀

  6. The earth's hydrological cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet, R-M; Calisto, M; Destouni, G; Gurney, R; Johannessen, J; Kerr, Y; Lahoz, WA; Rast, M

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive presentation of our present understanding of the Earth's Hydrological cycle and the problems, consequences and impacts that go with this topic. Water is a central component in the Earth's system. It is indispensable for life on Earth in its present form and influences virtually every aspect of our planet's life support system. On relatively short time scales, atmospheric water vapor interacts with the atmospheric circulation and is crucial in forming the Earth's climate zones. Water vapor is the most powerful of the greenhouse gases and serves to enhance the tropospheric temperature. The dominant part of available water on Earth resides in the oceans. Parts are locked up in the land ice on Greenland and Antarctica and a smaller part is estimated to exist as groundwater. If all the ice over the land and all the glaciers were to melt, the sea level would rise by some 80 m. In comparison, the total amount of water vapor in the atmosphere is small; it amounts to ~ 25 kg/m2, or the ...

  7. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  8. Modeling the earth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, D. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  9. The t-core of an s-core

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We consider the $t$-core of an $s$-core partition, when $s$ and $t$ are coprime positive integers. Olsson has shown that the $t$-core of an $s$-core is again an $s$-core, and we examine certain actions of the affine symmetric group on $s$-cores which preserve the $t$-core of an $s$-core. Along the way, we give a new proof of Olsson's result. We also give a new proof of a result of Vandehey, showing that there is a simultaneous $s$- and $t$-core which contains all others.

  10. The t-core of an s-core

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We consider the $t$-core of an $s$-core partition, when $s$ and $t$ are coprime positive integers. Olsson has shown that the $t$-core of an $s$-core is again an $s$-core, and we examine certain actions of the affine symmetric group on $s$-cores which preserve the $t$-core of an $s$-core. Along the way, we give a new proof of Olsson's result. We also give a new proof of a result of Vandehey, showing that there is a simultaneous $s$- and $t$-core which contains all others.

  11. Magnetic Fields in Earth-like Exoplanets and Implications for Habitability around M-dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Gomez-Perez, Natalia; Ruedas, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We present estimations of dipolar magnetic moments for terrestrial exoplanets using the Olson & Christiansen (2006) scaling law and assuming their interior structure is similar to Earth. We find that the dipolar moment of fast rotating planets (where the Coriolis force dominates convection in the core), may amount up to ~80 times the magnetic moment of Earth, M_Earth, for at least part of the planets' lifetime. For very slow rotating planets (where the force of inertia dominates), the dipolar...

  12. "Thinking about a Sustainable Earth"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshita, Makoto

    2014-05-01

    1.Introduction The Course of study for Junior high school teaching was changed in 2008 in Japan. We should especially mention about this change that ESD, "Education for Sustainable Development," was written as a point of view. ESD is a kind of educations that is studied with a target for a region and that aims at reorganize of consciousness through thinking of how to be a better region. ESD's view was written for Social studies, Science, Foreign Languages, Health and Physical Education, Home Economics and Technical Arts, and the Period for Integrated Studies. Of these subjects, Social studies are the one of core subjects. Social studies for Junior high school consist of Geography, History and Civics. "Problem of us and international society" is the last part of Civics. Teacher helps students to understand international society deeply and think about the role of our country for it. Students research many problems (global environment, resources and energy, poverty etc.) and organize their thoughts on how make a better society as a part of the human family. I taught them to think about how to solve many themes like religious problems, terrorism problems, the North-South problems, and resource and energy problems. It is my practice to let them think about what they should do to solve the global warming problem. 2.The truth of my class I pointed out to the students that the length of summer time in Japan is increasing, and we can anticipate it will continue to increase in the future. After that, I explained to them that occurrence of sudden, heavy downpour of rain is increasing and helped them understand the process of this kind of downpour through some diagrams and pictures. I helped them understand the context of this increase of the length of summer time and heavy downpour within the whole earth's ecosystem. Such increases as these things are causing global warming. I asked them to think about what are the possible problems if global warming progresses. The ideas the

  13. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  14. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  15. A Collisional Origin to Earth's Non-chondritic Composition?

    CERN Document Server

    Bonsor, Amy; Carter, Philip J; Elliott, Tim; Walter, Michael J; Stewart, Sarah T

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a non-chondritic composition for Bulk Earth. If Earth formed from the accretion of chondritic material, its non-chondritic composition, in particular the super-chondritic 142Nd/144Nd and low Mg/Fe ratios, might be explained by the collisional erosion of differentiated planetesimals during its formation. In this work we use an N-body code, that includes a state-of-the-art collision model, to follow the formation of protoplanets, similar to proto-Earth, from differentiated planetesimals (> 100 km) up to isolation mass (> 0.16 M_Earth). Collisions between differentiated bodies have the potential to change the core-mantle ratio of the accreted protoplanets. We show that sufficient mantle material can be stripped from the colliding bodies during runaway and oligarchic growth, such that the final protoplanets could have Mg/Fe and Si/Fe ratios similar to that of bulk Earth, but only if Earth is an extreme case and the core is assumed to contain 10% silicon by mass. This may indicat...

  16. Better Than Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do We Inhabit The Best O All Possible Worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  17. Better Than Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do we inhabit the best of all possible worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  18. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model.

  19. How Big is Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  20. PRcores_radiocarbon: Radiocarbon age dates for sections of 19 sediment cores from offshore Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2008 and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in the 1960's

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2008, as a collaborative effort between Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the U.S. Geological Survey, 20 giant gravity cores were collected from areas...