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Sample records for early jurassic theropod

  1. Bird-like anatomy, posture, and behavior revealed by an early jurassic theropod dinosaur resting trace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, A.R.C.; Harris, J.D.; Lockley, M.G.; Kirkland, J.I.; Matthews, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fossil tracks made by non-avian theropod dinosaurs commonly reflect the habitual bipedal stance retained in living birds. Only rarely-captured behaviors, such as crouching, might create impressions made by the hands. Such tracks provide valuable information concerning the often poorly understood functional morphology of the early theropod forelimb. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we describe a well-preserved theropod trackway in a Lower Jurassic (???198 millionyear- old) lacustrine beach sandstone in the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation in southwestern Utah. The trackway consists of prints of typical morphology, intermittent tail drags and, unusually, traces made by the animal resting on the substrate in a posture very similar to modern birds. The resting trace includes symmetrical pes impressions and well-defined impressions made by both hands, the tail, and the ischial callosity. Conclusions/Significance: The manus impressions corroborate that early theropods, like later birds, held their palms facing medially, in contrast to manus prints previously attributed to theropods that have forward-pointing digits. Both the symmetrical resting posture and the medially-facing palms therefore evolved by the Early Jurassic, much earlier in the theropod lineage than previously recognized, and may characterize all theropods.

  2. Bird-Like Anatomy, Posture, and Behavior Revealed by an Early Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur Resting Trace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Andrew R. C.; Harris, Jerald D.; Lockley, Martin G.; Kirkland, James I.; Matthews, Neffra A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Fossil tracks made by non-avian theropod dinosaurs commonly reflect the habitual bipedal stance retained in living birds. Only rarely-captured behaviors, such as crouching, might create impressions made by the hands. Such tracks provide valuable information concerning the often poorly understood functional morphology of the early theropod forelimb. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a well-preserved theropod trackway in a Lower Jurassic (∼198 million-year-old) lacustrine beach sandstone in the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation in southwestern Utah. The trackway consists of prints of typical morphology, intermittent tail drags and, unusually, traces made by the animal resting on the substrate in a posture very similar to modern birds. The resting trace includes symmetrical pes impressions and well-defined impressions made by both hands, the tail, and the ischial callosity. Conclusions/Significance The manus impressions corroborate that early theropods, like later birds, held their palms facing medially, in contrast to manus prints previously attributed to theropods that have forward-pointing digits. Both the symmetrical resting posture and the medially-facing palms therefore evolved by the Early Jurassic, much earlier in the theropod lineage than previously recognized, and may characterize all theropods. PMID:19259260

  3. Bird-like anatomy, posture, and behavior revealed by an early jurassic theropod dinosaur resting trace.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R C Milner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fossil tracks made by non-avian theropod dinosaurs commonly reflect the habitual bipedal stance retained in living birds. Only rarely-captured behaviors, such as crouching, might create impressions made by the hands. Such tracks provide valuable information concerning the often poorly understood functional morphology of the early theropod forelimb. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a well-preserved theropod trackway in a Lower Jurassic ( approximately 198 million-year-old lacustrine beach sandstone in the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation in southwestern Utah. The trackway consists of prints of typical morphology, intermittent tail drags and, unusually, traces made by the animal resting on the substrate in a posture very similar to modern birds. The resting trace includes symmetrical pes impressions and well-defined impressions made by both hands, the tail, and the ischial callosity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The manus impressions corroborate that early theropods, like later birds, held their palms facing medially, in contrast to manus prints previously attributed to theropods that have forward-pointing digits. Both the symmetrical resting posture and the medially-facing palms therefore evolved by the Early Jurassic, much earlier in the theropod lineage than previously recognized, and may characterize all theropods.

  4. A basal alvarezsauroid theropod from the early Late Jurassic of Xinjiang, China.

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    Choiniere, Jonah N; Xu, Xing; Clark, James M; Forster, Catherine A; Guo, Yu; Han, Fenglu

    2010-01-29

    The fossil record of Jurassic theropod dinosaurs closely related to birds remains poor. A new theropod from the earliest Late Jurassic of western China represents the earliest diverging member of the enigmatic theropod group Alvarezsauroidea and confirms that this group is a basal member of Maniraptora, the clade containing birds and their closest theropod relatives. It extends the fossil record of Alvarezsauroidea by 63 million years and provides evidence for maniraptorans earlier in the fossil record than Archaeopteryx. The new taxon confirms extreme morphological convergence between birds and derived alvarezsauroids and illuminates incipient stages of the highly modified alvarezsaurid forelimb.

  5. A Middle Jurassic abelisaurid from Patagonia and the early diversification of theropod dinosaurs.

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    Pol, Diego; Rauhut, Oliver W M

    2012-08-22

    Abelisaurids are a clade of large, bizarre predatory dinosaurs, most notable for their high, short skulls and extremely reduced forelimbs. They were common in Gondwana during the Cretaceous, but exceedingly rare in the Northern Hemisphere. The oldest definitive abelisaurids so far come from the late Early Cretaceous of South America and Africa, and the early evolutionary history of the clade is still poorly known. Here, we report a new abelisaurid from the Middle Jurassic of Patagonia, Eoabelisaurus mefi gen. et sp. nov., which predates the so far oldest known secure member of this lineage by more than 40 Myr. The almost complete skeleton reveals the earliest evolutionary stages of the distinctive features of abelisaurids, such as the modification of the forelimb, which started with a reduction of the distal elements. The find underlines the explosive radiation of theropod dinosaurs in the Middle Jurassic and indicates an unexpected diversity of ceratosaurs at that time. The apparent endemism of abelisauroids to southern Gondwana during Pangean times might be due to the presence of a large, central Gondwanan desert. This indicates that, apart from continent-scale geography, aspects such as regional geography and climate are important to reconstruct the biogeographical history of Mesozoic vertebrates.

  6. A New Theropod Dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Lufeng, Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-chun; Philip J.CURRIE; DONG Zhiming; PAN Shigang; WANG Tao

    2009-01-01

    A new theropod dinosaur,Shidaisaurusjinae gen.et sp.nov.,has been described on the basis of an incomplete skeleton.The specimen was found near the base of the Upper Lufeng Formation(early Middle Jurassic)in Yunnan,China.It is the first theropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Yunnan.Shidaisaurus jinae is distinguishable from other Jurassic theropods by certain features from the braincase,axis,and pelvic girdle.The absence of any pleurocoels in the axis or in any anterior dorsal vertebrae suggests that the new Lufeng theropod is relatively primitive and more plesiomorphic than most of the Middle to Late Jurassic theropods from China.Most Chinese taxa of Jurassic theropod dinosaurs have not been well described;a further detailed study will be necessary for us to determine their phylogenetic relationships with Shidaisaurus jinae.

  7. Isolated theropod teeth from the Middle Jurassic of Niger and the early dental evolution of Spinosauridae

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    Alejandro Serrano-Martínez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Four isolated theropod teeth from the ?Bathonian “Argiles de l’Irhazer” in Niger are described. The teeth were found in association with the holotype of the basal sauropod Spinophorosaurus nigerensis. These specimens have been assigned to two different taxa by independent analyses, such as direct comparison with teeth previously described in the literature, discriminant and morphometric analyses from metric characters, and cladistic and cluster analyses from discrete characters. The results suggest that three teeth share affinities with those of Megalosauridae and Allosauridae, belonging most likely to the former. The fourth tooth might be from a member of the stem group Spinosauridae. If so, this would be the oldest representative of this clade. This tooth shows a combination of characters that are unusual in typical spinosaurid teeth (crown moderately compressed labiolingually and curved distally with minute denticles on the carina and a deeply veined enamel surface texture without apicobasal ridges. This could shed light on the morphological transition from the plesiomorphic ziphodont dental pattern to that of Spinosauridae. This tooth would also allow a better understanding of the origin of the spinosaurids, supporting a Gondwanan origin for the group.

  8. An enigmatic plant-eating theropod from the Late Jurassic period of Chile.

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    Novas, Fernando E; Salgado, Leonardo; Suárez, Manuel; Agnolín, Federico L; Ezcurra, Martín D; Chimento, Nicolás R; de la Cruz, Rita; Isasi, Marcelo P; Vargas, Alexander O; Rubilar-Rogers, David

    2015-06-18

    Theropod dinosaurs were the dominant predators in most Mesozoic era terrestrial ecosystems. Early theropod evolution is currently interpreted as the diversification of various carnivorous and cursorial taxa, whereas the acquisition of herbivorism, together with the secondary loss of cursorial adaptations, occurred much later among advanced coelurosaurian theropods. A new, bizarre herbivorous basal tetanuran from the Upper Jurassic of Chile challenges this conception. The new dinosaur was discovered at Aysén, a fossil locality in the Upper Jurassic Toqui Formation of southern Chile (General Carrera Lake). The site yielded abundant and exquisitely preserved three-dimensional skeletons of small archosaurs. Several articulated individuals of Chilesaurus at different ontogenetic stages have been collected, as well as less abundant basal crocodyliforms, and fragmentary remains of sauropod dinosaurs (diplodocids and titanosaurians).

  9. Exceptionally preserved juvenile megalosauroid theropod dinosaur with filamentous integument from the Late Jurassic of Germany.

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    Rauhut, Oliver W M; Foth, Christian; Tischlinger, Helmut; Norell, Mark A

    2012-07-17

    Recent discoveries in Asia have greatly increased our understanding of the evolution of dinosaurs' integumentary structures, revealing a previously unexpected diversity of "protofeathers" and feathers. However, all theropod dinosaurs with preserved feathers reported so far are coelurosaurs. Evidence for filaments or feathers in noncoelurosaurian theropods is circumstantial and debated. Here we report an exceptionally preserved skeleton of a juvenile megalosauroid, Sciurumimus albersdoerferi n. gen., n. sp., from the Late Jurassic of Germany, which preserves a filamentous plumage at the tail base and on parts of the body. These structures are identical to the type 1 feathers that have been reported in some ornithischians, the basal tyrannosaur Dilong, the basal therizinosauroid Beipiaosaurus, and, probably, in the basal coelurosaur Sinosauropteryx. Sciurumimus albersdoerferi represents the phylogenetically most basal theropod that preserves direct evidence for feathers and helps close the gap between feathers reported in coelurosaurian theropods and filaments in ornithischian dinosaurs, further supporting the homology of these structures. The specimen of Sciurumimus is the most complete megalosauroid yet discovered and helps clarify significant anatomical details of this important basal theropod clade, such as the complete absence of the fourth digit of the manus. The dentition of this probably early-posthatchling individual is markedly similar to that of basal coelurosaurian theropods, indicating that coelurosaur occurrences based on isolated teeth should be used with caution.

  10. Exceptionally preserved juvenile megalosauroid theropod dinosaur with filamentous integument from the Late Jurassic of Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhut, Oliver W. M.; Foth, Christian; Tischlinger, Helmut; Norell, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries in Asia have greatly increased our understanding of the evolution of dinosaurs’ integumentary structures, revealing a previously unexpected diversity of “protofeathers” and feathers. However, all theropod dinosaurs with preserved feathers reported so far are coelurosaurs. Evidence for filaments or feathers in noncoelurosaurian theropods is circumstantial and debated. Here we report an exceptionally preserved skeleton of a juvenile megalosauroid, Sciurumimus albersdoerferi n. gen., n. sp., from the Late Jurassic of Germany, which preserves a filamentous plumage at the tail base and on parts of the body. These structures are identical to the type 1 feathers that have been reported in some ornithischians, the basal tyrannosaur Dilong, the basal therizinosauroid Beipiaosaurus, and, probably, in the basal coelurosaur Sinosauropteryx. Sciurumimus albersdoerferi represents the phylogenetically most basal theropod that preserves direct evidence for feathers and helps close the gap between feathers reported in coelurosaurian theropods and filaments in ornithischian dinosaurs, further supporting the homology of these structures. The specimen of Sciurumimus is the most complete megalosauroid yet discovered and helps clarify significant anatomical details of this important basal theropod clade, such as the complete absence of the fourth digit of the manus. The dentition of this probably early-posthatchling individual is markedly similar to that of basal coelurosaurian theropods, indicating that coelurosaur occurrences based on isolated teeth should be used with caution. PMID:22753486

  11. Didactyl tracks of paravian theropods (Maniraptora from the ?Middle Jurassic of Africa.

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    Alexander Mudroch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A new dinosaur tracksite from ?Middle Jurassic sediments of the Irhazer Group on the plains of Agadez (Rep. Niger, northwest Africa revealed extraordinarily well preserved didactyl tracks of a digitigrade bipedal trackmaker. The distinct morphology of the pes imprints indicates a theropod trackmaker from a paravian maniraptoran closely related to birds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The early age and the morphological traits of the tracks allow for description of the new ichnotaxon Paravipus didactyloides. A total of 120 tracks are assigned to 5 individual trackways. The 'medium-sized' tracks with an average footprint length of 27.5 cm and footprint width of 23.1 cm are deeply imprinted into the track bearing sandstone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A comparison with other didactyl tracks gives new insights into the foot morphology of advanced maniraptoran theropods and contributes to knowledge of their evolutionary history. The new ichnotaxon takes an important position in the ichnological fossil record of Gondwana and the mid-Jurassic biota worldwide, because it is among the earliest known records of paravian maniraptorans and of didactyl theropod tracks from Africa.

  12. A new Jurassic theropod from China documents a transitional step in the macrostructure of feathers

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    Lefèvre, Ulysse; Cau, Andrea; Cincotta, Aude; Hu, Dongyu; Chinsamy, Anusuya; Escuillié, François; Godefroit, Pascal

    2017-10-01

    Genuine fossils with exquisitely preserved plumage from the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous of northeastern China have recently revealed that bird-like theropod dinosaurs had long pennaceous feathers along their hindlimbs and may have used their four wings to glide or fly. Thus, it has been postulated that early bird flight might initially have involved four wings (Xu et al. Nature 421:335-340, 2003; Hu et al. Nature 461:640-643, 2009; Han et al. Nat Commun 5:4382, 2014). Here, we describe Serikornis sungei gen. et sp. nov., a new feathered theropod from the Tiaojishan Fm (Late Jurassic) of Liaoning Province, China. Its skeletal morphology suggests a ground-dwelling ecology with no flying adaptations. Our phylogenetic analysis places Serikornis, together with other Late Jurassic paravians from China, as a basal paravians, outside the Eumaniraptora clade. The tail of Serikornis is covered proximally by filaments and distally by slender rectrices. Thin symmetrical remiges lacking barbules are attached along its forelimbs and elongate hindlimb feathers extend up to its toes, suggesting that hindlimb remiges evolved in ground-dwelling maniraptorans before being co-opted to an arboreal lifestyle or flight.

  13. Reduced plumage and flight ability of a new Jurassic paravian theropod from China.

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    Godefroit, Pascal; Demuynck, Helena; Dyke, Gareth; Hu, Dongyu; Escuillié, François; Claeys, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Feathered theropods were diverse in the Early Cretaceous Jehol Group of western Liaoning Province, China. Recently, anatomically distinct feathered taxa have been discovered in the older Middle-Late Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation in the same region. Phylogenetic hypotheses including these specimens have challenged the pivotal position of Archaeopteryx in bird phylogeny. Here we report a basal troodontid from the Tiaojishan Formation that resembles Anchiornis, also from Jianchang County (regarded as sister-taxa). The feathers of Eosinopteryx are less extensive on the limbs and tail than Anchiornis and other deinonychosaurians. With reduced plumage and short uncurved pedal claws, Eosinopteryx would have been able to run unimpeded (with large foot remiges cursorial locomotion was likely problematic for Anchiornis). Eosinopteryx increases the known diversity of small-bodied dinosaurs in the Jurassic, shows that taxa with similar body plans could occupy different niches in the same ecosystem and suggests a more complex picture for the origin of flight.

  14. Filling the gaps of dinosaur eggshell phylogeny: Late Jurassic Theropod clutch with embryos from Portugal.

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    Araújo, Ricardo; Castanhinha, Rui; Martins, Rui M S; Mateus, Octávio; Hendrickx, Christophe; Beckmann, F; Schell, N; Alves, L C

    2013-01-01

    The non-avian saurischians that have associated eggshells and embryos are represented only by the sauropodomorph Massospondylus and Coelurosauria (derived theropods), thus missing the basal theropod representatives. We report a dinosaur clutch containing several crushed eggs and embryonic material ascribed to the megalosaurid theropod Torvosaurus. It represents the first associated eggshells and embryos of megalosauroids, thus filling an important phylogenetic gap between two distantly related groups of saurischians. These fossils represent the only unequivocal basal theropod embryos found to date. The assemblage was found in early Tithonian fluvial overbank deposits of the Lourinhã Formation in West Portugal. The morphological, microstructural and chemical characterization results of the eggshell fragments indicate very mild diagenesis. Furthermore, these fossils allow unambiguous association of basal theropod osteology with a specific and unique new eggshell morphology.

  15. New theropod, thyreophoran, and small sauropod tracks from the Middle Jurassic Bagå Formation, Bornholm, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milàn, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Three new dinosaur tracks are described from the Middle Jurassic Bagå Formation of Bornholm, Denmark. The tracks are all preserved as natural casts on the underside of fluvial sandstone blocks originating from the old Hasle Klinkefabrik’s clay pit, now called Pyritsøen. The new tracks are from...... a medium-sized theropod, a thyreophoran, and a small sauropod. Together with a hyreophoran track and large sauropod tracks described in 2005, the Middle Jurassic dinosaur fauna of Bornholm now comprises theropods, two sizes of sauropods and at least one type of thyreophoran dinosaur. This is important...

  16. A bizarre Jurassic maniraptoran theropod with preserved evidence of membranous wings.

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    Xu, Xing; Zheng, Xiaoting; Sullivan, Corwin; Wang, Xiaoli; Xing, Lida; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaomei; O'Connor, Jingmai K; Zhang, Fucheng; Pan, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    The wings of birds and their closest theropod relatives share a uniform fundamental architecture, with pinnate flight feathers as the key component. Here we report a new scansoriopterygid theropod, Yi qi gen. et sp. nov., based on a new specimen from the Middle-Upper Jurassic period Tiaojishan Formation of Hebei Province, China. Yi is nested phylogenetically among winged theropods but has large stiff filamentous feathers of an unusual type on both the forelimb and hindlimb. However, the filamentous feathers of Yi resemble pinnate feathers in bearing morphologically diverse melanosomes. Most surprisingly, Yi has a long rod-like bone extending from each wrist, and patches of membranous tissue preserved between the rod-like bones and the manual digits. Analogous features are unknown in any dinosaur but occur in various flying and gliding tetrapods, suggesting the intriguing possibility that Yi had membranous aerodynamic surfaces totally different from the archetypal feathered wings of birds and their closest relatives. Documentation of the unique forelimbs of Yi greatly increases the morphological disparity known to exist among dinosaurs, and highlights the extraordinary breadth and richness of the evolutionary experimentation that took place close to the origin of birds.

  17. Multivariate and Cladistic Analyses of Isolated Teeth Reveal Sympatry of Theropod Dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany.

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    Gerke, Oliver; Wings, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Remains of theropod dinosaurs are very rare in Northern Germany because the area was repeatedly submerged by a shallow epicontinental sea during the Mesozoic. Here, 80 Late Jurassic theropod teeth are described of which the majority were collected over decades from marine carbonates in nowadays abandoned and backfilled quarries of the 19th century. Eighteen different morphotypes (A-R) could be distinguished and 3D models based on micro-CT scans of the best examples of all morphotypes are included as supplements. The teeth were identified with the assistance of discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis based on updated datamatrices. The results show that a large variety of theropod groups were present in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany. Identified specimens comprise basal Tyrannosauroidea, as well as Allosauroidea, Megalosauroidea cf. Marshosaurus, Megalosauridae cf. Torvosaurus and probably Ceratosauria. The formerly reported presence of Dromaeosauridae in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany could not be confirmed. Some teeth of this study resemble specimens described as pertaining to Carcharodontosauria (morphotype A) and Abelisauridae (morphotype K). This interpretation is however, not supported by discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis. Two smaller morphotypes (N and Q) differ only in some probably size-related characteristics from larger morphotypes (B and C) and could well represent juveniles of adult specimens. The similarity of the northern German theropods with groups from contemporaneous localities suggests faunal exchange via land-connections in the Late Jurassic between Germany, Portugal and North America.

  18. Multivariate and Cladistic Analyses of Isolated Teeth Reveal Sympatry of Theropod Dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Oliver; Wings, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Remains of theropod dinosaurs are very rare in Northern Germany because the area was repeatedly submerged by a shallow epicontinental sea during the Mesozoic. Here, 80 Late Jurassic theropod teeth are described of which the majority were collected over decades from marine carbonates in nowadays abandoned and backfilled quarries of the 19th century. Eighteen different morphotypes (A—R) could be distinguished and 3D models based on micro-CT scans of the best examples of all morphotypes are included as supplements. The teeth were identified with the assistance of discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis based on updated datamatrices. The results show that a large variety of theropod groups were present in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany. Identified specimens comprise basal Tyrannosauroidea, as well as Allosauroidea, Megalosauroidea cf. Marshosaurus, Megalosauridae cf. Torvosaurus and probably Ceratosauria. The formerly reported presence of Dromaeosauridae in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany could not be confirmed. Some teeth of this study resemble specimens described as pertaining to Carcharodontosauria (morphotype A) and Abelisauridae (morphotype K). This interpretation is however, not supported by discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis. Two smaller morphotypes (N and Q) differ only in some probably size-related characteristics from larger morphotypes (B and C) and could well represent juveniles of adult specimens. The similarity of the northern German theropods with groups from contemporaneous localities suggests faunal exchange via land-connections in the Late Jurassic between Germany, Portugal and North America. PMID:27383054

  19. Multivariate and Cladistic Analyses of Isolated Teeth Reveal Sympatry of Theropod Dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany.

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    Oliver Gerke

    Full Text Available Remains of theropod dinosaurs are very rare in Northern Germany because the area was repeatedly submerged by a shallow epicontinental sea during the Mesozoic. Here, 80 Late Jurassic theropod teeth are described of which the majority were collected over decades from marine carbonates in nowadays abandoned and backfilled quarries of the 19th century. Eighteen different morphotypes (A-R could be distinguished and 3D models based on micro-CT scans of the best examples of all morphotypes are included as supplements. The teeth were identified with the assistance of discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis based on updated datamatrices. The results show that a large variety of theropod groups were present in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany. Identified specimens comprise basal Tyrannosauroidea, as well as Allosauroidea, Megalosauroidea cf. Marshosaurus, Megalosauridae cf. Torvosaurus and probably Ceratosauria. The formerly reported presence of Dromaeosauridae in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany could not be confirmed. Some teeth of this study resemble specimens described as pertaining to Carcharodontosauria (morphotype A and Abelisauridae (morphotype K. This interpretation is however, not supported by discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis. Two smaller morphotypes (N and Q differ only in some probably size-related characteristics from larger morphotypes (B and C and could well represent juveniles of adult specimens. The similarity of the northern German theropods with groups from contemporaneous localities suggests faunal exchange via land-connections in the Late Jurassic between Germany, Portugal and North America.

  20. New Early Jurassic Tetrapod Assemblages Constrain Triassic-Jurassic Tetrapod Extinction Event

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    Olsen, P. E.; Shubin, N. H.; Anders, M. H.

    1987-08-01

    The discovery of the first definitively correlated earliest Jurassic (200 million years before present) tetrapod assemblage (Fundy basin, Newark Supergroup, Nova Scotia) allows reevaluation of the duration of the Triassic-Jurassic tetrapod extinction event. Present are tritheledont and mammal-like reptiles, prosauropod, theropod, and ornithischian dinosaurs, protosuchian and sphenosuchian crocodylomorphs, sphenodontids, and hybodont, semionotid, and palaeonisciform fishes. All of the families are known from Late Triassic and Jurassic strata from elsewhere; however, pollen and spore, radiometric, and geochemical correlation indicate an early Hettangian age for these assemblages. Because all ``typical Triassic'' forms are absent from these assemblages, most Triassic-Jurassic tetrapod extinctions occurred before this time and without the introduction of new families. As was previously suggested by studies of marine invertebrates, this pattern is consistent with a global extinction event at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. The Manicouagan impact structure of Quebec provides dates broadly compatible with the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and, following the impact theory of mass extinctions, may be implicated in the cause.

  1. Tetradactyl Footprints of an Unknown Affinity Theropod Dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of Morocco

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    Nouri, Jaouad; Díaz-Martínez, Ignacio; Pérez-Lorente, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Background New tetradactyl theropod footprints from Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian) have been found in the Iouaridène syncline (Morocco). The tracksites are at several layers in the intermediate lacustrine unit of Iouaridène Formation. The footprints were named informally in previous works “Eutynichnium atlasipodus”. We consider as nomen nudum. Methodology/Principal Findings Boutakioutichnium atlasicus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. is mainly characterized by the hallux impression. It is long, strong, directed medially or forward, with two digital pads and with the proximal part of the first pad in lateral position. More than 100 footprints in 15 trackways have been studied with these features. The footprints are large, 38–48 cm in length, and 26–31 cm in width. Conclusions/Significance Boutakioutichnium mainly differs from other ichnotaxa with hallux impression in lacking metatarsal marks and in not being a very deep footprint. The distinct morphology of the hallux of the Boutakioutichnium trackmaker –i.e. size and hallux position- are unique in the dinosaur autopodial record to date. PMID:22180775

  2. Tetradactyl footprints of an unknown affinity theropod dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of Morocco.

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    Jaouad Nouri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New tetradactyl theropod footprints from Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian have been found in the Iouaridène syncline (Morocco. The tracksites are at several layers in the intermediate lacustrine unit of Iouaridène Formation. The footprints were named informally in previous works "Eutynichnium atlasipodus". We consider as nomen nudum. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Boutakioutichnium atlasicus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. is mainly characterized by the hallux impression. It is long, strong, directed medially or forward, with two digital pads and with the proximal part of the first pad in lateral position. More than 100 footprints in 15 trackways have been studied with these features. The footprints are large, 38-48 cm in length, and 26-31 cm in width. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Boutakioutichnium mainly differs from other ichnotaxa with hallux impression in lacking metatarsal marks and in not being a very deep footprint. The distinct morphology of the hallux of the Boutakioutichnium trackmaker -i.e. size and hallux position- are unique in the dinosaur autopodial record to date.

  3. Sizing the Jurassic theropod dinosaur Allosaurus: assessing growth strategy and evolution of ontogenetic scaling of limbs.

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    Bybee, Paul J; Lee, Andrew H; Lamm, Ellen-Thérèse

    2006-03-01

    Allosaurus is one of the most common Mesozoic theropod dinosaurs. We present a histological analysis to assess its growth strategy and ontogenetic limb bone scaling. Based on an ontogenetic series of humeral, ulnar, femoral, and tibial sections of fibrolamellar bone, we estimate the ages of the largest individuals in the sample to be between 13-19 years. Growth curve reconstruction suggests that maximum growth occurred at 15 years, when body mass increased 148 kg/year. Based on larger bones of Allosaurus, we estimate an upper age limit of between 22-28 years of age, which is similar to preliminary data for other large theropods. Both Model I and Model II regression analyses suggest that relative to the length of the femur, the lengths of the humerus, ulna, and tibia increase in length more slowly than isometry predicts. That pattern of limb scaling in Allosaurus is similar to those in other large theropods such as the tyrannosaurids. Phylogenetic optimization suggests that large theropods independently evolved reduced humeral, ulnar, and tibial lengths by a phyletic reduction in longitudinal growth relative to the femur.

  4. Perennial Lakes as an Environmental Control on Theropod Movement in the Jurassic of the Hartford Basin

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    Patrick R. Getty

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Eubrontes giganteus is a common ichnospecies of large dinosaur track in the Early Jurassic rocks of the Hartford and Deerfield basins in Connecticut and Massachusetts, USA. It has been proposed that the trackmaker was gregarious based on parallel trackways at a site in Massachusetts known as Dinosaur Footprint Reservation (DFR. The gregariousness hypothesis is not without its problems, however, since parallelism can be caused by barriers that direct animal travel. We tested the gregariousness hypothesis by examining the orientations of trackways at five sites representing permanent and ephemeral lacustrine environments. Parallelism is only prominent in permanent lacustrine rocks at DFR, where trackways show a bimodal orientation distribution that approximates the paleoshoreline. By contrast, parallel trackways are uncommon in ephemeral lacustrine facies, even at sites with large numbers of trackways, and those that do occur exhibit differences in morphology, suggesting that they were made at different times. Overall, the evidence presented herein suggests that parallelism seen in Hartford Basin Eubrontes giganteus is better explained as a response to the lake acting as a physical barrier rather than to gregariousness. Consequently, these parallel trackways should not be used as evidence to support the hypothesis that the trackmaker was a basal sauropodomorph unless other evidence can substantiate the gregariousness hypothesis.

  5. Abelisauridae (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal and dentition-based phylogeny as a contribution for the identification of isolated theropod teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Christophe; Mateus, Octávio

    2014-01-30

    Theropod dinosaurs form a highly diversified clade, and their teeth are some of the most common components of the Mesozoic dinosaur fossil record. This is the case in the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Kimmeridgian-Tithonian) of Portugal, where theropod teeth are particularly abundant and diverse. Four isolated theropod teeth are here described and identified based on morphometric and anatomical data. They are included in a cladistic analysis performed on a data matrix of 141 dentition-based characters coded in 60 taxa, as well as a supermatrix combining our dataset with six recent datamatrices based on the whole theropod skeleton. The consensus tree resulting from the dentition-based data matrix reveals that theropod teeth provide reliable data for identification at approximately family level. Therefore, phylogenetic methods will help identifying theropod teeth with more confidence in the future. Although dental characters do not reliably indicate relationships among higher clades of theropods, they demonstrate interesting patterns of homoplasy suggesting dietary convergence in (1) alvarezsauroids, therizinosaurs and troodontids; (2) coelophysoids and spinosaurids; (3) compsognathids and dromaeosaurids; and (4) ceratosaurids, allosauroids and megalosaurids.        Based on morphometric and cladistic analyses, the biggest tooth from Lourinhã is referred to a mesial crown of the megalosaurid Torvosaurus tanneri, due to the elliptical cross section of the crown base, the large size and elongation of the crown, medially positioned mesial and distal carinae, and the coarse denticles. The smallest tooth is identified as Richardoestesia, and as a close relative of R. gilmorei based on the weak constriction between crown and root, the "eight-shaped" outline of the base crown and, on the distal carina, the average of ten symmetrically rounded denticles per mm, as well as a subequal number of denticles basally and at mid-crown. Finally, the two medium

  6. Découverte de pistes de dinosaures théropodes dans le Lias inférieur des environs de Figeac (Lot)First record of theropod dinosaur trackways from the Lower Jurassic of Figeac (Lot, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Badré, Brigitte; Lafon, Jean-Paul

    2000-03-01

    For the first time, dinosaur trackways were recorded from the Lower Jurassic near Figeac (Lot, France). All the footprints were tridactyl and were made clearly by animals walking bipedally, probably theropods. These prints, with a longer length than width, have broad and short digits with phalangeal pads and small claws. They are assigned to the ichnogenus Eubrontes. The footprints exposed on limestone hardground, overlying the Latest Hettangian dolomies, are dated to Lower Sinemurian.

  7. A Jurassic avialan dinosaur from China resolves the early phylogenetic history of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroit, Pascal; Cau, Andrea; Dong-Yu, Hu; Escuillié, François; Wenhao, Wu; Dyke, Gareth

    2013-06-20

    The recent discovery of small paravian theropod dinosaurs with well-preserved feathers in the Middle-Late Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning Province (northeastern China) has challenged the pivotal position of Archaeopteryx, regarded from its discovery to be the most basal bird. Removing Archaeopteryx from the base of Avialae to nest within Deinonychosauria implies that typical bird flight, powered by the forelimbs only, either evolved at least twice, or was subsequently lost or modified in some deinonychosaurians. Here we describe the complete skeleton of a new paravian from the Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning Province, China. Including this new taxon in a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis for basal Paraves does the following: (1) it recovers it as the basal-most avialan; (2) it confirms the avialan status of Archaeopteryx; (3) it places Troodontidae as the sister-group to Avialae; (4) it supports a single origin of powered flight within Paraves; and (5) it implies that the early diversification of Paraves and Avialae took place in the Middle-Late Jurassic period.

  8. Schmeissneria: An angiosperm from the Early Jurassic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin WANG

    2010-01-01

    The origin of angiosperms has been a focus of intensive research for a long time. The so-called preCretaceous angiosperms, including Schmeissneria, are usually clouded with doubt. To expel the cloud around the enigmatic Schmeissneria, the syntype and new materials of Schmeissneria collected previously in Germany and recently in China are studied. These materials include female inflorescences and infructescences. The latter are old materials but were under-studied previously. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscope observations indicate that the fruits in these infructescences have in situ seeds enclosed, and that the ovaries are closed before pollination. Thus the plants meet two strict criteria for angiosperms: angiospermy plus angio-ovuly. Placing Schmeissneria in angiosperms will extend the record of angiosperms up to the Early Jurassic, more compatible with many molecular dating conclusions on the age of angiosperms, and demanding a reassessment of the current doctrines on the origin of angiosperms. Although the phylogenetic relationship of Schmeissneria to other angiosperms apparently is still an open question, this study adds to research concerning the origin of angiosperms.

  9. Embryology of Early Jurassic dinosaur from China with evidence of preserved organic remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Robert R; Huang, Timothy D; Roberts, Eric M; Peng, ShinRung; Sullivan, Corwin; Stein, Koen; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Shieh, DarBin; Chang, RongSeng; Chiang, ChengCheng; Yang, Chuanwei; Zhong, Shiming

    2013-04-11

    Fossil dinosaur embryos are surprisingly rare, being almost entirely restricted to Upper Cretaceous strata that record the late stages of non-avian dinosaur evolution. Notable exceptions are the oldest known embryos from the Early Jurassic South African sauropodomorph Massospondylus and Late Jurassic embryos of a theropod from Portugal. The fact that dinosaur embryos are rare and typically enclosed in eggshells limits their availability for tissue and cellular level investigations of development. Consequently, little is known about growth patterns in dinosaur embryos, even though post-hatching ontogeny has been studied in several taxa. Here we report the discovery of an embryonic dinosaur bone bed from the Lower Jurassic of China, the oldest such occurrence in the fossil record. The embryos are similar in geological age to those of Massospondylus and are also assignable to a sauropodomorph dinosaur, probably Lufengosaurus. The preservation of numerous disarticulated skeletal elements and eggshells in this monotaxic bone bed, representing different stages of incubation and therefore derived from different nests, provides opportunities for new investigations of dinosaur embryology in a clade noted for gigantism. For example, comparisons among embryonic femora of different sizes and developmental stages reveal a consistently rapid rate of growth throughout development, possibly indicating that short incubation times were characteristic of sauropodomorphs. In addition, asymmetric radial growth of the femoral shaft and rapid expansion of the fourth trochanter suggest that embryonic muscle activation played an important role in the pre-hatching ontogeny of these dinosaurs. This discovery also provides the oldest evidence of in situ preservation of complex organic remains in a terrestrial vertebrate.

  10. A bizarre theropod from the Early Cretaceous of Japan highlighting mosaic evolution among coelurosaurians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Yoichi; Xu, Xing; Shibata, Masateru; Kawabe, Soichiro; Miyata, Kazunori; Imai, Takuya

    2016-02-23

    Our understanding of coelurosaurian evolution, particularly of bird origins, has been greatly improved, mainly due to numerous recently discovered fossils worldwide. Nearly all these discoveries are referable to the previously known coelurosaurian subgroups. Here, we report a new theropod, Fukuivenator paradoxus, gen. et sp. nov., based on a nearly complete specimen from the Lower Cretaceous Kitadani Formation of the Tetori Group, Fukui, Japan. While Fukuivenator possesses a large number of morphological features unknown in any other theropod, it has a combination of primitive and derived features seen in different theropod subgroups, notably dromaeosaurid dinosaurs. Computed-tomography data indicate that Fukuivenator possesses inner ears whose morphology is intermediate between those of birds and non-avian dinosaurs. Our phylogenetic analysis recovers Fukuivenator as a basally branching maniraptoran theropod, yet is unable to refer it to any known coelurosaurian subgroups. The discovery of Fukuivenator considerably increases the morphological disparity of coelurosaurian dinosaurs and highlights the high levels of homoplasy in coelurosaurian evolution.

  11. Microstructures of Early Jurassic (Toarcian) shales of Northern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M.E.; Barnhoorn, A.; Wasch, L.; Trabucho-Alexandre, João; Peach, C.J.; Drury, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    The Toarcian (Early Jurassic) Posidonia Shale Formation is a possible unconventional gas source in Northern Europe and occurs within the Cleveland Basin (United Kingdom), the Anglo-Paris Basin (France), the Lower Saxony Basin and the Southwest Germany Basin (Germany), and the Roer Valley Graben, the

  12. The first well-preserved coelophysoid theropod dinosaur from Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hai-Lu; Azuma, Yoichi; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ya-Ming; Dong, Zhi-Ming

    2014-10-16

    Coelophysoid dinosaurs represent the earliest major radiation of neotheropods. These small-to-medium-sized agile bipeds lived throughout much of Pangaea during the Late Triassic-arly Jurassic. Previously reported coelophysoid material from Asia (excluding the Gondwanan territory of India) is limited to two specimens that comprise only limb fragments. This paper describes a new genus and species of coelophysoid, Panguraptor lufengensis, from the Lower Jurassic Lufeng Formation of Yunnan Province, China. The new taxon is represented by a well-preserved skeleton, including the skull and lower jaw, the presacral vertebral column and partial ribs, the right scapula, a partial forelimb, part of the pelvic girdle, and an almost complete hind limb. It is distinguished from other coelophysoid theropods by the unique combination of the following three character states: 1) diagonal (rostrodorsal-caudoventral) ridge on lateral surface of maxilla, within antorbital fossa, 2) elliptical, laterally facing fenestra caudodorsal to aforementioned diagonal ridge, and 3) hooked craniomedial corner of distal tarsal IV. Cladistic analysis recovers Panguraptor lufengensis deeply nested within Coelophysoidea as a member of Coelophysidae, and it is more closely related to Coelophysis than to "Syntarsus". Panguraptor represents the first well-preserved coelophysoid theropod dinosaur from Asia, and provides fresh evidence supporting the hypothesis that terrestrial tetrapods tended to be distributed pan-continentally during the Early Jurassic.

  13. Femoral bone strength in large theropod dinosaurs: A study by genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott

    2015-03-01

    The locomotion of bipedal theropod dinosaurs is controlled by the strength of the femur to resist bending torques (caused by the foot striking the ground and the action of muscles on the femur). The section modulus at the narrowest part measures the ability of the femur to resist such torques. We present the results of our study of the femoral section moduli for six genus of large theropods: Tyrannosaurus, Nanotyrannus, Gorgosaurus, and Albertosaurus of the Late Cretaceous, Acrocanthosaurus of the Early Cretaceous, and Allosaurus of the Late Jurassic. These animals had femora of lengths between 65 and 134 cm. The corresponding section moduli varied between 23 and 570 cm3. Some species of Tyrannosaurus, Gorgosaurus, Allosaurus, and Albertosaurus had femora with lengths in the same 75 to 90 cm range. The section moduli of these animals are all in the same range, showing that the animals had the same abilities of locomotion. That is, Allosaurus of the Late Jurassic could locomote just as well as the Late Cretaceous Tyrannosaurus, Gorgosaurus, and Albertosaurus. There is no evidence that these later theropods had evolved to be any faster than similarly-sized theropods living about 80 million years earlier.

  14. Reanalysis of Wupus agilis (Early Cretaceous of Chongqing, China as a Large Avian Trace: Differentiating between Large Bird and Small Non-Avian Theropod Tracks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Xing

    Full Text Available Trace fossils provide the only records of Early Cretaceous birds from many parts of the world. The identification of traces from large avian track-makers is made difficult given their overall similarity in size and tridactyly in comparison with traces of small non-avian theropods. Reanalysis of Wupus agilis from the Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian Jiaguan Formation, one of a small but growing number of known avian-pterosaur track assemblages, of southeast China determines that these are the traces of a large avian track-maker, analogous to extant herons. Wupus, originally identified as the trace of a small non-avian theropod track-maker, is therefore similar in both footprint and trackway characteristics to the Early Cretaceous (Albian large avian trace Limiavipes curriei from western Canada, and Wupus is reassigned to the ichnofamily Limiavipedidae. The reanalysis of Wupus reveals that it and Limiavipes are distinct from similar traces of small to medium-sized non-avian theropods (Irenichnites, Columbosauripus, Magnoavipes based on their relatively large footprint length to pace length ratio and higher mean footprint splay, and that Wupus shares enough characters with Limiavipes to be reassigned to the ichnofamily Limiavipedidae. The ability to discern traces of large avians from those of small non-avian theropods provides more data on the diversity of Early Cretaceous birds. This analysis reveals that, despite the current lack of body fossils, large wading birds were globally distributed in both Laurasia and Gondwana during the Early Cretaceous.

  15. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  16. New information on Nqwebasaurus thwazi, a coelurosaurian theropod from the Early Cretaceous Kirkwood Formation in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choiniere, Jonah N.; Forster, Catherine A.; de Klerk, William J.

    2012-08-01

    We performed additional preparation on the holotype skeleton of Nqwebasaurus thwazi and discovered new skeletal material. We describe this material, which includes a maxilla with small, conical, unserrated teeth and bones of the braincase, as well as parts of the holotype postcranial anatomy that were previously poorly documented. We incorporate this new anatomical information into a broadly sampled matrix designed to test theropod relationships. Our phylogenetic results hypothesize that Nqwebasaurus is the basalmost ornithomimosaur, and recover numerous characters supporting this relationship, including features of the maxilla, frontal, dentition, axial skeleton, forelimb and hindlimb. Nqwebasaurus is the first African ornithomimosaur and the first Gondwanan member of this group known from articulated skeletal material, supporting the hypothesis that coelurosaurian groups were cosmopolitan during their early evolutionary history. The presence of reduced dentition and a gastric mill in Nqwebasaurus strongly suggest that this taxon was herbivorous.

  17. Two theropod track assemblages from the Jurassic of Chongqing, China, and the Jurassic Stratigraphy of Sichuan Basin%重庆晚侏罗世两处兽脚类足迹组合与四川盆地侏罗纪地层

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢立达; Martin G.LOCKLEY; 陈伟; Gerard D.GIERLI(N)SKI; 李建军; W.Scott PERSONSIV; 松川正树; 叶勇; Murray K.GINGRAS

    2013-01-01

    the Shangshaximiao Formation.The fourth site (Chengyu),so far not accessible to the present authors,is not described.The Nan'an site,and type locality of Chongqingpus nananensis,has yielded a large sample of theropod tracks from the heart of Chongqing Municipality,at a site that has been lost in the urban development.Fortunately the sample is preserved at Chongqing Museum of Natural History and has been studied independently on two occasions to produce the results presented here.C.nananensis is a medium-sized track (mean track length ~29 cm) that may best be accommodated in ichngenus Kayentapus,and may in some cases preserve ill-defined hallux traces.Associated tracks are attributed to cf.Anomoepus.Other smaller ichnospecies from other localities outside Chongqing municipality,and from older middle Middle Jurassic formations,were previously assigned to ichnogenus Grallator.The Jinji site has yielded a single long theropod trackway of a robust form tentatively labeled cf.Therangospodus.This Jinji trackway also provides intermittent evidence of a hallux.Although theropod tracks are becoming increasingly well-known in the Jurassic sections of Chongqing Municipality,the Sichuan Basin and the broader region,determining their precise age and assigning them to valid ichnotaxa remain challenging.This is because Jurassic theropod tracks,despite being abundant,show a continuous range of morphological,and preservational variation that is difficult to define and differentiate in space and time.

  18. Early Jurassic Flora and Stratigraphy from Shansonggang of Southern Jilin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengxiang Liu; Yuewu Sun; Chunlin Sun; Jiansheng Lu; Yanhua Zhao

    2003-01-01

    More than 35 species belonging to 22 genera of fossil plants are recognized by the authors from the Shansonggang flora in the 8hansonggang Basin of Jilin, China. Among them, the coexistence of Coniopteris and Cycadocarpidium demonstrates that the present flora possesses the characters of the early assemblage of Early Jurassic floras in Eurasia. Therefore, the age of the Shansonggang flora is considered the Early Jurassic.This study would be beneficial for better understanding the paleoecological and paleoclimatic characteristics of the Shansonggang Basin. Based mainly on the characters of the flora, the authors suggest that the Lower Jurassic coal-bearing strata, the Shansongang Formation, should namely be renewed.

  19. The geographic and phylogenetic position of sauropod dinosaurs from the Kota formation (Early Jurassic) of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, David D.

    2003-03-01

    The earliest sauropods are the Late Triassic Isanosaurus from Thailand, the Early Jurassic Barapasaurus and Kotasaurus from the Kota Formation of the Pranhita-Godavari Basin of India and Vulcanodon from Zimbabwe, and a variety of Middle Jurassic genera from many localities in Gondwana and Laurasia except North America. These early sauropod genera are related, but their phylogenetic positions remain unresolved. Sauropods originated in Laurasia (Thailand and vicinity) or Pangea (broadly, Thailand, China, India), with at least three additional steps involving expansion and diversification through the Middle Jurassic.

  20. Hettangian (early jurassic) plant fossils from Puale Bay (peninsular terrane, Alaska)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Middle Hettangian (Early Jurassic) plant macrofossils from the Kamishak Formation at Puale Bay,Alaska occur mainly as leaves and leafy shoots found together with...

  1. Early Jurassic allotherians from South Wales (United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Clemens

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Fossils from two fissure fillings in Pant Quarry (designated Pant 4 and Pant 5, South Wales, United Kingdom, probably of Early Jurassic age document a taxonomically diverse vertebrate fauna, the Morganucodon-sphenodont fauna, composed of several kinds of reptiles, non-mammalian synapsids, and mammals. Six isolated molariform teeth from Pant 4 and 5 fissures clearly record the presence of Thomasia (Mammalia, Allotheria, Haramiyidae, a genus previously known only from purported Late Triassic faunas of southwestern England, France, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, and Switzerland. Small morphological differences from teeth in the larger English and continental European samples warrant identification of the Welsh material as Thomasia cf. moorei. The highly derived morphology of an isolated molariform tooth from Pant 5 fissure indicates the presence of another, possibly allotherian, taxon. Fossilien aus zwei wahrscheinlich unterjurassischen Spaltenfüllungen (Pant 4 und Pant 5 im Steinbruch Pant in Süd-Wales dokumentieren eine taxonomisch diverse Wirbeltierfauna. Diese Morganucodon-Sphenodontiden-Fauna besteht aus verschiedenen Formen von Reptilien, Synapsiden und Säugetieren. Sechs isolierte molariforme Zähne aus den Spaltenfüllungen Pant 4 und Pant 5 belegen eindeutig das Vorkommen von Thomasia (Mammalia, Allotheria, Haramiyidae, einer bisher nur aus vermutlich obertriassischen Faunen Südwest-Englands, Frankreichs, Belgiens, Luxemburgs, Deutschlands und der Schweiz bekannten Gattung. Geringe morphologische Unterschiede zu dem umfangreicheren Material aus England und Kontinental-Europa sprechen für die Identifikation des neuen Materials als Thomasia cf. moorei. Die stark abgeleitete Morphologie eines isolierten molariformen Zahnes aus der Spalte Pant 5 belegt das Vorkommen eines anderen Taxons, das möglicherweise auch den Allotheria zuzuordnen ist. doi:10.1002/mmng.200600018

  2. Early and Middle Jurassic climate changes: implications for palaeoceanography and tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen; Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz;

    2014-01-01

    three pronounced oxygen isotope ‘Ice Age’ cycles, and the subsequent well known Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic ‘supergreenhouse’ Event is followed by very warm seawater temperatures in the late Toarcian. Moreover, a very pronounced and effective cooling occurred during the latest Toarcian and early Aalenian...... (Early-Middle Jurassic Boundary Event) resulted in substantial expansion of Arctic climates to palaeolatitudes as low as 45° and in distinctly cooler seawater temperatures in lower latitude European seas. At least the extensive cooling at the Early-Middle Jurassic Boundary Event was most likely driven...

  3. Dinosaur evolution. A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroit, Pascal; Sinitsa, Sofia M; Dhouailly, Danielle; Bolotsky, Yuri L; Sizov, Alexander V; McNamara, Maria E; Benton, Michael J; Spagna, Paul

    2014-07-25

    Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits from northeastern China have yielded varied theropod dinosaurs bearing feathers. Filamentous integumentary structures have also been described in ornithischian dinosaurs, but whether these filaments can be regarded as part of the evolutionary lineage toward feathers remains controversial. Here we describe a new basal neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of Siberia with small scales around the distal hindlimb, larger imbricated scales around the tail, monofilaments around the head and the thorax, and more complex featherlike structures around the humerus, the femur, and the tibia. The discovery of these branched integumentary structures outside theropods suggests that featherlike structures coexisted with scales and were potentially widespread among the entire dinosaur clade; feathers may thus have been present in the earliest dinosaurs.

  4. A bizarre Jurassic maniraptoran from China with elongate ribbon-like feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fucheng; Zhou, Zhonghe; Xu, Xing; Wang, Xiaolin; Sullivan, Corwin

    2008-10-23

    Recent coelurosaurian discoveries have greatly enriched our knowledge of the transition from dinosaurs to birds, but all reported taxa close to this transition are from relatively well known coelurosaurian groups. Here we report a new basal avialan, Epidexipteryx hui gen. et sp. nov., from the Middle to Late Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China. This new species is characterized by an unexpected combination of characters seen in several different theropod groups, particularly the Oviraptorosauria. Phylogenetic analysis shows it to be the sister taxon to Epidendrosaurus, forming a new clade at the base of Avialae. Epidexipteryx also possesses two pairs of elongate ribbon-like tail feathers, and its limbs lack contour feathers for flight. This finding shows that a member of the avialan lineage experimented with integumentary ornamentation as early as the Middle to Late Jurassic, and provides further evidence relating to this aspect of the transition from non-avian theropods to birds.

  5. Polar record of Early Jurassic massive carbon injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suan, Guillaume; Nikitenko, Boris L.; Rogov, Mikhail A.; Baudin, François; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Knyazev, Valeriy G.; Glinskikh, Larisa A.; Goryacheva, Anna A.; Adatte, Thierry; Riding, James B.; Föllmi, Karl B.; Pittet, Bernard; Mattioli, Emanuela; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) (ca. 182 Myr, Early Jurassic) represents one of the best-recognized examples of greenhouse warming, decreased seawater oxygenation and mass extinction. The leading hypothesis to explain these changes is the massive injection of thermogenic or gas hydrate-derived 13C-depleted carbon into the atmosphere, resulting in a > 3 per mil negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE), accelerated nutrient input and dissolved oxygen consumption in the oceans. Nevertheless, the lack of a precisely dated record of the T-OAE outside low latitudes has led to considerable debate about both its temporal and spatial extent and hence concerning its underlying causes. Here we present new isotopic and lithological data from three precisely dated N Siberian sections, which demonstrate that mass extinction and onset of strong oxygen-deficiency occurred near synchronously in polar and most tropical sites and were intimately linked to the onset of a marked 6‰ negative CIE recorded by bulk organic carbon. Rock Eval pyrolysis data from Siberia and comparisons with low latitudes show that the CIE cannot be explained by the extent of stratification of the studied basins or changes in organic matter sourcing and suggest that the negative CIE reflects rapid 13C-depleted carbon injection to all exchangeable reservoirs. Sedimentological and palynological indicators show that the injection coincided with a change from cold (abundant glendonites and exotic boulder-sized clasts) to exceptionally warm conditions (dominance of the thermophyllic pollen genus Classopollis) in the Arctic, which likely triggered a rapid, possibly partly glacioeustatic sea-level rise. Comparisons with low latitude records reveal that warm climate conditions and poor marine oxygenation persisted in continental margins at least 600 kyr after the CIE, features that can be attributed to protracted and massive volcanic carbon dioxide degassing. Our data reveal that the T-OAE profoundly

  6. A New Basal Sauropod Dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Niger and the Early Evolution of Sauropoda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, Kristian; Ortega, Francisco; Fierro, Ignacio; Joger, Ulrich; Kosma, Ralf; Marín Ferrer, José Manuel; Ide, Oumarou Amadou; Maga, Abdoulaye

    2009-01-01

    Background The early evolution of sauropod dinosaurs is poorly understood because of a highly incomplete fossil record. New discoveries of Early and Middle Jurassic sauropods have a great potential to lead to a better understanding of early sauropod evolution and to reevaluate the patterns of sauropod diversification. Principal Findings A new sauropod from the Middle Jurassic of Niger, Spinophorosaurus nigerensis n. gen. et sp., is the most complete basal sauropod currently known. The taxon shares many anatomical characters with Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods, while it is strongly dissimilar to Lower and Middle Jurassic South American and Indian forms. A possible explanation for this pattern is a separation of Laurasian and South Gondwanan Middle Jurassic sauropod faunas by geographic barriers. Integration of phylogenetic analyses and paleogeographic data reveals congruence between early sauropod evolution and hypotheses about Jurassic paleoclimate and phytogeography. Conclusions Spinophorosaurus demonstrates that many putatively derived characters of Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods are plesiomorphic for eusauropods, while South Gondwanan eusauropods may represent a specialized line. The anatomy of Spinophorosaurus indicates that key innovations in Jurassic sauropod evolution might have taken place in North Africa, an area close to the equator with summer-wet climate at that time. Jurassic climatic zones and phytogeography possibly controlled early sauropod diversification. PMID:19756139

  7. A new basal sauropod dinosaur from the middle Jurassic of Niger and the early evolution of sauropoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Remes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early evolution of sauropod dinosaurs is poorly understood because of a highly incomplete fossil record. New discoveries of Early and Middle Jurassic sauropods have a great potential to lead to a better understanding of early sauropod evolution and to reevaluate the patterns of sauropod diversification. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new sauropod from the Middle Jurassic of Niger, Spinophorosaurus nigerensis n. gen. et sp., is the most complete basal sauropod currently known. The taxon shares many anatomical characters with Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods, while it is strongly dissimilar to Lower and Middle Jurassic South American and Indian forms. A possible explanation for this pattern is a separation of Laurasian and South Gondwanan Middle Jurassic sauropod faunas by geographic barriers. Integration of phylogenetic analyses and paleogeographic data reveals congruence between early sauropod evolution and hypotheses about Jurassic paleoclimate and phytogeography. CONCLUSIONS: Spinophorosaurus demonstrates that many putatively derived characters of Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods are plesiomorphic for eusauropods, while South Gondwanan eusauropods may represent a specialized line. The anatomy of Spinophorosaurus indicates that key innovations in Jurassic sauropod evolution might have taken place in North Africa, an area close to the equator with summer-wet climate at that time. Jurassic climatic zones and phytogeography possibly controlled early sauropod diversification.

  8. A new troodontid theropod dinosaur from the lower Cretaceous of Utah.

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    Phil Senter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The theropod dinosaur family Troodontidae is known from the Upper Jurassic, Lower Cretaceous, and Upper Cretaceous of Asia and from the Upper Jurassic and Upper Cretaceous of North America. Before now no undisputed troodontids from North America have been reported from the Early Cretaceous. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we describe a theropod maxilla from the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah and perform a phylogenetic analysis to determine its phylogenetic position. The specimen is distinctive enough to assign to a new genus and species, Geminiraptor suarezarum. Phylogenetic analysis places G. suarezarum within Troodontidae in an unresolved polytomy with Mei, Byronosaurus, Sinornithoides, Sinusonasus, and Troodon+(Saurornithoides+Zanabazar. Geminiraptor suarezarum uniquely exhibits extreme pneumatic inflation of the maxilla internal to the antorbital fossa such that the anterior maxilla has a triangular cross-section. Unlike troodontids more closely related to Troodon, G. suarezarum exhibits bony septa between the dental alveoli and a promaxillary foramen that is visible in lateral view. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of a North American troodontid from the Lower Cretaceous. It therefore contributes to a fuller understanding of troodontid biogeography through time. It also adds to the known dinosaurian fauna of the Cedar Mountain Formation.

  9. Theropod fauna from southern Australia indicates high polar diversity and climate-driven dinosaur provinciality.

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    Roger B J Benson

    Full Text Available The Early Cretaceous fauna of Victoria, Australia, provides unique data on the composition of high latitude southern hemisphere dinosaurs. We describe and review theropod dinosaur postcranial remains from the Aptian-Albian Otway and Strzelecki groups, based on at least 37 isolated bones, and more than 90 teeth from the Flat Rocks locality. Several specimens of medium- and large-bodied individuals (estimated up to ~8.5 metres long represent allosauroids. Tyrannosauroids are represented by elements indicating medium body sizes (~3 metres long, likely including the holotype femur of Timimus hermani, and a single cervical vertebra represents a juvenile spinosaurid. Single specimens representing medium- and small-bodied theropods may be referrable to Ceratosauria, Ornithomimosauria, a basal coelurosaur, and at least three taxa within Maniraptora. Thus, nine theropod taxa may have been present. Alternatively, four distinct dorsal vertebrae indicate a minimum of four taxa. However, because most taxa are known from single bones, it is likely that small-bodied theropod diversity remains underestimated. The high abundance of allosauroids and basal coelurosaurs (including tyrannosauroids and possibly ornithomimosaurs, and the relative rarity of ceratosaurs, is strikingly dissimilar to penecontemporaneous dinosaur faunas of Africa and South America, which represent an arid, lower-latitude biome. Similarities between dinosaur faunas of Victoria and the northern continents concern the proportional representatation of higher clades, and may result from the prevailing temperate-polar climate of Australia, especially at high latitudes in Victoria, which is similar to the predominant warm-temperate climate of Laurasia, but distinct from the arid climate zone that covered extensive areas of Gondwana. Most dinosaur groups probably attained a near-cosmopolitan distribution in the Jurassic, prior to fragmentation of the Pangaean supercontinent, and some aspects of

  10. Theropod fauna from southern Australia indicates high polar diversity and climate-driven dinosaur provinciality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Roger B J; Rich, Thomas H; Vickers-Rich, Patricia; Hall, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The Early Cretaceous fauna of Victoria, Australia, provides unique data on the composition of high latitude southern hemisphere dinosaurs. We describe and review theropod dinosaur postcranial remains from the Aptian-Albian Otway and Strzelecki groups, based on at least 37 isolated bones, and more than 90 teeth from the Flat Rocks locality. Several specimens of medium- and large-bodied individuals (estimated up to ~8.5 metres long) represent allosauroids. Tyrannosauroids are represented by elements indicating medium body sizes (~3 metres long), likely including the holotype femur of Timimus hermani, and a single cervical vertebra represents a juvenile spinosaurid. Single specimens representing medium- and small-bodied theropods may be referrable to Ceratosauria, Ornithomimosauria, a basal coelurosaur, and at least three taxa within Maniraptora. Thus, nine theropod taxa may have been present. Alternatively, four distinct dorsal vertebrae indicate a minimum of four taxa. However, because most taxa are known from single bones, it is likely that small-bodied theropod diversity remains underestimated. The high abundance of allosauroids and basal coelurosaurs (including tyrannosauroids and possibly ornithomimosaurs), and the relative rarity of ceratosaurs, is strikingly dissimilar to penecontemporaneous dinosaur faunas of Africa and South America, which represent an arid, lower-latitude biome. Similarities between dinosaur faunas of Victoria and the northern continents concern the proportional representatation of higher clades, and may result from the prevailing temperate-polar climate of Australia, especially at high latitudes in Victoria, which is similar to the predominant warm-temperate climate of Laurasia, but distinct from the arid climate zone that covered extensive areas of Gondwana. Most dinosaur groups probably attained a near-cosmopolitan distribution in the Jurassic, prior to fragmentation of the Pangaean supercontinent, and some aspects of the hallmark

  11. Theropod Fauna from Southern Australia Indicates High Polar Diversity and Climate-Driven Dinosaur Provinciality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Roger B. J.; Rich, Thomas H.; Vickers-Rich, Patricia; Hall, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The Early Cretaceous fauna of Victoria, Australia, provides unique data on the composition of high latitude southern hemisphere dinosaurs. We describe and review theropod dinosaur postcranial remains from the Aptian–Albian Otway and Strzelecki groups, based on at least 37 isolated bones, and more than 90 teeth from the Flat Rocks locality. Several specimens of medium- and large-bodied individuals (estimated up to ∼8.5 metres long) represent allosauroids. Tyrannosauroids are represented by elements indicating medium body sizes (∼3 metres long), likely including the holotype femur of Timimus hermani, and a single cervical vertebra represents a juvenile spinosaurid. Single specimens representing medium- and small-bodied theropods may be referrable to Ceratosauria, Ornithomimosauria, a basal coelurosaur, and at least three taxa within Maniraptora. Thus, nine theropod taxa may have been present. Alternatively, four distinct dorsal vertebrae indicate a minimum of four taxa. However, because most taxa are known from single bones, it is likely that small-bodied theropod diversity remains underestimated. The high abundance of allosauroids and basal coelurosaurs (including tyrannosauroids and possibly ornithomimosaurs), and the relative rarity of ceratosaurs, is strikingly dissimilar to penecontemporaneous dinosaur faunas of Africa and South America, which represent an arid, lower-latitude biome. Similarities between dinosaur faunas of Victoria and the northern continents concern the proportional representatation of higher clades, and may result from the prevailing temperate–polar climate of Australia, especially at high latitudes in Victoria, which is similar to the predominant warm–temperate climate of Laurasia, but distinct from the arid climate zone that covered extensive areas of Gondwana. Most dinosaur groups probably attained a near-cosmopolitan distribution in the Jurassic, prior to fragmentation of the Pangaean supercontinent, and some aspects of the

  12. Three new Jurassic euharamiyidan species reinforce early divergence of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shundong; Wang, Yuanqing; Guan, Jian; Sheng, Xia; Meng, Jin

    2014-10-30

    The phylogeny of Allotheria, including Multituberculata and Haramiyida, remains unsolved and has generated contentious views on the origin and earliest evolution of mammals. Here we report three new species of a new clade, Euharamiyida, based on six well-preserved fossils from the Jurassic period of China. These fossils reveal many craniodental and postcranial features of euharamiyidans and clarify several ambiguous structures that are currently the topic of debate. Our phylogenetic analyses recognize Euharamiyida as the sister group of Multituberculata, and place Allotheria within the Mammalia. The phylogeny suggests that allotherian mammals evolved from a Late Triassic (approximately 208 million years ago) Haramiyavia-like ancestor and diversified into euharamiyidans and multituberculates with a cosmopolitan distribution, implying homologous acquisition of many craniodental and postcranial features in the two groups. Our findings also favour a Late Triassic origin of mammals in Laurasia and two independent detachment events of the middle ear bones during mammalian evolution.

  13. Hints of the early Jehol Biota: important dinosaur footprint assemblages from the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary Tuchengzi Formation in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lida; Zhang, Jianping; Lockley, Martin G; McCrea, Richard T; Klein, Hendrik; Alcalá, Luis; Buckley, Lisa G; Burns, Michael E; Kümmell, Susanna B; He, Qing

    2015-01-01

    New reports of dinosaur tracksites in the Tuchengzi Formation in the newly established Yanqing Global Geopark, Beijing, China, support previous inferences that the track assemblages from this formation are saurischian-dominated. More specifically, the assemblages appear theropod-dominated, with the majority of well-preserved tracks conforming to the Grallator type (sensus lato), thus representing relatively small trackmakers. Such ichnofaunas supplement the skeletal record from this unit that lacks theropods thus far, proving a larger diversity of dinosaur faunas in that region. Sauropods are represented by medium to large sized and narrow and wide-gauge groups, respectively. The latter correspond with earlier discoveries of titanosauriform skeletons in the same unit. Previous records of ornithischian tracks cannot be positively confirmed. Purported occurrences are re-evaluated here, the trackways and imprints, except of a single possible specimen, re-assigned to theropods. Palecologically the Tuchengzi ichnofauna is characteristic of semi-arid fluvio-lacustrine inland basins with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous deposits in northern China that all show assemblages with abundant theropod and sauropod tracks and minor components of ornithopod, pterosaur and bird tracks.

  14. Hints of the early Jehol Biota: important dinosaur footprint assemblages from the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary Tuchengzi Formation in Beijing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Xing

    Full Text Available New reports of dinosaur tracksites in the Tuchengzi Formation in the newly established Yanqing Global Geopark, Beijing, China, support previous inferences that the track assemblages from this formation are saurischian-dominated. More specifically, the assemblages appear theropod-dominated, with the majority of well-preserved tracks conforming to the Grallator type (sensus lato, thus representing relatively small trackmakers. Such ichnofaunas supplement the skeletal record from this unit that lacks theropods thus far, proving a larger diversity of dinosaur faunas in that region. Sauropods are represented by medium to large sized and narrow and wide-gauge groups, respectively. The latter correspond with earlier discoveries of titanosauriform skeletons in the same unit. Previous records of ornithischian tracks cannot be positively confirmed. Purported occurrences are re-evaluated here, the trackways and imprints, except of a single possible specimen, re-assigned to theropods. Palecologically the Tuchengzi ichnofauna is characteristic of semi-arid fluvio-lacustrine inland basins with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous deposits in northern China that all show assemblages with abundant theropod and sauropod tracks and minor components of ornithopod, pterosaur and bird tracks.

  15. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Early and Middle Jurassic mires of Bornholm and the Fennoscandian Border Zone: a comparison of depositional environments and vegetation

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    Koppelhus, Eva B.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Suitable climatic conditions for peat formation existed during Early–Middle Jurassic times in the Fennoscandian Border Zone. Autochthonous peat and allochthonous organic matter were depositedfrom north Jylland, south-east through the Kattegat and Øresund area, to Skåne and Bornholm. The increase in coal seam abundance and thickness from north Jylland to Bornholm indicates that the most favourable peat-forming conditions were present towards the south-east. Peat formation and deposition of organic-rich muds in the Early Jurassic coastal mires were mainly controlled by a continuous rise of relative sea level governed by subsidence and an overall eustatic rise. Watertable rise repeatedly outpaced the rate of accumulation of organic matter and terminated peat formationby lacustrine or lagoonal flooding. Organic matter accumulated in open-water mires and in continuously waterlogged, anoxic and periodically marine-influenced mires. The latter conditionsresulted in huminite-rich coals containing framboidal pyrite. The investigated Lower Jurassic seams correspond to peat and peaty mud deposits that ranged from 0.5–5.7 m in thickness, but were generallyless than 3 m thick. It is estimated that on Bornholm, the mires existed on average for c. 1200 years in the Hettangian–Sinemurian and for c. 2300 years in the Late Pliensbachian; the Early Jurassic(Hettangian–Sinemurian mires in the Øresund area existed for c. 1850 years. Aalenian uplift of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High and major parts of the Danish Basin caused a significant change in the basinconfiguration and much reduced subsidence in the Fennoscandian Border Zone during the Middle Jurassic. This resulted in a more inland position for the Middle Jurassic mires which on occasionenabled peat accumulation to keep pace with, or temporarily outpace, watertable rise. Thus, peat formation was sometimes sustained for relatively long periods, and the mires may have existed for up to 7000 years in the

  16. Origination and death of petroleum systems along the Late Jurassic/Early Cretaceous northern Tethyan margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golonka, J. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Kiessling, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Krobicki, M. [Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering; Bocharova, N.Y. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Center for Program Studies

    1997-09-01

    Breakup of Pangea during Jurassic and Cretaceous times created a system of rifts along the northern Tethyan margin. Some of these rifts developed into oceanic basins while others developed on continental crust and turned into aulacogenes. The basins were separated from the main Tethys ocean by several plates and ridges. Partial uplift of the main European plate and late Kimmerian orogeny resulted in the establishment of restricted conditions in the marginal Tethyan basins. The paleogeographic and paleoclimatic setting favoured upwelling along the ridges and continental margins. Source rock prediction value modelling placed Tethyan marginal basins among the best Jurassic source rocks of the world. Self-contained petroleum systems consisting of source rocks, carbonate reservoirs and evaporitic seals occur in the area east of Poland. Actual hydrocarbon production is ongoing in Afghanistan and the Amu-Daria province. Some of Carpathian oils might also be sourced by Late Jurassic/Early Cretaceous rocks. In the western area, petroleum systems were destroyed during the Alpine orogeny.

  17. New robertinid foraminifers from the Early Jurassic of Adnet, Austria and their evolutionary importance

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    Sylvain Rigaud

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New benthic multichambered foraminifers have been discovered in the Hettangian–Sinemurian of the Northern Calcareous Alps (Adnet, Salzburg, Austria. Originally aragonitic, these forms are completely recrystallized but the early impregnation of their tests by Fe-Mn solutions has, to some extent, allowed an indirect preservation of their primary structure. The most remarkably preserved specimens are found in close vicinity to the marmorea crust, a heavily mineralized multiphased hardground. We describe two new genera, Velleditsiella gen. nov., a microgastropod look-alike foraminifer, which includes the species V. felicitaszae gen. et sp. nov. and V. spinaferra gen. et sp. nov., and Rossanella gen. nov., the first known representative of the superfamily Conorboidoidea, which includes the species R. martinii gen. et sp. nov. Considering their structural and morphological characteristics, Velleditsiella and Rossanella phylogenetically derive from two distinct Triassic lineages, respectively the families Trochosiphoniidae and Variostomatidae. The discovery of diverse aragonitic assemblages in earliest Jurassic strata dismisses the long believed hypothesis that all Jurassic aragonitic multichambered foraminifers originated from a single Oberhauserellidae ancestor. It also supports a lower impact of the Triassic/Jurassic biotic crisis on the evolution of aragonitic foraminifers. Hypotheses for the short term and long term evolution of aragonitic multichambered foraminifers are discussed and new phyletic trees are proposed.

  18. Kinematic reconstruction of the Caribbean region since the Early Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochman, Lydian; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Torsvik, Trond; Spakman, Wim; Pindell, James

    2014-05-01

    The Caribbean region results from a complex tectonic history governed by the interplay of the North American, South American and (Paleo-)Pacific plates, between which the Caribbean plate evolved since the early Cretaceous. During its entire tectonic evolution, the Caribbean plate was largely surrounded by subduction and transform boundaries, which hampers a quantitative integration into the global circuit of plate motions. In addition, reconstructions of the region have so far not resulted in a first order kinematic description of the main tectonic units in terms of Euler poles and finite rotation angles. Here, we present an updated, quantitatively described kinematic reconstruction of the Caribbean region back to 200 Ma integrated into the global plate circuit, and implemented with GPlates free software. Our analysis of Caribbean tectonic evolution incorporates an extensive literature review. To constrain the Caribbean plate motion between the American continents, we use a novel approach that takes structural geological observations rather than marine magnetic anomalies as prime input, and uses regionally extensive metamorphic and magmatic phenomena such as the Great Arc of the Caribbean, the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) and the Caribbean high-pressure belt as correlation markers. The resulting model restores the Caribbean plate back along the Cayman Trough and major strike-slip faults in Guatemala, offshore Nicaragua, offshore Belize and along the Northern Andes towards its position of origin, west of the North and South American continents in early Cretaceous time. We provide the paleomagnetic reference frame for the Caribbean region by rotating the Global Apparent Polar Wander Path into coordinates of the Caribbean plate interior, Cuba, and the Chortis Block. We conclude that a plate kinematic scenario for a Panthalassa/Pacific origin of Caribbean lithosphere leads to a much simpler explanation than a Proto-Caribbean/Atlantic origin. Placing our

  19. Late Triassic - Early Jurassic successions of the Atuel depocenter: sequence stratigraphy and tectonic controls

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    Silvia Lanés

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Biostratigraphic correlations of the Late Triassic - Early Jurassic successions of the Atuel depocenter allowed determining the accommodation changes and the possible tectonic controls on sedimentation. The Rhaetian - late Early Sinemurian deposits contain facies of slope-type fan deltas, braided fluvial systems and low sinuosity rivers with alternate bars deposited during a synrift phase. The late Early Sinemurian - Toarcian series host facies of intermediate (Gilbert to shelf type fan deltas, braided and low sinuosity fluvial systems, wave-dominated estuaries, transgressive storm-dominated and turbidite-influenced marine shelves which record the sag phase. According to different criteria two stratigraphic schemes are proposed, the first one considering tectosedimentary units (TSU and the second one using "Exxon-like" sequences. In the first scheme the synrift TSU matches the actual Precuyo Mesosequence and the sag TSU is partly equivalent to the Cuyo Mesosequence, mainly keeping the current mesosequence scheme for the Neuquén basin but assigning the fandeltaic deposits to the Precuyo Mesosequence. The second sequence scheme considers the whole Late Triassic - Early Jurassic succession as a part of the Cuyo Mesosequence, where the synrift deposits composes the detached lowstand system tract (LST and most of the sag deposits makes the transgressive system tract (TST. The basal sequence boundary does not crop out, the flooding surface at the TST base and the maximum flooding surface at the TST top are respectively marked by the lowest estuarine levels and by black shales with suboxic-compatible bivalves (Bositra sp..

  20. Evolutionary and Ecological Sequelae of Mass Extinctions: Examples From the Continental Triassic-Jurassic Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, P. E.; Whiteside, J. H.

    2003-12-01

    after the boundary. Species flocks of semionotid fishes dominated earliest Jurassic giant rift lakes in eastern North America, but not Triassic or later Early Jurassic lakes in the same basins. Based on footprint data, it is quite possible that there were also species flocks of morphologically similar ceratosaurian theropod dinosaurs in the Early Jurassic.

  1. Embryos of an early Jurassic prosauropod dinosaur and their evolutionary significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Robert R; Scott, Diane; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Evans, David C; Raath, Michael A

    2005-07-29

    Articulated embryos from the Lower Jurassic Elliot Formation of South Africa are referable to the prosauropod Massospondylus carinatus and, together with other material, provide substantial insights into the ontogenetic development in this early dinosaur. The large forelimbs and head and the horizontally held neck indicate that the hatchlings were obligate quadrupeds. In contrast, adult Massospondylus were at least facultatively bipedal. This suggests that the quadrupedal gait of giant sauropods may have evolved by retardation of postnatal negative allometry of the forelimbs. Embryonic body proportions and an absence of well-developed teeth suggest that hatchlings of this dinosaur may have required parental care.

