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Sample records for early gastrointestinal toxicity

  1. Radiation therapy for early stage seminoma of testis. Analysis of survival and gastrointestinal toxicity in patients treated with modern megavoltage techniques over 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, E.; O'Brein, P.C.; Razali, M.

    1993-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients treated with megavoltage irradiation to the paraaortic and/or pelvic nodal areas, for stage I and non-bulky ( 34 years), stage (I vs II) and dose of radiation (≤ 30 Gy vs > 30 Gy), showed none of these variables to have a significant influence on overall survival or on the incidence of late complications. The results of these findings are discussed in the light of recent studies of a surveillance policy following orchidectomy for stage I seminoma of the testis. Given that gastrointestinal toxicity is the major toxicity associated with the treatment of stage I patients, the data from this study should assist clinicians and their patients to arrive at an informed decision regarding adjuvant radiotherapy. 15 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  2. Late Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiotherapy for Early Prostate Cancer: Results From the UK Medical Research Council RT01 Trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syndikus, Isabel; Morgan, Rachel C.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Graham, John D.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In men with localized prostate cancer, dose-escalated conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) improves efficacy outcomes at the cost of increased toxicity. We present a detailed analysis to provide further information about the incidence and prevalence of late gastrointestinal side effects. Methods and Materials: The UK Medical Research Council RT01 trial included 843 men with localized prostate cancer, who were treated for 6 months with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and were randomly assigned to either 64-Gy or 74-Gy CFRT. Toxicity was evaluated before CFRT and during long-term follow-up using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading, the Late Effects on Normal Tissue: Subjective, Objective, Management (LENT/SOM) scale, and Royal Marsden Hospital assessment scores. Patients regularly completed Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Prostate (FACT-P) and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaires. Results: In the dose-escalated group, the hazard ratio (HR) for rectal bleeding (LENT/SOM grade ≥2) was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.17-2.04); for diarrhea (LENT/SOM grade ≥2), the HR was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.10-2.94); and for proctitis (RTOG grade ≥2), the HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.20-2.25). Compared to baseline scores, the prevalence of moderate and severe toxicities generally increased up to 3 years and than lessened. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of patient-reported severe bowel problems was 6% vs. 8% (standard vs. escalated, respectively) and severe distress was 4% vs. 5%, respectively. Conclusions: There is a statistically significant increased risk of various adverse gastrointestinal events with dose-escalated CFRT. This remains at clinically acceptable levels, and overall prevalence ultimately decreases with duration of follow-up.

  3. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Pai, Reetesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  4. Intolerable toxicity of simultaneous 5-fluorouracil-radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced gastrointestinal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higi, M.; Arndt, D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitt, G.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous application of 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy is generally accepted in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumours. However, in 10 patients with metastatic gastrointestinal tumours we oberseved intolerable toxicity during this combined treatment regimen. Because of gastrointestinal and haematological toxicity the combined modality was interrupted in all patients. Given sequentially, this regimen was tolerated. Our experience indicates that an intolerable high rate of toxicity has to be taken into consideration in case of the simultaneous combination of 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  5. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Karina; Pontoppidan, Peter; Uhlving, Hilde Hylland

    2017-01-01

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immun...

  6. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immune-r...

  7. Gastrointestinal toxicity of vorinostat: reanalysis of phase 1 study results with emphasis on dose-volume effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratland, Åse; Dueland, Svein; Hollywood, Donal; Flatmark, Kjersti; Ree, Anne H

    2011-01-01

    In early-phase studies with targeted therapeutics and radiotherapy, it may be difficult to decide whether an adverse event should be considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the investigational systemic agent, as acute normal tissue toxicity is frequently encountered with radiation alone. We have reanalyzed the toxicity data from a recently conducted phase 1 study on vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with pelvic palliative radiotherapy, with emphasis on the dose distribution within the irradiated bowel volume to the development of DLT. Of 14 eligible patients, three individuals experienced Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events grade 3 gastrointestinal and related toxicities, representing a toxicity profile vorinostat has in common with radiotherapy to pelvic target volumes. For each study patient, the relative volumes of small bowel receiving radiation doses between 6 Gy and 30 Gy at 6-Gy intervals (V6-V30) were determined from the treatment-planning computed tomography scans. The single patient that experienced a DLT at the second highest dose level of vorinostat, which was determined as the maximum-tolerated dose, had V6-V30 dose-volume estimates that were considerably higher than any other study patient. This patient may have experienced an adverse radiation dose-volume effect rather than a toxic effect of the investigational drug. When reporting early-phase trial results on the tolerability of a systemic targeted therapeutic used as potential radiosensitizing agent, radiation dose-volume effects should be quantified to enable full interpretation of the study toxicity profile.

  8. Clinical pattern and prevalence of upper gastrointestinal toxicity in patients abusing ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shirley Yuk Wah; Ng, Stephen Ka Kei; Tam, Yuk Him; Yee, Samuel Chi Hang; Lai, Franco Pui Tak; Hong, Cindy Yuek Lam; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Ng, Enders Kwok Wai; Ng, Chi Fai

    2017-09-01

    Evaluations of upper gastrointestinal toxicity from ketamine abuse are uncommon. This study investigated the clinical pattern of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients inhaling ketamine. In a cross-sectional study of 611 consecutive patients who were seeking treatment for ketamine uropathy in a tertiary hospital setting between August 2008 and June 2016, their clinical pattern of upper gastrointestinal symptoms was evaluated and compared with a control population of 804 non-users. A total of 168 (27.5%) patients abusing ketamine (mean age 26.3 years, 58.9% female) reported the presence of upper gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms were significantly more prevalent in patients inhaling ketamine than in those who were not (27.5% vs 5.2%, P ketamine abuse before symptom presentation was 5.0 ± 3.1 years. The presenting symptoms included epigastric pain (n = 155, 25.4%), recurrent vomiting (n = 48, 7.9%), anemia (n = 36, 5.9%) and gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 20, 3.3%). Uropathy symptoms were preceded by upper gastrointestinal symptoms for 4.4 ± 3.0 years in 141 (83.9%) patients. Logistic regression showed that elder age (odds ratio [OR] 1.06, P = 0.04), active abuser status (OR 1.60, P = 0.04) and longer duration of ketamine abuse (OR 1.00, P = 0.04) were independent factors associated with upper gastrointestinal toxicity. Although epigastric symptoms are unusual in the young population, upper gastrointestinal toxicity was highly prevalent in those inhaling ketamine. Enquiries about ketamine abuse are recommended when assessing young patients with epigastric symptoms. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Associations between nutritional status, weight loss, radiotherapy treatment toxicity and treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Amanda; Kiss, Nicole; Hodgson, Belinda; Crowe, Timothy C; Walsh, Adam D

    2011-02-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancers are susceptible to nutritional deterioration which may be compounded by radiotherapy treatment toxicities. This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy were associated with treatment toxicity and outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Seventy-three gastrointestinal cancer patients receiving curative radiotherapy underwent medical record audits assessing body weight, radiotherapy toxicity, unplanned treatment breaks or hospital admissions and completion of prescribed treatment/s. Nutritional status was assessed in a subset of patients (n = 11) using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment tool. Seventy-five percent of patients lost weight throughout radiotherapy. Weight loss was significantly greater in patients experiencing unplanned radiotherapy breaks (-3.1% vs -1.6%, p nutritional status during radiotherapy (as measured by weight loss) may be associated with poorer short-term treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Patient numbers were too small to definitively determine the effect of nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy (defined by PG-SGA) on treatment outcomes. Further research is required to investigate this in larger, longer-term studies. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Gastrointestinal toxicity of vorinostat: reanalysis of phase 1 study results with emphasis on dose-volume effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bratland, Ase

    2011-04-08

    Abstract Background In early-phase studies with targeted therapeutics and radiotherapy, it may be difficult to decide whether an adverse event should be considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the investigational systemic agent, as acute normal tissue toxicity is frequently encountered with radiation alone. We have reanalyzed the toxicity data from a recently conducted phase 1 study on vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with pelvic palliative radiotherapy, with emphasis on the dose distribution within the irradiated bowel volume to the development of DLT. Findings Of 14 eligible patients, three individuals experienced Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events grade 3 gastrointestinal and related toxicities, representing a toxicity profile vorinostat has in common with radiotherapy to pelvic target volumes. For each study patient, the relative volumes of small bowel receiving radiation doses between 6 Gy and 30 Gy at 6-Gy intervals (V6-V30) were determined from the treatment-planning computed tomography scans. The single patient that experienced a DLT at the second highest dose level of vorinostat, which was determined as the maximum-tolerated dose, had V6-V30 dose-volume estimates that were considerably higher than any other study patient. This patient may have experienced an adverse radiation dose-volume effect rather than a toxic effect of the investigational drug. Conclusions When reporting early-phase trial results on the tolerability of a systemic targeted therapeutic used as potential radiosensitizing agent, radiation dose-volume effects should be quantified to enable full interpretation of the study toxicity profile. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00455351

  11. Sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose markedly prevents cisplatin-induced gastrointestinal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun; Sun, Kang [School of Tea and Food Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, Anhui (China); Ni, Lijuan; Wang, Xufang [School of Chemistry and Materials of Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052, Anhui (China); Wang, Dongxu [School of Tea and Food Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, Anhui (China); Zhang, Jinsong, E-mail: zjs@ahau.edu.cn [School of Tea and Food Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, Anhui (China)

    2012-02-01

    Our previous studies in mice revealed that two weeks short-term toxicity of sodium selenosulfate was significantly lower than that of sodium selenite, but selenium repletion efficacy of both compounds was equivalent. In addition, we showed that sodium selenosulfate reduced nephrotoxicity of cisplatin (CDDP) without compromising its anticancer activity, thus leading to a dramatic increase of cancer cure rate from 25% to 75%. Hydration has been used in clinical practice to reduce CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity, but it cannot mitigate CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. The present work investigated whether sodium selenosulfate is a potential preventive agent for the gastrointestinal toxicity. In tumor-bearing mice, sodium selenosulfate was administered at a dose of 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days, CDDP alone resulted in diarrhea by 88% on day 12, whereas the co-administration of CDDP and sodium selenosulfate dramatically reduced diarrhea to 6% (p < 0.0001). Such a prominent protective effect promoted us to evaluate the safety potential of long-term sodium selenosulfate application. Mice were administered with sodium selenosulfate or sodium selenite for 55 days at the doses of 12.7 and 19 μmol/kg. The low-dose sodium selenite caused growth suppression and hepatotoxicity which were aggravated by the high-dose, leading to 40% mortality rate, but no toxic symptoms were observed in the two sodium selenosulfate groups. Altogether these results clearly show that sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose can markedly prevent CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. -- Highlights: ►Cisplatin resulted in diarrhea in mice by 88%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days reduced diarrhea to 6%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was not toxic. ►i.p. selenite at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was lethal. ►Innocuous dose of selenosulfate greatly prevents cisplatin-induced diarrhea.

  12. Sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose markedly prevents cisplatin-induced gastrointestinal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Sun, Kang; Ni, Lijuan; Wang, Xufang; Wang, Dongxu; Zhang, Jinsong

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies in mice revealed that two weeks short-term toxicity of sodium selenosulfate was significantly lower than that of sodium selenite, but selenium repletion efficacy of both compounds was equivalent. In addition, we showed that sodium selenosulfate reduced nephrotoxicity of cisplatin (CDDP) without compromising its anticancer activity, thus leading to a dramatic increase of cancer cure rate from 25% to 75%. Hydration has been used in clinical practice to reduce CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity, but it cannot mitigate CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. The present work investigated whether sodium selenosulfate is a potential preventive agent for the gastrointestinal toxicity. In tumor-bearing mice, sodium selenosulfate was administered at a dose of 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days, CDDP alone resulted in diarrhea by 88% on day 12, whereas the co-administration of CDDP and sodium selenosulfate dramatically reduced diarrhea to 6% (p < 0.0001). Such a prominent protective effect promoted us to evaluate the safety potential of long-term sodium selenosulfate application. Mice were administered with sodium selenosulfate or sodium selenite for 55 days at the doses of 12.7 and 19 μmol/kg. The low-dose sodium selenite caused growth suppression and hepatotoxicity which were aggravated by the high-dose, leading to 40% mortality rate, but no toxic symptoms were observed in the two sodium selenosulfate groups. Altogether these results clearly show that sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose can markedly prevent CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. -- Highlights: ►Cisplatin resulted in diarrhea in mice by 88%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days reduced diarrhea to 6%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was not toxic. ►i.p. selenite at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was lethal. ►Innocuous dose of selenosulfate greatly prevents cisplatin-induced diarrhea.

  13. Anthelmintic effect of thymol and thymol acetate on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes and their toxicity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibson Paz Pinheiro André

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymol is a monoterpene and acetylation form of this compound can reduce the toxicity and enhance its biological effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of thymol and thymol acetate (TA on egg, larva and adult Haemonchus contortus and the cuticular changes, acute toxicity in mice and the efficacy on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes. In vitro tests results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA and followed by comparison with Tukey test or Bonferroni. The efficacy of in vivo test was calculated by the BootStreet program. In the egg hatch test (EHT, thymol (0.5 mg/mL and TA (4 mg/mL inhibited larval hatching by 98% and 67.1%, respectively. Thymol and TA (8 mg/mL inhibited 100% of larval development. Thymol and TA (800 µg/mL reduced the motility of adult worms, by 100% and 83.4%, respectively. Thymol caused cuticular changes in adult worm teguments. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 of thymol and TA were 1,350.9 mg/kg and 4,144.4 mg/kg, respectively. Thymol and TA reduced sheep egg count per gram of faeces (epg by 59.8% and 76.2%, respectively. In in vitro tests thymol presented better anthelmintic activity than TA. However TA was less toxic and in in vivo test efficacy was similar.

  14. Periodical assessment of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity in patients who underwent prostate low-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Anai, Satoshi; Hirayama, Akihide; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2013-01-01

    To compare the periodical incidence rates of genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients who underwent prostate low-dose-rate brachytherapy between the monotherapy group (seed implantation alone) and the boost group (in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT)). A total of 218 patients with a median follow-up of 42.5 months were enrolled. The patients were divided into 2 groups by treatment modality, namely, the monotherapy group (155 patients) and the boost group (63 patients). The periodical incidence rates of GU and GI toxicity were separately evaluated and compared between the monotherapy group and the boost group using the National Cancer Institute - Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. To elucidate an independent factor among clinical and postdosimetric parameters to predict grade 2 or higher GU and GI toxicity in the acute and late phases, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Of all patients, 78.0% showed acute GU toxicity, and 7.8% showed acute GI toxicity, while 63.8% showed late GU toxicity, and 21.1% showed late GI toxicity. The incidence rates of late GU and GI toxicity were significantly higher in the boost group. Multivariate analysis showed that the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) before seed implantation was a significant parameter to predict acute GU toxicity, while there were no significant predictive parameters for acute GI toxicity. On the other hand, combination with EBRT was a significant predictive parameter for late GU toxicity, and rectal volume (mL) receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (R100) was a significant predictive parameter for late GI toxicity. The boost group showed higher incidence rates of both GU and GI toxicity. Higher IPSS before seed implantation, combination with EBRT and a higher R100 were significant predictors for acute GU, late GU and late GI toxicity

  15. Radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. Pathophysiologie, approaches to treatment and prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classen, J.; Belka, C.; Paulsen, F.; Budach, W.; Hoffmann, W.; Bamberg, M.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal toxicity is frequently observed during radiotherapy of malignancies in the abdomen and pelvis. The proposed pathophysiology of radiation enteritis is complex and a variety of different treatment strategies have been suggested for the management of acute radiation-induced diarrhea. Material and methods: Data are presented from an extensive review of the current literature. Results: Radiation-induced diarrhea results from a variety of different pathophysiological mechanisms including malabsorption of bile salts and lactose, imbalances in local bacterial flora and changes in the intestinal patterns of motility. Up to date acute radiation diarrhea is predominantly treated symptomatically using opioide derivates (loperamide) or adsorbants of bile salts such as smectite. Clinical trials have been performed using L. acidophilus, smectite or sucralfate for diarrhea prophylaxis with moderate reduction of acute symptoms. Conclusions: Further evaluation of strategies for diarrhea prophylaxis is warranted. Due to the complex nature of radiation enteritis a multimodal approach taking into account alterations in intestinal motility patterns, malabsorption of bile salts and an imbalance of mucosal bacterial flora may offer new perspectives. (orig.) [de

  16. Non-toxic lead sulfide nanodots as efficient contrast agents for visualizing gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Ran, Xiang; Liu, Jianhua; Du, Yingda; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive imaging of gastrointestinal (GI) tract using novel but efficient contrast agents is of the most important issues in the diagnosis and prognosis of GI diseases. Here, for the first time, we reported the design and synthesis of biothiol-decorated lead sulfide nanodots, as well as their usages in functional dual-modality imaging of GI tract in vivo. Due to the presence of glutathione on the surface of the nanodots, these well-prepared contrast agents could decrease the unwanted ion leakage, withstand the harsh conditions in GI tract, and avoid the systemic absorption after oral administration. Compared with clinical barium meal and iodine-based contrast agents, these nanodots exhibited much more significant enhancement in contrast efficiency during both 2D X-ray imaging and 3D CT imaging. Different from some conventional invasive imaging modalities, such as gastroscope and enteroscope, non-invasive imaging strategy by using glutathione modified PbS nanodots as contrast agents could reduce the painfulness towards patients, facilitate the imaging procedure, and economize the manipulation period. Moreover, long-term toxicity and bio-distribution of these nanodots after oral administration were evaluated in detail, which indicated their overall safety. Based on our present study, these nanodots could act as admirable contrast agents to integrate X-ray imaging and CT imaging for the direct visualization of GI tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Proton therapy with concomitant capecitabine for pancreatic and ampullary cancers is associated with a low incidence of gastrointestinal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R. Charles Jr.; Huh, Soon; Ho, Meng Wei; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Morris, Christopher G.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; George, Thomas J.; Zaiden, Robert A. Jr.; Awad, Ziad T.; Asbun, Horacio J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To review treatment toxicity for patients with pancreatic and ampullary cancer treated with proton therapy at our institution. Material and methods: From March 2009 through April 2012, 22 patients were treated with proton therapy and concomitant capecitabine (1000 mg PO twice daily) for resected (n = 5); marginally resectable (n = 5); and unresectable/inoperable (n = 12) biopsy-proven pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinoma. Two patients with unresectable disease were excluded from the analysis for reasons unrelated to treatment. Proton doses ranged from 50.40 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) to 59.40 CGE. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 11 (range 5-36) months. No patient demonstrated any grade 3 toxicity during treatment or during the follow-up period. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities occurred in three patients, consisting of vomiting (n = 3); and diarrhea (n = 2). Median weight loss during treatment was 1.3 kg (1.75% of body weight). Chemotherapy was well-tolerated with a median 99% of the prescribed doses delivered. Percentage weight loss was reduced (p = 0.0390) and grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was eliminated (p = 0.0009) in patients treated with plans that avoided anterior and left lateral fields which were associated with reduced small bowel and gastric exposure. Discussion: Proton therapy may allow for significant sparing of the small bowel and stomach and is associated with a low rate of gastrointestinal toxicity. Although long-term follow-up will be needed to assess efficacy, we believe that the favorable toxicity profile associated with proton therapy may allow for radiotherapy dose escalation, chemotherapy intensification, and possibly increased acceptance of preoperative radiotherapy for patients with resectable or marginally resectable disease