  2. Dolomitization in Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Platform Carbonates (Berdiga Formation), Ayralaksa Yayla (Trabzon), NE Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Merve; Ziya Kırmacı, Mehmet; Kandemir, Raif

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT Pontides constitute an E-W trending orogenic mountain belt that extends about 1100 km along the northern side of Turkey from the immediate east of Istanbul to the Georgian border at the east. Tectono-stratigraphically, the Pontides are divided into three different parts: Eastern, Central, and Western Pontides. The Eastern Pontides, including the studied area, comprise an area of 500 km in length and 100 km in width, extending along the southeast coast of the Black Sea from the Kizilirmak and Yesilirmak Rivers in the vicinity of Samsun to the Little Caucasus. This area is bordered by the Eastern Black Sea basin to the north and the Ankara-Erzincan Neotethyan suture zone to the south. The Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous platform carbonates are widely exposed in E-W direction in the Eastern Pontides (NE Turkey). The Platform carbonates shows varying lithofacies changing from supratidal to platform margin reef laterally and vertically, and was buried until the end of Late Cretaceous. The studied Ayralaksa Yayla (Trabzon, NE Turkey) area comprises one of the best typical exposures of formation in northern zone of Eastern Pontides. In this area, the lower parts of the formation are pervasively dolomitized by fabric-destructive and fabric-preserving replacement dolomite which are Ca-rich and nonstoichiometric (Ca56-66Mg34-44). Replacement dolomites (Rd) are represented by D18O values of -19.0 to -4.2 (VPDB), D13C values of 4.4 to 2.1 \\permil (VPDB) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70889 to 0.70636. Petrographic and geochemical data indicate that Rd dolomites are formed prior to compaction at shallow-moderate burial depths from Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous seawater and/or partly modified seawater as a result of water/rock interaction and they were recrystallized at elevated temperatures during subsequent burial. In the subsequent diagenetic process during the Late Cretaceous when the region became a magmatic arc, as a result of interaction with Early Jurassic volcanic

  3. Changes of taxonomical composition of Late Jurassic Early Cretaceous palynofloras of Bureya Basin,Russia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The changes of taxonomical composition of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous palynofloras are revealed,in the upper stream of Bureya River in Bureya Basin.The palynofloras are dominated as follows:the Berriasian one by ferns (Cyatheaceae,Dicksoniaceae,Osmundaceae), Classopollis and bisaccate pollen;the Valanginian-Hauterivian one by ferns (Cyatheaceae,Dicksoniaceae), Ginkgocycadophytus and bisaccate pollen;the Barremian one by ferns(Cyatheaceae,Dieksoniaceae);the Aptian one by ferns(Cyatheaceae,Dieksoniaceae,Gleicheniaceae)and Ginkgocycadophytus;and the Albian one by ferns(Schizaeaceae)and bisaccate pollen.In the Albian the floral diversity raises with the angiosperms appearing.

  4. Marine ecosystem resilience during extreme deoxygenation: the Early Jurassic oceanic anoxic event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Bryony A; Frid, Christopher L J

    2017-01-01

    Global warming during the Early Jurassic, and associated widespread ocean deoxygenation, was comparable in scale with the changes projected for the next century. This study quantifies the impact of severe global environmental change on the biological traits of marine communities that define the ecological roles and functions they deliver. We document centennial-millennial variability in the biological trait composition of Early Jurassic (Toarcian) seafloor communities and examine how this changed during the event using biological traits analysis. Environmental changes preceding the global oceanic anoxic event (OAE) produced an ecological shift leading to stressed benthic palaeocommunities with reduced resilience to the subsequent OAE. Changes in traits and ecological succession coincided with major environmental changes; and were of similar nature and magnitude to those in severely deoxygenated benthic communities today despite the very different timescales. Changes in community composition were linked to local redox conditions whereas changes in populations of opportunists were driven by primary productivity. Throughout most of the OAE substitutions by tolerant taxa conserved the trait composition and hence functioning, but periods of severe deoxygenation caused benthic defaunation that would have resulted in functional collapse. Following the OAE recovery was slow probably because the global nature of the event restricted opportunities for recruitment from outside the basin. Our findings suggest that future systems undergoing deoxygenation may initially show functional resilience, but severe global deoxygenation will impact traits and ecosystem functioning and, by limiting the species pool, will slow recovery rates.

  5. Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Gondwanan homoxylous woods: a nomenclatural revision of the genera with taxonomic notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, M K.; Philippe, M

    2001-04-01

    The homoxylous fossil woods occurring in the Gondwanan continents of South America, Australia, Africa, India and Antarctica during the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous period are considered here. Original descriptions of the genera and wherever possible, the type material, have been consulted. Applying the rules of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, the generic names of the homoxylous woods have been revised from a nomenclatural point of view. According to this review, out of 31 generic names used for woods from the given time interval and area, 6 are illegitimate later nomenclatural synonyms, 1 is a later homonym, and 5 can be considered as taxonomical synonyms. Moreover, 9 genera have been used erroneously. We propose one new generic name (Protaxodioxylon n. gen.) and elsewhere we will propose for conservation, with a conserved type one of the illegitimate names and one of the taxonomic synonyms. As a result, we consider that there are only eighteen generic names correctly quoted for the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous of Gondwana, and we provide a taxonomic key for the corresponding genera. This revision is the first step in systematically comparing northern and southern hemisphere woods.

  6. The Emergence of Pelagic Carbonate Production by Nannoplankton in The Early Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, E.; Pittet, B.; Suan, G.; Sucheras-Marx, B.; Reggiani, L.; Planck, J.

    2008-12-01

    Coccolithophores are among the main carbonate producers in today's Oceans. They participate to the organic-carbon pump and carbonate counter-pump at the same time, and therefore have a fundamental role in the carbon cycle. In this regard, the first occurrence and subsequent diversification of calcareous nannoplankton and in particular of coccolithophorids (225-65 Mya) likely had a major impact on biogeochemical cycles and the regulation of pCO2 in the atmosphere/hydrosphere. Nevertheless, both causes and consequences of the emergence of calcareous nannoplankton between the Late Triassic and the Early Jurassic remain poorly understood. In order to address the possible relationships between the early diversification of coccolithopororids and the evolution of atmospheric CO2 conditions, we performed a quantitative micropaleontological study in the well-exposed sections outcropping along the west coast of Portugal, spanning the entire Lower Jurassic. The accumulation rates of pelagic carbonates were reconstructed using the absolute abundances and size estimates of the most important pelagic carbonate producers as well as the cyclostratigraphic calibration of the studied successions. Our results show that nannofossil absolute abundance, although fluctuating in the Early Jurassic, increased by discrete steps. The first step (up to 0.2 billion of nannofossils per gram of rock) occurred at the base of the Late Pliensbachian and coincided with the deposition of organic matter-rich sediments. A second, more important increase is recorded at the Pliensbachian/Toarcian transition (-183 Mya), when absolute abundance attained values of 1.1 billion of nannofossils per gram of rock. These abundances are comparable to the record of surface sediments deposited under oligotrophic conditions. The following decrease in coccolithophorids observed during the Early Toarcian oceanic anoxic event is particularly intriguing. The dramatic decrease or loss of biocalcification potential could

  7. Virtual reconstruction of the endocranial anatomy of the early Jurassic marine crocodylomorph Pelagosaurus typus (Thalattosuchia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie E. Pierce

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Thalattosuchians were highly specialised aquatic archosaurs of the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, and represent a peak of aquatic adaptation among crocodylomorphs. Relatively little is known of their endocranial anatomy or its relevance for the evolution of sensory systems, physiology, and other aspects of biology. Nevertheless, such data have significance for two reasons: (1 thalattosuchians represent an important data point regarding adaptation to marine life in tetrapods; and (2 as early-diverging members of the crocodylian stem-lineage, thalattosuchians provide information on the evolutionary assembly of the brain and other endocranial structures in crocodylomorphs. Here we use µCT data to virtually reconstruct the endocranial anatomy of Pelagosaurus typus, an early thalattosuchian with plesiomorphic traits of relevance to the split between the two major subgroups: Teleosauroidea and Metriorhynchoidea. Interpretation of these data in a broad comparative context indicate that several key endocranial features may be unique to thalattosuchians, including: a pyramidal morphology of the semicircular canals, the presence of an elongate endosseous cochlear duct that may indicate enhanced hearing ability, the presence of large, paired canals extending anteriorly from an enlarged pituitary fossa, a relatively straight brain (possibly due to the presence of large, laterally placed orbits, and an enlarged venous sinus projecting dorsally from the endocast that is confluent with the paratympanic sinus system. Notably, we document a large expansion of the nasal cavity anterior to the orbits in Pelagosaurus as an osteological correlate of an enlarged salt gland previously only documented in Late Jurassic metriorhynchoids. This is the first anatomical evidence of this structure in early thalattosuchians. Pelagosaurus also shares the presence of paired olfactory bulbs with metriorhynchoids, and shows an enlarged cerebrum, which may also be present in

  8. Petrogenesis and tectonic implications of Early Jurassic volcanic rocks of the Raohe accretionary complex, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui; Ge, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hao; Bi, Jun-Hui; Ji, Zheng; Dong, Yu; Xu, Wen-Liang

    2017-02-01

    The Raohe accretionary complex, located at the border between the Russian Far East and Northeastern China, is a significant part of the western Pacific Oceanic tectonic regime. Due to lack of precise age and geochemical constraints, the tectonic setting and petrogenesis of the magmatic rocks in this area remain undefined, resulting in debate about crustal growth mechanisms and subduction-related accretionary processes in Northeastern China. Here, we report whole-rock major and trace element and Sr-Nd isotope data, together with zircon U-Pb ages and in situ zircon Hf isotope data for calc-alkaline andesites, dacites, rhyolites, rhyolitic crystal tuffs, Nb-enriched andesites and basaltic andesites, and high-Mg andesites of the Raohe accretionary complex in NE China. Samples were collected from Late Triassic to Early Jurassic strata. However, geochronological results in this study indicated that the studied magmatism occurred in the Early Jurassic (187-174 Ma). The calc-alkaline volcanic rocks possess geochemical characteristics typical of arc magmas that form at active continental margins, such as moderate enrichments in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depletions in high field strength elements (HFSEs). They have positive εHf(t) values of +3.4 to +10.6 and relatively high (87Sr/86Sr)i values of 0.7047-0.7102. While the Nb-enriched andesites and basaltic andesites have higher TiO2, Hf, Nb, and Zr contents and higher Nb/Ta (24.0-87.6), Nb/U (11.9-75.9), (Nb/Th)PM (0.67-2.70), and (Nb/La)PM (1.95-5.00) ratios than typical arc basalts. They have negative εNd(t) values (-5.5 to -6.0) and relatively variable (87Sr/86Sr)i values of 0.7047-0.7114, suggesting an origin via the partial melting of mantle wedge peridotite that had been metasomatized by slab-derived melt. The high-Mg volcanic rocks, characterized by high MgO and Mg#, TiO2, Al2O3, Cr, Ni, (La/Yb)N and (La/Sm)N, but low Ba/Th ratios, are geochemically similar to

  9. Cold seep-related occurrence of the Early Jurassic rhynchonellid brachiopod Anarhynchia from the Canadian Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálfy, József; Price, Gregory D.; Vörös, Attila; Kovács, Zsófia; Johannson, Gary G.

    2017-04-01

    Cold seeps, where seepage of methane and/or other hydrocarbon-rich fluids and hydrogen-sulfide occurs in the sea floor, are sites which harbor highly specialized ecosystems associated with distinctive carbonate sediments. Although their Mesozoic record is scarce and patchy, it commonly includes rhynchonellid brachiopods, often of large size. Each new occurrence is valuable in filling gaps and providing additional insight into these peculiar ecosystems. Here we report a monospecific assemblage of Anarhynchia from a boulder-sized limestone clast of Early Pliensbachian (Early Jurassic) age in the Inklin Formation of the Whitehorse Trough in Stikine terrane, recovered from a locality at Copper Island in Atlin Lake, northern British Columbia, Canada. Specimens are of unusually large size, up to 9 cm in length, and their external and internal morphology allows assignment to Anarhynchia but warrants introduction of a new species. Although d13C and d18O values of the shells are close to equilibrium with ancient seawater, early precipitated carbonate cement phases of the enclosing limestone are characterised by highly depleted carbon isotopic composition, indicative of the influence of microbial oxidation of methane derived from a cold seep. Carbonate petrography of the isopachous, banded-fibrous cement supports its origin in a cold seep environment. Volcanogenic detrital grains in the micritic matrix of the limestone clast are indistinguishable from those in the sandstone layers in the siliciclastic sequence, suggesting that the seep carbonate is broadly coeval with the enclosing conglomerate. Previously, Anarhynchia has been known from the Lower Jurassic of California and Oregon, from both cold seep and hydrothermal vent deposits. Our new record extends the geographic range and species-level diversity of the genus, but supports its endemism to the East Pacific and membership in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems.

  10. A new early brachyuran (Crustacea, Decapoda) from the Middle Jurassic of northwest France, epibionts and ecological considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, N.; Bakel, van B.W.M.; Hondt, d' J.-L.; Charbonnier, S.

    2015-01-01

    The earliest known crabs are of Early and Middle Jurassic age; in general, they are rare. Here we describe a new species of homolodromioid from the late Bathonian of Sarthe (France), based on a single dorsal carapace, Tanidromites raboeufi n. sp. This specimen has mostly well-preserved cuticle, and

  11. Pangaean climate during the Early Jurassic: GCM simulations and the sedimentary record of paleoclimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, M.A. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States); Rind, D.; Ruedy, R. [Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Results from new simulations of the Early Jurassic climate show that increased ocean heat transport may have been the primary force generating warmer climates during the past 180 m.y. The simulations, conducted using the general circulation model (GCM) at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, include realistic representations of paleocontinental distribution, topography, epeiric seas, and vegetation, in order to facilitate comparisons between model results and paleoclimate data. three major features of the simulated Early Jurassic climate include the following. (1) A global warming, compared to the present, of 5 {degrees}C to 10 {degrees}C, with temperature increases at high latitudes five times this global average. Average summer temperatures exceed 35 {degrees}C in low-latitude regions of western Pangaea where eolian sandstones testify to the presence of vast deserts. (2) Simulated precipitation and evaporation patterns agree closely with the moisture distribution interpreted from evaporites, and coal deposits. High rainfall rates are associated primarily with monsoons that originate over the warm Tethys Ocean. Unlike the {open_quotes}megamonsoons{close_quotes} proposed in previous studies, these systems are found to be associated with localized pressure cells whose positions are controlled by topography and coastal geography. (3) Decreases in planetary albedo, occurring because of reductions in sea ice, snow cover, and low clouds, and increases in atmospheric water vapor are the positive climate feedbacks that amplify the global warming. Similar to other Mesozoic climate simulations, our model finds that large seasonal temperature fluctuations occurred over mid- and high-latitude continental interiors, refuting paleoclimate evidence that suggests more equable conditions. 101 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Early Jurassic foraminiferal assemblages in platform carbonates of Mt. Krim, central Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Gale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During the Early Jurassic, the subtropical carbonate platforms of the peri-Tethys Ocean experienced signifiant changes in their architectures, as well as in their biota compositions. Shallow-water carbonates from the northern part of the ancient Adriatic Carbonate Platform (External Dinarides were investigated in six sections, which taken together cover the development of the platform from deposition of the uppermost Triassic Main Dolomite to the middle Lower Jurassic, lithiotid limestone. Our aim was to establish a detailed foraminiferal biostratigraphy and to observe the changes in size, abundance and diversity of foraminifera in different types of facies. As a result, the succession was successfully divided into stage or substage levels. Foraminiferal assemblages were shown to experience a gradual change in taxonomic composition (including an increase in the proportion of complex agglutinated forms, a general increase in abundance of specimens, and greater diversity in each facies type, except in bindstone and mudstone. Notable is the difference between Hettangian assemblages, which display fairly uniform compositions in all facies types and the predominance of opportunists, and the post-Hettangian assemblages, which become progressively more species-rich and where the differences in facies are perhaps more pronounced. Changes in the size of the species Meandrovoluta asiagoensis Fugagnoli & Rettori, and of the largest specimen in the assemblages, however, are less clear, but are arguably present. Faunal changes roughly correspond to the gradual change from the flt-top platform of the upper Triassic – Hettangian, where biota would be repeatedly subjected to stressed peritidal conditions, to a platform differentiated into lagoon, sand bars and ephemeral emergent areas, offering numerous habitats and perhaps more stable living conditions for organisms.

  13. Middle Jurassic - Early Cretaceous rifting on the Chortis Block in Honduras: Implications for proto-Caribbean opening (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, R. D.; Emmet, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Regional mapping integrated with facies analysis, age constraints and airborne geophysical data reveal WNW and NE trends of Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous basins which intersect in southeast Honduras that we interpret as the result of rifting associated with the breakup of the Americas and opening of the proto-Caribbean seaway. The WNW-trending rift is 250 km long by 90 km wide and defined by a basal 200 to 800 m thick sequence of Middle to Late Jurassic fluvial channel and overbank deposits overlain by transgressive clastic shelf strata. At least three sub-basins are apparent. Flanking the WNW trending rift basins are fault bounded exposures of the pre-Jurassic continental basement of the Chortis block which is the source of the conglomeratic channel facies that delineate the axes of the rifts. Cretaceous terrigenous strata mantle the exposed basement-cored rift flanks. Lower Cretaceous clastic strata and shallow marine limestone strata are dominant along this trend indicating that post-rift related subsidence continued through the Early Cretaceous. The rifts coincide with a regional high in the total magnetic intensity data. We interpret these trends to reflect NNE-WSW extension active from the Middle Jurassic through Early Cretaceous. These rifts were inverted during Late Cretaceous shortening oriented normal to the rift axes. To the east and at a 120 degree angle to the WNW trending rift is the 300 km long NE trending Guayape fault system that forms the western shoulder of the Late Jurassic Agua Fria rift basin filled by > 2 km thickness of clastic marine shelf and slope strata. This NE trending basin coincides with the eastern extent of the surface exposure of continental basement rocks and a northeast-trending fabric of the Jurassic (?) metasedimentary basement rocks. We have previously interpreted the eastern basin to be the Jurassic rifted margin of the Chortis block with the Guayape originating as a normal fault system. These two rifts basin intersect

  14. Permian, Jurassic and Early Cretaceous palynofloral assemblages from subsurface sedimentary rocks in Chuperbhita Coalfield, Rajmahal Basin, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A

    2001-04-01

    The results of a palynological analysis of the sedimentary sequence of Borehole RCH-151, Chuperbhita Coalfield, Rajmahal Basin, Bihar are presented here. The borehole penetrated the Rajmahal Formation (comprising two traps sandwiching an intertrappean bed), the thinly represented Dubrajpur Formation and in its lower part, the Coal Measures. The coal-bearing interval is associated with Scheuringipollenites barakarensis, Faunipollenites varius, Densipollenites indicus, Gondisporites raniganjensis and Densipollenites magnicorpus Assemblage Zones. The presence of these biostratigraphic units indicates correlation with the Barakar Formation (Early Permian) and the Barren Measures and Raniganj Formations (both Late Permian). This is the first record, in the Chuperbhita Coalfield, of Late Permian strata, which appear to represent a condensed sequence. Prior to the present study, the Permian succession was thought to have been associated entirely with the Barakar Formation. The overlying Dubrajpur Formation yielded a distinct spore-pollen assemblage (in association with the first report of dinoflagellate, Phallocysta), which is assigned to the newly identified Callialasporites turbatus palynozone of latest Early to early Middle Jurassic age. The diverse spore-pollen flora of the intertrappean bed (Rajmahal Formation) incorporates several age marker taxa, viz. Undulatisporites, Leptolepidites, Klukisporites, Ruffordiaspora, and Coptospora. The assemblages from intertrappean beds are correlated with the Ruffordiaspora australiensis palynozone of Australia. Thus the palynodating indicates Permian, latest Early to early Mid-Jurassic and Early Cretaceous age for the strata studied. This is the first record of definite Jurassic microfossils from the non-marine sequence of Rajmahal Basin, India.

  15. Tectonic forcing of early to middle jurassic seawater Sr/Ca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Korte, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The Jurassic Period (ca. 201–145 Ma) is marked by fundamental reorganizations of paleogeography, paleoceanography, ecosystems, and the progressive shift from aragonite to calcite as the favored marine biogenic carbonate polymorph. Sr/Ca ratios of well-preserved Jurassic oysters and belemnites from...

  16. Oldest known dinosaurian nesting site and reproductive biology of the Early Jurassic sauropodomorph Massospondylus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Robert R; Evans, David C; Roberts, Eric M; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Yates, Adam M

    2012-02-14

    The extensive Early Jurassic continental strata of southern Africa have yielded an exceptional record of dinosaurs that includes scores of partial to complete skeletons of the sauropodomorph Massospondylus, ranging from embryos to large adults. In 1976 an incomplete egg clutch including in ovo embryos of this dinosaur, the oldest known example in the fossil record, was collected from a road-cut talus, but its exact provenance was uncertain. An excavation program at the site started in 2006 has yielded multiple in situ egg clutches, documenting the oldest known dinosaurian nesting site, predating other similar sites by more than 100 million years. The presence of numerous clutches of eggs, some of which contain embryonic remains, in at least four distinct horizons within a small area, provides the earliest known evidence of complex reproductive behavior including site fidelity and colonial nesting in a terrestrial vertebrate. Thus, fossil and sedimentological evidence from this nesting site provides empirical data on reproductive strategies in early dinosaurs. A temporally calibrated optimization of dinosaurian reproductive biology not only demonstrates the primary significance of the Massospondylus nesting site, but also provides additional insights into the initial stages of the evolutionary history of dinosaurs, including evidence that deposition of eggs in a tightly organized single layer in a nest evolved independently from brooding.

  17. Fungal decomposition of terrestrial organic matter accelerated Early Jurassic climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieńkowski, Grzegorz; Hodbod, Marta; Ullmann, Clemens V.

    2016-08-01

    Soils – constituting the largest terrestrial carbon pool - are vulnerable to climatic warming. Currently existing uncertainties regarding carbon fluxes within terrestrial systems can be addressed by studies of past carbon cycle dynamics and related climate change recorded in sedimentary successions. Here we show an example from the Early Jurassic (early Toarcian, c. 183 mya) marginal-marine strata from Poland, tracking the hinterland response to climatic changes through a super-greenhouse event. In contrast to anoxia-related enhanced carbon storage in coeval open marine environments, Total Organic Carbon (TOC) concentrations in the Polish successions are substantially reduced during this event. Increasing temperature favoured fungal-mediated decomposition of plant litter – specifically of normally resistant woody tissues. The associated injection of oxidized organic matter into the atmosphere corresponds to abrupt changes in standing vegetation and may have contributed significantly to the amplified greenhouse climate on Earth. The characteristic Toarcian signature of multiple warm pulses coinciding with rapidly decreasing carbon isotope ratios may in part be the result of a radical reduction of the terrestrial carbon pool as a response to climate change.

  18. A new carnivorous dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Solnhofen archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhlich, Ursula B; Chiappe, Luis M

    2006-03-16

    Small Late Jurassic theropod dinosaurs are rare worldwide. In Europe these carnivorous dinosaurs are represented primarily by only two skeletons of Compsognathus, neither of which is well preserved. Here we describe a small new theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period of Schamhaupten in southern Germany. Being exquisitely preserved and complete from the snout to the distal third of the tail, the new fossil is the best-preserved predatory, non-avian dinosaur in Europe. It possesses a suite of characters that support its identification as a basal coelurosaur. A cladistic analysis indicates that the new taxon is closer to maniraptorans than to tyrannosauroids, grouping it with taxa often considered to be compsognathids. Large portions of integument are preserved along its tail. The absence of feathers or feather-like structures in a fossil phylogenetically nested within feathered theropods indicates that the evolution of these integumentary structures might be more complex than previously thought.

  19. Combined oxygen- and carbon-isotope records through the Early Jurassic: multiple global events and two modes of carbon-cycle/temperature coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Korte, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    The Jurassic comprises some 55 million years of Earth history. However, within the Jurassic, only one major environmental change (hyperthermal) event is really well known - the Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE) at ~183 Ma - and until very recently the extent to which the accompanying...... environmental changes were global has been strongly debated. Nevertheless, partly as a result of the international effort to define Global Stratotype Sections and Points (GSSPs), much more is now being discovered about environmental changes taking place at and around the other Jurassic Age (Stage) boundaries......, to the extent that meaningful comparisons between these events can begin to be made. Here we present new carbon and oxygen isotope data from mollusks (bivalves and belemnites) and brachiopods collected through the marine Early Jurassic succession of NE England, including the Sinemurian-Plienbachian boundary...

  20. The Tendaguru Formation (Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, southern Tanzania: definition, palaeoenvironments, and sequence stratigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bussert

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The well-known Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Tendaguru Beds of southern Tanzania have yielded fossil plant remains, invertebrates and vertebrates, notably dinosaurs, of exceptional scientific importance. Based on data of the German-Tanzanian Tendaguru Expedition 2000 and previous studies, and in accordance with the international stratigraphic guide, we raise the Tendaguru Beds to formational rank and recognise six members (from bottom to top: Lower Dinosaur Member, Nerinella Member, Middle Dinosaur Member, Indotrigonia africana Member, Upper Dinosaur Member, and Rutitrigonia bornhardti-schwarzi Member. We characterise and discuss each member in detail in terms of derivation of name, definition of a type section, distribution, thickness, lithofacies, boundaries, palaeontology, and age. The age of the whole formation apparently ranges at least from the middle Oxfordian to the Valanginian through Hauterivian or possibly Aptian. The Tendaguru Formation constitutes a cyclic sedimentary succession, consisting of three marginal marine, sandstone-dominated depositional units and three predominantly coastal to tidal plain, fine-grained depositional units with dinosaur remains. It represents four third-order sequences, which are composed of transgressive and highstand systems tracts. Sequence boundaries are represented by transgressive ravinement surfaces and maximum flooding surfaces. In a more simple way, the depositional sequences can be subdivided into transgressive and regressive sequences/systems tracts. Whereas the transgressive systems tracts are mainly represented by shallow marine shoreface, tidal channel and sand bar sandstones, the regressive systems tracts predominantly consist of shallow tidal channel, tidal flat, and marginal lagoonal to supratidal deposits. doi:10.1002/mmng.200900004

  1. Low durophagous predation on Toarcian (Early Jurassic ammonoids in the northwestern Panthalassa shelf basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Takeda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Predatory shell breakage is known to occur occasionally on the ventrolateral portion of the body chamber in Mesozoic ammonoids. Here we report, for the first time, quantitative data of shell breakage in large ammonoid samples that were recovered from the lower Toarcian (Lower Jurassic strata in the Toyora area, western Japan. The strata yielding the ammonoid samples consisted mostly of well-laminated, bituminous black shale that was deposited in an oxygen-depleted shelf basin of the northwestern Panthalassa, under the influence of the early Toarcian oceanic anoxic event. Among a total of 1305 specimens from 18 localities, apparent shell breakage was recognised in 35 specimens belonging to 7 genera, resulting in only a 2.7% frequency of occurrence relative to the total number of specimens. The breakage occurs mostly on the ventrolateral side of the body chamber with a complete shell aperture. This fact, as well as the low energy bottom condition suggested for the ammonoid-bearing shale, indicate that the shell breaks observed in the examined ammonoids were not produced by non-biological, post-mortem biostratinomical processes but were lethal injuries inflicted by nektonic predators such as reptiles, jawed fishes, coleoids, nautiloids, and carnivorous ammonoids with calcified rostral tips in their upper and lower jaws. Similar predatory shell breaks on the ventrolateral side of the body chamber have been found in contemporaneous ammonoid assemblages of the Tethys Realm, with a much higher frequency of occurrence than in the examined samples from the northwestern Panthalassa, suggesting a weaker durophagous predation pressure on ammonoids in the latter bioprovince.

  2. Mantle source heterogeneity of the Early Jurassic basalt of eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory Shellnutt, J.; Dostal, Jaroslav; Yeh, Meng-Wan

    2017-08-01

    One of the defining characteristics of the basaltic rocks from the Early Jurassic Eastern North America (ENA) sub-province of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is the systematic compositional variation from South to North. Moreover, the tectono-thermal regime of the CAMP is debated as it demonstrates geological and structural characteristics (size, radial dyke pattern) that are commonly associated with mantle plume-derived mafic continental large igneous provinces but is considered to be unrelated to a plume. Mantle potential temperature (T P) estimates of the northern-most CAMP flood basalts (North Mountain basalt, Fundy Basin) indicate that they were likely produced under a thermal regime (T P ≈ 1450 °C) that is closer to ambient mantle (T P ≈ 1400 °C) conditions and are indistinguishable from other regions of the ENA sub-province (T Psouth = 1320-1490 °C, T Pnorth = 1390-1480 °C). The regional mantle potential temperatures are consistent along the 3000-km-long ENA sub-province suggesting that the CAMP was unlikely to be generated by a mantle plume. Furthermore, the mantle potential temperature calculation using the rocks from the Northern Appalachians favors an Fe-rich mantle (FeOt = 8.6 wt %) source, whereas the rocks from the South Appalachians favor a less Fe-rich (FeOt = 8.3 wt %) source. The results indicate that the spatial-compositional variation of the ENA basaltic rocks is likely related to differing amounts of melting of mantle sources that reflect the uniqueness of their regional accreted terranes (Carolinia and West Avalonia) and their post-accretion, pre-rift structural histories.

  3. A revision of Sanpasaurus yaoi Young, 1944 from the Early Jurassic of China, and its relevance to the early evolution of Sauropoda (Dinosauria

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    Blair W. McPhee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Early Jurassic of China has long been recognized for its diverse array of sauropodomorph dinosaurs. However, the contribution of this record to our understanding of early sauropod evolution is complicated by a dearth of information on important transitional taxa. We present a revision of the poorly known taxon Sanpasaurus yaoi Young, 1944 from the late Early Jurassic Ziliujing Formation of Sichuan Province, southwest China. Initially described as the remains of an ornithopod ornithischian, we demonstrate that the material catalogued as IVPP V156 is unambiguously referable to Sauropoda. Although represented by multiple individuals of equivocal association, Sanpasaurus is nonetheless diagnosable with respect to an autapomorphic feature of the holotypic dorsal vertebral series. Additional material thought to be collected from the type locality is tentatively referred to Sanpasaurus. If correctly attributed, a second autapomorphy is present in a referred humerus. The presence of a dorsoventrally compressed pedal ungual in Sanpasaurus is of particular interest, with taxa possessing this typically ‘vulcanodontid’ character exhibiting a much broader geographic distribution than previously thought. Furthermore, the association of this trait with other features of Sanpasaurus that are broadly characteristic of basal eusauropods underscores the mosaic nature of the early sauropod–eusauropod transition. Our revision of Sanpasaurus has palaeobiogeographic implications for Early Jurassic sauropods, with evidence that the group maintained a cosmopolitan Pangaean distribution.

  4. Early Jurassic tectonism occurred within the Basu metamorphic complex, eastern central Tibet: Implications for an archipelago-accretion orogenic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua-Qi; Xu, Zhi-Qin; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Li, Tian-Fu; Ma, Shi-Wei; Huang, Xue-Meng

    2017-04-01

    The Basu metamorphic complex, surrounded by ophiolitic melanges and intruded by a large volume of undeformed granitoid rocks along the eastern segment of the Bangong-Nujiang suture, holds one of the keys to understanding the pre-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of central Tibet. Zircon U-Pb dating of rocks from the Basu metamorphic complex reveals that meta-igneous rocks yield Early Paleozoic crystallization ages of 500-492 Ma and an Early Jurassic metamorphic age of 173 Ma, and that undeformed granitoid rocks yield crystallization ages of approximately 186-174 Ma. Whole rock geochemical and zircon Lu-Hf isotopic data indicate that the undeformed granitoid rocks originated mainly from partial melting of ancient crustal sources, which may reflect a collisional orogenic setting. 40Ar/39Ar dating of biotite from a sillimanite-garnet-biotite paragneiss shows cooling to 300 ± 50 °C at 165 Ma. These data indicate significant Early Jurassic tectonism, during which most of the Basu metamorphic complex was formed. Furthermore, the age data resemble those of the Amdo metamorphic complex located approximately 500 km to the west along the Bangong-Nujiang suture. Together, these complexes may represent a ;destroyed or unrecognized; block, i.e., the Amdo-Tongka block, which may be the eastern extension of the South Qiangtang terrane. Based on the tectonic outlines of the multiple ophiolitic zones and magmatic belts, we suggest a new archipelago-accretion model that attributes the Early Jurassic tectonism to an arc-continent/micro-continent collision. This model further enables the reconstruction of the eastern Tethyan Ocean and the orogenic processes of central Tibet during the Mesozoic.

  5. Swelling behaviour of Early Jurassic shales when exposed to water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Maartje; Barnhoorn, Auke; Peach, Colin; Drury, Martyn

    2017-04-01

    The presence of water in mudrocks has a largely negative impact on production of gas, due to the fact that water causes swelling of the rock. Removing the water from the mudrock on the other hand could potentially shrink the rock and increase the matrix permeability. Investigation of the swelling/shrinkage behaviour of the rock during exposure to water vapour is of key importance in designing and optimizing unconventional production strategies. We have used outcrop samples of the Whitby Mudstone and the Posidonia shale [1], potential unconventional sources for gas in North-western Europe, to measure the swelling and shrinkage behaviour. Subsamples, 1 mm cubes, were prepared by the Glass Workshop at Utrecht University using a high precision digitally controlled diamond wafering saw cooled by air. The mm cubes were then exposed to atmospheres with different relative humidities either in an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) or in a 3D dilatometer. So that the sample responses to exposure of water vapour could be measured. Parallel to the bedding we found a swelling strain between 0.5 and 1.5 %, perpendicular to the bedding though swelling strain varied between 1 and 3.5%. Volumetric swelling strain varied between 1 and 2% at a maximum relative humidity of 95%. Volumetric swelling strains measured in the Early Toarcian Shales are similar to the ones found in coal [2], where the results suggest that it might be possible to increase permeability in the reservoir by decreasing the in-situ water activity due to shrinkage of the matrix. [1] M.E. Houben, A. Barnhoorn, L. Wasch, J. Trabucho-Alexandre, C. J. Peach, M.R. Drury (2016). Microstructures of Early Jurassic (Toarcian) shales of Northern Europe, International Journal of Coal Geology, 165, 76-89. [2] Jinfeng Liu, Colin J. Peach, Christopher J. Spiers (2016). Anisotropic swelling behaviour of coal matrix cubes exposed to water vapour: Effects of relative humidity and sample size, International Journal of

  6. Palaeoecology and depositional environments of the Tendaguru Beds (Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aberhan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Tendaguru Beds (Tanzania, East Africa have been well known for nearly a century for their diverse dinosaur assemblages. Here, we present sedimentological and palaeontological data collected by the German-Tanzanian Tendaguru Expedition 2000 in an attempt to reconstruct the palaeo-ecosystems of the Tendaguru Beds at their type locality. Our reconstructions are based on sedimentological data and on a palaeoecological analysis of macroinvertebrates, microvertebrates, plant fossils and microfossils (ostracods, foraminifera, charophytes, palynomorphs. In addition, we included data from previous expeditions, particularly those on the dinosaur assemblages. The environmental model of the Tendaguru Beds presented herein comprises three broad palaeoenvironmental units in a marginal marine setting: (1 Lagoon-like, shallow marine environments above fair weather wave base and with evidence of tides and storms. These formed behind barriers such as ooid bar and siliciclastic sand bar complexes and were generally subject to minor salinity fluctuations. (2 Extended tidal flats and low-relief coastal plains. These include low-energy, brackish coastal lakes and ponds as well as pools and small fluvial channels of coastal plains in which the large dinosaurs were buried. Since these environments apparently were, at best, poorly vegetated, the main feeding grounds of giant sauropods must have been elsewhere. Presumably, tidal flats and coastal plains were visited by dinosaurs primarily during periods of drought. (3 Vegetated hinterland. Vegetation of this environment can only be inferred indirectly from plant material transported into the other depositional environments. Vegetation was dominated by a diverse conifer flora, which apparently formed part of the food source of large herbivorous sauropods. Evidence from various sources suggests a subtropical to tropical palaeoclimate, characterised by seasonal rainfall alternating with

  7. Timing, duration, and causes for Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous anoxia in the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Xu, Guangping; Bingen, Bernard; Weiss, Hermann M.

    2017-03-01

    Re-Os isochron ages for black shales of the Hekkingen Formation in the Barents Sea constrain the onset (157.7 ± 1.3 Ma) and termination (138.8 ± 1.0 Ma), and thereby indicate a long duration (∼19 Myr) of widespread Jurassic-Cretaceous anoxia in the Arctic. Integration of these new Re-Os ages with published radiometric ages, ammonite biostratigraphy and geomagnetic polarity chrons shows shorter late Oxfordian-late Kimmeridgian and longer Berriasian stages relative to estimates in the 2012 and 2016 Geological Time Scales. Late Jurassic anoxia was likely the result of warming climate due to high atmospheric CO2 levels from increased oceanic crust production. Rising temperatures enhanced weathering and nutrient supply, increased productivity, and slowed ocean circulation before a sea-level rise brought anoxic waters onto continental shelves. Assessment of new and published Os- and Sr-isotopic data suggests that prolonged oceanic anoxia required a sustained CO2 source from fast spreading rates and/or longer subduction zones and spreading ridges to balance large burial of carbon in voluminous Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous black shales.

  8. A late-surviving basal theropod dinosaur from the latest Triassic of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sues, Hans-Dieter; Nesbitt, Sterling J; Berman, David S; Henrici, Amy C

    2011-11-22

    The oldest theropod dinosaurs are known from the Carnian of Argentina and Brazil. However, the evolutionary diversification of this group after its initial radiation but prior to the Triassic-Jurassic boundary is still poorly understood because of a sparse fossil record near that boundary. Here, we report on a new basal theropod, Daemonosaurus chauliodus gen. et sp. nov., from the latest Triassic 'siltstone member' of the Chinle Formation of the Coelophysis Quarry at Ghost Ranch, New Mexico. Based on a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis, Daemonosaurus is more closely related to coeval neotheropods (e.g. Coelophysis bauri) than to Herrerasauridae and Eoraptor. The skeletal structure of Daemonosaurus and the recently discovered Tawa bridge a morphological gap between Eoraptor and Herrerasauridae on one hand and neotheropods on the other, providing additional support for the theropod affinities of both Eoraptor and Herrerasauridae and demonstrating that lineages from the initial radiation of Dinosauria persisted until the end of the Triassic. Various features of the skull of Daemonosaurus, including the procumbent dentary and premaxillary teeth and greatly enlarged premaxillary and anterior maxillary teeth, clearly set this taxon apart from coeval neotheropods and demonstrate unexpected disparity in cranial shape among theropod dinosaurs just prior to the end of the Triassic.

  9. Geochronology and geochemistry of Early Jurassic volcanic rocks in the Erguna Massif, northeast China: Petrogenesis and implications for the tectonic evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk suture belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Jie; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Feng

    2015-03-01

    The Mongol-Okhotsk suture belt played an important role in the tectonic evolution of northeast Asia during the Mesozoic. However, few studies have examined the influence of this tectonic belt on the geological evolution of northeast China. In this paper, we present zircon U-Pb geochronology, major and trace element geochemistry, and zircon Hf-O isotopic data for Early Jurassic volcanic rocks in the Erguna Massif of northeast China, with the aim of constraining the evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk suture belt and its influence on the tectonic history of China during the Early Jurassic. Zircon U-Pb dating indicates that the trachybasalt and basaltic andesite in the study area were erupted between 193 ± 5 Ma and 181 ± 9 Ma (i.e., in the Early Jurassic). These Early Jurassic volcanic rocks belong to the high-K calc-alkaline series and are enriched in large ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements, as well as being depleted in heavy rare earth elements and high field strength elements such as Nb and Ta. The rocks show a small negative Eu anomaly. The zircon εHf (182 Ma) values of the volcanic rocks range from - 1.9 to + 5.1, corresponding to TDM1 values of 640-901 Ma and TDM2 values of 901-1345 Ma. Zircons from two volcanic rocks yield δ18O values of 7.2‰ ± 1.5‰ (n = 19) and 6.6‰ ± 0.7‰ (n = 35). Geochemically, these Early Jurassic volcanic rocks are similar to those from active continental margin settings, and their primary magmas could have been derived from the partial melting of a lithospheric mantle wedge modified by fluid from a subducted slab. The discovery of Early Jurassic calc-alkaline volcanic rocks in the Erguna Massif, together with the coeval porphyry Cu-Mo deposits, indicates that an active continental margin existed in the Erguna area during the Early Jurassic. Taken together, we conclude that southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate took place beneath the Erguna Massif during the Early Jurassic.

  10. New data on internal morphology of exceptionally preserved Nannirhynchia pygmaea (Morris, 1847 from the Lusitanian Basin (Brachiopoda, Early Jurassic, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schemm-Gregory

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyritized internal moulds of articulated shells of the Early Jurassic brachiopod taxon Nannirhynchia pygmaea were found in beds closely below the early Toarcian oceanic anoxic event in the Polymorphum Zone in Portugal. The material allows a detailed study of the outline of the muscle fields, the length and direction of the crura, and the orientation of the cardinalia, which are hitherto undescribed. Three-dimensional reconstructions of articulated shells of N. pygmaea occurring in a single horizon were produced to show the orientation and length of arcuiform crura. The preservation of internal moulds together with the three-dimensional reconstruction of the internal shell morphology allow a more precise description of the internal morphology of this taxon than it is possible with articulated shells and serial sections. doi:10.1002/mmng.201200005

  11. LATE JURASSIC AND EARLY CRETACEOUS AMMONITES FROM THE WEIMEI FORMATION IN GYANGZE, SOUTHERN TIBET

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    MASAHIKO TAKEI

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The Weimei Formation in southern Tibet is a shallow marine sequence accumulated in the northern margin of the Indian subcontinent. It has been dated as Tithonian based on ammonites such as Haplophylloceras strigile (Blanford, Berriasella sp. and Himalayites sp. Six ammonite specimens were found in the type locality of the Weimei Formation. They include Spiticeras (Spiticeras spitiense (Blanford, Berriasella sp. and Phylloceras sp. The occurrence of S. spitiense indicates that the ammonite-bearing portion is assignable to the Berriasian stage. The Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary possibly exists within the Weimei Formation.

  12. The Dabie Orogen as the early Jurassic sedimentary provenance: Constraints from the detrital zircon SHRIMP U-Pb dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Renwei; WAN Yusheng; CHENG Zhenyu; ZHOU Jianxiong; XU Yunhua; LI Zhong; JIANG Maosheng

    2005-01-01

    The SHRIMP U-Pb ages of detrital zircon from the oldest Mesozoic strata, the Fanghushan Fomation, in the Hefei Basin range from 200 Ma to ca. 2500 Ma, which indicates that the Dabie Orogen as the early Jurassic sedimentary provenance was complex. The composition of the Dabie Orogen includes: the Triassic high pressure-ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks, of which the detrital zircon ages are from 234 Ma to 200 Ma; the rocks possibly related to the Qinling and Erlangping Groups representing the southern margin of the Sino-Korean craton in the Qinling and Dabie area, of which the detrital zircon has an age of 481-378 Ma; the Neoproterozoic rocks originated from the Yangtze croton, of which the detrital zircon ages are 799-721 Ma old; and the rocks with the detrital zircon ages of ca. 2000 Ma and ca. 2500 Ma, which could be the old basement of the Yangtze craton.

  13. Early to Middle Jurassic palaeoenvironmental changes: High resolution δ13C and δ18O records from the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen; Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz

    Low-Mg-calcite fossils, such as bivalves, belemnites and brachiopods, and bulk rocks have been extensively utilized to reconstruct past seawater chemistry and paleoenviron¬mental changes. Recent work on major bioevents demonstrated that particularly higher resolution stable isotope records...... are necessary to reveal short-term paleoenviron¬mental fluctuations and, in addition, to discover its causes. Here we present a new high resolution carbon and oxygen isotope dataset generated from low-Mg-calcite fossils, fossil wood and bulk rocks collected from Early to Middle Jurassic marine successions...... inference of partial icehouse conditions at that time. More uncertain are potential icehouse interludes during the Aalenian-Bajocian interval. The new isotope datasets show partly a strong similarity between the positions of the global warming/cooling events within transgressive/regressive phases of second...

  14. Jurassic fishes of Gondwana

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    Adriana López-Arbarello

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Jurassic is an important period for understanding the origin of modern fish faunas, since it saw the first radiation - and in some cases the origin - of most modern groups. In chondrichthyans, neoselachian sharks and rays diversified during this time. In actinopterygians, the neopterygians, and among them the teleosts, experienced an important radiation, which led to the appearance of several of the modern teleosts groups. In the sarcopterygians, dipnoans and actinistians approached their current forms. However, the Jurassic fossil record of fishes is strongly biased towards the Northern Hemisphere. The only notable Early Jurassic fish fauna from Gondwana is that of the Kota Formation of India. For the Middle Jurassic, the most important Gondwanan fish faunas are those of the Aalenian-Bathonian Stanleyville Beds of the Democratic Republic of Congo, in which a distinct freshwater and a marine fauna are found. In the Late Jurassic, the Gondwanan record is slightly better, with important marine faunas being known from the Oxfordian Quebrada del Profeta in Chile and the Tithonian Vaca Muerta Formation of Argentina. Freshwater faunas have been described from the Tithonian Talbragar Beds of eastern Australia and the Tithonian Cañadón Calcáreo Formation of Argentina. The taxonomic composition of the known marine actinopterygian faunas of Gondwana is in general agreement with faunas of the Northern Hemisphere. However, the Jurassic fish record from Gondwana is highly incomplete both stratigraphically and geographically, and most faunas are in need of revision, further hampering an interpretation of Jurassic fish evolution in the Southern Hemisphere.

  15. The Tendaguru formation of southeastern Tanzania, East Africa: An alternating Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous palaeoenvironment of exceptional status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sames, B.

    2009-04-01

    Dinosaur remains have inspired considerable scientific interest in the Tendaguru formation of southeastern Tanzania during the 20th century; however, this formation is exceptional in many other respects. The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits of the Tendaguru formation in the southwestern Tethys are unique because they represent a marginal marine palaeoenvironment with nonmarine faunal and floral content. It is a threefold succession of marginal marine to terrestrial, carbonate-siliciclastic sediments with cyclic character, consisting of three transgressive-regressive cycles. Revisitation of the type locality (the Tendaguru, a hill approximately 60km northwest of the town of Lindi) by a German-Tanzanian expedition in summer 2000 (Heinrich et al., 2001) resulted in a new standard section (hitherto unpublished, the informal terminology is indicated by the use of lower case in Tendaguru formation), a refined environmental model (Aberhan et al., 2002) and many new insights towards its geology (with evidence of event-sedimentation, Bussert and Aberhan, 2004), biostratigraphy and a better understanding of the Tendaguru palaeo-ecosystems and the palaeoclimate. Within the scope of the designation of a new standard section at the type locality, calcareous microfossils (ostracods, charophytes) have been described to supplement the ongoing discussion about the age and palaeoecology of the Tendaguru formation (Sames, 2008). Although only a few unevenly distributed layers across the section produced calcareous microfossils, the results are very promising. A total of 40 ostracode and 2 charophyte taxa could be distinguished. The non-marine part of the ostracod fauna provides an important contribution to the documentation of Purbeck/Wealden-type nonmarine palaeoenvironments and its microfaunas and -floras previously unknown from East Africa. The marine faunal part belongs to a relatively endemic southern (Gondwana) fauna. Together with other fossil groups, the

  16. Petrogenesis of early Jurassic basalts in southern Jiangxi Province, South China: Implications for the thermal state of the Mesozoic mantle beneath South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Tao; Li, Wu-xian; Wang, Xuan-ce; Pang, Chong-jin; Li, Zheng-xiang; Xing, Guang-fu; Zhao, Xi-lin; Tao, Jihua

    2016-07-01

    Early Jurassic bimodal volcanic and intrusive rocks in southern South China show distinct associations and distribution patterns in comparison with those of the Middle Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks in the area. It is widely accepted that these rocks formed in an extensional setting, although the timing of the onset and the tectonic driver for extension are debated. Here, we present systematic LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotope data for bimodal volcanic rocks from the Changpu Formation in the Changpu-Baimianshi and Dongkeng-Linjiang basins in southern Jiangxi Province, South China. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate that the bimodal volcanic rocks erupted at ca. 190 Ma, contemporaneous with the Fankeng basalts (~ 183 Ma). A compilation of geochronological results demonstrates that basin-scale basaltic eruptions occurred during the Early Jurassic within a relatively short interval (plate continental mantle setting, such as the Basin and Range Province in western North America. This study provides an important constraint on the Early Jurassic mantle thermal state beneath South China.

  17. Late Paleozoic to Early Jurassic tectonic development of the high Andean Principal Cordillera, El Indio Region, Chile (29 30°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mark W.; Clavero R, Jorge; Mpodozis M, Constantino

    1999-01-01

    Regional mapping (1:50,000) and U-Pb and K-Ar geochronology in the El Indio region refines the knowledge of the distribution, lithostratigraphy, and age of the sedimentary, volcanic, and intrusive rocks that comprise the regionally extensive Pastos Blancos Group which is equivalent to the Choiyoi Group of the Argentine Frontal Cordillera. The Pastos Blancos Group (which we elevate to Group status herein) includes at least two diachronous volcanic-sedimentary sequences: an older felsic volcanic and volcaniclastic unit, the Guanaco Sonso sequence, that is Permian in age, and a younger bimodal volcanic and volcaniclastic unit, the Los Tilos sequence that is Middle Triassic to Early Jurassic. Sedimentary rocks of the Los Tilos sequence are transitional upward into the overlying Early to Middle Jurassic shallow marine limestones of the Lautaro Formation. Intrusions that make up the regionally extensive Permian to Early Jurassic plutons of the Chollay and Elqui-Limarı´ batholiths that were previously mapped as a single plutonic association, the Ingaguás Complex, include in the El Indio region at least three discrete intrusive units. These include: Early Permian (280-270 Ma) biotite granites, Early to Middle Triassic (242-238 Ma) silica-rich leucocratic granites and rhyolitic porphyries that made up the bulk of the Chollay Batholith, and a younger Late Triassic-Early Jurassic unit (221-200 Ma) of mainly intrusive rhyolitic porphyries, extrusive domes, and subordinate mafic intrusions and both felsic and mafic dikes, which are coeval with volcanic rocks of the Los Tilos sequence. Our data show that latest Paleozoic to Early Jurassic intrusive, volcanic, and sedimentary rocks in the El Indio region of the High Andes of Chile between 29-30°S likely formed during extension driven processes after the cessation of Carboniferous-Early Permian subduction along the western edge of Gondwana. These processes began by Late Permian time, but instead of recording a single and

  18. Jurassic cooling ages in Paleozoic to early Mesozoic granitoids of northeastern Patagonia: 40Ar/39Ar, 40K-40Ar mica and U-Pb zircon evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Dopico, Carmen I.; Tohver, Eric; López de Luchi, Mónica G.; Wemmer, Klaus; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cawood, Peter A.

    2016-12-01

    U-Pb SHRIMP zircon crystallization ages and Ar-Ar and K-Ar mica cooling ages for basement rocks of the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu areas in northeastern Patagonia are presented. Granitoids that cover the time span from Ordovician to Early Triassic constitute the main outcrops of the western sector of the Yaminué block. The southern Yaminué Metaigneous Complex comprises highly deformed Ordovician and Permian granitoids crosscut by undeformed leucogranite dikes (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 254 ± 2 Ma). Mica separates from highly deformed granitoids from the southern sector yielded an Ar-Ar muscovite age of 182 ± 3 Ma and a K-Ar biotite age of 186 ± 2 Ma. Moderately to highly deformed Permian to Early Triassic granitoids made up the northern Yaminué Complex. The Late Permian to Early Triassic (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 252 ± 6 Ma) Cabeza de Vaca Granite of the Yaminué block yielded Jurassic mica K-Ar cooling ages (198 ± 2, 191 ± 1, and 190 ± 2 Ma). At the boundary between the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu blocks, K-Ar muscovite ages of 188 ± 3 and 193 ± 5 Ma were calculated for the Flores Granite, whereas the Early Permian Navarrete granodiorite, located in the Nahuel Niyeu block, yielded a K-Ar biotite age of 274 ± 4 Ma. The Jurassic thermal history is not regionally uniform. In the supracrustal exposures of the Nahuel Niyeu block, the Early Permian granitoids of its western sector as well as other Permian plutons and Ordovician leucogranites located further east show no evidence of cooling age reset since mica ages suggest cooling in the wake of crystallization of these intrusive rocks. In contrast, deeper crustal levels are inferred for Permian-Early Triassic granitoids in the Yaminué block since cooling ages for these rocks are of Jurassic age (198-182 Ma). Jurassic resetting is contemporaneous with the massive Lower Jurassic Flores Granite, and the Marifil and Chon Aike volcanic provinces. This intraplate deformational pulse that affected northeastern

  19. A detrital record of continent-continent collision in the Early-Middle Jurassic foreland sequence in the northern Yangtze foreland basin, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tao; Liu, Shaofeng; Wang, Zongxiu; Li, Wangpeng; Chen, Xinlu

    2016-12-01

    The Mesozoic northern Yangtze foreland basin system was formed by continental collision between the North China and South China plates along the Mianlue suture. Synorogenic stratigraphic sequences of Late Triassic to Early-Middle Jurassic age were developed in the northern Yangtze foreland basin. The upper Middle Jurassic Shaximiao Formation consists mainly of thick-bedded terrestrial successions that serve as the main body of the basin-filling sequences, suggesting intense tectonism in the peripheral orogeny of the foreland basin. Laser-ICP-MS U-Pb analysis of 254 detrital zircon grains from sandstone samples and several published Lower-Middle Jurassic samples, detrital compositions, petrofacies, and paleocurrent reconstructions in the northern Yangtze foreland basin indicate that discrete source areas included the Qinling-Dabieshan ranges and the Mianlue suture zone to the north, and the South China plate to the south. The stratigraphic succession and sediment provenance of the foreland basin imply that the early Mianlue oceanic basin, magmatic arc, and nonmarine molasse foreland basin during the period of deposition were modified or buried by the subsequent continent-continent collision between the North China-Qinling-Dabieshan plate and the Yangtze plate during the Jurassic, which followed the oblique amalgamation between these plates during the Middle-Late Triassic.

  20. Early Jurassic calc-alkaline magmatism in northeast China: Magmatic response to subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasian continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Xu, Yi-Gang; Xu, Wen-Liang; Yang, Lei; Wu, Wei; Sun, Chen-Yang

    2017-08-01

    The subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate played an important role in the regional evolution of the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent, but the timing and extent of this event remain ambiguous. To address these issues, we examine the geochronology and geochemistry of Early Jurassic intrusive rocks in eastern Jilin Province, NE China. The Early Jurassic gabbro-diorites, diorites, granodiorites, and monzogranites are found to have been emplaced at 183-185 Ma and are characterized by enrichment in large ion lithophile elements and depletion in high field strength elements, similar to calc-alkaline arc-type igneous rocks. The Early Jurassic gabbroic and dioritic rocks have εHf(t) values of +2.1 to +10.1 and Hf single-stage (TDM1) model ages of 430-774 Ma, whereas the monzogranites have εHf(t) values of +6.7 to +8.9 and Hf single-stage (TDM1) ages of 597-718 Ma. The gabbro-diorites, diorites, and granodiorites described in this study are genetically linked and they represent the products of the fractional crystallization of a common mafic magma that was in turn derived from the partial melting of a mantle source that was metasomatized by subduction-related fluids. In contrast, the Early Jurassic monzogranites were generated by partial melting of a depleted lower crustal block that was probably accreted during the Neoproterozoic. More importantly, the Early Jurassic calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the east part of NE China form a NE-trending belt that is oriented perpendicular to the direction of Paleo-Pacific Plate movement at that time. West of this belt, contemporaneous bimodal igneous rocks occur in the Lesser Xing'an-Zhangguangcai Ranges. This magmatic configuration is best explained by continental arc magmatism along the continental margin and extensional magmatism in a back-arc setting, in each case triggered by the initial subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate beneath Eurasia in the Early Jurassic.

  1. Footprints of large theropod dinosaurs and implications on the age of Triassic biotas from Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Costa; Barboni, Ronaldo; Dutra, Tânia; Godoy, Michel Marques; Binotto, Raquel Barros

    2012-11-01

    Dinosaur footprints found in an outcrop of the Caturrita Formation (Rio Grande do Sul State, Southern Brazil), associated with a diverse and well preserved record of fauna and flora, reopen the debate about its exclusive Triassic age. The studied footprints were identified as Eubrontes isp. and are interpreted as having been produced by large theropod dinosaurs. The morphological characteristics and dimensions of the footprints are more derived than those commonly found in the Carnian-Norian, and are more consistent with those found during the Rhaetian-Jurassic. The trackmaker does not correspond to any type of dinosaur yet known from Triassic rocks of Brazil. Recent studies with the paleofloristic content of this unit also support a more advanced Rhaetian or even Jurassic age for this unit.

  2. Shake a tail feather: the evolution of the theropod tail into a stiff aerodynamic surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pittman

    Full Text Available Theropod dinosaurs show striking morphological and functional tail variation; e.g., a long, robust, basal theropod tail used for counterbalance, or a short, modern avian tail used as an aerodynamic surface. We used a quantitative morphological and functional analysis to reconstruct intervertebral joint stiffness in the tail along the theropod lineage to extant birds. This provides new details of the tail's morphological transformation, and for the first time quantitatively evaluates its biomechanical consequences. We observe that both dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness decreased along the non-avian theropod lineage (between nodes Theropoda and Paraves. Our results show how the tail structure of non-avian theropods was mechanically appropriate for holding itself up against gravity and maintaining passive balance. However, as dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness decreased, the tail may have become more effective for dynamically maintaining balance. This supports our hypothesis of a reduction of dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness in shorter tails. Along the avian theropod lineage (Avialae to crown group birds, dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness increased overall, which appears to contradict our null expectation. We infer that this departure in joint stiffness is specific to the tail's aerodynamic role and the functional constraints imposed by it. Increased dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness may have facilitated a gradually improved capacity to lift, depress, and swing the tail. The associated morphological changes should have resulted in a tail capable of producing larger muscular forces to utilise larger lift forces in flight. Improved joint mobility in neornithine birds potentially permitted an increase in the range of lift force vector orientations, which might have improved flight proficiency and manoeuvrability. The tail morphology of modern birds with tail fanning capabilities originated in early ornithuromorph

  3. Late Jurassicearly Cretaceous inversion of rift structures, and linkage of petroleum system elements across post-rift unconformity, U.S. Chukchi Shelf, arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseknecht, David W.; Connors, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Basin evolution of the U.S. Chukchi shelf involved multiple phases, including Late Devonian–Permian rifting, Permian–Early Jurassic sagging, Late Jurassic–Neocomian inversion, and Cretaceous–Cenozoic foreland-basin development. The focus of ongoing exploration is a petroleum system that includes sag-phase source rocks; inversion-phase reservoir rocks; structure spanning the rift, sag, and inversion phases; and hydrocarbon generation during the foreland-basin phase.

  4. Sedimentological, climatic and environmental changes during the Early Jurassic (Hettangian-Pliensbachian) on the northern Tethyan margin (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöllhorn, Iris; Foellmi, Karl; adatte, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The Early Jurassic interval witnessed different phases of paleoenvironmental change, starting with the end-Triassic mass extinction event, c. 201.4 Ma ago, which was marked by terrestrial ecosystem turnover, up to 50% loss in marine biodiversity and large turnovers in global geochemical cycles linked to the onset of Central Atlantic Magmatic Province volcanism (Raup et Sepkosky, 1982 ; Hesselbo et al., 2002 ; Deenen et al., 2010). This time interval saw equally a phase of major climate change near the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary, which was followed by the Early Toarcian oceanic anoxic episode (e.g., Suan et al., 2010). Previous studies mainly focused on these major and short-lived events, while the remaining intervals of the Early Jurassic received significantly less attention. Therefore, in this study, we examine the sedimentological, geochemical and environmental changes between these events on the northern Tethyan margin (Swiss Jura). With this purpose, a wide array of geochemical analyses (carbon isotope, Rock-Eval, phosphorus content, mineralogy, trace and major element content and clay analyses) and sedimentary observations has been performed on four sections and cores (Frick, Riniken, Pfaffnau and Kreuzlingen). We observed two depositional systems: (1) the Schambelen Member (lower Hettangian) and the Frick Mb. (middle Upper Sinemurian), which are characterised by organic-rich shales intercalated by tempestites; and (2) the Beggingen Member (Upper Hettangian to Lower Sinemurian) and the Grünscholz, Breitenmatt and Rietheim Members (upper Upper Sinemurian to Pliensbachian), which are composed of carbonates marked by the presence of hiati, condensed beds, phosphate- and fossil-rich strata, and erosional features, which testify to a dynamic environment characterised by overall low sediment-accumulation rates. The clay fraction, composed mainly of kaolinite, chlorite and illite, was controlled by various parameters. The rise of kaolinite in the Late

  5. Ichnological evidence of Megalosaurid Dinosaurs Crossing Middle Jurassic Tidal Flats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzolini, Novella L; Oms, Oriol; Castanera, Diego; Vila, Bernat; Santos, Vanda Faria Dos; Galobart, Àngel

    2016-08-19

    A new dinosaur tracksite in the Vale de Meios quarry (Serra de Aire Formation, Bathonian, Portugal)preserves more than 700 theropod tracks. They are organized in at least 80 unidirectional trackways arranged in a bimodal orientation pattern (W/NW and E/SE). Quantitative and qualitative comparisons reveal that the large tridactyl, elongated and asymmetric tracks resemble the typical Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Megalosauripus ichnogenus in all morphometric parameters. Few of the numerous tracks are preserved as elite tracks while the rest are preserved as different gradients of modified true tracks according to water content, erosive factors, radial fractures and internal overtrack formations. Taphonomical determinations are consistent with paleoenvironmental observations that indicate an inter-tidal flat located at the margin of a coastal barrier. The Megalosauripus tracks represent the oldest occurrence of this ichnotaxon and are attributed to large megalosaurid dinosaurs. Their occurrence in Vale de Meios tidal flat represents the unique paleoethological evidence of megalosaurids moving towards the lagoon, most likley during the low tide periods with feeding purposes.

  6. Ichnological evidence of Megalosaurid Dinosaurs Crossing Middle Jurassic Tidal Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzolini, Novella L.; Oms, Oriol; Castanera, Diego; Vila, Bernat; Santos, Vanda Faria Dos; Galobart, Àngel

    2016-08-01

    A new dinosaur tracksite in the Vale de Meios quarry (Serra de Aire Formation, Bathonian, Portugal)preserves more than 700 theropod tracks. They are organized in at least 80 unidirectional trackways arranged in a bimodal orientation pattern (W/NW and E/SE). Quantitative and qualitative comparisons reveal that the large tridactyl, elongated and asymmetric tracks resemble the typical Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Megalosauripus ichnogenus in all morphometric parameters. Few of the numerous tracks are preserved as elite tracks while the rest are preserved as different gradients of modified true tracks according to water content, erosive factors, radial fractures and internal overtrack formations. Taphonomical determinations are consistent with paleoenvironmental observations that indicate an inter-tidal flat located at the margin of a coastal barrier. The Megalosauripus tracks represent the oldest occurrence of this ichnotaxon and are attributed to large megalosaurid dinosaurs. Their occurrence in Vale de Meios tidal flat represents the unique paleoethological evidence of megalosaurids moving towards the lagoon, most likley during the low tide periods with feeding purposes.

  7. The impact of global warming and anoxia on marine benthic community dynamics: an example from the Toarcian (Early Jurassic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danise, Silvia; Twitchett, Richard J; Little, Crispin T S; Clémence, Marie-Emilie

    2013-01-01

    The Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Early Jurassic) fossil record is an archive of natural data of benthic community response to global warming and marine long-term hypoxia and anoxia. In the early Toarcian mean temperatures increased by the same order of magnitude as that predicted for the near future; laminated, organic-rich, black shales were deposited in many shallow water epicontinental basins; and a biotic crisis occurred in the marine realm, with the extinction of approximately 5% of families and 26% of genera. High-resolution quantitative abundance data of benthic invertebrates were collected from the Cleveland Basin (North Yorkshire, UK), and analysed with multivariate statistical methods to detect how the fauna responded to environmental changes during the early Toarcian. Twelve biofacies were identified. Their changes through time closely resemble the pattern of faunal degradation and recovery observed in modern habitats affected by anoxia. All four successional stages of community structure recorded in modern studies are recognised in the fossil data (i.e. Stage III: climax; II: transitional; I: pioneer; 0: highly disturbed). Two main faunal turnover events occurred: (i) at the onset of anoxia, with the extinction of most benthic species and the survival of a few adapted to thrive in low-oxygen conditions (Stages I to 0) and (ii) in the recovery, when newly evolved species colonized the re-oxygenated soft sediments and the path of recovery did not retrace of pattern of ecological degradation (Stages I to II). The ordination of samples coupled with sedimentological and palaeotemperature proxy data indicate that the onset of anoxia and the extinction horizon coincide with both a rise in temperature and sea level. Our study of how faunal associations co-vary with long and short term sea level and temperature changes has implications for predicting the long-term effects of "dead zones" in modern oceans.

  8. Early diagenetic pyrite morphology in a mudstone-dominated succession: the Lower Jurassic Cleveland Ironstone Formation, eastern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K. G.; Macquaker, J. H. S.

    2000-03-01

    Diagenetic pyrite in the mudstones and ironstones of the Lower Jurassic Cleveland Ironstone Formation of eastern England exhibits two distinct morphologies: framboidal pyrite, commonly associated with organic matter, and euhedral pyrite, associated with detrital clay pellets. These two morphologies are mutually exclusive in occurrence. Framboidal pyrite is present in clay-rich mudstones, ooidal ironstones, apatite-rich units and some silt-rich mudstones. Euhedral pyrite is present in silt-rich and sand-rich mudstones. δ34S isotopic analysis of six samples of pyrite suggests that both types of pyrite morphology precipitated during early diagenesis from porewaters with open access to overlying sea-water, although both probably acted as sites for continued pyrite precipitation during burial. It is proposed that framboidal pyrite precipitated from iron-dominated porewaters at sites of sulfide supply (i.e. in the region of organic matter as a result of bacterial sulfate reduction) where, locally, sulfide production rates were high enough for porewaters to reach supersaturation with respect to FeS. Euhedral pyrite also precipitated from iron-dominated porewaters, but sulfide production rates from organic matter was such that FeS saturation was not reached at the sites of sulfide production. Instead, euhedral pyrite was precipitated directly from porewater when FeS2 saturation was reached. The control over pyrite morphology was probably the amount and reactivity of the organic matter within the deposited sediments. The sand-rich mudstones contained less reactive organic matter due to clastic dilution and deposition in shallower environments with O2-rich bottom waters. The ironstones and apatite-rich units were deposited under very low sedimentation rates, and as a result organic matter contents were very low and iron reduction dominated early diagenesis, which inhibited sulfate-reduction. The presence of minor framboidal pyrite within these units, however, suggests that

  9. A new transitional sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and the evolution of sauropod feeding and quadrupedalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Adam M; Bonnan, Matthew F; Neveling, Johann; Chinsamy, Anusuya; Blackbeard, Marc G

    2010-03-01

    Aardonyx celestae gen. et sp. nov. is described from the upper Elliot Formation (Early Jurassic) of South Africa. It can be diagnosed by autapomorphies of the skull, particularly the jaws, cervical column, forearm and pes. It is found to be the sister group of a clade of obligatory quadrupedal sauropodomorphs (Melanorosaurus + Sauropoda) and thus lies at the heart of the basal sauropodomorph-sauropod transition. The narrow jaws of A. celestae retain a pointed symphysis but appear to have lacked fleshy cheeks. Broad, U-shaped jaws were previously thought to have evolved prior to the loss of gape-restricting cheeks. However, the narrow jaws of A. celestae retain a pointed symphysis but appear to have lacked fleshy cheeks, demonstrating unappreciated homoplasy in the evolution of the sauropod bulk-browsing apparatus. The limbs of A. celestae indicate that it retained a habitual bipedal gait although incipient characters associated with the pronation of the manus and the adoption of a quadrupedal gait are evident through geometric morphometric analysis (using thin-plate splines) of the ulna and femur. Cursorial ability appears to have been reduced and the weight bearing axis of the pes shifted to a medial, entaxonic position, falsifying the hypothesis that entaxony evolved in sauropods only after an obligate quadrupedal gait had been adopted.

  10. An Unusual New Theropod with a Didactyl Manus from the Upper Cretaceous of Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apesteguía, Sebastián; Smith, Nathan D.; Juárez Valieri, Rubén; Makovicky, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Late Cretaceous terrestrial strata of the Neuquén Basin, northern Patagonia, Argentina have yielded a rich fauna of dinosaurs and other vertebrates. The diversity of saurischian dinosaurs is particularly high, especially in the late Cenomanian-early Turonian Huincul Formation, which has yielded specimens of rebacchisaurid and titanosaurian sauropods, and abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid theropods. Continued sampling is adding to the known vertebrate diversity of this unit. Methodology/ Principal Findings A new, partially articulated mid-sized theropod was found in rocks from the Huincul Formation. It exhibits a unique combination of traits that distinguish it from other known theropods justifying erection of a new taxon, Gualicho shinyae gen. et sp. nov. Gualicho possesses a didactyl manus with the third digit reduced to a metacarpal splint reminiscent of tyrannosaurids, but both phylogenetic and multivariate analyses indicate that didactyly is convergent in these groups. Derived characters of the scapula, femur, and fibula supports the new theropod as the sister taxon of the nearly coeval African theropod Deltadromeus and as a neovenatorid carcharodontosaurian. A number of these features are independently present in ceratosaurs, and Gualicho exhibits an unusual mosaic of ceratosaurian and tetanuran synapomorphies distributed throughout the skeleton. Conclusions/ Significance Gualicho shinyae gen. et sp. nov. increases the known theropod diversity of the Huincul Formation and also represents the first likely neovenatorid from this unit. It is the most basal tetatanuran to exhibit common patterns of digit III reduction that evolved independently in a number of other tetanuran lineages. A close relationship with Deltadromaeus from the Kem Kem beds of Niger adds to the already considerable biogeographic similarity between the Huincul Formation and coeval rock units in North Africa. PMID:27410683

  11. Early Jurassic schizosphaerellid crisis in Cantabria, Spain: Implications for calcification rates and phytoplankton evolution across the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolada, Fabrizio; van de Schootbrugge, Bas; Erba, Elisabetta

    2005-06-01

    The Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (˜183 Myr ago) represents a global perturbation marked by increasing organic carbon burial and a general decrease in calcium carbonate production likely triggered by elevated carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. Here we present quantitative analyses of calcareous nannofossil diversity and abundance from the Castillo de Pedroso section in Cantabria, northern Spain. We compare these data with geochemical data (C and O isotopes) obtained from biogenic and bulk carbonate records in order to highlight the response of calcareous phytoplankton to major climatic and paleoceanographic changes. The Pliensbachian/Toarcian boundary is characterized by an abrupt decrease in abundance of Schizosphaerella punctulata, the most important lithogenic contributor to (hemi) pelagic carbonates in the Early Jurassic. The early Toarcian nannofloral assemblages show an increase in abundance of Mitrolithus jansae and small-sized r-selected taxa and a progressive decrease in S. punctulata percentages. The deep dwellers M. jansae and S. punctulata experienced a major crisis slightly prior to the deposition of the Toarcian black shales that are characterized by high abundances of eutrophic taxa such as Lotharingius spp. and Biscutum spp. The return of S. punctulata associated with lower percentages of eutrophic taxa was observed just above the Toarcian black shales. The Toarcian episode reveals that high CO2 levels and increasing primary productivity probably triggered a shift in abundance from highly calcified nannoliths such as S. punctulata and M. jansae to small-sized r-selected coccoliths that overall record a biocalcification crisis at the onset and during the Toarcian episode.

  12. New fossil evidence of the early diversification of scarabs:Alloioscarabaeus cheni (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Bai; Dirk Ahrens; Xing-Ke Yang; Dong Ren

    2012-01-01

    Scarabaeoidea are known from the Lower Jurassic and may have originated in the Triassic based on fossil evidence and phylogenetic research.However,the early diversification of Scarabaeoidea remains unclear due to the lack of high-quality fossil evidence.Here we describe an exceptionally well-preserved new fossil of Scarabaeoidea,Alloioscarabaeus cheni gen.et sp.nov from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Inner Mongolia,China.Based on a morphometric analysis using 17 landmarks of the hind wing of Alloioscarabaeus and 10 scarabaeoid families,we found that Alloioscarabaeus cheni gen.et sp.nov clearly does not belong to any of the known scarabaeoid families and,consequently,is a new family,Alloioscarabaeidae fam.nov.,was erected.The discovery of Alloioscarabaeus brought further evidence for the early diversification of major scarab lineages which could allow more detail in the palaeobiogeography of the Scarabaeoidea and Northeast of China which might be one of the originating places or an important radiation place during the evolution of Scarabaeoidea.Alloioscarabaeidae were very likely not good diggers and might have fed on decaying organic materials.Based on the evidence we have now,we tend to believe that most families and some subfamilies of Scarabaeoidea were present in the Jurassic period.

  13. Combined oxygen- and carbon-isotope records through the Early Jurassic: multiple global events and two modes of carbon-cycle/temperature coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Korte, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    -isotope signature), but also some significant contrasts (oxygen-isotope based paleotemperatures which provide no evidence for warming). Significant contrast in oxygen- and carbon-isotope co-variation also occurs on a long timescale. There appear to be two modes in the co-variation of carbon and oxygen isotopes...... environmental changes were global has been strongly debated. Nevertheless, partly as a result of the international effort to define Global Stratotype Sections and Points (GSSPs), much more is now being discovered about environmental changes taking place at and around the other Jurassic Age (Stage) boundaries...... that both long-term and short-term carbon-isotope shifts from the UK Early Jurassic represent global changes in carbon cycle balances. The Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary event is an event of global significance and shows several similarities to the Toarcian OAE (relative sea-level change, carbon...

  14. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Finding topics that inspire students is an important aspect of any physics course. Virtually everyone is fascinated by "Tyrannosaurus rex," and the excitement of the class is palpable when we explore scaling effects in "T. rex" and other bipedal theropod dinosaurs as part of our discussion of mechanics and elasticity. In this…

  15. Palaeoclimatic conditions in the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic of southern Africa: A geochemical assessment of the Elliot Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciscio, Lara; Bordy, Emese M.

    2016-07-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic boundary marks a global faunal turnover event that is generally considered as the third largest of five major biological crises in the Phanerozoic geological record of Earth. Determining the controlling factors of this event and their relative contributions to the biotic turnover associated with it is on-going globally. The Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic rock record of southern Africa presents a unique opportunity for better constraining how and why the biosphere was affected at this time not only because the succession is richly fossiliferous, but also because it contains important palaeoenvironmental clues. Using mainly sedimentary geochemical proxies (i.e., major, trace and rare earth elements), our study is the first quantitative assessment of the palaeoclimatic conditions during the deposition of the Elliot Formation, a continental red bed succession that straddles the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in southern Africa. Employing clay mineralogy as well as the indices of chemical alteration and compositional variability, our results confirm earlier qualitative sedimentological studies and indicate that the deposition of the Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic Elliot Formation occurred under increasingly dry environmental conditions that inhibited chemical weathering in this southern part of Pangea. Moreover, the study questions the universal validity of those studies that suggest a sudden increase in humidity for the Lower Jurassic record and supports predictions of long-term global warming after continental flood basalt emplacement.

  16. Early Evolution of Apocrita(Insecta,Hymenoptera)as Indicated by New Findings in the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou,Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandr P.PASNITSYN; ZHANG Haichun

    2010-01-01

    The classification and phylogeny of the basal Vespina(= Orussoidea+Apocrita)are reconsidered based primarily on rich and well preserved material from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou in Inner Mongolia,China.Comparatively smooth morphological transitions are traced from a Xiphydriidae-like ancestor toward Orussoidea via the Jurassic family Karatavitidae,and through Karatavitidae and the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous family Ephialtitidae independently to Stephanidae,to Evanioidea,and,via the extinct Jurassic Kuafuidae fam.nov.to the remaining Apocrita.New hypothesis is proposed concerning development of the characteristic wasp-waist of Apocrita,which is supposed to appear independently and in different ways in Evanioidea and in the rest of Apocrita.As a result,six infraorders are proposed for the suborder Vespina with the following taxonomic structure:infraorder Orussomorpha including the only superfamily Ornssoidea(Karatavitidae+Paroryssidae+Orussidae),infraorder Stephanomorpha with the only superfamily Stephanoidea(Ephialfitidae+Stephanidae),infraorder Evaniomorpha with the only superfamily Evanioidea of traditional composition,infraorder Ceraphronomorpha with the superfamilies Ceraphronoidea s.str.and monotypical Megalyroidea and Trigonaloidea,and the infraorders Proctotrnpomorpha,lchneumonomorpha,and Vespomorpha of traditional composition.The family Kuafuidae is unplaced to infraorder because it is putatively paraphyletic with respect to Ceraphronomorpha,Proctotrupomorpha,Ichneumonomorpha and Vespomorpha.Described as new are Karatavites junfengi sp.nov.,Praeratavites wuhuaensis sp.nov.,P.perspicuus sp.nov,Postxiphydria daohugouensis gen.et sp.nov.,P.ningchengensis gen.et sp.nov.,Postxiphydroides strenuus gen.et sp.nov.,Praeratavitoides amabilis gen.et sp.nov.,Proapocritus densipediculus sp.nov.,P.sculptus sp.nov.,P.longantennatus sp.nov.,P.formosus sp.nov.,P.atropus sp.nov.,P.elegans sp.nov.,Stephanogaster pristinus sp.nov.,Asiephialtites lini sp

  17. Early and Middle Jurassic climate changes: implications for palaeoceanography and tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen; Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz

    2014-01-01

    ; Rogov and Zakharov, 2010). Here we present new high-resolution oxygen isotope datasets from marine calcitic fossils of different European basins that indicate strong temperature fluctuations during the Pliensbachian-Bajocian time span. The already reported cold Late Pliensbachian episode with at least...... three pronounced oxygen isotope ‘Ice Age’ cycles, and the subsequent well known Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic ‘supergreenhouse’ Event is followed by very warm seawater temperatures in the late Toarcian. Moreover, a very pronounced and effective cooling occurred during the latest Toarcian and early Aalenian...

  18. Complete forelimb myology of the basal theropod dinosaur Tawa hallae based on a novel robust muscle reconstruction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Sara H

    2014-09-01

    The forelimbs of nonavian theropod dinosaurs have been the subject of considerable study and speculation due to their varied morphology and role in the evolution of flight. Although many studies on the functional morphology of a limb require an understanding of its musculature, comparatively little is known about the forelimb myology of theropods and other bipedal dinosaurs. Previous phylogenetically based myological reconstructions have been limited to the shoulder, restricting their utility in analyses of whole-limb function. The antebrachial and manual musculature in particular have remained largely unstudied due to uncertain muscular homologies in archosaurs. Through analysis of the musculature of extant taxa in a robust statistical framework, this study presents new hypotheses of homology for the distal limb musculature of archosaurs and provides the first complete reconstruction of dinosaurian forelimb musculature, including the antebrachial and intrinsic manual muscles. Data on the forelimb myology of a broad sample of extant birds, crocodylians, lizards, and turtles were analyzed using maximum likelihood ancestral state reconstruction and examined together with the osteology of the early theropod Tawa hallae from the Late Triassic of New Mexico to formulate a complete plesiomorphic myology for the theropod forelimb. Comparisons with previous reconstructions show that the shoulder musculature of basal theropods is more similar to that of basal ornithischians and sauropodomorphs than to that of dromaeosaurids. Greater development of the supracoracoideus and deltoideus musculature in theropods over other bipedal dinosaurs correlates with stronger movements of the forelimb at the shoulder and an emphasis on apprehension of relatively large prey. This emphasis is further supported by the morphology of the antebrachium and the intrinsic manual musculature, which exhibit a high degree of excursion and a robust morphology well-suited for powerful digital flexion

  19. Petrosal anatomy and inner ear structures of the Late Jurassic Henkelotherium (Mammalia, Cladotheria, Dryolestoidea): insight into the early evolution of the ear region in cladotherian mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Irina; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Wible, John R; Martin, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The petrosal anatomy and inner ear structure of Jurassic cladotherian mammals represent the ancestral morphological conditions (groundplan) from which modern therian mammals (marsupials and placentals) have evolved. We present the reconstruction of the petrosal and inner ear features of the Late Jurassic dryolestoid mammal Henkelotherium guimarotae from high-resolution computed tomography and three-dimensional imaging analysis. This study of Henkelotherium revealed a combination of derived and primitive features, including: cladotherian apomorphies, such as the promontorial sulcus for the internal carotid artery and reduced lateral trough; trechnotherian characters, such as an enclosed cochlear canaliculus for the perilymphatic duct, post-promontorial tympanic sinus and caudal tympanic process; in addition to plesiomorphic mammalian features, such as the cavum supracochleare and prootic canal. The inner ear of Henkelotherium shows a division between the utricle and saccule, a cochlear canal coiled through at least 270°, a distinctive primary bony lamina for the basilar membrane, and a secondary bony lamina. The development of the primary and secondary bony laminae in the cochlear canal is suggested here to be correlated with the concurrent coiling of the bony canal and membranous duct of the inner ear cochlea, apomorphies of the more inclusive cladotherian clade that also represent the ancestral morphotype of modern therian mammals. Because these features are crucial for high-frequency hearing in extant therian mammals, their early appearance in Late Jurassic cladotherians suggests a more ancient origination for high-frequency hearing in mammalian history than previously thought. PMID:19438763

  20. Petrosal anatomy and inner ear structures of the Late Jurassic Henkelotherium (Mammalia, Cladotheria, Dryolestoidea): insight into the early evolution of the ear region in cladotherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Irina; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Wible, John R; Martin, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    The petrosal anatomy and inner ear structure of Jurassic cladotherian mammals represent the ancestral morphological conditions (groundplan) from which modern therian mammals (marsupials and placentals) have evolved. We present the reconstruction of the petrosal and inner ear features of the Late Jurassic dryolestoid mammal Henkelotherium guimarotae from high-resolution computed tomography and three-dimensional imaging analysis. This study of Henkelotherium revealed a combination of derived and primitive features, including: cladotherian apomorphies, such as the promontorial sulcus for the internal carotid artery and reduced lateral trough; trechnotherian characters, such as an enclosed cochlear canaliculus for the perilymphatic duct, post-promontorial tympanic sinus and caudal tympanic process; in addition to plesiomorphic mammalian features, such as the cavum supracochleare and prootic canal. The inner ear of Henkelotherium shows a division between the utricle and saccule, a cochlear canal coiled through at least 270 degrees, a distinctive primary bony lamina for the basilar membrane, and a secondary bony lamina. The development of the primary and secondary bony laminae in the cochlear canal is suggested here to be correlated with the concurrent coiling of the bony canal and membranous duct of the inner ear cochlea, apomorphies of the more inclusive cladotherian clade that also represent the ancestral morphotype of modern therian mammals. Because these features are crucial for high-frequency hearing in extant therian mammals, their early appearance in Late Jurassic cladotherians suggests a more ancient origination for high-frequency hearing in mammalian history than previously thought.

  1. Heterochronic truncation of odontogenesis in theropod dinosaurs provides insight into the macroevolution of avian beaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Stiegler, Josef; Wu, Ping; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Hu, Dongyu; Balanoff, Amy; Zhou, Yachun; Xu, Xing

    2017-09-25

    Beaks are innovative structures characterizing numerous tetrapod lineages, including birds, but little is known about how developmental processes influenced the macroevolution of these important structures. Here we provide evidence of ontogenetic vestigialization of alveoli in two lineages of theropod dinosaurs and show that these are transitional phenotypes in the evolution of beaks. One of the smallest known caenagnathid oviraptorosaurs and a small specimen of the Early Cretaceous bird Sapeornis both possess shallow, empty vestiges of dentary alveoli. In both individuals, the system of vestiges connects via foramina with a dorsally closed canal homologous to alveoli. Similar morphologies are present in Limusaurus, a beaked theropod that becomes edentulous during ontogeny; and an analysis of neontological and paleontological evidence shows that ontogenetic reduction of the dentition is a relatively common phenomenon in vertebrate evolution. Based on these lines of evidence, we propose that progressively earlier postnatal and embryonic truncation of odontogenesis corresponds with expansion of rostral keratin associated with the caruncle, and these progenesis and peramorphosis heterochronies combine to drive the evolution of edentulous beaks in nonavian theropods and birds. Following initial apomorphic expansion of rostral keratinized epithelia in perinatal toothed theropods, beaks appear to inhibit odontogenesis as they grow postnatally, resulting in a sequence of common morphologies. This sequence is shifted earlier in development through phylogeny until dentition is absent at hatching, and odontogenesis is inhibited by beak formation in ovo.

  2. Dynamic locomotor capabilities revealed by early dinosaur trackmakers from southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A new investigation of the sedimentology and ichnology of the Early Jurassic Moyeni tracksite in Lesotho, southern Africa has yielded new insights into the behavior and locomotor dynamics of early dinosaurs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The tracksite is an ancient point bar preserving a heterogeneous substrate of varied consistency and inclination that includes a ripple-marked riverbed, a bar slope, and a stable algal-matted bar top surface. Several basal ornithischian dinosaurs and a single theropod dinosaur crossed its surface within days or perhaps weeks of one another, but responded to substrate heterogeneity differently. Whereas the theropod trackmaker accommodated sloping and slippery surfaces by gripping the substrate with its pedal claws, the basal ornithischian trackmakers adjusted to the terrain by changing between quadrupedal and bipedal stance, wide and narrow gauge limb support (abduction range = 31 degrees , and plantigrade and digitigrade foot posture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The locomotor adjustments coincide with changes in substrate consistency along the trackway and appear to reflect 'real time' responses to a complex terrain. It is proposed that these responses foreshadow important locomotor transformations characterizing the later evolution of the two main dinosaur lineages. Ornithischians, which shifted from bipedal to quadrupedal posture at least three times in their evolutionary history, are shown to have been capable of adopting both postures early in their evolutionary history. The substrate-gripping behavior demonstrated by the early theropod, in turn, is consistent with the hypothesized function of pedal claws in bird ancestors.

  3. Structure of an inverted basin from subsurface and field data: the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Maestrat Basin (Iberian Chain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebot, M.; Guimera, J.

    2016-07-01

    The Maestrat Basin experienced two main rifting events: Late Permian-Late Triassic and Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, and was inverted during the Cenozoic Alpine orogeny. During the inversion, an E-W-trending, N-verging fold-and-thrust belt developed along its northern margin, detached in the Triassic evaporites, while southwards it also involved the Variscan basement. A structural study of the transition between these two areas is presented, using 2D seismic profiles, exploration wells and field data, to characterize its evolution during the Mesozoic extension and the Cenozoic contraction. The S-dipping Maestrat basement thrust traverses the Maestrat Basin from E to W; it is the result of the Cenozoic inversion of the lower segment–within the acoustic basement–of the Mesozoic extensional fault system that generated the Salzedella sub-basin. The syn-rift Lower Cretaceous rocks filling the Salzedella sub-basin thicken progressively northwards, from 350m to 1100m. During the inversion, a wide uplifted area –40km wide in the N-S direction– developed in the hanging wall of the Maestrat basement thrust. This uplifted area is limited to the North by the E-W-trending Calders monocline, whose limb is about 13km wide in its central part, dips about 5ºN, and generates a vertical tectonic step of 800-1200m. We interpreted the Calders monocline as a fault-bend fold; therefore, a flat-ramp-flat geometry is assumed in depth for the Maestrat basement thrust. The northern synformal hinge of the Calders monocline coincides with the transition from thick-skinned to thin-skinned areas. The vast uplifted area and the low-dip of the monocline suggest a very low-dip for the basement ramp, rooted in the upper crust. The Calders monocline narrows and disappears laterally, in coincidence with the outcrop of the Maestrat basement thrust. The evaporitic Middle Muschelkalk detachment conditioned the structural style. Salt structures are also related to it; they developed during the

  4. The Early Jurassic Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex (southeastern Alaska): geochemistry, petrogenesis and rare-metal mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Kontak, Daniel J.; Karl, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Early Jurassic (ca. 177 Ma) Bokan Mountain granitic complex, located on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, cross-cuts Paleozoic igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane of the North American Cordillera and was emplaced during a rifting event. The complex is a circular body (~3 km in diameter) of peralkaline granitic composition that has a core of arfvedsonite granite surrounded by aegirine granite. All the rock-forming minerals typically record a two-stage growth history and aegirine and arfvedsonite were the last major phases to crystalize from the magma. The Bokan granites and related dikes have SiO2 from 72 to 78 wt. %, high iron (FeO (tot) ~3-4.5 wt. %) and alkali (8-10 wt.%) concentrations with high FeO(tot)/(FeO(tot)+MgO) ratios (typically >0.95) and the molar Al2O3/(Na2O+K2O) ratio Nd values which are indicative of a mantle signature. The parent magma is inferred to be derived from an earlier metasomatized lithospheric mantle by low degrees of partial melting and generated the Bokan granitic melt through extensive fractional crystallization. The Bokan complex hosts significant rare-metal (REE, Y, U, Th, Nb) mineralization that is related to the late-stage crystallization history of the complex which involved the overlap of emplacement of felsic dikes, including pegmatite bodies, and generation of orthomagmatic fluids. The abundances of REE, HFSE, U and Th as well as Pb and Nd isotopic values of the pluton and dikes were modified by orthomagmatic hydrothermal fluids highly enriched in the strongly incompatible trace elements, which also escaped along zones of structural weakness to generate rare-metal mineralization. The latter was deposited in two stages: the first relates to the latest stage of magma emplacement and is associated with felsic dikes that intruded along the faults and shear deformations, whereas the second stage involved ingress of hydrothermal fluids that both remobilized and enriched the initial

  5. The Early Jurassic Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex (southeastern Alaska): Geochemistry, petrogenesis and rare-metal mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Kontak, Daniel J.; Karl, Susan M.

    2014-08-01

    The Early Jurassic (ca. 177 Ma) Bokan Mountain granitic complex, located on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, cross-cuts Paleozoic igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane of the North American Cordillera and was emplaced during a rifting event. The complex is a circular body (~ 3 km in diameter) of peralkaline granitic composition that has a core of arfvedsonite granite surrounded by aegirine granite. All the rock-forming minerals typically record a two-stage growth history and aegirine and arfvedsonite were the last major phases to crystallize from the magma. The Bokan granites and related dikes have SiO2 from 72 to 78 wt.%, high iron (FeO (tot) ~ 3-4.5 wt.%) and alkali (8-10 wt.%) concentrations with high FeO(tot)/(FeO(tot) + MgO) ratios (typically > 0.95) and the molar Al2O3/(Na2O + K2O) ratio metal (REE, Y, U, Th, Nb) mineralization that is related to the late-stage crystallization history of the complex which involved the overlap of emplacement of felsic dikes, including pegmatite bodies, and generation of orthomagmatic fluids. The abundances of REE, HFSE, U and Th as well as Pb and Nd isotopic values of the pluton and dikes were modified by orthomagmatic hydrothermal fluids highly enriched in the strongly incompatible trace elements, which also escaped along zones of structural weakness to generate rare-metal mineralization. The latter was deposited in two stages: the first relates to the latest stage of magma emplacement and is associated with felsic dikes that intruded along the faults and shear deformations, whereas the second stage involved ingress of hydrothermal fluids that both remobilized and enriched the initial magmatic mineralization. Mineralization is mostly composed of “new” minerals. Fluorine complexing played a role during the transportation of REE and HFSE in hydrothermal fluids and oxygen isotopes in the granites and quartz veins negate the significant incursion of an external fluid and support a

  6. Theropod courtship: large scale physical evidence of display arenas and avian-like scrape ceremony behaviour by Cretaceous dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Martin G; McCrea, Richard T; Buckley, Lisa G; Lim, Jong Deock; Matthews, Neffra A; Breithaupt, Brent H; Houck, Karen J; Gierliński, Gerard D; Surmik, Dawid; Kim, Kyung Soo; Xing, Lida; Kong, Dal Yong; Cart, Ken; Martin, Jason; Hadden, Glade

    2016-01-07

    Relationships between non-avian theropod dinosaurs and extant and fossil birds are a major focus of current paleobiological research. Despite extensive phylogenetic and morphological support, behavioural evidence is mostly ambiguous and does not usually fossilize. Thus, inferences that dinosaurs, especially theropods displayed behaviour analogous to modern birds are intriguing but speculative. Here we present extensive and geographically widespread physical evidence of substrate scraping behavior by large theropods considered as compelling evidence of "display arenas" or leks, and consistent with "nest scrape display" behaviour among many extant ground-nesting birds. Large scrapes, up to 2 m in diameter, occur abundantly at several Cretaceous sites in Colorado. They constitute a previously unknown category of large dinosaurian trace fossil, inferred to fill gaps in our understanding of early phases in the breeding cycle of theropods. The trace makers were probably lekking species that were seasonally active at large display arena sites. Such scrapes indicate stereotypical avian behaviour hitherto unknown among Cretaceous theropods, and most likely associated with terrirorial activity in the breeding season. The scrapes most probably occur near nesting colonies, as yet unknown or no longer preserved in the immediate study areas. Thus, they provide clues to paleoenvironments where such nesting sites occurred.

  7. Theropod courtship: large scale physical evidence of display arenas and avian-like scrape ceremony behaviour by Cretaceous dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Martin G.; McCrea, Richard T.; Buckley, Lisa G.; Deock Lim, Jong; Matthews, Neffra A.; Breithaupt, Brent H.; Houck, Karen J.; Gierliński, Gerard D.; Surmik, Dawid; Soo Kim, Kyung; Xing, Lida; Yong Kong, Dal; Cart, Ken; Martin, Jason; Hadden, Glade

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between non-avian theropod dinosaurs and extant and fossil birds are a major focus of current paleobiological research. Despite extensive phylogenetic and morphological support, behavioural evidence is mostly ambiguous and does not usually fossilize. Thus, inferences that dinosaurs, especially theropods displayed behaviour analogous to modern birds are intriguing but speculative. Here we present extensive and geographically widespread physical evidence of substrate scraping behavior by large theropods considered as compelling evidence of “display arenas” or leks, and consistent with “nest scrape display” behaviour among many extant ground-nesting birds. Large scrapes, up to 2 m in diameter, occur abundantly at several Cretaceous sites in Colorado. They constitute a previously unknown category of large dinosaurian trace fossil, inferred to fill gaps in our understanding of early phases in the breeding cycle of theropods. The trace makers were probably lekking species that were seasonally active at large display arena sites. Such scrapes indicate stereotypical avian behaviour hitherto unknown among Cretaceous theropods, and most likely associated with terrirorial activity in the breeding season. The scrapes most probably occur near nesting colonies, as yet unknown or no longer preserved in the immediate study areas. Thus, they provide clues to paleoenvironments where such nesting sites occurred.

  8. Dinosaur tracks from the Jurassic Shemshak Group in the Central Alborz Mountains (Northern Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbassi, Nasrollah; Madanipour, Saeed

    2014-04-01

    The Shemshak Group includes alternating layers of coal-bearing shale and siliciclastic sediments in the Baladeh area in the central Alborz Mountains of northern Iran. A diverse and abundant Jurassic dinosaur footprint assemblage is now recognized in the group, which is Toarcian to Bajocian in age in the northern Baladeh. This is the first report of a diverse dinosaur ichnoassemblage from Iran that includes the footprints of sauropods. These tracks can be assigned to three groups of trackmakers: theropods, ornithopods and sauropods. Those of theropods are typically tridactyl in shape, their trackways reflecting bipedal movement. Theropod footprints are very abundant in both northern and western Baladeh. The studied theropod tracks themselves are divided into three major dimensional groups. The medium sized footprints (footprint length, 11-15 cm) are abundant and have a stride length, digit and pace angles like the coelurosaurs footprints and trackway. Theropod footprints were identified as similar to Schizograllator otariensis, Talmontopus tersi and Wildeichnus isp. Ornithopod footprints are tridactyl with rounded and thick toes and belong to bipeds. Some didactyl imprints were also observed. Skin imprints were well preserved in these footprints. The ornithopod tracks resemble Jiayinosorupus johnsoni, as well as Velociraptorichnus sichuanensis for didactyl footprints. Sauropod footprints found in the western part of Baladeh are assigned here to Eosauropus isp., which are pentadactyl pes imprints of a quadruped. The assemblage from Iran resembles similar associations from eastern Asia.

  9. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Strength and Locomotion II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In the second paper of this series, the effect of transverse femoral stresses due to locomotion in theropod dinosaurs of different sizes was examined for the case of an unchanging leg geometry. Students are invariably thrilled to learn about theropod dinosaurs, and this activity applies the concepts of torque and stress to the issue of theropod…

  10. Tooth-marked small theropod bone: an extremely rare trace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland

    2001-01-01

    Tooth-marked dinosaur bones provide insight into feeding behaviours and biting strategies of theropod dinosaurs. The majority of theropod tooth marks reported to date have been found on herbivorous dinosaur bones, although some tyrannosaurid bones with tooth marks have also been reported. In 1988...

  11. Petrogenesis of Early-Middle Jurassic intrusive rocks in northern Liaoning and central Jilin provinces, northeast China: Implications for the extent of spatial-temporal overprinting of the Mongol-Okhotsk and Paleo-Pacific tectonic regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Hong; Wang, Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Cao, Hua-Hua; Pei, Fu-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The Mesozoic tectonic evolution of NE China was controlled mainly by the Mongol-Okhotsk and Paleo-Pacific tectonic regimes. However, the extent of the spatial and temporal overprinting of these two regimes is poorly understood. Here, we report new zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating and geochemical analyses of Jurassic intrusive rocks in northern Liaoning and central Jilin provinces, northeast China, to discuss their petrogenesis and outline the extent of spatial and temporal overprinting of these two tectonic regimes. Dating results indicate that Jurassic magmatism occurred in two stages during the Early (ca. 175 Ma) and Middle Jurassic (170-163 Ma). These rocks represent two-stage typical bimodal igneous rock associations composed mainly of olivine gabbro, gabbro, and gneissic granitoids. The Early and Middle Jurassic gabbros have low rare earth element (REE) abundances, positive Eu anomalies, depletion in high field strength elements (HFSEs), and positive εHf(t) values (+ 4.0 to + 10.3, except for one value of - 17.8), suggesting that the primary magma was derived from partial melting of depleted lithospheric mantle metasomatized by subducted-slab-derived fluids. The Early Jurassic monzogranite exhibit high REE abundances (195-201 ppm), weak negative Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.63-0.64), and negative εHf(t) values (- 11.9 to - 8.2), suggesting a primary magma that was derived from partial melting of lower continental crust of the NCC. The Middle Jurassic granodiorites are enriched in light REEs (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), and are depleted in heavy REEs (HREEs) and HFSEs, as well as high Sr/Y (29-132) and (La/Yb)N (15-44) ratios. In addition, the Middle Jurassic granitoids near or within the NCC exhibit negative εHf(t) values (- 18.9 to + 0.2), whereas those within the Xing'an-Mongolia Orogenic Belt (XMOB) have generally positive εHf(t) values (- 0.6 to + 6.4), suggesting their origin from partial melting of thickened ancient NCC and newly accreted

  12. Decoupling of carbon isotope records between organic matter and carbonate prior to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Early Jurassic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Stephane; Kothe, Tim; Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Suan, Guillaume; Heimhofer, Ulrich; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Across the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary (P-To, Early Jurassic), ca. 1 Myr before the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE), an initial negative carbon isotope excursion has been documented in western Tethys sedimentary rocks. In carbonate, its amplitude (2-3 permil) is similar to the subsequent excursion recorded at the onset of the T-OAE. Being also associated with a rapid warming event, the significance of this first carbon isotope shift, in terms of paleoenvironmental interpretation and triggering mechanism, remains however elusive. Taking advantage of expanded and rather continuous sections in the High Atlas of Morocco, several high-resolution, paired organic-inorganic carbon isotope records have been obtained across the Upper Pliensbachian - Lower Toarcian interval. At the onset of the T-OAE, an abrupt 1-2 permil negative shift is recorded in both organic and inorganic phases, succeeded by a relatively longer term 1-2 permil negative trend and a final slow return to pre-excursion conditions. In accordance with previous interpretations, this pattern indicates a perturbation of the entire exogenic carbon isotope reservoir at the onset of the T-OAE by the sudden release of isotopically light carbon into the atmosphere. By contrast, there is no negative shift in carbon isotopes for the P-To event recorded in bulk organic matter of Morocco. Given the strong dominance of terrestrial particles in the bulk organic matter fraction, this absence indicates that massive input of 12C-rich carbon into the atmosphere is not likely to have happened during the P-To event. A pronounced (2 permil) and abrupt negative shift in carbon isotope is however recorded in the bulk carbonate phase. We suggest that this decoupling between organic and inorganic phase is due to changes in the nature of the bulk carbonate phase. Indeed, the negative shift occurs at the lithological transition between Pliensbachian-lowermost Toarcian limestone-marl alternations and the Lower Toarcian marl

  13. Climatic and palaeoceanographic changes during the Pliensbachian (Early Jurassic) inferred from clay mineralogy and stable isotope (C-O) geochemistry (NW Europe)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bougeault, Cédric; Pellenard, Pierre; Deconinck, Jean François

    2017-01-01

    The Early Jurassic was broadly a greenhouse climate period that was punctuated by short warm and cold climatic events, positive and negative excursions of carbon isotopes, and episodes of enhanced organic matter burial. Clay minerals from Pliensbachian sediments recovered from two boreholes...... isotope excursion at the so-called Sinemurian Pliensbachian Boundary Event (SPBE). The Early/Late Pliensbachian transition was also characterised by more humid conditions. This warm interval is associated with a major change in oceanic circulation during the Davoei Zone, likely triggered by sea-level rise......), which occurred also during a warm period, favouring organic matter production and preservation. Our study highlights the major role of the London Brabant Massif in influencing oceanic circulation of the NW European area, as a topographic barrier (emerged lands) during periods of lowstand sea...

  14. Evolution of olfaction in non-avian theropod dinosaurs and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenitsky, Darla K; Therrien, François; Ridgely, Ryan C; McGee, Amanda R; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2011-12-22

    Little is known about the olfactory capabilities of extinct basal (non-neornithine) birds or the evolutionary changes in olfaction that occurred from non-avian theropods through modern birds. Although modern birds are known to have diverse olfactory capabilities, olfaction is generally considered to have declined during avian evolution as visual and vestibular sensory enhancements occurred in association with flight. To test the hypothesis that olfaction diminished through avian evolution, we assessed relative olfactory bulb size, here used as a neuroanatomical proxy for olfactory capabilities, in 157 species of non-avian theropods, fossil birds and living birds. We show that relative olfactory bulb size increased during non-avian maniraptoriform evolution, remained stable across the non-avian theropod/bird transition, and increased during basal bird and early neornithine evolution. From early neornithines through a major part of neornithine evolution, the relative size of the olfactory bulbs remained stable before decreasing in derived neoavian clades. Our results show that, rather than decreasing, the importance of olfaction actually increased during early bird evolution, representing a previously unrecognized sensory enhancement. The relatively larger olfactory bulbs of earliest neornithines, compared with those of basal birds, may have endowed neornithines with improved olfaction for more effective foraging or navigation skills, which in turn may have been a factor allowing them to survive the end-Cretaceous mass extinction.

  15. Aspects of Romanian Early Jurassic palaeobotany and palynology. Part II. A new species of Pachypteris from Cristian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa

    2000-08-01

    The Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian) deposits of Cristian (Brasov County, Romania) contain a well-preserved land flora. Pachypteris gradinarui n.sp., a new species of seed fern foliage belonging to the Corystospermales, is described, figured and analysed. The species has a bipinnate, petioled frond; secondary rachises inserted on the upper side of the primary rachis; rounded, occasionally lobed pinnules without marked abaxial thickening or folding. The material is compared with other Pachypteris species, and with Cycadopteris, a related genus characterised by marginal (cuticular) thickening and folding, as it presents transitional characters between the two genera.

  16. K/Ar chronologies of tephra units from the Middle Jurassic Sundance, and Late Early Cretaceous Mowry and Shell Creek Formations, Big Horn Basin, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Meyer, E. E.; Johnson, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Jurassic Sundance and Late Early Cretaceous Shell Creek and Mowry Formations of the Big Horn Basin, Wyoming, contain an extensive record of altered tephra. These tephra are likely related to contemporary volcanic activity in the Sierra Nevada and various Coast Range terranes to the west and provide valuable chronometric control on the sedimentary record within a portion of the Sevier-aged and later Cordilleran foreland basin. In addition, several of these altered tephra (bentonites) provide a valuable economic resource. Despite the prominence of these strata across the basin, few isotopic ages have been reported to date. Here we present new K/Ar ages on biotite phenocrysts from those tephra occurrences as a chronometric check on samples that contained zircons with significant Pb loss, that preclude more precise U/Pb age determinations. A bulk biotite sample extracted from an altered tuff in the Lower Sundance Formation gives an age of 167.5 × 5 Ma. This tuff occurs just above a dinosaur track-bearing peritidal sequence. Bulk biotite ages from the lower Shell Creek Formation give an age of 100.3 × 3 Ma and are statistically indistinguishable from biotite grains dated at 103.1 × 3 Ma extracted from the economically important 'Clay Spur' bentonite found at the top of the Mowry Shale. This work provides important new chronometric constraints on a portion of the Medial Jurassic to Late Early Cretaceous stratigraphy of the Big Horn Basin, Wyoming, and may be useful in understanding the regional tectonics that helped shape the development of the Sevier foreland basin and Western Interior Seaway.

  17. Early Jurassic subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Ocean in NE China: Petrologic and geochemical evidence from the Tumen mafic intrusive complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Hongxia; Fan, Weiming; Li, Jingyan; Zhao, Liang; Huang, Miwei; Xu, Wenliang

    2015-05-01

    Subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Oceanic Plate is widely considered to have caused extensive Mesozoic magmatism, lithospheric deformation and mineralization in East Asia. However, it is still unclear when this subduction began. Here we report an Early Jurassic (~ 187 Ma) mafic intrusive complex (including olivine norite, gabbro, and diorite) from the Tumen area in NE China. The olivine norite contains a mineral assemblage of olivine, pyroxene, Ca-plagioclase, and hornblende that crystallized in a water-saturated parental magma. The rocks in the complex show variable degrees of plagioclase and ferromagnesian mineral accumulation as reflected by positive Sr and Eu anomalies in primitive mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns. Mass-balance calculations indicate that the parental magma was calc-alkaline with arc-type trace element features (i.e., large ion incompatible and light rare earth element enrichment and Nb-Ta depletion). It also had Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7042 to 0.7044, εNd(t) = + 2.5 to + 3.5 and εHf(t) = + 8.4 to + 10.5) similar to those of modern arc basalts. The parental magma was likely derived from 5 to 20% melting of a mantle wedge metasomatized by an addition of 3-4% hydrous sediment melt from the subducting Paleo-Pacific Oceanic slab. The Tumen mafic intrusive complex, together with other contemporaneous mafic intrusions, I-type granitoids, and felsic lavas, constitutes an Early Jurassic N-S-trending arc magmatic belt that was formed by westward subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Ocean.

  18. The behavioral implications of a multi-individual bonebed of a small theropod dinosaur.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio M Ibiricu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Central Patagonia, Argentina, preserves an abundant and rich fossil record. Among vertebrate fossils from the Upper Cretaceous Bajo Barreal Formation of Patagonia, five individuals of the small, non-avian theropod dinosaur Aniksosaurus darwini were recovered. Group behavior is an important aspect of dinosaur paleoecology, but it is not well-documented and is poorly understood among non-avian Theropoda. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The taphonomic association of individuals from the Bajo Barreal Formation and aspects of their bone histology suggest gregarious behavior for Aniksosaurus, during at least a portion of the life history of this species. Histology indicates that the specimens were juvenile to sub-adult individuals. In addition, morphological differences between individuals, particularly proportions of the appendicular bones, are probably related to body-size dimorphism rather than ontogenetic stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Gregarious behaviour may have conferred a selective advantage on Aniksosaurus individuals, contributing to their successful exploitation of the Cretaceous paleoenvironment preserved in the Bajo Barreal Formation. The monospecific assemblage of Aniksosaurus specimens constitutes only the second body fossil association of small, coelurosaurian theropods in South America and adds valuable information about the paleoecologies of non-avian theropod dinosaurs, particularly in the early Late Cretaceous of Patagonia.

  19. Edentulism, beaks, and biomechanical innovations in the evolution of theropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Witmer, Lawrence M; Altangerel, Perle; Rayfield, Emily J

    2013-12-17

    Maniraptoriformes, the speciose group of derived theropod dinosaurs that ultimately gave rise to modern birds, display a diverse and remarkable suite of skeletal adaptations. Apart from the evolution of flight, a large-scale change in dietary behavior appears to have been one of the main triggers for specializations in the bauplan of these derived theropods. Among the different skeletal specializations, partial or even complete edentulism and the development of keratinous beaks form a recurring and persistent trend in from the evolution of derived nonavian dinosaurs. Therizinosauria is an enigmatic maniraptoriform clade, whose members display these and other osteological characters thought to be correlated with the shift from carnivory to herbivory. This makes therizinosaurians prime candidates to assess the functional significance of these morphological characters. Based on a highly detailed biomechanical model of Erlikosaurus andrewsi, a therizinosaurid from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia, different morphological configurations incorporating soft-tissue structures, such as a keratinous rhamphotheca, are evaluated for their biomechanical performance. Our results indicate that the development of beaks and the presence of a keratinous rhamphotheca would have helped to dissipate stress and strain, making the rostral part of the skull less susceptible to bending and displacement, and this benefit may extend to other vertebrate clades that possess rhamphothecae. Keratinous beaks, paralleled by edentulism, thus represent an evolutionary innovation developed early in derived theropods to enhance cranial stability, distinct to postulated mass-saving benefits associated with the origin of flight.

  20. Air-filled postcranial bones in theropod dinosaurs: physiological implications and the 'reptile'-bird transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Roger B J; Butler, Richard J; Carrano, Matthew T; O'Connor, Patrick M

    2012-02-01

    Pneumatic (air-filled) postcranial bones are unique to birds among extant tetrapods. Unambiguous skeletal correlates of postcranial pneumaticity first appeared in the Late Triassic (approximately 210 million years ago), when they evolved independently in several groups of bird-line archosaurs (ornithodirans). These include the theropod dinosaurs (of which birds are extant representatives), the pterosaurs, and sauropodomorph dinosaurs. Postulated functions of skeletal pneumatisation include weight reduction in large-bodied or flying taxa, and density reduction resulting in energetic savings during foraging and locomotion. However, the influence of these hypotheses on the early evolution of pneumaticity has not been studied in detail previously. We review recent work on the significance of pneumaticity for understanding the biology of extinct ornithodirans, and present detailed new data on the proportion of the skeleton that was pneumatised in 131 non-avian theropods and Archaeopteryx. This includes all taxa known from significant postcranial remains. Pneumaticity of the cervical and anterior dorsal vertebrae occurred early in theropod evolution. This 'common pattern' was conserved on the line leading to birds, and is likely present in Archaeopteryx. Increases in skeletal pneumaticity occurred independently in as many as 12 lineages, highlighting a remarkably high number of parallel acquisitions of a bird-like feature among non-avian theropods. Using a quantitative comparative framework, we show that evolutionary increases in skeletal pneumaticity are significantly concentrated in lineages with large body size, suggesting that mass reduction in response to gravitational constraints at large body sizes influenced the early evolution of pneumaticity. However, the body size threshold for extensive pneumatisation is lower in theropod lineages more closely related to birds (maniraptorans). Thus, relaxation of the relationship between body size and pneumatisation preceded

  1. Current Status of the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic APTS from Continental Sediments and Correlation with Standard Marine Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, D. V.; Olsen, P. E.; Muttoni, G.

    2014-12-01

    A reproducible geomagnetic polarity template for the Late Triassic and earliest Jurassic continues to be that determined from ~5,000 meters of cored section in the Newark basin and ~2,500 meters of outcrop section in the Hartford basin, sampled at nominal ~20 kyr intervals according to a well-developed climate cyclicity that characterizes the lacustrine strata present in all but the fluviatile portions of the basins [Kent & Olsen, 1999, 2008 JGR]. The age model is based on the 405 kyr Milankovich climate cycle and pegging the sequence to high precision U-Pb dating of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) at 201.6 to 200.9 Ma [Blackburn+2013 Science], the initiation of which is practically coincident with the end-Triassic extinction level (formerly set to 202 Ma) and within a climatic precession cycle after magnetochron E23r. The resulting astrochronostratigraphic polarity time scale (APTS) has 66 Poisson-distributed polarity intervals from chrons E8r (~225 Ma) to H27n (~199 Ma) with a constant sediment-accumulation rate extrapolation to chron E1r (~233 Ma). Magnetostratigraphic correlations from the most complete and usually the thickest Tethyan marine sections suggest that the Carnian/Norian boundary occurs within ~E7n [Channell+2003 PPP; Muttoni+2004 GSAB] at an APTS age of 227.5 Ma and for the Norian/Rhaetian boundary anywhere from E16n [Husing+2011 EPSL] at ~210.5 Ma to E20r [Maron+2014 Geology] at ~205.4 Ma depending on choice of conodont taxa, whereas the Hettangian/Sinemurian boundary can be placed at ~199.5 Ma within the marine equivalent of H25r [Husing+2014 EPSL]. These APTS ages are in substantive agreement with available high-precision dates in marine strata for the late Carnian [231 Ma: Furin+2006 Geology], latest Norian [205.5 Ma: Wotslaw+2014 Geology], and the boundaries of the Triassic/Jurassic [201.3 Ma: Guex+2012 PPP] and the Hettangian/Sinemurian [199.5 Ma: Schaltegger+2008 EPSL]. Carnian magnetostratigraphy needs to be improved but

  2. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta formation, Venezuelan Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Max C; Rincón, Ascanio D; Ramezani, Jahandar; Solórzano, Andrés; Rauhut, Oliver W M

    2014-10-01

    Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along the western border of Venezuela, where strata of the La Quinta Formation have yielded the ornithischian Laquintasaura venezuelae and other dinosaur remains. Here, we report isolated bones (ischium and tibia) of a small new theropod, Tachiraptor admirabilis gen. et sp. nov., which differs from all previously known members of the group by an unique suite of features of its tibial articulations. Comparative/phylogenetic studies place the new form as the sister taxon to Averostra, a theropod group that is known primarily from the Middle Jurassic onwards. A new U-Pb zircon date (isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry; ID-TIMS method) from the bone bed matrix suggests an earliest Jurassic maximum age for the La Quinta Formation. A dispersal-vicariance analysis suggests that such a stratigraphic gap is more likely to be filled by new records from north and central Pangaea than from southern areas. Indeed, our data show that the sampled summer-wet equatorial belt, which yielded the new taxon, played a pivotal role in theropod evolution across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary.

  3. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta formation, Venezuelan Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Max C.; Rincón, Ascanio D.; Ramezani, Jahandar; Solórzano, Andrés; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along the western border of Venezuela, where strata of the La Quinta Formation have yielded the ornithischian Laquintasaura venezuelae and other dinosaur remains. Here, we report isolated bones (ischium and tibia) of a small new theropod, Tachiraptor admirabilis gen. et sp. nov., which differs from all previously known members of the group by an unique suite of features of its tibial articulations. Comparative/phylogenetic studies place the new form as the sister taxon to Averostra, a theropod group that is known primarily from the Middle Jurassic onwards. A new U–Pb zircon date (isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry; ID-TIMS method) from the bone bed matrix suggests an earliest Jurassic maximum age for the La Quinta Formation. A dispersal–vicariance analysis suggests that such a stratigraphic gap is more likely to be filled by new records from north and central Pangaea than from southern areas. Indeed, our data show that the sampled summer-wet equatorial belt, which yielded the new taxon, played a pivotal role in theropod evolution across the Triassic–Jurassic boundary. PMID:26064540

  4. Evolution of the carbon cycle and seawater temperature from the Triassic-Jurassic boundary to the Early Toarcian based on brachiopod geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Tamás; Tomašových, Adam

    2017-04-01

    The ecological crisis and extinction at the end of the Triassic coincides with several environmental perturbations such as global temperature rise, ocean acidification and carbon isotope anomalies, with a large observed negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) in the Late Rhaetian as well. Followed by the ETE, the Early Jurassic was characterized by marked fluctuations of the global seawater temperature and carbon cycle. Carbon isotope records are showing positive and remarkable negative excursions. A particular example of these phenomena is connected to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (TOAE). The δ13C record of the TOAE is showing a negative excursion of a high magnitude, suggesting the injection of large amount of light carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system, coinciding with rapid global warming and widespread anoxia. Beside the TOAE there are many other, smaller scale carbon isotope anomalies and environmental perturbations at the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian transition or at the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary. In our study, we provide new brachiopod δ13C, δ18O, and Mg/Ca data from the time interval starting in the Rhaetian till the end of the Early Toarcian. Considering the strong resistance of brachiopod shells against diagenesis, our aim is to reconstruct seawater temperature, seawater Mg/Ca, and carbon cycle evolution based on a reliable geochemical proxy database of the studied time interval. The samples have been collected from various localities across Europe achieving a good, at least ammonite subzone scale resolution for the Rhaetian stage and for the Lower Jurassic. The geochemical preservation of the shell material have been tested by several approaches. Thin-sections were made from the shells and analyzed by electron microprobe and ICP-OES to evaluate their preservation by assessing concentrations of Fe, Mn, Sr, and their ratios (Mn/Ca, Sr/Ca). Considering the various elemental composition data of fossil and recent brachiopods published by several

  5. Climatic fluctuations and seasonality during the Late Jurassic (Oxfordian-Early Kimmeridgian) inferred from δ18O of Paris Basin oyster shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigaud, Benjamin; Pucéat, Emmanuelle; Pellenard, Pierre; Vincent, Benoît; Joachimski, Michael M.

    2008-08-01

    Oxygen isotope data from biostratigraphically well-dated oyster shells from the Late Jurassic of the eastern Paris Basin are used to reconstruct the thermal evolution of western Tethyan surface waters during the Early Oxfordian-Early Kimmeridgian interval. Seventy eight oyster shells were carefully screened for potential diagenetic alteration using cathodoluminescence microscopy. Isotope analyses were performed on non-luminescent parts of shells (n = 264). Intra-shell δ18O variability was estimated by microsampling along a transect perpendicular to the growth lines of the largest oyster shell. The sinusoidal distribution of the δ18O values along this transect and the dependence of the amplitude of variations with bathymetry suggest that intra-shell variability reflects seasonal variations of temperature and/or salinity. Average amplitudes of about 5 °C in shallow water environments and of about 2-3 °C in deeper offshore environments are calculated. These amplitudes reflect minimum seasonal temperature variation. Our new data allow to constrain existing paleotemperature trends established from fish tooth and belemnite δ18O data and are in better agreement with paleontological data. More specifically, a warming trend of about 3 °C is reconstructed for oceanic surface waters during the Early to Middle Oxfordian transition, with maximum temperatures reaching 24 °C in the transversarium Zone (late Middle Oxfordian). From the transversarium Zone to the bimmamatum Zone, a cooling of about 7 °C is indicated, whereas from the bimmamatum Zone, temperatures increased again by about 7 °C to reach 24 °C in average during the cymodoce Zone (Early Kimmeridgian).

  6. Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Pacific Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, M.; Ishihara, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the tectonic evolution of the Jurassic Pacific plate based on magnetic anomly lineations and abyssal hills. The Pacific plate is the largest oceanic plate on Earth. It was born as a microplate aroud the Izanagi-Farallon-Phoenix triple junction about 192 Ma, Early Jurassic [Nakanishi et al., 1992]. The size of the Pacific plate at 190 Ma was nearly half that of the present Easter or Juan Fernandez microplates in the East Pacific Rise [Martinez et at, 1991; Larson et al., 1992]. The plate boundary surrounding the Pacific plate from Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous involved the four triple junctions among Pacific, Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix plates. The major tectonic events as the formation of oceanic plateaus and microplates during the period occurred in the vicinity of the triple junctions [e.g., Nakanishi and Winterer, 1998; Nakanishi et al., 1999], implying that the study of the triple junctions is indispensable for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate. Previous studies indicate instability of the configuration of the triple junctions from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (155-125 Ma). On the other hand, the age of the birth of the Pacific plate was determined assuming that all triple junctions had kept their configurations for about 30 m.y. [Nakanishi et al., 1992] because of insufficient information of the tectonic history of the Pacific plate before Late Jurassic.Increase in the bathymetric and geomagnetic data over the past two decades enables us to reveal the tectonic evolution of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction before Late Jurassic. Our detailed identication of magnetic anomaly lineations exposes magnetic bights before anomaly M25. We found the curved abyssal hills originated near the triple junction, which trend is parallel to magnetic anomaly lineations. These results imply that the configuration of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction had been RRR before Late Jurassic.

  7. High-resolution carbon isotope records of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Early Jurassic) from North America and implications for the global drivers of the Toarcian carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Them, T. R.; Gill, B. C.; Caruthers, A. H.; Gröcke, D. R.; Tulsky, E. T.; Martindale, R. C.; Poulton, T. P.; Smith, P. L.

    2017-02-01

    The Mesozoic Era experienced several instances of abrupt environmental change that are associated with instabilities in the climate, reorganizations of the global carbon cycle, and elevated extinction rates. Often during these perturbations, oxygen-deficient conditions developed in the oceans resulting in the widespread deposition of organic-rich sediments - these events are referred to as Oceanic Anoxic Events or OAEs. Such events have been linked to massive injections of greenhouse gases into the ocean-atmosphere system by transient episodes of voluminous volcanism and the destabilization of methane clathrates within marine environments. Nevertheless, uncertainty surrounds the specific environmental drivers and feedbacks that occurred during the OAEs that caused perturbations in the carbon cycle; this is particularly true of the Early Jurassic Toarcian OAE (∼183.1 Ma). Here, we present biostratigraphically constrained carbon isotope data from western North America (Alberta and British Columbia, Canada) to better assess the global extent of the carbon cycle perturbations. We identify the large negative carbon isotope excursion associated with the OAE along with high-frequency oscillations and steps within the onset of this excursion. We propose that these high-frequency carbon isotope excursions reflect changes to the global carbon cycle and also that they are related to the production and release of greenhouse gases from terrestrial environments on astronomical timescales. Furthermore, increased terrestrial methanogenesis should be considered an important climatic feedback during Ocean Anoxic Events and other similar events in Earth history after the proliferation of land plants.

  8. Mesozoic units in SE Rhodope (Bulgaria): new structural and petrologic data and geodynamic implications for the Early Jurassic to Mid-Cretaceous evolution of the Vardar ocean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonev, N.; Stampfli, G.

    2003-04-01

    . Immobile trace element discrimination of both rock types constrains the volcanic (oceanic)-arc origin. They generally show low total REE concentrations (LREE>HREE) with enrichment of LIL elements relative to the HFS elements, and also very low Nb and relatively high Ce content consistent with an island-arc tectonic setting. We consider that the Meliata-Maliac ocean northern passive margin could be the source provenance for the Upper Permian clastics and Middle-Upper Triassic limestone blocks within the olistostromic melange-like unit, whereas turbidites and magmatic blocks may originate in an island arc-accretionary complex that relates to the southward subduction of the Maliac ocean under the supra-subduction back-arc Vardar ocean/island arc system. These new structural and petrologic data allow to precise the tectonic setting of the Mesozoic units and their geodynamic context in the frame of the Early Jurassic to Late Cretaceous evolution of the Vardar ocean.

  9. Jurassic Amber in Lebanon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dany AZAR; Raymond G(E)ZE; Antoine EL-SAMRANI; Jacqueline MAALOULY; André NEL

    2010-01-01

    Reports of amber predating the Lower Cretaceous are unusual and scarce; they mostly refer to amber pieces of millimetric dimension.In the present study,we report the discovery of 10 new outcrops of Jurassic amber in Lebanon.Some of these had large centimetric-sized pieces of amber.The new localities are described,amber is characterized,and its infrared spectra given.Although the new Jurassic amber yielded to date no more than fungal inclusions,this material is significant and promising.The discovery of several Jurassic outcrops provides crucial information on the prevailing paleoenvironment of that time.

  10. A new sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of Patagonia and the origin and evolution of the sauropod-type sacrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Pol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The origin of sauropod dinosaurs is one of the major landmarks of dinosaur evolution but is still poorly understood. This drastic transformation involved major skeletal modifications, including a shift from the small and gracile condition of primitive sauropodomorphs to the gigantic and quadrupedal condition of sauropods. Recent findings in the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic of Gondwana provide critical evidence to understand the origin and early evolution of sauropods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new sauropodomorph dinosaur, Leonerasaurus taquetrensis gen. et sp. nov., is described from the Las Leoneras Formation of Central Patagonia (Argentina. The new taxon is diagnosed by the presence of anterior unserrated teeth with a low spoon-shaped crown, amphicoelous and acamerate vertebral centra, four sacral vertebrae, and humeral deltopectoral crest low and medially deflected along its distal half. The phylogenetic analysis depicts Leonerasaurus as one of the closest outgroups of Sauropoda, being the sister taxon of a clade of large bodied taxa composed of Melanorosaurus and Sauropoda. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dental and postcranial anatomy of Leonerasaurus supports its close affinities with basal sauropods. Despite the small size and plesiomorphic skeletal anatomy of Leonerasaurus, the four vertebrae that compose its sacrum resemble that of the large-bodied primitive sauropods. This shows that the appearance of the sauropod-type of sacrum predated the marked increase in body size that characterizes the origins of sauropods, rejecting a causal explanation and evolutionary linkage between this sacral configuration and body size. Alternative phylogenetic placements of Leonerasaurus as a basal anchisaurian imply a convergent acquisition of the sauropod-type sacrum in the new small-bodied taxon, also rejecting an evolutionary dependence of sacral configuration and body size in sauropodomorphs. This and other recent discoveries are

  11. The significance of an Early Jurassic (Toarcian) carbon-isotope excursion in Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands), British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruthers, Andrew H.; Gröcke, Darren R.; Smith, Paul L.

    2011-07-01

    During the Early Toarcian there was a significant disruption in the short-term active carbon reservoir as revealed by carbon-isotope records, which show a broad positive shift that is interrupted by a large 5-7‰ negative excursion (δ 13C org). Carbon-isotope excursion co-occurs with the deposition of organic-rich shales in many areas. This perturbation in carbon isotopes is thought to be indicative of severe climate change and marine anoxia. The two leading hypotheses as to the cause of this event invoke either global or regional controls. Here we present carbon-isotope data from Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada showing a significant perturbation within a temporally constrained Early Toarcian succession that was deposited in the northeastern paleo-Pacific Ocean. These data reinforce the concept that the short-term active carbon reservoir was affected globally, and assist with the correlation of ammonite zonal schemes between western North America and Europe. The δ 13C org data show a broad positive shift that is interrupted by a sharp and pronounced negative excursion of 7‰ (8.5‰ in δ 13C wood) in the Early Toarcian Kanense Zone. This negative excursion also coincides with increasing total organic carbon (TOC) from ~ 0.4% to ~ 1.2%. These data suggest that the Early Toarcian carbon-isotope perturbation was indeed global and imprinted itself on all active global reservoirs of the exchangeable carbon cycle (deep marine, shallow marine, atmospheric).

  12. The influence of climate on early and burial diagenesis of Triassic and Jurassic sandstones from the Norwegian – Danish Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kjøller, Claus

    2017-01-01

    the humid climate, kaolinite precipitated due to leaching of feldspar and mica, and the abundant organic matter caused reducing conditions, which led to other Fe-rich phases, i.e. pyrite, Fe-chlorite and siderite. The inherited early diagenetic pore fluids and mineral assemblage also affect the mineral...

  13. The influence of climate on early and burial diagenesis of Triassic and Jurassic sandstones from the Norwegian – Danish Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kjøller, Claus

    2017-01-01

    to the Gassum Formation, which was characterized by quartz and more stable heavy minerals. The arid to semi-arid climate led to early oxidising conditions under which abundant iron-oxide/hydroxide coatings formed, while the evaporative processes occasionally resulted in caliche and gypsum precipitation. Under...... and geochemical study complemented by porosity and permeability measurements of cores widely distributed in the basin (1700 – 5900 m burial depth). The Skagerrak Formation had an immature composition with more abundant feldspar, rock fragments and a larger variability in the heavy mineral assemblage when compared...... the humid climate, kaolinite precipitated due to leaching of feldspar and mica, and the abundant organic matter caused reducing conditions, which led to other Fe-rich phases, i.e. pyrite, Fe-chlorite and siderite. The inherited early diagenetic pore fluids and mineral assemblage also affect the mineral...

  14. Climatic and palaeoceanographic changes during the Pliensbachian (Early Jurassic) inferred from clay mineralogy and stable isotope (C-O) geochemistry (NW Europe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougeault, Cédric; Pellenard, Pierre; Deconinck, Jean-François; Hesselbo, Stephen P.; Dommergues, Jean-Louis; Bruneau, Ludovic; Cocquerez, Théophile; Laffont, Rémi; Huret, Emilia; Thibault, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    The Early Jurassic was broadly a greenhouse climate period that was punctuated by short warm and cold climatic events, positive and negative excursions of carbon isotopes, and episodes of enhanced organic matter burial. Clay minerals from Pliensbachian sediments recovered from two boreholes in the Paris Basin, are used here as proxies of detrital supplies, runoff conditions, and palaeoceanographic changes. The combined use of these minerals with stable isotope data (C-O) from bulk carbonates and organic matter allows palaeoclimatic reconstructions to be refined for the Pliensbachian. Kaolinite/illite ratio is discussed as a reliable proxy of the hydrological cycle and runoff from landmasses. Three periods of enhanced runoff are recognised within the Pliensbachian. The first one at the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian transition shows a significant increase of kaolinite concomitant with the negative carbon isotope excursion at the so-called Sinemurian Pliensbachian Boundary Event (SPBE). The Early/Late Pliensbachian transition was also characterised by more humid conditions. This warm interval is associated with a major change in oceanic circulation during the Davoei Zone, likely triggered by sea-level rise; the newly created palaeogeography, notably the flooding of the London-Brabant Massif, allowed boreal detrital supplies, including kaolinite and chlorite, to be exported to the Paris Basin. The last event of enhanced runoff occurred during the late Pliensbachian (Subnodosus Subzone of the Margaritatus Zone), which occurred also during a warm period, favouring organic matter production and preservation. Our study highlights the major role of the London Brabant Massif in influencing oceanic circulation of the NW European area, as a topographic barrier (emerged lands) during periods of lowstand sea-level and its flooding during period of high sea-level. This massif was the unique source of smectite in the Paris Basin. Two episodes of smectite-rich sedimentation ('smectite

  15. Sauropod and theropod dinosaur tracks from the Upper Cretaceous of Mendoza (Argentina): Trackmakers and anatomical evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Riga, Bernardo Javier; Ortiz David, Leonardo Daniel; Tomaselli, María Belén; dos Anjos Candeiro, Carlos Roberto; Coria, Juan Pedro; Prámparo, Mercedes

    2015-08-01

    New findings of dinosaur ichnites from Agua del Choique section (Mendoza Province, Argentina) provides ichnological and anatomical information about the Cretaceous sauropods and theropods. Around 330 tracks distributed in six footprint levels were identified in this area, one of most important of South America. Two ichnocenoses are located in different paleoenvironmental contexts. In the Anacleto Formation (early Campanian) around 20 titanosaurian tracks were found in floodplain and ephemeral channel deposits. Herein, one pes track shows three claw impressions and this is congruent to two new titanosaur specimens recently discovered in Mendoza Province that have articulated and complete pedes. In this context, for the first time to titanosaurs, ichnological evidences are supported by skeletal elements. In the Loncoche Formation (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian) titanosaurian tracks of Titanopodus mendozensis are abundant (around 310 tracks) and were produced by titanosaurs that walked in a very wet substrate of tidally dominated deltas related with the first Atlantic transgression for northern Patagonia. In this facies association, three different trydactl tracks indicate the presence of small theropods (1-2 m long), expanding the knowledge about the faunistic components that lived in these marine marginal environments.

  16. Paleomagnetism of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous red beds from the Cardamom Mountains, southwestern Cambodia: Tectonic deformation of the Indochina Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, Yukiho; Zaman, Haider; Sotham, Sieng; Samuth, Yos; Sato, Eiichi; Ahn, Hyeon-Seon; Uno, Koji; Tsumura, Kosuke; Miki, Masako; Otofuji, Yo-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous red beds of the Phuquoc Formation were sampled at 33 sites from the Sihanoukville and Koah Kong areas of the Phuquoc-Kampot Som Basin, southwestern Cambodia. Two high-temperature remanent components with unblocking temperature ranging 650°-670 °C and 670-690 °C were identified. The magnetization direction for the former component (D = 5.2 °, I = 18.5 ° with α95 = 3.1 ° in situ) reveals a negative fold test that indicates a post-folding secondary nature. However, the latter component, carried by specular hematite, is recognized as a primary remanent magnetization. A tilt-corrected mean direction of D = 43.4 °, I = 31.9 ° (α95 = 3.6 °) was calculated for the primary component at 11 sites, corresponding to a paleopole of 47.7°N, 178.9°E (A95 = 3.6 °). When compared with the 130 Ma East Asian pole, a southward displacement of 6.0 ° ± 3.5 ° and a clockwise rotation of 33.1 ° ± 4.0 ° of the Phuquoc-Kampot Som Basin (as a part of the Indochina Block) with respect to East Asia were estimated. This estimate of the clockwise rotation is ∼15° larger than that of the Khorat Basin, which we attribute to dextral motion along the Wang Chao Fault since the mid-Oligocene. The comparison of the herein estimated clockwise rotation with the counter-clockwise rotation reported from the Da Lat area in Vietnam suggests the occurrence of a differential tectonic rotation in the southern tip of the Indochina Block. During the southward displacement of the Indochina Block, the non-rigid lithosphere under its southern tip moved heterogeneously, while the rigid lithosphere under the Khorat Basin moved homogeneously.

  17. Sedimentary paleoenvironment and fossil plants of the El freno formation (early jurassic in Las leñas valley, Neuquén basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lanés

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-marine Early Jurassic successions in Las Leñas valley and their paleofloristic fossil content have been known since late nineteenth century, though they are scarce in the bibliography. It led us to study the sedimentology and paleobotanical content of El Freno Formation outcrops in the surroundings of the Portezuelo and Peuquenes creeks, report the first finding of fossil plants there and interpret their taphonomic features and enclosing sedimentary environment. The studied section is a lensoidal, fining- and thinning-upwards, conglomerate and sandy succession, with carbonaceous plant impressions and silicified trunks. It records the evolution of a gravel braided fluvial system (with longitudinal and transverse bars, abandoned channels and strong topographic irregularities into a sand braided fluvial system (with transverse bars, overbank deposits and no evidence of lateral migration. Both flowed mainly towards the NNW and show a continuously increasing accommodation probably driven by a relative base level rise and regional sag or erosional lowering of the topography. Collected fossil plants include Dictyophylum (Dictyophylum sp., Goeppertella sp. and undetermined Equisetopsida. Goeppertella sp. is recorded for the first time in this unit. Equisetopsida would have thrived in semi-permanent water bodies on abandoned channels and Dipteridaceae, in well-drained zones of the channel belt above the permanent channel level. Conversely, the trees would have lived in higher and well-drained areas with well-developed soils, probably outside the channel belt. Based largely on lithostratigraphical considerations, the age of the studied deposits was limited to the Hettangian?-Middle Sinemurian without identifying hiatus inside the fluvial succession or between it and the overlain marine beds.

  18. Dinosaur ichnofauna of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous of the Paraná Basin (Brazil and Uruguay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francischini, H.; Dentzien–Dias, P. C.; Fernandes, M. A.; Schultz, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sedimentary layers are represented in the Brazilian Paraná Basin by the fluvio-aeolian Guará Formation and the Botucatu Formation palaeoerg, respectively, overlapped by the volcanic Serra Geral Formation. In Uruguay, the corresponding sedimentary units are named Batoví and Rivera Members (both from the Tacuarembó Formation), and the lava flows constitute the Arapey Formation (also in Paraná Basin). Despite the lack of body fossils in the mentioned Brazilian formations, Guará/Batoví dinosaur fauna is composed of theropod, ornithopod and wide-gauge sauropod tracks and isolated footprints, as well as theropod teeth. In turn, the Botucatu/Rivera dinosaur fauna is represented by theropod and ornithopod ichnofossils smaller than those from the underlying units. The analysis of these dinosaur ichnological records and comparisons with other global Mesozoic ichnofauna indicates that there is a size reduction in dinosaur fauna in the more arid Botucatu/Rivera environment, which is dominated by aeolian dunes. The absence of sauropod trackways in the Botucatu Sandstone fits with the increasingly arid conditions because it is difficult for heavy animals to walk on sandy dunes, as well as to obtain the required amount of food resources. This comparison between the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous dinosaur fauna in south Brazil and Uruguay demonstrates the influence of aridization on the size of animals occupying each habitat.

  19. Earliest records of theropod and mammal-like tetrapod footprints in the Upper Triassic of Sichuan Basin, China%四川盆地上三叠统最古老的兽脚类恐龙和似哺乳四足类动物足迹

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢立达; Hendrik KLEIN; Martin G.LOCKLEY; 王仕莉; 陈伟; 叶勇; 松川正树; 张建平

    2013-01-01

    Eubrontes-and Grallator-sized theropod footprints are known from two localities in the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation of the Sichuan Basin,southwest China.The larger footprints include a partial trackway with two successive pes imprints that were named as Pengxianpus cifengensis.Compared with robust Eubrontes,they have slender digits,less welldefined pad impressions and display a wider digit divarication similar to the theropod ichnotaxon Kayentapus from the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic.Presently,a synonymy of the latter cannot be proved conclusively and the ichnotaxon is retained here.For both footprints,some small areas preserve skin texture with polygonal scales,the clearest preservation is in a small area on the metatarsal-phalangeal pad Ⅳ of the second imprint.The smaller theropod footprints are also part of an incomplete trackway.They show a wide digit divarication similar to Kayentapus and Pengxianpus but they are here tentatively referred to theropod footprints indet.A peculiarity on the surface with Pengxianpus is the presence of small pes or manus imprints that can be assigned to mammal-like tetrapods somewhat similar to those known from Triassic-Jurassic strata of North America and southern Africa.This is the first report of mammal-like footprints in the Triassic of southeastern Asia.%四川盆地须家河组地层已发现了两处兽脚类恐龙足迹化石点,其大小分别与实雷龙足迹(Eubrontes)和跷脚龙足迹(Grallator)相仿.其中与实雷龙足迹大小相近的足迹包括了两个连续的后足迹,并构成行迹的一部分,已被命名为磁峰彭县足迹(Pengxianpus cifengensis).与粗壮的实雷龙足迹相比,彭县足迹有着较细长的脚趾、保存尚清晰的趾垫、较宽的趾间角,这些特征都与晚三叠世-早侏罗世的卡岩塔足迹(Kayentapus)相似.目前尚不能证明彭县足迹和卡岩塔足迹属于同物异名,彭县足迹仍然被保留.两个足迹的部分区域都保存有皮肤纹理和

  20. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Strength and Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In our first article on scaling in theropod dinosaurs, the longitudinal stress in the leg bones due to supporting the weight of the animal was studied and found not to control the dimensions of the femur. As a continuation of our study of elasticity in dinosaur bones, we now examine the transverse stress in the femur due to locomotion and find…

  1. Early and late lithification of aragonitic bivalve beds in the Purbeck Formation (upper jurassic-lower cretaceous) of Southern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shahat, Adam; West, Ian

    1983-05-01

    Beds of euryhaline bivalves alternating with shales constitute much of the middle Purbeck Formation. They originated on "tidal" flats at the western margin of an extensive brackish lagoon. When these shell beds are thin and enclosed in shale they are often still preserved as aragonite and are associated with "beef", fibrous calcite formed during compaction. In most cases, however, the shell debris has been converted by diagenesis into calcitic biosparrudite limestones. A compacted type has been lithified at a late stage, after deep burial. In this, pyrite is abundant and most of the shell aragonite has been replaced neomorphically by ferroan pseudopleochroic calcite. A contrasting uncompacted type of biosparrudite is characterised by bivalve fragments with micrite envelopes. Shells and former pores are occupied by non-ferroan sparry calcite cement, and there is little pyrite. These limestones frequently contain dinosaur footprints and originated in "supratidal" environments where they were cemented early, mainly in meteoric water. Once lithified they were unaffected by compaction. This uncompacted type indicates phases of mild uplift or halts in subsidence. These shell-bed lithologies, and also intermediate types described here, will probably be recognised in other lagoonal formations.

  2. Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous episodic development of the Bangong Meso-Tethyan subduction: Evidence from elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry of arc magmatic rocks, Gaize region, central Tibet, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Xiu; Li, Zhi-Wu; Yang, Wen-Guang; Zhu, Li-Dong; Jin, Xin; Zhou, Xiao-Yao; Tao, Gang; Zhang, Kai-Jun

    2017-03-01

    The Bangong Meso-Tethys plays a critical role in the development of the Tethyan realm and the initial elevation of the Tibetan Plateau. However, its precise subduction polarity, and history still remain unclear. In this study, we synthesize a report for the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous two-phase magmatic rocks in the Gaize region at the southern margin of the Qiangtang block located in central Tibet. These rocks formed during the Late Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous (161-142 Ma) and Early Cretaceous (128-106 Ma), peaking at 146 Ma and 118 Ma, respectively. The presence of inherited zircons indicates that an Archean component exists in sediments in the shallow Qiangtang crust, and has a complex tectonomagmatic history. Geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data show that the two-phase magmatic rocks exhibit characteristics of arc magmatism, which are rich in large-ion incompatible elements (LIIEs), but are strongly depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs). The Late Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous magmatic rocks mixed and mingled among mantle-derived mafic magmas, subduction-related sediments, or crustally-derived felsic melts and fluids, formed by a northward and steep subduction of the Bangong Meso-Tethys ocean crust. The magmatic gap at 142-128 Ma marks a flat subduction of the Meso-Tethys. The Early Cretaceous magmatism experienced a magma MASH (melting, assimilation, storage, and homogenization) process among mantle-derived mafic magmas, or crustally-derived felsic melts and fluids, as a result of the Meso-Tethys oceanic slab roll-back, which triggered simultaneous back-arc rifting along the southern Qiangtang block margin.

  3. The Chachil Limestone (Pliensbachian-earliest Toarcian) Neuquén Basin, Argentina: U-Pb age calibration and its significance on the Early Jurassic evolution of southwestern Gondwana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanza, H. A.; Mazzini, A.; Corfu, F.; Llambías, E. J.; Svensen, H.; Planke, S.; Galland, O.

    2013-03-01

    New radiometric U-Pb ages obtained on zircon crystals from Early Jurassic ash layers found within beds of the Chachil Limestone at its type locality in the Chachil depocentre (southern Neuquén Basin) confirm a Pliensbachian age (186.0 ± 0.4 Ma). Additionally, two ash layers found in limestone beds in Chacay Melehue at the Cordillera del Viento depocentre (central Neuquén Basin) gave Early Pliensbachian (185.7 ± 0.4 Ma) and earliest Toarcian (182.3 ± 0.4 Ma) U-Pb zircon ages. Based on these new datings and regional geological observations, we propose that the limestones cropping out at Chacay Melehue are correlatable with the Chachil Limestone. Recent data by other authors from limestones at Serrucho creek in the upper Puesto Araya Formation (Valenciana depocentre, southern Mendoza) reveal ages of 182.16 ± 0.6 Ma. Based on these new evidences, we consider the Chachil Limestone an important Early Jurassic stratigraphic marker, representing an almost instantaneous widespread flooding episode in western Gondwana. The unit marks the initiation in the Neuquén Basin of the Cuyo Group, followed by widespread black shale deposition. Accordingly, these limestones can be regarded as the natural seal of the Late Triassic -earliest Jurassic Precuyano Cycle, which represents the infill of halfgrabens and/or grabens related to a strong extensional regime. Paleontological evidence supports that during Pliensbachian-earliest Toarcian times these limestones were deposited in western Gondwana in marine warm water environments.

  4. Tooth loss and alveolar remodeling in Sinosaurus triassicus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Lower Jurassic strata of the Lufeng Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING LiDa; BELL Phil R; ROTHSCHILD Bruce M; RAN Hao; ZHANG JianPing; DONG ZhiMing; ZHANG Wei

    2013-01-01

    Pathological or traumatic loss of teeth often results in the resorption and remodeling of the affected alveoli in mammals.However,instances of alveolar remodeling in reptiles are rare.A remodeled alveolus in the maxilla of the Chinese theropod Sinosaurus (Lower Jurassic Lower Lufeng Formation) is the first confirmed example of such dental pathology in a dinosaur.Given the known relationship between feeding behavior and tooth damage in theropods (teeth with spalled enamel,tooth crowns embedded in bone) and the absence of dentary,maxillary,and premaxillary osteomyelitis,traumatic loss of a tooth is most likely the cause of alveolar remodeling.Based on the extent of remodeling,the injury and subsequent tooth loss were non-fatal in this individual.

  5. Contrasting styles of large-scale displacement of unconsolidated sand: examples from the early Jurassic Navajo Sandstone on the Colorado Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale soft-sediment deformation features in the Navajo Sandstone have been a topic of interest for nearly 40 years, ever since they were first explored as a criterion for discriminating between marine and continental processes in the depositional environment. For much of this time, evidence for large-scale sediment displacements was commonly attributed to processes of mass wasting. That is, gravity-driven movements of surficial sand. These slope failures were attributed to the inherent susceptibility of dune sand responding to environmental triggers such as earthquakes, floods, impacts, and the differential loading associated with dune topography. During the last decade, a new wave of research is focusing on the event significance of deformation features in more detail, revealing a broad diversity of large-scale deformation morphologies. This research has led to a better appreciation of subsurface dynamics in the early Jurassic deformation events recorded in the Navajo Sandstone, including the important role of intrastratal sediment flow. This report documents two illustrative examples of large-scale sediment displacements represented in extensive outcrops of the Navajo Sandstone along the Utah/Arizona border. Architectural relationships in these outcrops provide definitive constraints that enable the recognition of a large-scale sediment outflow, at one location, and an equally large-scale subsurface flow at the other. At both sites, evidence for associated processes of liquefaction appear at depths of at least 40 m below the original depositional surface, which is nearly an order of magnitude greater than has commonly been reported from modern settings. The surficial, mass flow feature displays attributes that are consistent with much smaller-scale sediment eruptions (sand volcanoes) that are often documented from modern earthquake zones, including the development of hydraulic pressure from localized, subsurface liquefaction and the subsequent escape of

  6. Exploring Jurassic Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Patricia E.; Wiley, Clyde

    1993-01-01

    Describes several student-tested activities built around "Jurassic Park." The activities feature students engaged in role-playing scenarios, investigative research projects, journal writing and communications skills activities, cooperative learning groups, and learning experiences that make use of reading skills and mathematical knowledge. (PR)

  7. Exploring Jurassic Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Patricia E.; Wiley, Clyde

    1993-01-01

    Describes several student-tested activities built around "Jurassic Park." The activities feature students engaged in role-playing scenarios, investigative research projects, journal writing and communications skills activities, cooperative learning groups, and learning experiences that make use of reading skills and mathematical knowledge. (PR)

  8. Taphonomy and paleoecology inferences of vertebrate ichnofossils from Guará Formation (Upper Jurassic), southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentzien-Dias, Paula C.; Schultz, Cesar L.; Bertoni-Machado, Cristina

    2008-03-01

    In southern Brazil, the eolian facies of the Guará Formation (Late Jurassic) reveal footprints and trackways of vertebrates (dinosaurs), as well as burrows made by small vertebrates. All the footprints and trackways are preserved in dunes and sand sheets. The footprints made in the sand sheets are not well preserved due to intense trampling and can be distinguished only by the deformation of the sandstone laminations. In some cases it is possible to see this deformation in plan and in section. Tracks of theropods, ornithopods and middle-sized sauropods are present. Two footprints preserved in the foreset of a paleodune permitted recognition of slide structures and identification of the trackmaker, a theropod. Burrows horizontally across the foresets were found at this same paleodune. Ribbons of massive sandstone - interpreted as the partial filling of the base of the burrows - covered by little blocks of stratified sandstone - suggest the collapse of the burrow roof inward. There are no body fossils in the Guará Formation, consequently the preservation of these tracks provides unique evidence of widespread dinosaurs activity in southern Brazil near the end of the Jurassic.

  9. Preliminary study on Late Triassic to Early Jurassic strata and floral variation in Hechuan region of Chongqing,southern Sichuan Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning TIAN; Yongdong WANG; Xiaoju YANG; Qing NI; Zikun JIANG

    2008-01-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction event is extensively known, however, the terrestrial response of this event is still poorly understood. Here we briefly report our preliminary results on the variation of floral diversity through the Triassic/Jurassic boundary deposits in the Tanba section of Hechuan region, Chongqing, southern China. It is recognized that the floral biodiversity of the Hechuan region shows a distinct change through the Triassic and Jurassic transition; and the floral diversity loss reaches up to 92 5% at species level. Meanwhile, in northeastern region of the Sichuan Basin, the floral diversity declines by about 50% across the T/J boundary at species level with a remarkable turnover of genera and species. The potential reasons and mechanisms that cause the floral diversity differentiation of the T/J boundary in the Sichuan Basin are briefly discussed in this note.

  10. An abelisauroid theropod dinosaur from the Turonian of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farke, Andrew A; Sertich, Joseph J W

    2013-01-01

    Geophysical evidence strongly supports the complete isolation of India and Madagascar (Indo-Madagascar) by ∼100 million years ago, though sparse terrestrial fossil records from these regions prior to ∼70 million years ago have limited insights into their biogeographic history during the Cretaceous. A new theropod dinosaur, Dahalokely tokana, from Turonian-aged (∼90 million years old) strata of northernmost Madagascar is represented by a partial axial column. Autapomorphies include a prominently convex prezygoepipophyseal lamina on cervical vertebrae and a divided infraprezygapophyseal fossa through the mid-dorsal region, among others. Phylogenetic analysis definitively recovers the species as an abelisauroid theropod and weakly as a noasaurid. Dahalokely is the only known dinosaur from the interval during which Indo-Madagascar likely existed as a distinct landmass, but more complete material is needed to evaluate whether or not it is more closely related to later abelisauroids of Indo-Madagascar or those known elsewhere in Gondwana.

  11. An abelisauroid theropod dinosaur from the Turonian of Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Farke

    Full Text Available Geophysical evidence strongly supports the complete isolation of India and Madagascar (Indo-Madagascar by ∼100 million years ago, though sparse terrestrial fossil records from these regions prior to ∼70 million years ago have limited insights into their biogeographic history during the Cretaceous. A new theropod dinosaur, Dahalokely tokana, from Turonian-aged (∼90 million years old strata of northernmost Madagascar is represented by a partial axial column. Autapomorphies include a prominently convex prezygoepipophyseal lamina on cervical vertebrae and a divided infraprezygapophyseal fossa through the mid-dorsal region, among others. Phylogenetic analysis definitively recovers the species as an abelisauroid theropod and weakly as a noasaurid. Dahalokely is the only known dinosaur from the interval during which Indo-Madagascar likely existed as a distinct landmass, but more complete material is needed to evaluate whether or not it is more closely related to later abelisauroids of Indo-Madagascar or those known elsewhere in Gondwana.