  18. Proton therapy with concomitant capecitabine for pancreatic and ampullary cancers is associated with a low incidence of gastrointestinal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R. Charles Jr.; Huh, Soon; Ho, Meng Wei; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Morris, Christopher G.; Hoppe, Bradford S. [Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org; George, Thomas J.; Zaiden, Robert A. Jr. [Dept. of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville and Jacksonville (United States); Awad, Ziad T. [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. of Florida, Jacksonville (United States); Asbun, Horacio J. [Dept. of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Background: To review treatment toxicity for patients with pancreatic and ampullary cancer treated with proton therapy at our institution. Material and methods: From March 2009 through April 2012, 22 patients were treated with proton therapy and concomitant capecitabine (1000 mg PO twice daily) for resected (n = 5); marginally resectable (n = 5); and unresectable/inoperable (n = 12) biopsy-proven pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinoma. Two patients with unresectable disease were excluded from the analysis for reasons unrelated to treatment. Proton doses ranged from 50.40 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) to 59.40 CGE. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 11 (range 5-36) months. No patient demonstrated any grade 3 toxicity during treatment or during the follow-up period. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities occurred in three patients, consisting of vomiting (n = 3); and diarrhea (n = 2). Median weight loss during treatment was 1.3 kg (1.75% of body weight). Chemotherapy was well-tolerated with a median 99% of the prescribed doses delivered. Percentage weight loss was reduced (p = 0.0390) and grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was eliminated (p = 0.0009) in patients treated with plans that avoided anterior and left lateral fields which were associated with reduced small bowel and gastric exposure. Discussion: Proton therapy may allow for significant sparing of the small bowel and stomach and is associated with a low rate of gastrointestinal toxicity. Although long-term follow-up will be needed to assess efficacy, we believe that the favorable toxicity profile associated with proton therapy may allow for radiotherapy dose escalation, chemotherapy intensification, and possibly increased acceptance of preoperative radiotherapy for patients with resectable or marginally resectable disease.

  19. The Frequency and Severity of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Young Sung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although gastrointestinal dysfunctions occur in the majority of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD, they are often unrecognized because many patients remain relatively asymptomatic in the early stage. We investigated the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PD using newly developed gastrointestinal symptom questionnaires. Methods Early PD patients with a symptom duration not exceeding 3 years were included in this study. All PD patients were evaluated using a questionnaire, which consisted of three relevant domains: oropharyngoesophageal (10 items; gastric (3 items; and intestinal-anorectal (7 items. The frequency of symptoms was calculated as a proportion with an item score ≥ 2. Results Of the 54 patients enrolled, 48 patients (88.9% responded that bowel symptoms developed before the onset of Parkinsonian motor symptoms, and four patients reported that the onset of two types of symptoms (i.e., bowel and neurological occurred approximately simultaneously, with only months between them. The frequencies of gastrointestinal symptoms are as follows: speech disturbance (40.7%, drooling (24.1%, sense of getting stuck (31.5%, choking (27.8%, globus pharyngis (16.7%, repetitive deglutition (29.6%, pain during swallowing (5.6%, food regurgitation (3.7%, acid reflux (7.4%, nausea/vomiting (11.1%, early satiety (16.7%, postprandial fullness (14.8%, epigastric soreness (9.3%, abdominal pain (3.7%, constipation (46.3%, excessive strain during defecation (33.3%, fecal incontinence (7.4%, tenesmus (20.4%, loose stool or diarrhea (3.7%, and difficulty in relaxing anal sphincter (11.1%. Two patients were scored at zero. Conclusions Our findings confirm that gastrointestinal dysfunction occurs in early PD in relatively high frequency.

  20. G3.5 PAMAM dendrimers enhance transepithelial transport of SN38 while minimizing gastrointestinal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Deborah S; Vijayalakshmi, Nirmalkumar; Swaan, Peter W; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2011-03-30

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown promise in oral drug delivery. Conjugation of SN38 to PAMAM dendrimers has the potential to improve its oral absorption while minimizing gastrointestinal toxicity. In this work we evaluated G3.5 PAMAM dendrimer-SN38 conjugates with ester-linked glycine and β-alanine spacers for their suitability in oral therapy of hepatic colorectal cancer metastases. G3.5-βAlanine-SN38 was mostly stable while G3.5-Glycine-SN38 showed 10%, 20%, and 56% SN38 release in simulated gastric, intestinal and liver environments for up to 6, 24 and 48 hours, respectively. Short-term treatment of Caco-2 cells with G3.5-SN38 conjugates did not reduce cell viability, while comparable concentrations of SN38 caused significant cytotoxicity. G3.5-Glycine-SN38 and G3.5-βAlanine-SN38 showed IC₅₀ values of 0.60 and 3.59 μM, respectively, in HT-29 cells treated for 48 h, indicating the efficacy of the drug delivery system in colorectal cancer cells with longer incubation time. Both conjugates increased SN38 transepithelial transport compared to the free drug. Transport of G3.5-Glycine-SN38 was highly concentration-dependent whereas transport of G3.5-βAlanine-SN38 was concentration-independent, highlighting the influence of drug loading and spacer chemistry on transport mechanism. Together these results show that PAMAM dendrimers have the potential to improve the oral bioavailability of potent anti-cancer drugs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Period Results and Clinical Characteristics of Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Sivrihisar State Hospital

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    Ozgur Turk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Our aim was to identify the characteristics of the patient that performed upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in a new established endoscopy unit of a state hospital. We want to present the spectrum of gastrointestinal diseases in our hospitals region. Material and Method: We analyzed patients upper endoscopy results according to age, sex, complaints, clinical characteristics, type of anesthesia, and the necessity of biopsy. We reviewed 256 patients data between 2013 December-2014 July. All endoscopies were performed by same surgeon. Results: The highest complaint was epigastric pain (n=112, 43, 8%. Other complaints were followed as dyspepsia (n=84, 32.8%, heartburn (n=42, 16.4%, nausea (n=4, 1.6%, vomiting (n=2, 0.8%, dysphagia (n=6, 2.3%. We determined 218 gastritis (85.2%, 64 hiatal hernia (25%, 120 esophagitis (46.9%, 76 duodenitis (29.7%, 4 gastric ulcer (1.6%, 18 duodenal ulcers (7%, 20 bile reflux (7.8%, 26 Gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD in patients (10.2%. 10 patients reported as normal (3.9%. Biopsy was performed in 186 of the patients. Discussion: Endoscopy can become an early diagnostic examination by increasing the availability of endoscopy. Also alarm symptoms should not be ignored and endoscopy should perform immediately in symptomatic patients. As an early result of upper gastrointestinal endoscopies that performed in this study; gastritis, esophagitis, duodenitis and hiatal hernia are common gastrointestinal diseases in our region.

  2. Gastric wall shortening in early gastric cancer: upper gastrointestinal series and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Jae; Choi, Chul Soon; Kim, Eun Ah; Kim, Kyu Sun; Yun, Ku Sub; Kim, Ho Chul; Bae, Sang Hun; Kang, Gu; Shin, Hyung Sik

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the causes of gastric wall shortening in early gastric cancer, upper gastrointestinal study was correlated with pathologic findings. We evaluated 41 cases (M:F = 1.7:1, average age = 49) of early gastric cancer, retrospectively. The gastric wall shortening were classified as Grade I; none, Grade II; intermediate, and Grade III; prominent. Pathologic findings such as size of lesions, depth of tumor invasion, degree of the submucosal fibrosis, degree of thickness of the submucosa and muscularis propria, and morphologic patterns of lesions including conversing mucosal folds were correlated with the degree of gastric wall shortening on upper gastrointestinal series. Submucosal fibrosis was present in 4 cases in Grade I (n = 21), 4 cases in Grade II (n = 6) and 8 cases in Grade III (n = 10). Positive conversing mucosal folds were seen in 5 cases in Grade I (n = 17), 0 case in Grade II (n = 2) and 9 cases in Grade III (n = 9). Gastric wall shortening was significantly associated with submucosal fibrosis and conversing mucosal folds of early gastric cancer. (ρ = 0.0001, and ρ = 0.02, respectively) Upper gastrointestinal finding of gastric wall protrusion in patients with early gastric cancer should not misinterprete as advanced gastric cancer since the finding could be a result of submucosal fibrosis

  3. Early esophagogastroduodenoscopy is associated with better Outcomes in upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a nationwide study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sushil K.; Anugwom, Chimaobi; Campbell, James; Wadhwa, Vaibhav; Gupta, Nancy; Lopez, Rocio; Shergill, Sukhman; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims We analyzed NIS (National Inpatient Sample) database from 2007 – 2013 to determine if early esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (24 hours) for upper gastrointestinal bleeding improved the outcomes in terms of mortality, length of stay and costs. Patients and methods Patients were classified as having upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage by querying all diagnostic codes for the ICD-9-CM codes corresponding to upper gastrointestinal bleeding. For these patients, performance of EGD during admission was determined by querying all procedural codes for the ICD-9-CM codes corresponding to EGD; early EGD was defined as having EGD performed within 24 hours of admission and late EGD was defined as having EGD performed after 24 hours of admission. Results A total of 1,789,532 subjects with UGIH were identified. Subjects who had an early EGD were less likely to have hypovolemia, acute renal failure and acute respiratory failure. On multivariable analysis, we found that subjects without EGD were 3 times more likely to die during the admission than those with early EGD. In addition, those with late EGD had 50 % higher odds of dying than those with an early EGD. Also, after adjusting for all factors in the model, hospital stay was on average 3 and 3.7 days longer for subjects with no or late EGD, respectively, then for subjects with early EGD. Conclusion Early EGD (within 24 hours) is associated with lower in-hospital mortality, morbidity, shorter length of stay and lower total hospital costs. PMID:28512647

  4. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm 3 of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10–50 Gy [V 10–50 ]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4–37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V 50 of ≥16 cm 3 of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V 50 3 of the stomach vs. those with V 50 of ≥16 cm 3 was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V 50 of ≥33 cm 3 of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V 50 3 of the StoDuo vs. those with V 50 ≥33 cm 3 was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, for the treatment of pancreatic

  5. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko, E-mail: kei@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  6. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S; Medland, Julia E; Moeser, Adam J

    2015-12-15

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S.; Medland, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted. PMID:26451004

  8. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, Aaron W.; Fricano, Janine; Correa, David; Pelizzari, Charles A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose-volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), 65 Gy (V{sub 65}), and 40 Gy (V{sub 40}). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}10%, V{sub 65} {<=}20%, and V{sub 40} {<=}40%; 92% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}20%, V{sub 65} {<=}40%, and V{sub 40} {<=}80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose-volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints

  9. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose–Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, Aaron W.; Fricano, Janine; Correa, David; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose–volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V 70 ), 65 Gy (V 65 ), and 40 Gy (V 40 ). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V 70 ≤10%, V 65 ≤20%, and V 40 ≤40%; 92% for men with rectal V 70 ≤20%, V 65 ≤40%, and V 40 ≤80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged ≥70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints may help limit late GI morbidity.

  10. Predictors of Early Rebleeding after Endoscopic Therapy in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to High-Risk Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Maggio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In an era of increasingly shortened admissions, data regarding predictors of early rebleeding among patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB exhibiting high-risk stigmata (HRS having undergone endoscopic hemostasis are lacking.

  11. Adjuvant chemotherapy and risk of gastrointestinal, hematologic, and cardiac toxicities in elderly patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chung-Yuan; Chan, Wenyaw; Delclos, George P; Du, Xianglin L

    2012-06-01

    Randomized trials have established the effectiveness of 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III resectable colon cancer but the toxicity has not been well established outside the trial setting. The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of various toxicity-related endpoints among the elderly patients. Patients diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in 1991 to 2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Chemotherapy use within 3 months after tumor resection was identified from submitted claims. We reported the 3-month cumulative incidence rate (CIR) for gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities. The risk of ischemic heart disease in relation to chemotherapy use and length was assessed using Cox regression models, stratified by age and comorbidity subgroups. Of the 12,099 patients, 63.9% (n=7740) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Common gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities among chemotherapy group include volume depletion disorder (CIR=9.1%), agranulocytosis (CIR=3.4%), diarrhea (CIR=2.4%), nausea and vomiting (CIR=2.3%). Chemotherapy use was significantly associated with the onset of these toxicities [hazard ratio (HR)=2.76; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=2.42-3.15]. The risk of ischemic heart disease was slightly associated with chemotherapy use (HR=1.08, 95% CI=0.96-1.22), but significant only among patients aged colon cancer. On account of the effects of these side effects on treatment discontinuation, rehospitalization, and overall health status, some close monitoring and preventive measures may be emphasized to maximize the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy.

  12. The role of surfactant protein D in chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leicht von Huth, Sebastian; Rathe, Mathias; Sørensen, Grith Lykke

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a host defense molecule produced by epithelial cells. SP-D is known for its role in pulmonary innate immunology, but is present in mucosa throughout the body. SP-D has been shown to be regulated in the gastrointestinal (GI-) mucosa of chemotherapy-treated piglets...

  13. The impact of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity on health related quality of life among irradiated prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaake, Wouter; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Groot, Martijn de; Laan, Hans Paul van der; Schans, Cees P. van der; Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of late radiation-induced toxicity on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with prostate cancer. Patients and methods: The study sample was composed of 227 patients, treated with external beam radiotherapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 were used to grade late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of life Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) was used to assess HRQoL at baseline, and 6, 12 and 24 months after completion of radiotherapy. Statistical analysis was performed using a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Results: Urinary incontinence and rectal discomfort significantly affected HRQoL. The impact of urinary incontinence on HRQoL was most pronounced 6 months after radiotherapy and gradually decreased over time. The impact of rectal discomfort on HRQoL was predominant at 6 months after radiotherapy, decreased at 12 months and increased again 2 years after radiotherapy. No significant impact on HRQoL was observed for any of the other toxicity endpoints, or non-toxicity related factors such as hormonal therapy, radiotherapy technique or age. Conclusion: Urinary incontinence and rectal discomfort have a significant impact on HRQoL. Prevention of these side effects may likely improve quality of life of prostate cancer patients after completion of treatment

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Reduces Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Patients Treated With Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Navesh K.; Li Tianyu; Chen, David Y.; Pollack, Alan; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy (AD) has been shown to increase late Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity when used concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicity by limiting the radiation dose received by the bowel and bladder. The present study compared the genitourinary and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in men treated with 3D-CRT+AD vs. IMRT+AD. Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and July 2004, 293 men underwent 3D-CRT (n = 170) or IMRT (n = 123) with concurrent AD (<6 months, n = 123; ≥6 months, n = 170). The median radiation dose was 76 Gy for 3D-CRT (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements) and 76 Gy for IMRT (95% to the planning target volume). Toxicity was assessed by a patient symptom questionnaire that was completed at each visit and recorded using a Fox Chase Modified Late Effects Normal Tissue Task radiation morbidity scale. Results: The mean follow-up was 86 months (standard deviation, 29.3) for the 3D-CRT group and 40 months (standard deviation, 9.7) for the IMRT group. Acute GI toxicity (odds ratio, 4; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-11.7; p = .005) was significantly greater with 3D-CRT than with IMRT and was independent of the AD duration (i.e., <6 vs. ≥6 months). The interval to the development of late GI toxicity was significantly longer in the IMRT group. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate for Grade 2 or greater GI toxicity was 20% for 3D-CRT and 8% for IMRT (p = .01). On multivariate analysis, Grade 2 or greater late GI toxicity (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.3; p = .04) was more prevalent in the 3D-CRT patients. Conclusion: Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT significantly decreased the acute and late GI toxicity in patients treated with AD.