  12. A theropod tooth from the Late Triassic of southern Africa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanghamitra Ray; Anusuya Chinsamy

    2002-06-01

    An isolated, large recurved and finely serrated tooth found associated with the prosauropod Euskelosaurus from the Late Triassic part of the Elliot Formation is described here. It is compared to the Triassic thecodonts and carnivorous dinosaurs and its possible affinity is discussed. The tooth possibly belongs to a basal theropod and shows some features similar to the allosauroids. This tooth is of significance, as dinosaur remains except for some footprints and trackways, are poorly known in the Late Triassic horizons of southern Africa.

  13. Temporal patterns in disparity and diversity of the Jurassic ammonoids of southern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Simon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A morphometric analysis of the characteristic whorl cross-sections of 1,200 Jurassic ammonoid species from southern Germany enabled us to characterise their morphospace. The successive Jurassic ammonoid faunas of southern Germany show characteristic patterns in morphospace occupation. While Early and Middle Jurassic ammonoids occupy limited areas of the morphospace range, the Late Jurassic ammonoids cover the entire spectrum. The ammonoids are characterised by an overall increase of both taxonomic diversity and morphological disparity in the course of the Jurassic. Strong fluctuations occur until the middle Late Jurassic, followed by a diversity decrease in the early Kimmeridgian and a disparity reduction in the early Tithonian. While diversity and disparity show similar progression during most of the Early Jurassic, they diverge subsequently and show only poor correlation until the end of the Jurassic. Particularly in the Middle Jurassic diversity and sea level changes correlate strongly. Neither temporal patterns in diversity nor disparity support the hypothesis of a mass extinction event in the early Toarcian. Significant changes in diversity and disparity in the early Callovian support a putative migration event of Boreal ammonoids into the Tethyan realm. doi:10.1002/mmng.201000016

  14. Organic Geochemistry of the Early Jurassic Oil Shale from the Shuanghu Area in Northern Tibet and the Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lan; YI Haisheng; HU Ruizhong; ZHONG Hong; ZOU Yanrong

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents new geological and geochemical data from the Shuanghu area in northern Tibet, which recorded the Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. The stratigraphic succession in the Shuanghu area consists mostly of grey to dark-colored alternating oil shales, marls and mudstones. Ammonite beds are found at the top of the Shuanghu oil shale section, which are principally of early Toarcian age, roughly within the Harplocearasfalciferrum Zone. Therefore,the oil shale strata at Shuanghu can be correlated with early Toarcian black shales distributing extensively in the European epicontinental seas that contain the records of an Oceanic Anoxic Event. Sedimentary organic matter of laminated shale anomalously rich in organic carbon across the Shuanghu area is characterized by high organic carbon contents, ranging from 1.8 % to 26.1%. The carbon isotope curve displays the δ13C values of the kerogen (δ 13Ckerogen) fluctuating from -26.22to -23.53‰ PDB with a positive excursion close to 2.17‰, which, albeit significantly smaller, may also have been associated with other Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) in Europe. The organic atomic C/N ratios range between 6 and 43, and the curve of C/N ratios is consistent with that of the δ13Ckerogen values. The biological assemblage,characterized by scarcity of benthic organisms and bloom of calcareous nannofossils (coccoliths), reveals high biological productivity in the surface water and an unfavorable environment for the benthic fauna in the bottom water during the Oceanic Anoxic Event. On the basis of organic geochemistry and characteristics of the biological assemblage, this study suggests that the carbon-isotope excursion is caused by the changes of sea level and productivity, and that the black shale deposition, especially oil shales, is related to the bloom and high productivity of coccoliths.

  15. SICILIAN JURASSIC PHYSIOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGIC REALMS (ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BENEDETTO ABATE

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Two tectono-sedimentary domains, which were deformed during the Neogene and evolved into two large structural sectors, characterize the Sicilian Jurassic: the Maghrebides and Peloritani. Africa margin sediments, passing downward to Triassic successions and perhaps originally to Paleozoic deposits, characterize the former. The latter belongs to the European "Calabrian Arc", where the Jurassic transgressively rests on a continental substrate (i.e. the crystalline Variscan basement. These domains are characterized by four sedimentary facies: shallow platform-derived limestones; condensed seamount-type red limestones; nodular limestones with ammonites; deep radiolarites and shales. These facies are illustrated in a dozen of stratigraphic logs. The drowning of most Triassic-Liassic carbonate platforms or ramps and the deepening of adjacent basins came with inferred Jurassic strike-slip tectonics, connected to the relative movement of Africa (Gondwanan part vs Europe (Laurasian part; the same strike-slip tectonics may have caused scattered intraplate volcanic seamounts found in Maghrebides. During the Jurassic the Maghrebide realm was characterized by the interfingering of basins and carbonate platforms. During the Early and Middle Liassic, carbonate platforms and ramps were dominant. Since Toarcian either radiolarites in some basins or Ammonite-bearing calcareous muds developed with intervening basaltic flows, and were accompanied by condensed pelagic carbonates on the ensialic seamount-type highs. The Peloritani realm displays similar characteristics, but with later transgression on the basement, several strike-slip basins and without any volcanoes.

  16. The first definitive Asian spinosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the early cretaceous of Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Ronan; Xaisanavong, Tiengkham; Richir, Philippe; Khentavong, Bounsou

    2012-05-01

    Spinosaurids are among the largest and most specialized carnivorous dinosaurs. The morphology of their crocodile-like skull, stomach contents, and oxygen isotopic composition of the bones suggest they had a predominantly piscivorous diet. Even if close relationships between spinosaurids and Middle Jurassic megalosaurs seem well established, very little is known about the transition from a generalized large basal tetanuran to the specialized morphology of spinosaurids. Spinosaurid remains were previously known from the Early to Late Cretaceous of North Africa, Europe, and South America. Here, we report the discovery of a new spinosaurid theropod from the late Early Cretaceous Savannakhet Basin in Laos, which is distinguished by an autapomorphic sinusoidal dorsosacral sail. This new taxon, Ichthyovenator laosensis gen. et sp. nov., includes well-preserved and partially articulated postcranial remains. Although possible spinosaurid teeth have been reported from various Early Cretaceous localities in Asia, the new taxon I. laosensis is the first definite record of Spinosauridae from Asia. Cladistic analysis identifies Ichthyovenator as a member of the sub-clade Baryonychinae and suggests a widespread distribution of this clade at the end of the Early Cretaceous. Chilantaisaurus tashouikensis from the Cretaceous of Inner Mongolia, and an ungual phalanx from the Upper Jurassic of Colorado are also referred to spinosaurids, extending both the stratigraphical and geographical range of this clade.

  17. Sequence of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous magmatic-hydrothermal events in the Xiong'ershan region, Central China: An overview with new zircon U-Pb geochronology data on quartz porphyries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jun; Gong, Qingjie; Wang, Changming; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; Santosh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations have revealed several large Au and Mo deposits in the Xiong'ershan region, Central China. Most quartz porphyries associated with the mineralization occur as dikes and apophyses, or as rubbles cemented in mineralized breccia pipes. Three types of quartz porphyries were sampled from the Leimengou Mo deposit, the Qiyugou Au deposit, and the Niutougou Au deposit. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb analysis was performed in zircons from two quartz porphyries; the results yielded ages of 125.4 ± 0.77 Ma for Leimengou Mo deposit and 150.1 ± 1.1 Ma for Qiyugou Au deposit. The magma source of Leimengou quartz porphyry is similar to that of the mineralized cementing material in breccia pipes of the Qiyugou Au deposit, whereas the magma source of Qiyugou quartz porphyry is the same as that of quartz porphyries in Niutougou Au deposit. Based on the new U-Pb isotopic ages of granitic plutons reported in this study, together with the age data in the literature, we identify distinct magmatic pulses in the Xiong'ershan region at ca.160, 150, 143, 133, 125, and 115 Ma during the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous. The ages of Au and Mo mineralization coincide with the thermal events at about 115, 125, 133, and 143 Ma are considered to be co-eval with granitic magmatism. No mineralization ages of 150 and 160 Ma thermal events have been previously reported. Our study demonstrates Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous multiple magmatic pulses and mineralization in the Xiong'ershan region.

  18. Geochronology and geochemistry of the Early Jurassic Yeba Formation volcanic rocks in southern Tibet: Initiation of back-arc rifting and crustal accretion in the southern Lhasa Terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Youqing; Zhao, Zhidan; Niu, Yaoling; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Liu, Dong; Wang, Qing; Hou, Zengqian; Mo, Xuanxue; Wei, Jiuchuan

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the geological history of the Lhasa Terrane prior to the India-Asia collision ( 55 ± 10 Ma) is essential for improved models of syn-collisional and post-collisional processes in the southern Lhasa Terrane. The Miocene ( 18-10 Ma) adakitic magmatism with economically significant porphyry-type mineralization has been interpreted as resulting from partial melting of the Jurassic juvenile crust, but how this juvenile crust was accreted remains poorly known. For this reason, we carried out a detailed study on the volcanic rocks of the Yeba Formation (YF) with the results offering insights into the ways in which the juvenile crust may be accreted in the southern Lhasa Terrane in the Jurassic. The YF volcanic rocks are compositionally bimodal, comprising basalt/basaltic andesite and dacite/rhyolite dated at 183-174 Ma. All these rocks have an arc-like signature with enriched large ion lithophile elements (LILEs; e.g., Rb, Ba and U) and light rare earth elements (LREEs) and depleted high field strength elements (HFSEs; e.g., Nb, Ta, Ti). They also have depleted whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic compositions, pointing to significant mantle isotopic contributions. Modeling results of trace elements and isotopes are most consistent with the basalts being derived from a mantle source metasomatized by varying enrichment of subduction components. The silicic volcanic rocks show the characteristics of transitional I-S type granites, and are best interpreted as resulting from re-melting of a mixed source of juvenile amphibole-rich lower crust with reworked crustal materials resembling metagraywackes. Importantly, our results indicate northward Neo-Tethyan seafloor subduction beneath the Lhasa Terrane with the YF volcanism being caused by the initiation of back-arc rifting. The back-arc setting is a likely site for juvenile crustal accretion in the southern Lhasa Terrane.

  19. Vertebral Adaptations to Large Body Size in Theropod Dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John P.; Woodruff, D. Cary; Gardner, Jacob D.; Flora, Holley M.; Horner, John R.; Organ, Chris L.

    2016-01-01

    Rugose projections on the anterior and posterior aspects of vertebral neural spines appear throughout Amniota and result from the mineralization of the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments via metaplasia, the process of permanent tissue-type transformation. In mammals, this metaplasia is generally pathological or stress induced, but is a normal part of development in some clades of birds. Such structures, though phylogenetically sporadic, appear throughout the fossil record of non-avian theropod dinosaurs, yet their physiological and adaptive significance has remained unexamined. Here we show novel histologic and phylogenetic evidence that neural spine projections were a physiological response to biomechanical stress in large-bodied theropod species. Metaplastic projections also appear to vary between immature and mature individuals of the same species, with immature animals either lacking them or exhibiting smaller projections, supporting the hypothesis that these structures develop through ontogeny as a result of increasing bending stress subjected to the spinal column. Metaplastic mineralization of spinal ligaments would likely affect the flexibility of the spinal column, increasing passive support for body weight. A stiff spinal column would also provide biomechanical support for the primary hip flexors and, therefore, may have played a role in locomotor efficiency and mobility in large-bodied species. This new association of interspinal ligament metaplasia in Theropoda with large body size contributes additional insight to our understanding of the diverse biomechanical coping mechanisms developed throughout Dinosauria, and stresses the significance of phylogenetic methods when testing for biological trends, evolutionary or not. PMID:27442509

  20. Vertebral Adaptations to Large Body Size in Theropod Dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Wilson

    Full Text Available Rugose projections on the anterior and posterior aspects of vertebral neural spines appear throughout Amniota and result from the mineralization of the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments via metaplasia, the process of permanent tissue-type transformation. In mammals, this metaplasia is generally pathological or stress induced, but is a normal part of development in some clades of birds. Such structures, though phylogenetically sporadic, appear throughout the fossil record of non-avian theropod dinosaurs, yet their physiological and adaptive significance has remained unexamined. Here we show novel histologic and phylogenetic evidence that neural spine projections were a physiological response to biomechanical stress in large-bodied theropod species. Metaplastic projections also appear to vary between immature and mature individuals of the same species, with immature animals either lacking them or exhibiting smaller projections, supporting the hypothesis that these structures develop through ontogeny as a result of increasing bending stress subjected to the spinal column. Metaplastic mineralization of spinal ligaments would likely affect the flexibility of the spinal column, increasing passive support for body weight. A stiff spinal column would also provide biomechanical support for the primary hip flexors and, therefore, may have played a role in locomotor efficiency and mobility in large-bodied species. This new association of interspinal ligament metaplasia in Theropoda with large body size contributes additional insight to our understanding of the diverse biomechanical coping mechanisms developed throughout Dinosauria, and stresses the significance of phylogenetic methods when testing for biological trends, evolutionary or not.

  1. Vertebral Adaptations to Large Body Size in Theropod Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John P; Woodruff, D Cary; Gardner, Jacob D; Flora, Holley M; Horner, John R; Organ, Chris L

    2016-01-01

    Rugose projections on the anterior and posterior aspects of vertebral neural spines appear throughout Amniota and result from the mineralization of the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments via metaplasia, the process of permanent tissue-type transformation. In mammals, this metaplasia is generally pathological or stress induced, but is a normal part of development in some clades of birds. Such structures, though phylogenetically sporadic, appear throughout the fossil record of non-avian theropod dinosaurs, yet their physiological and adaptive significance has remained unexamined. Here we show novel histologic and phylogenetic evidence that neural spine projections were a physiological response to biomechanical stress in large-bodied theropod species. Metaplastic projections also appear to vary between immature and mature individuals of the same species, with immature animals either lacking them or exhibiting smaller projections, supporting the hypothesis that these structures develop through ontogeny as a result of increasing bending stress subjected to the spinal column. Metaplastic mineralization of spinal ligaments would likely affect the flexibility of the spinal column, increasing passive support for body weight. A stiff spinal column would also provide biomechanical support for the primary hip flexors and, therefore, may have played a role in locomotor efficiency and mobility in large-bodied species. This new association of interspinal ligament metaplasia in Theropoda with large body size contributes additional insight to our understanding of the diverse biomechanical coping mechanisms developed throughout Dinosauria, and stresses the significance of phylogenetic methods when testing for biological trends, evolutionary or not.

  2. Feeding strategies as revealed by the section moduli of the humerus bones in bipedal theropod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott; Richards, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    The section modulus of a bone is a measure of its ability to resist bending torques. Carnivorous dinosaurs presumably had strong arm bones to hold struggling prey during hunting. Some theropods are believed to have become herbivorous and such animals would not have needed such strong arms. In this work, the section moduli of the humerus bones of bipedal theropod dinosaurs (from Microvenator celer to Tyrannosaurus rex) are studied to determine the maximum bending loads their arms could withstand. The results show that bending strength is not of uniform importance to these magnificent animals. The predatory theropods had strong arms for use in hunting. In contrast, the herbivorous dinosaurs had weaker arms.

  3. Transgression regression event element geochemistry records of southwestern Fujian in Late Triassic-Middle Jurassic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许中杰; 程日辉; 张莉; 王嘹亮

    2013-01-01

    Southwest Fujian area has experienced a large-scale transgression regression cycle in Late Triassic-Middle Jurassic and the maximum transgression has taken place in Early Jurassic. The migration and enrichment of geochemical element in the continuous fine-grained sediments in the basin recorded the paleosalinity and the paleodepth. The changes of paleosalinity and paleodepth indicate the sea(lake) level relative change in every period of Late Triassic-Middle Jurassic in southwestern Fujian. The relative change curve of sea(lake) level in southwestern Fujian is established based on the m value(m=100×w(MgO)/w(Al2 O3)) and the ratios of w(B)/w(Ga), w(Sr)/w(Ba) and w(Ca)/w(Mg). The curve indicates that level I sea-level relative change in southwestern Fujian is composed of the transgression in Late Triassic-Early Jurassic and the regression in the late period of Early Jurassic-Middle Jurassic. The level III sea-level relative change is frequent, which is composed by the lake level descent lake level rise lake level descent of Wenbin Shan formation in Late Triassic, the regression transgression regression of Lishan formation in Early Jurassic and the lake level rise lake level descent-lake level rise lake level descent of Zhangping formation in Middle Jurassic. The transgression regression cycle in southwestern Fujian is significantly controlled by the sea-level change in the north of South China Sea. The relative change curve trends of the level I sea-level in the north of South China Sea and the one in southwestern Fujian are the same. The maximum transgressions both occur in Early Jurassic. The level III sea-level curve reflects the fluctuation of a transgression and two regressions in the early period of Early Jurassic.

  4. The Early Jurassic sporo-pollen assemblages and paleoclimate of the central depression in the Junggar Basin%准噶尔盆地中央坳陷早侏罗世孢粉组合与古气候

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春雷; 尹凤娟; 樊婷婷

    2013-01-01

    通过显微镜观察鉴定了准噶尔盆地中央坳陷重点探井——征1井早侏罗世孢粉化石.认为准噶尔盆地征沙村地区早侏罗世孢粉组合划分为两个:产于八道湾组的Cyathidites-Cycadopites 孢粉组合和产于三工河组的Cyathidites-Classopollis孢粉组合.通过研究孢粉组分和母本植物的亲缘关系,得出准噶尔盆地中央坳陷早侏罗世植被主要由草本的真蕨植物和乔木、灌木的松柏类及银杏、苏铁类等组成,所反映古气候应属亚热带气候.%According to palynological assemblages from the analysis of sporo-pollen sample collected in drilling hole, sporo-pollen assemblages of the Zheng 1 well in the central depression in the Junggar Basin were recognized by observing and identifying under microscope. The Lower Jurassic in the Zhengshacun of Juggar Basin can be divided into two sporo-pollen assemblages: the Cyathidites-Cycadopites assemblage from the Badaowan Formation and Cyathidites-Classopollis assemblage from Sangonghe Formation. By researching the kinship between the sporo-pollen assemblages and vegetation types, it is concluded that the Early Jurassic consists mainly of herbaceous Filicinae and arbor, Coniferales and ginkgo belonged to bush and cycad,and indicates that the paleoclimate belongs to subtropical climate.

  5. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Upper Jurassic – Lower Cretaceous of the Danish Central Graben: structural framework and nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Japsen, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Danish Central Graben is part of the mainly Late Jurassic complex of grabens in the central and southern North Sea which form the Central Graben. The tectonic elements of the Danish Central Graben in the Late Jurassic are outlined and compared to those in the Early Cretaceous based on reduced versions of published maps (1:200 000, compiled on the basis of all 1994 public domain seismic and well data. The Tail End Graben, a half-graben which stretches for about 90 km along the East North Sea High, is the dominant Late Jurassic structural feature. The Rosa Basin (new name is a narrow, north-south-trending basin extending from the south-western part of the Tail End Graben. The Tail End Graben ceased to exist as a coherent structural element during the Early Cretaceous and developed into three separate depocentres: the Iris and Gulnare Basins to the north and the Roar Basin to the south (new names. The Early Cretaceous saw a shift from subsidence focused along the East North Sea High during the Late Jurassic to a more even distribution of minor basins within the Danish Central Graben. The depth to the top of the Upper Jurassic - lowermost Cretaceous Farsund Formation reaches a maximum of 4800 m in the northern part of the study area, while the depth to the base of the Upper Jurassic reaches 7500 m in the Tail End Graben, where the Upper Jurassic attains a maximum thickness of 3600 m. The Lower Cretaceous Cromer Knoll Group attains a maximum thickness of 1100 m in the Outer Rough Basin.

  6. Origin of marine petroleum source rocks from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Norwegian Greenland Seaway - evidence for stagnation and upwelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langrock, U.; Stein, R. [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Forty samples were selected from Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous black shales of IKU sites 6307/07-U-02 and 6814/04-U-02, located on the mid-Norwegian shelf, for a detailed maceral analysis. The penetrated rocks include the Spekk and Hekkingen Formations, which represent major potential petroleum source rocks in the region. It was our first objective to reveal the type of organic material that is responsible for the source rock potential of these sediments. The results suggest that black shale formation has occurred in two different paleoceanographic settings; (1) in a 'high-productive' and (2) an 'anoxic/stagnant' environment. This conclusion is supported by inorganic and sedimentological data. In addition, sedimentation rates (SR) from recent biostratigraphic and sedimentological work on these sequences gave impulse for using accumulation rates to estimate the original organic carbon flux to the sediment. Organic carbon accumulation rates are relatively low but similar to mid-Cretaceous black shales from other ocean areas (average 10-300 mg/cm{sup 2}/ka). Supported by redox-sensitive Re/Mo ratios, SR/TOC relationships, and paleoproductivity estimates we suggest that the formation and preservation of organic carbon during black shale formation in the Spekk Formation has followed largely the conditions of the 'stagnation model', whereas the Hekkingen Formation is likely one possible example for the 'productivity model'. (Author)

  7. Jurassic Park: Adventure in Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Marcia; Boteler, Trina

    1993-01-01

    Describes using the movie "Jurassic Park" as a foundation for a middle school interdisciplinary unit involving science, math, language arts, history, and geography. Suggested books and activities are presented. (PR)

  8. Jurassic Park: Adventure in Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Marcia; Boteler, Trina

    1993-01-01

    Describes using the movie "Jurassic Park" as a foundation for a middle school interdisciplinary unit involving science, math, language arts, history, and geography. Suggested books and activities are presented. (PR)

  9. Ascent of dinosaurs linked to an iridium anomaly at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, P E; Kent, D V; Sues, H-D; Koeberl, C; Huber, H; Montanari, A; Rainforth, E C; Fowell, S J; Szajna, M J; Hartline, B W

    2002-05-17

    Analysis of tetrapod footprints and skeletal material from more than 70 localities in eastern North America shows that large theropod dinosaurs appeared less than 10,000 years after the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and less than 30,000 years after the last Triassic taxa, synchronous with a terrestrial mass extinction. This extraordinary turnover is associated with an iridium anomaly (up to 285 parts per trillion, with an average maximum of 141 parts per trillion) and a fern spore spike, suggesting that a bolide impact was the cause. Eastern North American dinosaurian diversity reached a stable maximum less than 100,000 years after the boundary, marking the establishment of dinosaur-dominated communities that prevailed for the next 135 million years.

  10. Biomechanics (Communication arising): prey attack by a large theropod dinosaur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzetta, T H; Kardong, Kenneth V

    2002-03-28

    Prey-capture strategies in carnivorous dinosaurs have been inferred from the biomechanical features of their tooth structure, the estimated bite force produced, and their diet. Rayfield et al. have used finite-element analysis (FEA) to investigate such structure-function relationships in Allosaurus fragilis, and have found that the skull was designed to bear more stress than could be generated by simple biting. They conclude that this large theropod dinosaur delivered a chop-and-slash 'hatchet' blow to its prey, which it approached with its mouth wide open before driving its upper tooth row downwards. We argue that this mode of predation is unlikely, and that the FEA results, which relate to an 'overengineered' skull, are better explained by the biomechanical demands of prey capture. Understanding the mechanics of predation is important to our knowledge of the feeding habits of carnivorous dinosaurs and for accurate reconstruction their lifestyles.

  11. Geochemistry evidence for depositional settings and provenance of Jurassic argillaceous rocks of Jiyuan Basin, North China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yao Meng; Deshun Zheng; Minglong Li

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to discuss the depositional settings and provenances for the Jurassic in Jiyuan basin, North China, based on the rare earth element (REE) and trace element features of 16 Jurassic argillaceous rock samples from the Anyao, Yangshuzhuang and Ma’ao Formations, respectively. Generally, geochemical analysis results show that chondrite-normalised REE distribution patterns of all the three formations are characterised by light-REE (LREE) enrichment, moderately negative Eu anomalies, slightly negative Ce anomalies, and strong fractionation between LREE and heavy-REE (HREE). Trace element proxies V/(V+Ni), Ceanom index, Ce/La, Sr/Ba, and Sr/Cu indicate a weak oxidation–reduction environment, progressively decreasing reducibility and water depth from the bottom up during Jurassic in Jiyuan basin. Palaeoclimate varied from humid in the Early Jurassic to arid in the Middle Jurassic, corresponding with the variations of palaeoredox and palaeosalinity. The provenances of Jurassic rocks in Jiyuan basin are mainly from felsic sources related to active continental margin and continental island arc. The Early–Middle Jurassic (Anyao and Yangshuzhuang Formations) provenances are mainly derived from North Qinling and partially from the eroded recycled felsic sedimentary covers of Taihang Mountain. In the late stage of Middle Jurassic (Ma’ao Formation), Taihang Mountain has been the primary source to Jiyuan basin. We conclude that the Jurassic rocks of Jiyuan basin reveal the progressive uplift and denudation processes of the Taihang Mountain.

  12. Walking like dinosaurs: chickens with artificial tails provide clues about non-avian theropod locomotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Grossi

    Full Text Available Birds still share many traits with their dinosaur ancestors, making them the best living group to reconstruct certain aspects of non-avian theropod biology. Bipedal, digitigrade locomotion and parasagittal hindlimb movement are some of those inherited traits. Living birds, however, maintain an unusually crouched hindlimb posture and locomotion powered by knee flexion, in contrast to the inferred primitive condition of non-avian theropods: more upright posture and limb movement powered by femur retraction. Such functional differences, which are associated with a gradual, anterior shift of the centre of mass in theropods along the bird line, make the use of extant birds to study non-avian theropod locomotion problematic. Here we show that, by experimentally manipulating the location of the centre of mass in living birds, it is possible to recreate limb posture and kinematics inferred for extinct bipedal dinosaurs. Chickens raised wearing artificial tails, and consequently with more posteriorly located centre of mass, showed a more vertical orientation of the femur during standing and increased femoral displacement during locomotion. Our results support the hypothesis that gradual changes in the location of the centre of mass resulted in more crouched hindlimb postures and a shift from hip-driven to knee-driven limb movements through theropod evolution. This study suggests that, through careful experimental manipulations during the growth phase of ontogeny, extant birds can potentially be used to gain important insights into previously unexplored aspects of bipedal non-avian theropod locomotion.

  13. Walking like dinosaurs: chickens with artificial tails provide clues about non-avian theropod locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Bruno; Iriarte-Díaz, José; Larach, Omar; Canals, Mauricio; Vásquez, Rodrigo A

    2014-01-01

    Birds still share many traits with their dinosaur ancestors, making them the best living group to reconstruct certain aspects of non-avian theropod biology. Bipedal, digitigrade locomotion and parasagittal hindlimb movement are some of those inherited traits. Living birds, however, maintain an unusually crouched hindlimb posture and locomotion powered by knee flexion, in contrast to the inferred primitive condition of non-avian theropods: more upright posture and limb movement powered by femur retraction. Such functional differences, which are associated with a gradual, anterior shift of the centre of mass in theropods along the bird line, make the use of extant birds to study non-avian theropod locomotion problematic. Here we show that, by experimentally manipulating the location of the centre of mass in living birds, it is possible to recreate limb posture and kinematics inferred for extinct bipedal dinosaurs. Chickens raised wearing artificial tails, and consequently with more posteriorly located centre of mass, showed a more vertical orientation of the femur during standing and increased femoral displacement during locomotion. Our results support the hypothesis that gradual changes in the location of the centre of mass resulted in more crouched hindlimb postures and a shift from hip-driven to knee-driven limb movements through theropod evolution. This study suggests that, through careful experimental manipulations during the growth phase of ontogeny, extant birds can potentially be used to gain important insights into previously unexplored aspects of bipedal non-avian theropod locomotion.

  14. Pterodactylus scolopaciceps Meyer, 1860 (Pterosauria, Pterodactyloidea from the Upper Jurassic of Bavaria, Germany: the problem of cryptic pterosaur taxa in early ontogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven U Vidovic

    Full Text Available The taxonomy of the Late Jurassic pterodactyloid pterosaur Pterodactylus scolopaciceps Meyer, 1860 from the Solnhofen Limestone Formation of Bavaria, Germany is reviewed. Its nomenclatural history is long and complex, having been synonymised with both P. kochi (Wagner, 1837, and P. antiquus (Sömmerring, 1812. The majority of pterosaur species from the Solnhofen Limestone, including P. scolopaciceps are represented by juveniles. Consequently, specimens can appear remarkably similar due to juvenile characteristics detracting from taxonomic differences that are exaggerated in later ontogeny. Previous morphological and morphometric analyses have failed to separate species or even genera due to this problem, and as a result many species have been subsumed into a single taxon. A hypodigm for P. scolopaciceps, comprising of the holotype (BSP AS V 29 a/b and material Broili referred to the taxon is described. P. scolopaciceps is found to be a valid taxon, but placement within Pterodactylus is inappropriate. Consequently, the new genus Aerodactylus is erected to accommodate it. Aerodactylus can be diagnosed on account of a unique suite of characters including jaws containing 16 teeth per-jaw, per-side, which are more sparsely distributed caudally and terminate rostral to the nasoantorbital fenestra; dorsal surface of the skull is subtly depressed rostral of the cranial table; rostrum very elongate (RI = ∼7, terminating in a point; orbits correspondingly low and elongate; elongate cervical vertebrae (approximately three times the length of their width; wing-metacarpal elongate, but still shorter than the ulna and first wing-phalanx; and pteroid approximately 65% of the total length of the ulna, straight and extremely thin (less than one third the width of the ulna. A cladistic analysis demonstrates that Aerodactylus is distinct from Pterodactylus, but close to Cycnorhamphus Seeley, 1870, Ardeadactylus Bennett, 2013a and Aurorazhdarcho Frey, Meyer

  15. P-T-time evolution of the Mejillones Metamorphic Complex: Insights into Late Triassic to Early Jurassic orogenic processes in northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, M.; Massonne, H.-J.; Hervé, F.; Theye, T.

    2017-10-01

    Better constrained pressure-temperature (P-T) histories of metamorphic complexes along the Andean continental margin are important for understanding the late Paleozoic and Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the southwestern margin of Gondwana. The Mejillones Metamorphic Complex of the northern Chilean Coastal Cordillera is composed of two tectonic units, the Morro Mejillones and Morro Jorgiño blocks. These units are bound by the NW-trending Caleta Herradura fault and show distinctly metamorphic ages and thermal evolution. The Morro Mejillones block was metamorphosed at low pressure conditions (andalusite-sillimanite series) during the intrusion of tonalitic plutons at ca. 208 Ma, as indicated by available geochronological data. In contrast, the Morro Jorgiño block comprises amphibolite-facies schists, gneisses and foliated metabasites with characteristic garnet-bearing mineral assemblages. For garnet-bearing pelitic gneisses, a clockwise P-T path has been determined from pseudosection modelling in the MnNCKFMASHTO system. The proposed evolution is characterized by a pressure increase from 7.5 to 8.5 kbar at increasing temperatures from 585 to 615 °C. Decompression to 6 kbar followed, accompanied by heating to 630-640 °C. Electron microprobe Th-U-Pb in-situ dating of high-Y monazite grains yielded a weighted average age of ca. 190 ± 4 Ma, which is interpreted as the age of tectonic burial of metamorphic rocks of the Morro Jorgiño tectonic unit. We infer that the block was buried to 25 km depth through contractional deformation of the continental edge in a subduction zone, likely linked to the docking of the Mejillonia terrane. Rapid exhumation followed and the ensuing juxtaposition of both tectonic units was controlled by Jurassic transtensional activity of the Atacama Fault System.

  16. From Back-arc Drifting to Arc Accretion: the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Evolution of the Guerrero Terrane Recorded by a Major Provenance Change in Sandstones from the Sierra de los Cuarzos, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios Garcia, N. B.; Martini, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Guerrero terrane composed of Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous arc assemblages, were drifted from the North American continental mainland during lower Early Cretaceous spreading in the Arperos back arc basin, and subsequently accreted back to the continental margin in the late Aptian. Although the accretion of the Guerrero terrane represents one of the major tectonic processes that shaped the southern North American Pacific margin, the stratigraphic record related to such a regional event was not yet recognized in central Mexico. Due to the Sierra de los Cuarzos is located just 50 km east of the Guerrero terrane suture belt, its stratigraphic record should be highly sensitive to first order tectonic changes and would record a syn-tectonic deposits related to this major event. In that study area, were identified two main Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous clastic units. The Sierra de los Cuarzos formation represents the lowermost exposed stratigraphic record. Sedimentary structures, sandstones composition, and U-Pb detrital zircon ages document that the Sierra de los Cuarzos formation reflects a vigorous mass wasting along the margin of the North American continental mainland, representing the eastern side of the Arperos back arc basin. Sandstones of the Sierra de los Cuarzos formation are free from detrital contributions related to the Guerrero terrane juvenile sources, indicating that the Arperos Basin acted like an efficient sedimentological barrier that inhibited the influence of the arc massifs on the continental mainland deposits. The Sierra de los Cuarzos formation is overlain by submarine slope deposits of the Pelones formation, which mark a sudden change in the depositional conditions. Provenance analysis documents that sandstones from the Pelones formation were fed by the mafic to intermediate arc assemblages of the Guerrero terrane, as well as by quartz-rich sources of the continental mainland, suggesting that, by the time of deposition of the Pelones

  17. Jurassic domes in the North Sea - northern North Atlantic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surlyk, F. [Univ. of Copenhagen, Geological Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    The stratigraphic and tectonic evolution of the Jurassic of East Greenland, the Norwegian Shelf and the North Sea is remarkably similar. A major Middle Jurassic unconformity occurs in all three areas. In the North Sea it is commonly termed the `Mid-Cimmerian Unconformity` and is characterized by progressive truncation of the underlying section towards a centre at the triple junction between the Central Graben, Viking Graben and Moray Firth. Strata above the unconformity show a progressive Late Aalenian-Early Kimmeridgian onlap in the same direction. These relations have been interpreted as caused by Early Jurassic uplift and of a major thermal dome in the central North Sea, followed by Medial and Late Jurassic rifting, erosion, deflation and transgression of the dome. The East Greenland unconformity shows progressive truncation of underlying strata from south to north, and Bajocian to Callovian onlap in the same direction. The same pattern seems to be developed on the conjugate Norwegian margin. This suggests the possibility that the three unconformities have similar causes for their development. It is proposed that major rift domes formed in the Central North Sea and in the Greenland-Norway seaway in Early Jurassic times. The domes were eroded and gradually deflated during Medial Jurassic times and were finally submerged by the Late Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian. They were associated with volcanism and rifting which was delayed with respect to dome initiation. Roughly contemperaneous domes were present west of Britain, north of the Porcupine Seabight, and in Scania, southern Sweden, as reflected by development of asymmetrical unconformities showing progressive truncation of underlying strata, onlap of overlying Jurassic strata, and associated intrusive and extrusive volcanism. The domes are related to impingement of the heads of transient mantle plumes at the base of the lithosphere. The associated unconformities are thus of non-eustatic nature. Domal uplift and

  18. Trachyteuthis covacevichi n. sp., a Late Jurassic Palaeopacific coleoid cephalopod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fuchs

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A new early Oxfordian coleoid cephalopod, Trachyteuthis covacevichi n. sp., is described from northern Chile. It represents the first Late Jurassic Palaeopacific vampyropod and thus considerably extends the palaeogeographic distribution of trachyteuthids. In general, Tr. covacevichi n. sp. possesses a gladius typical for the genus, but wider than in other species. Similarities between Tr. covacevichi n. sp., Tr. palmeri from the Oxfordian of Cuba and Tr. sp. from the Kimmeridgian of Europe confirm a Caribbean Seaway between the Tethys and the Palaeopacific during Late Jurassic times. Morphologically, the wide gladius of Tr. covacevichi n. sp. supports a close phylogenetic relationship between Teudopsis and Trachyteuthis. doi:10.1002/mmng.200700012

  19. Torvosaurus gurneyi n. sp., the largest terrestrial predator from Europe, and a proposed terminology of the maxilla anatomy in nonavian theropods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Hendrickx

    Full Text Available The Lourinhã Formation (Kimmeridgian-Tithonian of Central West Portugal is well known for its diversified dinosaur fauna similar to that of the Morrison Formation of North America; both areas share dinosaur taxa including the top predator Torvosaurus, reported in Portugal. The material assigned to the Portuguese T. tanneri, consisting of a right maxilla and an incomplete caudal centrum, was briefly described in the literature and a thorough description of these bones is here given for the first time. A comparison with material referred to Torvosaurus tanneri allows us to highlight some important differences justifying the creation of a distinct Eastern species. Torvosaurus gurneyi n. sp. displays two autapomorphies among Megalosauroidea, a maxilla possessing fewer than eleven teeth and an interdental wall nearly coincidental with the lateral wall of the maxillary body. In addition, it differs from T. tanneri by a reduced number of maxillary teeth, the absence of interdental plates terminating ventrally by broad V-shaped points and falling short relative to the lateral maxillary wall, and the absence of a protuberant ridge on the anterior part of the medial shelf, posterior to the anteromedial process. T. gurneyi is the largest theropod from the Lourinhã Formation of Portugal and the largest land predator discovered in Europe hitherto. This taxon supports the mechanism of vicariance that occurred in the Iberian Meseta during the Late Jurassic when the proto-Atlantic was already well formed. A fragment of maxilla from the Lourinhã Formation referred to Torvosaurus sp. is ascribed to this new species, and several other bones, including a femur, a tibia and embryonic material all from the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian of Portugal, are tentatively assigned to T. gurneyi. A standard terminology and notation of the theropod maxilla is also proposed and a record of the Torvosaurus material from Portugal is given.

  20. Torvosaurus gurneyi n. sp., the largest terrestrial predator from Europe, and a proposed terminology of the maxilla anatomy in nonavian theropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Christophe; Mateus, Octávio

    2014-01-01

    The Lourinhã Formation (Kimmeridgian-Tithonian) of Central West Portugal is well known for its diversified dinosaur fauna similar to that of the Morrison Formation of North America; both areas share dinosaur taxa including the top predator Torvosaurus, reported in Portugal. The material assigned to the Portuguese T. tanneri, consisting of a right maxilla and an incomplete caudal centrum, was briefly described in the literature and a thorough description of these bones is here given for the first time. A comparison with material referred to Torvosaurus tanneri allows us to highlight some important differences justifying the creation of a distinct Eastern species. Torvosaurus gurneyi n. sp. displays two autapomorphies among Megalosauroidea, a maxilla possessing fewer than eleven teeth and an interdental wall nearly coincidental with the lateral wall of the maxillary body. In addition, it differs from T. tanneri by a reduced number of maxillary teeth, the absence of interdental plates terminating ventrally by broad V-shaped points and falling short relative to the lateral maxillary wall, and the absence of a protuberant ridge on the anterior part of the medial shelf, posterior to the anteromedial process. T. gurneyi is the largest theropod from the Lourinhã Formation of Portugal and the largest land predator discovered in Europe hitherto. This taxon supports the mechanism of vicariance that occurred in the Iberian Meseta during the Late Jurassic when the proto-Atlantic was already well formed. A fragment of maxilla from the Lourinhã Formation referred to Torvosaurus sp. is ascribed to this new species, and several other bones, including a femur, a tibia and embryonic material all from the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian of Portugal, are tentatively assigned to T. gurneyi. A standard terminology and notation of the theropod maxilla is also proposed and a record of the Torvosaurus material from Portugal is given.

  1. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Jurassic of the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herngreen, G.F. Waldemar

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A recent revision of the lithostratigraphy of the Netherlands has triggered an extensive re-evaluation of existing ideas on the Jurassic structural and depositional history. Significant advances can be attributed to the incorporation of sequence stratigraphic concepts. In the course of the Triassic and Jurassic, structural complexity increased progressively. The Jurassic sedimentary succession can be subdivided into three depositional megasequences. Megasequence I (Rhaetian- Aalenian reflects the period between the so-called early and mid-Cimmerian tectonic phases. Megasequence II (Aalenian - Middle Callovian covers the period of activity of the mid-Cimmerian phase. Megasequence III (Middle Callovian - Ryazanian corresponds with the period between the mid-Cimmerian and late Cimmerian phases (particularly after pulse II. In this latter megasequence, six stages (IIIa-f are recognised. Sediments deposited during the Rhaetian and Ryazanian bear a stronger affinity with the Jurassic succession than with Triassic and Cretaceous sediments respectively. These stages are thus treated here as an integral part of the Jurassic succession. During the Rhaetian-Bajocian the area subsided relatively uniformly. A sheet of predominantly fine-grained marine sediments of great lateral uniformity was deposited. During the Toarcian, in particular, basin circulation was largely restricted. The cooling that followed the thermal Central North Sea dome uplift triggered an important extensional phase during the Aalenian-Callovian. The rift phase resulted in the formation of several smaller basins, each with its own characteristic depositional succession. The basins fall into three structural provinces: the eastern province (Lower Saxony Basin, E-W-striking; the northern province (Central Graben, N-S-striking; and the southern-central system (Roer Valley Graben - Broad Fourteens, with a strong NW-SE strike. The mid-Cimmerian event started to affect the Dutch basins during

  2. New theropod and prosauropod ichnites from Issil-n-Aït Arbi (Lower Jurassic, Central High Atlas, Morocco)

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    El conjunto de afloramientos de 1AAR presenta huellas de dinosaurios bípedos y cuadrúpedos. Las huellas bípedas se han asociado a icnitas terópodas y prosaurópodas, mientras que las segundas se asocian a icnitas prosaurópodas. Cabe la posibilidad de que parte de las icnitas cuadrupedas sean saurópodas, pero la mala conservación y las condiciones de los afloramientos no permiten hacer observaciones directas ni apropiadas sobre ellas. En este trabajo se describen los caractere...

  3. Evidence for a Mid-Jurassic Adaptive Radiation in Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Roger A; Friedman, Matt; Lloyd, Graeme T; Benson, Roger B J

    2015-08-17

    A series of spectacular discoveries have transformed our understanding of Mesozoic mammals in recent years. These finds reveal hitherto-unsuspected ecomorphological diversity that suggests that mammals experienced a major adaptive radiation during the Middle to Late Jurassic. Patterns of mammalian macroevolution must be reinterpreted in light of these new discoveries, but only taxonomic diversity and limited aspects of morphological disparity have been quantified. We assess rates of morphological evolution and temporal patterns of disparity using large datasets of discrete characters. Rates of morphological evolution were significantly elevated prior to the Late Jurassic, with a pronounced peak occurring during the Early to Middle Jurassic. This intense burst of phenotypic innovation coincided with a stepwise increase in apparent long-term standing diversity and the attainment of maximum disparity, supporting a "short-fuse" model of early mammalian diversification. Rates then declined sharply, and remained significantly low until the end of the Mesozoic, even among therians. This supports the "long-fuse" model of diversification in Mesozoic therians. Our findings demonstrate that sustained morphological innovation in Triassic stem-group mammals culminated in a global adaptive radiation of crown-group members during the Early to Middle Jurassic.

  4. Advances in the study of vertebrate fossils of the Middle Jurassic Yanliao biota in western Liaoning Province and adjacent areas%辽宁西部及邻区中侏罗世燕辽生物群脊椎动物化石研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭相奇; 韩建刚; 姬书安

    2012-01-01

    近年来,在中国辽宁西部、内蒙古东南部、河北北部中侏罗世髫髻山组和九龙山组中发现了丰富的脊椎动物、无脊椎动物和植物化石,这一化石群被称为燕辽生物群.燕辽生物群已正式命名的脊椎动物26属28种,包括鱼类1属1种、两栖类4属4种、有鳞类1属1种、翼龙类10属12种、兽脚类恐龙5属5种、哺乳类5属5种.燕辽生物群的脊椎动物化石对研究长羽毛兽脚类恐龙的演化、翼龙类的分类演化、滑体两栖类的分异等具有重要意义.虽然辽宁西部及邻区燕辽生物群脊椎动物的多样性不及同一地区早白垩世的热河生物群,但它为认识这一地区晚中生代生物群的演替提供了极为重要的依据.%In recent years, numerous fossil vertebrates, invertebrates and plants have been found in the Middle Jurassic Tiaojishan and Jiulongshan Formations in western Liaoning, southeastern Inner Mongolia and northern Hebei. This biota is called Yanliao biota. Up till now, 28 species of different vertebrate groups have been formally named, which include 1 fish, 4 amphibians, 1 lizard, 12 pterosaurs, 5 theropods, and 5 mammals. The vertebrates of this biota have great significance for studying the theropod evolution, the pterosaur classification, and the lissamphibian diversity. Although the diversity of the Middle Jurassic Yanliao biota is less than that of the Early Cretaceous Jehol biota, it provides important evidence for understanding the succession of the Late Mesozoic biotas in this region.

  5. Final results on the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary in the Gresten Klippenbelt (Austria): Macro-, micro-, nannofossils, isotopes, geochemistry, susceptibility, gamma-log and palaeomagnetic data as environmental proxies of the early Penninic Ocean history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, A.; Halásová, E.; Kroh, A.; Mayrhofer, S.; Pruner, P.; Reháková, D.; Schnabl, P.; Sprovieri, M.

    2009-04-01

    Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous pelagic sediments are well known to form a major element of the northernmost tectonic units of the Gresten Klippenbelt (Lower Austria). The Penninic Ocean was a side tract of the Central Atlantic Oceanic System intercalated between the European and the Austroalpine plates. Its opening started during the Mid Jurrasic, as rifting of the of the oceanic crust between the European and the Austroalpine plates. The turnover of the deposition on the European shelf (Helvetic Zone) from deep-water siliciclastics into pelagic carbonates is correlated with the deepening of this newly arising ocean. Within the Gresten Klippenbelt Unit, this transition is reflected by the lithostratigraphic boundary between the Tithonian marl-limestone succession and the Berriasian limestones of the Blassenstein Formation. This boundary is well exposed in a newly discovered site at Nutzhof, in the heart of Lower Austria (Kroh and Lukeneder 2009, Lukeneder 2009, Pruner, Schnabl, and Lukeneder 2009, Reháková, Halásová and Lukeneder 2009). Biostratigraphy. According to microfossil (calcareous dinoflagellates, calpionellids) and palaeomagnetic data, the association indicates that the cephalopod-bearing beds of the Nutzhof section belong to the Carpistomiosphaera tithonica-Zone of the Early Tithonian up to the Calpionella Zone of the Middle Berriasian. This interval corresponds to the ammonoid zones from the Early Tithonian Hybonoticeras hybonotum-Zone up to the Middle Berriasian Subthurmannia occitanica-Zone. Ammonoids. Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous ammonoids were collected at the Nutzhof locality in the eastern part of the Gresten Klippenbelt in Lower Austria. The cephalopod fauna from the Blassenstein Formation, correlated with micro- and nannofossil data from the marly unit and the limestone unit, indicates Early Tithonian to Middle Berriasian age (Hybonoticeras hybonotum Zone up to the Subthurmannia occitanica Zone). According to the correlation of the fossil

  6. The evolution of cranial form and function in theropod dinosaurs: insights from geometric morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusatte, S L; Sakamoto, M; Montanari, S; Harcourt Smith, W E H

    2012-02-01

    Theropod dinosaurs, an iconic clade of fossil species including Tyrannosaurus and Velociraptor, developed a great diversity of body size, skull form and feeding habits over their 160+ million year evolutionary history. Here, we utilize geometric morphometrics to study broad patterns in theropod skull shape variation and compare the distribution of taxa in cranial morphospace (form) to both phylogeny and quantitative metrics of biting behaviour (function). We find that theropod skulls primarily differ in relative anteroposterior length and snout depth and to a lesser extent in orbit size and depth of the cheek region, and oviraptorosaurs deviate most strongly from the "typical" and ancestral theropod morphologies. Noncarnivorous taxa generally fall out in distinct regions of morphospace and exhibit greater overall disparity than carnivorous taxa, whereas large-bodied carnivores independently converge on the same region of morphospace. The distribution of taxa in morphospace is strongly correlated with phylogeny but only weakly correlated with functional biting behaviour. These results imply that phylogeny, not biting function, was the major determinant of theropod skull shape.

  7. Jurassic Tectonics of North China: A Synthetic View

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yueqiao; DONG Shuwen; ZHAO Yue; ZHANG Tian

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives a synthetic view on the Jurassic tectonics of North China, with an attempt to propose a framework for the stepwise tectonic evolution history. Jurassic sedimentation, deformation and magmatism in North China have been divided into three stages. The earliest Jurassic is marked by a period of magmatism quiescence (in 205-190 Ma) and regional uplift, which are considered to be the continuation of the "Indosinian movement" characterized by continent-continent collision between the North and South China blocks. The Early to Middle Jurassic (in 190-170 Ma) was predominated by weak lithospheric extension expressed by mantle-derived plutonism and volcanism along the Yanshan belt and alongside the Tan-Lu fault zone, normal faulting and graben formation along the Yinshan-Yanshan tectonic belt, depression and resuming of coal-bearing sedimentation in vast regions of the North China block (NCB). The Middle to Late Jurassic stage started at 165,.5 Ma and ended up before 136 Ma; it was dominated by intensive intraplate deformation resulting from multi-directional compressions. Two major deformation events have been identified. One is marked by stratigraphic unconformity beneath the thick Upper Jurassic molasic series in the foreland zones of the western Ordos thrust-fold belt and along the Yinshan-Yanshan belt; it was predated 160 Ma. The other one is indicated by stratigraphic unconformity at the base of the Lower Cretaceous and predated 135 Ma. During this last stage, two latitudinal tectonic belts, the Yinshan-Yanshan belt in the north and the Qinling-Dabie belt in the south, and the western margin of the Ordos basin were all activated by thrusting; the NCB itself was deformed by the NE to NNE-trending structural system involving thrusting, associated folding and sinistral strike-slip faulting, which were spatially partitioned. Foliated S-type granitic plutons aged 160-150 Ma were massively emplaced in the Jiao-Liao massif east of the Tan-Lu fault zone and

  8. Lower Jurassic palynostratigraphy of Eastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryacheva, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a palynological study of the natural outcrops of the Lower and Middle Jurassic on the Kelimyar River (Outcrops 5, 6, 7, 14, and 16) and two boreholes, Middle-Nakynskaya and Ygyata-Tyungskaya 1, in Eastern Siberia. The Ukugut, Tyung, Motorchuna, Suntar, Kyrin, and Kelimyar formations were studied. Six biostrata with dinocysts were established for the Upper Sinemurian-Toarcian. The analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of dinocysts in the sections allowed the identification of the stratigraphic ranges for important genera of dinocysts, which enabled the updating of the geochronology of some biostrata. Three main stages of the evolution of dinocysts in the Early Jurassic in the Siberian Paleobasin were characterized by the appearance, diversification, and disappearance of some orders of dinocysts at certain times. Seven biostrata (beds with characteristic palynoassemblages) were established for the upper Sinemurian-Toarcian on the basis of the study of the taxonomic composition of spores and pollen of land plants and successive changes in the composition of the palynospectra.

  9. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Terry A.; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E.

    2016-09-01

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers.

  10. Developmental and evolutionary novelty in the serrated teeth of theropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, K S; Reisz, R R; LeBlanc, A R H; Chang, R S; Lee, Y C; Chiang, C C; Huang, T; Evans, D C

    2015-07-28

    Tooth morphology and development can provide valuable insights into the feeding behaviour and evolution of extinct organisms. The teeth of Theropoda, the only clade of predominantly predatory dinosaurs, are characterized by ziphodonty, the presence of serrations (denticles) on their cutting edges. Known today only in varanid lizards, ziphodonty is much more pervasive in the fossil record. Here we present the first model for the development of ziphodont teeth in theropods through histological, SEM, and SR-FTIR analyses, revealing that structures previously hypothesized to prevent tooth breakage instead first evolved to shape and maintain the characteristic denticles through the life of the tooth. We show that this novel complex of dental morphology and tissues characterizes Theropoda, with the exception of species with modified feeding behaviours, suggesting that these characters are important for facilitating the hypercarnivorous diet of most theropods. This adaptation may have played an important role in the initial radiation and subsequent success of theropods as terrestrial apex predators.

  11. Feeding mechanics in spinosaurid theropods and extant crocodilians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Cuff

    Full Text Available A number of extant and extinct archosaurs evolved an elongate, narrow rostrum. This longirostrine condition has been associated with a diet comprising a higher proportion of fish and smaller prey items compared to taxa with broader, more robust snouts. The evolution of longirostrine morphology and a bulbous anterior rosette of premaxillary teeth also occurs in the spinosaurid theropod dinosaurs, leading to suggestions that at least some members of this clade also had a diet comprising a notable proportion of fish or other small vertebrates. Here we compare the rostral biomechanics of the spinosaurs Baryonyx walkeri and Spinosaurus c.f. S. aegyptiacus to three extant crocodilians: two longistrine taxa, the African slender-snouted crocodile Mecistops cataphractus and the Indian gharial Gavialis gangeticus; and the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis. Using computed tomography (CT data, the second moments of area and moments of inertia at successive transverse slices along the rostrum were calculated for each of the species. Size-independent results tested the biomechanical benefits of material distribution within the rostra. The two spinosaur rostra were both digitally reconstructed from CT data and compared against all three crocodilians. Results show that African slender-snouted crocodile skulls are more resistant to bending than an equivalent sized gharial. The alligator has the highest resistances to bending and torsion of the crocodiles for its size and greater than that of the spinosaurs. The spinosaur rostra possess similar resistance to bending and torsion despite their different morphologies. When size is accounted for, B. walkeri performs mechanically differently from the gharial, contradicting previous studies whereas Spinosaurus does not. Biomechanical data support known feeding ecology for both African slender-snouted crocodile and alligator, and suggest that the spinosaurs were not obligate piscivores with diet being

  12. Vertebrate fossils and trace fossils in Upper Jurassic-Lower cretaceous red beds in the Atacama region, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, C. M.; Suárez, M.

    Pterosaur, dinosaur, and crocodile bones are recorded here for the first time in Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous red beds in the Atacama region east of Copiapó, Chile. Trace fossils produced by vertebrate animals include the footprints of theropod dinosaurs and the depressions of sandstone laminae interpreted as burrows and foot impressions. The fossils occur in the 1500-meter-thick Quebrada Monardes Formation, which consists predominantly of the aeolian and alluvial deposits of a semi-arid terrestrial environment. Vertebrate fossils are very rare in Chile. Dinosaur bones and footprints have previously been recorded at only seven locations, and pterosaur remains at only one location. The newly discovered dinosaur bones are the oldest to be described in Chile.

  13. The first dinosaur tracksite from Xinjiang, NW China (Middle Jurassic Sanjianfang Formation, Turpan Basin)——a preliminary report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver WINGS; Rico SCHELLHORN; Heinrich MALLISON; Ben THUY; Wenhao WU; Ge SUN

    2007-01-01

    A new dinosaur tracksite was discovered in a steeply inclined sandstone layer of the Middle Jurassic Sanjianfang Formation in the Shanshan area of the Turpan Basin. The site is the first record of dinosaur footprints from Xinjiang Province in northwestern China. More than 150 tridactyl theropod dinosaur footprints are preserved as positive hyporeliefs on the lower bedding plane of a fine-grained sandstone body. Most of the footprints are isolated and appear to be randomly distributed. Some show well defined phalangeal pads, heels and rarely indistinct impressions of the distal part of the metatarsus. Two distinct morphotypes are present: a larger type with relatively broad pads shows similarities to Changpeipus and Megalosauripus, and a slightly smaller, slender and gracile type which is similar to Grallator, Eubrontes and Anchisauripus. In both morphotypes, digit III is the longest with a length between 11.4 and 33.6 cm. A single imprint shows prominent scratches, probably formed during slipping of the track maker.

  14. Jurassic sedimentary evolution of southern Junggar Basin:Implication for palaeoclimate changes in northern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Li Li; Xing-He Yu; Cheng-Peng Tan; Ronald Steel

    2014-01-01

    Junggar Basin, located in northern Xinjiang, presents continuous and multi-kilometer-thick strata of the Jurassic deposits. The Jurassic was entirely terrestrial lfuvial and lacustrine deltaic sedimentation. Eight outcrop sections across the Jurassic strata were meas-ured at a resolution of meters in southern Junggar Basin. Controlling factors of sedimentary evolution and palaeoclimate changes in Junggar Basin during the Jurassic were discussed based on lithology, fossils and tectonic setting. In the Early to Middle Jurassic, the warm and wide Tethys Sea generated a strong monsoonal circulation over the central Asian continent, and provided adequate moisture for Junggar Basin. Coal-bearing strata of the Badaowan, Sangonghe, and Xishanyao Formations were developed under warm and humid palaeocli-mate in Junggar Basin. In the late Middle Jurassic, Junggar Basin was in a semi-humid and semi-arid environment due to global warming event. Stratigraphy in the upper part of the Mid-dle Jurassic with less plant fossils became multicolor or reddish from dark color sediments. During the Late Jurassic, collision of Lhasa and Qiangtang Block obstructed monsoon from the Tethys Sea. A major change in climate from semi-humid and semi-arid to arid conditions took place, and reddish strata of the Upper Jurassic were developed across Junggar Basin.

  15. Jurassic sedimentary evolution of southern Junggar Basin:Implication for palaeoclimate changes in northern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Li; Li; Xing-He; Yu; Cheng-Peng; Tan; Ronald; Steel

    2014-01-01

    Junggar Basin,located in northern Xinjiang,presents continuous and multikilometer-thick strata of the Jurassic deposits.The Jurassic was entirely terrestrial fluvial and lacustrine deltaic sedimentation.Eight outcrop sections across the Jurassic strata were measured at a resolution of meters in southern Junggar Basin.Controlling factors of sedimentary evolution and palaeoclimate changes in Junggar Basin during the Jurassic were discussed based on lithology,fossils and tectonic setting.In the Early to Middle Jurassic,the warm and wide Tethys Sea generated a strong monsoonal circulation over the central Asian continent,and provided adequate moisture for Junggar Basin.Coal-bearing strata of the Badaowan,Sangonghe,and Xishanyao Formations were developed under warm and humid palaeoclimate in Junggar Basin.In the late Middle Jurassic,Junggar Basin was in a semi-humid and semi-arid environment due to global warming event.Stratigraphy in the upper part of the Middle Jurassic with less plant fossils became multicolor or reddish from dark color sediments.During the Late Jurassic,collision of Lhasa and Qiangtang Block obstructed monsoon from the Tethys Sea.A major change in climate from semi-humid and semi-arid to arid conditions took place,and reddish strata of the Upper Jurassic were developed across Junggar Basin.

  16. Jurassic sedimentary evolution of southern Junggar Basin: Implication for palaeoclimate changes in northern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Li Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Junggar Basin, located in northern Xinjiang, presents continuous and multikilometer-thick strata of the Jurassic deposits. The Jurassic was entirely terrestrial fluvial and lacustrine deltaic sedimentation. Eight outcrop sections across the Jurassic strata were measured at a resolution of meters in southern Junggar Basin. Controlling factors of sedimentary evolution and palaeoclimate changes in Junggar Basin during the Jurassic were discussed based on lithology, fossils and tectonic setting. In the Early to Middle Jurassic, the warm and wide Tethys Sea generated a strong monsoonal circulation over the central Asian continent, and provided adequate moisture for Junggar Basin. Coal-bearing strata of the Badaowan, Sangonghe, and Xishanyao Formations were developed under warm and humid palaeoclimate in Junggar Basin. In the late Middle Jurassic, Junggar Basin was in a semi-humid and semi-arid environment due to global warming event. Stratigraphy in the upper part of the Middle Jurassic with less plant fossils became multicolor or reddish from dark color sediments. During the Late Jurassic, collision of Lhasa and Qiangtang Block obstructed monsoon from the Tethys Sea. A major change in climate from semi-humid and semi-arid to arid conditions took place, and reddish strata of the Upper Jurassic were developed across Junggar Basin.

  17. The first euthemistid damsel-dragonfly from the Middle Jurassic of China (Odonata, Epiproctophora, Isophlebioptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinoeuthemis daohugouensis gen. et sp. n. is the first record of the isophlebiopteran family Euthemistidae from Middle Jurassic of northeast China, while previously this family was restricted to the early Late Jurassic Kazakhstan. This new finding allows us to emend the family diagnosis with hindwing characters. This new species shows a mixture of characters alternatively present in different genera of the two families Euthemistidae and Sphenophlebiidae.

  18. The palaeogeography of Sundaland and Wallacea since the Late Jurassic

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Hall

    2013-01-01

    The continental core of Southeast (SE) Asia, Sundaland, was assembled from Gondwana fragments by the Early Mesozoic. Continental blocks rifted from Australia in the Jurassic [South West (SW) Borneo, East Java-West Sulawesi-Sumba], and the Woyla intraoceanic arc of Sumatra, were added to Sundaland in the Cretaceous. These fragments probably included emergent areas and could have carried a terrestrial flora and fauna. Sarawak, the offshore Luconia-Dangerous Grounds areas, and Palawan include As...

  19. JURASSIC PALEOGEOGRAPHY OF THE PIENINY AND OUTER CARPATHIAN BASINS

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    JAN GOLONKA

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The Jurassic history of the Pieniny/Outer Carpathian basins reflects the evolution of the Circum-Tethyan area, especially its Alpine Tethys part. The Alpine Tethys that is Ligurian, Penninic Oceans and Pieniny/Magura Basin constitute the extension of the Central Atlantic system. The synrift stage lasted in the Pieniny/Magura Basin from late Early Jurassic to Tithonian (the Magura Unit constitutes the southernmost part of the Outer Flysch Carpathians. The Pieniny rift opened during Pliensbachian – Aalenian. The central Atlantic and Alpine Tethys went into a drifting stage during the Middle Jurassic. The Late Jurassic (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian history of the Pieniny/Magura Basin reflects strongest facial differentiation within sedimentary basin where mixed siliceous-carbonate sedimentation took place. Greatest deepening effect is indicated by widespread Oxfordian radiolarites, which occur in the all basinal successions, whereas the shallowest zone is completely devoid of siliceous intercalations at that time (sedimentation from Ammonitico Rosso facies up to coral reef limestone. The southern part of the North European Platform, north from the Pieniny/Magura realm, started to be rifted during Late Jurassic time and Silesian Basin in the Outer Western Carpathians and Sinaia Basin in the Eastern Carpathians, with black, mainly redeposited marls have been created. The outer sub-basins were differentiated during the latest (Hauterivian-Barremian phase of basinal development. The connection of Silesian Basin with Sinaia and Southern Carpathian Severin areas suggests the NW-SE direction of the basinal axis while the orientation of the Pieniny Klippen Belt/Magura Basin was SW-NE so, two Outer Carpathian perpendicular directions are possible within the basins. Major reorganization happened during the Tithonian-Berriasian time. It was reflected by both paleoceanographical and paleoclimatical changes. The Neo-Cimmerian tectonic events as well as main phase

  20. A large abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from Morocco and comments on the Cenomanian theropods from North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarenza, Alfio Alessandro; Cau, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We describe the partially preserved femur of a large-bodied theropod dinosaur from the Cenomanian "Kem Kem Compound Assemblage" (KKCA) of Morocco. The fossil is housed in the Museo Geologico e Paleontologico "Gaetano Giorgio Gemmellaro" in Palermo (Italy). The specimen is compared with the theropod fossil record from the KKCA and coeval assemblages from North Africa. The combination of a distally reclined head, a not prominent trochanteric shelf, distally placed lesser trochanter of stout, alariform shape, a stocky shaft with the fourth trochanter placed proximally, and rugose muscular insertion areas in the specimen distinguishes it from Carcharodontosaurus, Deltadromeus and Spinosaurus and supports referral to an abelisaurid. The estimated body size for the individual from which this femur was derived is comparable to Carnotaurus and Ekrixinatosaurus (up to 9 meters in length and 2 tons in body mass). This find confirms that abelisaurids had reached their largest body size in the "middle Cretaceous," and that large abelisaurids coexisted with other giant theropods in Africa. We review the taxonomic status of the theropods from the Cenomanian of North Africa, and provisionally restrict the Linnean binomina Carcharodontosaurus iguidensis and Spinosaurus aegyptiacus to the type specimens. Based on comparisons among the theropod records from the Aptian-Cenomanian of South America and Africa, a partial explanation for the so-called "Stromer's riddle" (namely, the coexistence of many large predatory dinosaurs in the "middle Cretaceous" record from North Africa) is offered in term of taphonomic artifacts among lineage records that were ecologically and environmentally non-overlapping. Although morphofunctional and stratigraphic evidence supports an ecological segregation between spinosaurids and the other lineages, the co-occurrence of abelisaurids and carcharodontosaurids, two groups showing several craniodental convergences that suggest direct resource competition

  1. A large abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda from Morocco and comments on the Cenomanian theropods from North Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfio Alessandro Chiarenza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the partially preserved femur of a large-bodied theropod dinosaur from the Cenomanian “Kem Kem Compound Assemblage” (KKCA of Morocco. The fossil is housed in the Museo Geologico e Paleontologico “Gaetano Giorgio Gemmellaro” in Palermo (Italy. The specimen is compared with the theropod fossil record from the KKCA and coeval assemblages from North Africa. The combination of a distally reclined head, a not prominent trochanteric shelf, distally placed lesser trochanter of stout, alariform shape, a stocky shaft with the fourth trochanter placed proximally, and rugose muscular insertion areas in the specimen distinguishes it from Carcharodontosaurus, Deltadromeus and Spinosaurus and supports referral to an abelisaurid. The estimated body size for the individual from which this femur was derived is comparable to Carnotaurus and Ekrixinatosaurus (up to 9 meters in length and 2 tons in body mass. This find confirms that abelisaurids had reached their largest body size in the “middle Cretaceous,” and that large abelisaurids coexisted with other giant theropods in Africa. We review the taxonomic status of the theropods from the Cenomanian of North Africa, and provisionally restrict the Linnean binomina Carcharodontosaurus iguidensis and Spinosaurus aegyptiacus to the type specimens. Based on comparisons among the theropod records from the Aptian-Cenomanian of South America and Africa, a partial explanation for the so-called “Stromer’s riddle” (namely, the coexistence of many large predatory dinosaurs in the “middle Cretaceous” record from North Africa is offered in term of taphonomic artifacts among lineage records that were ecologically and environmentally non-overlapping. Although morphofunctional and stratigraphic evidence supports an ecological segregation between spinosaurids and the other lineages, the co-occurrence of abelisaurids and carcharodontosaurids, two groups showing several craniodental convergences that

  2. A new basal bird from China with implications for morphological diversity in early birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2016-01-25

    The Chinese Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group is the second oldest fossil bird-bearing deposit, only surpassed by Archaeopteryx from the German Upper Jurassic Solnhofen Limestones. Here we report a new bird, Chongmingia zhengi gen. et sp. nov., from the Jehol Biota. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Chongmingia zhengi is basal to the dominant Mesozoic avian clades Enantiornithes and Ornithuromorpha, and represents a new basal avialan lineage. This new discovery adds to our knowledge regarding the phylogenetic differentiation and morphological diversity in early avian evolution. The furcula of Chongmingia is rigid (reducing its efficiency), consequently requiring more power for flight. However, the elongated forelimb and the large deltopectoral crest on the humerus might indicate that the power was available. The unique combination of features present in this species demonstrates that numerous evolutionary experimentations took place in the early evolution of powered flight. The occurrence of gastroliths further confirms that herbivory was common among basal birds. The Jehol birds faced competition with pterosaurs, and occupied sympatric habitats with non-avian theropods, some of which consumed birds. Thus, avialan herbivory may have reduced ecological competition from carnivorous close relatives and other volant vertebrates early in their evolutionary history.

  3. Occurrence of sauropod dinosaur tracks in the Upper Jurassic of Chile (redescription of Iguanodonichnus frenki)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Karen; Benton, Michael J.

    2005-12-01

    New observations from the only studied Upper Jurassic dinosaur unit in South America, the Baños del Flaco Formation, Chile, are presented herein. The original description of the ichnospecies Iguanodonichnus frenki contains several mistakes and information that needs updating. Therefore, we provide a redescription, including new data collected in the field, that supports I. frenki as a sauropod in origin on the basis of the following features: step angles average less than 110°; pes prints intersect the trackway midline; pes prints are longer than wide, with the long axis rotated outward; the claw impression of digit I is prominent and directed forward; and claws on digits II, III, and IV are strongly reduced. These morphological characteristics might give clues about the pes morphology of the South American Jurassic sauropods, whose foot bone remains are scarce. The presence of this sauropod ichnospecies in the Late Jurassic agrees with Early-Middle Jurassic faunal associations in South America.

  4. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Shallow marine syn-rift sedimentation: Middle Jurassic Pelion Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland

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    Engkilde, Michael

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Jurassic Pelion Formation – Fossilbjerget Formation couplet of Jameson Land, East Greenland, is a well-exposed example of the Middle Jurassic inshore–offshore successions characteristicof the rifted seaways in the Northwest European – North Atlantic region. Early Jurassic deposition took place under relatively quiet tectonic conditions following Late Permian – earliest Triassic and Early Triassic rift phases and the Lower Jurassic stratal package shows an overall layer-cake geometry. A long-term extensional phase was initiated in Middle Jurassic (Late Bajocian time, culminated in the Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian–Volgian, and petered out in the earliest Cretaceous (Valanginian. The Upper Bajocian – Middle Callovian early-rift succession comprises shallow marine sandstones of the Pelion Formation and correlative offshore siltstones of theFossilbjerget Formation. Deposition was initiated by southwards progradation of shallow marine sands of the Pelion Formation in the Late Bajocian followed by major backstepping in Bathonian–Callovian times and drowning of the sandy depositional system in the Middle–Late Callovian. Six facies associations are recognised in the Pelion–Fossilbjerget couplet, representing estuarine, shoreface, offshore transition zone and offshore environments. The north–southtrendingaxis of the Jameson Land Basin had a low inclination, and deposition was sensitive to even small changes in relative sea level which caused the shorelines to advance or retreat over tens to several hundreds of kilometres. Eight composite sequences, termed P1–P8, are recognised and are subdivided into a total of 28 depositional sequences. The duration of the two orders of sequences was about 1–2 Ma and 360,000 years, respectively. The Upper Bajocian P1–2 sequencesinclude the most basinally positioned shallow marine sandstones, deposited during major sealevel lowstands. The lowstands were terminated by significant marine

  5. A Remarkable New Family of Jurassic Insects (Neuroptera) with Primitive Wing Venation and Its Phylogenetic Position in Neuropterida

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Yang; Vladimir N Makarkin; Winterton, Shaun L.; Khramov, Alexander V.; Dong Ren

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lacewings (insect order Neuroptera), known in the fossil record since the Early Permian, were most diverse in the Mesozoic. A dramatic variety of forms ranged in that time from large butterfly-like Kalligrammatidae to minute two-winged Dipteromantispidae. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the intriguing new neuropteran family Parakseneuridae fam. nov. with three new genera and 15 new species from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou (Inner Mongolia, China) and the Early/Middle Jurassic o...

  6. A basal tyrannosauroid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Clark, James M; Forster, Catherine A; Norell, Mark A; Erickson, Gregory M; Eberth, David A; Jia, Chengkai; Zhao, Qi

    2006-02-01

    The tyrannosauroid fossil record is mainly restricted to Cretaceous sediments of Laurasia, although some very fragmentary Jurassic specimens have been referred to this group. Here we report a new basal tyrannosauroid, Guanlong wucaii gen. et sp. nov., from the lower Upper Jurassic of the Junggar Basin, northwestern China. G. wucaii is the oldest known tyrannosauroid and shows several unexpectedly primitive pelvic features. Nevertheless, the limbs of G. wucaii share several features with derived coelurosaurs, and it possesses features shared by other coelurosaurian clades. This unusual combination of character states provides an insight into the poorly known early radiation of the Coelurosauria. Notably, the presumed predatory Guanlong has a large, fragile and highly pneumatic cranial crest that is among the most elaborate known in any non-avian dinosaur and could be comparable to some classical exaggerated ornamental traits among vertebrates.

  7. A mysterious giant ichthyosaur from the lowermost Jurassic of Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E. Martin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ichthyosaurs rapidly diversified and colonised a wide range of ecological niches during the Early and Middle Triassic period, but experienced a major decline in diversity near the end of the Triassic. Timing and causes of this demise and the subsequent rapid radiation of the diverse, but less disparate, parvipelvian ichthyosaurs are still unknown, notably because of inadequate sampling in strata of latest Triassic age. Here, we describe an exceptionally large radius from Lower Jurassic deposits at Penarth near Cardiff, south Wales (UK the morphology of which places it within the giant Triassic shastasaurids. A tentative total body size estimate, based on a regression analysis of various complete ichthyosaur skeletons, yields a value of 12–15 m. The specimen is substantially younger than any previously reported last known occurrences of shastasaurids and implies a Lazarus range in the lowermost Jurassic for this ichthyosaur morphotype.

  8. 冀西北尚义上侏罗统—下白垩统后城组恐龙足迹新发现及生物古地理意义%New discovery of dinosaur footprints in the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Houcheng Formation at Shangyi,northwestern Hebei Province and its biogeographical implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳永清; 旷红伟; 彭楠; 许欢; 陈军; 徐加林; 刘海; 章朋

    2012-01-01

    简要报道了新近首次在冀西北张家口尚义地区发现的恐龙足迹.野外地质调查发现,恐龙足迹赋存于尚义晚中生代盆地侏罗系—白垩系后城组顶部.恐龙行迹呈近东西向展布,由数十个足迹构成.初步研究表明,造迹者分别属于兽脚类和蜥脚类恐龙,由西向东行进.足迹中包括兽脚类足迹70余个,组成数个行迹;蜥脚类足迹15个,构成1列行迹.蜥脚类足迹特征显示其可能属于游泳状的行迹.华北北部土城子组/后城组发育于燕辽生物群—热河生物群更替演化时期(晚侏罗世—早白垩世早期),以往在该时期沉积物中罕见脊椎动物骨骼化石.近年来华北北部土城子组/后城组中频繁发现的恐龙足迹表明,燕辽生物群—热河生物群更替演化时期发育着以恐龙为代表的脊椎动物群.该发现将有助于进一步了解土城子组/后城组沉积时期恐龙属种的多样性及其生物古地理环境.晚侏罗世—早白垩世早期沉积古地理和古生态环境及其与恐龙动物群发育的研究有助于揭示陆地生物群更替演化和环境的关系.%A number of dinosaur footprints have been discovered recently from the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Houcheng Formation in Shangyi, Zhangjiakou, northwestern Hebei Province. The trackways and footprints display a east-west trend on the rock surface of the top of the Houcheng Formation. The preliminary research indicates that these trackways comprise theropod and probably swimming sauropod footprints. One trackway consisted of fifteen sauropod footprints and the other footprints cluster including more than seventy theropod footprints were both recognized. The Tuchengzi/Houcheng Formation was deposited in the transitional period from the Yanliao Biota to the Jehol Biota, which was previously considered as poor palaeogeography and palaeoecology and rare dinosaur bone fossils have been found. Frequent discoveries of dinosaur footprints

  9. The upper Jurassic-lower cretaceous siliciclastic system in the Morocco offshore - Prevenance, transport and deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertotti, G.; Arantegui, A.; Charton, R.; Luber, T.; Redfern, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Morocco segment of the Central Atlantic passive continental margin experienced km-scale exhumation during the early post-rift (late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous). In the Meseta and the High Atlas this led to the development of a N-S trending ridge sourcing terrigenous sediments which were brought t

  10. A NEW OCCURRENCE OF SMALL THEROPOD TRACKS IN THE HOUCHENG (TUCHENGZI) FORMATION OF HEBEI PROVINCE, CHINA%记河北省后城组新发现之小型兽脚类足迹

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒柯文; 洪大卫; 提姆·科普; 刘阳; 刘俊

    2009-01-01

    Small theropod footprints have been known from the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary strata of northeastern China for several decades, although these ichnofossils have been overshadowed by the feathered dinosaurs and other body fossils from the Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province. This paper describes a sample of several theropod footprints from a coarse fluvial deposit at Nanshuangmiao, in the lowermost Houcheng (Tuchengzi) Formation of Hebei Province. The Nanshuangmiao tracks exhibit a tridactyl, pachydactylous morphology corresponding to classic "brontozoid" ichnites (Grallator, Anchisauripus and Eubrontes) from the Lower Jurassic of the United States of America. Although many brontozoid tracks from the roughly equivalent Tuchengzi of Liaoning have been previously assigned to the small ichnogenus Grallator, as G. ssatoi, the Nanshuangmiao trcks are larger (up to 28.8 cm total length) and are probably referable to Anchisauripus. The Nanshuangmiao tracks were most likely produced by small theropods travelling in a group. Of the abundant theropod taxa known from the Yixian Formation of Liaoning, the small oviraptorosaur Caudipteryx is the most plausible trackmaker, but this interpretation remains uncertain because of a lack of diagnostic features in the tracks and because of the temporal and geographic gap between the Houcheng of Hebei and the Yixian of Liaoning.%几十年前人们就已经开始研究中国东北侏罗纪-白垩纪界线附近地层中的小型兽脚类恐龙足迹,虽然这些遗迹化石比辽宁省义县组带羽毛的恐龙及其他实体化石逊色了许多.本文记述了河北省承德南双庙后城组(土城子组)最下部河流相沉积中发现的一组兽脚类恐龙足迹.南双庙足迹具有三趾,趾粗大,其形态与美国下侏罗统经典的"brontozoid"足迹(Gral-lator,Anchisauripus和Eubrontes)相符.虽然许多产自辽宁土城子组中基本同时的brontozoid足迹被鉴定为小型的跷脚龙足迹属(Grallator),但南

  11. JURASSIC PALAEOGEOGRAPHY OF THE TRANSDANUBIAN CENTRAL RANGE (HUNGARY

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    ATTILA VÖRÖS

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The Transdanubian Central Range (TCR is a flattened range of hills in northern Transdanubia (Hungary, formed mainly by Mesozoic carbonate rocks showing strong facies similarities with the Southern Alps and the Austroalpine domain. The Jurassic system is divided into several formations of predominantly pelagic limestones. Ammonoids are frequent and were collected bed-by-bed in numerous sections, providing an excellent biostratigraphic resolution. The thickness of the Jurassic system is usually small but changes along the strike of the TCR. It reaches a maximum thickness of 500 m in the western part; is very variable (10-400 m in the central segment (Bakony Mts. and rather low (less than 100 m in the east (Gerecse. In the Bakony segment, the thickness variation reflects the strongly dissected topography of the Jurassic sea-floor. Synsedimentary tectonics is dominated by normal faults; tilted blocks and listric faults may be inferred only in the east.Five main steps were identified in the palaeogeographic evolution: 1 Late Hettangian: carbonate oolitic shoals prevail, except for a few sites where non-deposition or neritic sediments occur. 2 Sinemurian and Pliensbachian: tectonic disintegration resulted in an intricate pattern of submarine horsts and intervening basins, with condensed sedimentation or non-deposition on the horsts and thicker, continuous sedimentary sequences in the basins. The submarine topographic highs are surrounded by aprons of redeposited material (scarp breccias, brachiopod coquinas, crinoidal calcarenites, spiculitic cherty limestones, while pure or argillaceous limestones (Rosso Ammonitico prevail in the distal areas. 3 Early Toarcian: the Tethys-wide anoxic event is superimposed on the previous submarine bottom topography; the resulting black shales and sedimentary Mn-ores are concentrated on the western sides of some horsts. 4 Dogger to Early Malm: radiolarites with heterochronous lower and upper boundaries (Aalenian to

  12. Multivariate Analyses of Small Theropod Dinosaur Teeth and Implications for Paleoecological Turnover through Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Derek W.; Currie, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated small theropod teeth are abundant in vertebrate microfossil assemblages, and are frequently used in studies of species diversity in ancient ecosystems. However, determining the taxonomic affinities of these teeth is problematic due to an absence of associated diagnostic skeletal material. Species such as Dromaeosaurus albertensis, Richardoestesia gilmorei, and Saurornitholestes langstoni are known from skeletal remains that have been recovered exclusively from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Campanian). It is therefore likely that teeth from different formations widely disparate in age or geographic position are not referable to these species. Tooth taxa without any associated skeletal material, such as Paronychodon lacustris and Richardoestesia isosceles, have also been identified from multiple localities of disparate ages throughout the Late Cretaceous. To address this problem, a dataset of measurements of 1183 small theropod teeth (the most specimen-rich theropod tooth dataset ever constructed) from North America ranging in age from Santonian through Maastrichtian were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods: canonical variate analysis, pairwise discriminant function analysis, and multivariate analysis of variance. The results indicate that teeth referred to the same taxon from different formations are often quantitatively distinct. In contrast, isolated teeth found in time equivalent formations are not quantitatively distinguishable from each other. These results support the hypothesis that small theropod taxa, like other dinosaurs in the Late Cretaceous, tend to be exclusive to discrete host formations. The methods outlined have great potential for future studies of isolated teeth worldwide, and may be the most useful non-destructive technique known of extracting the most data possible from isolated and fragmentary specimens. The ability to accurately assess species diversity and turnover through time based on isolated teeth will help illuminate

  13. Jurassic extension and Cenozoic inversion tectonics in the Asturian Basin, NW Iberian Peninsula: 3D structural model and kinematic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzkeda, Hodei; Bulnes, Mayte; Poblet, Josep; García-Ramos, José Carlos; Piñuela, Laura

    2016-09-01

    We constructed a geological map, a 3D model and cross-sections, carried out a structural analysis, determined the stress fields and tectonic transport vectors, restored a cross section and performed a subsidence analysis to unravel the kinematic evolution of the NE emerged portion of the Asturian Basin (NW Iberian Peninsula), where Jurassic rocks crop out. The major folds run NW-SE, normal faults exhibit three dominant orientations: NW-SE, NE-SW and E-W, and thrusts display E-W strikes. After Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic thermal subsidence, Middle Jurassic doming occurred, accompanied by normal faulting, high heat flow and basin uplift, followed by Upper Jurassic high-rate basin subsidence. Another extensional event, possibly during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, caused an increment in the normal faults displacement. A contractional event, probably of Cenozoic age, led to selective and irregularly distributed buttressing and fault reactivation as reverse or strike-slip faults, and folding and/or offset of some previous faults by new generation folds and thrusts. The Middle Jurassic event could be a precursor of the Bay of Biscay and North Atlantic opening that occurred from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, whereas the Cenozoic event would be responsible for the Pyrenean and Cantabrian ranges and the partial closure of the Bay of Biscay.

  14. Análisis petrográfico de las areniscas jurásicas tempranas en el depocentro Atuel de la cuenca neuquina Petrographic analyses of the early Jurassic sandstones at the Atuel depocenter, Neuquén basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisa A. TUNIK

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El depocentro Atuel es un hemigraben de rumbo NNO y polaridad al oeste, que fue rellenado durante el Triásico Tardío - Jurásico Temprano, ubicado en el norte de la cuenca Neuquina. El relleno de este hemigraben corresponde a las sedimentitas marinas y continentales de las formaciones Arroyo Malo, El Freno, Puesto Araya y Tres Esquinas. La caracterización petrográfica de las areniscas que conforman dichas unidades permitió discriminar tres petrofacies y analizar sus áreas de procedencia. La petrofacies A (Q 25 ± 3, F 27 ± 7, L 48 ± 7, coincide con el desarrollo de la Formación Arroyo Malo y el marco tectónico del área de procedencia analizada a partir de los gráficos de Dickinson et al. (1983, es de arco transicional. La petrofacies B, incluye a las formaciones El Freno (Q 39 ± 12, F 32 ± 8, L 29 ± 9 y Puesto Araya en su sección inferior (Q 36± 9, F 28 ± 10, L 37 ± 10 y tienen una procedencia de un arco volcánico transicional a disectado. La petrofacies C, correspondiente a la Formación Puesto Araya en su sección superior (Q 48 ± 3, F 23 ± 14, L 29 ± 12, presentan una procedencia de un arco disectado a orógeno reciclado. Finalmente, se incluye una muestra correspondiente a la Formación Tres Esquinas (Q 15 F 49 L 36 cuya composición es muy diferente a las anteriores, ya que está caracterizada por el bajo porcentaje de cuarzo y la presencia de trizas de caída directa; la procedencia de esta muestra es de arco volcánico. La caracterización de las petrofacies A, B y C, permitió en forma preliminar, identificar sus áreas de aporte y apoyar la coetaneidad entre las formaciones El Freno y Puesto Araya inferior, tal como lo propusieron estudios sedimentológicos, estratigráficos y estructurales previos.The Atuel depocenter is a NNO trending hemigraben with west polarity filled during the Late Triassic - Early Jurassic. It is located on the northern are of the Neuquén basin. The hemigraben infill is made of marine and

  15. Cardio-pulmonary anatomy in theropod dinosaurs: Implications from extant archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Devon E; Ruben, John A

    2009-10-01

    Although crocodilian lung and cardiovascular organs are markedly less specialized than the avian heart and lung air-sac system, all living archosaurs possess four-chambered hearts and heterogeneously vascularized, faveolar lungs. In birds, normal lung function requires extensive, dorsally situated nonvascularized abdominal air-sacs ventilated by an expansive sternum and specially hinged costal ribs. The thin walled and voluminous abdominal air-sacs are supported laterally and caudally to prevent inward (paradoxical) collapse during generation of negative (inhalatory) pressure: the synsacrum, posteriorly directed, laterally open pubes and specialized femoral-thigh complex provide requisite support and largely prevent inhalatory collapse. In comparison, theropod dinosaurs probably lacked similarly enlarged abdominal air-sacs, and skeleto-muscular modifications consistent with their ventilation. In the absence of enlarged, functional abdominal air-sacs, theropods were unlikely to have possessed a specialized bird-like, air-sac lung. The likely absence of bird-like pulmonary function in theropods is inconsistent with suggestions of cardiovascular anatomy more sophisticated than that of modern crocodilians.

  16. Carbon cycle history through the Middle Jurassic of Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gregory; Fozy, Istvan; Galacz, Andras

    2016-04-01

    A carbonate carbon isotope curve from the Aalenian-Bathonian interval is presented from the Obanya valley, of the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary. This interval is less well constrained and studied that other Jurassic time slices. The Obanya valley lies in the eastern part of the Mecsek Mountains, between Obanya and Kisujbanya and provides excellent exposures of a near continuous Aalenian to Lower Cretaceous sequence. It is not strongly affected by tectonics, as compared to other sections of eastern Mecsek of the same age. In parts, a rich fossil assemblage has been collected; the Bathonian ammonites are especially valuable as this locality. The pelagic Middle Jurassic is represented by thin-bedded limestones (the Obanya Limestone) and is overlain by Upper Jurassic siliceous limestones and radiolarites (the Fonyaszo Limestone). The new data indicates a series of positive anomalies within the late Aalenian and early-middle Bajocian. These data are comparable with carbonate carbon isotope recorded from other Tethyan margin sediments. Our integrated biostratigraphy and carbon isotope stratigraphy enables us to improve stratigraphic correlation and age determination of the examined strata.

  17. Archosaur evolution during the Jurassic: a southern perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. M. Rauhut

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The fossil record of archosaurs - crocodylomorphs, pterosaurs and dinosaurs - from the Jurassic of the Southern Hemisphere is critically reviewed, and its evolutionary implications are evaluated. Although several important faunas and also isolated finds are known from Gondwana, the record in total is still very patchy, and any evolutionary scenario based on this record should be seen as tentative. Compared to the Northern Hemisphere, southern archosaurs are much more poorly known, which is especially true for terrestrial crocodiles and pterosaurs. Marine crocodiles are rather well represented in south-western South America, whereas the report of terrestrial archosaurs is currently best for Africa. However, in South America, important and especially promising archosaur faunas are known from the Callovian Cañadón Asfalto and the (?Tithonian Cañadón Calcáreo formations of Chubut province, Argentina. Early and Middle Jurassic Gondwanan archosaurs demonstrate that the faunas of that period still had a generally Pangean distribution, whereas first indications of differential archosaur evolution in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are evident in Late Jurassic Gondwanan faunas.

  18. The origin and early radiation of dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusatte, Stephen L.; Nesbitt, Sterling J.; Irmis, Randall B.; Butler, Richard J.; Benton, Michael J.; Norell, Mark A.

    2010-07-01

    Dinosaurs were remarkably successful during the Mesozoic and one subgroup, birds, remain an important component of modern ecosystems. Although the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous has been the subject of intense debate, comparatively little attention has been given to the origin and early evolution of dinosaurs during the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic, one of the most important evolutionary radiations in earth history. Our understanding of this keystone event has dramatically changed over the past 25 years, thanks to an influx of new fossil discoveries, reinterpretations of long-ignored specimens, and quantitative macroevolutionary analyses that synthesize anatomical and geological data. Here we provide an overview of the first 50 million years of dinosaur history, with a focus on the large-scale patterns that characterize the ascent of dinosaurs from a small, almost marginal group of reptiles in the Late Triassic to the preeminent terrestrial vertebrates of the Jurassic and Cretaceous. We provide both a biological and geological background for early dinosaur history. Dinosaurs are deeply nested among the archosaurian reptiles, diagnosed by only a small number of characters, and are subdivided into a number of major lineages. The first unequivocal dinosaurs are known from the late Carnian of South America, but the presence of their sister group in the Middle Triassic implies that dinosaurs possibly originated much earlier. The three major dinosaur lineages, theropods, sauropodomorphs, and ornithischians, are all known from the Triassic, when continents were joined into the supercontinent Pangaea and global climates were hot and arid. Although many researchers have long suggested that dinosaurs outcompeted other reptile groups during the Triassic, we argue that the ascent of dinosaurs was more of a matter of contingency and opportunism. Dinosaurs were overshadowed in most Late Triassic ecosystems by crocodile-line archosaurs and

  19. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: key elements in the reconstruction of the North Atlantic Jurassic rift system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlyk, Finn

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Jurassic succession of Denmark is largely confined to the subsurface with the exception of exposures on the island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea. In East Greenland, in contrast, the Jurassic is extensively exposed. Comparison of basin evolution in the two regions, which now occur on two separate plates, thus relies on highly different datasets. It is possible nevertheless to construct an integrated picture allowing testing of hypotheses concerning basin evolution, regional uplift, onset and climax of rifting, relative versus eustatic sea-level changes and sequence stratigraphic subdivision and correlation. On a smaller scale, it is possible to compare the signatures of sequence stratigraphic surfaces as seen on well logs, in cores and at outcrop and of sequences recognised and defined on the basis of very different data types. Breakdown of the successions into tectonostratigraphic megasequences highlights the high degree of similarity in overall basin evolution and tectonic style. An important difference, however, lies in the timing. Major events such as late Early - Middle Jurassic uplift, followed by onset of rifting, basin reorganisation and rift climax were delayed in East Greenland relative to the Danish region. This has important implications both for regional reconstructions of the rift system and for the understanding and testing of classical sequence stratigraphic concepts involving eustatic versus tectonic controls of basin evolution and stratigraphy.

  20. Origin attachments of the caudofemoralis longus muscle in the Jurassic dinosaur Allosaurus

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    Andrea Cau

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The caudofemoralis longus muscle (CFL is the primary limb retractor among non-avian sauropsids, and underwent a dramatic reduction along the dinosaur lineage leading to birds. The osteological correlates of the CFL among fossil reptiles have been controversial, because, contrary to traditional interpretations, the extent of the muscle is not necessarily related to the distribution of the caudal ribs. In some Cretaceous dinosaurs, the extent of the CFL has been inferred based on the preserved bony septa between the CFL and other tail muscles. Here, we describe a series of tail vertebrae of the Jurassic dinosaur Allosaurus, each showing a previously-unreported feature: a sulcus, formed by a regular pattern of tightly packed horizontal slits, that runs vertically along the lateral surfaces of the centra and neural arches. These sulci are interpreted as the origin attachment sites of the CFL, allowing for direct determination of the muscle extent along the tail of this dinosaur. Anteriorly to the 18th caudal vertebra, the sulcus runs along most of the centrum and neural arch, then it progressively reduces its vertical extent, and disappears between caudals 24 and 32, a pattern consistent with previous CFL reconstructions in other theropods.

  1. A New Sauropod, Gongxianosaurus, from the Lower Jurassic of Sichuan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes an early and primitive sauropod dinosaur, Gongxianosaurus shibeiensis (gen. et sp. nov.), from the Dongyuemiao Member of the Lower Jurassic Ziliujing Formation in Shibei Township, Gongxian County, Sichuan Province, China, which is one of the 5 dinosaur fossils discovered in Gongxian in 1997. Except the skull which is incomplete, the fossils are well preserved. It has some features of both sauropods and prosauropods. It is an intermediate type in the evolution of dinosaurs from prosauropods to sauropods and provides materials for the study of the origin and evolution of the sauropod dinosaur fauna. The discovery of this new sauropod furnishes a way for the stratigraphic correlation between the Early Jurassic Ziliujing Formation in the Sichuan basin and the Lower Jurassic Lufeng Formation in the Central Yunnan basin.

  2. MIDDLE JURASSIC-LOWER CRETACEOUS BIOSTRATIGRAPHY IN THE CENTRAL PONTIDES (TURKEY): REMARKS ON PALEOGEOGRAPHY AND TECTONIC EVOLUTION

    OpenAIRE

    BORA ROJAY; DEMIR ALTINER

    1998-01-01

    The deposition of Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonates in the Pontides was controlled mainly by the evolution of an Atlantic-type continental margin in the Tethys. The study of several stratigraphic sections from allochthonous slices and blocks of the North Anatolian Ophiolitic Melange provided insight into the Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Central Pontide Belt. The Callovian-Aptian successions span the Globuligerina gr. oxfordiana, Clypeina jurassica (equi...

  3. The first euthemistid damsel-dragonfly from the Middle Jurassic of China (Odonata, Epiproctophora, Isophlebioptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjun; Nel, André; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong; Pang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Sinoeuthemis daohugouensis gen. et sp. n. is the first record of the isophlebiopteran family Euthemistidae from Middle Jurassic of northeast China, while previously this family was restricted to the early Late Jurassic Kazakhstan. This new finding allows us to emend the family diagnosis with hindwing characters. This new species shows a mixture of characters alternatively present in different genera of the two families Euthemistidae and Sphenophlebiidae.

  4. An arboreal docodont from the Jurassic and mammaliaform ecological diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-Jin; Ji, Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Guang; Liu, Di; Grossnickle, David M.; Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2015-02-01

    A new docodontan mammaliaform from the Middle Jurassic of China has skeletal features for climbing and dental characters indicative of an omnivorous diet that included plant sap. This fossil expands the range of known locomotor adaptations in docodontans to include climbing, in addition to digging and swimming. It further shows that some docodontans had a diet with a substantial herbivorous component, distinctive from the faunivorous diets previously reported in other members of this clade. This reveals a greater ecological diversity in an early mammaliaform clade at a more fundamental taxonomic level not only between major clades as previously thought.

  5. The Oldest Jurassic Dinosaur: A Basal Neotheropod from the Hettangian of Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martill, David M; Vidovic, Steven U; Howells, Cindy; Nudds, John R

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 40% of a skeleton including cranial and postcranial remains representing a new genus and species of basal neotheropod dinosaur is described. It was collected from fallen blocks from a sea cliff that exposes Late Triassic and Early Jurassic marine and quasi marine strata on the south Wales coast near the city of Cardiff. Matrix comparisons indicate that the specimen is from the lithological Jurassic part of the sequence, below the first occurrence of the index ammonite Psiloceras planorbis and above the last occurrence of the Rhaetian conodont Chirodella verecunda. Associated fauna of echinoderms and bivalves indicate that the specimen had drifted out to sea, presumably from the nearby Welsh Massif and associated islands (St David's Archipelago). Its occurrence close to the base of the Blue Lias Formation (Lower Jurassic, Hettangian) makes it the oldest known Jurassic dinosaur and it represents the first dinosaur skeleton from the Jurassic of Wales. A cladistic analysis indicates basal neotheropodan affinities, but the specimen retains plesiomorphic characters which it shares with Tawa and Daemonosaurus.

  6. The Oldest Jurassic Dinosaur: A Basal Neotheropod from the Hettangian of Great Britain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Martill

    Full Text Available Approximately 40% of a skeleton including cranial and postcranial remains representing a new genus and species of basal neotheropod dinosaur is described. It was collected from fallen blocks from a sea cliff that exposes Late Triassic and Early Jurassic marine and quasi marine strata on the south Wales coast near the city of Cardiff. Matrix comparisons indicate that the specimen is from the lithological Jurassic part of the sequence, below the first occurrence of the index ammonite Psiloceras planorbis and above the last occurrence of the Rhaetian conodont Chirodella verecunda. Associated fauna of echinoderms and bivalves indicate that the specimen had drifted out to sea, presumably from the nearby Welsh Massif and associated islands (St David's Archipelago. Its occurrence close to the base of the Blue Lias Formation (Lower Jurassic, Hettangian makes it the oldest known Jurassic dinosaur and it represents the first dinosaur skeleton from the Jurassic of Wales. A cladistic analysis indicates basal neotheropodan affinities, but the specimen retains plesiomorphic characters which it shares with Tawa and Daemonosaurus.

  7. 鄂尔多斯盆地吴起地区侏罗纪早中期河流沉积及油气分布%Study on fluvial deposits and oil & gas distribution of early and middle Jurassic in Wuqi area,Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟立娜; 李凤杰; 方朝刚; 李磊; 林洪

    2012-01-01

    应用现代沉积学理论,结合岩心观察描述、钻井、测井等资料,对鄂尔多斯盆地吴起地区侏罗纪早中期富县组到延安组延10、9、8期的沉积体系、岩相古地理特征及演化进行了详细研究,认为早侏罗世富县组和中侏罗世延安组延10期为深切河谷充填的辫状河沉积,延9和延8期则发育曲流河沉积.这2种河流沉积经历了有规律的继承性演化:富县组河谷充填作用最强,辫状河道砂体沉积厚度最大.延10期河谷进一步填平补齐,河谷斜坡上次级河道溯源增长、侧向侵蚀使河道变宽,漫滩分布面积减小.延9和延8期,古地形差异进一步减弱,河流转型为曲流河,河道和漫滩沉积均发育.吴起地区侏罗纪早中期河流发育辫状河和曲流河2种河流沉积模式.沉积相对富县组-延安组延8油层组油藏分布起主要控制作用,油气聚集主要受河道砂体展布控制,储层发育的河道砂体是该区今后勘探的主要目标.%On the basis of core observation,well drilling datalogging data and so on,the characteristics and evolution of the sedimentary system from Fuxian Formation to Yan10, Yan 9, Yan 8 reservoirs of Yan an Formation of early and middle Jurassic in Wuqi are-a, Ordos Basin are studied in detail using modem sedimentology theory. It is held that Fuxian Formation of early Jurassic and YanlO reservoir of middle Jurassic are dominated by deep valley filling braided fluvial deposits, and Yan 9 and Yan 8 reservoirs are dominated by meandering fluvial deposits. The two types of fluvial deposits experienced regular inherited evolution. The braided sand-body of Fuxian Formation is the thickest because of the strongest valley packing action. During YanlO period,the filling process continued,headward e-rosion was developed on the sub-valley slopes, the channel grew wider due to lateral erosion and the distribution range of flood plain reduced. During Yan 9 and Yan 8 periods, river became

  8. An Undercover Angiosperm from the Jurassic of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shaolin; WANG Xin

    2010-01-01

    Searching for early angiosperms is a riveting activity in botany because it helps to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among seed plants and among angiosperms themselves.One of the challenges for this job is what the target fossils look like.Most possibly early angiosperms may elude our scrutiny with gymnospermous appearances.This possibility becomes a reality in a Jurassic plant,Solaranthus gen.nov,which bears a peltaspermalean appearance and enclosed ovules.According to knowledge available hitherto,the latter feature makes it an angiosperm.However,such a feature is more likely to be eclipsed by its gymnospermous appearance.The early age and unexpected character assemblage of Solaranthus urge for a fresh look on the assumed-simple relationship between angiosperms and gymnosperms.Its resemblance to the order Peltaspermales favors the Mostly Male Theory.

  9. Early Jurassic sauropod tracks from the Yimen Forma tion of Panxi region, Southwest China:Ichnotaxonomy and potential trackmaker%中国西南攀西地区下侏罗统益门组蜥脚类足迹:分类学与潜在的造迹者

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢立达; Lockley Martin G; 尤海鲁; 彭光照; 唐翔; 冉浩; 王涛; 胡健; PersonsⅣW Scott

    2016-01-01

    恐龙足迹和骨骼的记录往往出现在不同的地区。然而,一些地层显示了关系紧密的骨骼和足迹,它们都指向同一个来源。报道了来自四川省攀西地区会理县通安镇通保村下侏罗统益门组中上部的蜥脚类足迹(雷龙足迹Brontopodus),其地理和地层归属均与真蜥脚类的何氏通安龙极为接近。通保足迹与造迹者的关联是可能的,但目前还需要更多的证据。通保的雷龙足迹是攀西地区首次发现侏罗纪的蜥脚类足迹,这也表明,在早侏罗世,原始蜥脚类和基干蜥脚型类共存于中国西南地区。%Dinosaur track and bone records often occur at different locations. However, a few formations show a close correspon⁃dence between bones and tracks that correspond to likely trackmakers. In this paper, the authors report sauropod tracks ( Brontopodus) in very close geographic and stratigraphic proximity to the type locality of the eusauropod Tonganosaurus hei in the middle-upper parts of the Lower Jurassic Yimen Formation in Tongbao Village, Huili County, Panxi region of Sichuan Province. This Huili track-trackmaker correlation is possibly existent, but still needs more evidence to confirm. As the first Jurassic sauropod tracks found in the Panxi region, the Tongbao Brontopodus tracks have provided evidence indicating coexistence of primitive sauropod and basal sau⁃ropodomorphs in Southwest China during Early Jurassic.

  10. Reconstruction of Original SedimentaryProvince of the Jurassic in the Northwestern China%西北地区侏罗纪原始沉积区恢复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛良清; 李文厚

    2000-01-01

    The Jurassic strata are widely distributed in the northwesternChina. The Early to early Middle Jurassic strata are major coal-bearing strata in the northwestern China that consist of sedimentary products of warm-humid climte,which are easily traced and correlated regionally. The late Middle to Late Jurassic strata are mainly composed of red beds, interbedded conglomerate and light-gray sandstones deposited in the alluvial and fluvial environments, showing paleoclimate changed from humid to dry features. In recent years, hydrocarbon exploration and researches in the Jurassic of NW China found the following facts:many present basin-margin areas often lack basinmarginal coarse-grain sediments of the Jurassic, while present tectonic uplift belts separating sedimentary basins are not present in some periods of the Jurassic or even whole Jurassic. Thus, it is necessary to reconstruct original sedimentary province of the Jurassic basins in NW China. Reconstruction of sedimentary province of the Jurassic in NW China is based on marginal sedimentary facies analysis, stratigraphic contact relationship analysis, paleocurrent system analysis, and tectonic/structural framework analysis. Marginal sedimentary facies analysis focuses on identifying alluvial fan and fluvial depositional systems that define sedimentary extent of basins. Stratigraphic contact relationship analysis is study on relationship between the residual Jurassic strata and underlying or overlaying strata because the relationship reflects depositional setting of the Jurassic strata and transform extent after the Jurassic deposition. Paleocurrent system analysis can help recognize relationship among remade basins at present. Identification of source area, shape and boundary of basins can be carried out on the basis of paleocurrent distribution. Tectonic/structural framework directly or indirectly affects deposition, sometimes are main factor to control sdimentary province and distribution of depositional systems

  11. Lower limits of ornithischian dinosaur body size inferred from a new Upper Jurassic heterodontosaurid from North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Richard J; Galton, Peter M; Porro, Laura B; Chiappe, Luis M; Henderson, Donald M; Erickson, Gregory M

    2010-02-07

    The extremes of dinosaur body size have long fascinated scientists. The smallest (member of the basal dinosaur clade Heterodontosauridae, and is the first member of this clade to be described from North America. The craniodental anatomy and diminutive body size of Fruitadens suggest that this taxon was an ecological generalist with an omnivorous diet, thus providing new insights into morphological and palaeoecological diversity within Dinosauria. Late-surviving (Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous) heterodontosaurids are smaller and less ecologically specialized than Early (Late Triassic and Early Jurassic) heterodontosaurids, and this ecological generalization may account in part for the remarkable 100-million-year-long longevity of the clade.

  12. Phylogenetic eigenvectors and nonstationarity in the evolution of theropod dinosaur skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-Filho, J A F; Alves, D M C C; Villalobos, F; Sakamoto, M; Brusatte, S L; Bini, L M

    2015-07-01

    Despite the long-standing interest in nonstationarity of both phenotypic evolution and diversification rates, only recently have methods been developed to study this property. Here, we propose a methodological expansion of the phylogenetic signal-representation (PSR) curve based on phylogenetic eigenvectors to test for nonstationarity. The PSR curve is built by plotting the coefficients of determination R(2) from phylogenetic eigenvector regression (PVR) models increasing the number of phylogenetic eigenvectors against the accumulated eigenvalues. The PSR curve is linear under a stationary model of trait evolution (i.e. the Brownian motion model). Here we describe the distribution of shifts in the models R(2) and used a randomization procedure to compare observed and simulated shifts along the PSR curve, which allowed detecting nonstationarity in trait evolution. As an applied example, we show that the main evolutionary pattern of variation in the theropod dinosaur skull was nonstationary, with a significant shift in evolutionary rates in derived oviraptorosaurs, an aberrant group of mostly toothless, crested, birdlike theropods. This result is also supported by a recently proposed Bayesian-based method (AUTEUR). A significant deviation between Ceratosaurus and Limusaurus terminal branches was also detected. We purport that our new approach is a valuable tool for evolutionary biologists, owing to its simplicity, flexibility and comprehensiveness.

  13. Dinosaur dynamics in the Jurassic Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott

    2010-04-01

    Dinosaurs were fascinating animals and elicit much excitement in the classroom. Analysis of fossilized dinosaur trackways permits one to estimate the locomotion speeds and accelerations of these extinct beasts. Such analysis allows one to apply Newton's laws of motion to examples from the Jurassic Era.

  14. Basin geodynamics and sequence stratigraphy of Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic deposits of Southern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Cédric; Hadouth, Suhail; Bouaziz, Samir; Lathuilière, Bernard; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2016-05-01

    Aims of this paper are to propose a geodynamic and sequential framework for the late Triassic and early Jurassic of and south Tunisia and to evidence the impact of local tectonics on the stratigraphic architecture. Facies of the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic of Southern Tunisia have been interpreted in terms of depositional environments. A sequential framework and correlation schemes are proposed for outcrops and subsurface transects. Nineteen middle frequency sequences inserted in three and a half low frequency transgression/regression cycles were evidenced. Despite some datation uncertainties and the unknown durations of Lower Jurassic cycles, middle frequency sequences appear to be controlled by eustasy. In contrast the tectonics acted as an important control on low frequency cycles. The Carnian flooding was certainly favored by the last stages of a rifting episode which started during the Permian. The regression accompanied by the formation of stacked angular unconformities and the deposition of lowstand deposits during the late Carnian and Norian occured during the uplift and tilting of the northern basin margins. The transpressional activity of the Jeffara fault system generated the uplift of the Tebaga of Medenine high from the late Carnian and led to the Rhaetian regional angular Sidi Stout Unconformity. Facies analysis and well-log correlations permitted to evidence that Rhaetian to Lower Jurassic Messaoudi dolomites correspond to brecciated dolomites present on the Sidi Stout unconformity in the North Dahar area. The Early-cimmerian compressional event is a possible origin for the global uplift of the northern African margin and Western Europe during the late Carnian and the Norian. During the Rhaetian and the early Jurassic a new episode of normal faulting occured during the third low frequency flooding. This tectonosedimentary evolution ranges within the general geodynamic framework of the north Gondwana margin controlled by the opening of both

  15. The dinosaurs of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffetaut, Eric; Suteethorn, Varavudh

    After more than ten years of Thai-French research, the Thai dinosaur record, from the continental rocks of the Khorat Plateau, is, to date, the best in Southeast Asia. The oldest evidence consists of footprints of small dinosaurs from the Middle to Late Jurassic Phra Wihan Formation. The most varied dinosaur assemblage hitherto found in Thailand comes from the Late Jurassic Sao Khua Formation; it is dominated by sauropods, but also includes various theropods. Large theropod footprints are known from the Early Cretaceous Phu Phan Formation. Theropods and the primitive ceratopsian Psittacosaurus occur in the Aptian-Albian Khok Kruat Formation.

  16. Spectroscopic Analysis of a Theropod Dinosaur (Reptilia, Archosauria from the Ipubi Formation, Araripe Basin, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Hermínio da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Araripe Sedimentary Basin is known by the excellence of its fossils, regarding the preservation, diversity, and quantity. Here, we present a spectroscopic analysis using several experimental techniques (X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis applied in small fragments of bones from the posterior members of a theropod dinosaur. The results agree regarding the different composition of the stone matrix and the fossilized bone, indicating a partial substitution of the material by elements present in the depositional environment. However, differently from what is believed to occur, there is evidence that pyritization is not the only mechanism of fossilization for a specimen of Ipubi formation, but calcification, additionally, plays an important role in the fossil production of this Formation.

  17. Middle Jurassic (Bajocian and Bathonian) dinosaur megatracksites, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, E.P.; Johnson, G.D.; Mickelson, D.L.; Keller, K.; Furer, L.; Archer, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two previously unknown rare Middle Jurassic dinosaur megatracksites are reported from the Bighorn Basin of northern Wyoming in the Western Interior of the United States. These trace fossils occur in carbonate units once thought to be totally marine in origin, and constitute the two most extensive Middle Jurassic dinosaur tracksites currently known in North America. The youngest of these occurs primarily along a single horizon at or near the top of the "basal member" of the "lower" Sundance Formation, is mid-Bathonian in age, and dates to ??? 167 ma. This discovery necessitates a major change in the paleogeographic reconstructions for Wyoming for this period. The older tracksites occur at multiple horizons within a 1 m interval in the middle part of the Gypsum Spring Formation. This interval is uppermost Bajocian in age and dates to ??? 170 ma. Terrestrial tracks found, to date, have been all bipedal tridactyl dinosaur prints. At least some of these prints can be attributed to the theropods. Possible swim tracks of bipedal dinosaurs are also present in the Gypsum Spring Formation. Digitigrade prints dominate the Sundance trackways, with both plantigrade and digitigrade prints being preserved in the Gypsum Spring trackways. The Sundance track-bearing surface locally covers 7.5 square kilometers in the vicinity of Shell, Wyoming. Other tracks occur apparently on the same horizon approximately 25 kilometers to the west, north of the town of Greybull. The Gypsum Spring megatracksite is locally preserved across the same 25 kilometer east-west expanse, with the Gypsum Spring megatracksite more extensive in a north-south direction with tracks occurring locally across a 100 kilometer extent. Conservative estimates for the trackway density based on regional mapping in the Sundance tracksite discovery area near Shell suggests that over 150, 000 in situ tracks may be preserved per square kilometer in the Sundance Formation in this area. Comparable estimates have not been made

  18. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Jurassic of Skåne, southern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivhed, Ulf

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available In Sweden, Jurassic strata are restricted to Skåne and adjacent offshore areas. Jurassic sedimentary rocks predominantly comprise sandy to muddy siliciclastics, with subordinate coal beds andfew carbonate-rich beds. During Mesozoic times, block-faulting took place in the Sorgenfrei–Tornquist Zone, a tectonic zone which transects Skåne in a NW–SE direction. The Jurassic depositionalenvironments in Skåne were thus strongly influenced by uplift and downfaulting, and to some extent by volcanism. Consequently, the sedimentary record reveals evidence of numerous transgressions, regressions and breaks in sedimentation. Relative sea-level changes played a significant role in controlling the facies distribution, as deposition mainly took place in coastal plain to shallow shelf environments.The alluvial deposits in Skåne include floodplain palaeosols, autochthonous coals, overbank sandstones, and stream channel pebbly sandstones. Restricted marine strata comprise intertidalheteroliths with mixed freshwater and marine trace fossil assemblages, and intertidal delta distributary channel sandstones. Shallow marine sediments encompass subtidal and shoreface sandstoneswith herringbone structures, and bioturbated mudstones with tempestite sandstones. Offshore deposits typically comprise extensively bioturbated muddy sandstones.Floral remains, palaeopedology, clay mineralogy and arenite maturity indicate a warm and humid climate in Skåne throughout the Jurassic, possibly with slightly increasing aridity towards the end of the period. Most Jurassic strata in Skåne have been subjected to mild burial diagenesis, and the petroleum generative window has rarely been reached.

  19. Molecular composition and ultrastructure of Jurassic paravian feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Johan; Sjövall, Peter; Carney, Ryan M; Cincotta, Aude; Uvdal, Per; Hutcheson, Steven W; Gustafsson, Ola; Lefèvre, Ulysse; Escuillié, François; Heimdal, Jimmy; Engdahl, Anders; Gren, Johan A; Kear, Benjamin P; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Yans, Johan; Godefroit, Pascal

    2015-08-27

    Feathers are amongst the most complex epidermal structures known, and they have a well-documented evolutionary trajectory across non-avian dinosaurs and basal birds. Moreover, melanosome-like microbodies preserved in association with fossil plumage have been used to reconstruct original colour, behaviour and physiology. However, these putative ancient melanosomes might alternatively represent microorganismal residues, a conflicting interpretation compounded by a lack of unambiguous chemical data. We therefore used sensitive molecular imaging, supported by multiple independent analytical tests, to demonstrate that the filamentous epidermal appendages in a new specimen of the Jurassic paravian Anchiornis comprise remnant eumelanosomes and fibril-like microstructures, preserved as endogenous eumelanin and authigenic calcium phosphate. These results provide novel insights into the early evolution of feathers at the sub-cellular level, and unequivocally determine that melanosomes can be preserved in fossil feathers.

  20. New Fossil Lepidoptera (Insecta: Amphiesmenoptera) from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiting; Shih, Chungkun; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Sohn, Jae-Cheon; Davis, Donald R.; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A.; Flint, Oliver; Ren, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background The early history of the Lepidoptera is poorly known, a feature attributable to an inadequate preservational potential and an exceptionally low occurrence of moth fossils in relevant mid-Mesozoic deposits. In this study, we examine a particularly rich assemblage of morphologically basal moths that contribute significantly toward the understanding of early lepidopteran biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Our documentation of early fossil moths involved light- and scanning electron microscopic examination of specimens, supported by various illumination and specimen contrast techniques. A total of 20 moths were collected from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation in Northeastern China. Our principal results were the recognition and description of seven new genera and seven new species assigned to the Eolepidopterigidae; one new genus with four new species assigned to the Mesokristenseniidae; three new genera with three new species assigned to the Ascololepidopterigidae fam. nov.; and one specimen unassigned to family. Lepidopteran assignment of these taxa is supported by apomorphies of extant lineages, including the M1 vein, after separation from the M2 vein, subtending an angle greater than 60 degrees that is sharply angulate at the junction with the r–m crossvein (variable in Trichoptera); presence of a foretibial epiphysis; the forewing M vein often bearing three branches; and the presence of piliform scales along wing veins. Conclusions/Significance The diversity of these late Middle Jurassic lepidopterans supports a conclusion that the Lepidoptera–Trichoptera divergence occurred by the Early Jurassic. PMID:24278142

  1. The oldest known snakes from the Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous provide insights on snake evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Michael W; Nydam, Randall L; Palci, Alessandro; Apesteguía, Sebastián

    2015-01-27

    The previous oldest known fossil snakes date from ~100 million year old sediments (Upper Cretaceous) and are both morphologically and phylogenetically diverse, indicating that snakes underwent a much earlier origin and adaptive radiation. We report here on snake fossils that extend the record backwards in time by an additional ~70 million years (Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous). These ancient snakes share features with fossil and modern snakes (for example, recurved teeth with labial and lingual carinae, long toothed suborbital ramus of maxillae) and with lizards (for example, pronounced subdental shelf/gutter). The paleobiogeography of these early snakes is diverse and complex, suggesting that snakes had undergone habitat differentiation and geographic radiation by the mid-Jurassic. Phylogenetic analysis of squamates recovers these early snakes in a basal polytomy with other fossil and modern snakes, where Najash rionegrina is sister to this clade. Ingroup analysis finds them in a basal position to all other snakes including Najash.

  2. Predatory behaviour of carnivorous dinosaurs: Ecological interpretations based on tooth marked dinosaur bones and wear patterns of theropod teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland

    Predation marks on bones are a source on information on the feeding behaviour of the carnivores involved. Although predator damaged bone is common in the fossil record, published reports of such marks on dinosaur bones are rare. Patterns of bone modification by mammalian carnivores overlap patterns...... left by theropod dinosaurs.Differences in tooth morphology can also be correlated with characteristics of the marks left by the teeth. In a study of tooth marks on dinosaur bones from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta, Canada, it was possible to identify the feeding theropods to family, generic...... different taxa and different skeletal elements produced some interesting results. The frequency of tooth marked dinosaur bones is higher than expected. Up to 14 % of the observed hadrosaur bones were predator damaged. The lower incidence of damage in ceratopsian bones can be explained by the fact...

  3. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Upper Jurassic of Europe: its subdivision and correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeiss, Arnold

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last 40 years, the stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic of Europe has received much attention and considerable revision; much of the impetus behind this endeavour has stemmed from the work of the International Subcommission on Jurassic Stratigraphy. The Upper Jurassic Series consists of three stages, the Oxfordian, Kimmeridgian and Tithonian which are further subdivided into substages, zones and subzones, primarily on the basis of ammonites. Regional variations between the Mediterranean, Submediterranean and Subboreal provinces are discussed and correlation possibilities indicated. The durations of the Oxfordian, Kimmeridgian and Tithonian Stages are reported to have been 5.3, 3.4 and 6.5 Ma, respectively. This review of the present status of Upper Jurassic stratigraphy aids identification of a number of problems of subdivision and definition of Upper Jurassic stages; in particular these include correlation of the base of the Kimmeridgian and the top of the Tithonian between Submediterranean and Subboreal Europe. Although still primarily based on ammonite stratigraphy, subdivision of the Upper Jurassic is increasingly being refined by the incorporation of other fossil groups; these include both megafossils, such as aptychi, belemnites, bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods, echinoderms, corals, sponges and vertebrates, and microfossils such as foraminifera, radiolaria, ciliata, ostracodes, dinoflagellates, calcareous nannofossils, charophyaceae, dasycladaceae, spores and pollen. Important future developments will depend on the detailed integration of these disparate biostratigraphic data and their precise combination with the abundant new data from sequence stratigraphy, utilising the high degree of stratigraphic resolution offered by certain groups of fossils. This article also contains some notes on the recent results of magnetostratigraphy and sequence chronostratigraphy.

  4. A reappraisal of the morphology and systematic position of the theropod dinosaur Sigilmassasaurus from the “middle” Cretaceous of Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serjoscha W. Evers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis is an enigmatic theropod dinosaur from the early Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian of Morocco, originally based on a few isolated cervical vertebrae. Ever since its original description, both its taxonomic validity and systematic affinities were contentious. Originally considered to represent its own family, Sigilmassasauridae, the genus has variously been suggested to represent a carcharodontosaurid, an ornithischian, and, more recently, a spinosaurid. Here we describe new remains referrable to this taxon and re-evaluate its taxonomic status and systematic affinities. Based on the new remains, a re-evaluation of the original materials, and comparisons with other spinosaurids, the holotype of Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis is identified as an anterior dorsal, rather than a cervical vertebra, and differences between elements referred to this taxon can be explained by different positions of the elements in question within the vertebral column. Many characters used previously to diagnose the genus and species are found to be more widespread among basal tetanurans, and specifically spinosaurids. However, the taxon shows several autapomorphies that support its validity, including the presence of a strongly rugose, ventrally offset triangular platform that is confluent with a ventral keel anteriorly in the mid-cervical vertebral centra and a strongly reduced lateral neural arch lamination, with no or an incomplete distinction between anterior and posterior centrodiapophyseal laminae in the posterior cervical and anterior dorsal vertebrae. We argue furthermore that Spinosaurus maroccanus, also described on the basis of isolated cervical vertebrae from the same stratigraphic unit and in the same paper as Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis, is a subjective synonym of the latter. Both a detailed comparison of this taxon with other theropods and a formal phylogenetic analysis support spinosaurid affintities for Sigilmassasaurus. However, we

  5. A reappraisal of the morphology and systematic position of the theropod dinosaur Sigilmassasaurus from the “middle” Cretaceous of Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhut, Oliver W.M.; Milner, Angela C.; McFeeters, Bradley; Allain, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis is an enigmatic theropod dinosaur from the early Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Morocco, originally based on a few isolated cervical vertebrae. Ever since its original description, both its taxonomic validity and systematic affinities were contentious. Originally considered to represent its own family, Sigilmassasauridae, the genus has variously been suggested to represent a carcharodontosaurid, an ornithischian, and, more recently, a spinosaurid. Here we describe new remains referrable to this taxon and re-evaluate its taxonomic status and systematic affinities. Based on the new remains, a re-evaluation of the original materials, and comparisons with other spinosaurids, the holotype of Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis is identified as an anterior dorsal, rather than a cervical vertebra, and differences between elements referred to this taxon can be explained by different positions of the elements in question within the vertebral column. Many characters used previously to diagnose the genus and species are found to be more widespread among basal tetanurans, and specifically spinosaurids. However, the taxon shows several autapomorphies that support its validity, including the presence of a strongly rugose, ventrally offset triangular platform that is confluent with a ventral keel anteriorly in the mid-cervical vertebral centra and a strongly reduced lateral neural arch lamination, with no or an incomplete distinction between anterior and posterior centrodiapophyseal laminae in the posterior cervical and anterior dorsal vertebrae. We argue furthermore that Spinosaurus maroccanus, also described on the basis of isolated cervical vertebrae from the same stratigraphic unit and in the same paper as Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis, is a subjective synonym of the latter. Both a detailed comparison of this taxon with other theropods and a formal phylogenetic analysis support spinosaurid affintities for Sigilmassasaurus. However, we reject the recently

  6. TRANSITION FROM CARBONATE PLATFORM TO PELAGIC DEPOSITION (MID JURASSIC- LATE CRETACEOUS, VOURINOS MASSIF, NORTHERN GREECE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLAOS CARRAS

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A Jurassic- Cretaceous carbonate succession crops out along the Zyghosti Rema, Kozani (Northern Greece. The substratum consists of the ophiolitic succession of the Vourinos Massif (Pelagonian Domain: serpentinites tectonically overlain by basalts, with thin lenses of radiolarian cherts of middle Bathonian age. The contact with the overlying Jurassic limestones is tectonic. Eight informal units have been distinguished within the Mesozoic limestones, from the base upwards. (A bioclastic, intraclastic and oolitic packstone (Callovian- Oxfordian. (B bioclastic packstone and coral boundstone (Oxfordian . (C bioclastic and oncoidal wackestone with Clypeina jurassica (Oxfordian- Upper Kimmeridgian. (D (Upper Kimmeridgian- Portlandian: oncoidal packstone and rudstone (facies D1; intraclastic and bioclastic grainstone and packstone (facies D2; neptunian dykes with intraclastic and bioclastic wackestone and packstone filling (facies D3; neptunian dykes with Fe-Mn rich laterite filling and with pink silty filling of early Late Cretaceous age. An unconformity surface, due to emersion and erosion of the platform during the latest Jurassic- Early Cretaceous, is overlain by (E intraclastic, bioclastic packstone and grainstone (Cenomanian. (F massive body of debrites with coral, echinoderm, algae and rudist large clasts (facies F1 (Cenomanian; turbiditic beds of bioclastic, intraclastic and lithoclastic rudstone and grainstone (facies F2. (G thin bedded bioclastic mudstone and wackestone with planktonic foraminifers and radiolarians, alternating with turbiditic beds of bioclastic, intraclastic packstone and rudstone and with conglomeratic levels and slumped beds of the previous turbidites (upper Santonian- lower Campanian. (H: bioclastic packstone with planktonic foraminifers (facies H1 (lower Campanian - ?Maastrichtian; amalgamated turbiditic beds of bioclastic wackestone and packstone with planktonic foraminifers (facies H2; turbiditic beds of bioclastic

  7. Jurassic-Cretaceous Herpetofaunas from the Jehol Associated Strata in NE China:Evolutionary and Ecological Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuan; DONG Liping; Susan E.EVANS

    2010-01-01

    @@ Jurassic-Cretaceous herpetofaunas have recently been recovered from tuffinterbedded lacustrine strata in northeastern(NE)China.Most of them are from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Group(131-120 Ma),which has yielded a diverse and important fossil assemblage including insects,plants,fishes and tetrapods.

  8. Late Triassic - Early Jurassic successions of the Atuel depocenter: sequence stratigraphy and tectonic controls Sucesiones del Triásico Tardío - Jurásico Temprano del depocentro Atuel: estratigrafía secuencial y controles tectónicos

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    Silvia Lanés

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Biostratigraphic correlations of the Late Triassic - Early Jurassic successions of the Atuel depocenter allowed determining the accommodation changes and the possible tectonic controls on sedimentation. The Rhaetian - late Early Sinemurian deposits contain facies of slope-type fan deltas, braided fluvial systems and low sinuosity rivers with alternate bars deposited during a synrift phase. The late Early Sinemurian - Toarcian series host facies of intermediate (Gilbert to shelf type fan deltas, braided and low sinuosity fluvial systems, wave-dominated estuaries, transgressive storm-dominated and turbidite-influenced marine shelves which record the sag phase. According to different criteria two stratigraphic schemes are proposed, the first one considering tectosedimentary units (TSU and the second one using "Exxon-like" sequences. In the first scheme the synrift TSU matches the actual Precuyo Mesosequence and the sag TSU is partly equivalent to the Cuyo Mesosequence, mainly keeping the current mesosequence scheme for the Neuquén basin but assigning the fandeltaic deposits to the Precuyo Mesosequence. The second sequence scheme considers the whole Late Triassic - Early Jurassic succession as a part of the Cuyo Mesosequence, where the synrift deposits composes the detached lowstand system tract (LST and most of the sag deposits makes the transgressive system tract (TST. The basal sequence boundary does not crop out, the flooding surface at the TST base and the maximum flooding surface at the TST top are respectively marked by the lowest estuarine levels and by black shales with suboxic-compatible bivalves (Bositra sp..La correlación bioestratigráfica de las sucesiones del Triásico Tardío - Jurásico Temprano del depocentro Atuel permitió determinar los cambios del espacio de acomodación y los posibles controles tectónicos de la sedimentación. La sección del Retiano - Sinemuriano Temprano tardío contiene facies de abanicos deltaicos de

  9. Radiometric Dating of Ignimbrite from Inner Mongolia Provides no Indication of a Post-Middle Jurassic Age for the Daohugou Beds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Lacustrine deposits exposed at Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China, have yielded superbly preserved vertebrate fossils. The fossil beds were first misinterpreted as of Early Cretaceous age, based on alleged occurrences of key fossils of the Jehol Biota. Compelling evidence revealed by more rigorous research involving regional biostratigraphy, radiometric dating, and paleontology supports the Middle Jurassic age of the fossil beds. Despite the awesome evidence for the Middle Jurassic age of the Daohugou beds, the age dispute has been resurrected recently by invoking an overturned stratigraphic sequence. A careful review of the data, however, found no evidence that this sequence has been overturned. In addition, many of the assumptions, on which the conjecture of the fossil beds being postMiddle Jurassic is imprudently based, are self-contradictory or otherwise misleading. Thus, the postMiddle Jurassic age of the Daohugou beds as an unfounded conclusion can readily be dismissed.

  10. Small theropod teeth from the Late Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin, northwestern New Mexico and their implications for understanding latest Cretaceous dinosaur evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Thomas E; Brusatte, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    Studying the evolution and biogeographic distribution of dinosaurs during the latest Cretaceous is critical for better understanding the end-Cretaceous extinction event that killed off all non-avian dinosaurs. Western North America contains among the best records of Late Cretaceous terrestrial vertebrates in the world, but is biased against small-bodied dinosaurs. Isolated teeth are the primary evidence for understanding the diversity and evolution of small-bodied theropod dinosaurs during the Late Cretaceous, but few such specimens have been well documented from outside of the northern Rockies, making it difficult to assess Late Cretaceous dinosaur diversity and biogeographic patterns. We describe small theropod teeth from the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. These specimens were collected from strata spanning Santonian - Maastrichtian. We grouped isolated theropod teeth into several morphotypes, which we assigned to higher-level theropod clades based on possession of phylogenetic synapomorphies. We then used principal components analysis and discriminant function analyses to gauge whether the San Juan Basin teeth overlap with, or are quantitatively distinct from, similar tooth morphotypes from other geographic areas. The San Juan Basin contains a diverse record of small theropods. Late Campanian assemblages differ from approximately coeval assemblages of the northern Rockies in being less diverse with only rare representatives of troodontids and a Dromaeosaurus-like taxon. We also provide evidence that erect and recurved morphs of a Richardoestesia-like taxon represent a single heterodont species. A late Maastrichtian assemblage is dominated by a distinct troodontid. The differences between northern and southern faunas based on isolated theropod teeth provide evidence for provinciality in the late Campanian and the late Maastrichtian of North America. However, there is no indication that major components of small-bodied theropod diversity were lost

  11. Small theropod teeth from the Late Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin, northwestern New Mexico and their implications for understanding latest Cretaceous dinosaur evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Williamson

    Full Text Available Studying the evolution and biogeographic distribution of dinosaurs during the latest Cretaceous is critical for better understanding the end-Cretaceous extinction event that killed off all non-avian dinosaurs. Western North America contains among the best records of Late Cretaceous terrestrial vertebrates in the world, but is biased against small-bodied dinosaurs. Isolated teeth are the primary evidence for understanding the diversity and evolution of small-bodied theropod dinosaurs during the Late Cretaceous, but few such specimens have been well documented from outside of the northern Rockies, making it difficult to assess Late Cretaceous dinosaur diversity and biogeographic patterns. We describe small theropod teeth from the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. These specimens were collected from strata spanning Santonian - Maastrichtian. We grouped isolated theropod teeth into several morphotypes, which we assigned to higher-level theropod clades based on possession of phylogenetic synapomorphies. We then used principal components analysis and discriminant function analyses to gauge whether the San Juan Basin teeth overlap with, or are quantitatively distinct from, similar tooth morphotypes from other geographic areas. The San Juan Basin contains a diverse record of small theropods. Late Campanian assemblages differ from approximately coeval assemblages of the northern Rockies in being less diverse with only rare representatives of troodontids and a Dromaeosaurus-like taxon. We also provide evidence that erect and recurved morphs of a Richardoestesia-like taxon represent a single heterodont species. A late Maastrichtian assemblage is dominated by a distinct troodontid. The differences between northern and southern faunas based on isolated theropod teeth provide evidence for provinciality in the late Campanian and the late Maastrichtian of North America. However, there is no indication that major components of small-bodied theropod

  12. Porphyrin geochemistry of Atlantic Jurassic-Cretaceous black shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, E.W.; Louda, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Late Jurassic-early Cretaceous black shales and an overlying sequence of Albian-Campanian zeolitic claystones from the Falkland Plateau (DSDP/IPOD Leg 71, Site 511) were analyzed for tetrapyrrole pigment type and abundance. The black shale sequence was found to be rich in DPEP-series dominated free-base, nickel (Ni) and, to a lesser extent, vanadyl (V = 0) porphyrins. A low level of organic maturity (i.e. precatagenesis) is indicated for these strata as nickel chelation by free-base porphyrins is only 50-75% complete, proceeding down-hole to 627 meters sub-bottom. Electronic and mass spectral data reveal that the proposed benzo-DPEP (BD) and tetrahydrobenzo-DPEP (THBD) series are present in the free-base and Ni species, as well as the more usual occurrence in V = 0 porphyrin arrays. Highly reducing conditions are suggested by an abundance of the PAH perylene, substantial amounts of the THBD/BD series and a redox equilibrium between free-base DPEP and 7,8-dihydro-DPEP series, which exist in a 7:1 molar ratio. The Albian-Campanian claystone strata were found to be tetrapyrrole poor, and those pigments present were typed as Cu/Ni highly dealkylated (C/sub 26/ max.) etioporphyrins, thought to be derived via redeposition and oxidation of terrestrial organic matter (OM). Results from the present study are correlated to their past analyses of Jurassic-Cretaceous sediments from Atlantic margins in an effort to relate tetrapyrrole quality and quantity to basin evolution and OM sources in the proto-Atlantic.

  13. Remagnetization and Clay diagenesis in Jurassic Sediments of Skye, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, A.; Elliott, W.; Wampler, J.; Elmore, R.; Engel, M. H.

    2003-12-01

    The thrust of this study is to test the hypothesized connection between magnetite authigenesis and diagenetic reactions forming illite, an idea based on the results of paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, geochemical, and petrographic/SEM studies on Jurassic sedimentary rocks of Skye, Scotland. The Jurassic rocks in southern Skye contain a dual polarity magnetization residing in magnetite that is interpreted as a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) and has directions similar to those of early Tertiary igneous rocks on Skye. The presence-absence test and the timing of acquisition for this CRM suggest that magnetite authigenesis is related to the smectite-to-illite conversion, and that clay diagenesis is a viable remagnetization mechanism. The clay fractions consist of illite-smectite (I-S), kaolinite, and trace amounts of chlorite. The I-S exhibits Kalkberg order (IISI) and typically contains ˜ 85% to 90% illite layers based on the positions of the 001 reflection. The 2M1, 1M and 1Md illite polytypes are present in variable proportions depending on size fraction. The K-Ar dates of I-S in the finest fraction range from 100 to 131 Ma while the K-Ar dates of I-S of the coarse fractions range from 160-210 Ma. In all cases, the dates of the finest I-S are much greater than the Tertiary CRM ages recorded in these rocks (65 Ma). The K-Ar dates decrease with decrease in particle size. At first approximation, the decrease is thought to reflect smaller amounts of detrital illite in the finer fractions. The youngest K-Ar dates of I-S are significantly greater than the CRM age recorded in these sediments. The most likely explanation of the discordance between K-Ar dates and CRM is that the finest fractions contain small amounts of detrital illite.

  14. Dynamic Paleogeography of the Jurassic Andean Basin: pattern of regression and general considerations on main features

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    J-C. Vicente

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Following examination of the evolution of the Jurassic Andean retroarc basin at a global scale for the Central Andes, this paper analyses the pattern of the regressive process, and discusses some general features concerning Andean Jurassic Paleogeography. The early Upper Jurassic regression obeys to an exactly reverse pattern as the one evidenced for the Lower Jurassic transgressive process. Sectors with late transgressions become those with early regressions while those with early transgressions show later regressions. This fact may indicate that the Norte Chico Isthmus (29°S to 30°30'S was a precociously emerged zone from the Bajocian. This carries again a split up between the Tarapacá and Aconcagua-Neuquén basins until their complete drying up in the Late Oxfordian following their restricted circulation. This evaporitic late stage presents great analogy with the Mediterranean «Messinian crisis» and gives evidence of a general tectonic and magmatic control on the straits. The local transgressions observed on the cratonic margin of the central part of these shrinking basins were due to shifting of water masses resulting from the regressive process on the northern and southern margins. Comparison between the main stages of transgression and regression allows some quantification concerning velocities of displacement of coastlines, specifically lengthwise. The permanence of paleogeographic and structural features over the time argues for an indisputable tectonic heritage. In the dynamic framework of this typical barred retroarc basin where arc magmatic activity has contributed considerably to variation on sediment supply and changing bathymetry of the seaways connecting with the Pacific Ocean, evidence for an assumed global eustatic cycle remains questionable or very subordinated.

  15. A new Basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic Navajo sandstone of Southern Utah.

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    Joseph J W Sertich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Basal sauropodomorphs, or 'prosauropods,' are a globally widespread paraphyletic assemblage of terrestrial herbivorous dinosaurs from the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic. In contrast to several other landmasses, the North American record of sauropodomorphs during this time interval remains sparse, limited to Early Jurassic occurrences of a single well-known taxon from eastern North America and several fragmentary specimens from western North America. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On the basis of a partial skeleton, we describe here a new basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah, Seitaad ruessi gen. et sp. nov. The partially articulated skeleton of Seitaad was likely buried post-mortem in the base of a collapsed dune foreset. The new taxon is characterized by a plate-like medial process of the scapula, a prominent proximal expansion of the deltopectoral crest of the humerus, a strongly inclined distal articular surface of the radius, and a proximally and laterally hypertrophied proximal metacarpal I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Phylogenetic analysis recovers Seitaad as a derived basal sauropodomorph closely related to plateosaurid or massospondylid 'prosauropods' and its presence in western North America is not unexpected for a member of this highly cosmopolitan clade. This occurrence represents one of the most complete vertebrate body fossil specimens yet recovered from the Navajo Sandstone and one of the few basal sauropodomorph taxa currently known from North America.

  16. No evidence for directional evolution of body mass in herbivorous theropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanno, Lindsay E; Makovicky, Peter J

    2013-01-22

    The correlation between large body size and digestive efficiency has been hypothesized to have driven trends of increasing mass in herbivorous clades by means of directional selection. Yet, to date, few studies have investigated this relationship from a phylogenetic perspective, and none, to our knowledge, with regard to trophic shifts. Here, we reconstruct body mass in the three major subclades of non-avian theropod dinosaurs whose ecomorphology is correlated with extrinsic evidence of at least facultative herbivory in the fossil record--all of which also achieve relative gigantism (more than 3000 kg). Ordinary least-squares regressions on natural log-transformed mean mass recover significant correlations between increasing mass and geological time. However, tests for directional evolution in body mass find no support for a phylogenetic trend, instead favouring passive models of trait evolution. Cross-correlation of sympatric taxa from five localities in Asia reveals that environmental influences such as differential habitat sampling and/or taphonomic filtering affect the preserved record of dinosaurian body mass in the Cretaceous. Our results are congruent with studies documenting that behavioural and/or ecological factors may mitigate the benefit of increasing mass in extant taxa, and suggest that the hypothesis can be extrapolated to herbivorous lineages across geological time scales.

  17. A new large-bodied oviraptorosaurian theropod dinosaur from the latest Cretaceous of western North America.

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    Matthew C Lamanna

    Full Text Available The oviraptorosaurian theropod dinosaur clade Caenagnathidae has long been enigmatic due to the incomplete nature of nearly all described fossils. Here we describe Anzu wyliei gen. et sp. nov., a new taxon of large-bodied caenagnathid based primarily on three well-preserved partial skeletons. The specimens were recovered from the uppermost Cretaceous (upper Maastrichtian Hell Creek Formation of North and South Dakota, and are therefore among the stratigraphically youngest known oviraptorosaurian remains. Collectively, the fossils include elements from most regions of the skeleton, providing a wealth of information on the osteology and evolutionary relationships of Caenagnathidae. Phylogenetic analysis reaffirms caenagnathid monophyly, and indicates that Anzu is most closely related to Caenagnathus collinsi, a taxon that is definitively known only from a mandible from the Campanian Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta. The problematic oviraptorosaurs Microvenator and Gigantoraptor are recovered as basal caenagnathids, as has previously been suggested. Anzu and other caenagnathids may have favored well-watered floodplain settings over channel margins, and were probably ecological generalists that fed upon vegetation, small animals, and perhaps eggs.

  18. Jurassic Tectonic Revolution in China and New Interpretation of the "Yanshan Movement"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shuwen; ZHANG Yueqiao; LONG Changxing; YANG Zhenyu; JI Qiang; WANG Tao; HU Jianming; CHEN Xuanhua

    2008-01-01

    With acquisition and accumulation of new data of structural geological investigations and high-resolution isotopic dating data, we have greatly improved our understanding of the tectonic events occurring in eastern China during the period from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous and may give a new interpretation of the nature, timing and geodynamic settings of the "Yanshan Movement". During the Mid-Late Jurassic (165±5 Ma), great readjustment of plate amalgamation kinematics took place in East Asia and the tectonic regime underwent great transformation, thus initiating a new tectonic regime in which the North China Block was the center and different plates converged toward it from the north, east and southwest and forming the "East Asia convergent"tectonic system characterized by intracontinental subduction and orogeny. As a consequence, the crustal lithosphere of the East Asian continent thickened considerably during the Late Jurassic,followed immediately by Early Cretaceous substantial lithospheric thinning and craton destruction featured by drastic lithospheric extension and widespread volcano-magmatic activities, resulting in a major biotic turnover from the Yanliao biota to Jehol Biota. Such a tremendous tectonic event that took place in the continent of China and East Asia is the basic connotation of the "Yanshan Movement". In the paper, according to the deformation patterns, geodynamic settings and deep processes, the "Yanshan Movement" is redefined as the Late Jurassic East Asian multi-directional plate convergent tectonic regime and its associated extensive intracontinental orogeny and great tectonic change that started at ~165±5 Ma. The substantial lithospheric attenuation in East China is considered the post-effect of the Yanshanian intracontinental orogeny and deformation.

  19. Modeling the Middle Jurassic ocean circulation

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    Maura Brunetti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present coupled ocean–sea-ice simulations of the Middle Jurassic (∼165 Ma when Laurasia and Gondwana began drifting apart and gave rise to the formation of the Atlantic Ocean. Since the opening of the Proto-Caribbean is not well constrained by geological records, configurations with and without an open connection between the Proto-Caribbean and Panthalassa are examined. We use a sea-floor bathymetry obtained by a recently developed three-dimensional (3D elevation model which compiles geological, palaeogeographical and geophysical data. Our original approach consists in coupling this elevation model, which is based on detailed reconstructions of oceanic realms, with a dynamical ocean circulation model. We find that the Middle Jurassic bathymetry of the Central Atlantic and Proto-Caribbean seaway only allows for a weak current of the order of 2 Sv in the upper 1000 m even if the system is open to the west. The effect of closing the western boundary of the Proto-Caribbean is to increase the transport related to barotropic gyres in the southern hemisphere and to change water properties, such as salinity, in the Neo-Tethys. Weak upwelling rates are found in the nascent Atlantic Ocean in the presence of this superficial current and we discuss their compatibility with deep-sea sedimentological records in this region.

  20. Discovery of the 187Ma granite in Jincheng area, Fujian Province: Constraint on Early Jurassic tectonic evolution of southeastern China%福建锦城187Ma花岗岩的发现——对华南沿海早侏罗世构造演化的制约

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘潜; 于津海; 苏斌; 王勤; 唐红峰; 许海; 崔翔

    2011-01-01

    本文对福建沿海福清地区的锦城花岗岩和牛头尾花岗闪长岩进行了岩石地球化学、锆石U-Pb-Hf同位素分析.LA-ICP-MS锆石U-Pb定年结果显示锦城花岗岩的年龄为187±1Ma,为福建沿海首次发现的早侏罗世岩浆活动;牛头尾花岗岩形成时代为130±1Ma,代表燕山晚期(白垩纪)的一期岩浆活动.锦城花岗岩具有高5iO2、偏碱、高Fe2OT3等特征,为高钾钙碱性系列,岩石相对富集轻稀土,亏损Nb、Ta、Ti等高场强元素,富集Ba、Sr等大离子亲石元素,具高Rb/Sr( 1.31 ~ 1.93)比值及低Rb/Ba(0.26 ~0.29)、Eu/Eu*(0.30 ~0.56)、La/Yb(5.69 ~ 18.39),Sr/Y(2.24 ~2.29)比值,为典型的Ⅰ型花岗岩,且具有火山孤花岗岩的地球化学特征,很可能形成于与俯冲相关的构造背景.牛头尾花岗岩相比锦城花岗岩低SiO2,贫钾,而富镁、钙,属于花岗闪长岩.其更亏损Nb、Ta及富集Ba、Sr,具较低Rb/Sr(0.27)、Rb/Ba(0.09)比值和较高的Eu/Eu*(0.98)、La/Yb( 16.87),Sr/Y( 19.08)比值,同样为具有弧特征的钙碱性Ⅰ型花岗岩,也形成于与大洋俯冲有关的构造背景.锦城花岗岩和年头尾花岗闪长岩具有相似的锆石Hf同位素组成,εHf(t)分别为2.18~4.73和1.25 ~4.15,tDMC均为~ 1.0Ga,表明二者起源于相同的新元古代新生地壳.结合已有的资料,本次研究发现锦城花岗岩与南岭地区同时代岩浆岩( 194 ~ 172Ma)在成因上有密切的联系,暗示古太平洋板决的俯冲很可能自早侏罗世开始.这样,华南古特提斯构造域向古太平洋构造域的转换很可能发生在早侏罗世之前,大致在205 ~ 190Ma期间.%This study presents bulk geochemical and zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopic results for the Jincheng granite and Niutouwei granodiorite in the Fuqing area, coastal Fujian Province. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating results show that the Jincheng granite has an crystallization age of 187 ± 1 Ma, which is the firstly found Early Jurassic magmatism

  1. Post-Jurassic mammal-like reptile from the Palaeocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R C; Youzwyshyn, G P; Krause, D W

    1992-07-16

    Mammal-like reptiles of the order Therapsida document the emergence of mammals from more primitive synapsids and are of unique zoological and palaeontological interest on that account. Therapsids, first appearing in the Early Permian, were thought to become extinct in the Middle Jurassic, soon after the Late Triassic origin of mammals. Here, however, we report the discovery of a therapsid from the late Palaeocene, 100 million years younger than the youngest previous occurrence of the order. This discovery nearly doubles the stratigraphic range of therapsids and furnishes their first record from the Cenozoic. The documenting fossils, an incomplete dentary containing three teeth, and four isolated teeth from other, conspecific individuals (Fig. 1), are from the Paskapoo Formation, at Cochrane, Alberta, Canada, from beds yielding a diverse mammalian fauna of early Tiffanian age. These specimens are catalogued in the collections of the University of Alberta Laboratory for Vertebrate Paleontology (UALVP) and provide the basis for a new taxon, as named and described below: (see text)

  2. The origin and early evolution of dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Max C; Ezcurra, Martin D; Bittencourt, Jonathas S; Novas, Fernando E

    2010-02-01

    The oldest unequivocal records of Dinosauria were unearthed from Late Triassic rocks (approximately 230 Ma) accumulated over extensional rift basins in southwestern Pangea. The better known of these are Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis, Pisanosaurus mertii, Eoraptor lunensis, and Panphagia protos from the Ischigualasto Formation, Argentina, and Staurikosaurus pricei and Saturnalia tupiniquim from the Santa Maria Formation, Brazil. No uncontroversial dinosaur body fossils are known from older strata, but the Middle Triassic origin of the lineage may be inferred from both the footprint record and its sister-group relation to Ladinian basal dinosauromorphs. These include the typical Marasuchus lilloensis, more basal forms such as Lagerpeton and Dromomeron, as well as silesaurids: a possibly monophyletic group composed of Mid-Late Triassic forms that may represent immediate sister taxa to dinosaurs. The first phylogenetic definition to fit the current understanding of Dinosauria as a node-based taxon solely composed of mutually exclusive Saurischia and Ornithischia was given as "all descendants of the most recent common ancestor of birds and Triceratops". Recent cladistic analyses of early dinosaurs agree that Pisanosaurus mertii is a basal ornithischian; that Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis and Staurikosaurus pricei belong in a monophyletic Herrerasauridae; that herrerasaurids, Eoraptor lunensis, and Guaibasaurus candelariensis are saurischians; that Saurischia includes two main groups, Sauropodomorpha and Theropoda; and that Saturnalia tupiniquim is a basal member of the sauropodomorph lineage. On the contrary, several aspects of basal dinosaur phylogeny remain controversial, including the position of herrerasaurids, E. lunensis, and G. candelariensis as basal theropods or basal saurischians, and the affinity and/or validity of more fragmentary taxa such as Agnosphitys cromhallensis, Alwalkeria maleriensis, Chindesaurus bryansmalli, Saltopus elginensis, and

  3. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Late Triassic – Jurassic development of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone, southern Scandinavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The continental to marine Upper Triassic – Jurassic succession of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone is interpreted within a sequence stratigraphic framework, and the evolution of the depositional basin is discussed. The intracratonic Permian–Cenozoic Danish Basin was formed by Late Carboniferous – Early Permian crustal extension followed by subsidence governed primarily by thermal cooling and local faulting. The basin is separated from thestable Precambrian Baltic Shield by the Fennoscandian Border Zone, and is bounded by basement blocks of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High towards the south. In Late Triassic – Jurassic times, the basin was part of the epeiric shallow sea that covered most of northern Europe. The Upper Triassic – Jurassic basin-fill is subdivided into two tectono-stratigraphic units by a basinwide intra-Aalenian unconformity. The Norian – Lower Aalenian succession was formed under relative tectonic tranquillity and shows an overall layer-cake geometry, except for areas with local faults and salt movements.Deposition was initiated by a Norian transgression that led to shallow marine deposition and was accompanied by a gradual climatic change to more humid conditions. Extensive sheets of shoreface sand and associated paralic sediments were deposited during short-lived forced regressions in Rhaetian time. A stepwise deepening and development of fully marine conditions followed in the Hettangian – Early Sinemurian. Thick uniform basinwide mud blankets weredeposited on an open storm-influenced shelf, while sand was trapped at the basin margins. This depositional pattern continued until Late Toarcian – Early Aalenian times when the basin became restricted due to renewed uplift of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High. In Middle Aalenian – Bathonian times, the former basin area was subjected to deep erosion, and deposition became restricted to the fault-bounded Sorgenfrei–Tornquist Zone. Eventually the fault margins

  4. Upper Jurassic basin axial turbidites within the Gertrud Graben, Danish Central Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, E.S.; Jepsen, A.M.; Maver, K.G.

    1998-10-01

    Fore more than twenty years, the Jurassic succession in the Danish Central Graben has been subject to intense exploration for hydrocarbons. Approximately 43 wildcats have been drilled and most of these tested were structural traps located on footwall crests. The reservoirs encountered were Middle and Upper Jurassic sandstones deposited mainly in near shore depositional environments. Some of these wells penetrated thin turbidites of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous age. Within the Gertrud Graben distinct seismic anomalies indicate the presence of basin floor turbidites, which can be correlated to fan fringe turbites encountered in the Jeppe-1, Gwen-2 and Mona-1 wells. Within the Gertrud Graben, seismic anomalies characterized by high amplitude reflections with in an otherwise transparent reflection pattern have been recognized. The zone with high amplitude reflections correlates with thin turbidites with oil shows encountered in the Jeppe-1 well. The turbiditic sandstone succession has a gross thickness of 25 m and a net to gross of 75%, with porosity up to 10%. The presence of oil shows in the thin turbiditic sandstones in the Jeppe-1 well, drilled on a footwall crest, suggests the possibility of thicker sandstones in the basinal areas. The aim of this study is to map the distribution of the seismic anomalies by performing seismic inversion. Seismic inversion is used to derive acoustic impedance as a lithology indicator and to establish a geological model that is a likely prediction of the lithology and architecture of the depositional system. (EG) 2 fig., 17 refs.