  15. Multivariate normal tissue complication probability modeling of gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cella, Laura; D’Avino, Vittoria; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Conson, Manuel; Doria, Francesca; Faiella, Adriana; Loffredo, Filomena; Salvatore, Marco; Pacelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The risk of radio-induced gastrointestinal (GI) complications is affected by several factors other than the dose to the rectum such as patient characteristics, hormonal or antihypertensive therapy, and acute rectal toxicity. Purpose of this work is to study clinical and dosimetric parameters impacting on late GI toxicity after prostate external beam radiotherapy (RT) and to establish multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced GI complications. A total of 57 men who had undergone definitive RT for prostate cancer were evaluated for GI events classified using the RTOG/EORTC scoring system. Their median age was 73 years (range 53–85). The patients were assessed for GI toxicity before, during, and periodically after RT completion. Several clinical variables along with rectum dose-volume parameters (Vx) were collected and their correlation to GI toxicity was analyzed by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (Rs). Multivariate logistic regression method using resampling techniques was applied to select model order and parameters for NTCP modeling. Model performance was evaluated through the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). At a median follow-up of 30 months, 37% (21/57) patients developed G1-2 acute GI events while 33% (19/57) were diagnosed with G1-2 late GI events. An NTCP model for late mild/moderate GI toxicity based on three variables including V65 (OR = 1.03), antihypertensive and/or anticoagulant (AH/AC) drugs (OR = 0.24), and acute GI toxicity (OR = 4.3) was selected as the most predictive model (Rs = 0.47, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.79). This three-variable model outperforms the logistic model based on V65 only (Rs = 0.28, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.69). We propose a logistic NTCP model for late GI toxicity considering not only rectal irradiation dose but also clinical patient-specific factors. Accordingly, the risk of G1-2 late GI increases as V65 increases, it is higher for patients experiencing

  16. Early hospital readmission for gastrointestinal-related complications predicts long-term mortality after pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Craig-Schapiro, Rebecca; Valero, Vicente; Cameron, John L; Eckhauser, Frederic E; Hirose, Kenzo; Makary, Martin A; Pawlik, Timothy M; Ahuja, Nita; Weiss, Matthew J; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of early (30-day) hospital readmission (EHR) on mortality after pancreatectomy. Using a prospectively collected institutional database linked with a statewide dataset, we evaluated the association between EHR and overall mortality in all patients undergoing pancreatectomy at our tertiary institution (2005 to 2010). Of 595 pancreatectomy patients, EHR occurred in 21.5%. Overall mortality was 29.4% (median follow-up 22.7 months). Patients with EHR had decreased survival compared with those who were not readmitted (P = .011). On multivariate analysis adjusting for baseline group differences, EHR for gastrointestinal-related complications was a significant independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 2.30, P = .001). In addition to known risk factors, 30-day readmission for gastrointestinal-related complications following pancreatectomy independently predicts increased mortality. Additional studies are necessary to identify surgical, medical, and social factors contributing to EHR, as well as interventions aimed at decreasing postpancreatectomy morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy of free and nanoencapsulated Eucalyptus citriodora essential oils on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes and toxicity for mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, J C; Ribeiro, W L C; Camurça-Vasconcelos, A L F; Macedo, I T F; Santos, J M L; Paula, H C B; Araújo Filho, J V; Magalhães, R D; Bevilaqua, C M L

    2014-08-29

    Herbal medicines with anthelmintic effects are alternatives for the sustainable control and prevention of disease caused by gastrointestinal parasites. The nanoencapsulation of essential oils has been proposed to enhance the absorption of their constituents and improve their efficacy. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of free and nanoencapsulated Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil (EcEO) on the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants in vitro and in vivo. Chitosan was used as a matrix for the formulation of a nanoemulsion. Chromatographic and physico-chemical analyses of EcEO were performed. Egg hatch (EHT) and larval development (LDT) tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of nanoencapsulated and free EcEO on the eggs and larvae of Haemonchus contortus. Acute toxicity of free and nanoencapsulated EcEO was evaluated using mice. Finally, nanoencapsulated EcEO efficacy on the control of gastrointestinal nematodes was calculated by fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) treating 30 sheep naturally infected with 250 mg/kg of free and nanoencapsulated EcEO. In vitro tests were analyzed by an analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by comparison with the Tukey test. The efficacy of FECRT was calculated by the BootStreet program through arithmetic average, using the formula 100 (1-XT/XC). To compare the differences between epg, the data were transformed to log(x+1) and subjected to an ANOVA to compare the significant differences between groups by Tukey's. The level of significance was P<0.05. The free (4 mg/ml concentration) and nanoencapsulated (2mg/ml concentration) EcEO inhibited larvae hatching by 97.2% and 92.8%, respectively. Free and nanoencapsulated EcEO at 8 mg/ml inhibited larval development by 99.8% and 98.1%, respectively. In the acute toxicity test, the LD10 and LD50 of free EcEO was 1999 and 2653 mg/kg, respectively, while the LD10 and LD50 of nanoencapsulated EcEO was 1121 and 1681 mg/kg, respectively

  18. Early Oral Feeding After Surgery for Upper Gastrointestinal Malignancies: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Shoar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Poor nutritional status following abdominal surgeries for esophageal and gastric cancers remains a major challenge in postoperative care. Our study aimed to investigate the efficacy of starting early oral feeding (EOF in patients undergoing surgical resection of upper gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods: A total of 180 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of esophageal or gastric malignancies undergoing elective surgical resection between January 2008 and February 2011 were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Seventy-two patients were assigned to the EOF group, and 108 patients received late oral feeding (LOF. Postoperative endpoints were compared between the two groups. Results: Nasogastric tubes were removed from patients on average 3.3±1.6 days after the surgery in the EOF group and 5.2±2.5 days in the LOF group (p 0.050. Conclusions: EOF is safe following esophageal and gastric cancer surgery and results in faster recovery and hospital discharge.

  19. The Detection of Patients at Risk of Gastrointestinal Toxicity during Pelvic Radiotherapy by Electronic Nose and FAIMS: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, James A.; Wedlake, Linda; Andreyev, Jervoise; Ouaret, Nathalie; Thomas, Matthew G.; Nwokolo, Chuka U.; Bardhan, Karna D.; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the electronic nose can be used to identify differences between human health and disease for a range of disorders. We present a pilot study to investigate if the electronic nose and a newer technology, FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry), can be used to identify and help inform the treatment pathway for patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy, which frequently causes gastrointestinal side-effects, severe in some. From a larger group, 23 radiotherapy patients were selected where half had the highest levels of toxicity and the others the lowest. Stool samples were obtained before and four weeks after radiotherapy and the volatiles and gases emitted analysed by both methods; these chemicals are products of fermentation caused by gut microflora. Principal component analysis of the electronic nose data and wavelet transform followed by Fisher discriminant analysis of FAIMS data indicated that it was possible to separate patients after treatment by their toxicity levels. More interestingly, differences were also identified in their pre-treatment samples. We believe these patterns arise from differences in gut microflora where some combinations of bacteria result to give this olfactory signature. In the future our approach may result in a technique that will help identify patients at “high risk” even before radiation treatment is started. PMID:23201982

  20. The Detection of Patients at Risk of Gastrointestinal Toxicity during Pelvic Radiotherapy by Electronic Nose and FAIMS: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh P. Arasaradnam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the electronic nose can be used to identify differences between human health and disease for a range of disorders. We present a pilot study to investigate if the electronic nose and a newer technology, FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry, can be used to identify and help inform the treatment pathway for patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy, which frequently causes gastrointestinal side-effects, severe in some. From a larger group, 23 radiotherapy patients were selected where half had the highest levels of toxicity and the others the lowest. Stool samples were obtained before and four weeks after radiotherapy and the volatiles and gases emitted analysed by both methods; these chemicals are products of fermentation caused by gut microflora. Principal component analysis of the electronic nose data and wavelet transform followed by Fisher discriminant analysis of FAIMS data indicated that it was possible to separate patients after treatment by their toxicity levels. More interestingly, differences were also identified in their pre-treatment samples. We believe these patterns arise from differences in gut microflora where some combinations of bacteria result to give this olfactory signature. In the future our approach may result in a technique that will help identify patients at “high risk” even before radiation treatment is started.

  1. Body Composition as a Predictor of Toxicity in Patients Receiving Anthracycline and Taxane Based Chemotherapy for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar, Shlomit Strulov; Deal, Allison M.; Weinberg, Marc; Williams, Grant R.; Nyrop, Kirsten A.; Popuri, Karteek; Choi, Seul Ki; Muss, Hyman B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Poor body composition metrics (BCM) are associated with inferior cancer outcomes; however, in early breast cancer (EBC) there is a paucity of evidence regarding BCM’s impact on toxicities. This study investigates associations between BCM and treatment-related toxicity in EBC patients receiving anthracyclines-taxane based chemotherapy. Experimental Design Pretreatment computerized tomography (CT) images were evaluated for skeletal muscle area (SMA), density (SMD), and fat tissue at the 3rd lumbar vertebrae. Skeletal muscle index (SMI) (SMA/height2) and skeletal muscle gauge (SMG=SMI x SMD) were also calculated. Relative risks (RR) are reported for associations between body composition measures and toxicity outcomes, after adjustment for age and body surface area (BSA). Results BCM were calculated for 151 patients with EBC (median age 49, range 23 to 75). Fifty patients (33%) developed grade 3 or 4 toxicity, which was significantly higher in those with low SMI (RR=1.29, p=0.002), low SMG (RR=1.09, p=0.01), and low LBM (RR=1.48, p=.002). ROC analysis showed the SMG measure to be the best predictor of grade 3 and 4 toxicity. Dividing SMG into tertiles showed toxicity rates of 46%, and 22% for lowest versus highest tertile, respectively (p=0.005). After adjusting for age and BSA, low SMG (<1475 units) was significantly associated with hematological (RR=2.12, p=0.02), gastrointestinal grade 3–4 toxicities (RR=6.49, p=0.02), and hospitalizations (RR=1.91, p=0.05). Conclusions Poor BCM are significantly associated with increased treatment-related toxicities. Further studies are needed to investigate how these metrics can be used to more precisely dose chemotherapy to reduce treatment related toxicity while maintaining efficacy. PMID:28143874

  2. Development of a Set of Nomograms to Predict Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Toxicity for Prostate Cancer 3D-CRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Rancati, Tiziana; Fiorino, Claudio; Fellin, Gianni; Magli, Alessandro; Baccolini, Michela; Bianchi, Carla; Cagna, Emanuela; Greco, Carlo; Mauro, Flora A.; Monti, Angelo F.; Munoz, Fernando; Stasi, Michele; Franzone, Paola; Vavassori, Vittorio

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To predict acute Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and Subjective Objective Signs Management and Analysis/Late Effect of Normal Tissue (SOMA/LENT) toxicities of the lower gastrointestinal (LGI) syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using a tool (nomogram) that takes into account clinical and dosimetric variables that proved to be significant in the Italian Association for Radiation Oncology (AIRO) Group on Prostate Cancer (AIROPROS) 0102 trial. Methods and Materials: Acute rectal toxicity was scored in 1,132 patients by using both the RTOG/EORTC scoring system and a 10-item self-assessed questionnaire. Correlation between clinical variables/dose-volume histogram constraints and rectal toxicity was investigated by means of multivariate logistic analyses. Multivariate logistic analyses results were used to create nomograms predicting the symptoms of acute LGI syndrome. Results: Mean rectal dose was a strong predictor of Grade 2-3 RTOG/EORTC acute LGI toxicity (p 0.0004; odds ratio (OR) = 1.035), together with hemorrhoids (p = 0.02; OR 1.51), use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p = 0.02; OR = 0.63), and androgen deprivation (AD) (p = 0.04; OR = 0.65). Diabetes (p = 0.34; OR 1.28) and pelvic node irradiation (p = 0.11; OR = 1.56) were significant variables to adjust toxicity prediction. Bleeding was related to hemorrhoids (p = 0.02; OR = 173), AD (p = 0.17; OR = 0.67), and mean rectal dose (p 0.009; OR = 1.024). Stool frequency was related to seminal vesicle irradiation (p = 0.07; OR = 6.46), AD administered for more than 3 months (p = 0.002; OR = 0.32), and the percent volume of rectum receiving more than 60 Gy (V60Gy) V60 (p = 0.02; OR = 1.02). Severe fecal incontinence depended on seminal vesicle irradiation (p = 0.14; OR = 4.5) and V70 (p = 0.033; OR 1.029). Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this work presents the

  3. Dose and volume effects of gastrointestinal toxicity during neoadjuvant IMRT for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Vogelius, I. R.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    . Materials and Methods: We explored dose metrics correlating with acute diarrhea and chemotherapy compliance for a single-institution cohort of rectal cancer patients (n=115) treated with IMRT. Acute diarrhea during treatment was scored prospectively by trained RT nurses (CTCAE v3.0). The highest toxicity.......03) and patients with diabetes (OR=7.29, 1.21-43.8, p=0.03). Age, brachytherapy boost, prior abdominal surgery, smoking history, or domestic status had no influence on any of the two endpoints, nor had concurrent chemotherapy on the risk of acute diarrhea. Conclusions: We found that dose to the intestinal cavity...

  4. Early hematologic changes during prostate cancer radiotherapy predictive for late urinary and bowel toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Djukic, Victoria; Klotz, Jens; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Ribbing, Carolina [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The primary objective of the study was to identify early hematologic changes predictive for radiotherapy (RT)-associated genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. In a group of 91 prostate cancer patients presenting for primary (n = 51) or postoperative (n = 40) curative RT, blood samples (blood count, acute phase proteins, and cytokines) were analyzed before (T1), three times during (T2-T4), and 6-8 weeks after (T5) radiotherapy. Before RT (baseline), on the last day (acute toxicity), a median of 2 months and 16 months (late toxicity) after RT, patients responded to a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Acute score changes > 20 points and late changes > 10 points were considered clinically relevant. Radiotherapy resulted in significant changes of hematologic parameters, with the largest effect on lymphocytes (mean decrease of 31-45 %) and significant dependence on target volume. C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation > 5 mg/l and hemoglobin level decrease ≥ 5 G/1 at T2 were found to be independently predictive for acute urinary toxicity (p < 0.01, respectively). CRP elevation was predominantly detected in primary prostate RT (p = 0.02). Early lymphocyte level elevation ≥ 0.3G/l at T2 was protective against late urinary and bowel toxicity (p = 0.02, respectively). Other significant predictive factors for late bowel toxicity were decreasing hemoglobin levels (cut-off ≥ 5 G/l) at T2 (p = 0.04); changes of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor; p = 0.03) and ferritin levels (p = 0.02) at T5. All patients with late bowel toxicity had interleukin (IL)-6 levels < 1.5 ng/l at T2 (63 % without; p = 0.01). Early hematologic changes during prostate cancer radiotherapy are predictive for late urinary and bowel toxicity. (orig.) [German] Das primaere Ziel der Studie war die Identifikation von fruehen haematologischen Veraenderungen mit praediktiver Bedeutung fuer radiotherapieassoziierte genitourinale und gastrointestinale Toxizitaet. In einer

  5. Promoter methylation and large intragenic rearrangements of DPYD are not implicated in severe toxicity to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in gastrointestinal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savva-Bordalo, Joana; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Ramalho-Carvalho, João; Pinheiro, Manuela; Costa, Vera L; Rodrigues, Ângelo; Dias, Paula C; Veiga, Isabel; Machado, Manuela; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2010-01-01

    Severe toxicity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based chemotherapy in gastrointestinal cancer has been associated with constitutional genetic alterations of the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD). In this study, we evaluated DPYD promoter methylation through quantitative methylation-specific PCR and screened DPYD for large intragenic rearrangements in peripheral blood from 45 patients with gastrointestinal cancers who developed severe 5-FU toxicity. DPYD promoter methylation was also assessed in tumor tissue from 29 patients Two cases with the IVS14+1G > A exon 14 skipping mutation (c.1905+1G > A), and one case carrying the 1845 G > T missense mutation (c.1845G > T) in the DPYD gene were identified. However, DPYD promoter methylation and large DPYD intragenic rearrangements were absent in all cases analyzed. Our results indicate that DPYD promoter methylation and large intragenic rearrangements do not contribute significantly to the development of 5-FU severe toxicity in gastrointestinal cancer patients, supporting the need for additional studies on the mechanisms underlying genetic susceptibility to severe 5-FU toxicity

  6. Promoter methylation and large intragenic rearrangements of DPYD are not implicated in severe toxicity to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in gastrointestinal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savva-Bordalo Joana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe toxicity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU based chemotherapy in gastrointestinal cancer has been associated with constitutional genetic alterations of the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD. Methods In this study, we evaluated DPYD promoter methylation through quantitative methylation-specific PCR and screened DPYD for large intragenic rearrangements in peripheral blood from 45 patients with gastrointestinal cancers who developed severe 5-FU toxicity. DPYD promoter methylation was also assessed in tumor tissue from 29 patients Results Two cases with the IVS14+1G > A exon 14 skipping mutation (c.1905+1G > A, and one case carrying the 1845 G > T missense mutation (c.1845G > T in the DPYD gene were identified. However, DPYD promoter methylation and large DPYD intragenic rearrangements were absent in all cases analyzed. Conclusions Our results indicate that DPYD promoter methylation and large intragenic rearrangements do not contribute significantly to the development of 5-FU severe toxicity in gastrointestinal cancer patients, supporting the need for additional studies on the mechanisms underlying genetic susceptibility to severe 5-FU toxicity.

  7. Early postoperative enteral nutrition is useful for recovering gastrointestinal motility and maintaining the nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Naruo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakayoshi, Tomoko; Hanyu, Nobuyoshi; Nakao, Masatoshi; Takeda, Akihiro; Furukawa, Yoshiyuki; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of enteral nutrition in postoperative nutritional management is known, but the effects on gastrointestinal motility and nutrition have not yet been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of enteral and parenteral nutrition soon after open abdominal surgery on gastrointestinal motility and nutritional status. A partial resection of rectum models was prepared to compare two types of nutrient administration: enteral nutrition and total parenteral nutrition. The differences between the effects of nutrition types in terms of gastrointestinal motility and nutritional status were investigated. Enteral nutrition contributed to recovery of gastrointestinal motility and maintenance of nutritional status. Enteral nutrition should therefore be initiated soon after surgery if the gastrointestinal tract is available.

  8. Acute lymphoid and gastrointestinal toxicity induced by selective p38alpha map kinase and map kinase-activated protein kinase-2 (MK2) inhibitors in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Dale L; O'Neil, Shawn P; Devraj, Rajesh V; Portanova, Joseph P; Gilles, Richard W; Gross, Cindy J; Curtiss, Sandra W; Komocsar, Wendy J; Garner, Debra S; Happa, Fernando A; Kraus, Lori J; Nikula, Kristen J; Monahan, Joseph B; Selness, Shaun R; Galluppi, Gerald R; Shevlin, Kimberly M; Kramer, Jeffrey A; Walker, John K; Messing, Dean M; Anderson, David R; Mourey, Robert J; Whiteley, Laurence O; Daniels, John S; Yang, Jerry Z; Rowlands, Philip C; Alden, Carl L; Davis, John W; Sagartz, John E

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to moderately selective p38alpha mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors in the Beagle dog results in an acute toxicity consisting of mild clinical signs (decreased activity, diarrhea, and fever), lymphoid necrosis and depletion in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen, and linear colonic and cecal mucosal hemorrhages. Lymphocyte apoptosis and necrosis in the GALT is the earliest and most prominent histopathologic change observed, followed temporally by neutrophilic infiltration and acute inflammation of the lymph nodes and spleen and multifocal mucosal epithelial necrosis and linear hemorrhages in the colon and cecum. These effects are not observed in the mouse, rat, or cynomolgus monkey. To further characterize the acute toxicity in the dog, a series of in vivo, in vitro, and immunohistochemical studies were conducted to determine the relationship between the lymphoid and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and p38 MAPK inhibition. Results of these studies demonstrate a direct correlation between p38alpha MAPK inhibition and the acute lymphoid and gastrointestinal toxicity in the dog. Similar effects were observed following exposure to inhibitors of MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 (MK2), further implicating the role of p38alpha MAPK signaling pathway inhibition in these effects. Based on these findings, the authors conclude that p38alpha MAPK inhibition results in acute lymphoid and GI toxicity in the dog and is unique among the species evaluated in these studies.