  5. A Middle Jurassic heterodontosaurid dinosaur from Patagonia and the evolution of heterodontosaurids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Diego; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.; Becerra, Marcos

    2011-05-01

    Heterodontosauridae is a morphologically divergent group of dinosaurs that has recently been interpreted as one of the most basal clades of Ornithischia. Heterodontosaurid remains were previously known from the Early Jurassic of southern Africa, but recent discoveries and studies have significantly increased the geographical and temporal range for this clade. Here, we report a new ornithischian dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic Cañadón Asfalto Formation in central Patagonia, Argentina. This new taxon, Manidens condorensis gen. et sp. nov., includes well-preserved craniomandibular and postcranial remains and represents the only diagnostic ornithischian specimen yet discovered in the Jurassic of South America so far. Derived features of its anatomy indicate that Manidens belongs to Heterodontosauridae, as the sister taxon of Heterodontosaurus and other South African heterodontosaurids. The presence of posterior dentary teeth with high crowns but lacking extensive wear facets in Manidens suggests that this form represents an intermediate stage in the development of the remarkable adaptations to herbivory described for Heterodontosaurus. The dentition of Manidens condorensis also has autapomorphies, such as asymmetrically arranged denticles in posterior teeth and a mesially projected denticle in the posteriormost teeth. At an estimated total length of 60-75 cm, Manidens furthermore confirms the small size of basal heterodontosaurids.

  6. New gliding mammaliaforms from the Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-Jin; Grossnickle, David M.; Liu, Di; Zhang, Yu-Guang; Neander, April I.; Ji, Qiang; Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2017-08-01

    Stem mammaliaforms are Mesozoic forerunners to mammals, and they offer critical evidence for the anatomical evolution and ecological diversification during the earliest mammalian history. Two new eleutherodonts from the Late Jurassic period have skin membranes and skeletal features that are adapted for gliding. Characteristics of their digits provide evidence of roosting behaviour, as in dermopterans and bats, and their feet have a calcaneal calcar to support the uropagatium as in bats. The new volant taxa are phylogenetically nested with arboreal eleutherodonts. Together, they show an evolutionary experimentation similar to the iterative evolutions of gliders within arboreal groups of marsupial and placental mammals. However, gliding eleutherodonts possess rigid interclavicle-clavicle structures, convergent to the avian furculum, and they retain shoulder girdle plesiomorphies of mammaliaforms and monotremes. Forelimb mobility required by gliding occurs at the acromion-clavicle and glenohumeral joints, is different from and convergent to the shoulder mobility at the pivotal clavicle-sternal joint in marsupial and placental gliders.

  7. [Proceedings of the symposium 'Molluscan Palaeontology' : 11th International Malacological Congress, Siena (Italy) 30th August - 5th September 1992 / A.W. Janssen and R. Janssen (editors)]: Early rissoid gastropods from the Jurassic of Italy: the meaning of first appearances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conti, M.A.; Monari, S.; Oliviero, M.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of Jurassic outcrops from Veneto, Central Italy and Sicily improved our knowledge on the gastropods of these areas, characterised by the presence, aside of archaic forms, of some modern ones. Noteworthy is the record from those outcrops of several species, which can be referred to the family

  8. Relationship of voluminous ignimbrites to continental arc plutons: Petrology of Jurassic ignimbrites and contemporaneous plutons in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohey-Breting, N. K.; Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.; Carter, C.A.; Schermer, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    Volcanism was broadly associated in both space and time with Mesozoic plutonism in the Cordillera continental margin arc, but the precise petrogenetic relationships between volcanic rocks and adjacent zoned plutons are not known. Igneous rocks in a tilted crustal section in California include four laterally extensive Jurassic ash flow tuffs from 550 to >1100 m thick underlain at deeper structural levels by Jurassic plutons. Zircon geochronology confirms previous correlations of individual tuffs, suggesting ignimbrites with eruptive volumes up to 800 km3 were deposited both during the apparent Early Jurassic plutonic lull as well as contemporaneous with solidification of regionally widespread Middle and Late Jurassic plutons. The tuffs are weakly to strongly porphyritic (5 to 55% phenocrysts) monotonous intermediate porphyritic dacite to low-silica rhyolite and show strong bulk rock chemical affinity to contemporaneous plutons. Trace element compositions of zircons from the tuffs and contemporaneous plutonic rocks record large and consistent differences in Hf/Zr and REE over similar ranges in Ti abundances, supporting bulk compositional similarities and illuminating similarities and variations in thermal histories despite the effects of hydrothermal alteration. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Basin architecture, salt tectonics, and Upper Jurassic structural styles, DeSoto Canyon Salt basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacRae, G.; Watkins, J.S. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Despite the Gulf of Mexico being a mature hydrocarbon province, the least understood aspects of the basin's geologic history are undoubtedly those concerning pre-Middle Jurassic tectonic events and their implication for the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the region. Despite awareness of the importance of continental extension during rifting, there are few quantitative studies that show the influence of crustal extension on basin architecture, the distribution of salt, and Late Jurassic sedimentation in the DeSoto Canyon Salt basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Application of simplified isostatic principles using a lithospheric buoyancy model allow quantification of total tectonic subsidence, crustal thickness, crustal extension, and crust type. An average crustal thickness of 25 km and crustal extension [beta] values between 1.4 and 1.8 suggest the sedimentary succession is underlain by moderately stretched and attenuated continental crust. The widespread distribution and geometry of dipping subsalt reflectors, particularly in the shelfal areas, provide evidence for a Late Triassic-Early Jurassic phase of rifting prior to deposition of Middle Jurassic salt. Although deposition occurred in a slowly subsiding, stable marginal setting, salt movement and associated growth faulting are the most significant tectonic elements affecting the stratigraphic and structural development of the overlying strata.

  10. Post-Jurassic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Seton, Maria; Dietmar Müller, R.; Flament, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The accretionary growth of Asia, linked to long-term convergence between Eurasia, Gondwana-derived blocks and the Pacific, resulted in a mosaic of terranes for which conflicting tectonic interpretations exist. Here, we propose solutions to a number of controversies related to the evolution of Sundaland through a synthesis of published geological data and plate reconstructions that reconcile both geological and geophysical constraints with plate driving forces. We propose that West Sulawesi, East Java and easternmost Borneo rifted from northern Gondwana in the latest Jurassic, collided with an intra-oceanic arc at ~115 Ma and subsequently sutured to Sundaland by 80 Ma. Although recent models argue that the Southwest Borneo core accreted to Sundaland at this time, we use volcanic and biogeographic constraints to show that the core of Borneo was on the Asian margin since at least the mid Jurassic. This northward transfer of Gondwana-derived continental fragments required a convergent plate boundary in the easternmost Tethys that we propose gave rise to the Philippine Archipelago based on the formation of latest Jurassic-Early Cretaceous supra-subduction zone ophiolites on Halmahera, Obi Island and Luzon. The Late Cretaceous marks the shift from Andean-style subduction to back-arc opening on the east Asian margin. Arc volcanism along South China ceased by ~60 Ma due to the rollback of the Izanagi slab, leading to the oceanward migration of the volcanic arc and the opening of the Proto South China Sea (PSCS). We use the Apennines-Tyrrhenian system in the Mediterranean as an analogue to model this back-arc. Continued rollback detaches South Palawan, Mindoro and the Semitau continental blocks from the stable east Asian margin and transfers them onto Sundaland in the Eocene to produce the Sarawak Orogeny. The extrusion of Indochina and subduction polarity reversal along northern Borneo opens the South China Sea and transfers the Dangerous Grounds-Reed Bank southward to

  11. Record-Breaking Pain: The Largest Number and Variety of Forelimb Bone Maladies in a Theropod Dinosaur.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Senter

    Full Text Available Bone abnormalities are common in theropod dinosaur skeletons, but before now no specimen was known with more than four afflicted bones of the pectoral girdle and/or forelimb. Here we describe the pathology of a specimen of the theropod dinosaur Dilophosaurus wetherilli with eight afflicted bones of the pectoral girdle and forelimb. On its left side the animal has a fractured scapula and radius and large fibriscesses in the ulna and the proximal thumb phalanx. On its right side the animal has abnormal torsion of the humeral shaft, bony tumors on the radius, a truncated distal articular surface of metacarpal III, and angular deformities of the first phalanx of the third finger. Healing and remodeling indicates that the animal survived for months and possibly years after its ailments began, but its right third finger was permanently deformed and lacked the capability of flexion. The deformities of the humerus and the right third finger may be due to developmental osteodysplasia, a condition known in extant birds but unreported in non-avian dinosaurs before now.

  12. Record-Breaking Pain: The Largest Number and Variety of Forelimb Bone Maladies in a Theropod Dinosaur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Phil; Juengst, Sara L

    2016-01-01

    Bone abnormalities are common in theropod dinosaur skeletons, but before now no specimen was known with more than four afflicted bones of the pectoral girdle and/or forelimb. Here we describe the pathology of a specimen of the theropod dinosaur Dilophosaurus wetherilli with eight afflicted bones of the pectoral girdle and forelimb. On its left side the animal has a fractured scapula and radius and large fibriscesses in the ulna and the proximal thumb phalanx. On its right side the animal has abnormal torsion of the humeral shaft, bony tumors on the radius, a truncated distal articular surface of metacarpal III, and angular deformities of the first phalanx of the third finger. Healing and remodeling indicates that the animal survived for months and possibly years after its ailments began, but its right third finger was permanently deformed and lacked the capability of flexion. The deformities of the humerus and the right third finger may be due to developmental osteodysplasia, a condition known in extant birds but unreported in non-avian dinosaurs before now.

  13. Functional variation of neck muscles and their relation to feeding style in Tyrannosauridae and other large theropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, Eric; Russell, Anthony P

    2007-08-01

    Reconstructed neck muscles of large theropod dinosaurs suggest influences on feeding style that paralleled variation in skull mechanics. In all examined theropods, the head dorsiflexor m. transversospinalis capitis probably filled in the posterior dorsal concavity of the neck, for a more crocodilian- than avian-like profile in this region. The tyrannosaurine tyrannosaurids Daspletosaurus and Tyrannosaurus had relatively larger moment arms for latero-flexion by m. longissimus capitis superficialis and m. complexus than albertosaurine tyrannosaurids, and longer dorsiflexive moment arms for m. complexus. Areas of dorsiflexor origination are significantly larger relative to neck length in adult Tyrannosaurus rex than in other tyrannosaurids, suggesting relatively large muscle cross-sections and forces. Tyrannosaurids were not particularly specialized for neck ventro-flexion. In contrast, the hypothesis that Allosaurus co-opted m. longissimus capitis superficialis for ventro-flexion is strongly corroborated. Ceratosaurus had robust insertions for the ventro-flexors m. longissimus capitis profundus and m. rectus capitis ventralis. Neck muscle morphology is consistent with puncture-and-pull and powerful shake feeding in tyrannosaurids, relatively rapid strikes in Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus, and ventroflexive augmentation of weaker jaw muscle forces in the non tyrannosaurids. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. 广西十万大山调查区晚三叠世至早侏罗世聚煤规律研究%Research on the coal accumulation regularity of Shiwandashan survey area in Guangxi during Late Triassic epoch to Early Jurassic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新柱; 李居奎; 姚存伟

    2015-01-01

    Taking the Shiwandashan prospecting area during Late Triassic epoch to Early Ju-rassic as the research obj ect,the coal seam properties,main coal seam distribution,main coal-controlling factors and coal forming pattern were discussed on the basis of detail field geological investigation and laboratory analysis. The results showed that the main coal-bearing formation was Fulongao Formation of Upper Triassic,especially the upper fourth section,the coal-bearing property of Lower Triassic was very bad. The coal distribution scale was not large,most of the coal seams were carbon mudstone lamina,mudstone containing carbon or extremely thin coal seam except three layers of minable seams or local minable seams. The lateral distribution of coal seam was inhomogenous obviously,it concentrated mainly in mid-eastern region of investigation area which located between Shiwandashan forest park and Pinghehuai,and distributed discontinu-ously. The coal formation controlling factors were mainly sedimentary environment and paleoto-pography. The coal-forming environment was depression between alluvial fans.%以广西十万大山勘查区晚三叠世至早侏罗世为研究对象,在详细野外地质调查和实验室分析的基础上探讨研究区主要含煤层段的性质、主要煤层的分布、主要控煤因素及成煤模式。研究表明调查区主要含煤地层为上三叠统扶隆坳组,尤其是第四段上部,下侏罗统含煤性则极差。煤层分布规模不大,除了3层可采或局部可采煤层以外,绝大多数均为薄层炭质泥岩、含炭泥岩或煤线。煤层分布具有明显的不均一性,主要集中于调查区中东部十万大山森林公园与平和怀之间,并呈透镜体状不连续地展布。煤炭形成的控制因素主要为沉积环境和古地形。成煤环境主要为冲积扇扇间洼地。

  15. Presence of the dinosaur Scelidosaurus indicates Jurassic age for the Kayenta Formation (Glen Canyon Group, northern Arizona)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padian, Kevin

    1989-05-01

    The Glen Canyon Group (Moenave, Wingate, Kayenta and Navajo Formations) of northern Arizona represents an extensive outcrop of early Mesozoic age terrestrial sediments. The age of these formations has long been disputed because independent stratigraphic data from marine tie-ins, paleobotanical and palynological evidence, and radiometric calibrations have been scanty or absent. The fauna of the Kayenta Formation in particular has been problematic because it has appeared to contain both typical Late Triassic and Early Jurassic taxa Here I report that the principal evidence for Late Triassic taxa, dermal scutes previously assigned to an aetosaur, in fact belongs to the thyreophoran ornithischian dinosaur Scelidosaurus, previously known only as a washed-in form found in marine sediments in the Early Jurassic of England. The presence of this dinosaur represents the first vertebrate biostratigraphic tie-in of the Glen Canyon Group horizons with reliably dated marine deposits in Europe. Together with revised systematic assessments of other vertebrates and independent evidence from fossil pollen, it supports an Early Jurassic age for the Kayenta Formation and most or all of the Glen Canyon Group.

  16. Dinosaur tracks from Middle-Upper Jurassic Santai Formation:New materials and new interpretation%山东蒙阴盆地中晚侏罗世三台组恐龙足迹化石新材料新认识

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李日辉; 刘明渭; 杜圣贤

    2015-01-01

    对山东蒙阴盆地三台组以前及新发现的三趾型恐龙足迹化石开展了综合研究,认为应归入翘脚龙足迹属Grallator,其造迹者是小型兽脚类恐龙而非此前认为的鸟脚类恐龙,是目前山东省时代最老的恐龙足迹化石,也是中晚侏罗世恐龙活动的唯一证据。%New revealed and previously reported dinosaur tracks,which are all from Middle-Upper Juras-sic Santai Formation of the Mengyin basin in Yangzhuang,Xintai City,Shandong Province,are syntheti-cally studied herein.These tracks are all tridactyl,longer than wide (ranges 12.0~17.5 cm in length and 9.5~12.4 cm in width),and the track length/width ratios range between 1.3 and 1.4.One of the track (LR-XT10.1)even shows clear sharp claw traces.All these features demonstrate that these traces are of theropod,instead of ornithopod as previously interpreted,dinosaur affinity,and they are herein tentatively labeled as Grallator isp.The tracks from the Santai Formation are the earliest dinosaur record ever repor-ted in Shandong Province,it also indicate that small-scale theropod dinosaurs once existed in the Megnyin basin during Middle-Late Jurassic time.

  17. NEW EARLY BATHONIAN BIGOTITINAE AND ZIGZAGICERATINAE (AMMONOIDEA, MIDDLE JURASSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIXTO R. FERNÁNDEZ-LÓPEZ

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Several tens of Lower Bathonian Bigotites from Digne-Castellane region (SE France and Cabo Mondego area (Portugal have been reviewed. Three species have been distinguished in the lowermost subzone of the Zigzag Zone (Parvum Subzone just above the boundary Bajocian to Bathonian: B. diniensis Sturani [M+m], B. sturanii sp. nov. [M+m] and B. mondegoensis sp. nov. [M+m]. In the Bas Auran area, a chronocline from evolute, strongly ribbed and constricted forms (including B. sturanii and B. diniensis to involute forms with blunt, moderately prominent ribbing and weak constrictions (including B. mondegoensis can be recognized. The shared taxa B. mondegoensis sp. nov. and possibly B. diniensis Sturani permit detailed subdivision and correlation to be established between ammonite fossil assemblages of Parvum Subzone in the Lusitanian and Alpine basins. A separate genus of Zigzagiceratinae, Protozigzagiceras g. nov., is proposed to encompass P. torrensi (Sturani as type species. These new palaeontological data about the youngest members of Bigotitinae and the oldest members of Zigzagiceratinae are of biochronostratigraphic importance for the subdivision and correlation of the basal Bathonian Zigzag Zone. Three successive biohorizons can be identified at the Parvum Subzone in Bas Auran (French Alpine Basin and Cabo Mondego (Lusitanian Basin: Diniensis, Mondegoensis and Protozigzagiceras biohorizons. 

  18. Fluid flow from matrix to fractures in Early Jurassic shales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M.E.; Hardebol, N.J.; Barnhoorn, A.; Boersma, Quinten; Carone, A.; Liu, Y.; de Winter, D.A.M.; Peach, C.J.; Drury, M.R.

    2017-01-01

    The potential of shale reservoirs for gas extraction is largely determined by the permeability of the rock. Typical pore diameters in shales range from the μm down to the nm scale. The permeability of shale reservoirs is a function of the interconnectivity between the pore space and the natural

  19. Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous of Sanjiang-Middle Amur basin: Non-marine and marine correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIRILLOVA; Galina

    2009-01-01

    A comparative analysis of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous strata have been done for the Sanjiang Middle Amur basin, a coaland oil-bearing area spanning the eastern Heilongjiang of northeastern China and southeastern Far East of Russia. On the basis of various fossils occurring in the formations, particularly by means of the Tithonian-Valanginian index Buchia and the late Barremian-middle Albian indicator Aucellina assemblages, the marine and non-marine Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous strata in the basin are correlated. The Mesozoic international chronostratigraphic chart (http://www.stratigra phy.org) is established basically based on the marine rocks. To accurately date the non-marine strata, it is necessary to correlate them with the marine deposits. This study sheds new light on the dating and correlation of non-marine Upper Mesozoic. Additionally, the results would help understand the tectonics and paleogeography and thus aid the exploration of energy resources.

  20. MIDDLE JURASSIC-LOWER CRETACEOUS BIOSTRATIGRAPHY IN THE CENTRAL PONTIDES (TURKEY: REMARKS ON PALEOGEOGRAPHY AND TECTONIC EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORA ROJAY

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The deposition of Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonates in the Pontides was controlled mainly by the evolution of an Atlantic-type continental margin in the Tethys. The study of several stratigraphic sections from allochthonous slices and blocks of the North Anatolian Ophiolitic Melange provided insight into the Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Central Pontide Belt. The Callovian-Aptian successions span the Globuligerina gr. oxfordiana, Clypeina jurassica (equivalent of the Tubiphytes morronensis zone, Protopeneroplis ultragranulata (with the Haplophragmoides joukowskyi subzone, Montsalevia salevensis, Hedbergella delrioensis - Hedbergella planispira - Leupoldina - Globigerinelloides and Globigerinelloides algerianus biozones. Two major stratigraphic gaps corresponding to the pre-Callovian and Hauterivian-Early Aptian ages are recognised within the successions. Lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic studies indicate strong similarities in the evolution of the successions in the Amasya region (Central Pontides and Biga-Bursa-Bilecik (BBB Platform (North-western Anatolia. 

  1. Geometric morphometric analysis of intratrackway variability: a case study on theropod and ornithopod dinosaur trackways from Münchehagen (Lower Cretaceous, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heteren, Anneke H.; Wings, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    A profound understanding of the influence of trackmaker anatomy, foot movements and substrate properties is crucial for any interpretation of fossil tracks. In this case study we analyze variability of footprint shape within one large theropod (T3), one medium-sized theropod (T2) and one ornithopod (I1) trackway from the Lower Cretaceous of Münchehagen (Lower Saxony, Germany) in order to determine the informativeness of individual features and measurements for ichnotaxonomy, trackmaker identification, and the discrimination between left and right footprints. Landmark analysis is employed based on interpretative outline drawings derived from photogrammetric data, allowing for the location of variability within the footprint and the assessment of covariation of separate footprint parts. Objective methods to define the margins of a footprint are tested and shown to be sufficiently accurate to reproduce the most important results. The lateral hypex and the heel are the most variable regions in the two theropod trackways. As indicated by principal component analysis, a posterior shift of the lateral hypex is correlated with an anterior shift of the margin of the heel. This pattern is less pronounced in the ornithopod trackway, indicating that variation patterns can differ in separate trackways. In all trackways, hypices vary independently from each other, suggesting that their relative position a questionable feature for ichnotaxonomic purposes. Most criteria commonly employed to differentiate between left and right footprints assigned to theropods are found to be reasonably reliable. The described ornithopod footprints are asymmetrical, again allowing for a left–right differentiation. Strikingly, 12 out of 19 measured footprints of the T2 trackway are stepped over the trackway midline, rendering the trackway pattern a misleading left–right criterion for this trackway. Traditional measurements were unable to differentiate between the theropod and the ornithopod

  2. Late Jurassic Crustal Thickening in the Mesozoic Arc of Ecuador and Colombia: Implications on the Evolution of Continental Arcs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, J.; Cardona, A.; Blanco-Quintero, I.; Valencia, V.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of South America during the Jurassic is related to the subduction of the Farallon plate and the formation of a series of continental arcs. In the northern Andes such arcs have been considered as controlled by extensional dominated tectonics. Paleomagnetic constraints have also suggested that between the Early and Late Jurassic several crustal domains were translate along the continental margin in association with strain partitioning in the convergent margin. A review of the character of the Salado terrane in the Cordillera Real of Ecuador indicates that it includes extensively deformed and metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary rocks that have achieved a greenschist to amphibolite facies event with chloritoid and garnet. This rocks are tightly associated with a ca. 143 Ma syn-tectonic granodiorite to monzogranite batholith that is also extensively milonitized.A similar Late Jurassic crustal thickening event that apparently affected volcano-sedimentary rocks have been also recently suspected in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes in association with Jurassic plutonic rocks (Blanco-Quintero et al., 2013) It is therefore suggested that during the Late Jurassic the Northern Andes experienced significant contractional tectonics. Such crustal thickening may be related to either the active subduction setting were the crustal slivers formed in relation to oblique convergence are transfered and re-accreted to the margin and triggered the deformational event or to a collisional event associated to the arrival of an allocthonous terrane. New geochronological constraints on the metamorphic evolution and precise understanding on the relations between magmatism and deformation are going to be obtain in the Salado Terrane to appropriately test this hypothesis and contribute to the understanding of the extensional to compressional tectonic switching in continental arcs. Blanco-Quintero, I. F., García-Casco, A., Ruíz, E. C., Toro, L. M., Moreno, M

  3. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic-Cretaceous basalts from the Franz Josef Land Archipelago: tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abashev, Victor; Mikhaltsov, Nikolay; Vernikovsky, Valery

    2015-04-01

    New paleomagnetic data were obtained from a total of 158 oriented samples collected from the Jurassic magmatic complexes exposed on the Franz Joseph Land Archipelago (FJL). The field work was conducted during 2011 field season. Present study was focused on the tholeiitic basaltic lava flows that crop out on the Hooker Island. The samples were subjected to a detailed step-wise thermal demagnetization in temperatures up to 600 deg C or alternating field demagnetization with maximum filed up to 140 mT. Natural remanent magnetization (NRM) was measured with a 2G cryogenic magnetometer or a JR-6A spin-magnetometer housed in a magnetically shielded room at the Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences. The main NRM carriers in the FJL samples are titanomagnetites with varying Ti-content. Magnetic remanence was unblocked in temperatures of 350-400 deg C. Some samples are characterized by unblocking temperatures of 560 deg C. The new paleomagnetic data were combined with those previously obtained from the early Cretaceous volcanics exposed on the FJL. A new mean paleomagnetic direction for the Jurassic rocks was calculated as D=78.3 deg, I=74.7 deg, a95=3.1 deg, k=194.3, N=13. A corresponding paleomagnetic pole is now located at Plat=62.1 deg; Plon=136.5 deg, A95=5.5 deg, K=63.6. New results suggest that the JFL occupied a significantly different position from that of the present day. However, in early Cretaceous the JFL was already located close to its present day position. We propose a rifting event between the North Barentz terrane (FJL and possibly Svalbard) and the counterpart of European tectonic domain. The rifting occurred during Early-Middle Jurassic. This event was accompanied by a significant shift of the FJL to the north-east for approximately 500 km. New results are in good agreement with a hypothesis that the FJL was passing over the Icelandic-Siberian hot spot during the Jurassic-Cretaceous time

  4. A new long-proboscid genus of Pseudopolycentropodidae (Mecoptera from the Middle Jurassic of China and its plant-host specializations

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    ChungKun Shih

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new genus and species of Mecoptera with siphonate mouthparts, Sinopolycentropus rasnitsyni gen. et sp. n., assigned to the family Pseudopolycentropodidae Handlirsch, 1925. The specimen was collected from late middle Jurassic nonmarine strata of the Jiulongshan Formation in Inner Mongolia, northeastern China. The new material provides additional evidence for an early diversification of pseudopolycentropodids that was ongoing during the middle Jurassic. This diversity also adds to the variety of known pseudopolycentropodids with tubular proboscides that apparently fed on ovulate fluids produced by Mesozoic gymnosperms.

  5. A new long-proboscid genus of Pseudopolycentropodidae (Mecoptera) from the Middle Jurassic of China and its plant-host specializations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, ChungKun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Ren, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We describe a new genus and species of Mecoptera with siphonate mouthparts, Sinopolycentropus rasnitsyni gen. et sp. n., assigned to the family Pseudopolycentropodidae Handlirsch, 1925. The specimen was collected from late Middle Jurassic nonmarine strata of the Jiulongshan Formation in Inner Mongolia, northeastern China. The new material provides additional evidence for an early diversification of pseudopolycentropodids that was ongoing during the Middle Jurassic. This diversity also adds to the variety of known pseudopolycentropodids with tubular proboscides that apparently fed on ovulate fluids produced by Mesozoic gymnosperms. PMID:22259283

  6. Jurassic fishes of Gondwana Peces jurásicos de Gondwana

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    Adriana López-Arbarello

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Jurassic is an important period for understanding the origin of modern fish faunas, since it saw the first radiation - and in some cases the origin - of most modern groups. In chondrichthyans, neoselachian sharks and rays diversified during this time. In actinopterygians, the neopterygians, and among them the teleosts, experienced an important radiation, which led to the appearance of several of the modern teleosts groups. In the sarcopterygians, dipnoans and actinistians approached their current forms. However, the Jurassic fossil record of fishes is strongly biased towards the Northern Hemisphere. The only notable Early Jurassic fish fauna from Gondwana is that of the Kota Formation of India. For the Middle Jurassic, the most important Gondwanan fish faunas are those of the Aalenian-Bathonian Stanleyville Beds of the Democratic Republic of Congo, in which a distinct freshwater and a marine fauna are found. In the Late Jurassic, the Gondwanan record is slightly better, with important marine faunas being known from the Oxfordian Quebrada del Profeta in Chile and the Tithonian Vaca Muerta Formation of Argentina. Freshwater faunas have been described from the Tithonian Talbragar Beds of eastern Australia and the Tithonian Cañadón Calcáreo Formation of Argentina. The taxonomic composition of the known marine actinopterygian faunas of Gondwana is in general agreement with faunas of the Northern Hemisphere. However, the Jurassic fish record from Gondwana is highly incomplete both stratigraphically and geographically, and most faunas are in need of revision, further hampering an interpretation of Jurassic fish evolution in the Southern Hemisphere.El Período Jurásico es muy importante para entender el origen de las ictiofaunas modernas, dado que evidenció la primera radiación - y en algunos casos el origen - de la mayoría de los grupos modernos. Así, los condrictios neoselacios se diversificaron durante este periodo. Los actinopterigios

  7. The palaeogeography of Sundaland and Wallacea since the Late Jurassic

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    Robert Hall

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The continental core of Southeast (SE Asia, Sundaland, was assembled from Gondwana fragments by the Early Mesozoic. Continental blocks rifted from Australia in the Jurassic [South West (SW Borneo, East Java-West Sulawesi-Sumba], and the Woyla intraoceanic arc of Sumatra, were added to Sundaland in the Cretaceous. These fragments probably included emergent areas and could have carried a terrestrial flora and fauna. Sarawak, the offshore Luconia-Dangerous Grounds areas, and Palawan include Asian continental material. These probably represent a wide accretionary zone at the Asia-Pacific boundary, which was an active continental margin until the mid Cretaceous. Subduction ceased around Sundaland in the Late Cretaceous, and from about 80 Ma most of Sundaland was emergent, physically connected to Asia, but separated by deep oceans from India and Australia. India moved rapidly north during the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic but there is no evidence that it made contact with SE Asia prior to collision with Asia. One or more arc-India collisions during the Eocene may have preceded India-Asia collision. The arcs could have provided dispersal pathways from India into SE Asia before final suturing of the two continents. During the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic there was no significant subduction beneath Sumatra, Java and Borneo. At about 45 Ma Australia began to move north, subduction resumed and there was widespread rifting within Sundaland. During the Paleogene east and north Borneo were largely submerged, the Makassar Straits became a wide marine barrier within Sundaland, and West Sulawesi was separated from Sundaland but included land. By the Early Miocene the proto-South China Sea had been eliminated by subduction leading to emergence of land in central Borneo, Sabah and Palawan. Australia-SE Asia collision began, eliminating the former deep ocean separating the two continents, and forming the region now known as Wallacea. The microplate or

  8. A THEROPOD DOMINATED ICHNOCOENOSIS FROM LATE HAUTERIVIAN-EARLYBARREMIAN OF BORGO CELANO (GARGANO PROMONTORY, APULIA, SOUTHERN ITALY

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    FABIO MASSIMO PETTI

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Several dinosaur footprints were discovered on three different levels cropping out in the CO.L.MAR quarry, south of the village of Borgo Celano in the Gargano Promontory (Apulia, southern Italy. The track-bearing levels belong to a carbonate inner platform succession referred to the Lower Cretaceous (upper Hauterivian-lower Barremian. This paper describes only the lowest dinoturbated bed, where footprints are preserved as natural cast. Forty footprints, mostly tridactyl, have been attributed to medium-sized theropods. Tridactyl tracks are similar to Kayentapus Welles, 1971 regarding ichnotaxonomy. Round shaped footprints, previously not described from this site, are found in association with tridactyl footprints and are related to ornitischian dinosaurs. 

  9. A new troodontid theropod, Talos sampsoni gen. et sp. nov., from the Upper Cretaceous Western Interior Basin of North America.

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    Lindsay E Zanno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Troodontids are a predominantly small-bodied group of feathered theropod dinosaurs notable for their close evolutionary relationship with Avialae. Despite a diverse Asian representation with remarkable growth in recent years, the North American record of the clade remains poor, with only one controversial species--Troodon formosus--presently known from substantial skeletal remains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a gracile new troodontid theropod--Talos sampsoni gen. et sp. nov.--from the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, Utah, USA, representing one of the most complete troodontid skeletons described from North America to date. Histological assessment of the holotype specimen indicates that the adult body size of Talos was notably smaller than that of the contemporary genus Troodon. Phylogenetic analysis recovers Talos as a member of a derived, latest Cretaceous subclade, minimally containing Troodon, Saurornithoides, and Zanabazar. MicroCT scans reveal extreme pathological remodeling on pedal phalanx II-1 of the holotype specimen likely resulting from physical trauma and subsequent infectious processes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Talos sampsoni adds to the singularity of the Kaiparowits Formation dinosaur fauna, which is represented by at least 10 previously unrecognized species including the recently named ceratopsids Utahceratops and Kosmoceratops, the hadrosaurine Gryposaurus monumentensis, the tyrannosaurid Teratophoneus, and the oviraptorosaurian Hagryphus. The presence of a distinct troodontid taxon in the Kaiparowits Formation supports the hypothesis that late Campanian dinosaurs of the Western Interior Basin exhibited restricted geographic ranges and suggests that the taxonomic diversity of Late Cretaceous troodontids from North America is currently underestimated. An apparent traumatic injury to the foot of Talos with evidence of subsequent healing sheds new light on the paleobiology of deinonychosaurians

  10. Harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) from the Middle Jurassic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Diying; Selden, Paul A.; Dunlop, Jason A.

    2009-08-01

    Harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) are familiar animals in most terrestrial habitats but are rare as fossils, with only a handful of species known from each of the Palaeozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras. Fossil harvestmen from Middle Jurassic (ca. 165 Ma) strata of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China, are described as Mesobunus martensi gen. et sp. nov. and Daohugopilio sheari gen. et sp. nov.; the two genera differ primarily in the relative length of their legs and details of the pedipalps. Jurassic arachnids are extremely rare and these fossils represent the first Jurassic, and only the fourth Mesozoic, record of Opiliones. These remarkably well-preserved and modern-looking fossils are assigned to the Eupnoi, whereby M. martensi demonstrably belongs in Sclerosomatidae. It thus represents the oldest record of a modern harvestman family and implies a high degree of evolutionary stasis among one of the most widespread and abundant groups of long-legged, round-bodied harvestmen.

  11. Cretaceous and Jurassic intrusions in Crimean Mountains: The first data of U-Pb (SIMS SHRIMP) dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, E. B.; Sergeev, S. A.; Savelev, A. D.

    2017-05-01

    U-Pb geochronological studies of igneous rocks of the Crimean Mountains were carried out for the first time. The ages of magma crystallization determined for gabbro-dolerites of the Dzhidair and Pervomaiskii intrusions point to the injection of these rocks during the Middle Jurassic Aalenian-Bajocian stage of magmatism. The Berriasian-Valanginian and Aptian age of sill-like bodies within the mass of volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks presumes the necessity to reconsider the common notion of an exclusively Albian magmatic event during the Cretaceous. High-precision U-Pb dating of magma intrusions allowed us to verify the age of Middle Jurassic magmatism and to distinguish the new Early Cretaceous Berriasian-Valanginian magmatism stage of basic composition.

  12. A Quantitative Study on Paleo—River Environment During Late Jurassic on yaojie Region,Minhe Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵树勋; 燕永峰; 等

    2000-01-01

    Fluvial Sedimentation of alluvial facies prevailed during the Late Jrassic in the Minhe Basin.On the basis of the study of sedimentary facies of the Upper Jurassic series.this paper focuses on the river types suing the "Architecture Element" analysis method proposed by Miall,and calculated all the quantitative parameters to reflect the characteristics of the stream channel geometry and hydrodynamic conditions of paleo-rivers with the equations of ethrideg,schumm et al.Finally,we discussed the characteristics of environmental evolution of palsorivers on the quantitative basis.Our conclusion indicates that the evolution of paleo-rivers during the Late Jurassic,from early to late,shows such a tendency as alluvial fan river→ braid river→alluvial fan river→mid-sinuoisty river→ high-sinuosity river.

  13. The second Jurassic dinosaur rush and the dawn of dinomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-09-01

    During the second Jurassic dinosaur rush museum paleontologists raced to display the world's first mounted sauropod dinosaur. The American Museum of Natural History triumphed in 1905 when its Brontosaurus debuted before an admiring crowd of wealthy New Yorkers. The Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, the Field Columbian Museum in Chicago and other institutions were quick to follow with their own sauropod displays. Thereafter, dinomania spread far and wide, and big, showpiece dinosaurs became a museum staple. This brief but intensely competitive period of acquisitiveness fostered important Jurassic dinosaur revisions and crucial innovations in paleontological field and lab techniques.

  14. TRIASSIC AND JURASSIC CALCAREOUS NANNOFOSSILS OF THE PIZZO MONDELLO SECTION: A SEM STUDY

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    NEREO PRETO

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pizzo Mondello is a ca. 500 m thick pelagic-hemipelagic succession cropping out in Sicily consisting of a nodular cherty limestone facies association of late Carnian to late Norian age. The uppermost portion was attributed to the Rhaetian and is represented by the plane-bedded Portella Gebbia Limestone. The section has been proposed as the stratotype for the base of the Norian stage. The calcareous nannofossil content of limestones was studied with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM in two portions of the Pizzo Mondello section, one within 'La Cava' that encompasses all the proposed horizons for the base of the Norian, and one within the Portella Gebbia Limestone in the uppermost part of the section.Calcareous nannofossil assemblages of the first portion display low diversity, being constituted exclusively by calcispheres, that may constitute up to 40% of the sediment volume. Species richness increases in the upper portion. Initially, samples are dominated by Prinsiosphaera triassica, a nannolith of unknown taxonomic affinity. Rare calcareous dinocysts (Thoracosphaera cf. geometrica and coccoliths are present in few samples. Uppermost samples are still dominated by "calcispheres" comparable to Thoracosphaera, but also yield a variety of coccoliths and nannoliths.Calcareous nannofossil distribution was calibrated with conodont and radiolarian biostratigraphy. On the basis of this integrated work, specimens attributed to cf. Thoracosphaera, observed in the lower portion of the section, are late Carnian to early Norian, while samples dominated by Prinsiosphaera, with rare Thoracosphaera and coccoliths are Rhaetian. The calcareous nannofossil assemblage of the uppermost samples, along with radiolarians and the absence of conodonts, point to a Jurassic age (Pliensbachian for the uppermost Portella Gebbia Limestone at Pizzo Mondello. In conclusion, the age of the uppermost part of the Pizzo Mondello section is Jurassic, i.e., younger than previously

  15. Possible trace fossils of putative termite origin in the Lower Jurassic (Karoo Supergroup of South Africa and Lesotho

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    O. Catuneanu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex structures in the sandstones of the Lower Jurassic aeolian Clarens Formation (Karoo Supergroup are found at numerous localities throughout southern Africa, and can be assigned to five distinct architectural groups: (1 up to 3.3-m high, free-standing, slab-shaped forms of bioturbated sandstones with elliptical bases, orientated buttresses and an interconnecting large burrow system; (2 up to 1.2-m high, free-standing, irregular forms of bioturbated sandstones with 2-cm to 4-cm thick, massive walls, empty chambers and vertical shafts; (3 about 0.15-m to 0.25-m high, mainly bulbous, multiple forms with thin walls (larger than 2 cm, hollow chambers with internal pillars and bridges; (4 about 0.15-m to 0.2-m (maximum 1-m high, free-standing forms of aggregated solitary spheres associated with massive horizontal, orientated capsules or tubes, and meniscate tubes; and (5 about 5 cmin diameter, ovoid forms with weak internal shelving in a close-fitting cavity. Based on size, wall thickness, orientation and the presence of internal chambers, these complex structures are tentatively interpreted as ichnofossils of an Early Jurassic social organism; the different architectures are reflective of the different behaviours of more than one species, the history of structural change in architectural forms (ontogenetic series or an architectural adaptation to local palaeoclimatic variability. While exact modern equivalents are unknown, some of these ichnofossils are comparable to nests (or parts of nests constructed by extant termites, and thus these Jurassic structures are very tentatively interpreted here as having been made by a soil-dwelling social organism, probably of termite origin. This southern African discovery, along with reported Triassic and Jurassic termite ichnofossils from North America, supports previous hypotheses that sociality in insects, particularity in termites, likely evolved prior to the Pangea breakup in the Early Mesozoic.

  16. Palaeo-equatorial temperatures and carbon-cycle evolution at the Triassic- Jurassic boundary: A stable isotope perspective from shallow-water carbonates from the UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, M. R.; John, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic boundary was marked by global changes including carbon-cycle perturbations and the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. These changes were accompanied by one of the major extinction events of the Phanerozoic. The carbon-cycle perturbations have been recorded in carbon isotope curves from bulk carbonates, organic carbon and fossil wood in several Tethyan locations and have been used for chemostratigraphic purposes. Here we present data from shallow-marine carbonates deposited on a homoclinal Middle Eastern carbonate ramp (United Arab Emirates). Our site was located at the equator throughout the Late Triassic and the Early Jurassic, and this study provides the first constraints of environmental changes at the low-latitudes for the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Shallow-marine carbonate depositional systems are extremely sensitive to palaeoenvironmental changes and their usefulness for chemostratigraphy is being debated. However, the palaeogeographic location of the studied carbonate ramp gives us a unique insight into a tropical carbonate factory at a time of severe global change. Stable isotope measurements (carbon and oxygen) are being carried out on micrite, ooids and shell material along the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. The stable isotope results on micrite show a prominent negative shift in carbon isotope values of approximately 2 ‰ just below the inferred position of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. A similar isotopic trend is also observed across the Tethys but with a range of amplitudes (from ~2 ‰ to ~4 ‰). These results seem to indicate that the neritic carbonates from our studied section can be used for chemostratigraphic purposes, and the amplitudes of the carbon isotope shifts provide critical constraints on the magnitude of carbon-cycle perturbations at low latitudes across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Seawater temperatures across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary will be constrained using the clumped isotope palaeo-thermometer applied

  17. Ecpagloxylon mathiesenii gen. nov. et sp. nov., a Jurassic wood from Greenland with several primitive angiosperm features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippe, Marc; Cuny, Gilles Guy Roger; Bashforth, Arden Roy

    2010-01-01

    Fossil wood specimens from the late Early–early Middle Jurassic of Jameson Land, Eastern Greenland, have several unexpected features: tracheids of irregular size and shape, thinly pitted ray cell walls, heterogeneous rays, partially scalariform radial pitting, both areolate and simple pits, and p...... is an early bench-mark in the evolution that led from homoxylous conifer-like wood to that of the angiosperms. Its particular biogeography (Arctic) could renew the discussion about the area of origin of the angiosperms....

  18. Tracing biosignatures from the Recent to the Jurassic in sabkha-associated microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Land, Cees; Dutton, Kirsten; Andrade, Luiza; Paul, Andreas; Sherry, Angela; Fender, Tom; Hewett, Guy; Jones, Martin; Lokier, Stephen W.; Head, Ian M.

    2017-04-01

    Microbial mat ecosystems have been operating at the sediment-fluid interface for over 3400 million years, influencing the flux, transformation and preservation of carbon from the biosphere to the physical environment. These ecosystems are excellent recorders of rapid and profound changes in earth surface environments and biota as they often survive crisis-induced extreme paleoenvironmental conditions. Their biosignatures, captured in the preserved organic matter and the biominerals that form the microbialite rock, constitute a significant tool in understanding geobiological processes and the interactions of the microbial communities with sediments and with the prevailing physical chemical parameters, as well as the environmental conditions at a local and global scale. Nevertheless, the exact pathways of diagenetic organic matter transformation and early-lithification, essential for the accretion and preservation in the geological record as microbialites, are not well understood. The Abu Dhabi coastal sabkha system contains a vast microbial mat belt that is dominated by continuous polygonal and internally-laminated microbial mats across the upper and middle intertidal zones. This modern system is believed to be the best analogue for the Upper Jurassic Arab Formation, which is both a prolific hydrocarbon reservoir and source rock facies in the United Arab Emirates and in neighbouring countries. In order to characterise the processes that lead to the formation of microbialites we investigated the modern and Jurassic system using a multidisciplinary approach, including growth of field-sampled microbial mats under controlled conditions in the laboratory and field-based analysis of microbial communities, mat mineralogy and organic biomarker analysis. In this study, we focus on hydrocarbon biomarker data obtained from the surface of microbial mats actively growing in the intertidal zone of the modern system. By comparing these findings to data obtained from recently

  19. Klukiopsis jurassica--A new Jurassic schizaeaceous fern from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new Jurassic schizaeaceous fern Klukiopsis jurassica gen. et sp. nov. from Yima, Henan Province, China is described. The new fern is characterized by the abaxial sori arranged in two rows, apical and complete annulus and more than 800 smooth trilete spores in each sorus.

  20. Jurassic Park as a Teaching Tool in the Chemistry Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollis, W. Gary, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Describes how the science fiction novel "Jurassic Park" has been used to provide the focus for summate discussions among gifted high school students participating in a state-sponsored, science-intensive summer program. Discusses adaptations of this approach for use in chemistry classes from the high school to intermediate college level. (JRH)

  1. In situ Gymnosperm pollen from the Middle Jurassic of Yorkshire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnenburg-van Cittert, van Johanna H.A.

    1971-01-01

    In this paper the morphology of pollen grains yielded by male Gymnosperm fructifications from the Jurassic flora of Yorkshire is studied and discussed. Several new male fructifications were found and described: Hastystrobus gen. nov. was erected for male cones yielding the Eucommiidites type of poll

  2. The bivalve Anopaea (Inoceramidae) from the Upper Jurassic-lowermost Cretaceous of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Patrick; Crame, J. Alistair; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Seija

    2015-07-01

    In Mexico, the Upper Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous La Casita and coeval La Caja and La Pimienta formations are well-known for their abundant and well-preserved marine vertebrates and invertebrates. The latter include conspicuous inoceramid bivalves of the genus Anopaea not formally described previously from Mexico. Anopaea bassei (Lecolle de Cantú, 1967), Anopaea cf. stoliczkai (Holdhaus, 1913), Anopaea cf. callistoensis Crame and Kelly, 1995 and Anopaea sp. are rare constituents in distinctive Tithonian-lower Berriasian levels of the La Caja Formation and one Tithonian horizon of the La Pimienta Formation. Anopaea bassei was previously documented from the Tithonian of central Mexico and Cuba, while most other members of Anopaea described here are only known from southern high latitudes. The Mexican assemblage also includes taxa which closely resemble Anopaea stoliczkai from the Tithonian of India, Indonesia and the Antarctic Peninsula, and Anopaea callistoensis from the late Tithonian to ?early Berriasian of the Antarctic Peninsula. Our new data expand the palaeogeographical distribution of the high latitude Anopaea to the Gulf of Mexico region and substantiate faunal exchange, in the Late Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, between Mexico and the Antarctic Realm.

  3. Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous(?) synorogenic sedimentary rocks in the southern Spring Mountains, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael D.

    1980-08-01

    A newly recognized sequence of Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous(?) terrigenous rocks in the Good-springs district, Nevada, was deposited during the emplacement of the Contact thrust plate. Two facies are recognized: (1) interbedded conglomerate and sandstone derived from Mesozoic igneous and terrigenous platform rocks and (2) interbedded carbonate and sandstone-clast conglomerate, quartz sandstone, and red shale. No igneous detritus occurs in the facies with carbonate-clast conglomerate. Carbonate clasts could only have been derived from the Paleozoic carbonate sequence, which was exposed in the area by latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous thrusting. The age of rocks from a volcanic unit within the synorogenic sequence was determined radiometrically to be 150 ± 10 m.y. (K-Ar on biotite). The sequence was deposited disconformably on deeply eroded rocks of the early Mesozoic platform and ultimately overridden from the west by the Contact thrust plate. Information from the sequence corroborates previously reported regional data regarding the timing and nature of the Contact-Red Springs thrust event. *Present address: U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025

  4. Trans-border (east Serbia/west Bulgaria correlation of the Jurassic sediments: Main Jurassic paleogeographic units

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    Tchoumatchenco Platon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the region across the Serbian/Bulgarian state border, there are individualized 5 Jurassic paleogeographic units (from West to East: (1 the Thracian Massif Unit without Jurassic sediments; (2 the Lužnica-Koniavo Unit - partially with Liassic in Grsten facies and with deep water Middle Callovian-Kimmeridgian (p. p sediments of the type "ammonitico rosso", and Upper Kimmeridgian-Tithonian siliciclastics flysch; (3 The Getic Unit subdivided into two subunits - the Western Getic Sub-Uni - without Lower Jurassic sediments and the Eastern Getic Sub-Unit with Lower Jurassic continental and marine sediments, which are followed in both sub-units by carbonate platform limestones (type Stramberk; (4 the Infra (Sub-Getic Unit - with relatively deep water Liassic and Dogger sediments (the Dogger of type "black shales with Bossitra alpine" and Middle Callovian-Tithonian of type "ammonitico rosso"; (5 the Danubian Unit - with shallow water Liassic, Dogger and Malm (Miroč-Vrška Čuka Zone, deep water Dogger and Malm (Donjomilanovačko-Novokoritska Zone.

  5. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Jurassic of East Greenland: a sedimentary record of thermal subsidence, onset and culmination of rifting

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    Surlyk, Finn

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Late Palaeozoic – Mesozoic extensional basin complex of East Greenland contains a record of deposition during a period of Rhaetian – Early Bajocian thermal subsidence, the onset of riftingin the Late Bajocian, its growth during the Bathonian–Kimmeridgian, culmination of rifting in the Volgian – Early Ryazanian, and waning in the Late Ryazanian – Hauterivian. The area was centred over a palaeolatitude of about 45°N in the Rhaetian and drifted northwards to about 50°N in the Hauterivian. A major climate change from arid to humid subtropical conditions took place at the Norian–Rhaetian transition. Deposition was in addition governed by a long-term sea-level rise with highstands in the Toarcian–Aalenian, latest Callovian and Kimmeridgian, and lowstands in the latest Bajocian – earliest Bathonian, Middle Oxfordian and Volgian.The Rhaetian – Lower Bajocian succession is considered the upper part of a megasequence, termed J1, with its base in the upper Lower Triassic, whereas the Upper Bajocian – Hauterivian succession forms a complete, syn-rift megasequence, termed J2. The southern part of the basin complex in Jameson Land contains a relatively complete Rhaetian–Ryazanian succession and underwent only minor tilting during Middle Jurassic – earliest Cretaceous rifting. Rhaetian – Lower Jurassic deposits are absent north of Jameson Land and this region was fragmented into strongly tilted fault blocks during the protracted rift event. The syn-rift successions of the two areas accordingly show different long-term trends in sedimentary facies. In the southern area, the J2 syn-rift megasequence forms a symmetrical regressive–transgressive–regressive cycle, whereas the J2 megasequence in the northern area shows an asymmetrical, stepwise deepening trend.A total of eight tectonostratigraphic sequences are recognised in the Rhaetian–Hauterivian interval. They reflect major changes in basin configuration, drainage systems

  6. Conchostracans as evidence of Jurassic levels in the Caturrita Formation, Faxinal do Soturno, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazi

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    Rosemarie Rohn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focus on the first conchostracans (Crustacea, Spinicaudata found at the São Luís outcrop (Caturrita Formation, Rosário do Sul Group, in Faxinal do Soturno, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil (29º33’ 29.09”S, 53º 26’ 54”W. Fossil vertebrates and plants identified at this outcrop suggest conflicting ages, respectively Late Triassic and Early Jurassic. Dinosaur tracks recently found at the upper part of the outcrop enhance these age problems. In this way, the conchostracans constitute important additional elements in this discussion. Some specimens share many characteristics with Carapacestheria disgregaris (Tasch Shen (Eosestheriidae of the Ferrar Group, Lower-Mid Jurassic of the Transantartic Mountains. But differences in the ornamentation details led to the proposal of a new genus and a new species, Nothocarapacestheria soturnensis , and to the interpretation of a close phylogenetic relationship with the Antarctic species. Other samples in this assemblage are similar to Australestheria corneti (Marliére Chen (Fushunograptidae of the Middle Jurassic from Zaire. Together, these conchostracans substantiate a Jurassic age and corroborate the data of the Bennettitales flora found at the same levels in the outcrop. However, the Late Triassic age indicated by the tetrapods cannot be discarded according to their lower stratigraphic position in São Luís outcrop. In the same way, the present chronostratigraphic discussion does not apply to the other occurrences of the Caturrita Formation, especially because the correlations between outcrops are extremely difficult, both by the lack of paleontological support and by the numerous faultings during the Mesozoic sedimentation in the southern part of the Paraná Basin.

  7. The first metriorhynchid crocodylomorph from the Middle Jurassic of Spain, with implications for evolution of the subclade Rhacheosaurini.

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    Jara Parrilla-Bel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marine deposits from the Callovian of Europe have yielded numerous species of metriorhynchid crocodylomorphs. While common in English and French Formations, metriorhynchids are poorly known from the Iberian Peninsula. Twenty years ago an incomplete, but beautifully preserved, skull was discovered from the Middle Callovian of Spain. It is currently the oldest and best preserved metriorhynchid specimen from the Iberian Peninsula. Until now it has never been properly described and its taxonomic affinities remained obscure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a comprehensive description for this specimen and in doing so we refer it to a new genus and species: Maledictosuchus riclaensis. This species is diagnosed by numerous autapomorphies, including: heterodont dentition; tightly interlocking occlusion; lachrymal anterior process excludes the jugal from the preorbital fenestra; orbits longer than supratemporal fenestrae; palatine has two non-midline and one midline anterior processes. Our phylogenetic analysis finds Maledictosuchus riclaensis to be the basal-most known member of Rhacheosaurini (the subclade of increasingly mesopelagic piscivores that includes Cricosaurus and Rhacheosaurus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our description of Maledictosuchus riclaensis shows that the craniodental morphologies that underpinned the success of Rhacheosaurini in the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, as a result of increasing marine specialization to adaptations for feeding on fast small-bodied prey (i.e. divided and retracted external nares; reorientation of the lateral processes of the frontal; elongate, tubular rostrum; procumbent and non-carinated dentition; high overall tooth count; and dorsolaterally inclined paroccipital processes, first appeared during the Middle Jurassic. Rhacheosaurins were curiously rare in the Middle Jurassic, as only one specimen of Maledictosuchus riclaensis is known (with no representatives discovered from

  8. New ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs from the European Lower Cretaceous demonstrate extensive ichthyosaur survival across the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary.

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    Valentin Fischer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ichthyosauria is a diverse clade of marine amniotes that spanned most of the Mesozoic. Until recently, most authors interpreted the fossil record as showing that three major extinction events affected this group during its history: one during the latest Triassic, one at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary (JCB, and one (resulting in total extinction at the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary. The JCB was believed to eradicate most of the peculiar morphotypes found in the Late Jurassic, in favor of apparently less specialized forms in the Cretaceous. However, the record of ichthyosaurs from the Berriasian-Barremian interval is extremely limited, and the effects of the end-Jurassic extinction event on ichthyosaurs remains poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on new material from the Hauterivian of England and Germany and on abundant material from the Cambridge Greensand Formation, we name a new ophthalmosaurid, Acamptonectes densus gen. et sp. nov. This taxon shares numerous features with Ophthalmosaurus, a genus now restricted to the Callovian-Berriasian interval. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that Ophthalmosauridae diverged early in its history into two markedly distinct clades, Ophthalmosaurinae and Platypterygiinae, both of which cross the JCB and persist to the late Albian at least. To evaluate the effect of the JCB extinction event on ichthyosaurs, we calculated cladogenesis, extinction, and survival rates for each stage of the Oxfordian-Barremian interval, under different scenarios. The extinction rate during the JCB never surpasses the background extinction rate for the Oxfordian-Barremian interval and the JCB records one of the highest survival rates of the interval. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is currently no evidence that ichthyosaurs were affected by the JCB extinction event, in contrast to many other marine groups. Ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs remained diverse from their rapid radiation in the Middle

  9. Sedimentology and ichnology of the Mafube dinosaur track site (Lower Jurassic, eastern Free State, South Africa): a report on footprint preservation and palaeoenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordy, Emese M.; Reid, Mhairi; Abrahams, Miengah

    2016-01-01

    Footprint morphology (e.g., outline shape, depth of impression) is one of the key diagnostic features used in the interpretation of ancient vertebrate tracks. Over 80 tridactyl tracks, confined to the same bedding surface in the Lower Jurassic Elliot Formation at Mafube (eastern Free State, South Africa), show large shape variability over the length of the study site. These morphological differences are considered here to be mainly due to variations in the substrate rheology as opposed to differences in the trackmaker’s foot anatomy, foot kinematics or recent weathering of the bedding surface. The sedimentary structures (e.g., desiccation cracks, ripple marks) preserved in association with and within some of the Mafube tracks suggest that the imprints were produced essentially contemporaneous and are true dinosaur tracks rather than undertracks or erosional remnants. They are therefore valuable not only for the interpretation of the ancient environment (i.e., seasonally dry river channels) but also for taxonomic assessments as some of them closely resemble the original anatomy of the trackmaker’s foot. The tracks are grouped, based on size, into two morphotypes that can be identified as Eubrontes-like and Grallator-like ichnogenera. The Mafube morphotypes are tentatively attributable to large and small tridactyl theropod trackmakers, possibly to Dracovenator and Coelophysis based on the following criteria: (a) lack of manus impressions indicative of obligate bipeds; (b) long, slender-digits that are asymmetrical and taper; (c) often end in a claw impression or point; and (d) the tracks that are longer than broad. To enable high-resolution preservation, curation and subsequent remote studying of the morphological variations of and the secondary features in the tracks, low viscosity silicone rubber was used to generate casts of the Mafube tracks. PMID:27635310

  10. Sedimentology and ichnology of the Mafube dinosaur track site (Lower Jurassic, eastern Free State, South Africa: a report on footprint preservation and palaeoenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Sciscio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Footprint morphology (e.g., outline shape, depth of impression is one of the key diagnostic features used in the interpretation of ancient vertebrate tracks. Over 80 tridactyl tracks, confined to the same bedding surface in the Lower Jurassic Elliot Formation at Mafube (eastern Free State, South Africa, show large shape variability over the length of the study site. These morphological differences are considered here to be mainly due to variations in the substrate rheology as opposed to differences in the trackmaker’s foot anatomy, foot kinematics or recent weathering of the bedding surface. The sedimentary structures (e.g., desiccation cracks, ripple marks preserved in association with and within some of the Mafube tracks suggest that the imprints were produced essentially contemporaneous and are true dinosaur tracks rather than undertracks or erosional remnants. They are therefore valuable not only for the interpretation of the ancient environment (i.e., seasonally dry river channels but also for taxonomic assessments as some of them closely resemble the original anatomy of the trackmaker’s foot. The tracks are grouped, based on size, into two morphotypes that can be identified as Eubrontes-like and Grallator-like ichnogenera. The Mafube morphotypes are tentatively attributable to large and small tridactyl theropod trackmakers, possibly to Dracovenator and Coelophysis based on the following criteria: (a lack of manus impressions indicative of obligate bipeds; (b long, slender-digits that are asymmetrical and taper; (c often end in a claw impression or point; and (d the tracks that are longer than broad. To enable high-resolution preservation, curation and subsequent remote studying of the morphological variations of and the secondary features in the tracks, low viscosity silicone rubber was used to generate casts of the Mafube tracks.

  11. Sedimentology and ichnology of the Mafube dinosaur track site (Lower Jurassic, eastern Free State, South Africa): a report on footprint preservation and palaeoenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciscio, Lara; Bordy, Emese M; Reid, Mhairi; Abrahams, Miengah

    2016-01-01

    Footprint morphology (e.g., outline shape, depth of impression) is one of the key diagnostic features used in the interpretation of ancient vertebrate tracks. Over 80 tridactyl tracks, confined to the same bedding surface in the Lower Jurassic Elliot Formation at Mafube (eastern Free State, South Africa), show large shape variability over the length of the study site. These morphological differences are considered here to be mainly due to variations in the substrate rheology as opposed to differences in the trackmaker's foot anatomy, foot kinematics or recent weathering of the bedding surface. The sedimentary structures (e.g., desiccation cracks, ripple marks) preserved in association with and within some of the Mafube tracks suggest that the imprints were produced essentially contemporaneous and are true dinosaur tracks rather than undertracks or erosional remnants. They are therefore valuable not only for the interpretation of the ancient environment (i.e., seasonally dry river channels) but also for taxonomic assessments as some of them closely resemble the original anatomy of the trackmaker's foot. The tracks are grouped, based on size, into two morphotypes that can be identified as Eubrontes-like and Grallator-like ichnogenera. The Mafube morphotypes are tentatively attributable to large and small tridactyl theropod trackmakers, possibly to Dracovenator and Coelophysis based on the following criteria: (a) lack of manus impressions indicative of obligate bipeds; (b) long, slender-digits that are asymmetrical and taper; (c) often end in a claw impression or point; and (d) the tracks that are longer than broad. To enable high-resolution preservation, curation and subsequent remote studying of the morphological variations of and the secondary features in the tracks, low viscosity silicone rubber was used to generate casts of the Mafube tracks.

  12. Early

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    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  13. Topology, divergence dates, and macroevolutionary inferences vary between different tip-dating approaches applied to fossil theropods (Dinosauria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapst, D W; Wright, A M; Matzke, N J; Lloyd, G T

    2016-07-01

    Dated phylogenies of fossil taxa allow palaeobiologists to estimate the timing of major divergences and placement of extinct lineages, and to test macroevolutionary hypotheses. Recently developed Bayesian 'tip-dating' methods simultaneously infer and date the branching relationships among fossil taxa, and infer putative ancestral relationships. Using a previously published dataset for extinct theropod dinosaurs, we contrast the dated relationships inferred by several tip-dating approaches and evaluate potential downstream effects on phylogenetic comparative methods. We also compare tip-dating analyses to maximum-parsimony trees time-scaled via alternative a posteriori approaches including via the probabilistic cal3 method. Among tip-dating analyses, we find opposing but strongly supported relationships, despite similarity in inferred ancestors. Overall, tip-dating methods infer divergence dates often millions (or tens of millions) of years older than the earliest stratigraphic appearance of that clade. Model-comparison analyses of the pattern of body-size evolution found that the support for evolutionary mode can vary across and between tree samples from cal3 and tip-dating approaches. These differences suggest that model and software choice in dating analyses can have a substantial impact on the dated phylogenies obtained and broader evolutionary inferences.

  14. An exquisitely preserved troodontid theropod with new information on the palatal structure from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuihiji, Takanobu; Barsbold, Rinchen; Watabe, Mahito; Tsogtbaatar, Khishigjav; Chinzorig, Tsogtbaatar; Fujiyama, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Troodontidae is a clade of small-bodied theropod dinosaurs. A new troodontid, Gobivenator mongoliensis gen. et sp. nov., is described based on the most complete skeleton of a Late Cretaceous member of this clade presently known, from the Campanian Djadokhta Formation in the central Gobi Desert. G. mongoliensis is different from other troodontids in possessing a pointed anterior end of the fused parietal and a fossa on the surangular in front of the posterior surangular foramen. The skull was superbly preserved in the specimen and provides detailed information of the entire configuration of the palate in Troodontidae. Overall morphology of the palate in Gobivenator resembles those of dromaeosaurids and Archaeopteryx, showing an apparent trend of elongation of the pterygoid process of the palatine and reduction of the pterygopalatine suture toward the basal Avialae. The palatal configuration suggests that the skull of Gobivenator would have been akinetic but had already acquired prerequisites for later evolution of cranial kinesis in birds, such as the loss of the epipterygoid and reduction in contact areas among bones.

  15. The “χ” of the Matter: Testing the Relationship between Paleoenvironments and Three Theropod Clades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Marcos A. F.; Lacerda, Marcel B.; Horn, Bruno L. D.; de Oliveira, Isabel A. P.; Schultz, Cesar L.

    2016-01-01

    The view of spinosaurs as dinosaurs of semi-aquatic habits and strongly associated with marginal and coastal habitats are deeply rooted in both scientific and popular knowledge, but it was never statistically tested. Inspired by a previous analysis of other dinosaur clades and major paleoenvironmental categories, here we present our own statistical evaluation of the association between coastal and terrestrial paleoenvironments and spinosaurids, along with other two theropod taxa: abelisaurids and carcharodontosaurids. We also included a taphonomic perspective and classified the occurrences in categories related to potential biases in order to better address our interpretations. Our main results can be summarized as follows: 1) the taxon with the largest amount of statistical evidence showing it positively associated to coastal paleoenvironments is Spinosauridae; 2) abelisaurids and carcharodontosaurids had more statistical evidence showing them positively associated with terrestrial paleoenvironments; 3) it is likely that spinosaurids also occupied spatially inland areas in a way somehow comparable at least to carcharodontosaurids; 4) abelisaurids may have been more common than the other two taxa in inland habitats. PMID:26829315

  16. A new sauropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Phillip L; Egerton, Victoria M; Romano, Mike

    2015-01-01

    A new record of a sauropodomorph dinosaur is here described from the Middle Jurassic (Aalenian) Saltwick Formation of Whitby (Yorkshire), UK. A single caudal vertebra represents an early sauropodomorph and signifies the earliest recognised eusauropod dinosaur from the United Kingdom. The absence of pleurocoels and a narrow, dorsoventrally deep, but craniocaudally short centrum, suggests a primitive sauropodomorph. Distinct spinopostzygopophyseal laminae rise from the lateral margins of the postzygapophyses and pass caudally along what remains of the neural spine, a character unique to a subgroup of sauropods that includes Barapasaurus, Omeisaurus and other neosauropods and eusauropods. The lack of phylogenetically robust characters in sauropod caudal vertebrae usually makes it difficult to establish affinities, but the absence of mild procoely excludes this specimen from both Diplodocoidea and Lithostrotia. The vertebra cannot be further distinguished from those of a wide range of basal sauropods, cetiosaurids and basal macronarians. However, this plesiomorphic vertebra still signifies the earliest stratigraphic occurrence for a British sauropod dinosaur.

  17. A new sauropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of the United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip L Manning

    Full Text Available A new record of a sauropodomorph dinosaur is here described from the Middle Jurassic (Aalenian Saltwick Formation of Whitby (Yorkshire, UK. A single caudal vertebra represents an early sauropodomorph and signifies the earliest recognised eusauropod dinosaur from the United Kingdom. The absence of pleurocoels and a narrow, dorsoventrally deep, but craniocaudally short centrum, suggests a primitive sauropodomorph. Distinct spinopostzygopophyseal laminae rise from the lateral margins of the postzygapophyses and pass caudally along what remains of the neural spine, a character unique to a subgroup of sauropods that includes Barapasaurus, Omeisaurus and other neosauropods and eusauropods. The lack of phylogenetically robust characters in sauropod caudal vertebrae usually makes it difficult to establish affinities, but the absence of mild procoely excludes this specimen from both Diplodocoidea and Lithostrotia. The vertebra cannot be further distinguished from those of a wide range of basal sauropods, cetiosaurids and basal macronarians. However, this plesiomorphic vertebra still signifies the earliest stratigraphic occurrence for a British sauropod dinosaur.

  18. A Jurassic stem pleurodire sheds light on the functional origin of neck retraction in turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anquetin, Jérémy; Tong, Haiyan; Claude, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Modern turtles are composed of two monophyletic groups, notably diagnosed by divergent neck retraction mechanisms. Pleurodires (side-necked turtles) bend their neck sideways and protect their head under the anterior margin of the carapace. Cryptodires (hidden-necked turtles) withdraw their neck and head in the vertical plane between the shoulder girdles. These two mechanisms of neck retraction appeared independently in the two lineages and are usually assumed to have evolved for protective reasons. Here we describe the neck of Platychelys oberndorferi, a Late Jurassic early stem pleurodire, and find remarkable convergent morphological and functional similarities with modern cryptodires. Partial vertical neck retraction in this taxon is interpreted to have enabled fast forward projection of the head during underwater prey capture and offers a likely explanation to the functional origin of neck retraction in modern cryptodires. Complete head withdrawal for protection may therefore have resulted from an exaptation in that group. PMID:28206991

  19. Rock mechanics related to Jurassic underburden at Valdemar oil field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels

    1999-01-01

    .It has been initiated as a feasibility study of the North Jens-1 core 12 taken in the top Jurassic clay shale as a test specimens for integrated petrological, mineralogical and rock mechanical studies. Following topics are studied:(1) Pore pressure generation due to conversion of organic matter...... and deformation properties of the clay shale using the actual core material or outcrop equivalents.(3) Flushing mechanisms for oil and gas from source rocks due to possibly very high pore water pressure creating unstable conditions in deeply burried sedimentsThere seems to be a need for integrating the knowledge...... in a number of geosciences to the benefit of common understanding of important reservoir mechanisms. Rock mechanics and geotechnical modelling might be key points for this understanding of reservoir geology and these may constitute a platform for future research in the maturing and migration from the Jurassic...

  20. Rock mechanics related to Jurassic underburden at Valdemar oil field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The presented study is a part of the Danish Energy Research project PRIORITY - Imroved Oil Recovery and Productivity from Lower Cretaceous Carbonates.It considers a multi-disciplinary study of the Jurassic shale underlying the Valdemar structure and gives a status of the on-going research work.......It has been initiated as a feasibility study of the North Jens-1 core 12 taken in the top Jurassic clay shale as a test specimens for integrated petrological, mineralogical and rock mechanical studies. Following topics are studied:(1) Pore pressure generation due to conversion of organic matter...... and deformation properties of the clay shale using the actual core material or outcrop equivalents.(3) Flushing mechanisms for oil and gas from source rocks due to possibly very high pore water pressure creating unstable conditions in deeply burried sedimentsThere seems to be a need for integrating the knowledge...

  1. MIDDLE TO LATE JURASSIC BIOFACIES OF SAUDI ARABIA

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    GERAINT W. HUGHES

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Saudi Arabian Jurassic carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs were first examined stratigraphically using microfauna. Current microfaunal studies concentrate on the identification and constraint of palaeoenvironmental variations and determination of high-resolution depositional cyclicity of the reservoir carbonates. It is apparent that the environmental sensitivity of benthonic foraminifera provides a potentially valuable technique for the determining subtle variations in the depositional environment and also providing a proxy for sea-level fluctuations.

  2. New Fossil Evidence on the Sister-Group of Mammals and Early Mesozoic Faunal Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Neil H.; Crompton, A. W.; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Olsen, Paul E.

    1991-03-01

    Newly discovered remains of highly advanced mammal-like reptiles (Cynodontia: Tritheledontidae) from the Early Jurassic of Nova Scotia, Canada, have revealed that aspects of the characteristic mammalian occlusal pattern are primitive. Mammals and tritheledontids share an homologous pattern of occlusion that is not seen in other cynodonts. The new tritheledontids represent the first definite record of this family from North America. The extreme similarity of North American and African tritheledontids supports the hypothesis that the global distribution of terrestrial tetrapods was homogeneous in the Early Jurassic. This Early Jurassic cosmopolitanism represents the continuation of a trend toward increased global homogeneity among terrestrial tetrapod communities that began in the late Paleozoic.

  3. New ages and chemical analysis on Lower Jurassic volcanism close to the dorsal de Huincul, Neuquén

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    Mario SCHIUMA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available New single zircon ages from hydrocarbon well cores in the A-1 Norte de la Dorsal and Anticlinal Campamento area of the Neuquén basin indicate that 199.0 ± 1.5 Ma andesite lava flow and 203.75 ± 0.26 Ma dacite breccia overlie a 286.5 ± 2.3 Ma granodiorite and 284.0 ± 1.3 Ma andesite dike. The Lower Jurassic volcanics were deposited on a regional erosion surface affecting the Permian rocks. In the studied area there is no record of Middle to Upper Triassic volcanics as in other areas of the basin. Exotic zircon crystals gave ages of Mesoproterozoic, Middle Cambian, Early Devonian and Early Carboniferous, suggesting a poliphasic basement. Chemical analyses of three selected samples show a calc-alkaline signature, supporting the existence of a volcanic arc at the Early Jurassic as it has been proposed for the center of the basin.

  4. Study on lithogeochemistry of Middle Jurassic basalts from southern China represented by the Fankeng basalts from Yongding of Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Jincheng; JIANG; Shaoyong; WANG; Xiaolei; YANG; Jinghong; ZHANG; Mengqun

    2006-01-01

    There exists an E-W trending Middle Jurassic volcanic zone in southern China. The Fankeng basalts in the Yongding basin of Fujian Province are considered to be a typical example. The Fankeng basalts have TiO2 contents in the range of 1.92%-3.21%. They are classified as high-Ti basalts. They also have higher total Fe (averaging FeO*= 11.09%). The Middle Jurassic Fankeng basalts from southwestern Fujian have obvious distinctive lithogeochemical features from early Cretaceous basalts from southeastern coast of China. They have higher HFSE, such as Th, Nb, Ta, Zr and Ti. Their element ratios related with HFSE, such as Zr/Ba, La/Nb, La/Ta ,Zr/Y, Ti/Y, Ba/Nb, K/Ti and Rb/Zr are similar to those of OIB. The most samples have εNd(T) of -0.70-0.24, which are near chondrite. Some samples have higher εNd(T) of 1.87-3.55.Therefore, these basaltic magmas might be derived from depleted asthenospheric mantle. The lithogeochemical characteristics of the Fankeng basalts may be caused by interaction between asthenosphere and lithosphere at the time. The (Early-)Middle Jurassic basalts and gabbros from southeastern Hunan, southern Jiangxi and northern Guangdong provinces show similar geochemical features to those of the Fankeng basalts from the Yongding of Fujian. Occurrence of these OIB-type basalts in the area may be regarded as the petrological mark of upwelling of asthenosphere at the time. Upwelling of asthenosphere has led to tectonic extension and the formation of rifted basin in the area.