  9. Duodenal and Other Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer Treated With Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Paraaortic Lymph Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poorvu, Philip D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sadow, Cheryl A. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Townamchai, Kanokpis; Damato, Antonio L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the rates of acute and late duodenal and other gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities among patients treated for cervical and endometrial cancers with extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) to the paraaortic nodes and to analyze dose-volume relationships of GI toxicities. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent EF-IMRT to the paraaortic nodes, of whom 46 met the inclusion criteria for GI toxicity and 45 for duodenal toxicity analysis. The median prescribed dose to the paraaortic nodes was 54 Gy (range, 41.4-65 Gy). The 4 duodenal segments, whole duodenum, small bowel loops, peritoneum, and peritoneum plus retroperitoneal segments of colon were contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric analysis was performed to identify dose-volume relationships to grade ≥3 acute (<90 day) and late (≥90 day) GI toxicity. Results: Only 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced acute grade ≥3 GI toxicity and 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced late grade ≥3 GI toxicity. The median dose administered to these 6 patients was 50.4 Gy. One of 12 patients who received 63 to 65 Gy at the level of the renal hilum experienced grade 3 GI toxicity. Dosimetric analysis of patients with and without toxicity revealed no differences between the mean absolute or fractional volumes at any 5-Gy interval between 5 Gy and the maximum dose. None of the patients experienced duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment of paraaortic nodes with IMRT is associated with low rates of GI toxicities and no duodenal-specific toxicity, including patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. This technique may allow sufficient dose sparing of the bowel to enable safe dose escalation to at least 65 Gy.

  10. Duodenal and Other Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer Treated With Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Paraaortic Lymph Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poorvu, Philip D.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Townamchai, Kanokpis; Damato, Antonio L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the rates of acute and late duodenal and other gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities among patients treated for cervical and endometrial cancers with extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) to the paraaortic nodes and to analyze dose-volume relationships of GI toxicities. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent EF-IMRT to the paraaortic nodes, of whom 46 met the inclusion criteria for GI toxicity and 45 for duodenal toxicity analysis. The median prescribed dose to the paraaortic nodes was 54 Gy (range, 41.4-65 Gy). The 4 duodenal segments, whole duodenum, small bowel loops, peritoneum, and peritoneum plus retroperitoneal segments of colon were contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric analysis was performed to identify dose-volume relationships to grade ≥3 acute (<90 day) and late (≥90 day) GI toxicity. Results: Only 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced acute grade ≥3 GI toxicity and 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced late grade ≥3 GI toxicity. The median dose administered to these 6 patients was 50.4 Gy. One of 12 patients who received 63 to 65 Gy at the level of the renal hilum experienced grade 3 GI toxicity. Dosimetric analysis of patients with and without toxicity revealed no differences between the mean absolute or fractional volumes at any 5-Gy interval between 5 Gy and the maximum dose. None of the patients experienced duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment of paraaortic nodes with IMRT is associated with low rates of GI toxicities and no duodenal-specific toxicity, including patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. This technique may allow sufficient dose sparing of the bowel to enable safe dose escalation to at least 65 Gy

  11. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, Curtiland; Both, Stefan; Bui, Viet; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Tan, Kay-See; Schaer, Mattia; Tochner, Zelig; Vapiwala, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERB H2O ), and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERB H2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Mean age was 68 (range 51–88). Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV) rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps < 0.05). Maximum acute GU toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 for 17%, 41%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Infield bladder V20 (P = 0.03) and pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Scale (IPSS) (P = 0.003) were associated with grade 2 GU toxicity. Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERB H2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities

  12. Early life factors initiate a 'vicious circle' of affective and gastrointestinal symptoms: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael P; Oudenhove, Lukas Van; Koloski, Natasha; Tack, Jan; Talley, Nicholas J

    2013-10-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) have been shown to be associated with both comorbid mood disorders and traumatic events such as abuse earlier in life. In a longitudinal study, we tested a model that hypothesized: (i) childhood abuse was associated with subsequent mood disorder and pain or interference in life by bowel symptoms both directly and indirectly via neurotic personality; and (ii) an ongoing cycle of mood disorder impacts on bowel symptoms. Subjects from the general population classified as irritable bowel syndrome and/or functional dyspepsia (IBS/FD, n = 207) or free of FGID (n = 100) were prospectively studied every 6 months over 18 months. In addition to bowel symptom interference and abdominal pain, measures of personality (neuroticism), childhood abuse history, depression, and anxiety were obtained. The hypothesized model was tested via Path Modelling. Childhood abuse was found to be directly associated with neuroticism but only indirectly associated with baseline interference and mood disorders (via neuroticism). The data further supported an ongoing cycle of elevations in mood disorders and pain/interference by bowel symptoms. The data supported direct effects of interference at one time point on interference at the subsequent time point in addition to indirect effects of prior anxiety and depression. Repeating the model with pain frequency as the outcome yielded almost identical findings which suggests the findings are generalized across domains of symptoms and quality-of-life. Our data provide support for a model characterized by a 'vicious circle' between mood disorders and FGID symptoms in adulthood, with initial input from early life factors.

  13. Meal parameters and vagal gastrointestinal afferents in mice that experienced early postnatal overnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddinger, Jessica E; Fox, Edward A

    2010-08-04

    Early postnatal overnutrition results in a predisposition to develop obesity due in part to hypothalamic and sympathetic dysfunction. Potential involvement of another major regulatory system component--the vagus nerve--has not been examined. Moreover, feeding disturbances have rarely been investigated prior to development of obesity when confounds due to obesity are minimized. To examine these issues, litters were culled on the day of birth to create small litters (SL; overnutrition), or normal size litters (NL; normal nutrition). Body weight, fat pad weight, meal patterns, and vagal sensory duodenal innervation were compared between SL and NL adult mice prior to development of obesity. Meal patterns were studied 18 h/day for 3 weeks using a balanced diet. Then vagal mechanoreceptors were labeled using anterograde transport of wheatgerm agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase injected into the nodose ganglion and their density and morphology were examined. Between postnatal day 1 and weaning, body weight of SL mice was greater than for NL mice. By young adulthood it was similar in both groups, whereas SL fat pad weight was greater in males, suggesting postnatal overnutrition produced a predisposition to obesity. SL mice exhibited increased food intake, decreased satiety ratio, and increased first meal rate (following mild food deprivation) compared to NL mice, suggesting postnatal overnutrition disrupted satiety. The density and structure of intestinal IGLEs appeared similar in SL and NL mice. Thus, although a vagal role cannot be excluded, our meal parameter and anatomical findings provided no evidence for significant postnatal overnutrition effects on vagal gastrointestinal afferents. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of a XRCC3 polymorphism and rectum mean dose with the risk of acute radio-induced gastrointestinal toxicity in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fachal, Laura; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Peleteiro, Paula; Carballo, Ana; Calvo-Crespo, Patricia; Sánchez-García, Manuel; Lobato-Busto, Ramón; Carracedo, Ángel; Vega, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: We have performed a case–control study among prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformational radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in order to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), treatment and patient features with gastrointestinal and genitourinary acute toxicity. Material and methods: A total of 698 patients were screened for 14 SNPs located in the ATM, ERCC2, LIG4, MLH1 and XRCC3 genes. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were recorded prospectively using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: The XRCC3 SNP rs1799794 (G/G OR = 5.65; 95% CI: 1.95–16.38; G/A OR = 2.75; 95% CI: 1.25–6.05; uncorrected p-value = 2.8 × 10 −03 ; corrected p-value = 0.03; FDR q-value = 0.06) as well as the mean dose received by the rectum (OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.02–1.1; uncorrected p-value = 2.49 × 10 −03 ; corrected p-value = 0.03; FDR q-value = 0.06) were significantly associated with gastrointestinal toxicity after correction for multiple testing. Those patients who undergone previous prostatectomy were less prone to develop genitourinary toxicity (OR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.18–0.71; uncorrected p-value = 4.95 × 10 −03 ; corrected p-value = 0.03; FDR q-value = 0.08). Our study excludes the possibility of a >2-fold risk increase in genitourinary acute toxicity being due to rs1801516 ATM SNP, the rs1805386 and rs1805388 LIG4 markers, as well as all the SNPs evaluated in the ERCC2, MLH1 and XRCC3 genes. Conclusions: The XRCC3 rs1799794 SNP and the mean dose received by the rectum are associated with the development of gastrointestinal toxicity after 3D-CRT.

  15. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis of Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Undergoing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Daniel R.; Song, William Y.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Rose, Brent S.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased bowel radiation dose is associated with acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using a previously derived normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Methods: Fifty patients with Stage I–III cervical cancer undergoing IMRT and concurrent weekly cisplatin were analyzed. Acute GI toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, excluding upper GI events. A logistic model was used to test correlations between acute GI toxicity and bowel dosimetric parameters. The primary objective was to test the association between Grade ≥2 GI toxicity and the volume of bowel receiving ≥45 Gy (V 45 ) using the logistic model. Results: Twenty-three patients (46%) had Grade ≥2 GI toxicity. The mean (SD) V 45 was 143 mL (99). The mean V 45 values for patients with and without Grade ≥2 GI toxicity were 176 vs. 115 mL, respectively. Twenty patients (40%) had V 45 >150 mL. The proportion of patients with Grade ≥2 GI toxicity with and without V 45 >150 mL was 65% vs. 33% (p = 0.03). Logistic model parameter estimates V50 and γ were 161 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 60–399) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04–0.63), respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increased V 45 was associated with an increased odds of Grade ≥2 GI toxicity (odds ratio 2.19 per 100 mL, 95% CI 1.04–4.63, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that increasing bowel V 45 is correlated with increased GI toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing IMRT and concurrent cisplatin. Reducing bowel V 45 could reduce the risk of Grade ≥2 GI toxicity by approximately 50% per 100 mL of bowel spared.

  16. A modified inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire and the Vaizey Incontinence questionnaire are more sensitive measures of acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy than RTOG grading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Usman; McGough, Camilla; Hackett, Claire; Blake, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Tait, Diana; Norman, Andrew R.; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Simple scales with greater sensitivity than Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading to detect acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy, could be clinically useful. Methods and Materials: Do questionnaires used in benign gastrointestinal diseases detect toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy? The patient-completed Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBDQ) and Vaizey Incontinence questionnaires were compared prospectively at baseline and at Week 5 to physician-completed RTOG grading. Results: A total of 107 patients, median age 63 years, were recruited. After 5 weeks of treatment, patients with gynecologic and gastrointestinal cancer were more symptomatic than urologic patients (p 0.012; p = 0.014). Overall, 94% had altered bowel habits, 80% loose stool, 74% frequency, 65% difficult gas, 60% pain, >48% distress, 44% tenesmus, >40% restrictions in daily activity, 39% urgency, 37% fecal incontinence, and 40% required antidiarrheal medication. The median RTOG score was 1 (range, 0-2), median IBDQ score 204.5 (range, 74-224), and median Vaizey score 5 (range, 0-20). Chemotherapy preceding radiotherapy increased fecal incontinence (p 0.002). RTOG scores stabilized after 3 weeks, IBDQ scores peaked at Week 4, and Vaizey scores worsened throughout treatment. IBDQ and Vaizey scores distinguished between groups with different RTOG scores. Conclusion: The IBDQ and Vaizey questionnaires are reliable and sensitive, offering greater insight into the severity and range of symptoms compared with RTOG grading

  17. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deville Curtiland

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERBH2O, and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. Methods The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERBH2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0 were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Results Mean age was 68 (range 51–88. Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps  Conclusion Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERBH2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities.

  18. Effect of chromium toxicity on germination and early seedling growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... germination and early seedling growth of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Chromium ... chromium on seed germination and seedling growth- biomass in early ..... such critical regulatory mechanisms are likely to operate in seeds at ...

  19. Cytotoxicity and Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity of Bacterial Cellulose-Poly (acrylamide-sodium acrylate Hydrogel: A Carrier for Oral Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Pandey 1,2 * , Hira Choudhury 1, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin 2

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preliminary safety evaluation of polymer intended to use as drug delivery carrier is essential. Methods: In this study polyacrylamide grafted bacterial cellulose (BC/AM hydrogel was prepared by microwave irradiation initiated free radical polymerization. The synthesized hydrogel was subjected to in vitro cytotoxicity and acute gastrointestinal toxicity studies to evaluate its biological safety as potential oral drug delivery carrier. Results: The results indicate that hydrogel was non cytotoxic and did not show any histopathological changes in GI tract after a high dose of oral administration. Conclusion: The results revealed that hydrogel composed of bacterial cellulose and polyacrylamide is safe as oral drug delivery carrier.

  20. Parenting Interventions in Early Head Start: The Buffering Toxic Stress Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Lisa; Blair, Clancy; Boyd, Misty L.; Constantino, John N.; Hallam, Rena A.; Han, Myae; Hustedt, Jason; Harden, Brenda Jones; Raver, C. Cybele; Sarche, Michelle; Vu, Jennifer A.; Watamura, Sarah Enos; Meyer, Aleta; Fortunato, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Buffering Toxic Stress Consortium was created by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families to test preventive interventions for Early Head Start families facing toxic stress, as conceptualized by Shonkoff, Boyce, and McEwen in their influential 2009 article. Because relationships…

  1. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [KVI Center for Advanced Radiation Research, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  2. Daily clinical practice and patterns of care in upper gastrointestinal cancer treatment : Toxicity, quality of life and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haj Mohammad, N.

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancers - esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancer - have a dismal prognosis. Despite treatment with curative intent, randomized clinical trials report 5-year survival rates of only 47% in esophageal cancer, 36 % in gastric cancer and 21% in pancreatic cancer. In

  3. A possible early sign of hydroxychloroquine macular toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandao, Livia M; Palmowski-Wolfe, Anja M

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) has a low risk of retinal toxicity which increases dramatically with a cumulative dose of >1000 g. Here we report a case of HCQ macular toxicity presentation in a young patient with a cumulative dose of 438 g. A 15-year-old female started attending annual consultations for retinal toxicity screening in our clinic after 3 years of HCQ treatment for juvenile idiopathic dermatomyositis. She had been diagnosed at age 12 and had been on hydroxychloroquine 200 mg/day, cyclosporin 150 mg/day and vitamin D3 since. Screening consultations included: complete ophthalmologic examination, automated perimetry (AP, M Standard, Octopus 101, Haag-Streit), multifocal electroretinogram (VERIS 6.06™, FMSIII), optical coherence tomography (OCT, fast macular protocol, Cirrus SD-OCT, Carl Zeiss), fundus autofluorescence imaging (Spectralis OCT, Heidelberg Engineering Inc.) and color testing (Farnsworth-Panel-D-15). After 5 years of treatment, AP demonstrated reduced sensibility in only one extra-foveal point in each eye (p < 0.2). Even though other exams showed no alteration and the cumulative dose was only around 353 g, consultations were increased to every 6 months. After 2-year follow-up, that is, 7 years of HCQ, a bilateral paracentral macula thinning was evident on OCT, suggestive of bull's eye maculopathy. However, the retinal pigmented epithelium appeared intact and AP was completely normal in both eyes. Further evaluation with ganglion cell analysis (GCA = ganglion cell + inner plexiform layer, Cirrus SD-OCT, Carl Zeiss) showed a concentric thinning of this layer in the same area. Although daily and cumulative doses were still under the high toxicity risk parameters, HCQ was suspended. At a follow-up 1 year later, visual acuity was 20/16 without any further changes in OCT or on any other exam. This may be the first case report of insidious bull's eye maculopathy exclusively identified using OCT thickness analysis, in a patient in whom both cumulative

  4. Using physiology and behaviour to understand the responses of fish early life stages to toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloman, K A; McNeil, P L

    2012-12-01

    The use of early life stages of fishes (embryos and larvae) in toxicity testing has been in existence for a long time, generally utilizing endpoints such as morphological defects and mortality. Behavioural endpoints, however, may represent a more insightful evaluation of the ecological effects of toxicants. Indeed, recent years have seen a considerable increase in the use of behavioural measurements in early life stages reflecting a substantial rise in zebrafish Danio rerio early life-stage toxicity testing and the development of automated behavioural monitoring systems. Current behavioural endpoints identified for early life stages in response to toxicant exposure include spontaneous activity, predator avoidance, capture of live food, shoaling ability and interaction with other individuals. Less frequently used endpoints include measurement of anxiogenic behaviours and cognitive ability, both of which are suggested here as future indicators of toxicant disruption. For many simple behavioural endpoints, there is still a need to link behavioural effects with ecological relevance; currently, only a limited number of studies have addressed this issue. Understanding the physiological mechanisms that underlie toxicant effects on behaviour so early in life has received far less attention, perhaps because physiological measurements can be difficult to carry out on individuals of this size. The most commonly established physiological links with behavioural disruption in early life stages are similar to those seen in juveniles and adults including sensory deprivation (olfaction, lateral line and vision), altered neurogenesis and neurotransmitter concentrations. This review highlights the importance of understanding the integrated behavioural and physiological response of early life stages to toxicants and identifies knowledge gaps which present exciting areas for future research. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. Social environment and weather during early life influence gastro-intestinal parasite loads in a group-living mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Heiko G; Starkloff, Anett

    2014-10-01

    Conditions experienced during early life have been frequently shown to exert long-term consequences on an animal's fitness. In mammals and birds, the time around and shortly after weaning is one of the crucial periods early in life. However, little is known about how social and abiotic environmental conditions experienced around this time affect fitness-related traits such as endoparasite loads. We studied consequences of social interactions and rainy weather conditions around and after weaning on gastro-intestinal nematode loads in juvenile European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus. Infestations with the gastric nematode Graphidium strigosum and with the intestinal nematode Passalurus ambiguus were higher in animals experiencing more rain during early life. This might have been due to the higher persistence of nematodes' infective stages outside the host body together with the animals' lower energy allocation for immune defence under more humid and thus energetically challenging conditions. In contrast, infestations with P. ambiguus were lower in animals with more positive social interactions with mother and litter siblings. We propose that social support provided by familiar group members buffered negative stress effects on immune function, lowering endoparasite infestations. This is supported by the negative correlation between positive social behaviour and serum corticosterone concentrations, indicating lower stress in juveniles which integrated more successfully into the social network of their group. In conclusion, the findings offer a pathway showing how differences in the abiotic environment and social life conditions experienced early in life could translate into long-term fitness consequences via the effects on endoparasite loads.

  6. The toxicity of vanadium on gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive system, and its influence on fertility and fetuses malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Wilk

    2017-09-01

    Additionally, this research identifies the doses of vanadium which lead to pathological alterations becoming visible within tissues. Moreover, this study includes information about the protective efficacy of some substances in view of the toxicity of vanadium.

  7. Home visiting and the biology of toxic stress: opportunities to address early childhood adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Andrew S

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting is an important mechanism for minimizing the lifelong effects of early childhood adversity. To do so, it must be informed by the biology of early brain and child development. Advances in neuroscience, epigenetics, and the physiology of stress are revealing the biological mechanisms underlying well-established associations between early childhood adversity and suboptimal life-course trajectories. Left unchecked, mediators of physiologic stress become toxic, alter both genome and brain, and lead to a vicious cycle of chronic stress. This so-called "toxic stress" results a wide array of behavioral attempts to blunt the stress response, a process known as "behavioral allostasis." Although behaviors like smoking, overeating, promiscuity, and substance abuse decrease stress transiently, over time they become maladaptive and result in the unhealthy lifestyles and noncommunicable diseases that are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The biology of toxic stress and the concept of behavioral allostasis shed new light on the developmental origins of lifelong disease and highlight opportunities for early intervention and prevention. Future efforts to minimize the effects of childhood adversity should focus on expanding the capacity of caregivers and communities to promote (1) the safe, stable, and nurturing relationships that buffer toxic stress, and (2) the rudimentary but foundational social-emotional, language, and cognitive skills needed to develop healthy, adaptive coping skills. Building these critical caregiver and community capacities will require a public health approach with unprecedented levels of collaboration and coordination between the healthcare, childcare, early education, early intervention, and home visiting sectors.

  8. Fractionated total body irradiation; the gastrointestinal toxicity versus the conditioning effect for bone marrow transplantation with different fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walma, E.P.; Klapwijk, W.M.; Miller, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    In most cases, bone marrow transplantation is preceded by a conditioning regimen employing irradiation and/or cytotoxic drugs. The authors are searching for better fractionation schedules in order to optimize the conditioning regimen prior to transplantation of stem-cell-enriched bone marrow. They have determined damage to the gastrointestinal tract in dogs and mice after total body irradiation in mice and dogs following a number of fractionation schedules, and these results are presented. The schedules were chosen such as to minimize the interval between irradiation and the bone marrow transplantation and to maximize clinical feasibility. (Auth./C.F.)

  9. Feed intake, gastrointestinal system and body composition in reindeer calves fed early harvested first cut timothy silage (Phleum pratense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri J. Norberg

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Early harvested first cut (EFC timothy silage was fed to five reindeer calves (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L. taken from their natural summer pasture and brought to Tromsø for feeding trial. The calves were housed indoors in metabolism cages and fed EFC timothy silage ad lib. during the trial, which lasted from late November 1994 until the end of February 1995, when animals subsequently were slaughtered. Daily feed intake, gastrointestinal (GI anatomy, body weight and body composition of the animals were examined. Timothy silage {Phleum praténse was harvested 21 June, 1994 in Tromsø, prewilted and stored as round bales containing 97% leaves. The EFC silage contained 42.1% dry matter (DM, and 18.1% crude protein, 20.7% cellulose, 16.9% hemicellulose and 28.0% water soluble carbohydrates (WSC of DM. Mean feed intake (DM 24 hours after the trial started (day 1 was 9-4 g/kg body mass (BM (S.D.+ 3-9, while the mean daily DM intake during days 15-74 comprised 24.2 g/kg BM (S.D.+ 6.1. All animals except one gained body weight during the trial. The median (range BM at start and at slaughter was 48.5 kg (34.5¬58.0 kg and 50.0 kg (42.0-53.5 kg, respectively. Median (range carcass weight % of BM was 58.0% (51.2-58.7% and muscle index value 0.0132 (0.0106-0.0176. The median reticulo-rumen (RR content wet weight (WW was 4601 g (range 2697-5000 g comprising 9.3% of the BM, and 85.1% of the total gastrointestinal wet weight content. The median (range gastrointestinal tract weight was 14.1% of BM (10.7-16.4%. Based on feed intake during the trial and body composition at slaughtet we conclude that first cut timothy silage is suitable as emergency feed to reindeer, as long as it is harvested in early growth stage with high proportion of leaves.

  10. Expression pattern of the homeotic gene Bapx1 during early chick gastrointestinal tract development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Sandrine; Georges, Maxime; McKey, Jennifer; Sagnol, Sébastien; de Santa Barbara, Pascal

    2013-12-01

    Regulation of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathway is essential for the normal development of vertebrate gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but also for the differentiation of the digestive mesenchymal layer into smooth muscles and submucosal layer. Different studies demonstrated that Bapx1 (for bagpipe homeobox homolog 1) negatively regulates the BMP pathway, but its precise expression pattern during the development and the differentiation of the GI tract mesenchyme actually remains to be examined. Here, we present the spatio-temporal expression profile of Bapx1 in the chick GI tract. We show that Bapx1 is first expressed in the undifferentiated mesenchyme of the gizzard and the colon. After the differentiation of the digestive mesenchyme, we found Bapx1 strongly expressed in the gizzard smooth muscle and in the submucosa layer of the colon. This expression pattern provides new insights into the roles of Bapx1 during the regionalization of the GI tract and the differentiation of the digestive mesenchyme of the colon and the stomach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The impact of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity on health related quality of life among irradiated prostate cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaake, Wouter; Wiegman, Erwin M.; de Groot, Martijn; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van der Schans, Cees; van den Bergh, Alfons C.M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the impact of late radiation-induced toxicity on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study sample was composed of 227 patients, treated with external beam radiotherapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse

  12. The impact of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity on health related quality of life among irradiated prostate cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaake, Wouter; Wiegman, Erwin M; de Groot, Martijn; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van der Schans, Cees P.; van den Bergh, Alfons C M; Langendijk, Johannes A

    PURPOSE: To determine the impact of late radiation-induced toxicity on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study sample was composed of 227 patients, treated with external beam radiotherapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse

  13. Early impairment of gut function and gut flora supporting a role for alteration of gastrointestinal mucosa in human immunodeficiency virus pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, Andrea; Tincati, Camilla; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Torti, Carlo; Quirino, Tiziana; Haarman, Monique; Ben Amor, Kaouther; van Schaik, Jacqueline; Vriesema, Aldwin; Knol, Jan; Marchetti, Giulia; Welling, Gjalt; Clerici, Mario

    Our results show that impairment of the gastrointestinal tracts in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is present in the early phases of HIV disease. This impairment is associated with alterations in gut microbiota and intestinal inflammatory parameters. These findings support the

  14. Biological-effective versus conventional dose volume histograms correlated with late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: a matched pair analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeske John C

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether the dose-volume histograms (DVH's for the rectum and bladder constructed using biological-effective dose (BED-DVH's better correlate with late gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity after treatment with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer than conventional DVH's (C-DVH's. Methods The charts of 190 patients treated with external beam radiotherapy with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were reviewed. Six patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GI toxicity, and similarly 6 patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GU toxicity. Average late C-DVH's and BED-DVH's of the bladder and rectum were computed for these patients as well as for matched-pair control patients. For each matched pair the following measures of normalized difference in the DVH's were computed: (a δAUC = (Area Under Curve [AUC] in grade 3 patient – AUC in grade 0 patient/(AUC in grade 0 patient and (b δV60 = (Percent volume receiving = 60 Gy [V60] in grade 3 patient – V60 in grade 0 patient/(V60 in grade 0 patient. Results As expected, the grade 3 curve is to the right of and above the grade 0 curve for all four sets of average DVH's – suggesting that both the C-DVH and the BED-DVH can be used for predicting late toxicity. δAUC was higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 0.27 vs 0.23 (p = 0.036 for the rectum and 0.24 vs 0.20 (p = 0.065 for the bladder. δV60 was also higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 2.73 vs 1.49 for the rectum (p = 0.021 and 1.64 vs 0.71 (p = 0.021 for the bladder. Conclusions When considering well-established dosimetric endpoints used in evaluating treatment plans, BED-DVH's for the rectum and bladder correlate better with late toxicity than C-DVH's and should be considered when attempting to minimize late GI and GU toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  15. Early outcomes of empiric embolization of tumor-related gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients with advanced malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandberg, Daniel J; Smith, Tony P; Suhocki, Paul V; Pabon-Ramos, Waleska; Nelson, Rendon C; Desai, Svetang; Branch, Stanley; Kim, Charles Y

    2012-11-01

    To report short-term results of empiric transcatheter embolization for patients with advanced malignancy and gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage directly from a tumor invading the GI tract wall. Between 2005 and 2011, 37 mesenteric angiograms were obtained in 26 patients with advanced malignancy (20 men, six women; mean age, 56.2 y) with endoscopically confirmed symptomatic GI hemorrhage from a tumor invading the GI tract wall. Angiographic findings and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical success was defined as absence of signs and symptoms of hemorrhage for at least 30 day following embolization. Active extravasation was demonstrated in three cases. Angiographic abnormalities related to a GI tract tumor were identified on 35 of 37 angiograms, including tumor neovascularity (n = 21), tumor enhancement (n = 24), and luminal irregularity (n = 5). In the absence of active extravasation, empiric embolization with particles and/or coils was performed in 25 procedures. Cessation of hemorrhage (ie, clinical success) occurred more frequently when empiric embolization was performed (17 of 25 procedures; 68%) than when embolization was not performed (two of nine; 22%; P = .03). Empiric embolization resulted in clinical success in 10 of 11 patients with acute GI bleeding (91%), compared with seven of 14 patients (50%) with chronic GI bleeding (P = .04). No ischemic complications were encountered. In patients with advanced malignancy, in the absence of active extravasation, empiric transcatheter arterial embolization for treatment of GI hemorrhage from a direct tumor source demonstrated a 68% short-term success rate, without any ischemic complications. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A simplified clinical risk score predicts the need for early endoscopy in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, Leonardo; Buda, Andrea; Di Paolo, Maria Carla; Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Riccio, Elisabetta; Vassallo, Roberto; Caserta, Luigi; Anderloni, Andrea; Natali, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    Pre-endoscopic triage of patients who require an early upper endoscopy can improve management of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To validate a new simplified clinical score (T-score) to assess the need of an early upper endoscopy in non variceal bleeding patients. Secondary outcomes were re-bleeding rate, 30-day bleeding-related mortality. In this prospective, multicentre study patients with bleeding who underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled. The accuracy for high risk endoscopic stigmata of the T-score was compared with that of the Glasgow Blatchford risk score. Overall, 602 patients underwent early upper endoscopy, and 472 presented with non-variceal bleeding. High risk endoscopic stigmata were detected in 145 (30.7%) cases. T-score sensitivity and specificity for high risk endoscopic stigmata and bleeding-related mortality was 96% and 30%, and 80% and 71%, respectively. No statistically difference in predicting high risk endoscopic stigmata between T-score and Glasgow Blatchford risk score was observed (ROC curve: 0.72 vs. 0.69, p=0.11). The two scores were also similar in predicting re-bleeding (ROC curve: 0.64 vs. 0.63, p=0.4) and 30-day bleeding-related mortality (ROC curve: 0.78 vs. 0.76, p=0.3). The T-score appeared to predict high risk endoscopic stigmata, re-bleeding and mortality with similar accuracy to Glasgow Blatchford risk score. Such a score may be helpful for the prediction of high-risk patients who need a very early therapeutic endoscopy. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomimicry 3D gastrointestinal spheroid platform for the assessment of toxicity and inflammatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Sing Ling; Tay, Chor Yong; Setyawati, Magdiel I; Leong, David T

    2015-02-11

    Our current mechanistic understanding on the effects of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cellular physiology is derived mainly from 2D cell culture studies. However, conventional monolayer cell culture may not accurately model the mass transfer gradient that is expected in 3D tissue physiology and thus may lead to artifactual experimental conclusions. Herein, using a micropatterned agarose hydrogel platform, the effects of ZnO NPs (25 nm) on 3D colon cell spheroids of well-defined sizes are examined. The findings show that cell dimensionality plays a critical role in governing the spatiotemporal cellular outcomes like inflammatory response and cytotoxicity in response to ZnO NPs treatment. More importantly, ZnO NPs can induce different modes of cell death in 2D and 3D cell culture systems. Interestingly, the outer few layers of cells in 3D model could only protect the inner core of cells for a limited time and periodically slough off from the spheroids surface. These findings suggest that toxicological conclusions made from 2D cell models might overestimate the toxicity of ZnO NPs. This 3D cell spheroid model can serve as a reproducible platform to better reflect the actual cell response to NPs and to study a more realistic mechanism of nanoparticle-induced toxicity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Associations between gastrointestinal toxicity, micro RNA and cytokine production in patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko; Jordan, Karina Kwi Im; Carlsen, Anting Liu

    2015-01-01

    with significantly elevated miRNA-155 and decreased miRNA-146a levels, from day 0 to day +28 compared with pre-conditioning levels. Citrulline levels below the median at day +7 were associated with higher spontaneous production of IL-6 and TNF-α as well as higher in vitro stimulated production of IL-17A at day +21......, lactulose-mannitol test and plasma citrulline, as a measure of the enterocyte population. Nadir of citrulline and maximum of oral toxicity scores, intestinal permeability, CRP and plasma levels of IL-6 and IL-10 was seen at day +7 post-HSCT. miRNA-155 and mi-RNA-146a showed an inverse relation...

  19. Comparative toxicity of four crude oils to the early life stages of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, L.M.J.; Khan, C.W.; Akhtar, P.; Hodson, P.V.; Short, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Crude oil is a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in aquatic ecosystems. Fish that are chronically exposed to alkyl PAHs show dioxin-like toxicity characterized by the presence of blue sac disease (BSD) and the induction of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A). This study compared the relative toxicity of four crude oils (Scotian Light Crude, MESA, the synthetic Federated Crude, and Alaska North Slope Crude) to early life stages of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The study examined the influence of the four crudes in causing the disease in rainbow trout embryos living in simulated spawning beds with hydrocarbon-contaminated gravel. Each oil had different chemical characteristics and PAH concentrations. Mortality in the direct exposure experiment increased as the oil concentration increased. The same trend was observed for the BSD prevalence. The study showed that Scotian Light Crude was the least toxic, with BSD increasing only at the highest concentration. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  20. Determining the Effect of Early Feeding after Cesarean section Compared with Regular Diet on the Gastrointestinal Function of Women Referred to Tajrish Hospital, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Amiri-Siavoshani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Early feeding after cesarean section can have beneficial effects, however, no sufficient study has been conducted in this area. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of early feeding on the gastrointestinal complications in women after cesarean section and comparing it with a regular diet.   Methods: The present randomized-clinical-trial study was conducted on 160 women who admitted to Shohada hospital and underwent cesarean section in 2011-2012. The inclusion criteria included women with gestational age more than 37 weeks, singleton pregnancy, having at least 8 hours of fasting, and regional anesthesia (spinal cord, respectively. After registration of demographic characteristics and pregnancy, women were randomly divided into two groups: Early feeding (2 hours after completion of the operation, 250 ml filtered juice, tea and biscuits style regime in the next 2 hours and 2 hours after the usual diet and the usual power (8 hours of operation clear liquid diet the day after the usual diet groups. Presence of gastrointestinal symptoms in 2, 4, 8 and 12 hours after surgery, time to the bowel sounds auscultation, passage of flatus and stool were recorded. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version13.The significance level of p-value was considered 0.05.   Conclusion: Early feeding caused the acceleration of gastrointestinal symptoms, earlier bowel sounds auscultation and earlier utilization of gas. It is recommended to investigate the different diets and examined the level of compliance and satisfaction.  

  1. Toxicity of quantum dots and cadmium to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss in early ontogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živilė Cibulskaitė

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate toxic effects of CdSe/ZnS-COOH quantum dots (QD and cadmium (Cd on biological parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhychus mykiss in its early stages of development (embryos and larvae. It was found that short-term (24-, 96-hour exposure to sublethal concentrations of QD and Cd increased mortality of embryos and larvae, disturbed function of the cardio-respiratory system (gill ventilation frequency, heart rate and affected behavioural responses (individuals making nests in rainbow trout larvae. The results indicated that toxic effects of QD and Cd on rainbow trout larvae depended on the type of chemical substance, affected stage of development and exposure duration. Comparative studies of the effects of QD and Cd on rainbow trout in early stages of development showed that larvae were more sensitive to Cd and QD as compared to embryos. It was suggested that the chorion envelopes of eggs surround and protect the embryo from QD and Cd. Cadmium was more toxic to larvae than QD. Longer exposure (96-hour of QD and Cd induced more remarkable changes in test-parameters. This original study requires more investigations evaluating the mechanism of toxicity of QD to fish.

  2. Gastrointestinal surgical emergencies in patients treated for hemathological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronna, R; Cardi, M; Arcese, W; Iori, A P; Martelli, M; Catinelli, S; Mangioni, S; Corelli, S; Priore, F; Tarantino, E; Frantellizzi, V; Spera, G; Borrini, F; Chirletti, P

    2005-01-01

    Upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms are major and serious complications in patients who undergo chemotherapy for hematological malignancies. Their most frequent causes are acute intestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplant, infections, toxicity or preexisting gastrointestinal diseases. Mortality can reach 30-60% of cases. We report 15 cases operated on for abdominal emergencies: 3 severe gastrointestinal bleeding and 12 acute abdomen. We performed 10 bowel resections, one cholecystectomy, one splenectomy, two laparotomy with pancreatic debridement and peritoneal lavage, and one suture of perforated peptic ulcer. Operative mortality was 33.3% (5/15). Deaths have been reported only in the group of patients with acute abdomen. In all cases death was correlated to generalized sepsis related to immunosuppression. We believe that an aggressive approach, consisting of close monitoring and early laparotomy combined with vigorous supportive therapy, should be used when dealing with suspected gastrointestinal complications in patients with hematological malignancies.

  3. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-01-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  4. Anterograde Tracing Method using DiI to Label Vagal Innervation of the Embryonic and Early Postnatal Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michelle C.; Fox, Edward A.