  5. A remarkable new family of Jurassic insects (Neuroptera) with primitive wing venation and its phylogenetic position in Neuropterida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Makarkin, Vladimir N; Winterton, Shaun L; Khramov, Alexander V; Ren, Dong

    2012-01-01

    Lacewings (insect order Neuroptera), known in the fossil record since the Early Permian, were most diverse in the Mesozoic. A dramatic variety of forms ranged in that time from large butterfly-like Kalligrammatidae to minute two-winged Dipteromantispidae. We describe the intriguing new neuropteran family Parakseneuridae fam. nov. with three new genera and 15 new species from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou (Inner Mongolia, China) and the Early/Middle Jurassic of Sai-Sagul (Kyrgyzstan): Parakseneura undula gen. et sp. nov., P. albomacula gen. et sp. nov., P. curvivenis gen. et sp. nov., P. nigromacula gen. et sp. nov., P. nigrolinea gen. et sp. nov., P. albadelta gen. et sp. nov., P. cavomaculata gen. et sp. nov., P. inflata gen. et sp. nov., P. metallica gen. et sp. nov., P. emarginata gen. et sp. nov., P. directa gen. et sp. nov., Pseudorapisma jurassicum gen. et sp. nov., P. angustipenne gen. et sp. nov., P. maculatum gen. et sp. nov. (Daohugou); Shuraboneura ovata gen. et sp. nov. (Sai-Sagul). The family comprises large neuropterans with most primitive wing venation in the order indicated by the presence of ScA and AA1+2, and the dichotomous branching of MP, CuA, CuP, AA3+4, AP1+2. The phylogenetic position of Parakseneuridae was investigated using a phylogenetic analysis of morphological scoring for 33 families of extinct and extant Neuropterida combined with DNA sequence data for representatives of all extant families. Parakseneuridae were recovered in a clade with Osmylopsychopidae, Prohemerobiidae, and Ithonidae. The presence of the presumed AA1+2 in wings of Parakseneuridae is a unique plesiomorphic condition hitherto unknown in Neuropterida, the clade comprising Neuroptera, Megaloptera, Raphidioptera. The relative uncertainty of phylogenetic position of Parakseneuridae and the majority of other families of Neuroptera reflects deficient paleontological data, especially from critical important periods for the order, earliest Triassic and latest Triassic

  6. Emplacement of the Jurassic Mirdita ophiolites (southern Albania): evidence from associated clastic and carbonate sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alastair H. F.; Ionescu, Corina; Hoeck, Volker; Koller, Friedrich; Onuzi, Kujtim; Bucur, Ioan I.; Ghega, Dashamir

    2012-09-01

    Sedimentology can shed light on the emplacement of oceanic lithosphere (i.e. ophiolites) onto continental crust and post-emplacement settings. An example chosen here is the well-exposed Jurassic Mirdita ophiolite in southern Albania. Successions studied in five different ophiolitic massifs (Voskopoja, Luniku, Shpati, Rehove and Morava) document variable depositional processes and palaeoenvironments in the light of evidence from comparable settings elsewhere (e.g. N Albania; N Greece). Ophiolitic extrusive rocks (pillow basalts and lava breccias) locally retain an intact cover of oceanic radiolarian chert (in the Shpati massif). Elsewhere, ophiolite-derived clastics typically overlie basaltic extrusives or ultramafic rocks directly. The oldest dated sediments are calpionellid- and ammonite-bearing pelagic carbonates of latest (?) Jurassic-Berrasian age. Similar calpionellid limestones elsewhere (N Albania; N Greece) post-date the regional ophiolite emplacement. At one locality in S Albania (Voskopoja), calpionellid limestones are gradationally underlain by thick ophiolite-derived breccias (containing both ultramafic and mafic clasts) that were derived by mass wasting of subaqueous fault scarps during or soon after the latest stages of ophiolite emplacement. An intercalation of serpentinite-rich debris flows at this locality is indicative of mobilisation of hydrated oceanic ultramafic rocks. Some of the ophiolite-derived conglomerates (e.g. Shpati massif) include well-rounded serpentinite and basalt clasts suggestive of a high-energy, shallow-water origin. The Berriasian pelagic limestones (at Voskopoja) experienced reworking and slumping probably related to shallowing and a switch to neritic deposition. Mixed ophiolite-derived clastic and neritic carbonate sediments accumulated later, during the Early Cretaceous (mainly Barremian-Aptian) in variable deltaic, lagoonal and shallow-marine settings. These sediments were influenced by local tectonics or eustatic sea

  7. A toothed turtle from the Late Jurassic of China and the global biogeographic history of turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Walter G; Rabi, Márton; Clark, James M; Xu, Xing

    2016-10-28

    Turtles (Testudinata) are a successful lineage of vertebrates with about 350 extant species that inhabit all major oceans and landmasses with tropical to temperate climates. The rich fossil record of turtles documents the adaptation of various sub-lineages to a broad range of habitat preferences, but a synthetic biogeographic model is still lacking for the group. We herein describe a new species of fossil turtle from the Late Jurassic of Xinjiang, China, Sichuanchelys palatodentata sp. nov., that is highly unusual by plesiomorphically exhibiting palatal teeth. Phylogenetic analysis places the Late Jurassic Sichuanchelys palatodentata in a clade with the Late Cretaceous Mongolochelys efremovi outside crown group Testudines thereby establishing the prolonged presence of a previously unrecognized clade of turtles in Asia, herein named Sichuanchelyidae. In contrast to previous hypotheses, M. efremovi and Kallokibotion bajazidi are not found within Meiolaniformes, a clade that is here reinterpreted as being restricted to Gondwana. A revision of the global distribution of fossil and recent turtle reveals that the three primary lineages of derived, aquatic turtles, including the crown, Paracryptodira, Pan-Pleurodira, and Pan-Cryptodira can be traced back to the Middle Jurassic of Euramerica, Gondwana, and Asia, respectively, which resulted from the primary break up of Pangaea at that time. The two primary lineages of Pleurodira, Pan-Pelomedusoides and Pan-Chelidae, can similarly be traced back to the Cretaceous of northern and southern Gondwana, respectively, which were separated from one another by a large desert zone during that time. The primary divergence of crown turtles was therefore driven by vicariance to the primary freshwater aquatic habitat of these lineages. The temporally persistent lineages of basal turtles, Helochelydridae, Meiolaniformes, Sichuanchelyidae, can similarly be traced back to the Late Mesozoic of Euramerica, southern Gondwana, and Asia. Given

  8. Chemo- and biostratigraphy of the Late Jurassic from the Lower Saxony Basin, Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbacher, Jochen; Luppold, Friedrich Wilhelm; Heunisch, Carmen; Heldt, Matthias; Caesar, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The upper Jurassic (Oxfordian to Tithonian) sediments of the Lower Saxony Basin (Northern Germany) comprises a succession of limestones, marlstones and claystones deposited in a shallow marine to lacustrine epicontinental basin situated between the Tethys and the Sub-Boreal seas. Both, the depositional environment and the palaeogeographically isolated position strongly compromise a chronostratigraphic dating of the regional lithostratigraphical and biostratigraphical units. In order to obtain a stratigraphic standard section for the Late Jurassic of the Lower Saxony Basin we drilled a 325 m long core (Core Eulenflucht 1) covering the lower part of the Berriasian (Wealden 2-3 of the Bückeburg Formation) to the lower Oxfordian (Heersum Formation). A compilation with a section outcropping in an active quarry 2 km north of the drill site resulted in a 340 m long section reaching down to the late Callovian (Ornatenton Formation) . Ammonites have only been described in the lowermost, Callovian part of the section. Investigations of benthic foraminifers, ostracods as well as palynology, however, allowed for a rather detailed biozonation of the core. These data indicate the stratigrapical completeness of the section when compared to the regional stratigraphic data of the Lower Saxony Basin. Due to the lack of ammonites in Late Jurassic part of the section, which would have allowed for a correlation with Tethyan successions, high resolution stable carbon isotope data have been produced from bulk rock carbonate. Even though most of the data derive from shallow marine, rather coarse grained carbonates, such as ooliths and floatstones the resulting carbon isotope curve is surprisingly clean with only little "noise" in the upper part (early Tithonian?) of the measured succession. The curve clearly shows some distinctive features reported from biostratigraphically well-dated carbon isotope records of the Northern Tethys (e.g. Bartolini et al., 2003, Padden et al., 2002, Rais et

  9. Stable oxygen isotopes from theropod dinosaur tooth enamel: interlaboratory comparison of results and analytical interference by reference standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, William H; Karr, Jonathan D; Cox, Julia E; Barrick, Reese E

    2004-01-01

    ('biophosphate') stable isotope research with caution, seasonal variations in enamel phosphate delta18O are a paleoecologically valuable, reproducible phenomenon in theropod dinosaur teeth. 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Petrographic and geochemical characterization of the Triassic and Jurassic magmatic and volcanic rocks of southeastern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villares, Fabián; Eguez, Arturo; Yanez, Ernesto

    2014-05-01

    Formely, the subandean zone in the southeastern Ecuador involved large volcanic and magmatic rocks included in the Misahualli Formation and Zamora batholith, both as expression of the Jurassic cal-alcaline volcanic arc. The aim of the project carried out by the INIGEMM (Instituto Nacional de Investigación Geológico Minero Metalúrgico) was discriminate the volcanic products including a continuous set going from basalts to ryolithes and volcanoclastic rocks. Geochemical characterization was done using representative 16 whole - rock chemical analysis. The oldest rocks of the investigated area called Pachicutza Unit, include greenish to black, massive basalts and basaltic andesites, locally showing pillows structures. The texture is aphanitic to microporphyritic with slight crystal growth of plagioclase and pyroxenes. The Unit include also local pyroclastic breccias and tuffs showing variable skarnification related to the intrusion of the jurassic Zamora Batholith. Two samples of basalts show tholeiitic affinity, corresponding to an N- MORB, probably representing an early stage in opening of a regional Triassic rift reported since Colombia to Peru in the Andes. These geochemical characteristics are similar to the amphibolites of Monte Olivo Unit in the Real Cordillera. The Jurassic large volcanic assembly of the Misahualli Formation was also differenciated. Basal volcanics include green, subporphyritic andesites and volcanic breccias possibly generated at an early stage of the volcanic arc, caused by a change of extensive to compressive regime. Continental volcano sedimentary and sedimentary rock were discriminate as Nueva Esperanza and Suarez Units, respectively. The volcanosedimentary sequence include massive to laminate tuffs and tuffites of intermediate composition. The sediments of the Suarez Unit include dominant conglomerats and sandstones of fluvial domain. The regional volcanic sequence is completed by the Las Peñas Unit that includes aphanitic to

  11. The Jurassic of East Greenland: a sedimentary record of thermal subsidence, onset and culmination of rifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surlyk, F. [Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)]. Geological Inst.

    2003-07-01

    The Late Palaeozoic - Mesozoic extensional basin complex of East Greenland contains a record of deposition during a period of Rhaetian - Early Bajocian thermal subsidence, the onset of rifting in the Late Bajocian, its growth during the Bathonian-Kimmeridgian, culmination of rifting in the Volgian - Early Ryazanian, and waning in the Late Ryazanian - Hauterivian.,The area was centred over a palaeolatitude of about 45 deg C N in the Rhaetian and drifted northwards to about 50 deg C N in the Hauterivian. A major climate change from arid to humid subtropical conditions took place at the Norian-Rhaetian transition. Deposition was in addition governed by a long-term sea-level rise with highstands in the Toarcian-Aalenian, latest Callovian and Kimmeridgian, and lowstands in the latest Bajocian - earliest Bathonian, Middle Oxfordian and Volgian. The Rhaetian - Lower Bajocian succession is considered the upper part of a megasequence, termed Jl, with its base in the upper Lower Triassic, whereas the Upper Bajocian - Hauterivian succession forms a complete, syn-rift megasequence, termed J2. The southem part of the basin complex in Jameson Land contains a relatively complete Rhaetian-Ryazanian succession and underwent only minor tilting during Middle Jurassic - earliest Cretaceous rifting. Rhaetian - Lower Jurassic deposits are absent north of Jameson Land and this region was fragmented into strongly tilted fault blocks during the protracted rift event. The syn-rift successions of the two areas accordingly show different long-term trends in sedimentary facies. In the southern area, the J2 syn-rift megasequence forms a symmetrical regressive-transgressive-regressive cycle, whereas the J2 megasequence in the northem area shows an asymmetrical, stepwise deepening trend. A total of eight tectonostratigraphic sequences are recognised in the Rhaetian-Hauterivian interval. They reflect major changes in basin configuration, drainage systems, sediment transport and distribution

  12. Synchronous wildfire activity rise and mire deforestation at the triassic-jurassic boundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik I Petersen

    Full Text Available The end-Triassic mass extinction event (∼201.4 million years ago caused major faunal and floral turnovers in both the marine and terrestrial realms. The biotic changes have been attributed to extreme greenhouse warming across the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J boundary caused by massive release of carbon dioxide and/or methane related to extensive volcanism in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP, resulting in a more humid climate with increased storminess and lightning activity. Lightning strikes are considered the primary source of wildfires, producing charcoal, microscopically recognized as inertinite macerals. The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs of pyrolytic origin and allochthonous charcoal in siliciclastic T-J boundary strata has suggested widespread wildfire activity at the time. We have investigated largely autochthonous coal and coaly beds across the T-J boundary in Sweden and Denmark. These beds consist of predominantly organic material from the in situ vegetation in the mires, and as the coaly beds represent a substantial period of time they are excellent environmental archives. We document a remarkable increase in inertinite content in the coal and coaly beds across the T-J boundary. We show estimated burning temperatures derived from inertinite reflectance measurements coupled with palynological data and conclude that pre-boundary late Rhaetian mire wildfires included high-temperature crown fires, whereas latest Rhaetian-Sinemurian mire wildfires were more frequent but dominated by lower temperature surface fires. Our results suggest a major change in the mire ecosystems across the T-J boundary from forested, conifer dominated mires to mires with a predominantly herbaceous and shrubby vegetation. Contrary to the overall regional vegetation for which onset of recovery commenced in the early Hettangian, the sensitive mire ecosystem remained affected during the Hettangian and did not start to recover until around

  13. CALCAREOUS NANNOFOSSILS AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY: STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION

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    CINZIA BOTTINI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, calcareous nannofossils are identified for the first time in the uppermost Triassic sequence of the Lombardy Basin (Southern Calcareous Alps, Italy. Two zones are recognized, namely the NT2b (latest Triassic and the NJT1 (earliest Jurassic. Two species resulted to be good markers to constrain the TJB interval: Prinsiosphaera triassica and Schizosphaerella punctulata. Nannofossil data are calibrated with C isotopic chemostratigraphy obtained for carbonate and organic matter. Size reduction of P. triassica and a decline in the abundance of Triassic nannofossils are detected soon after the “precursor Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE and culminated during the “initial negative CIE” characterized by lowest nannofossil abundances and small-sized P. triassica. The extinction of Triassic nannofossils occurred in distinctive steps within the “initial negative CIE”, while the Jurassic S. punctulata is first observed at the base of the “main negative CIE”. The latest Triassic nannofossil decline in abundance, size reduction and extinctions, represent a progressive deterioration associated to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP volcanism. Our findings are consistent with nannofossil changes at supraregional scale and indicate that the massive CAMP flood basalts were preceded by initial volcanic pulses. We speculate that a combination of climate change, fertilization and ocean acidification started to influence the calcification process prior to the “initial negative CIE”. Nannoplankton extinctions were not simultaneous and might imply limited capacity for adaptation in the early stages of evolutionary history. However, originations of new taxa soon after the disappearance of Triassic forms suggest the ability to rapidly overcame extreme stressing conditions.

  14. Magnetostratigraphy of the middle-upper Jurassic sedimentary sequences at Yanshiping, Qiangtang Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunhui; Zeng, Yongyao; Yan, Maodu; Wu, Song; Fang, Xiaomin; Bao, Jing; Zan, Jinbo; Liu, Xifang

    2016-09-01

    A series of important geological events occurred in the Tibetan Plateau area during the Jurassic, such as the collision of the Lhasa and Qiangtang Terranes, the closure of the Meso-Tethyan Ocean, the opening of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean and the cessation of the mega-monsoon. The ˜3000 m thick Jurassic sedimentary sequence in the Qiangtang Basin on the central Tibetan Plateau, which is called the Yanshiping (YSP) Group, recorded these geological events. However, the chronology of the sequence is surprisingly poorly constrained. Here, we perform a detailed palaeomagnetic analysis on the ˜1060 m thick middle and upper portions of the YSP Group (the Xiali and Suowa Formations) in the YSP section of the eastern Qiangtang Basin. Three bivalve zones at stratigraphic intervals of ˜40-140, 640-800 and 940-1040 m are identified, which yield a Bathonian-Callovian age for the Lower Xiali Fm., a Callovian-Oxfordian age for the Lower Suowa Fm. and an Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian age for the Upper Suowa Fm. A total of 544 oriented palaeomagnetic samples were collected from the section. By combining thermal and alternating field demagnetizations, clear characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) directions are isolated for most of the samples. The robust ChRM directions pass fold and reversals tests, which support the primary nature of the ChRMs and yield a palaeopole at 76.8°N/297.2°E (dp = 2.2°, dm = 3.7°). A total of 27 normal and 26 reversed polarity zones were successfully recorded in the section. Combined with fossil age constraints, results suggest that the section is plausibly composed of a Callovian-Early Kimmeridgian age sedimentary sequence.

  15. THE HETTANGIAN SHALLOW WATER CARBONATES AFTER THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BIOCALCIFICATION CRISIS: THE ALBENZA FORMATION IN THE WESTERN SOUTHERN ALPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLAVIO JADOUL

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the stratigraphic and sedimentologic setting of an early Hettangian carbonate platform in the Lombardy Basin, taking into account the Triassic-Jurassic (Tr-J post-crisis evolution and the geodynamic setting related to the beginning of the Early Jurassic rifting. The historical name of this platform ("Conchodon Dolomite", not adequate for the absence of Conchodon and for the mainly calcareous lithology, has been replaced with Albenza Formation. The depositional model of this carbonate platform unit is coherent with a leeward Great Bahama Bank-type environment, without any reefs facing deep water environments. The unusual abundance of ooids and marine cements, in the basal progradational ramp-type margins, reflects temporal variation in the saturation state of seawater after the Tr-J crisis, possibly due to marine calcified cyanobacteria blossom. The absence of biotically induced margins related to the (biocalcification Tr-J crisis and the concomitant tectonic fragmentation, with different subsidence rates of the Tethyan passive margin, conditioned the drowning and the eastward retrogradation of the Albenza platform. 

  16. CARBONATE FACIES ZONATION OF THE UPPER JURASSIC-LOWER CRETACEOUS APULIA PLATFORM MARGIN (GARGANO PROMONTORY, SOUTHERN ITALY

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    MICHELE MORSILLI

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Apulia platform margin and the transition to adjacent basinal deposits (inner platform to basin are well exposed in the Gargano Promontory. Detailed field work has allowed to recognize eight main facies associations which reflect various depositional environments, and which document a differentiated zonation, from the inner platform to the basin. A shallow lagoon existed in the internal part of the Gargano Promontory with a transition to tidal flat areas (F1. Oolitic shoals (F2 bordered this internal peritidal area passing seaward to a reef-flat with abundant corals (F3. A reef-front, associated with a coral rubble zone, has been found in some areas (F4. In the external margin zone, massive wackestones with Ellipsactinia occur (F5 and pass gradually to a rudstone facies on the proximal slope (F6. The base-of-slope facies association consists of pelagic sediments interbedded with gravity-displaced deposits (F7 and F8. The depositional profile of the Apulia Platform is typical of the Tethyan Jurassic-Early Cretaceous platforms, with slope declivities in the order of 25°-28°. The remarkable progradation of the platform in the northern tract of the Gargano (Lesina and Varano lakes area and its substantial stability east- and southwards (Mattinata area suggest a possible windward position of the margin in this latter portion and, in contrast, a leeward position of the northern portion.   

  17. Newly discovered Jurassic skarnfields in the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, M.; Fortey, N. J.; Beddoe-Stephens, B.

    1992-08-01

    A series of calcic magnetite skarn klippen in the north of the Cordillera Real are interpreted as erosional relics of a great skarn sheet, over 150 km long, formed by thrusting of island-arc type sediments and volcanics over the Jurassic Azafran batholith during an accretion event. The skarns are contrasted petrographically and compositionally with those of the Nambija field in the south of the Cordillera, which probably relates to the same chain of batholiths. However, the Nambija skarns are autochthonous and rich in gold, with Au:Ag ratios in the region of 20:1, whereas those to the north are allochthonous and relatively barren.

  18. A new basal sauropod from the pre-Toarcian Jurassic of South Africa: evidence of niche-partitioning at the sauropodomorph-sauropod boundary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Blair W; Bonnan, Matthew F; Yates, Adam M; Neveling, Johann; Choiniere, Jonah N

    2015-08-19

    The early evolution of sauropod dinosaurs remains poorly understood, with a paucity of unequivocal sauropod taxa known from the first twenty million years of the Jurassic. Recently, the Early Jurassic of South Africa has yielded an assemblage of dental and post-cranial remains displaying a more apomorphic character suite than any other similarly aged sauropodomorph. These remains are interpreted as a new species of basal sauropod and recovered cladistically as the sister taxon to Vulcanodon +more derived Sauropoda, underscoring its importance for our understanding of this pivotal period of sauropod evolution. Key changes in the dentition, axial skeleton and forelimb of this new species suggest a genuine functional distinction occurring at the sauropodiform-sauropod boundary. With reference to these changes, we propose a scenario in which interdependent refinements of the locomotory and feeding apparatus occurred in tandem with, or were effected by, restrictions in the amount of vertical forage initially available to the earliest sauropods. The hypothesized instance of niche-partitioning between basal sauropodan taxa and higher-browsing non-sauropodan sauropodomorphs may partially explain the rarity of true sauropods in the basal rocks of the Jurassic, while having the added corollary of couching the origins of Sauropoda in terms of an ecologically delimited 'event'.

  19. Facies Architecture And Sequence Stratigraphy of Jurassic Tidal Successions in the Lajas Formation, Neuquen Basin, Argentina; an Outcrop Analogue For the Tilje Formation, Offshore Mid-Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIlroy, D.; Flint, S.

    1999-07-01

    A common element of sequence stratigraphic models for ancient shallow marine systems is the switch from wave-dominated shoreface deposition during highstand to tidal/estuarine deposition within incised valleys which provide the necessary amplification of tidal currents, during lowstand/early base level rise. Thus, tide-dominated sedimentation is restricted to specific base level positions, which has important implications for reservoir geometry and quality. The Lajas Formation is studied as an analogue to the Jurassic Tilje Formation. The similar age, tectonic setting, sedimentology and aggradational nature of the tidal succession make the Lajas an ideal analogue with which to study facies architecture and test sequence stratigraphic models. This is especially so, since field data can be tied to geophysical data associated with producing oil fields. The lower Jurassic Lajas Formation of the Neuquen basin comprises 500 m of well-exposed tide-dominated sediments deposited as two low frequency unconformity-bounded sequences which are tide-dominated throughout.

  20. THE JURASSIC SEDIMENTARY EVOLUTION OF A CARBONATE PLATFORM INTO A DEEP-WATER BASIN, MT. MANGART (SLOVENIAN-ITALIAN BORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREJ SMUC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A complete Jurassic succession, recording the evolution from platform margin to a deep-water basin, is exposed at Mt. Mangart in the Julian Alps. The succession is a part of the Julian Nappe, where the Southern Alps overlap with the Dinarides. In the Jurassic, the area comprised part of the south Tethyan passive continental margin. The section was studied sedimentologically in detail and dated with radiolarians. It is divided into five lithostratigraphic units: Unit 1: Lower Jurassic shallow-water peloidal and oncoidal limestones; Unit 2: Pliensbachian distal shelf limestones rich in juvenile ammonites and sponge spicules topped by an Fe-Mn hardground; Unit 3: lower to possibly middle Toarcian sequence of black shales with interbedded siliceous limestone; Unit 4: upper Bajocian/Bathonian to lower Tithonian cherts, cherty limestones, and carbonate gravity-flow deposits; Unit 5: upper Tithonian red nodular cherty limestones with abundant calpionellids and aptychi. A stratigraphic gap, comprising the late Toarcian to early Bajocian, separates Unit 4 from Unit 3. In general, the succession correlates well with known Tethyan transgressive/regressive facies cycles. In addition, two periods of accelerated subsidence were recognized, the first, in the Pliensbachian, drowned the platform, the second, prior to the late Bajocian, created accommodation space for resedimented carbonate deposits from the adjacent Friuli Carbonate Platform. The present day position of the succession is between the Belluno Basin to the west and the Slovenian Basin to the south. The hitherto described successions of these two basins were located more distally from the Friuli Carbonate Platform than the Mt. Mangart succession. 

  1. Amphibious flies and paedomorphism in the Jurassic period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Diying; Nel, André; Cai, Chenyang; Lin, Qibin; Engel, Michael S

    2013-03-01

    The species of the Strashilidae (strashilids) have been the most perplexing of fossil insects from the Jurassic period of Russia and China. They have been widely considered to be ectoparasites of pterosaurs or feathered dinosaurs, based on the putative presence of piercing and sucking mouthparts and hind tibio-basitarsal pincers purportedly used to fix onto the host's hairs or feathers. Both the supposed host and parasite occur in the Daohugou beds from the Middle Jurassic epoch of China (approximately 165 million years ago). Here we analyse the morphology of strashilids from the Daohugou beds, and reach markedly different conclusions; namely that strashilids are highly specialized flies (Diptera) bearing large membranous wings, with substantial sexual dimorphism of the hind legs and abdominal extensions. The idea that they belong to an extinct order is unsupported, and the lineage can be placed within the true flies. In terms of major morphological and inferred behavioural features, strashilids resemble the recent (extant) and relict members of the aquatic fly family Nymphomyiidae. Their ontogeny are distinguished by the persistence in adult males of larval abdominal respiratory gills, representing a unique case of paedomorphism among endopterygote insects. Adult strashilids were probably aquatic or amphibious, shedding their wings after emergence and mating in the water.

  2. Triassic-Jurassic pteridosperms of Australasia: speciation, diversity and decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattemore, G. A.; Rigby, J. F.; Playford, G.

    2015-07-01

    Pteridosperms are preserved abundantly in the Gondwanan Triassic, with many species exhibiting consider- able morphological variation that has been attributed to a hybridization model of speciation. This is an improbable explanation given that hybridization is very rare in gymnosperms. Allopatric speciation resulting from geographic and climatic provincialism is a more likely explanation for the morphological diversity which is well represented in Anisian Norian (Middle and Upper Triassic) floras of Australasia and elsewhere in Gondwana. Most specimens are distributed among three families: Umkomasiaceae, Peltaspermaceae and Matatiellaceae. These families, together with other possibly pteridospermous genera, are reviewed herein. Diversity in these families apparently declined by the Rhaetian and they did not persist into the Gondwanan post-Triassic. Australasian post-Triassic strata contain remarkably different floral assemblages to those of the Triassic. No fructifications are clearly pteridospermous and no remains show any obvious relationship with pteridosperms of the Gondwanan Triassic. Caytonialean fructifications are not known in Australasian strata; however, associated foliage has been reported from the Eastern Gondwanan Upper Triassic through Middle Jurassic including Australia. Much fern-like foliage, claimed to be pteridospermous from the Lower Jurassic through Eocene of Eastern Gondwana, lacks supporting evidence of such affiliation. (Author)

  3. The Jurassic to Paleogene detrital record of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt: results from the Kyrgyz Tien Shan

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pelsmaeker, Elien; Jolivet, Marc; Dransart Laborde, Amandine; Robin, Cécile; Zhimulev, Fedor; Poujol, Marc; Nachtergaele, Simon; Glorie, Stijn; De Clercq, Shana; Batalev, Vladislav; De Grave, Johan

    2017-04-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) represents one of the largest Phanerozoic accretionary orogens in the world, pinched between North China - Tarim, Kazakhstan and the Siberian craton. It stretches from the Pamir in the southwest, over the Tien Shan, Junggar, Altai and Sayan mountain ranges to the Baikal rift in the northeast. The basement of the CAOB exists of various tectonic units that were assembled during several Paleozoic collision-accretion events. By the Permian, the accretionary tectonics in the CAOB culminated as all major composing units were joined. After final construction in the Late Paleozoic, the CAOB was subjected to several phases of Mesozoic deformation and was again reactivated in the Late Cenozoic as distant effect of the India-Eurasia collision. The Meso-Cenozoic reactivation episodes occurred in an intracontinental setting, related to tectonic far-field effects originating at the Eurasian margins. Subsequently intracontinental orogens, such as Tien Shan, were built superimposed on the inherited basement architecture and the erosion products of their exhuming mountain ranges accumulated in sedimentary basins. New sedimentological and detrital zircon U-Pb (LA-ICP-MS) results from several Jurassic to Paleogene sedimentary sections in Kyrgyzstan provide new insights in the Mesozoic - early Cenozoic geodynamic evolution and related basin-range interactions of the Kyrgyz Tien Shan. Studied sedimentary sections are located in the Fergana and Yarkand-Fergana basins to the west of the Talas-Fergana Fault (TFF) and in the Issyk-Kul and Ming-Kush-Kökömeren basins to the east of the TFF. The U-Pb ages of the post-Precambrian zircon grains found in 18 Jurassic to Paleogene sandstones, can be generally divided into four groups: Caledonian (470-390 Ma), Hercynian (315-260 Ma), Triassic (250-210 Ma) and Jurassic (190-160 Ma) ages. The differences in sedimentation pattern and detrital zircon U-Pb age components suggest that the TFF played an important

  4. The earliest fossil record of Panorpidae (Mecoptera from the Middle Jurassic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ding

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The early history of Panorpidae (Mecoptera is poorly known due to sparse fossil records. Up to date, only nine fossil species have been described, all from the Paleogene, except the Early Cretaceous Solusipanorpa gibbidorsa Lin, 1980. However, we suggest S. gibbidorsa is too incompletely preserved to permit even family classification. A new genus with two new species, Jurassipanorpa impunctata gen. et sp. n. and Jurassipanorpa sticta sp. n., are described based on four well-preserved specimens from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China. These two new species are the earliest fossil records of Panorpidae. The new genus is erected based on a combination of forewing characters: both R1 and Rs1 with two branches, 1A reaching posterior margin of wing distad of the forking of Rs from R1, and no crossveins or only one crossvein between veins of 1A and 2A. In all four specimens, long and robust setae ranging from 0.09 to 0.38 mm in length and pointing anteriorly, are present on anal veins of forewings. The function of these setae is enigmatic.

  5. Triassic-Jurassic Flora of Poland; Floristical Support of Climatic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbacka, Maria; Pacyna, Grzegorz; Feldman-Olszewska, Anna; Ziaja, Jadwiga; Bodor, Emese

    2014-12-01

    Plant macroremains from five boreholes in Poland were studied. Two of them (Huta OP-1 and Studzianna) from the northern margin of the Holy Cross Mountains, yielded several taxa. In the other three boreholes determinable fos-sil plants were sporadic, albeit important. Most of the taxa from the Huta OP-1 and Studzianna boreholes are typi-cal of the European Early Jurassic (Hettangian and Sinemurian). Both localities, although close to one another, show incertae sedis, Desmiophyllum harrisii phytes and conifers (a new species incertae sedis, Desmiophyllum harrisii Barbacka et Pacyna is herein proposed), which would suggest rather wet and warm conditions. This flora is typical of the European Province of the Euro-Sinian Region. In Studzianna the Siberian elements dominate, gymnosperms, mainly Czekanowskiales, which in-dicate a drier and colder environment. The palaeobotanical data correspond to the results of clay mineral studies, in particular the kaolinite/illite ratio in the source formations. The kaolinite content confirms a decrease in temperature and a reduction in rainfall in the late Early Hettangian and the latest Hettangian in the area.

  6. The Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous of eastern Heilongjiang, Northeast China: stratigraphy and regional basin history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, J.G.; Matsukawa, M.; Cai, H.W.; Jiang, B.Y.; Ito, M.; He, C.Q.; Gu, Z.W. [Academy of Sinica, Nanjing (China)

    2003-12-01

    In eastern Heilongjiang, the Upper Jurassic is marine and restricted to the Suibin and Dong'an areas, where it is characterized faunally by Callovian-Volgian (Tithonian) bivalves and florally by dinoflagellates. The Lower Cretaceous is widely distributed in eastern Heilongjiang, and characterized faunally by Berriasian-Valanginian bivalves, Barremian-Albian ammonites and Aucellina, and florally by dinoflagellates. To the west, the marine facies grade into non-marine beds. Thus, in the east, for example in the Dong'an and Dajiashan areas, near the northwestern Palaeo-Pacific, the Lower Cretaceous is marine; westward, in the Yunshan, Longzhaogou. Peide, and Zhushan areas, marine and non-marine deposits alternate, whereas further west still, e.g. in the Jixi Basin, non-marine facies are intercalated with marine beds. This regional distribution is indicative of a large, shallow embayment opening eastwards to the Palaeo-Pacific; during the Early Cretaceous successive transgressive-regressive events influenced the climate and biota of eastern Heilongjiang and northeastern China. Many of the Lower Cretaceous sections contain abundant coals, demonstrating that in this region the Early Cretaceous was an important coal-forming period.

  7. The stratigraphy of Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) reservoir sandstones in the Witch Ground Graben, United Kingdom North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, S.D. (Elf Enterprise Caledonia Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Mantel, K.A. (Narwhal, London (United Kingdom)); Morton, D.J. (Deminex UK Oil Gas Ltd., London (United Kingdom)); Riley, L.A. (Paleo Services, Hertfordshire (United Kingdom))

    1993-10-01

    Oil-bearing Upper Jurassic Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sandstones of the Sgiath and Piper formations are of major economic importance in the Witch Ground Gaben, United Kingdom North Sea. They form the reservoirs in 14 fields that originally contained 2 billion bbl of oil reserves, including Scott Field, which in 1993 will be the largest producing United Kingdom North Sea oil field to come on stream in more than a decade. The Sgiath and Piper formations represent Late Jurassic transgressive and regressive phases that began with paralic deposition and culminated in a wave-dominated delta system. These phases preceded the major grabel rifting episode (late Kimmeridgian to early Ryazanian) and deposition of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, the principal source rock of the Witch Ground Graben oil fields. A threefold subdivision of the middle to upper Oxfordian Sgiath Formation is formally proposed, with Scott field well 15/21a-15 as the designated reference well. The basal Skene Member consists of thinly interbedded paralic carbonaceous shales, coals, and sandstones. This is overlain by transgressive marine shales of the Saltire Member. The upper-most Oxfordian Scott Member consists of shallow marine sandstones that prograded to the southwest. The contact of the Sgiath and Piper formations is a basinwide transgressive marine shale (I shale), which can act as an effective barrier to fluid communication between the Sgiath and Piper reservoir sandstones.

  8. A unique fossil record from neptunian sills: the world's most extreme example of stratigraphic condensation (Jurassic, western Sicily)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Jobst

    2017-06-01

    Neptunian sills at Rocca Busambra, a fragment of the Trapanese/Saccense Domain in western Sicily, host the most abundant ammonite and gastropod fauna which has ever been recorded from the Jurassic of the western Tethys. The fauna is dominated by parautochthonous organisms which were swept into the sills by gentle transport. Ammonites are characterized by perfect preservation and small size, a feature which is due to the predominance of microconchs but also of stunting. The most complete sill is 0.7 m thick and could be separated into 17 levels which range in age from the early Toarcian into the late Kimmeridgian, thus representing the most extreme case of palaeontologically and depositionally documented stratigraphic condensation in Earth history. The unique feature of the Rocca Busambra sills is due to the interaction of three processes: extreme stratigraphic condensation on the sea floor, weak tectonic fracturing of the host rock and repeated reopening on top of already existing sills. Contrasting percentages of gastropods in individual levels reflect sea-level oscillations which correspond to long known low- and highstands during the Jurassic of the western Tethys. Comparisons with other ammonite-bearing sill faunas reveal several similarities, but represent only short-timed phases of tectonic pulses and deposition.

  9. JURASSIC PALEONTOLOGICAL HERITAGE OF MURCIA (BETIC CORDILLERA, SOUTH-EASTERN SPAIN

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    GREGORIO ROMERO

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Jurassic rocks of the External and Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera are widespread in the province of Murcia. Four areas are considered of special interest for stratigraphical and paleontological analysis: a Sierra Quípar and b Sierras Lúgar-Corque (External Subbetic, c Sierra Ricote (Median Subbetic and d Sierra Espuña (Malaguide Complex. The first two contain Jurassic sections including Sinemurian-Tithonian deposits, and major stratigraphic discontinuities, containing significant cephalopod concentrations of taphonomic and taxonomic interest, occuring in the Lower-Upper Pliensbachian, Lower/Middle Jurassic and Middle/Upper Jurassic boundaries. These areas are also relevant for biostratigraphical analysis of the Middle-Upper Jurassic interval. In the Sierra de Ricote, the Mahoma section is of especial interest for the study of Lías/Dogger transition. Casa Chimeneas section constitutes the best Subbetic site for the analysis of the Lower/Upper Bajocian boundary. In the La Bermeja-Casas de Vite area, the Bajocian-Tithonian interval is well-represented, including a parastratotype of the Radiolarite Jarropa Formation. Finally, the Malvariche section in Sierra Espuña represents the best Jurassic succession of Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera and could be considered as a reference section for this Betic Domain. In this paper a heritage evaluation has been carried out for these classical jurassic sections with the object of protecting these sites according to the legal framework prevailing in the province of Murcia.

  10. LA-ICPMS Zircon U-Pb Dating in the Jurassic Daohugou Beds and Correlative Strata in Ningcheng of Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yanxue; LIU Yongqing; ZHANG Hong

    2006-01-01

    LA-ICPMS Zircon U-Pb dating is applied to volcanic rocks overlying and underlying the Salamander-bearing bed in the Daohugou beds of Ningcheng in Inner Mongola and Reshuichang of Lingyuan and Mazhangzi of Jianping in western Liaoning. The results indicate that the youngest age of the rocks in Daohugou of Ningcheng is 158 Ma, and the oldest one is 164 Ma. Synthesized researches indicate that the salamander-bearing beds in Daohugou of Ningcheng, Reshuichang of Lingyuan and Mazhangzi of Jianping were developed in the same period. The Daohugou beds were formed in the geological age of 164-158 Ma of the middle-late Jurassic. Whilst, the Daohugou beds and its correlative strata should correspond to the Tiaojishan Formation (or Lanqi Formation) of the middle Jurassic in northern Hebei Province and western Liaoning Province, based on the disconformity between the Daohugou beds and its overlaying beds of the Tuchengzi Formation of Late Jurassic and the Jehol Beds of early Cretaceous, and the disconformity between the Daohugou Beds and its underlying Jiulongshan Formation, which is composed of conglomerate, sandstone, shale with coal and thin coal beds.

  11. The systematics and paleobiogeographic significance of Sub-Boreal and Boreal ammonites (Aulacostephanidae and Cardioceratidae from the Upper Jurassic of the Bohemian Massif

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    Hrbek Jan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Upper Jurassic marine deposits are either rarely preserved due to erosion or buried under younger sediments in the Bohemian Massif. However, fossil assemblages from a few successions exposed in northern Bohemia and Saxony and preserved in museum collections document the regional composition of macro-invertebrate assemblages and thus provide unique insights into broad-scale distribution and migration pathways of ammonites during the Late Jurassic. In this paper, we focus on the systematic revision of ammonites from the Upper Oxfordian and Lower Kimmeridgian deposits of northern Bohemia and Saxony. The ammonites belong to two families (Aulacostephanidae and Cardioceratidae of high paleobiogeographic and stratigraphic significance. Six genera belong to the family Aulacostephanidae (Prorasenia, Rasenia, Eurasenia, Rasenioides, Aulacostephanus, Aulacostephanoides and one genus belongs to the family Cardioceratidae (Amoeboceras. They show that the Upper Jurassic deposits of the northern Bohemian Massif belong to the Upper Oxfordian and Lower Kimmeridgian and paleobiogeographically correspond to the German-Polish ammonite branch with the geographical extent from the Polish Jura Chain to the Swabian and Franconian Alb. Therefore, the occurrences of ammonites described here imply that migration pathway connecting the Polish Jura Chain with habitats in southern Germany was located during the Late Oxfordian and Early Kimmeridgian in the Bohemian Massif.

  12. Diagenesis, low-grade and contact metamorphism in the Triassic-Jurassic of the Vichuquen-Tilicura and Hualane-Gualleco Basins, Coastal Range of Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmar, M.; Schmidt, S.T.; Mahlmann, R.F.; Mullis, J.; Stern, W.B.; Frey, M. [University of Chile, Santiago (Chile). Dept. of Geology

    2002-07-01

    Diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic conditions have been determined (pressure and temperature) for Late Triassic to Early Jurassic sedimentary rocks from the Vichuquen-Tilicura and the Hualane-Gualleco basins in Central Chile using Kubler index (KI), coal rank data, K-white mica b cell dimension, characteristic mineral assemblages and fluid inclusion data. A burial-related diagenetic to low-grade metamorphic event, which is recorded in both basins, is partly overprinted in the Hualane-Gualleco basin by contact metamorphism around Jurassic dioritic to granodioritic intrusions. Diagenetic conditions prevailed in the northern Vichuquen-Tilicura basin, whereas in the southern Hualane-Gualleco basin low-grade metamorphism is observed with an increase in metamorphic grade from north to south. Epizonal conditions are locally reached in the very south of the Hualane-Gualleco basin. Low-pressure conditions were determined using the K-white mica b cell dimension. A numerical maturity model corroborates with the regional low-grade metamorphism. Evidence of contact metamorphism in the immediate proximity of some Jurassic intrusions includes: (1) hornfels facies assemblages such as ferrosilite (XFe0.6)-magnesiohornblende-ferroactinolite-biotite together with chlorite, plagioclase, stilpnomelane and (2) natural coke and pyrolitic bituminite in some sedimentary samples. Epizonal KI and high coal rank values are probably a result of this locally occurring contact metamorphism.

  13. POROSPHAERA (PORIFERA, A GLOBULAR SPONGE FROM THE UPPER JURASSIC OF THE CENTRAL IRAN

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    BABA SENOWBARI-DARYAN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Porosphaera, an abundant small spherical calcisponge, well known from Cretaceous strata of Europe, was found in Middle and Upper Jurassic deposits of east-central Iran. This is the first record of Porosphaera from the Jurassic, except for a questionable occurrence of the genus from the Upper Jurassic of Canada, described by Jansa et al. (1982. The following species are new: P. regularis n. sp., P. biporata n. sp., P.? labyrinthica n. sp.,  and P.? asymmetrica n. sp. 

  14. Paleomagnetic studies on sedimentary Jurassic rocks from southern Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruczyk, J.; Kaḑziałko-Hofmokl, M.; Nozharov, P.; Petkov, N.; Nachev, I.

    Paleomagnetic investigations were performed on Jurassic sediments sampled in the mobile area of Bulgaria comprising Srednogorie, Kreiste and Stranja. The main carriers of magnetic properties of rocks studied are pigmentary haematite and goethite of post-sedimentary origin. The characteristic component of natural remanence (CARM), isolated by means of analysis of demagnetization procedure is secondary, and was acquired after the main tectonic event that took place in this area during the Upper Cretaceous. The CARM directions before tectonic correction are close to the results for Upper Cretaceous magmatic rocks from Srednogorie. The mean CARM direction and the corresponding polar position obtained for the whole region studied are compared with reference data for the Eurasian Platform. The difference between the reference and our data implies anticlockwise rotation of southern Bulgaria relative to Eurasia by ˜ 10-20° and a northward tilt of the region under study by ˜ 10-15° after acquisition of CARM.

  15. Geomagnetic field intensity in the middle jurassic - oligocene

    CERN Document Server

    Kurazhkovskii, A Yu; Klain, B I

    2014-01-01

    The present paper summarizes results of the studies on the intensity of geomagnetic field in the (167 - 23) Ma interval by sedimentary rocks of the Russian Plate and adjacent territories. The joint analysis of the data paleointensity obtained by sedimentary and thermomagnetized (from PINT12) rocks within this temporal interval is conducted. It is shown that the changes of the paleointensity were occurred chaotically. Alternating bursts and periods of quiet regime of the geomagnetic field are typical for intermittent processes and is a characteristic of the geological interval Jurassic-beginning of Paleogene. The distributions of the paleointensity corresponding to different intervals of geologic time were investigated. It is revealed that the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the paleointensity values is best approximated by a power function. The indices of the power functions varied depending on geologic time intervals.The analysis of the paleomagnetic data suggests that the medium in which the geoma...

  16. Extreme adaptations for aquatic ectoparasitism in a Jurassic fly larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Bo; Engel, Michael S; Wappler, Torsten; Jarzembowski, Edmund A; Zhang, Haichun; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Xiaoting; Rust, Jes

    2014-06-24

    The reconstruction of ancient insect ectoparasitism is challenging, mostly because of the extreme scarcity of fossils with obvious ectoparasitic features such as sucking-piercing mouthparts and specialized attachment organs. Here we describe a bizarre fly larva (Diptera), Qiyia jurassica gen. et sp. nov., from the Jurassic of China, that represents a stem group of the tabanomorph family Athericidae. Q. jurassica exhibits adaptations to an aquatic habitat. More importantly, it preserves an unusual combination of features including a thoracic sucker with six radial ridges, unique in insects, piercing-sucking mouthparts for fluid feeding, and crocheted ventral prolegs with upward directed bristles for anchoring and movement while submerged. We demonstrate that Q. jurassica was an aquatic ectoparasitic insect, probably feeding on the blood of salamanders. The finding reveals an extreme morphological specialization of fly larvae, and broadens our understanding of the diversity of ectoparasitism in Mesozoic insects.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02844.001.

  17. Triassic-Jurassic Mass Extinction: Evidence for Bolide Impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R.; Becker, L.; Haggart, J.; Poreda, R.

    2003-04-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic (TJ) mass extinction event is one of the most severe in geologic history and is one of the five largest in the Phanerozoic with as many as 80% of the species lost. It is also one of the most poorly understood. Only a few geologic sections have been identified for the TJ extinction and most of those are not well preserved. Previously, the paucity of suitable stratigraphic sections has prevented corroborative geochemical studies. Recently a well-preserved stratigraphic section spanning the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (˜200 mya) was identified at Kennecott Point, Queen Charlotte, Islands, British Columbia. Initial studies have shown that the Kennecott Point sequence is one of the best preserved and contains one of the most complete radiolarian microfossil turnovers known. Analyses of stable isotopes have shown that a 13C perturbation exits within the sequence and suggests a decline in organic productivity (Ward et al., 2001). Preliminary results of laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) of selected Queen Charlotte samples suggest that fullerenes (C60 to C200) may be present in the Kennecott Point stratigraphic sequence. Previous studies have shown that fullerenes are present in the mass extinction boundary of the Permian-Triassic (˜251 mya) as well as the well-known "dinosaur" extinction event of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (˜65 mya). Therefore, three of the big five extinction events appear to have associated fullerenes. The possible presence of fullerenes along with the productivity collapse (rapid environmental change) suggests that a cometary or asteroidal impact may have occurred. Although no known impact crater exists, we hope to present chemical evidence that an impact or multiple impacts may have been responsible for the TJ mass extinction.

  18. INSIGHT ON THE THEROPOD FAUNA FROM THE UBERABA FORMATION (BAURU GROUP, MINAS GERAIS STATE: NEW MEGARAPTORAN SPECIMEN FROM THE LATE CRETACEOUS OF BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGUSTÍN G. MARTINELLI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The first bony theropod record from the Campanian Uberaba Formation (Bauru Group is described. It consists of an isolated caudal centrum (CPPLIP 1324 found in the city of Uberaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The amphicoelous centrum possesses a length to height ratio of 1.74, deep elliptical lateral pneumatic foramen representing 26% of centrum length with three main sub-circular air chambers, andcamellate internal structure.This combination of features is shared with Aerosteon, Megaraptor, and Orkoraptor from the Late Cretaceous of Argentinaand with the Megaraptora indet. fromthe São José do Rio Preto Formation (Bauru Group, São Paulo State,allowing us to refer it to the Megaraptora clade (Tetanurae, Neovenatoridae. As such, the new specimen represents the second megaraptoran from the Late Cretaceous of Brazil and provides new information on tail anatomy on this bizarre group. 

  19. Climate change impacts on continental weathering through the Middle Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous of Sverdrup Basin, Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Jennifer; Grasby, Stephen; Swindles, Graeme; Dewing, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Jurassic to Cretaceous strata of Sverdrup Basin, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, contain marine and non-marine successions that can be studied to reconstruct ancient paleoclimates and paleoenvironments that are poorly understood in high-latitude regions. We use element geochemistry integrated with palynology to study a continuous Aalenian to Albian-aged succession preserved in the Hoodoo Dome H-37 oil and gas well located on southern Ellef Ringnes Island near the centre of Sverdrup Basin. Cluster analysis (stratigraphically constrained incremental sum of squares; CONISS) is used to delineate four geochemical zones that are broadly coeval with major changes in palyno-assemblages interpreted to reflect changes in regional paleoclimate. Zone 1 (late Aalenian to Bathonian) is characterized by palynomorphs associated with humid and warm climate conditions. The chemical alteration index (CAI) is high in this interval, expected under this a humid and warm climate. A transition to a seasonally arid and warm climate occurred in the Bathonian and persisted until the Kimmeridgian or Valanginian (Zone 2). This interval is characterized by decreased chemical weathering, indicated by a drop in CAI. The onset of Zone 3 (Kimmeridgian or Valanginian to late Barremian or early Aptian) occurs during a transition to humid and cool climate conditions and is associated with a period of regional uplift and rifting. Zone 3 is marked by a substantial and progressive drop in CAI, indicating a transition from a weathering to transport-dominated system, possibly associated with landscape destabilization. Reduced tectonic activity in Zone 4 (early Aptian to early or mid Albian) shows a return to active chemical weathering, possibly associated with landscape stabilization, suggested by a continued increase in pollen from upland coniferous taxa. The geochemical and palynological records of Middle Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous strata of the Hoodoo Dome H-37 oil and gas well show close correlation

  20. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology of Mesozoic granitoids from the Bariloche region (Argentina): Implications for the Middle-Late Jurassic evolution of the North Patagonian batholith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Antonio; Vujovich, Graciela; Fernández, Carlos; Moreno-Ventas, Iñaki; Martino, Roberto; Corretgé, Guillermo; Díaz-Alvarado, Juan; Heredia, Nemesio; Gallastegui, Gloria

    2010-05-01

    A detailed U-Pb geochronological study has been carried out on granitoids of the North Patagonian batholith in the region of Bariloche (Argentina), between 40°30' S and 41°45' S. In this region, the calc-alkaline, subduction-related, granitic bodies of the North Patagonian batholith intruded an Early Jurassic volcano-sedimentary sequence contemporary with the intrusion of the Subcordilleran Patagonian batholith (J1 magmatism), and unconformably overlying a metamorphic Gondwanan basement. All these rocks were affected by the Andean compressional phases during the Cenozoic. U-Pb SHRIMP dating of zircon crystals from 11 samples (109 spots) of diorites, tonalites, granodiorites and granites yielded dates ranging from 173 ± 3 Ma to 150 ± 2 Ma (Aalenian to Tithonian). No significant age differences have been identified among the distinct lithological types. Also no spatial trend emerges from these results, although ages tend to be younger westward in the traverse of the Manso River (≈ 41° 35' S). Two peaks appear in the probability density plot of zircon ages. Most of the dated zircons are Bajocian-Bathonian (Middle Jurassic, ≈169 Ma, J2 magmatism), while a secondary peak is observed at the boundary Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic, ≈ 156 Ma, J3 magmatism). The J2 magmatic period is coeval to the main stage of effusive activity (V2) in the huge volcanic Chon Aike Province, while J3 coincides with the lesser V3 period of volcanism in Chon Aike. These new geochronological data strongly contribute to the knowledge of the first stages of tectonic evolution of the Andean subduction margin in southern South America. Contrary to previous models, it can be proposed that the subduction-related Mesozoic magmatism started well before the Late Jurassic, and that a continuous supply of calc-alkaline magmas dominated the active margin of South America during at least 190 Ma, from the Early Jurassic to nowadays. Therefore, no dramatic time gap can be observed between

  1. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Middle Jurassic of western and northern Europe: its subdivisions, geochronology and correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callomon, John H.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The palaeogeographic settings of Denmark and East Greenland during the Middle Jurassic are outlined. They lay in the widespread epicontinental seas that covered much of Europe in the post-Triassic transgression. It was a period of continuing eustatic sea-level rise, with only distant connections to world oceans: to the Pacific, via the narrow Viking Straits between Greenland and Norway and hence the arctic Boreal Sea to the north; and to the subtropical Tethys, via some 1200 km of shelf-seas to the south. The sedimentary history of the region was strongly influenced by two factors: tectonism and climate. Two modes of tectonic movement governed basinal evolution: crustal extension leading to subsidence through rifting, such as in the Viking and Central Grabens of the North Sea; and subcrustal thermal upwelling, leading to domal uplift and the partition of marine basins through emergent physical barriers, as exemplified by the Central North Sea Dome with its associated volcanics. The climatic gradient across the 30º of temperate latitude spanned by the European seas governed biotic diversity and biogeography, finding expression in rock-forming biogenic carbonates that dominate sediments in the south and give way to largely siliciclastic sediments in the north. Geochronology of unrivalled finesse is provided by standard chronostratigraphy based on the biostratigraphy of ammonites. The Middle Jurassic saw the onset of considerable bioprovincial endemisms in these guide-fossils, making it necessary to construct parallel standard zonations for Boreal, Subboreal or NW European and Submediterranean Provinces, of which the NW European zonation provides the primary international standard. The current versions of these zonations are presented and reviewed.

  2. Fe-Ni Micrometorites from Upper Jurassic Cañadon Asfalto Fm., Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, M.; Hauser, N.; Cabaleri, N.; Silva Nieto, D.; Cuadros, F. A.; Reyes, S.

    2014-09-01

    Microspherules from an upper Jurassic sediments from Patagonia, show mineralogical, geochemical and textural features very similar to those reported for I-type micrometeorites whereas some spherules are interpreted as typical G-type micrometeorites.

  3. Paleoenvironmental conditions across the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary in central-eastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Yáñez, Mario; Núñez-Useche, Fernando; López Martínez, Rafael; Gardner, Rand D.

    2017-08-01

    The Padni section of central-eastern Mexico is characterized by pelagic, organic-rich carbonates and shales dated in this study by calpionellid biostratigraphy to the late Tithonian-late Berriasian time interval. Microfacies, pyrite framboid size, spectrometric gamma-ray and mineralogical data are herein integrated in order to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental change during the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary. Deposits of the late Tithonian-early Berriasian are characterized by laminated, organic-rich facies with abundant radiolarian, tiny pyrite framboids and low Th/U ratios. They are linked to upwelling in a semi-restricted basin, high marine productivity and anoxic bottom waters. The early incursions of Tethyan oceanic waters into the proto-Gulf of Mexico occurred during late Tithonian as attested the appearance of calpionellids. Short and intermittent accumulations of saccocomids during early Berriasian suggest episodes of sporadic connection between the Tethys, the proto-Atlantic and the Pacific ocean during sea-level rise events. A full and stable connection between the Tethys and proto-Gulf of Mexico was established until the late Berriasian. This event is supported by the presence of open marine and bioturbated facies with a framboid population typical of dysoxic conditions, higher Th/U ratios and a decreasing pattern of the total organic carbon content. In addition to highlighting the replenishment of the oxygen supply to the basin, this facies also points to a younger age for the finalization of the Yucatán Block rotation and the end of the Gulf of Mexico opening. Deposition of the studied section occurred mostly during a Tithonian-Berriasian arid phase reported in other Tethyan and Atlantic regions. The similarity between the discrete segments of the standard gamma-ray curve defined in the studied outcrop and those reported from subsurface implies their regional continuity allowing their use for correlation purposes.

  4. Vertebral pathology in an ornithopod dinosaur: a hemivertebra in Dysalotosaurus lettowvorbecki from the Jurassic of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzmann, Florian; Asbach, Patrick; Remes, Kristian; Hampe, Oliver; Hilger, André; Paulke, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    A vertebral fragment of the Late Jurassic ornithopod dinosaur Dysalotosaurus lettowvorbecki from Tanzania is described. It consists of a hemivertebra that is co-ossified with a complete vertebral centrum. The hemivertebra causes a hyperkyphotic posture of the vertebral column with an angle of approximately 35 degrees between the end plates of the vertebra, that is, a dorsal bending of the vertebral column. Associated with this is a 15 degrees lateral bending, which suggests a scoliosis. Micro-CT scans reveal thickening of the cortical bone in the hemivertebra and the complete vertebral centrum as compared to a "normal" vertebra. This can be interpreted as a reaction of the bone to the abnormal direction of forces arising from the defective configuration of the vertebral column. No signs of vertebral fracture are present. The arrangement of the Foramina venosa and the trapezoidal outline of the complete centrum that is co-ossified with the hemivertebra indicate that the hemivertebra in Dysalotosaurus developed early in embryogenesis probably by "hemimetameric segmental shift", that is, a defect of the fusion of the paired vertebral anlagen. This finding illustrates that hemivertebrae represent a fundamental defect of the vertebrate ontogenetic program.

  5. FIRST REPORT OF SITTING ANOMOEPUS TRACKS IN EUROPEAN LOWER JURASSIC (LAVINI DI MARCO SITE - NORTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCO AVANZINI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The palaeontologic site at Lavini di Marco, near to Rovereto (Trento, reveals a wide fossil tidal flat of Early Jurassic age (Calcari Grigi Formations – lower Member; Hettangian to lower Sinemurian . An extensive set of dinosaur prints were discovered a few years ago and are now the subject of ichnological and paleobiological studies. The prints which are described in present short note are believed to represent the right and left foot of the same individual, set in a side-by-side, sub-parallel, sitting posture. The prints can be classified as Anomoepus Hitchcock 1848. Amongst recognised ichnospecies, most of the charachteristics of the prints here described point to Moyenisauropus dodai Ellenberger 1974 (recte Anomoepus dodai Olsen & Galton 1984 of Lesotho. By contrast, the prints found at Lavini di Marco differ from the Anomoepus found in central-east Europe. These characters would seem to confirm the Gondwanic origins of the Rovereto ichnofauna as previously supposed from the study of other taxa. 

  6. A new basal sauropodiform dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic of Yunnan Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Ming; You, Hai-Lu; Wang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The Lufeng Formation in Lufeng Basin of Yunnan Province, southwestern China preserves one of the richest terrestrial Lower Jurassic vertebrate faunas globally, especially for its basal sauropodomorphs, such as Lufengosaurus and Yunnanosaurus. Here we report a new taxon, Xingxiulong chengi gen. et sp. nov. represented by three partial skeletons with overlapping elements. Xingxiulong possesses a number of autapomorphies, such as transversely expanded plate-like summit on top of the neural spine of posterior dorsal vertebrae, four sacral vertebrae, robust scapula, and elongated pubic plate approximately 40% of the total length of the pubis. Phylogenetic analysis resolves Xingxiulong as a basal member of Sauropodiformes, and together with another two Lufeng basal sauropodiforms Jingshanosaurus and Yunnanosaurus, they represent the basalmost lineages of this clade, indicating its Asian origin. Although being relatively primitive, Xingxiulong displays some derived features normally occurred in advanced sauropodiforms including sauropods, such as a four sacral-sacrum, a robust scapula, and a pubis with elongated pubic plate. The discovery of Xingxiulong increases the diversity of basal sauropodomorphs from the Lufeng Formation and indicates a more complicated scenario in the early evolution of sauropodiforms.

  7. Two new species of Paramesosciophilodes (Diptera, Nematocera, Mesosciophilidae from the Middle Jurassic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Gao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new species, Paramesosciophilodes bellus sp. n. and Paramesosciophilodes rarissima sp. n., from the Jiulongshan Formation at Daohugou Village, Inner Mongolia, China, are described in the extinct family Mesosciophilidae. Altogether seven genera with 21 species of mesosciophilids have been described from the Jurassic of Siberia and Kazakhstan, the Lower Cretaceous of Transbaikalia, and the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia. An emended generic diagnosis of Paramesosciophilodes and a list of known taxa of mesosciophilids are provided.

  8. Two new species of Paramesosciophilodes (Diptera, Nematocera, Mesosciophilidae) from the Middle Jurassic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiaqi; Shi, Guifeng; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Two new species, Paramesosciophilodesbellus sp. n. and Paramesosciophilodesrarissima sp. n., from the Jiulongshan Formation at Daohugou Village, Inner Mongolia, China, are described in the extinct family Mesosciophilidae. Altogether seven genera with 21 species of mesosciophilids have been described from the Jurassic of Siberia and Kazakhstan, the Lower Cretaceous of Transbaikalia, and the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia. An emended generic diagnosis of Paramesosciophilodes and a list of known taxa of mesosciophilids are provided.

  9. Reconstruction of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation extinct ecosystem—a synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Christine E.; Peterson, Fred

    2004-05-01

    A synthesis of recent and previous studies of the Morrison Formation and related beds, in the context of a conceptual climatic/hydrologic framework, permits reconstruction of the Late Jurassic dinosaurian ecosystem throughout the Western Interior of the United States and Canada. Climate models and geologic evidence indicate that a dry climate persisted in the Western Interior during the Late Jurassic. Early and Middle Kimmeridgian eolian deposits and Late Kimmeridgian alkaline, saline wetland/lacustrine deposits demonstrate that dryness persisted throughout the Kimmeridgian. Tithonian-age coal reflects lower evaporation rates associated with a slight cooling trend, but not a significant climate change. With a subtropical high over the Paleo-Pacific Ocean and atmospheric circulation generally toward the east, moisture carried by prevailing winds "rained out" progressively eastward, leaving the continental interior—and the Morrison depositional basin—dry. Within the basin, high evaporation rates associated with the southerly paleolatitude and greenhouse effects added to the dryness. Consequently, the two main sources of water—groundwater and surface water—originated outside the basin, through recharge of regional aquifers and streams that originated in the western uplands. Precipitation that fell west of the basin recharged aquifers that underlay the basin and discharged in wetlands and lakes in the distal, low-lying part of the basin. Precipitation west of the basin also fed intermittent and scarce perennial streams that flowed eastward. The streams were probably "losing" streams in their upstream reaches, and contributed to a locally raised water table. Elsewhere in the basin, where the floodplain intersected the water table, small lakes dotted the landscape. Seasonal storms, perhaps in part from the Paleo-Gulf of Mexico, brought some precipitation directly to the basin, although it was also subjected to "rain out" en route. Thus, meteoric input to the

  10. Reconstruction of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation extinct ecosystem - A synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, C.E.; Peterson, F.

    2004-01-01

    A synthesis of recent and previous studies of the Morrison Formation and related beds, in the context of a conceptual climatic/hydrologic framework, permits reconstruction of the Late Jurassic dinosaurian ecosystem throughout the Western Interior of the United States and Canada. Climate models and geologic evidence indicate that a dry climate persisted in the Western Interior during the Late Jurassic. Early and Middle Kimmeridgian eolian deposits and Late Kimmeridgian alkaline, saline wetland/lacustrine deposits demonstrate that dryness persisted throughout the Kimmeridgian. Tithonian-age coal reflects lower evaporation rates associated with a slight cooling trend, but not a significant climate change. With a subtropical high over the Paleo-Pacific Ocean and atmospheric circulation generally toward the east, moisture carried by prevailing winds "rained out" progressively eastward, leaving the continental interior-and the Morrison depositional basin-dry. Within the basin, high evaporation rates associated with the southerly paleolatitude and greenhouse effects added to the dryness. Consequently, the two main sources of water-groundwater and surface water-originated outside the basin, through recharge of regional aquifers and streams that originated in the western uplands. Precipitation that fell west of the basin recharged aquifers that underlay the basin and discharged in wetlands and lakes in the distal, low-lying part of the basin. Precipitation west of the basin also fed intermittent and scarce perennial streams that flowed eastward. The streams were probably "losing" streams in their upstream reaches, and contributed to a locally raised water table. Elsewhere in the basin, where the floodplain intersected the water table, small lakes dotted the landscape. Seasonal storms, perhaps in part from the Paleo-Gulf of Mexico, brought some precipitation directly to the basin, although it was also subjected to "rain out" en route. Thus, meteoric input to the basin was

  11. Coal petrology and genesis of Jurassic coal in the Ordos Basin, China

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    Weihua Ao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sets of thick coal beds characterized by simple structure and shallow burial depth were developed in the Early and Middle Jurassic strata of the Ordos Basin, northwestern China. The huge reserves of this high quality coal have a high commercial value. We studied the coal’s petrologic characteristics and its maceral distribution to determine the maceral’s contribution to generation of oil and gas. The results show that the Jurassic coals in the Ordos Basin have special petrological features because of the Basin’s unique depositional environment which was mainly a series of high-stand swamps in the upper fluvial system. These petrographic features are a result of the development of typical inland lakes where some sand bodies were formed by migrating rivers. After burial, the peat continued to undergo oxidizing conditions, this process generated extensive higher inertinite contents in the coals and the vitrinite components were altered to semi-vitrinite. The macroscopic petrographic types of these Jurassic coals are mainly semi-dull coal, dull coal, semilustrous and lustrous coal. The proportions of semi-dull coal and dull coal are higher in the basin margins, especially in the area near the northern margin. The numbers of semilustrous and lustrous coals increase southwards and towards the central basin. This situation indicates that different coal-forming swamp environments have major controlling effects on the coal components. Another observation is that in the Ordos’ coal sequences, especially in the lower part, some sandstone beds are thick, up to 20 m with a coarse grain size. The higher fusinite content in the macerals accompanies a higher semi-vitrinite content with more complete and regular plant cell structure. The fusinite structure is clear and well preserved. After burial, the lithology of the roof and floor rocks can continue to affect the evolution of coal petrology. The sand bodies in the roof and floor exhibit good

  12. A remarkable new family of Jurassic insects (Neuroptera with primitive wing venation and its phylogenetic position in Neuropterida.

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    Qiang Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lacewings (insect order Neuroptera, known in the fossil record since the Early Permian, were most diverse in the Mesozoic. A dramatic variety of forms ranged in that time from large butterfly-like Kalligrammatidae to minute two-winged Dipteromantispidae. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the intriguing new neuropteran family Parakseneuridae fam. nov. with three new genera and 15 new species from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou (Inner Mongolia, China and the Early/Middle Jurassic of Sai-Sagul (Kyrgyzstan: Parakseneura undula gen. et sp. nov., P. albomacula gen. et sp. nov., P. curvivenis gen. et sp. nov., P. nigromacula gen. et sp. nov., P. nigrolinea gen. et sp. nov., P. albadelta gen. et sp. nov., P. cavomaculata gen. et sp. nov., P. inflata gen. et sp. nov., P. metallica gen. et sp. nov., P. emarginata gen. et sp. nov., P. directa gen. et sp. nov., Pseudorapisma jurassicum gen. et sp. nov., P. angustipenne gen. et sp. nov., P. maculatum gen. et sp. nov. (Daohugou; Shuraboneura ovata gen. et sp. nov. (Sai-Sagul. The family comprises large neuropterans with most primitive wing venation in the order indicated by the presence of ScA and AA1+2, and the dichotomous branching of MP, CuA, CuP, AA3+4, AP1+2. The phylogenetic position of Parakseneuridae was investigated using a phylogenetic analysis of morphological scoring for 33 families of extinct and extant Neuropterida combined with DNA sequence data for representatives of all extant families. Parakseneuridae were recovered in a clade with Osmylopsychopidae, Prohemerobiidae, and Ithonidae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of the presumed AA1+2 in wings of Parakseneuridae is a unique plesiomorphic condition hitherto unknown in Neuropterida, the clade comprising Neuroptera, Megaloptera, Raphidioptera. The relative uncertainty of phylogenetic position of Parakseneuridae and the majority of other families of Neuroptera reflects deficient paleontological data, especially from critical

  13. Preliminary elemental analysis of fossil insects from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia and its taphonomic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo; LI JianFeng; FANG Yan; ZHANG HaiChun

    2009-01-01

    Fossil insects from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for the first time, and portions and distribution of some elements in com-pression and pyrited fossils were also revealed by X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) at-tached to SEM. Most of compression fossil insects from the Daohugou Biota are preserved in organic remains (diagenetic products of the original organic components). A small part of compression fossils retain a comparatively high Fe concentration which probably resulted from the absorption of Fe by biopolymers during the decaying period. Pyritized insect fossils suggest that the "fossil envelop" model found in the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota probably also occurs in the Daohugou Biota. Different preservation modes show various mechanisms of fossilization, and also suggest that several different microenvironments are present in Daohugou palaeolakes.

  14. Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous turbidite sandstones in the Central Graben, North Sea; with special focus on the Danish Gertrud Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannessen, P.

    1998-10-01

    Thick Late Jurassic - Early cretaceous turbidite sandstone successions in the Central Graben are uncommon except from the Moray Firth and Viking Graven north of the Central Graben, where several important hydrocarbon producing turbidite sandstone fields are known. The only hydrocarbon producing turbidite reservoir sandstones in the Central Graben is the up to 55 m thick Ribble Sandstone Member located in the British South-west Central Graben, where it is lying above thick shoreface reservoir sandstones of the Fulmar Formation, separated by offshore claystones of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation. The turbidite sandstones of the Ribble Sandstone Member derived from the more proximal thick reservoir sandstones of the Fulmar Formation located near the Mid North Sea High. It has not yet been possible to correlate thick shoreface sandstones of the Norwegian Ula Formation or the Danish Heno Formation to more distal thick turbidite sandstones derived from the shoreface sandstones. (au) 60 fig., 85 refs.

  15. The taphonomy of dinosaurs from the Upper Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania based on field sketches of the German tendaguru expedition (1909–1913

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    W.-D. Heinrich

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendaguru is one of the most important dinosaur localities in Africa. The Tendaguru Beds have produced a diverse Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian to Tithonian dinosaur assemblage, including sauropods (Brachiosaurus, Barosaurus, Dicraeosaurus, Janenschia, theropods (e.g., Elaphrosaurus, Ceratosaurus, Allosaurus, and ornithischians (Kentrosaurus, Dryosaurus. Contrary to the well studied skeletal anatomy of the Tendaguru dinosaurs, the available taphonomic information is rather limited, and a generally accepted taphonomic model has not yet been established. Assessment of unpublished excavation sketches by the German Tendaguru expedition (1909–1913 document bone assemblages of sauropod and ornithischian dinosaurs from the Middle Saurian Bed, Upper Saurian Bed, and the Transitional Sands above the Trigonia smeei Bed, and shed some light on the taphonomy of the Tendaguru dinosaurs. Stages of disarticulation range from incomplete skeletons to solitary bones, and strongly argue for carcass decay and post-mortem transport prior to burial. The sauropod bone accumulations are dominated by adult individuals, and juveniles are rare or missing. The occurrence of bones in different superimposed dinosaur-bearing horizons indicates that skeletal remains were accumulated over a long time span during the Late Jurassic, and the majority of the bone accumulations are probably attritional. These accumulations are likely to have resulted from long-term bone imput due to normal mortality events caused by starvation, seasonal drought, disease, old age and weakness. The depositional environment of the Middle and Upper Saurian Bed was mainly limnic to brackish in origin, while the palaeoenvironment of the Transitional Sands was marginal marine. Tendaguru zählt zu den bedeutendsten Dinosaurier-Lagerstätten Afrikas. Aus den Tendaguru-Schichten sind zahlreiche Skelettreste von Sauropoden (Brachiosaurus, Barosaurus, Dicraeosaurus, Janenschia, Theropoden (z.B. Elaphrosaurus

  16. Climatic and tectonic controls on Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic sedimentation in northeastern Guangdong Province, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chong-Jin; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Xu, Yi-Gang; Wen, Shu-Nv; Krapež, Bryan

    2016-05-01

    Stratigraphic analyses document climatic and tectonic controls on the filling of a Late Triassic to early Middle Jurassic (T3-J2) basin that developed on top of a young orogenic belt in southeastern South China. About 2700 m of Carnian to Bajocian sedimentary rocks is documented in the Meizhou region, Guangdong Province. The Carnian to Rhaetian sequence is characterized by deltaic facies that are succeeded by Hettangian fluvial, shallow marine and volcaniclastic facies, and by Sinemurian to early Toarcian interdistributary bay and floodplain facies. The late Toarcian to Bajocian sequence comprises proximal alluvial to lacustrine facies that changed upwards to fluvial facies. Fossil assemblages indicate that climatic conditions changed from tropical/subtropical warm humid, to temperate humid, and then to hot arid through the Late Triassic to the Middle Jurassic. Climatically induced changes (e.g., in precipitation, vegetation and erosion) exerted a strong influence on sediment supply, whereas tectonics played a dominant role in stratigraphic evolution, accommodation generation, sedimentation pattern and volcanism. Tectonostratigraphic analysis shows that the T3-J2 basin was initiated on an orogenic belt during late-stage orogeny, and evolved into shallow-marine and volcanic environments and then back to terrestrial facies during the post-orogenic stage. This was followed by regional uplift and the development of a basin-and-range province. The order of these events is similar to that of the central Rocky Mountains, western North America during the Palaeogene. The Mesozoic basin of South China and the Eocene basins of the central Rocky Mountains highlight the importance of subduction-related subsidence above young and broad orogens.

  17. Broad-scale patterns of late jurassic dinosaur paleoecology.

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    Christopher R Noto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There have been numerous studies on dinosaur biogeographic distribution patterns. However, these distribution data have not yet been applied to ecological questions. Ecological studies of dinosaurs have tended to focus on reconstructing individual taxa, usually through comparisons to modern analogs. Fewer studies have sought to determine if the ecological structure of fossil assemblages is preserved and, if so, how dinosaur communities varied. Climate is a major component driving differences between communities. If the ecological structure of a fossil locality is preserved, we expect that dinosaur assemblages from similar environments will share a similar ecological structure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study applies Ecological Structure Analysis (ESA to a dataset of 100+ dinosaur taxa arranged into twelve composite fossil assemblages from around the world. Each assemblage was assigned a climate zone (biome based on its location. Dinosaur taxa were placed into ecomorphological categories. The proportion of each category creates an ecological profile for the assemblage, which were compared using cluster and principal components analyses. Assemblages grouped according to biome, with most coming from arid or semi-arid/seasonal climates. Differences between assemblages are tied to the proportion of large high-browsing vs. small ground-foraging herbivores, which separates arid from semi-arid and moister environments, respectively. However, the effects of historical, taphonomic, and other environmental factors are still evident. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first to show that the general ecological structure of Late Jurassic dinosaur assemblages is preserved at large scales and can be assessed quantitatively. Despite a broad similarity of climatic conditions, a degree of ecological variation is observed between assemblages, from arid to moist. Taxonomic differences between Asia and the other regions demonstrate at

  18. Chasing the Late Jurassic APW Monster Shift in Ontario Kimberlites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, D. V.; Muttoni, G.; Gee, J. S.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    A 30° gap was recognized in a composite APW path when global poles from predominantly igneous rocks were assembled in North American coordinates using plate reconstructions (Kent & Irving 2010 JGR). The 'monster shift' occurred between a 160-190 Ma cluster of mean poles at 75-80°N 90-110°E to a 140-145 Ma grouping centered at 60-65°N ~200°E. There are hardly any intermediate igneous poles whereas the rather divergent directions from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation published by Steiner & Helsley (1975 GSA Bulletin) are subject to adjustments for Colorado Plateau rotation and sedimentary inclination error, neither of which are precisely known for this redbed unit sampled in Colorado. On the other hand, similar large rapid swings have been recognized in the Late Jurassic APW path for Adria (Channell et al. 2010 Paleo3), suggesting a global phenomena. In an effort to fill the data gap between ~145 and 160 Ma, we sampled accessible outcrops/subcrops of kimberlites in the Timiskaming area of Ontario, Canada, that are associated with high precision U-Pb perovskite ages (Heamon & Kjarsgaard 2000 EPSL). We report initial results from two of the intrusions: the 153.6±2.4 Ma Peddie kimberlite from outcrop and the Triple B kimberlite that was accessible by trenching and is assumed to be the same age as the nearby 153.7±1.8 Ma Seed kimberlite as delineated by aeromagnetic surveys and borings. Systematic progressive thermal demagnetization indicated in each unit a dominant characteristic component with unblocking temperatures to 575° that presumably reflect a magnetite carrier that will be checked by further rock magnetic experiments. Samples from the Peddie kimberlite had stable downward (normal polarity) magnetizations whose mean direction gives a paleopole at 73°N 184°E. In contrast, samples from the Triple B kimberlite have upward (reverse polarity) magnetizations with a well-grouped direction whose (north) paleopole is 78°N 197°E, proximal to the Peddie

  19. The Costa Rican Jurassic to Miocene oceanic complexes: Origin, tectonics and relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denyer, Percy; Gazel, Esteban

    2009-12-01

    The occurrences of oceanic assemblages on the Pacific shore of Costa Rica are part of an intricate group of complexes with different tectonic origins. Although they are dismembered and disrupted, they are the only available inland source of information to decipher the evolution of this active margin. Six main regions are described in this paper: (1) Santa Elena Peninsula, constituted by a supra-subduction zone (Santa Elena Nappe), that is overthrusting an igneous-sedimentary Aptian-Cenomanian sequence (Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex), which includes OIB (Ocean Island Basalts) portions, (2) the Nicoya Complex, which is a Jurassic-Cretaceous chert sediment pile disrupted and detached from its original basement by multiple magmatic events that occurred during the formation of the CLIP (Caribbean Large Igneous Province), (3) the Tortugal area formed by the Tortugal Suite with OIB signature and surrounded by Nicoya Complex outcrops, (4) the Herradura Block composed of the Tulín Formation to Maastrichtian to Lower Eocene OIB accreted oceanic island and the Nicoya Complex as basement, (5) Quepos Block correlated with the Tulín Formation, (6) the Osa-Burica Block composed of the Golfito and Burica Terranes (geochemically and chronologically correlated to the Nicoya Complex), Rincón Block (Early Paleocene to Early Eocene accreted seamounts), and the Miocene Osa-Caño Accretionary Complex. The Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex together with the Tortugal Suite have OIB signatures and possibly without Galapagos hotspot geochemical affinity. These coincidences would be explained by the hypothetical existence of an "autochthonous" Cretaceous basement formed by these two regions together with the rest of the Caribbean. Costa Rican basement is constituted by several CLIP portions and seamounts accreted from the end of Cretaceous in the northwest to the Miocene in the southeast, forming the diverse oceanic occurrences of the Pacific, which are mainly connected to the Galapagos

  20. THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY IN THE ANDES OF ARGENTINA

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    ALBERTO C. RICCARDI

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The Arroyo Malo Formation at Alumbre Creek, on the northern bank of the Atuel River, west central Argentina, comprises a c. 300 m thick continuous marine succession across the Triassic-Jurassic System boundary, consisting of massive and laminated pelites indicative of a slope depositional environment. Late Triassic invertebrates, including ammonoids, nautiloids, bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods and corals are restricted to the lower 150 m. Beds between 125-135 m from the bottom yield Choristoceras cf. marshi Hauer, a species found in the Marshi/Crickmayi Zone of Europe and North America, together with loose fragments of Psiloceras cf. pressum Hillebrandt, coeval with the lower to middle part of the Hettangian Planorbis Zone. About 80 m higher are beds yielding Psiloceras cf. rectocostatum Hillebrandt, a species that gives name to an Andean biozone partially coeval with the Johnstoni and Plicatulum Subzones, upper Planorbis Zone. Other fossils recorded in the Rhaetian strata of this section are foraminifers, ostracods and plant remains identified as Zuberia cf. zuberi (Szaj. Freng. and Clathropteris sp. The section was also sampled for conodonts and radiolarians, thus far with negative results. A palaeomagnetic study is underway.