    2007-01-01

    The mouse is an extremely valuable model for studying vagal development in relation to strain differences, genetic variation, gene manipulations, or pharmacological manipulations. Therefore, a method using 1, 1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) was developed for labeling vagal innervation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in embryonic and postnatal mice. DiI labeling was adapted and optimized for this purpose by varying several facets of the method. For example, insertion and crushing of DiI crystals into the nerve led to faster DiI diffusion along vagal axons and diffusion over longer distances as compared with piercing the nerve with a micropipette tip coated with dried DiI oil. Moreover, inclusion of EDTA in the fixative reduced leakage of DiI out of nerve fibers that occurred with long incubations. Also, mounting labeled tissue in PBS was superior to glycerol with n-propyl gallate, which resulted in reduced clarity of DiI labeling that may have been due to DiI leaking out of fibers. Optical sectioning of flattened wholemounts permitted examination of individual tissue layers of the GI tract wall. This procedure aided identification of nerve ending types because in most instances each type innervates a different tissue layer. Between embryonic day 12.5 and postnatal day 8, growth of axons into the GI tract, formation and patterning of fiber bundles in the myenteric plexus and early formation of putative afferent and efferent nerve terminals were observed. Thus, the DiI tracing method developed here has opened up a window for investigation during an important phase of vagal development. PMID:17418900

  5. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in preneoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract: A biomarker for the early detection of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery Elizabeth A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA are common in many human cancers. We have described an oligonucleotide microarray ("MitoChip" for rapid sequencing of the entire mitochondrial genome (Zhou et al, J Mol Diagn 2006, facilitating the analysis of mtDNA mutations in preneoplastic lesions. We examined 14 precancerous lesions, including seven Barrett esophagus biopsies, with or without associated dysplasia; four colorectal adenomas; and three inflammatory colitis-associated dysplasia specimens. In all cases, matched normal tissues from the corresponding site were obtained as germline control. MitoChip analysis was performed on DNA obtained from cryostat-embedded specimens. Results A total of 513,639 bases of mtDNA were sequenced in the 14 samples, with 490,224 bases (95.4% bases assigned by the automated genotyping software. All preneoplastic lesions examined demonstrated at least one somatic mtDNA sequence alteration. Of the 100 somatic mtDNA alterations observed in the 14 cases, 27 were non-synonymous coding region mutations (i.e., resulting in an amino acid change, 36 were synonymous, and 37 involved non-coding mtDNA. Overall, somatic alterations most commonly involved the COI, ND4 and ND5 genes. Notably, somatic mtDNA alterations were observed in preneoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract even in the absence of histopathologic evidence of dysplasia, suggesting that the mitochondrial genome is susceptible at the earliest stages of multistep cancer progression. Conclusion Our findings further substantiate the rationale for exploring the mitochondrial genome as a biomarker for the early diagnosis of cancer, and confirm the utility of a high-throughput array-based platform for this purpose from a clinical applicability standpoint.

  6. Alkyl PAH in crude oil cause chronic toxicity to early life stages of fish. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodson, P.V.; Khan, C.W.; Saravanabhavan, G.; Clarke, L.; Brown, R.S. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). School of Environmental Studies; Hollebone, B.; Wang, Z. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). ; Short, J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Juneau, AK (United States). Auke Bay Lab; Lee, K.; King, T. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Centre for Offshore Oil and Gas Environmental Research

    2007-07-01

    In order to mitigate the risk to fisheries following an offshore oil spill, it is necessary to know the components of crude oil that are toxic. Chronic exposure of early life stages of fish to crude oil causes Blue Sac Disease, a syndrome characterized by induction of the cytochrome P450 (CYP1A) enzyme. In this study, effects-driven fractionation of Alaska North Slope Crude was used to identify the classes of compounds that cause CYP1A induction in juvenile rainbow trout and chronic toxicity to developing stages of Japanese medaka. Four fractions of compounds were created by low temperature vacuum distillation. This separated the constituents of oil according to their volatility within defined temperature ranges. The fractions were separated according to their boiling points. With a temperature range of 287-481 degrees C, fraction F3 was the only fraction as toxic as whole oil and induced CYPP1A enzymes of fish. Fractions containing specific classes of alkyl PAH were also collected. For all separations, the performance of the method was evaluated by the extent to which PAH were separated from aliphatics, resins and waxes, as well as by the quantitative recovery of mass in fractions and subfractions. The induction of CYP1A enzymes showed that PAH was present in all fractions that were highly toxic, but the toxicity tests indicated that not all fractions containing PAH were toxic. This research provided a scientific basis for comparing the risks of different crude oils based on chemical analyses that show the different proportions or amounts of PAH present. The results indicate which compounds of concern should be used to determine the extent and success of oil spill remediation, and provide a biological interpretation of chemical fingerprinting used to discriminate the sources of oil pollution. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Alkyl PAH in crude oil cause chronic toxicity to early life stages of fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodson, P.V.; Khan, C.W.; Saravanabhavan, G.; Clarke, L.; Brown, R.S. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). School of Environmental Studies; Hollebone, B.; Wang, Z. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). ; Short, J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Juneau, AK (United States). Auke Bay Lab; Lee, K.; King, T. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Centre for Offshore Oil and Gas Environmental Research

    2007-07-01

    In order to mitigate the risk to fisheries following an offshore oil spill, it is necessary to know the components of crude oil that are toxic. Chronic exposure of early life stages of fish to crude oil causes Blue Sac Disease, a syndrome characterized by induction of the cytochrome P450 (CYP1A) enzyme. In this study, effects-driven fractionation of Alaska North Slope Crude was used to identify the classes of compounds that cause CYP1A induction in juvenile rainbow trout and chronic toxicity to developing stages of Japanese medaka. Four fractions of compounds were created by low temperature vacuum distillation. This separated the constituents of oil according to their volatility within defined temperature ranges. The fractions were separated according to their boiling points. With a temperature range of 287-481 degrees C, fraction F3 was the only fraction as toxic as whole oil and induced CYPP1A enzymes of fish. Fractions containing specific classes of alkyl PAH were also collected. For all separations, the performance of the method was evaluated by the extent to which PAH were separated from aliphatics, resins and waxes, as well as by the quantitative recovery of mass in fractions and subfractions. The induction of CYP1A enzymes showed that PAH was present in all fractions that were highly toxic, but the toxicity tests indicated that not all fractions containing PAH were toxic. This research provided a scientific basis for comparing the risks of different crude oils based on chemical analyses that show the different proportions or amounts of PAH present. The results indicate which compounds of concern should be used to determine the extent and success of oil spill remediation, and provide a biological interpretation of chemical fingerprinting used to discriminate the sources of oil pollution. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Impact of post operative intensity modulated radiotherapy on acute gastro-intestinal toxicity for patients with endometrial cancer: Results of the phase II RTCMIENDOMETRE French multicentre trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillot, Isabelle; Tavernier, Elsa; Peignaux, Karine; Williaume, Danièle; Nickers, Philippe; Leblanc-Onfroy, Magali; Lerouge, Delphine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/objective: Whole “conventional” pelvic irradiation (up to 45–50 Gy) following hysterectomy is associated with a high rate of adverse gastro-intestinal (GI) adverse events, of which around 60% correspond to acute grade 2 toxicity. The phase II RTCMIENDOMETRE trial was designed to test the hypothesis that IMRT could reduce the incidence of grade 2 or more acute GI toxicity to less than 30% in patients irradiated post-operatively for an endometrial cancer. Materials/methods: Patients with post-operative stage Ib G3, Ic or II endometrial carcinomas with no history of chronic inflammatory bowel disease were eligible. Guidelines for volume delineation and dose prescription were detailed in the protocol. The investigators were advised to use a web-based atlas developed for the RTOG 0418 study. The dose of the vaginal and nodal PTV was 45 Gy in 25 fractions. To assess the ability of the participating centres to comply with the protocol guidelines, they were requested to complete a dummy run procedure before inclusion of their 1st patient. GI and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity were graded according to the CTCAE V 3.0 classification and were prospectively recorded every week during irradiation, as well as at time of brachytherapy insertions and during the follow-up visit at week 15 (W15). Special attention was given to note any changes to the grade of adverse events between W5 and W15. Results: From May 2008 to April 2010, 49 patients from 6 centres were recruited for the trial. One patient could not be treated, one patient died of vascular stroke at W3 without toxicity, and 1 patient refused to be followed-up after treatment. Thus, 46 cases were available for analysis at W15. The distribution by stage was as follows: Ib 16.3%, Ic 64.2%, II 20.4%. Thirty six patients (75%) received an additional vaginal vault boost of 6–10 Gy delivered by HDR brachytherapy in 1 or 2 fractions. Among the 47 patients who completed IMRT, 27% (95% CI 14.5–39.7%) developed at

  9. Near-infrared reflectance bull’s eye maculopathy as an early indication of hydroxychloroquine toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong KL

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Keye L Wong,1 Scott E Pautler,2 David J Browning31Retina Associates of Sarasota, Sarasota, FL, USA; 2Retina Vitreous Associates of Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Charlotte Eye Ear Nose and Throat Associates, Charlotte, NC, USAImportance: In some patients, hydroxychloroquine ocular toxicity may progress even following cessation of therapy. Any leverage the clinician may use to allow earlier detection may avert significant vision loss.Observation: We report three cases suggesting that bull’s eye maculopathy seen on near-infrared reflectance with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope could be an early, objective manifestation of hydroxychloroquine ocular toxicity, and with progression of the disease this near-infrared “bull’s eye” change may disappear.Conclusion and relevance: Alerting clinicians to this observation may allow a larger case series to corroborate the hypothesis that bull’s eye maculopathy detected by near-infrared reflectance may represent an early sign of hydroxychloroquine toxicity.Keywords: confocal, scanning laser ophthalmoscope, multifocal ERG

  10. Evaluation of anatomical and visual function for early detection of ethambutol toxicity among tuberculosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Mani Penny Tevaraj

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate if early ethambutol toxicity can be detected by comparing pre-and post-treatment anatomical and visual function using retinal nerve fiber thickness, pattern visual evoked potentials and conventional optic nerve function tests.METHODS:This was a prospective study involving 72 eyes of 36 patients treated with ethambutol according to directly observed treatment short-course(DOTSstrategy in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia. The visual acuity and optic nerve function tests were performed by a single investigator. Likewise, Humphrey automated perimetry, optical coherence tomography(OCTmeasurement of the retinal nerve fibre layer(RNFLand pattern visual evoked potential(PVEPwere performed by a single technician. The examinations were performed before initiating ethambutol treatment and 3mo after that.RESULTS: There was no change in visual acuity, colour vision, light brightness, red saturation and fundus findings pre and post ethambutol. However, there was a statistically significant deterioration in the mean deviation of the visual field post treatment(P=0.010. There were also significant changes on OCT and PVEP, with increased RNFL thickness in all quadrants(PPCONCLUSION: Ethambutol toxicity is a known complication of tuberculosis treatment. Early detection of this toxicity may prevent severe irreversible visual loss. The use of OCT to detect RNFL thickness and PVEP to assess P100 latency and amplitude can assist in the detection of subclinical anatomical and visual function changes prior to development of abnormalities on conventional optic nerve function tests.

  11. Skin toxicity during hypo fractionated breast irradiation in patient with early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, Deva; Smichkoska, Snezhana

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important component in the treatment of breast cancer. (1) Many women with an early stage of breast cancer are candidates for a breast conservation therapy, which combines both conservative surgery and radiotherapy. (2) According to the data from some series, an estimated 90% of the patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer will develop a degree of radiation-induced dermatitis. (3) The severity of the skin reactions during and following the breast irradiation is influenced by both treatment-related and patient-related factors. The treatment - related factors include the fraction size (the dose delivered with each treatment), the total dose delivered, the volume of tissue treated, the type of radiation (4) and the addition of chemotherapy. (5) The patient-related factors include breast size, smoking, axillary lymphocele drainage before treatment, age, and infection of the surgical wound. (6) A hypo fractionation radiotherapy is alternative for a standard fractionation radiotherapy for women with early stage of breast cancer after conservative surgery. The aim of the study was to analyse the acute skin reactions during a hypo fractionated radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer at our institution. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with early stage of breast cancer (Stadium I and II) and conservative surgery (quadrantectomy of breast with ipsilateral axillary dissection) were analysed. The patients were treated with 6MV x rays on LINAC, using tangential fields with 2.65Gy per fraction and the total dose prescribed to target volume was 42,4 Gy. These patients were observed for acute skin toxicity during the second week and at the end of the treatment. We evaluated dryness, epilation, pigmentation, changes and eritema, dry desquamation (clinically characterized by scaling and pruritus) and moist desquamation (characterized by serious oozing and exposure of the dermis). By using the radiation therapy oncology group’s (RTOG

  12. Chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity is associated with changes in serum and urine metabolome and fecal microbiota in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsgård, Richard A; Marrachelli, Vannina G; Korpela, Katri; Frias, Rafael; Collado, Maria Carmen; Korpela, Riitta; Monleon, Daniel; Spillmann, Thomas; Österlund, Pia

    2017-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity (CIGT) is a complex process that involves multiple pathophysiological mechanisms. We have previously shown that commonly used chemotherapeutics 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan damage the intestinal mucosa and increase intestinal permeability to iohexol. We hypothesized that CIGT is associated with alterations in fecal microbiota and metabolome. Our aim was to characterize these changes and examine how they relate to the severity of CIGT. A total of 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally either with 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg), oxaliplatin (15 mg/kg), or irinotecan (200 mg/kg). Body weight change was measured daily after drug administration and the animals were euthanized after 72 h. Blood, urine, and fecal samples were collected at baseline and at the end of the experiment. The changes in the composition of fecal microbiota were analyzed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Metabolic changes in serum and urine metabolome were measured with 1 mm proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR). Irinotecan increased the relative abundance of Fusobacteria and Proteobacteria, while 5-FU and oxaliplatin caused only minor changes in the composition of fecal microbiota. All chemotherapeutics increased the levels of serum fatty acids and N(CH 3 ) 3 moieties and decreased the levels of Krebs cycle metabolites and free amino acids. Chemotherapeutic drugs, 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, induce several microbial and metabolic changes which may play a role in the pathophysiology of CIGT. The observed changes in intestinal permeability, fecal microbiota, and metabolome suggest the activation of inflammatory processes.

  13. Acute gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and dermatological toxicity during dose-escalated 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) using an intrarectal balloon for prostate gland localization and immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woel, Rosemonde; Beard, Clair; Chen, Ming-Hui; Hurwitz, Mark; Loffredo, Marian; McMahon, Elizabeth; Ching, Jane; Lopes, Lynn; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We determined the acute gastrointestinal (GI), genitourinary (GU), and dermatologic (D) toxicity during dose-escalated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). A modified intrarectal balloon (Medrad) was used for prostate gland localization and immobilization. Methods: Forty-six men with clinical category T1c to T3a, and at least one high-risk feature (PSA >10, Gleason ≥7, or MRI evidence of extracapsular extension or seminal vesical invasion) comprised the study cohort. Treatment consisted of hormonal therapy and 4-field 3DCRT using an intrarectal balloon for the initial 15 of 40 treatments. Planning treatment volume dose was 72 Gy (95% normalization). A Mantel-Haenzel Chi-square test compared the distribution of GU, GI, and D symptoms at baseline and at end of treatment (EOT). Results: There was no significant difference between the 2 time points in the proportion of patients with bowel symptoms (p = 0.73), tenesmus (p = 0.27), nocturia (p = 1.00), or GU urgency (p = 0.40). However, there was a significant decrease in GU frequency (70% vs. 50%, p = 0.46) as a result of medical interventions and a significant increase in hemorrhoidal irritation (4% vs. 20%, p = 0.02) and anal cutaneous skin reaction (0% vs. 70%, p < 0.001). By 3 months after EOT compared to baseline, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients experiencing hemorrhoidal bleeding (4% vs. 8%, p = 0.52), requiring intervention for hemorrhoidal symptoms (7% vs. 5%, p = 0.8), or experiencing persistent anal cutaneous skin reaction (0% vs. 3%, p = 0.31). Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3DCRT using an intrarectal balloon for prostate localization and immobilization was well tolerated. Acute GU, GI, and D symptoms resolved with standard dietary or medical interventions by the EOT or shortly thereafter

  14. Application of electroretinography (ERG) in early drug development for assessing retinal toxicity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wenhu, E-mail: wenhu.huang@pfizer.com; Collette, Walter; Twamley, Michelle; Aguirre, Shirley A.; Sacaan, Aida

    2015-12-15

    Retinal ocular toxicity is among the leading causes of drug development attrition in the pharmaceutical industry. Electroretinography (ERG) is a non-invasive functional assay used to assess neuro-retinal physiological integrity by measuring the electrical responses. To directly assess the utility of ERG, a series of studies was conducted following intravitreal and/or iv administration of pan-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: AG-012,986 and AG-024,322 in rats. Both compounds have previously shown to induce retinal toxicity. Retinal injury was evaluated by ERG, histopathology and TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-012,986 at ≥ 10 μg/eye resulted in decreases (60%) in ERG b-wave and microscopic changes of mild to moderate retinal degeneration, and at 30 μg/eye led to additional ophthalmic findings. Intravenous administration of AG-012,986 daily at ≥ 5 mg/kg resulted in dose-related decreases (25 to 40%) in b-wave and sporadic to intense positive TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-024,322 at 30 μg/eye also resulted in decreases (50 to 60%) in b-wave, mild to marked retinal degeneration and mild vitreous debris. These experiments demonstrate that ERG can be used as a sensitive and reliable functional tool to evaluate retinal toxicity induced by test compounds in rats complementing other classical ocular safety measurements. - Highlights: • There were strong correlations of ERG readouts to in vivo ophthalmic exams, TUNEL assay, and histopathology. • ERG appears to be more sensitive and can detect retinal functional changes at a very early stage of pathogenesis. • ERG can be incorporated into routine exploratory toxicity study to identify compound ocular safety issues. • In drug discovery, ERG is a quick, non-invasive, sensitive and reliable tool in retinal toxicity de-risking.

  15. Application of electroretinography (ERG) in early drug development for assessing retinal toxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Wenhu; Collette, Walter; Twamley, Michelle; Aguirre, Shirley A.; Sacaan, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ocular toxicity is among the leading causes of drug development attrition in the pharmaceutical industry. Electroretinography (ERG) is a non-invasive functional assay used to assess neuro-retinal physiological integrity by measuring the electrical responses. To directly assess the utility of ERG, a series of studies was conducted following intravitreal and/or iv administration of pan-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: AG-012,986 and AG-024,322 in rats. Both compounds have previously shown to induce retinal toxicity. Retinal injury was evaluated by ERG, histopathology and TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-012,986 at ≥ 10 μg/eye resulted in decreases (60%) in ERG b-wave and microscopic changes of mild to moderate retinal degeneration, and at 30 μg/eye led to additional ophthalmic findings. Intravenous administration of AG-012,986 daily at ≥ 5 mg/kg resulted in dose-related decreases (25 to 40%) in b-wave and sporadic to intense positive TUNEL staining. Intravitreal injection of AG-024,322 at 30 μg/eye also resulted in decreases (50 to 60%) in b-wave, mild to marked retinal degeneration and mild vitreous debris. These experiments demonstrate that ERG can be used as a sensitive and reliable functional tool to evaluate retinal toxicity induced by test compounds in rats complementing other classical ocular safety measurements. - Highlights: • There were strong correlations of ERG readouts to in vivo ophthalmic exams, TUNEL assay, and histopathology. • ERG appears to be more sensitive and can detect retinal functional changes at a very early stage of pathogenesis. • ERG can be incorporated into routine exploratory toxicity study to identify compound ocular safety issues. • In drug discovery, ERG is a quick, non-invasive, sensitive and reliable tool in retinal toxicity de-risking.

  16. Computational chemistry approach for the early detection of drug-induced idiosyncratic liver toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Cordeiro, M Natália D S; Borges, Fernanda

    2008-03-01

    Idiosyncratic drug toxicity (IDT), considered as a toxic host-dependent event, with an apparent lack of dose response relationship, is usually not predictable from early phases of clinical trials, representing a particularly confounding complication in drug development. Albeit a rare event (usually approach proposed in the present study, can play an important role in addressing IDT in early drug discovery. We report for the first time a systematic evaluation of classification models to predict idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA), artificial neural networks (ANN), and machine learning algorithms (OneR) in conjunction with a 3D molecular structure representation and feature selection methods. These modeling techniques (LDA, feature selection to prevent over-fitting and multicollinearity, ANN to capture nonlinear relationships in the data, as well as the simple OneR classifier) were found to produce QSTR models with satisfactory internal cross-validation statistics and predictivity on an external subset of chemicals. More specifically, the models reached values of accuracy/sensitivity/specificity over 84%/78%/90%, respectively in the training series along with predictivity values ranging from ca. 78 to 86% of correctly classified drugs. An LDA-based desirability analysis was carried out in order to select the levels of the predictor variables needed to trigger the more desirable drug, i.e. the drug with lower potential for idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. Finally, two external test sets were used to evaluate the ability of the models in discriminating toxic from nontoxic structurally and pharmacologically related drugs and the ability of the best model (LDA) in detecting potential idiosyncratic hepatotoxic drugs, respectively. The computational approach proposed here can be considered as a useful tool in early IDT prognosis.

  17. Lethal toxicity of industrial chemicals to early life stages of Tilapia guineensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezemonye, L I N; Ogeleka, D F; Okieimen, F E

    2008-08-30

    The toxic effects of industrial chemicals on three early life stages of an economically important fish, Tilapia guineensis were investigated using the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) # 203 recommended semi-static renewal bioassay. The assessment was necessary for the uncontrollable disposal of Neatex (liquid detergent) and Norust CR 486 (corrosion inhibitor) into the Niger Delta environment of Nigeria. The estimated 96-h LC(50) for 7-, 14- and 28-day-old fish in Norust CR 486 exposure was considered "more toxic" than Neatex in all life stages and was dependent on species age, exposure duration and environment. In the fresh water test, for Neatex and Norust CR 486 exposures for day 7, 14 and 28, the 96-h LC50 were 8.79, 17.10 and 82.42 mg/l and 5.55, 13.58 and 20.21 mg/l, respectively. In the brackish test, 15.42 and 46.52 mg/l, not determined (ND) and 7.35, 13.95 and 24.50mg/l were obtained. Differential toxicity was observed in the fresh and brackish water fish for the two chemicals and controls at pchemicals provides a rationale for regulatory surveillance and monitoring of both chemicals in the fragile Niger Delta environment.

  18. Toxicoproteomics: serum proteomic pattern diagnostics for early detection of drug induced cardiac toxicities and cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricoin, Emanuel F; Rajapaske, Vinodh; Herman, Eugene H; Arekani, Ali M; Ross, Sally; Johann, Donald; Knapton, Alan; Zhang, J; Hitt, Ben A; Conrads, Thomas P; Veenstra, Timothy D; Liotta, Lance A; Sistare, Frank D

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics is more than just generating lists of proteins that increase or decrease in expression as a cause or consequence of pathology. The goal should be to characterize the information flow through the intercellular protein circuitry which communicates with the extracellular microenvironment and then ultimately to the serum/plasma macroenvironment. The nature of this information can be a cause, or a consequence, of disease and toxicity based processes as cascades of reinforcing information percolate through the system and become reflected in changing proteomic information content of the circulation. Serum Proteomic Pattern Diagnostics is a new type of proteomic platform in which patterns of proteomic signatures from high dimensional mass spectrometry data are used as a diagnostic classifier. While this approach has shown tremendous promise in early detection of cancers, detection of drug-induced toxicity may also be possible with this same technology. Analysis of serum from rat models of anthracycline and anthracenedione induced cardiotoxicity indicate the potential clinical utility of diagnostic proteomic patterns where low molecular weight peptides and protein fragments may have higher accuracy than traditional biomarkers of cardiotoxicity such as troponins. These fragments may one day be harvested by circulating nanoparticles designed to absorb, enrich and amplify the diagnostic biomarker repertoire generated even at the critical initial stages of toxicity.

  19. Toxicity of crude oil to early life stages of two fish species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, L.M.; Hodson, P.V. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology; Brown, R.S. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; King, T.; Lee, K. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Bedford Inst. of Oceanography

    2004-07-01

    Fish exposed to crude oil in their early life stages exhibit signs of dioxin-like toxicity which is linked to the presence of alkyl-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Exposure is characterized by the presence of blue-sac disease which manifests itself in edema, hemorrhaging, deformities and induction of CYP1A enzymes. In this study, the extent of CYP1A induction and BSD was compared in the early life stages of rainbow trout and Japanese medaka following exposure to two crude oils (Scotian Shelf and Alaskan North Slope Crude). Embryos were exposed to a broad range of concentrations of chemically enhanced water fractions of both oils which have unique PAH composition and chemical characteristics. It was assumed that Alaskan North Slope Crude would be more toxic than Scotian Shelf because it has a higher PAH concentration. The occurrence and severity of BSD was characterized along with the extent of PAH exposure. Preliminary results confirm that PAH exposure is greater for Alaskan North Slope Crude and that the responses of the two fish species were highly correlated.

  20. Early enteral immune nutrition support after radical operation for gastric cancer on promoting the recovery of gastrointestinal function and immune function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Gang Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of early enteral immune nutrition support after radical operation for gastric cancer on the recovery of gastrointestinal function and immune function. Methods: A total of 106 cases of patients received radical operation for gastric cancer in our hospital were selected as research subjects, and according to different ways of postoperative nutrition intervention, all patients were divided into observation group (n=50 and control group (n=56. Control group received conventional enteral nutrition intervention, observation group received postoperative early enteral immune nutrition support, and then differences in postoperative intestinal mucosa barrier function, gastrointestinal hormone levels, immune function levels and nutrition-related indicator values were compared between two groups. Results: After observation group received enteral immune nutrition intervention, serum DAO, PS and D-lactate levels as well as urine L/M ratio were lower than those of control group; serum GAS, CCK, MTL and SP values of observation group after intervention were higher than those of control group, and GLU, VIP, GIP and SS values were lower than those of control group; CD4, IgG, NK cell, C3, C4, CH50 and S-IgA levels of observation group after intervention were higher than those of control group; serum ALB, PRE, TRF and RBP levels of observation group after intervention were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Early enteral immune nutrition support after radical operation for gastric cancer is conducive to the recovery of gastrointestinal function and the promotion of immune state, eventually promotes patients’ postoperative overall recovery and has active clinical significance.

  1. Early Combination of Material Characteristics and Toxicology Is Useful in the Design of Low Toxicity Carbon Nanofiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Syversen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an approach for the early combination of material characterization and toxicology testing in order to design carbon nanofiber (CNF with low toxicity. The aim was to investigate how the adjustment of production parameters and purification procedures can result in a CNF product with low toxicity. Different CNF batches from a pilot plant were characterized with respect to physical properties (chemical composition, specific surface area, morphology, surface chemistry as well as toxicity by in vitro and in vivo tests. A description of a test battery for both material characterization and toxicity is given. The results illustrate how the adjustment of production parameters and purification, thermal treatment in particular, influence the material characterization as well as the outcome of the toxic tests. The combination of the tests early during product development is a useful and efficient approach when aiming at designing CNF with low toxicity. Early quality and safety characterization, preferably in an iterative process, is expected to be efficient and promising for this purpose. The toxicity tests applied are preliminary tests of low cost and rapid execution. For further studies, effects such as lung inflammation, fibrosis and respiratory cancer are recommended for the more in-depth studies of the mature CNF product.

  2. Polyaluminium chloride (PAX-18) - acute toxicity and toxicity for early development stages of common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mácová, S.; Máchová, J.; Prokeš, Miroslav; Plhalová, L.; Široká, Z.; Dlesková, K.; Doleželová, P.; Svobodová, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, Suppl. 1 (2009), s. 192-198 ISSN 0172-780X. [Interdisciplinary Czech-Slovak Toxicological Conference /14./. Brno, 01.06.2009-03.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA MZe QH71305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : fish * acute toxicity test * embryo-larval toxicity test * pH Subject RIV: GL - Fishing Impact factor: 1.047, year: 2009 http://node.nel.edu/?node_id=9497

  3. Developmental toxicity of PAH mixtures in fish early life stages. Part II: adverse effects in Japanese medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihanic, Florane; Clérandeau, Christelle; Le Menach, Karyn; Morin, Bénédicte; Budzinski, Hélène; Cousin, Xavier; Cachot, Jérôme

    2014-12-01

    In aquatic environments, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mostly occur as complex mixtures, for which risk assessment remains problematic. To better understand the effects of PAH mixture toxicity on fish early life stages, this study compared the developmental toxicity of three PAH complex mixtures. These mixtures were extracted from a PAH-contaminated sediment (Seine estuary, France) and two oils (Arabian Light and Erika). For each fraction, artificial sediment was spiked at three different environmental concentrations roughly equivalent to 0.5, 4, and 10 μg total PAH g(-1) dw. Japanese medaka embryos were incubated on these PAH-spiked sediments throughout their development, right up until hatching. Several endpoints were recorded at different developmental stages, including acute endpoints, morphological abnormalities, larvae locomotion, and genotoxicity (comet and micronucleus assays). The three PAH fractions delayed hatching, induced developmental abnormalities, disrupted larvae swimming activity, and damaged DNA at environmental concentrations. Differences in toxicity levels, likely related to differences in PAH proportions, were highlighted between fractions. The Arabian Light and Erika petrogenic fractions, containing a high proportion of alkylated PAHs and low molecular weight PAHs, were more toxic to Japanese medaka early life stages than the pyrolytic fraction. This was not supported by the toxic equivalency approach, which appeared unsuitable for assessing the toxicity of the three PAH fractions to fish early life stages. This study highlights the potential risks posed by environmental mixtures of alkylated and low molecular weight PAHs to early stages of fish development.

  4. Shengjiang Xiexin Decoction Alters Pharmacokinetics of Irinotecan by Regulating Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters: A Multi-Target Therapy for Alleviating the Gastrointestinal Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huan-Yu; Li, Peng-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Yue, Jia-Jing; He, Yang; Luo, Xiao-Mei; Su, Mei-Feng; Liao, Shang-Gao; Shi, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Shengjiang Xiexin decoction (SXD), a classic traditional Chinese medical formula chronicled in Shang Han Lun , is used in modern clinical practice to decrease gastrointestinal toxicity induced by the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan (CPT-11). In this study, the effect of SXD on the pharmacokinetics of CPT-11 and its active metabolites (SN-38 and SN-38G), and the underlying mechanisms were further examined. An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of CPT-11, SN-38, and SN-38G in the plasma, bile, liver, intestine, and intestinal contents of control and SXD-pre-treated rats after intravenous administration of CPT-11. SXD pretreatment increased the area under the curve (AUC) and the initial plasma concentration (C 0 ) of CPT-11 but decreased the plasma clearance (CL). The AUC and the maximum plasma concentration (C max ) of SN-38 decreased, whereas the C max of SN-38G increased. Compared with that of the control group, the biliary excretion of CPT-11, SN-38, and SN-38G was inhibited. The CPT-11, SN-38, and SN-38G concentrations in the liver, intestine, and intestinal contents were different between the two groups. Furthermore, the hepatic expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein-2 (Mrp-2), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and carboxylesterase 2 (CES2) was significantly down-regulated by SXD, while the hepatic and jejunal uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) expression was elevated. The hydrolysis of CPT-11 to SN-38 by CES and the glucuronidation of SN-38 to SN-38G by UGT were affected by liver and jejunum S9 fractions from rats pre-treated with SXD. Therefore, this study demonstrated for the first time that SXD could alter the pharmacokinetics of CPT-11 and its metabolites to alleviate CPT-11-induced diarrhea. And the underlying mechanism of drug interaction between CPT-11 and SXD involves decreasing hepatic Mrp-2 and P

  5. Shengjiang Xiexin Decoction Alters Pharmacokinetics of Irinotecan by Regulating Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters: A Multi-Target Therapy for Alleviating the Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-yu Guan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shengjiang Xiexin decoction (SXD, a classic traditional Chinese medical formula chronicled in Shang Han Lun, is used in modern clinical practice to decrease gastrointestinal toxicity induced by the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan (CPT-11. In this study, the effect of SXD on the pharmacokinetics of CPT-11 and its active metabolites (SN-38 and SN-38G, and the underlying mechanisms were further examined. An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of CPT-11, SN-38, and SN-38G in the plasma, bile, liver, intestine, and intestinal contents of control and SXD-pre-treated rats after intravenous administration of CPT-11. SXD pretreatment increased the area under the curve (AUC and the initial plasma concentration (C0 of CPT-11 but decreased the plasma clearance (CL. The AUC and the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax of SN-38 decreased, whereas the Cmax of SN-38G increased. Compared with that of the control group, the biliary excretion of CPT-11, SN-38, and SN-38G was inhibited. The CPT-11, SN-38, and SN-38G concentrations in the liver, intestine, and intestinal contents were different between the two groups. Furthermore, the hepatic expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein-2 (Mrp-2, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, and carboxylesterase 2 (CES2 was significantly down-regulated by SXD, while the hepatic and jejunal uridine diphosphate (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1 expression was elevated. The hydrolysis of CPT-11 to SN-38 by CES and the glucuronidation of SN-38 to SN-38G by UGT were affected by liver and jejunum S9 fractions from rats pre-treated with SXD. Therefore, this study demonstrated for the first time that SXD could alter the pharmacokinetics of CPT-11 and its metabolites to alleviate CPT-11-induced diarrhea. And the underlying mechanism of drug interaction between CPT-11 and SXD involves decreasing hepatic Mrp-2 and P

  6. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc therapy for lymph node metastasized prostate cancer: Early late toxicity and 3-year clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonteyne, Valérie; Lumen, Nicolaas; Ost, Piet; Van Praet, Charles; Vandecasteele, Katrien; De Gersem Ir, Werner; Villeirs, Geert; De Neve, Wilfried; Decaestecker, Karel; De Meerleer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: For patients with N1 prostate cancer (PCa) aggressive local therapies can be advocated. We evaluated clinical outcome, gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity after intensity modulated arc radiotherapy (IMAT) + androgen deprivation (AD) for N1 PCa. Material and methods: Eighty patients with T1-4N1M0 PCa were treated with IMAT and 2–3 years of AD. A median dose of 69.3 Gy (normalized isoeffective dose at 2 Gy per fraction: 80 Gy [α/β = 3]) was prescribed in 25 fractions to the prostate. The pelvic lymph nodes received a minimal dose of 45 Gy. A simultaneous integrated boost to 72 Gy and 65 Gy was delivered to the intraprostatic lesion and/or pathologically enlarged lymph nodes, respectively. GI and GU toxicity was scored using the RTOG/RILIT and RTOG-SOMA/LENT-CTC toxicity scoring system respectively. Three-year actuarial risk of grade 2 and 3/4 GI–GU toxicity and biochemical and clinical relapse free survival (bRFS and cRFS) were calculated with Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Three-year actuarial risk for late grade 3 and 2 GI toxicity is 8% and 20%, respectively. Three-year actuarial risk for late grade 3–4 and 2 GU toxicity was 6% and 34%, respectively. Actuarial 3-year bRFS and cRFS was 81% and 89%, respectively. Actuarial 3-year bRFS and cRFS was, respectively 26% and 32% lower for patients with cN1 disease when compared to patients with cN0 disease. Conclusion: IMAT for N1 PCa offers good clinical outcome with moderate toxicity. Patients with cN1 disease have poorer outcome

  7. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, John J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chon, Brian; Tsai, Henry; Goenka, Anuj; DeBlois, David [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hug, Eugen [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Cahlon, Oren, E-mail: cahlono@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results: Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n=28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01-3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%-30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%-5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0-65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03-3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions: Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  8. Differences in Microbiota Membership along the Gastrointestinal Tract of Piglets and Their Differential Alterations Following an Early-Life Antibiotic Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlong Mu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Early-life antibiotic interventions can change the predisposition to disease by disturbing the gut microbiota. However, the impact of antibiotics on gut microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract is not completely understood, although antibiotic-induced alterations in the distal gut have been reported. Here, employing a piglet model, the microbial composition was analyzed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing and PICRUSt predictions of metagenome function. The present study showed clear spatial variation of microbial communities in the stomach and intestine, and found that the administration of antibiotics (a mixture of olaquindox, oxytetracycline calcium, kitasamycin in early life caused markedly differential alterations in the compartmentalized microbiota, with major alterations in their spatial variation in the lumen of the stomach and small intestine. In piglets fed an antibiotic-free diet, most of the variation in microbial communities was concentrated in gut segments and niches (lumen/mucosa. The microbial diversity was higher in the lumen of stomach and duodenum than that in ileum. The early-life antibiotic intervention decreased the abundance of some Lactobacillus species and increased the abundance of potentially pathogenic Streptococcus suis in the lumen of the stomach and small intestine. Interestingly, the intervention increased the abundance of Treponema only in the colonic lumen and that of Faecalibacterium only in the ileal mucosa. Furthermore, the antibiotic intervention exerted location-specific effects on the functional potential involved in the phosphotransferase system (decreased sucrose phosphotransferase in the stomach and antibiotic-resistance genes (increased in the colon. These results point to an early-life antibiotic-induced dramatic and location-specific shift in the gut microbiota, with profound impact in the foregut and less impact in the hindgut. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the

  9. Infantile colic, regurgitation, and constipation: an early traumatic insult in the development of functional gastrointestinal disorders in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrio, Flavia; Di Mauro, Antonio; Riezzo, Giuseppe; Cavallo, Luciano; Francavilla, Ruggiero

    2015-06-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are defined as a variable combination of chronic or recurrent gastrointestinal symptoms not explained by structural or biochemical abnormalities. Infantile colic, gastroesophageal reflux, and constipation are the most common FGIDs that lead to referral to a pediatrician during the first 6 months of life and are often responsible for hospitalization, feeding changes, use of drugs, parental anxiety, and loss of parental working days with relevant social consequences. We performed a retrospective study on patients referred for recurrent abdominal pain from January 2002 trough December 2009 to our Pediatric Gastroenterology Outpatient Unit. The population studied was matched with healthy control without history of recurrent abdominal pain, enrolled among pediatricians practicing primary health care. History of infantile colic, regurgitation, and functional constipation was detected respectively in 26.41, 25.31, and 30.16% of children diagnosed with FGIDs compared to 11.34, 12.85, and 11.76% of healthy children. According to our data, children with a history of gastrointestinal infantile distress have a higher prevalence of FGIDs years later.