  1. Boron-containing organic pigments from a Jurassic red alga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkenstein, Klaus; Gross, Jürgen H.; Falk, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Organic biomolecules that have retained their basic chemical structures over geological periods (molecular fossils) occur in a wide range of geological samples and provide valuable paleobiological, paleoenvironmental, and geochemical information not attainable from other sources. In rare cases, such compounds are even preserved with their specific functional groups and still occur within the organisms that produced them, providing direct information on the biochemical inventory of extinct organisms and their possible evolutionary relationships. Here we report the discovery of an exceptional group of boron-containing compounds, the borolithochromes, causing the distinct pink coloration of well-preserved specimens of the Jurassic red alga Solenopora jurassica. The borolithochromes are characterized as complicated spiroborates (boric acid esters) with two phenolic moieties as boron ligands, representing a unique class of fossil organic pigments. The chiroptical properties of the pigments unequivocally demonstrate a biogenic origin, at least of their ligands. However, although the borolithochromes originated from a fossil red alga, no analogy with hitherto known present-day red algal pigments was found. The occurrence of the borolithochromes or their possible diagenetic products in the fossil record may provide additional information on the classification and phylogeny of fossil calcareous algae. PMID:20974956

  2. Eurycormus – Eurypoma, two Jurassic actinopterygian genera with mixed identity

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    G. Arratia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Three Late Jurassic actinopterygian species are commonly placed in the genus Eurycormus: E. egertoni, E. grandis and E. speciosus. A detailed comparison supports an earlier assignment to two different genera, Eurycormus Wagner, 1863 (speciosus and Eurypoma Huxley, 1866 (E. egertoni and E. grande. Systematically, the two genera are only distantly related; Eurycormus belongs to the Teleosteomorpha, whereas Eurypoma is a halecomorph closely related to or a member of the Caturoidea within the Amiiformes. Drei oberjurassische Actinopterygier-Arten, egertoni, grandis und speciosus, werden gewöhnlich zur Gattung Eurycormus gestellt. Ein detaillierter Vergleich der drei Arten bestätigt eine frühere Zuordnung zu zwei verschiedenen Gattungen, Eurycormus Wagner, 1863 (speciosus und Eurypoma Huxley, 1866 (E. egertoni und E. grande, die zwei höheren Taxa innerhalb der Neopterygii zugeordnet werden: Eurycormus zu den Teleosteomorpha und Eurypoma zu den Amiiformes innerhalb der Halecomorphi, möglicherweise nahe oder innerhalb der Caturoidea. doi:10.1002/mmng.200600016

  3. Lower Jurassic beds with bivalves in south Slovenia

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    Irena Debeljak

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lower Jurassic beds of south Slovenia outcrop on a surface of several hundred km^ with their thickness in places exceeding 300 meters. They were deposited on the Dinaric Carbonate Platform. In them rich accumulations of characteristic bivalves occur that in Pliensbachian and Toarcian inhabited the wide interconnected shallow water regions of the western and southern margins of Tethysand the eastern Pacific. The most interesting are three large bivalve species:Lithiotis problematica, Cochlearites loppianus and Lithiopedalion scutatus.In addition, numerous other genera can be found: Gervilleiopema, Mytilus, Opisoma and Pachyrisma (with subgenera Pachymegalodon and Durga.The bivalves formed in the region of south Slovenia, in the prevailingly quiet environment of the restricted shelf, sea-bottom mats or biostromes. Their shells can be only rarely found in their growth position. The horizon with bivalves ("lithiotid horizon" in south Slovenia is attributed to Pliensbachian (Domerian. It isup to 75 metres thick and it almost does not pinch out. Within it individual lumachelles of bivalves occur which are from several centimetres to ten metres thick.They are almost exclusively associated with dark, micritic, in places marly limestone and bituminous dolomite. The biodiversity in lumachelles is very low. The intermediate beds that do not contain bivalves mostly consist of oolitic and biospariticlimestone. In this article some localities from various areas of the carbonate platform are described. Considered are paleogeographical and paleoecological conditions that permitted the existence of this typical bivalve fauna.

  4. Neuroanatomy of the marine Jurassic turtle Plesiochelys etalloni (Testudinata, Plesiochelyidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabajal, Ariana Paulina; Sterli, Juliana; Müller, Johannes; Hilger, André

    2013-01-01

    Turtles are one of the least explored clades regarding endocranial anatomy with few available descriptions of the brain and inner ear of extant representatives. In addition, the paleoneurology of extinct turtles is poorly known and based on only a few natural cranial endocasts. The main goal of this study is to provide for the first time a detailed description of the neuroanatomy of an extinct turtle, the Late Jurassic Plesiochelysetalloni, including internal carotid circulation, cranial endocast and inner ear, based on the first digital 3D reconstruction using micro CT scans. The general shape of the cranial endocast of P. etalloni is tubular, with poorly marked cephalic and pontine flexures. Anteriorly, the olfactory bulbs are clearly differentiated suggesting larger bulbs than in any other described extinct or extant turtle, and indicating a higher capacity of olfaction in this taxon. The morphology of the inner ear of P. etalloni is comparable to that of extant turtles and resembles those of slow-moving terrestrial vertebrates, with markedly low, short and robust semicircular canals, and a reduced lagena. In P. etalloni the arterial pattern is similar to that found in extant cryptodires, where all the internal carotid branches are protected by bone. As the knowledge of paleoneurology in turtles is scarce and the application of modern techniques such as 3D reconstructions based on CT scans is almost unexplored in this clade, we hope this paper will trigger similar investigations of this type in other turtle taxa.

  5. Middle Jurassic Topawa group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona: Volcanic and sedimentary record of deep basins within the Jurassic magmatic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxel, G.B.; Wright, J.E.; Riggs, N.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; May, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Among supracrustal sequences of the Jurassic magmatic arc of the southwestern Cordillera, the Middle Jurassic Topawa Group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona, is remarkable for its lithologic diversity and substantial stratigraphic thickness, ???8 km. The Topawa Group comprises four units (in order of decreasing age): (1) Ali Molina Formation-largely pyroclastic rhyolite with interlayered eolian and fluvial arenite, and overlying conglomerate and sandstone; (2) Pitoikam Formation-conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone overlain by interbedded silt- stone and sandstone; (3) Mulberry Wash Formation-rhyolite lava flows, flow breccias, and mass-flow breccias, with intercalated intraformational conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone, plus sparse within-plate alkali basalt and comendite in the upper part; and (4) Tinaja Spring Porphyry-intrusive rhyolite. The Mulberry Wash alkali basalt and comendite are genetically unrelated to the dominant calcalkaline rhyolite. U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon from volcanic and intrusive rocks indicate the Topawa Group, despite its considerable thickness, represents only several million years of Middle Jurassic time, between approximately 170 and 165 Ma. Sedimentary rocks of the Topawa Group record mixing of detritus from a minimum of three sources: a dominant local source of porphyritic silicic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, identical or similar to those of the Topawa Group itself; Meso- proterozoic or Cambrian conglomerates in central or southeast Arizona, which contributed well-rounded, highly durable, polycyclic quartzite pebbles; and eolian sand fields, related to Middle Jurassic ergs that lay to the north of the magmatic arc and are now preserved on the Colorado Plateau. As the Topawa Group evidently represents only a relatively short interval of time, it does not record long-term evolution of the Jurassic magmatic arc, but rather represents a Middle Jurassic "stratigraphic snapshot" of the arc

  6. Role of Variscan tectonics inheritance in the Jurassic rifting of the passive margin of Adria: insights from the Canavese Zone (Western Southern Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caroli, Sara; Succo, Andrea; Centelli, Arianna; Barbero, Edoardo; Borghi, Alessandro; Balestro, Gianni; Festa, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The formation of rifted continental margins by extension of continental lithosphere leading to seafloor spreading is a complex component of the plate tectonic cycle. Geological mapping, supported by multidisciplinary analyses of rifted continental margins may thus provide significant information to better understand and model the related processes, and explain the geometry of those margins as observed by means of seismic imaging. We present here our new findings on the Canavese Zone (Italian Western Alps), which is inferred to represent the remnant of the Jurassic syn-rift stretching, thinning and dismemberment of the distal passive margin of Adria, occurred during the opening of the Northern Alpine Tethys. Through multiscale and multidisciplinary, field- and laboratory-based structural, stratigraphic and petrographic studies (from geological map scale to mesoscale and microscope scale), we document that the tectonic dismemberment of the rifted continental margin of Adria did not simply result from the syn-rift Jurassic extension, but was strongly favored by the inheritance of older (Variscan and post-Variscan) tectonic stages, which controlled earlier lithospheric weakness. Our findings show the existence of two different tectonic units of the pre-Variscan basement, which were deformed, juxtaposed and exhumed already during the Variscan orogeny as constraint by (i) intrusion of early Permian granitoids, (ii) emplacement of volcanic rocks and (iii) unconformable overlie of Permian deposits on those metamorphic units. The syn-extensional (syn-rift) Jurassic faults, which affect the Mesozoic sedimentary succession, show only limited vertical displacement that was ineffective in producing and justifying the crustal thinning observed in pre-Variscan basement units. Finally, Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene and Late Cenozoic strike-slip faulting (i.e. Alpine and Insubric tectonic stages) reactivated previously formed faults, leading to the formation of a complex tectonic

  7. Jurassic to Miocene magmatism and metamorphism in the Mogok metamorphic belt and the India-Eurasia collision in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, M. E.; Pickard, A. L.; Zaw, Khin; Rak, P.; Doyle, M. G.

    2003-06-01

    Situated south of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis at the western margin of the Shan-Thai terrane the high-grade Mogok metamorphic belt (MMB) in Myanmar occupies a key position in the tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia. The first sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe U-Pb in zircon geochronology for the MMB shows that strongly deformed granitic orthogneisses near Mandalay contain Jurassic (˜170 Ma) zircons that have partly recrystallized during ˜43 Ma high-grade metamorphism. A hornblende syenite from Mandalay Hill also contains Jurassic zircons with evidence of Eocene metamorphic recrystallization rimmed by thin zones of 30.9 ± 0.7 Ma magmatic zircon. The relative abundance of Jurassic zircons in these rocks is consistent with suggestions that southern Eurasia had an Andean-type margin at that time. Mid-Cretaceous to earliest Eocene (120 to 50 Ma) I-type granitoids in the MMB, Myeik Archipelago, and Western Myanmar confirm that prior to the collision of India, an up to 200 km wide magmatic belt extended along the Eurasian margin from Pakistan to Sumatra. Metamorphic overgrowths to zircons in the orthogneiss near Mandalay date a period of Eocene (˜43 Ma) high-grade metamorphism possibly during crustal thickening related to the initial collision between India and Eurasia (at 65 to 55 Ma). This was followed by emplacement of syntectonic hornblende syenites and leucogranites between 35 and 23 Ma. Similar syntectonic syenites and leucogranites intruded the Ailao Shan-Red River shear belt in southern China and Vietnam during the Eocene-Oligocene to Miocene, and the Wang Chao and Three Pagodas faults in northern Thailand (that most likely link with the MMB) were also active at this time. The complex history of Eocene to early Miocene metamorphism, deformation, and magmatism in the MMB provides evidence that it may have played a key role in the network of deformation zones that accommodated strain during the northwards movement of India and resulting extrusion or

  8. Episodic Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous intraplate compression in Central Patagonia during Gondwana breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, César; Gianni, Guido; Echaurren, Andrés; Kingler, Federico Lince; Folguera, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    From Lower Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, several intraplate compression events affected discrete sectors of Central Patagonia, under a general context of crustal extension associated with Gondwana breakup. This was demonstrated by means of 2D and 3D seismic and borehole data, which show partial inversion of Lower and Middle Jurassic extensional structures of the Chubut and Cañadón Asfalto basins, during the earliest stages of breakup. A comparison with surrounding areas in Patagonia, where similar Jurassic intraplate compression was described, allowed the discrimination of three discrete pulses of subtle compression (C1: ∼188-185 Ma; C2: ∼170-163; C3: ∼157-136? Ma). Interestingly, episodic intraplate compressional events are closely followed by high flux magmatic events linked to the westward expansion of the Karoo-Ferrar thermal anomaly, which impacted on the lithosphere of southwest Gondwana in Lower Jurassic. In addition, we determined the approximate direction of the main compressive strain (σ1) compatible with other Jurassic intraplate belts of South America. These observations led us to propose a linkage between a thermo mechanically weakened continental crust due to LIPs activity, changes in plate motions and ridge-push forces generated by the opening of the Weddell Sea, in order to explain intraplate shortening, interrupted while Karoo LIPs magmatic invigoration took place.

  9. Palinspastic reconstruction and geological evolution of Jurassic basins in Mongolia and neighboring China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Genyao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The important event in Jurassic tectonics in Mongolia was the subduction and closure of the Mongolia-Okhotsk ocean; correspondingly, basin evolution can be divided into two main stages, related to the orogeny and collapse of the orogenic belt, respectively. The developing of Early–Middle Jurassic basins to the north of the ocean resulted from back-arc extension. The fossil sutures, from the China–SE Asia sub-continent to the south of the ocean, were rejuvenated by subduction-related orogeny; in addition, the Yanshanian intra-continental movement occurred. Three Early–Middle Jurassic molasse basins were developed by movement in Inner Mongolia, all of which stretched westwards (or northwards into Mongolia; therefore, the molasse basins in eastern and southern Mongolia had the same geometric and kinematic features as the basins in the Inner Mongolia. Owing to the collapse of the Mongolia-Okhotsk orogenic belt, a group of rift basins developed during the Late Jurassic. In eastern Mongolia, the NE orientated extensional basins were controlled by the neogenic NE-structure. The contemporary basins in southern Mongolia and the neighboring areas in China were constrained by remobilization (inherited activation of the latitudinal or ENE-directional basement structures. Three stages can be recognized in the evolution of the Early–Middle Jurassic basins after reversal; the basins also experienced four episodes of reformation.

  10. Composition of sandstone and heavy minerals implies the provenance of Kuqa Depression in Jurassic, Tarim basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chaodong; LIN Changsong; SHEN Yanping; FENG Xue

    2005-01-01

    The petrological characteristics and heavy mineral assembly of the Jurassic System in Kuqa Basin are consistent with the tectonic evolution, which is the major factor controlling the filling process of Kuqa Basin. Controlled by the source areas at the both sides of the Basin, the matrixes are dominated by sedimentary rock, high-grade metamorphic rock, acid magmatic rock, and the highest heavy mineral assemblage of zircon-garnet-magnetite in the content. According to heavy mineral indexes, the Jurassic strata can be classified into three rhythmic units of heavy mineral. The lower sequence contains abundant heavy minerals and relatively high content of detritus and its matrixes primarily came form the recycling orogen. The assemblage of "zircon-garnet-magnetite" indicates that the sedimentary area in the early evolution period of the basin is relatively near the provenance. The middle sequence is different from the lower sequence in the heavy mineral assemblage and has the different characteristics from that of source rock. The heavy mineral assemblage is "garnet-zircon" with the highest content of garnet and its main matrices are the high-grade metamorphic rock, acid magmatic rock and hydrothermal vein at the northeastern edge of the basin. The middle and upper sequences are characterized by the clast provenance, which is primarily from the recycling orogen at the northern edge of the basin and secondarily from the southern uplift. As a result of the two provenances, the strata with apparent changes of heavy mineral assemblage and index better coincides with the interfaces of the secondary strata sequences, which reflects the denudation history and the filling process of the orogen at the northern edge of the basin.

  11. High diversity, low disparity and small body size in plesiosaurs (Reptilia, Sauropterygia from the Triassic-Jurassic boundary.

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    Roger B J Benson

    Full Text Available Invasion of the open ocean by tetrapods represents a major evolutionary transition that occurred independently in cetaceans, mosasauroids, chelonioids (sea turtles, ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs. Plesiosaurian reptiles invaded pelagic ocean environments immediately following the Late Triassic extinctions. This diversification is recorded by three intensively-sampled European fossil faunas, spanning 20 million years (Ma. These provide an unparalleled opportunity to document changes in key macroevolutionary parameters associated with secondary adaptation to pelagic life in tetrapods. A comprehensive assessment focuses on the oldest fauna, from the Blue Lias Formation of Street, and nearby localities, in Somerset, UK (Earliest Jurassic: 200 Ma, identifying three new species representing two small-bodied rhomaleosaurids (Stratesaurus taylori gen et sp. nov.; Avalonnectes arturi gen. et sp. nov and the most basal plesiosauroid, Eoplesiosaurus antiquior gen. et sp. nov. The initial radiation of plesiosaurs was characterised by high, but short-lived, diversity of an archaic clade, Rhomaleosauridae. Representatives of this initial radiation were replaced by derived, neoplesiosaurian plesiosaurs at small-medium body sizes during a more gradual accumulation of morphological disparity. This gradualistic modality suggests that adaptive radiations within tetrapod subclades are not always characterised by the initially high levels of disparity observed in the Paleozoic origins of major metazoan body plans, or in the origin of tetrapods. High rhomaleosaurid diversity immediately following the Triassic-Jurassic boundary supports the gradual model of Late Triassic extinctions, mostly predating the boundary itself. Increase in both maximum and minimum body length early in plesiosaurian history suggests a driven evolutionary trend. However, Maximum-likelihood models suggest only passive expansion into higher body size categories.

  12. The Jurassic history of the Africa-Antarctica corridor — new constraints from magnetic data on the conjugate continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Volker Thor; Jokat, Wilfried

    2012-03-01

    Finding the best fit for East- and West-Gondwana requires a detailed knowledge of the initial Jurassic movements between Africa and Antarctica. This study presents results of systematic and densely spaced aeromagnetic measurements, which have been conducted in 2009/2010 across the Astrid Ridge (Antarctica) and in the western Riiser-Larsen Sea to provide constraints for the early seafloor spreading history between both continents. The data reveal different magnetic signatures of the northern and southern parts of the Astrid Ridge, which are separated by the Astrid Fracture Zone. The southern part is weakly magnetised, corresponding to the low amplitude anomaly field of the southwestern Riiser-Larsen Sea. In contrast, the northern Astrid Ridge bears strong anomalies of positive value. Furthermore, several sets of trends are visible in the data. In the Mozambique Channel, we extended the existing magnetic spreading anomaly identifications. Combined with the spreading anomalies in the conjugate Riiser-Larsen Sea, they were used to establish a new model of the relative movements of Africa and Antarctica after the breakup of Gondwana in Jurassic times. A detailed model for the emplacement of the Mozambique Ridge is now incorporated. The model postulates a tight fit between Africa and Antarctica and two stages of breakup, the first of which lasting until ~ 159 Ma (M33n). During this stage, Antarctica rotated anticlockwise with respect to Africa. The Grunehogna Craton cleared the Coastal Plains of Mozambique to a position east of the Mozambique Fracture Zone. The southern Astrid Ridge is interpreted to consist of oceanic crust, also formed during this first stage, prior to the Riiser-Larsen Sea. During the second stage, Antarctica moved southward with respect to Africa forming the Mozambique Basin and the conjugate Riiser-Larsen Sea. The Mozambique Ridge and the Northern Natal Valley were formed at different spreading centres being active subsequently.

  13. New insights into Mesozoic cycad evolution: an exploration of anatomically preserved Cycadaceae seeds from the Jurassic Oxford Clay biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Andrew R.; Raine, Robert J.; Rothwell, Gar W.; Hollingworth, Neville T.J.

    2017-01-01

    Most knowledge concerning Mesozoic Era floras has come from compression fossils. This has been augmented in the last 20 years by rarer permineralized material showing cellular preservation. Here, we describe a new genus of anatomically preserved gymnosperm seed from the Callovian–Oxfordian (Jurassic) Oxford Clay Formation (UK), using a combination of traditional sectioning and synchrotron radiation X-ray micro-tomography (SRXMT). Oxfordiana motturii gen. et sp. nov. is large and bilaterally symmetrical. It has prominent external ribs, and has a three-layered integument comprising: a narrow outer layer of thick walled cells; a thick middle parenchymatous layer; and innermost a thin fleshy layer. The integument has a longitudinal interior groove and micropyle, enveloping a nucellus with a small pollen chamber. The large size, bilateral symmetry and integumentary groove demonstrate an affinity for the new species within the cycads. Moreover, the internal groove in extant taxa is an autapomorphy of the genus Cycas, where it facilitates seed germination. Based upon the unique seed germination mechanism shared with living species of the Cycadaceae, we conclude that O. motturii is a member of the stem-group lineage leading to Cycas after the Jurassic divergence of the Cycadaceae from other extant cycads. SRXMT—for the first time successfully applied to fossils already prepared as slides—reveals the distribution of different mineral phases within the fossil, and allows us to evaluate the taphonomy of Oxfordiana. An early pyrite phase replicates the external surfaces of individual cells, a later carbonate component infilling void spaces. The resulting taphonomic model suggests that the relatively small size of the fossils was key to their exceptional preservation, concentrating sulfate-reducing bacteria in a locally closed microenvironment and thus facilitating soft-tissue permineralization. PMID:28875075

  14. New insights into Mesozoic cycad evolution: an exploration of anatomically preserved Cycadaceae seeds from the Jurassic Oxford Clay biota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R.T. Spencer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most knowledge concerning Mesozoic Era floras has come from compression fossils. This has been augmented in the last 20 years by rarer permineralized material showing cellular preservation. Here, we describe a new genus of anatomically preserved gymnosperm seed from the Callovian–Oxfordian (Jurassic Oxford Clay Formation (UK, using a combination of traditional sectioning and synchrotron radiation X-ray micro-tomography (SRXMT. Oxfordiana motturii gen. et sp. nov. is large and bilaterally symmetrical. It has prominent external ribs, and has a three-layered integument comprising: a narrow outer layer of thick walled cells; a thick middle parenchymatous layer; and innermost a thin fleshy layer. The integument has a longitudinal interior groove and micropyle, enveloping a nucellus with a small pollen chamber. The large size, bilateral symmetry and integumentary groove demonstrate an affinity for the new species within the cycads. Moreover, the internal groove in extant taxa is an autapomorphy of the genus Cycas, where it facilitates seed germination. Based upon the unique seed germination mechanism shared with living species of the Cycadaceae, we conclude that O. motturii is a member of the stem-group lineage leading to Cycas after the Jurassic divergence of the Cycadaceae from other extant cycads. SRXMT—for the first time successfully applied to fossils already prepared as slides—reveals the distribution of different mineral phases within the fossil, and allows us to evaluate the taphonomy of Oxfordiana. An early pyrite phase replicates the external surfaces of individual cells, a later carbonate component infilling void spaces. The resulting taphonomic model suggests that the relatively small size of the fossils was key to their exceptional preservation, concentrating sulfate-reducing bacteria in a locally closed microenvironment and thus facilitating soft-tissue permineralization.

  15. The Aguilar pluton (23°12‧ S-65°40‧ W; NW Argentina): Petrological implications on the origin of the Late Jurassic intraplate magmatism in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarini, Ricardo H.; Gioncada, Anna; Vezzoli, Luigina; Mazzuoli, Roberto; Cristiani, Chiara; Sureda, Ricardo J.

    2013-11-01

    The Late Jurassic Aguilar pluton is located in NW Argentina, about 300-400 Km east of the Tarapacá basin, representing the backarc basin linked to the Jurassic volcanic arc. This small-size and compositionally heterogeneous pluton intruded the metasedimentary rocks of the Ordovician Santa Victoria Group, along the Cobres-Salinas Grandes lineament. A revision of published geochemical data in the light of new field and petrological results, allows us to propose a model concerning the petrogenesis and emplacement mechanisms of Aguilar pluton and to discuss its geodynamic setting. The pluton is mainly composed of metaluminous and nearly peraluminous granitoids, showing the geochemical characteristics of ferroan granites. The volumetrically subordinate mafic rocks are both ne- and hy-normative, and their primary magmas were generated by partial melting of a pristine Proterozoic mantle. Aguilar rocks display a rather limited range in (87Sr/86Sr)i, compared to the entire rift-related plutonic suite, i.e., 0.703198-0.704601, and ɛNdt from -1.06 to 3.82, calculated at 149 Ma. Fractional crystallization of mantle-derived magmas and crustal contamination processes explain the evolution to produce strongly silica-oversaturated magmas, which emplaced in the continental crust. The petrological data indicate that magma emplacement and cooling occurred at rather shallow depth. Multiple injections of magma batches into the magma chamber caused mingling and mixing processes early in the crystallization history. The Aguilar pluton is one of the several igneous complexes whose formation was associated with the extensional tectonics active during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous in NW Argentina. Based on the geological position and the igneous rocks affinity, we exclude that the Late Jurassic magmatism was generated in an orogenic setting and envisage that it was linked to the early extensional phase that preceded the Cretaceous continental rifting, related to the break-up of the South

  16. Jurassic tetrapods and flora of Cañadón Asfalto Formation in Cerro Cóndor area, Chubut Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio H. Escapa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant and tetrapod fossil record of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Middle to Late Jurassic found in Cerro Cóndor area (Chubut Province is summarized here. The flora is dominated by conifers (Araucariaceae, Cupressaceae sensu lato but also includes ferns and equisetaleans. The tetrapod fauna is composed of dinosaur taxa described in the 70's as well as other remains recently described and other vertebrate groups such as amphibians, turtles, and mammals. The amphibian remains have been interpreted as representatives of a new species of Notobatrachus, considered one of the most basal members of the anuran lineage. Similarly, turtle remains have been recently recognized as a new species of basal turtle, bringing valuable information about the early evolution of this group. The dinosaur remains are largely dominated by saurischian taxa, represented by basal forms of Eusauropoda and Tetanurae. In addition, three different mammalian species have been identified and considered as early representatives of an endemic Gondwanan mammalian fauna. The fossil record of this formation represents the most completely known biota from the continental Middle to Late Jurassic of the Southern Hemisphere and one of the most complete of the entire world.

  17. A New Look at the Magnetostratigraphy and Paleomagnetism of the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic Moenave Formation, St. George Area, Southwestern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoo-Hurley, L. L.; Geissman, J. W.; Lucas, S. G.; Roy, M.

    2006-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data from rocks exposed on and off the Colorado Plateau provide poles that young westward during the Late Triassic (to about 52^{O} E longitude) and young eastward during the Early Jurassic. This pattern has been used to posit the existence of a J-1 cusp in the North American APW path at the Triassic- Jurassic boundary (TJB), at about 199.6 Ma. Considerable debate has focused on the morphology and placement of the J-1 cusp due to poorly exposed and/or incompletely sampled sections, debates about the magnitude of Colorado Plateau rotation, and disagreements regarding stratigraphic relationships. Red beds of the Whitmore Point (~25 m of mostly lacustrine deposits) and Dinosaur Canyon (~55 m of hematitic fluvial sandstones and siltstones) members of the Moenave Formation (MF) are inferred to have been deposited across the TJB based on palynostratigraphy and vertebrate biostratigraphy. Two previously unsampled sections (Leeds and Warner Valley) of the MF are well exposed near St. George, Utah, and located in the transition zone that defines the western boundary of the Colorado Plateau. Preliminary data from samples collected from the Whitmore Point and Dinosaur Canyon members yield exclusively normal polarity magnetizations, which is consistent with previous studies and the normal polarity TJB magnetozone. Thermal demagnetization response suggests that the remanence is carried mainly in hematite. The degree of hematite pigmentation varies in both sections, and several Leeds sites show a weak overprint component that unblocks by 400^{O}-450^{O} C, with a higher unblocking temperature components, consistent with an Early Triassic Late Jurassic age that fully unblock around 670^{O}-680^{O} C. Individual beds (treated as specific sites) in part of the Dinosaur Canyon Member yield site mean directions with declinations between about 020 and 030, and may define the easternmost position (i.e. 60-50^{O} E latitude) of the NAMAPW path and thus the approximate the

  18. The First Stegosaur (Dinosauria, Ornithischia) from the Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation of Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Chengkai; Catherine A. FOSTER; XU Xing; James M. CLARK

    2007-01-01

    A new stegosaur species, Jiangjunosaurus junggarensis, gen. et sp. nov., is erected based on a specimen collected from the Upper Jurassic upper section of the Shishugou Formation in the Junggar Basin, Xinjiang, China. It represents the first stegosaur from the Jurassic of Xinjiang and increases the diversity of the dinosaur fauna in the Shishugou Formation. The new genus is characterized by symmetrical and proportionally wide tooth crowns, a sub-rectangular axial neural spine seen in lateral view, and large openings on the lateral surfaces of the cervical centra. A preliminary character analysis suggests that this new taxon is more derived than the Middle Jurassic stegosaur Huayangosaurus but more primitive than most other known stegosaur species.

  19. Three new species of mesosciophilid gnats from the Middle-Late Jurassic of China (insecta: Diptera: Nematocera: Mesosciophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J F

    2008-11-15

    Three extinct new species from the Callovian or Oxfordian (uppermost Middle Jurassic or lowermost Upper Jurassic) Daohugou beds in Inner Mongolia, China is described as Mesosciophila abstracta sp. n., Mesosciophilodes synchrona sp. n. and Paramesosciophilodes eximia sp. n. (Family Mesosciophilidae). All the records of mesosciophilid gnats are briefly reviewed.

  20. First American record of the Jurassic ichnogenus Deltapodus and a review of the fossil record of stegosaurian footprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milàn, Jesper; Chiappe, Luis M

    2009-01-01

    of a well-preserved pes track and the eroded remains of a manus track. Previously, Deltapodus was known only from the Middle Jurassic Yorkshire coast of England and the Upper Jurassic of Portugal and Spain. The new discovery thus substantially extends the geographic record of this ichnospecies...

  1. Critical review of research on the Lower Jurassic flora of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacyna Grzegorz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lower Jurassic plant macrofossils of Poland are poorly known. Relatively rich sources of fossils are found in only a few outcrops in the Holy Cross Mountains. Other described plant remains come from drill cores taken from most areas of Poland, but as a rule these are single specimens. The only professional descriptions of Lower Jurassic macroflora are papers by Raciborski, Makarewiczówna, and a team of researchers consisting of Reymanówna, Barbacka, Ziaja, and Wcisło-Luraniec. Raciborski’s fossil collection is still available for research and revision. Such work is in progress. The collection described by Makarewiczówna contained many interesting specimens but unfortunately the majority of them are now missing. Stratigraphic research by geologists has provided some new specimens from drill cores and outcrops in the Holy Cross Mountains but these have not been subjected to detailed palaeobotanical analysis. The palynology of the Lower Jurassic was focused on biostratigraphy from the outset of that research. As an outcome it provided spore-pollen and megaspore zonations for Lower Jurassic strata in Poland. The Polish Lower Jurassic flora is comprised of ferns (very numerous, lycopsids, sphenopsids, cycadaleans, bennettitaleans, gnetaleans, ginkgoaleans, and conifers. This flora is taxonomically poorer than the equally old and geographically close floras of Denmark, Sweden, and Germany. Macrofloristic data have been used by geologists as an important source of information for assessing the age of Lower Jurassic formations, particularly in the Holy Cross Mountains. Hence the need for the old collections to be taxonomically revised and for new material from outcrops and drill cores to be examined and described.

  2. New records of Staffia aenigmatica (Mammalia, Allotheria, Haramiyida from the Upper Jurassic of Tendaguru in southeastern Tanzania, East Africa

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    W.-D. Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Two non-multituberculate allotherian cheek teeth are described from the Upper Jurassic of Tendaguru in southeastern Tanzania, East Africa, Both specimens were collected from dinosaur-bearing matrix of bone bed Wj of the Middle Saurian Bed at Tendaguru Site dy by the German Tendaguru Expedition (1909–1913. Bone Bed Wj represents limnic to brackish deposits of Kimmeridgian-Tithonian age. The cheek teeth, considered as lower posterior molar and upper molar, represent a single taxon of the Haramiyida and are referred to Staffia aenigmatica, known only from the Upper Jurassic of Tendaguru. This assignment reinforces evidence for the palaeogeographic dispersal of haramiyids to Gondwana and the temporal persistence of these non-multituberculate allotherians into the Late Jurassic. Characters that distinguish Staffia aenigmatica from other haramiyids include the medial position of main cusp a1 at the front of the tooth crown and the presence of a large, anterolingual main notch between cusps a1 and a2 in lower cheek teeth, as well as the development of a strong anterolabial cingular ridge in the only known upper cheek tooth. Staffia shows the closest resemblance to Thomasia from the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic of Europe, although these genera are disdinctly different. Retention of the basic tooth crown pattern of haramiyids and traces of wear in the Tendaguru teeth suggest that the masticatory movements in Staffia were essentially restricted to a longitudinal direction, as in Thomasia. It is suggested that owing to its central position at the front of the tooth crown the lower main cusp a1 could have occluded in the central basin of the opposing upper molar during masticatory movements. Aus dem Oberjura von Tendaguru in Tansania, Ostafrika, werden zwei Backenzähne eines Haramiyiden beschrieben. Beide Zähne stammen aus knochenführenden Gesteinsproben, die von der Deutschen Tendaguru Expedition (1909–1913 in der Fundstelle dy gesammelt wurden

  3. Jurassic Lake T'oo'dichi': a large alkaline, saline lake, Morrison Formation, eastern Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, C.E.; Fishman, N.S.

    1991-01-01

    Recognition of alkaline, saline-lake deposits in the Morrison Formation significantly alters interpretations of depositional environments of this formation, and it also has important implications for paleoclimatic interpretation. Late Jurassic climate was apparently much more arid than had previously been thought. In fact, sedimentologic evidence suggests that the lake basin was typically dry for extended periods and enjoyed only brief wet intervals. This conclusion has important consequences for environmental interpretation of the habitat that was favorable for large herbivorous dinosaurs, which thrived in the Late Jurassic. -from Authors

  4. Androecium of Archaefructus, the Late Jurassic Angiosperms from Western Liaoning, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ge; ZHENG Shaolin; SUN Chunlin; SUN Yuewu; David L. DILCHER; MIAO Yuyan

    2002-01-01

    Androecium of the earliest known flowering plant Archaefructus liaoningensis was found from the Upper Jurassic Jianshangou Formation of western Liaoning, China. The androecium consists of numerous stamens bearing in pair on the reproductive axes below conduplicate carpels. The stamens are composed of a short filament and basifixed anther for each. Monosulcate pollen in situ are found from the anthers. The characters of the androecium reveals that Archaefructus are probably protandrous, and the paired stamens and monosulcate pollen appear to indicate that Archaefructus, as primitive angiosperms,might be derived from extinct seed -ferns during the Older Mesozoic. Archaefructus is considered Late Jurassic in age.

  5. Earliest evolution of multituberculate mammals revealed by a new Jurassic fossil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chong-Xi; Ji, Qiang; Meng, Qing-Jin; Tabrum, Alan R; Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2013-08-16

    Multituberculates were successful herbivorous mammals and were more diverse and numerically abundant than any other mammal groups in Mesozoic ecosystems. The clade also developed diverse locomotor adaptations in the Cretaceous and Paleogene. We report a new fossil skeleton from the Late Jurassic of China that belongs to the basalmost multituberculate family. Dental features of this new Jurassic multituberculate show omnivorous adaptation, and its well-preserved skeleton sheds light on ancestral skeletal features of all multituberculates, especially the highly mobile joints of the ankle, crucial for later evolutionary success of multituberculates in the Cretaceous and Paleogene.

  6. Environmental significance of foraminiferal assemblages dominated by small-sized Ammodiscus and Trochammina in Triassic and Jurassic delta-influenced deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Jenö; Hess, Silvia; Alve, Elisabeth

    2010-04-01

    The sediment packages analyzed for benthic foraminifera consist of mudstones with interbedded sandstones deposited in shallow delta-influenced shelf to deltaic environments. The sections are located in Spitsbergen, the Barents Sea, northern North Sea and Yorkshire, and range in age from Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic. Salient features of the foraminiferal successions are: (1) The assemblages consist entirely or dominantly of agglutinated taxa. (2) The faunal diversities are extremely low. (3) The dominant genera are Ammodiscus and Trochammina. (4) The species are generally of small size compared to usual dimensions within the genera. The features listed above suggest that the assemblages were adapted to restricted conditions (clearly divergent from those of a normal marine shelf), where the main limiting factors were low salinity and reduced amount of dissolved oxygen in unstable, storm-influenced environments. Evidence for environmental conditions is obtained from modern analogues, although the large evolutionary changes in foraminifera during post-Jurassic time make it difficult to find such analogues. Additional information is derived from functional morphology, sedimentary features and paleogeography. The analyzed sediment packages show close faunal similarities suggesting opening of a marine pathway, which connected the paleo-Arctic Ocean with the western European shelf seas in Early Jurassic. A depositional biofacies model of the small-sized Ammodiscus- Trochammina assemblages envisages a delta-influenced shelf environment, where high freshwater influx would have created a density-stratified water column with a tendency to develop hypoxic conditions in its deeper parts. The depth interval between fair-weather and storm wave base (the offshore-transition zone) is indicated as the habitat of the small-sized Ammodiscus- Trochammina assemblages. In this zone, benthic biota would have been stressed by intermittent periods with moderate hypoxia combined with

  7. Jurassic carbonate microfacies, sea-level changes and the Toarcian anoxic event in the Tethys Himalaya (South Tibet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhong; Hu, Xiumian; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Detailed microfacies analysis of carbonate rocks from the Tingri and Nyalam areas of South Tibet allowed us to reconstruct the evolution of sedimentary environments during the Early to Middle Jurassic. Based on texture, sedimentary structure, grain composition and fossil content of about 500 thin sections, 17 microfacies overall were identified, and three evolutionary stages were defined. Stage 1 (Rhaetian?-lower Sinemurian Zhamure Formation) was characterized by siliciclastic and mixed siliciclastic-carbonate sedimentation on a barrier shore environment, stage 2 (upper Sinemurian-Pliensbachian Pupuga Formation) by high-energy grainstones with rich benthic faunas thriving on a carbonate platform, and stage 3 (Toarcian-lower Bajocian Nieniexiongla Formation) by low-energy mudstones intercalated with frequent storm layers on a carbonate ramp. Besides, Carbon isotope analyses (δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg) were performed on the late Pliensbachian-early Toarcian interval, and the organic matter recorded a pronounced stepped negative excursion -4.5‰ corresponding to characteristics of the early Toarcian oceanic anoxic event globally, which began just below the stage 2-stage 3 facies shifting boundary. The comparison between the Tethys Himalaya (South Tibet) and the tropical/subtropical zones of the Western Tethys and Panthalassa was carried out to discuss the factors controlling sedimentary evolution. The change from stage 1 to stage 2 was possibly induced by sea-level rise, when the Tibetan Tethys Himalaya was located at tropical/subtropical latitudes in suitable climatic and ecological conditions for carbonate sedimentation. The abrupt change from stage 2 to stage 3 is interpreted as a consequence of the early Toarcian oceanic anoxic event, accompanied by obvious carbon-isotope negative excursion and sea-level rise. The failed recovery from the carbonate crisis in the early Bajocian, with continuing deposition on a low-energy carbonate ramp, is ascribed to the tectonic

  8. U-Pb, Re-Os, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Nambija Au-skarn and Pangui porphyry Cu deposits, Ecuador: implications for the Jurassic metallogenic belt of the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaradia, Massimo; Vallance, Jean; Fontboté, Lluis; Stein, Holly; Schaltegger, Urs; Coder, Joshua; Richards, Jeremy; Villeneuve, Mike; Gendall, Ian

    2009-05-01

    New U-Pb, Re-Os, and 40Ar/39Ar dates are presented for magmatic and hydrothermal mineral phases in skarn- and porphyry-related ores from the Nambija and Pangui districts of the Subandean zone, southeastern Ecuador. Nambija has been one of the main gold-producing centers of Ecuador since the 1980s due to exceptionally high-grade ores (average 15 g/t, but frequently up to 300 g/t Au). Pangui is a recently discovered porphyry Cu-Mo district. The geology of the Subandean zone in southeastern Ecuador is dominated by the I-type, subduction-related, Jurassic Zamora batholith, which intrudes Triassic volcanosedimentary rocks. The Zamora batholith is in turn cut by porphyritic stocks, which are commonly associated with skarn formation and/or porphyry-style mineralization. High precision U-Pb and Re-Os ages for porphyritic stocks (U-Pb, zircon), associated prograde skarn (U-Pb, hydrothermal titanite), and retrograde stage skarn (Re-Os, molybdenite from veins postdating gold deposition) of the Nambija district are all indistinguishable from each other within error (145 Ma) and indicate a Late Jurassic age for the gold mineralization. Previously, gold mineralization at Nambija was considered to be Early Tertiary based on K-Ar ages obtained on various hydrothermal minerals. The new Jurassic age for the Nambija district is slightly younger than the 40Ar/39Ar and Re-Os ages for magmatic-hydrothermal minerals from the Pangui district, which range between 157 and 152 Ma. Mineralization at Nambija and Pangui is associated with porphyritic stocks that represent the last known episodes of a long-lived Jurassic arc magmatism (˜190 to 145 Ma). A Jurassic age for mineralization at Nambija and Pangui suggests that the Northern Andean Jurassic metallogenic belt, which starts in Colombia at 3° N, extends down to 5° S in Ecuador. It also adds a new mineralization style (Au-skarn) to the metal endowment of this belt.

  9. The Middle Jurassic basinal deposits of the Surmeh Formation in the Central Zagros Mountains, southwest Iran: Facies, sequence stratigraphy, and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasemi, Y.; Jalilian, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    systems tract of a depositional sequence and grades upward to platform margin and platform interior facies as a result of late highstand basinward progradation. The sedimentary record of the 'lower shaley unit' in the Central Zagros region reveals the existence of a northwest-southeast trending platform margin during the Middle Jurassic that faced a deep basin, the 'Pars intrashelf basin' in the northeast. The thinning of calciturbidite layers towards the northeast and the widespread Middle Jurassic platform carbonates in the southern Persian Gulf states and in the Persian Gulf area support the existence of a southwest platform margin and platform interior source area. The platform margin was formed as a result of tectonic activity along the preexisting Mountain Front fault associated with Cimmerian continental rifting in northeast Gondwana. Flooding of the southwest platform margin during early to middle Bajocian resulted in the reestablishment of the carbonate sediment factory and overproduction of shallow marine carbonates associated with sea-level highstand, which led to vertical and lateral expansion of the platform and gradual infilling of the Pars intrashelf basin by late Bajocian time. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  10. 侏罗纪的花化石与被子植物起源%Jurassic flower fossils and the origin of angiosperms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 刘仲健

    2015-01-01

    理解被子植物的历史对于人们了解现代被子植物之间的关系十分重要。以前欧美古植物学家认为,被子植物的历史不会早于白垩纪,使得被子植物看起来似乎是在白垩纪早期突然爆发的。但是分子钟和系统分析显示,被子植物应当早在三叠纪,至少在侏罗纪就已经出现了,但是问题的关键是相应化石证据的缺失。因此侏罗纪的花化石成为解决两个学派之间争斗的关键证据。本文简要地介绍了产出于中国辽西同一地层的、侏罗纪的三个被子植物属种及其特征,确认了被子植物在侏罗纪的存在,提出了新的被子植物雌蕊同源性理论,并为下一步植物系统学的发展打下了坚实的基础。%Understanding on the history of angiosperms is hinged with our appreciation of the relationship among extant angiosperms. Formerly European and American palaeobotanists believed that angiosperms cannot be older than the Cretaceous, leaving the origin of angiosperms as if a sudden explosion during the Early Cretaceous. But molecular clock and systematic analysis suggested that angiosperms should have been in place in the Triassic or at least the Jurassic, but this point of view lacked fossil support. Therefore the fates of angiosperm evolution hypotheses are hinged with the existence of fossilflowers in the Jurassic. Herein we introduce three taxa of angiosperms from a single Jurassic fossil locality in western Liaoning, China, confirming the existence of angiosperms in the Jurassic, advancing a new theory on the homology of angiosperm gynoecium, and paving the road for further development of plant systematics.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Paleoatmospheric CO2 Level Based on Stomatal Characters of Fossil Ginkgo from Jurassic to Cretaceous in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A better theoretical and practical understanding of the linkage between paleo-CO2 and climate during geological history is important to enhance the sustainable development of modern human society. Development in plant physiology since the 1980s has led to the realization that fossil plants can serve as a proxy for paleoatmosphere and paleobiosphere. As a relict gymnosperm with evolutionary stasis, Ginkgo is well suited for paleoenvironmental reconstruction. This paper analyzes fossil Ginkgo species from integrated strata in the north of China using anatomic data of plant physiology. Using stomatal parameters, a trend for the paleo-CO2 level during the Early-Middle Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous was obtained, which is consistent with the estimates by GEOCARB.The trend is also similar to that of Mean Global Surface Temperature in geological time. Compared with three other atmospheric CO2 concentration parameters, the trend of paleo-CO2 level based on the stomatal parameter of the fossil Ginkgo specimens from three contiguous strata is more exact.

  12. Block faulted turbidites: an Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous subtle play-potential in the Central Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregersen, U.; Rasmussen, E.S.

    1998-10-01

    The Gertrud Graben, in the Danish Central Graben, was formed during Early Volgain by extensional block rotation, bounded by a series of NW-SE trending normal faults. The post-rift topography, formed after the Early Volgian rift pulse, controlled the depocenteres of Volgian-Ryazanian turbidites. The turbidites are interbedded in the Farsund Formation. Seismic correlation to basin marginal turbidite sand in the Jeppe-1 and Gwen-2 wells suggest, that high amplitude horizons and high acoustic impedance values in the depocenter of the turbidites probably reflect accumulation of sand-rich turbidites. The high amplitude and impedance values, calculated from seismic inversion, are locally concentrated in minor closures. A short flat impedance horizon within the turbidite depocenter and below a closure possible indicates hydrocarbon accumulation, adjacent to a well-known Jurassic source-rock (the `Hot Unit`) in the Central Graben area. The turbidites seem to have been transported mainly from the north, possibly from the Mandal High or Piggvar Terrace areas. Subsequent Late Ryazanian block faulting and local compressional tectonics caused erosional truncation of upper parts of the turbidites on footwall blocks, but preserved parts of the basin axial turbidites from erosion in the hanging wall positions. (au) 23 fig., 22 refs.

  13. Response to Comment on "A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and scales".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroit, Pascal; Sinitsa, Sofia M; Dhouailly, Danielle; Bolotsky, Yuri L; Sizov, Alexander V; McNamara, Maria E; Benton, Michael J; Spagna, Paul

    2014-10-24

    Lingham-Soliar questions our interpretation of integumentary structures in the Middle-Late Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur Kulindadromeus as feather-like appendages and alternatively proposes that the compound structures observed around the humerus and femur of Kulindadromeus are support fibers associated with badly degraded scales. We consider this hypothesis highly unlikely because of the taphonomy and morphology of the preserved structures.

  14. Battling Jurassic Park: From a Fascination with Violence toward Constructive Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Beverlyn; Bohrer, Cynthia

    1997-01-01

    Studied preschool children's inability to distinguish fantasy from fact utilizing the case of the popular movie Jurassic Park and the subsequent false information children obtained about dinosaurs. Described attempts made by teachers to address the resultant aggressive behavior and false knowledge gained and replace it with constructive knowledge.…

  15. Palynology of uppermost Jurassic and lowermost Cretaceous strata in the Eastern Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, D.

    1965-01-01

    The present investigation is a systematical treatment of the sporomorphs from strata at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary in the eastern Netherlands Twente area, and an attempt to apply palynology to detailed stratigraphical study, by making use of quantitative pollen analyses. The rock samples used

  16. The potential of vertebrate microfossils for marine to non-marine correlation in the Late Jurassic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Detlev Thies; Alexander Mudroch; Susan Turner

    2007-01-01

    Fish (cartilaginous: elasmobranch and bony: osteichthyan actinopterygian) and reptile (crocodile) microfossils comprising scales and teeth have been examined from a series of limestone samples in the Upper Jurassic of France and Germany to gauge the possibilities of using them for correlation between fully marine and hypo- or hyper-saline (non-marine) deposits.

  17. 3D visualisation of a Jurassic oolitic system with GPR data, Isle of Portland (UK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Hansen, Trine Lykke; Nielsen, Lars

    The Isle of Portland shows exposure of uppermost Jurassic oolitic carbonate all along its coast and within several inland quarries. The exposure quality is very high with a potential 3D control. The site has a potential to understand the 3D architecture and the sedimentary dynamic of an oolitic s...

  18. Strobilus organization in the enigmatic gymnosperm Bernettia inopinata from the Jurassic of Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kustatscher, E.; van Konijnenburg - van Cittert, J.H.A.; Bauer, K.; Krings, M.

    2016-01-01

    The enigmatic fossil Bernettia inopinata from Lower Jurassic strata of Upper Franconia, Germany, has been described as a leaf-like structure a leaf-like structure bearing a proximal cluster of densely spaced, pillow-like objects believed to represent ovules or ovule-containing units. The systematic

  19. New finds of stegosaur tracks from the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã formation, Portugal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateus, Octavio; Milàn, Jesper; Romano, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Eleven new tracks from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal are described and attributed to the stegosaurian ichnogenus Deltapodus. One track exhibits exceptionally well−preserved impressions of skin on the plantar surface, showing the stegosaur foot to be covered by closely spaced skin tubercles of ca...

  20. Geochemical Characteristics of REE in Jurassic Coal of Yan'an Formation from Dongsheng Coalfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵峰华; 丛志远; 彭苏萍; 唐跃刚; 任德贻

    2002-01-01

    Concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) in Jurassic coal of YanAn Formation from Dongsheng coalfield located in the northeast of Ordos basin were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Curves of distrib ution pattern of REE were drawn, and many geochemical parameters were calculated . The result shows that 1) The contents of REE in Jurassic coal with low ash an d sulfur are lower than those of Carboniferous and Permian coal from the Basin of North China; 2) Inside the Dongsheng coalfield, coal from the north has high er contents of REE than that form the south because the north is near the area of source rock which is the main supplier of REE, while the south is far away from the area of source rocks; 3) Although Jurassic coal in Dongsheng is the low-ash coal with less than 10%, the contents of REE are still proportional to ash yie ld of ash and SiO2 contents. 4) Although the Jurassic coal in Dongsheng were deposited in oxidative continental environment of river-lake, Eu depletion of RE E I n coal commonly exists, and positive abnormity of Ce dose not exist. This reflec ts the REE distribution pattern of REE in source rock of continental area; and 5) Compared with other rocks, coal shows extremely complexity of distribution pa ttern of REE, which is the result of continuous alteration and redistribution of matter in coal occurred in open basin system.

  1. Klukiopsis jurassica——A new Jurassic schizaeaceous fern from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓胜徽[1; 王仕俊[2

    2000-01-01

    A new Jurassic schizaeaceous fern Klukiopsis jurassica gen. et sp. nov. from Yima, Henan Province, China is described. The new fern is characterized by the abaxial sori arranged in two rows, apical and complete annulus and more than 800 smooth trilete spores in each sorus.

  2. Architecture of an Upper Jurassic barrier island sandstone reservoir, Danish Central Graben:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars H.; Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    An unusually thick (c. 88 m), transgressive barrier island and shoreface sandstone succession characterizes the Upper Jurassic Heno Formation reservoir of the Freja oil field situated on the boundary of Denmark and Norway. The development and preservation of such thick transgressive barrier islan...... such that the island aggraded and even prograded seawards and became wider and longer due to the large surplus of sand....

  3. Battling Jurassic Park: From a Fascination with Violence toward Constructive Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Beverlyn; Bohrer, Cynthia

    1997-01-01

    Studied preschool children's inability to distinguish fantasy from fact utilizing the case of the popular movie Jurassic Park and the subsequent false information children obtained about dinosaurs. Described attempts made by teachers to address the resultant aggressive behavior and false knowledge gained and replace it with constructive knowledge.…

  4. Sense-Making--a Case Study Using the Movie "Jurassic Park."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Tony P.

    1996-01-01

    Introduces Sense-Making, an alternative methodology which allows an insight into a person's perception of reality. Interviews science teachers following a viewing of "Jurassic Park" to investigate the relationship of the movie to their ontological view of science, society, and self. (Author/MVL)

  5. New Isophlebioid Dragonflies from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China (Insecta: Odonata: Isophlebioptera:Campterophlebiidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Binglan; REN Dong; PANG Hong

    2008-01-01

    Three new species of fossil dragonflies assigned to Sinokaratawia Nel, Huang and Lin in family Campterophlebiidae, i.e. S. daohugouica sp. nov., S. magica sp. nov. and S. gloriosa sp. nov., and new materials of male S. prokopi Nel, Huang and Lin, 2007 are described from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China. An emended diagnosis of genus Sinokaratawia was proposed.

  6. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks in central Patagonia: a key to constrain the timing of rotations during the breakup of southwestern Gondwana?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuna, Silvana E.; Somoza, Rubén; Vizán, Haroldo; Figari, Eduardo G.; Rinaldi, Carlos A.

    2000-08-01

    A paleomagnetic study in Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks from the Cañadón Asfalto basin, central Patagonia, indicates the occurrence of about 25-30° clockwise rotation in Upper Jurassic-lowermost Cretaceous rocks, whereas the overlying mid-Cretaceous rocks do not show evidence of rotation. This constrains the tectonic rotation to be related to a major regional unconformity in Patagonia, which in turn seems to be close in time with the early opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. The sense and probably the timing of this rotation are similar to those of other paleomagnetically detected rotations in different areas of southwestern Gondwana, suggesting a possible relationship between these and major tectonic processes related with fragmentation of the supercontinent. On the other hand, the mid-Cretaceous rocks in the region yield a paleopole located at Lat. 87° South, Long. 159° East, A95=3.8°. This pole position is consistent with coeval high-quality paleopoles of other plates when transferred to South American coordinates, implying it is an accurate determination of the Aptian (circa 116 Ma) geomagnetic field in South America.

  7. A hyper-robust sauropodomorph dinosaur ilium from the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic Elliot Formation of South Africa: Implications for the functional diversity of basal Sauropodomorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Blair W.; Choiniere, Jonah N.

    2016-11-01

    It has generally been held that the locomotory habits of sauropodomorph dinosaurs moved in a relatively linear evolutionary progression from bipedal through "semi-bipedal" to the fully quadrupedal gait of Sauropoda. However, there is now a growing appreciation of the range of locomotory strategies practiced amongst contemporaneous taxa of the latest Triassic and earliest Jurassic. Here we present on the anatomy of a hyper-robust basal sauropodomorph ilium from the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic Elliot Formation of South Africa. This element, in addition to highlighting the unexpected range of bauplan diversity throughout basal Sauropodomorpha, also has implications for our understanding of the relevance of "robusticity" to sauropodomorph evolution beyond generalized limb scaling relationships. Possibly representing a unique form of hindlimb stabilization during phases of bipedal locomotion, the autapomorphic morphology of this newly rediscovered ilium provides additional insight into the myriad ways in which basal Sauropodomorpha managed the inherited behavioural and biomechanical challenges of increasing body-size, hyper-herbivory, and a forelimb primarily adapted for use in a bipedal context.

  8. Trans-border (north-east Serbia/north-west Bulgaria correlations of the Jurassic lithostratigraphic units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchoumatchenco Platon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, correlations of the Jurassic sediments from NE Serbia with those of NW Bulgaria are made. The following Jurassic palaeogeographic units: the Eastern Getic, the Infra-Getic and the Moesian Platform are included in the study. The East Getic was studied in the outcrops near Rgotina, where the sedimentation started in the Hettangian and continued during the Callovian-Late Jurassic and is represented by platform carbonates. The Infra-Getic is documented by the sections of Dobra (Pesača and the allochtonous sediments near the Štubik. Very important for the Infra-Getic are the Late Jurassic volcano-sedimentary deposits of the Vratarnica Series, which crop out near Vratarnica Village. The Jurassic Moesian platform was studied in the sections near D. Milanovac and Novo Korito (Serbia and in their prolongation in NW Bulgaria into the Gornobelotintsi palaeograben. Very important are the correlation in the region of Vrška Čuka (Serbia and Vrashka Chuka (Bulgaria - Rabisha Village (Magura Cave. A revision of the Jurassic sediments on the Vidin palaeohorst, which were studied in the Belogradchik palaeohorst, Gorno-Belotintsi palaeograben, Belimel palaeohorst and the Mihaylovgrad palaeograben, is made. The sedimentation on the Vidin palaeohorst started during different parts of the Middle Jurassic, and in the Mihaylovgrad palaeograben during the Hettangian (Lower Jurassic where the sediments were deposited in relatively deeper water conditions. To south, the relatively shallow water sediments deposited on the Jurassic Vratsa palaeohorst on the southern board of the Mihaylovgrad palaeograben are described.

  9. Abrupt Change in North American Plate Motion: Magnetostratigraphy and Paleopoles of the Early Jurassic Moenave Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutny, M. K.; Steiner, M. B.

    2001-12-01

    The J-1 cusp marks a dramatic ~ 180° change in the apparent motion of the magnetic pole with respect to North America. The cusp is defined by a sequence of poles: Chinle - Moenave - Kayenta. The Moenave pole (Ekstrand and Butler, 1989), which forms the point of the cusp, was obtained primarily from the lower member (Dinosaur Canyon) of the three-member Moenave Formation. We present new paleomagnetic data from the upper two members (Whitmore Point and Springdale Sandstone) of the formation. The Vermillion Cliffs in southern Utah present excellent exposures of the Moenave Formation. At this location, the Moenave rests uncomformably on the Late Triassic Chinle Group, although to the southeast it overlies it in a conformable manner. The Moenave is seemingly conformably overlain by the Kayenta Formation. Our study identified six polarity intervals in 100 meters of section. A preliminary paleopole from the Whitmore Point Member falls within the 95% confidence limits of the Dinosaur Canyon pole (Ekstrand and Butler, 1989), as does our pole from the top Springdale Sandstone member. If the apparent polar wander does indeed represent motion of the North American continent, then the reversal in direction implied by the J-1 cusp takes place after the deposition of the Springdale Sandstone, and either before or during the deposition of the lower Kayenta Formation. No directions intermediate between the Moenave and Kayenta directions were observed up through the uppermost Moenave strata. Within the Moenave, the lack of discernable change in magnetic direction between the three members suggests continuous deposition. This result is consistent with the observed mutually interfingering nature of the Whitmore Point and Springdale Sandstone. The sudden change in magnetic direction between the top of the Moenave and the Kayenta suggests the possibility of an unconformity between the two formations, and/or rapid continental motion following the turnaround.

  10. Scenes from the past: initial investigation of early jurassic vertebrate fossils with multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Stephan A; Ross, Steffen; Thali, Michael J; Hostettler, Bernhard; Menkveld-Gfeller, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The study of fossils permits the reconstruction of past life on our planet and enhances our understanding of evolutionary processes. However, many fossils are difficult to recognize, being encased in a lithified matrix whose tedious removal is required before examination is possible. The authors describe the use of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in locating, identifying, and examining fossil remains of crocodilians (Mesosuchia) embedded in hard shale, all without removing the matrix. In addition, they describe how three-dimensional (3D) reformatted CT images provided details that were helpful for extraction and preparation. Multidetector CT can help experienced paleontologists localize and characterize fossils in the matrix of a promising rock specimen in a nondestructive manner. Moreover, with its capacity to generate highly accurate 3D images, multidetector CT can help determine whether the fossils warrant extraction and can assist in planning the extraction process. Thus, multidetector CT may well become an invaluable tool in the field of paleoradiology.

  11. Evidence of preserved collagen in an Early Jurassic sauropodomorph dinosaur revealed by synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yao-Chang; Chiang, Cheng-Cheng; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chung, Chao-Yu; Huang, Timothy D.; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Ching-Iue; Chang, Rong-Seng; Liao, Cheng-Hao; Reisz, Robert R.

    2017-01-01

    Fossilized organic remains are important sources of information because they provide a unique form of biological and evolutionary information, and have the long-term potential for genomic explorations. Here we report evidence of protein preservation in a terrestrial vertebrate found inside the vascular canals of a rib of a 195-million-year-old sauropodomorph dinosaur, where blood vessels and nerves would normally have been present in the living organism. The in situ synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra exhibit the characteristic infrared absorption bands for amide A and B, amide I, II and III of collagen. Aggregated haematite particles (α-Fe2O3) about 6∼8 μm in diameter are also identified inside the vascular canals using confocal Raman microscopy, where the organic remains were preserved. We propose that these particles likely had a crucial role in the preservation of the proteins, and may be remnants partially contributed from haemoglobin and other iron-rich proteins from the original blood. PMID:28140389

  12. Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous coal-forming plants of the Bureya Basin, Russian Far East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markevich, V. S.; Bugdaeva, E. V.

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the composition of fossil palynomorphs from coals and clastic rocks of the Talyndzhan, Dublikan, Soloni, Chagdamyn, and Chemchuko formations of the Bureya coaliferous Basin revealed that the main coal-forming plants during the Talyndzhan and Dublikan time were represented by cyatheaceous ferns, plants similar to Pinaceae, and plants produced Ginkgocycadophytus pollen. In the Soloni time, the boggy plant communities were composed of dominant Cyatheaceae, subordinate Pinaceae, rare Gleichenaceae representatives, and Ginkgocycadophytus-producing plants. During the Chagdamyn time, the main coal-forming role belonged to gleicheniaceous ferns, bryophytes, and lycopsids, while the Chemchuko time was marked by the dominant contribution of Gleicheniaceae, Cyatheaceae, Ginkgocycadophytus, and plants close to Taxodiaceae to the coal formation.

  13. The role of Variscan to pre-Jurassic active extension in controlling the architecture of the rifted passive margin of Adria: the example of the Canavese Zone (Western Southern Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succo, Andrea; De Caroli, Sara; Centelli, Arianna; Barbero, Edoardo; Balestro, Gianni; Festa, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The Canavese Zone, in the Italian Western Southern Alps, represents the remnant of the Jurassic syn-rift stretching, thinning and dismemberment of the distal passive margin of Adria during the opening of the Penninic Ocean (i.e., Northern Alpine Tethys). Our findings, based on detailed geological mapping, structural analysis and stratigraphic and petrographic observations, document however that the inferred hyper-extensional dismemberment of this distal part of the passive margin of Adria, up to seafloor spreading, was favored by the inherited Variscan geometry and crustal architecture of the rifted margin, and by the subsequent Alpine-related strike-slip deformation. The new field data document, in fact, that the limited vertical displacement of syn-extensional (syn-rift) Jurassic faults was ineffective in producing and justifying the crustal thinning observed in the Canavese Zone. The deformation and thinning of the continental basement of Adria are constrained to the late Variscan time by the unconformable overlying of Late Permian deposits. Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene and Late Cenozoic strike-slip faulting (i.e., Alpine and Insubric tectonic stages) reactivated previously formed faults, leading to the formation of a complex tectonic jigsaw which only partially coincides with the direct product of the Jurassic syn-rift dismemberment of the distal part of the passive margin of Adria. Our new findings document that this dismemberment of the rifted continental margin of Adria did not simply result from the syn-rift Jurassic extension, but was strongly favored by the inheritance of older (Variscan and post-Variscan) tectonic stages, which controlled earlier lithospheric weakness. The formation of rifted continental margins by extension of continental lithosphere leading to seafloor spreading is a complex and still poorly understood component of the plate tectonic cycle. Geological mapping of rifted continental margins may thus provide significant information to

  14. Tracing long term tectonic evolution of accretionary orogens by U-Pb zircon geochronology: Proterozoic to Jurassic tectonics of the Santander Massif, northern Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, V. A.; Cardona, A.; Gehrels, G. E.; Ruiz, J.; Ibañez, M.

    2009-12-01

    Accurate orogenic models are nedded to reconstruct complex tectonic histories of long lived convergent margins. Integrated zircon U-Pb geochronology on igneous, sedimentary and metasedimentry rocks within single crustal domains is a powerful tool, as it can be used to trace the timing of rock forming events, magmatic style and episodity, and identify crustal recycling. U-Pb detrital zircon and magmatic geochronology was carried on multiple litostratigraphic units of the Santander Massif in the northeastern Andes, in order to reconstruct its long term Late Proterozoic to Early Mesozoic tectonic evolution. Major zircon forming events includ well defined Grenvillian, Late Neoproterozoic to Ordovician, Silurian, Early Permian and Jurassic events. Major peaks of activity at ca. 197 Ma, 440-410 Ma and 470-490 Ma and 950-1052 Ma, support the existence of continental scale tectonic cycles. Older Mesoproterozoic (1.3-1.5 Ga) crustal input in metasediments and magmatic rocks link these units to crustal recycling on the margins of the Amazon Craton, whereas the older 950-1052 Ma peak indicates the link of this crustal segment with other Andean Grenvillian remnant. Previous interpretations of the Paleozoic Silgara Formation seem incorrect, as acquired dates from this study includ different metamorphic units, deposited and formed after the Silurian and Permian during final stages of Pangea's assemblage, probably as Laurentia migrated to its final Alleghanian position. Finally the presence of the NW South America Jurassic arc is also present in the region by granitoid ages. The limited input of this arc signature within the contemporaneous and overlapping Early Cretaceous sedimentary rocks suggest that this arc was developed in a back arc setting.

  15. A taxonomic review of the Late Jurassic eucryptodiran turtles from the Jura Mountains (Switzerland and France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Anquetin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Eucryptodiran turtles from the Late Jurassic (mainly Kimmeridgian deposits of the Jura Mountains (Switzerland and France are among the earliest named species traditionally referred to the Plesiochelyidae, Thalassemydidae, and Eurysternidae. As such, they are a reference for the study of Late Jurassic eucryptodires at the European scale. Fifteen species and four genera have been typified based on material from the Late Jurassic of the Jura Mountains. In the past 50 years, diverging taxonomic reassessments have been proposed for these turtles with little agreement in sight. In addition, there has been a shift of focus from shell to cranial anatomy in the past forty years, although most of these species are only represented by shell material. As a result, the taxonomic status of many of these 15 species remains ambiguous, which prevents comprehensive comparison of Late Jurassic turtle assemblages throughout Europe and hinders description of new discoveries, such as the new assemblage recently unearthed in the vicinity of Porrentruy, Switzerland.Methods. An exhaustive reassessment of the available material provides new insights into the comparative anatomy of these turtles. The taxonomic status of each of the 15 species typified based on material from the Late Jurassic of the Jura Mountains is evaluated. New diagnoses and general descriptions are provided for each valid taxon.Results. Six out of the 15 available species names are recognized as valid: Plesiochelys etalloni, Craspedochelys picteti, Craspedochelys jaccardi, Tropidemys langii, Thalassemys hugii, and ‘Thalassemys’ moseri. The intraspecific variability of the shell of P. etalloni is discussed based on a sample of about 30 relatively complete specimens from Solothurn, Switzerland. New characters are proposed to differentiate P. etalloni, C. picteti, and C. jaccardi, therefore rejecting the previously proposed synonymy of these forms. Based partly on previously undescribed

  16. Tango in the Mid-Jurassic: 10,000-Yr Geomagnetic Field Reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, M.

    2001-12-01

    A continuous magnetostratigraphic signature of Layer 2A from Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) oceanic crust now is known from two separate paleo-magnetic data sets. Measurement/demagnetization along the length of the entire core at 5-cm intervals generated ~100,000 data points, whereas a suite of 472 discrete samples also were taken from throughout the core. Both data sets display the same magnetization pattern, a series of repeated sinusoidal inclination changes downhole. Six inter-vals of maximum inclination (three positive, three negative) are obser-ved. Maximum inclination intervals of +/-40° are separated by regions of smoothly varying intermediate inclination values. Despite lack of azmuithal orientation of the core, downhole magnetic logging (Larson et al., in prep.) shows full ~360° directional change in the magnetization vector. Therefore, the maximum inclination regions represent polarity intervals of the geomagnetic field, and six polarity intervals in stacked sequence are contained in the upper 400 m thickness of Layer 2A at this site. The time duration spanned by these six reversals was estimated from recent seismic studies of young ocean crustal construction on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Estimates of completion of construction of Layer 2A within 1-3 km from the rise crest and typical EPR half-spreading rates of 5-8 cm/yr suggest that the studied 400 m of ocean crust represents 37,000-60,000 years. The fast construction of EPR crust implies that the Middle Jurassic geomagnetic field was reversing at a phenomenal rate of 5000-10,000 years. These data establish that the `quiet' signature in the oldest portion of the lineated magnetic anomaly patterns in the ocean crust is due to exceedingly rapid reversals of the geomagnetic field, because succes-sive, superposed opposite-polarity magnetic signatures will essentially cancel one another out at the sea surface. The width of the 'quiet' magnetic signature in the western Pacific Ocean implies that the 5000

  17. Faunal associations, paleoecology and paleoenvironment of marine Jurassic rocks in the Mae Sot, Phop Phra, and Umphang areas, western Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEESOOK; Assanee; YAMEE; Chotima; SAENGSRICHAN; Wirote

    2009-01-01

    We here report a paleoecological analysis and depositional history of the marine Jurassic (Toarcian–early Bajocian) strata cropping out in the western part of Thailand, based on bivalve assemblages with additional data from ammonites, brachiopods, and microfossils. Generally, the benthic bivalve facies in most outcrops is rich in infaunal, semi-infaunal and epifaunal suspension-feeders. Of these, infaunal forms dominate. The diversity of this benthic assemblage was influenced by energy level, substrate, sedimentation rate, and salinity. Low to intermediate energy levels and rather soft fine-grained siliciclastic substrate are proposed as factors governing faunal distribution and explaining the greater abundance and diversity of infaunal than epifaunal suspension-feeders. There were paleoenvironmental changes both in space and time, i.e., from south to north (Umphang to Mae Sot) and from Early Bajocian to Toarcian. In the Toarcian, most outcrops in Umphang are dominated by benthic bivalve facies (infaunal, semi-infaunal, and epifaunal associations). This implies warm, shallow water (inner neritic, 50―100 m) and oxygenated conditions except for the Mae Sot area where a deeper setting (outer neritic to possibly upper continental slope, 50―200 m) with restricted basinal anoxic conditions is favored as indicated by the presence of Bositra. After higher energy conditions in the Toarcian, lower energy conditions with low sediment supplies prevail in the Alenian, and the Mae Sot area was still a restricted basin. As a result of higher sea levels, the oxygen content in the basin is increased, resulting in the presence of the ammonites. By the end of the Alenian-early Bajocian, an ammonite-bivalve association (mixed facies A) and the presence of corals and microfauna (mixed facies B) are dominant but pass upwards to near-shore higher energy conditions in most areas except for restricted basin in Mae Sot. By the middle Bajocian the environment in all areas had changed

  18. Mesozoic (Lower Jurassic) red stromatactis limestones from the Southern Alps (Arzo, Switzerland): calcite mineral authigenesis and syneresis-type deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuweiler, Fritz; Bernoulli, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    The Broccatello lithological unit (Lower Jurassic, Hettangian to lower parts of Upper Sinemurian) near the village of Arzo (southern Alps, southern Switzerland) is a mound-shaped carbonate deposit that contains patches of red stromatactis limestone. Within the largely bioclastic Broccatello unit, the stromatactis limestone is distinguished by its early-diagenetic cavity system, a relatively fine-grained texture, and an in-situ assemblage of calcified siliceous sponges (various demosponges and hexactinellids). A complex shallow subsurface diagenetic pathway can be reconstructed from sediment petrography in combination with comparative geochemical analysis (carbon and oxygen isotopes; trace and rare earth elements, REE + Y). This pathway includes organic matter transformation, aragonite and skeletal opal dissolution, patchy calcification and lithification, sediment shrinkage, sagging and collapse, partial REE remobilization, and multiple sediment infiltration. These processes occurred under normal-marine, essentially oxic conditions and were independent from local, recurring syn-sedimentary faulting. It is concluded that the stromatactis results from a combination of calcite mineral authigenesis and syneresis-type deformation. The natural stromatactis phenomenon may thus be best explained by maturation processes of particulate polymer gels expected to form in fine-grained carbonate sediments in the shallow subsurface. Conditions favorable for the evolution of stromatactis appear to be particularly frequent during drowning of tropical or subtropical carbonate platforms.

  19. Late Jurassic blueschist facies pebbles from the Western Carpathian orogenic wedge and paleostructural implications for Western Tethys evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Piaz, Giorgio V.; Martin, Silvana; Villa, Igor M.; Gosso, Guido; Marschalko, Robert

    1995-08-01

    In spite of the absence of ophiolitic slices at the surface, some traces of the lost Tethys ocean are recorded along the Pieniny Klippen Belt (PKB), a narrow décollement thrust system sutured at the transpressive boundary between the Outer and Inner Carpathians. The enigmatic precollisional evolution of Western Carpathians can be deciphered from some late Albian to Campanian flysch conglomerates which display chrome spinel grains, ophiolitic detritus and pebbles of blueschist facies tholeiitic metabasalts yielding a 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 155.4+/-0.6 Ma. Other detrital components are represented by extrabasinal pebbles of limestones, arc volcanics, and igneous to metamorphic basement rocks from southern sources. Our results suggest a markedly northward extension of the sublongitudinal Triassic Vardar (Meliata) Ocean and its subduction since the late Middle Jurassic, supposedly balanced westward by coeval spreading in the Ligurian-Piedmont basin of the Apennine-Western Alpine Tethys. A lateral kinematic connection between these diachronous and roughly parallel Tethys branches was provided on the north by a left-lateral east-west trending shear zone running from the Swiss-Austrian Penninic domain to the Northern Carpathians. This reconstruction replaces the classic model of two paired North Penninic and South Penninic oceanic basins and eastern homologues with the Briançonnais-Hochstegen and Czorstin microcontinents in between. The Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous evolution of the Carpathian active margin was characterized by subduction metamorphism and accretion of a wide orogenic wedge; in this time, the shallowing to deeply subsiding basins inferred from facies analyses on the sedimentary units of the PKB were likely floored by individual sections of the growing wedge. Later, some exhuming blueschist ophiolitic units of the wedge were uplifted to the surface and functioned in the Albian-Campanian as an ``exotic ridge'' supplying clasts to the forearc basin

  20. Diverse subaerial and sublacustrine hot spring settings of the Cerro Negro epithermal system (Jurassic, Deseado Massif), Patagonia, Argentina