  10. Selective Thinning of the Perifoveal Inner Retina as an Early Sign of Hydroxychloroquine Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasadhika, Sirichai; Fishman, Gerald A; Choi, Dongseok; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate macular thickness profiles using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) and image segmentation in patients with chronic exposure to hydroxychloroquine. Methods This study included 8 patients with chronic exposure to hydroxychloroquine (Group 1) and 8 controls (Group 2). Group 1 patients had no clinically-evident retinal toxicity. All subjects underwent SDOCT imaging of the macula. An image segmentation technique was used to measure thickness of 6 retinal layers at 200 µm intervals. A mixed-effects model was used for multivariate analysis. Results By measuring total retinal thickness either at the central macular (2800 µm in diameter), the perifoveal region 1200-µm-width ring surrounding the central macula), or the overall macular area (5200 µm in diameter), there were no significant differences in the thickness between Groups 1 and 2. On an image segmentation analysis, selective thinning of the inner plexiform + ganglion cell layers (p=0.021) was observed only in the perifoveal area of the patients in Group 1 compared to that of Group 2 by using the mixed-effects model analysis. Conclusions Our results suggest that chronic exposure to hydroxychloroquine is associated with thinning of the perifoveal inner retinal layers, especially in the ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers, even in the absence of functional or structural clinical changes involving the photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelial cell layers. This may be a contributing factor as the reason most patients who have early detectable signs of drug toxicity present with paracentral or pericentral scotomas. PMID:20395978

  11. Early change of thyroid hormone concentration after 131I treatment in patients with solitary toxic adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirnat, E.; Fidler, V.; Zaletel, K.; Gaberscek, S.; Hojker, S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: In spite of extensive use of 131 I for treatment of hyperthyroidism, the results of early outcome are variable. In our prospective clinical study we tested whether 131 I induced necrosis causing clinical aggravation of hyperthyroidism and increasing the free thyroid hormone concentration in the serum of patients with solitary toxic adenoma not pretreated with antithyroid drugs. Patients and methods: 30 consecutive patients were treated with 925 MBq 131 I. Serum concentration of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (fT 4 ), free triiodothyronine (fT 3 ), thyroglobulin (Tg), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured before and after application of 131 I. Results: After application of 131 I no clinical worsening was observed. FT 4 and fT 3 concentration did not change significantly within the first five days, whereas both of them significantly decreased after 12 days (p 131 I induced necrosis of thyroid cells was found. Therefore, the application of 131 I may be considered as a safe and effective treatment for patients with hyperthyroidism due to toxic adenoma. (orig.)

  12. Alpha-Synuclein Toxicity in the Early Secretory Pathway: How it Drives Neurodegeneration in Parkinsons Disease

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    Ting eWang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-synuclein is a predominant player in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s Disease. However, despite extensive study for two decades, its physiological and pathological mechanisms remain poorly understood. Alpha-synuclein forms a perplexing web of interactions with lipids, trafficking machinery, and other regulatory factors. One emerging consensus is that synaptic vesicles are likely the functional site for alpha-synuclein, where it appears to facilitate vesicle docking and fusion. On the other hand, the disfunctions of alpha-synuclein are more dispersed and numerous; when mutated or over-expressed, alpha-synuclein affects several membrane trafficking and stress pathways, including exocytosis, ER-to-Golgi transport, ER stress, Golgi homeostasis, endocytosis, autophagy, oxidative stress and others. Here we examine recent developments in alpha-synuclein’s toxicity in the early secretory pathway placed in the context of emerging themes from other affected pathways to help illuminate its underlying pathogenic mechanisms in neurodegeneration.

  13. Early Evaluation of Response Using 18F-FDG PET Influences Management in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Sheima; Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de; van der Graaf, Winette T; van Coevorden, Frits; Grunhagen, Dirk; Reyners, Anna K L; Boonstra, Pieter A; Desar, Ingrid; Gelderblom, Hans; Steeghs, Neeltje

    2018-02-01

    18 F-FDG PET has previously been proven effective as an early way to evaluate the response of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) to imatinib treatment. However, it is unclear whether early evaluation of response affects treatment decisions in GIST patients treated with neoadjuvant intent. Methods: We retrospectively scored changes in management based on early evaluation of response by 18 F-FDG PET in patients in the Dutch GIST registry treated with neoadjuvant imatinib. Results: Seventy 18 F-FDG PET scans were obtained for 63 GIST patients to evaluate for an early response to neoadjuvant imatinib. The scans led to a change in management in 27.1% of the patients. Change in management correlated strongly with lack of metabolic response ( P PET for early evaluation of response often results in a change of management in GIST patients harboring the non- KIT exon 11 mutation and should be considered the standard of care in GIST patients treated with neoadjuvant intent. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  14. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, D J; Scott, R N

    1986-10-01

    In the developed countries gastrointestinal tuberculosis is no longer common in clinical practice. In this setting the importance of the condition lies in the vagaries of its presentation and the fact that it is eminently treatable, usually by a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. The clinical features and complications of gastrointestinal tuberculosis are highlighted by the seven cases which we report. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition is discussed and attention is drawn to the importance of case notification. Clinicians should bear in mind the diagnosis of gastrointestinal tuberculosis when dealing with any patient with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

  15. Uncovering the exposure mechanisms of sunken heavy oil that makes it chronically toxic to early life stages of fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Young, G.; Lemire, B.; Hodson, P.

    2010-01-01

    A train derailment in 2005 caused the release of 150,000 litres of No. 6 heavy fuel oil into a lake in Alberta. The oil is a residue of the crude oil refinement process and contains 3-4 ringed alkylated forms of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) that are known to cause sub-lethal toxic responses during the early life stages of rainbow trout. Because the oil does not disperse well, oil patches still persist in near-shore sediments of the lake where fish spawn. This study assessed how the behaviour of heavy oil in water interacts with exposure and toxicity to the early life stages of fish. Daily renewal tests with heavy fuel oil coated on glass plate demonstrated higher levels of toxicity to trout embryos than oil that was mechanically or chemically dispersed. A flow-through oil gravel column was used to assess whether the toxic constituents of the heavy oil are transferred quickly enough to cause toxicity. The aim of the study was to develop exposure and toxicity test methods that accurately reflect the behaviour of heavy oil after a spill.

  16. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sigmoidoscopy Alternative Names Lower GI bleeding; GI bleeding; Upper GI bleeding; Hematochezia Images GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  17. Antimony Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The...

  18. Toxicity and cardiac effects of carbaryl in early developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.C.; Hui, Michelle N.Y.; Cheng, S.H.

    2007-01-01

    Carbaryl, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, is known to be moderately toxic to adult zebrafish and has been reported to cause heart malformations and irregular heartbeat in medaka. We performed experiments to study the toxicity of carbaryl, specifically its effects on the heart, in early developing zebrafish embryos. LC50 and EC50 values for carbaryl at 28 h post-fertilization were 44.66 μg/ml and 7.52 μg/ml, respectively, and 10 μg/ml carbaryl was used in subsequent experiments. After confirming acetylcholinesterase inhibition by carbaryl using an enzymatic method, we observed red blood cell accumulation, delayed hatching and pericardial edema, but not heart malformation as described in some previous reports. Our chronic exposure data also demonstrated carbaryl-induced bradycardia, which is a common effect of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors due to the accumulation of acetylcholine, in embryos from 1 day post-fertilization (dpf) to 5 dpf. The distance between the sinus venosus, the point where blood enters the atrium, and the bulbus arteriosus, the point where blood leaves the ventricle, indicated normal looping of the heart tube. Immunostaining of myosin heavy chains with the ventricle-specific antibody MF20 and the atrium-specific antibody S46 showed normal development of heart chambers. At the same time, acute exposure resulted in carbaryl-induced bradycardia. Heart rate dropped significantly after a 10-min exposure to 100 μg/ml carbaryl but recovered when carbaryl was removed. The novel observation of carbaryl-induced bradycardia in 1- and 2-dpf embryos suggested that carbaryl affected cardiac function possibly through an alternative mechanism other than acetylcholinesterase inhibition such as inhibition of calcium ion channels, since acetylcholine receptors in zebrafish are not functional until 3 dpf. However, the exact nature of this mechanism is currently unknown, and thus further studies are required

  19. Early cystic bleb needling revision after glaucoma filtering surgery with toxic keratopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Petrov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case of high thin-wall cystic limited filtering bleb needling revision in the early post-op period after trabeculectomy with sinusotomy accompanied by toxic keratopathy is presented. Optical coherence tomography (OCT demonstrated that filtering bleb height was 2700 μm and bleb wall thickness was 70 μm. Bleb needling revision with its lateralwall dissection and subconjunctival injection of dexamethasone, fluorouracil, and ranibizumab near to the bleb site was performed. In 1.5 hours after the procedure, bleb height decreased to 550 μm (by 5 times while bleb wall thickness increased up to 100 μm. Topical antibacterial, steroid, and non-steroid anti-inflammatory therapy was recommended. The next day IOP level reduced from 11 mm Hg to 4.5 mm Hg. It was accompanied by choroidal effusion that was managed conservatively with cycloplegic agents (drops and injections for 3 days. On day 6, central corneal edema affecting all layers, Descemet’s membrane folds, and ocular hypertension were revealed. Metabolic therapy resolved corneal edema within 3 days. Re-needling bleb revision decreased IOP level to 6.2 mm Hg. This resulted in transient Descemet’s membrane folds. This paper describes filtering bleb needling revision with its lateral wall dissection and anti-inflammatory, cytostatic, and anti-VEGF agents use to prolong glaucoma filtering surgery effect in excessive scarring. The procedure was accompanied by toxic corneal endothelium decompensation with corneal edema and Descemet’s membrane folds treated with active metabolic therapy.

  20. The gastrointestinal manifestation of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome: from a single adenoma to polyposis-like phenotype and early onset cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Z; Kariv, R; Barnes-Kedar, I; Goldberg, Y; Half, E; Morgentern, S; Eli, B; Baris, H N; Vilkin, A; Belfer, R G; Niv, Y; Elhasid, R; Dvir, R; Abu-Freha, N; Cohen, S

    2015-11-01

    Data on the clinical presentation of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome (CMMRD) is accumulating. However, as the extraintestinal manifestations are often fatal and occur at early age, data on the systematic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is scarce. Here we describe 11 subjects with verified biallelic carriage and who underwent colonoscopy, upper endoscopy and small bowel evaluation. Five subjects were symptomatic and in six subjects the findings were screen detected. Two subjects had colorectal cancer and few adenomatous polyps (19, 20 years), three subjects had polyposis-like phenotype (13, 14, 16 years), four subjects had few adenomatous polyps (8, 12-14 years) and two subjects had no polyps (both at age 6). Of the three subjects in the polyposis-like group, two subjects had already developed high-grade dysplasia or cancer and one subject had atypical juvenile polyps suggesting juvenile polyposis. Three out of the five subjects that underwent repeated exams had significant findings during short interval. The gastrointestinal manifestations of CMMRD are highly dependent upon age of examination and highly variable. The polyps may also resemble juvenile polyposis. Intensive surveillance according to current guidelines is mandatory. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ribosomal genes as early targets of cadmium-induced toxicity in Chironomus riparius larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planello, R.; Martinez-Guitarte, J.L.; Morcillo, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant that causes severe impacts in organisms. Although the effects of cadmium on aquatic insects have been studied in terms of their toxicity and changes in developmental parameters, little is known about its molecular and genetic effects. We have investigated the alterations in the pattern of gene expression provoked by acute exposure to cadmium in Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera, Chironomidae), a sentinel organism widely used in aquatic toxicity testing. The early cytotoxic effects were evaluated using immunocytochemistry and specific fluorescent probes in fourth instar larvae after 12 h of 10 mM cadmium treatments; under these conditions no significant effect on larvae mortality was detected until after 36 h of exposure. The changes in the pattern of gene expression were analysed by means of DNA/RNA hybrid antibodies in the polytene chromosomes from salivary gland cells. A decrease in the activity of the nucleolus is especially remarkable, accompanied by a significant reduction in size and the modification in nucleolar architecture, as shown by FISH. The inhibition of rDNA transcription was further evaluated by Northern blot analysis, which showed a marked decrease in the level of preribosomal rRNA (54% 45S 12 h). However, the BR genes, whose products are the giant polypeptides that constitute the silk-like secretion for constructing housing tubes, remain active. Simultaneously, decondensation and activation take place at some chromosomal regions, especially at the centromeres. The changes observed in the pattern of gene expression do not resemble those found after heat shock or other cell stressors. These data provide the first evidence that cadmium interacts with ribosomal genes and results in a drastic impairment of the functional activity of the nucleolus, an essential organelle for cellular survival. Therefore, the depletion of ribosomes would be a long-term effect of Cd-induced cellular damage. These findings may

  2. Ribosomal genes as early targets of cadmium-induced toxicity in Chironomus riparius larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planello, R. [Biologia Ambiental, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey 9, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Guitarte, J.L. [Biologia Ambiental, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey 9, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Morcillo, G. [Biologia Ambiental, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey 9, 28040, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: gmorcillo@ccia.uned.es

    2007-02-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant that causes severe impacts in organisms. Although the effects of cadmium on aquatic insects have been studied in terms of their toxicity and changes in developmental parameters, little is known about its molecular and genetic effects. We have investigated the alterations in the pattern of gene expression provoked by acute exposure to cadmium in Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera, Chironomidae), a sentinel organism widely used in aquatic toxicity testing. The early cytotoxic effects were evaluated using immunocytochemistry and specific fluorescent probes in fourth instar larvae after 12 h of 10 mM cadmium treatments; under these conditions no significant effect on larvae mortality was detected until after 36 h of exposure. The changes in the pattern of gene expression were analysed by means of DNA/RNA hybrid antibodies in the polytene chromosomes from salivary gland cells. A decrease in the activity of the nucleolus is especially remarkable, accompanied by a significant reduction in size and the modification in nucleolar architecture, as shown by FISH. The inhibition of rDNA transcription was further evaluated by Northern blot analysis, which showed a marked decrease in the level of preribosomal rRNA (54% 45S 12 h). However, the BR genes, whose products are the giant polypeptides that constitute the silk-like secretion for constructing housing tubes, remain active. Simultaneously, decondensation and activation take place at some chromosomal regions, especially at the centromeres. The changes observed in the pattern of gene expression do not resemble those found after heat shock or other cell stressors. These data provide the first evidence that cadmium interacts with ribosomal genes and results in a drastic impairment of the functional activity of the nucleolus, an essential organelle for cellular survival. Therefore, the depletion of ribosomes would be a long-term effect of Cd-induced cellular damage. These findings may

  3. Tumour associated antigen CA-50, CA-242 immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) in genitourinary malignancy and gastrointestinal carcinoma early diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhizhou.

    1992-04-01

    Tumour markers CA-50 and CA-242 were measured by immunometric assay (IRMA) to investigate their usefulness in the diagnosis of cancer of the pancreas, biliary tract, liver, breast, lung, gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems. The cutoff points, derived from studies on normal subjects and those with proven benign disease, were 20 u/ml and 12 u/ml for CA-50 and CA-242 respectively. Both markers were found to be generally useful with significant differences between malignant and non malignant disease. The highest positive rates, were found in cancers of the pancreas and gall bladder. The overall rate of false positives was low. It is concluded that measurements of CA-50 and CA-242 are useful in the detection of malignancy, particularly of the pancreas and biliary tract. 2 figs, 2 tabs

  4. Comparison and Limitations of DVH-Based NTCP Models Derived From 3D-CRT and IMRT Data for Prediction of Gastrointestinal Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients by Using Propensity Score Matched Pair Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troeller, Almut [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich (Germany); Yan, Di, E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Marina, Ovidiu; Schulze, Derek [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Alber, Markus [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Parodi, Katia [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich (Germany); Belka, Claus; Söhn, Matthias [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: This study compared normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling of chronic gastrointestinal toxicities following prostate cancer treatment for 2 treatment modalities. Possible factors causing discrepancies in optimal NTCP model parameters between 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT) were analyzed and discussed, including the impact of patient characteristics, image guidance, toxicity scoring bias, and NTCP model limitations. Methods and Materials: Rectal wall dose-volume histograms of 1115 patients treated for prostate cancer under an adaptive radiation therapy protocol were used to model gastrointestinal toxicity grade ≥2 (according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events). A total of 457 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 658 with IMRT. 3D-CRT patients were matched to IMRT patients based on various patient characteristics, using a propensity score–based algorithm. Parameters of the Lyman equivalent uniform dose and cut-off dose logistic regression NTCP models were estimated for the 2 matched treatment modalities and the combined group. Results: After they were matched, the 3D-CRT and IMRT groups contained 275 and 550 patients with a large discrepancy of 28.7% versus 7.8% toxicities, respectively (P<.001). For both NTCP models, optimal parameters found for the 3D-CRT groups did not fit the IMRT patients well and vice versa. Models developed for the combined data overestimated NTCP for the IMRT patients and underestimated NTCP for the 3D-CRT group. Conclusions: Our analysis did not reveal a single definitive cause for discrepancies of model parameters between 3D-CRT and IMRT. Patient characteristics and bias in toxicity scoring, as well as image guidance alone, are unlikely causes of the large discrepancy of toxicities. Whether the cause was inherent to the specific NTCP models used in this study needs to be verified by future investigations. Because IMRT is increasingly used

  5. Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a “Toxicity Identification Evaluation” (TIE), which is the focus of this...

  6. Chromium Toxicity Test for Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Using Hanford Site Groundwater: Onsite Early Life-Stage Toxicity Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, Gregory W; Dauble, Dennis D; Chamness, Mickie A; Abernethy, Cary S; McKinstry, Craig A

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate site-specific effects for early life-stage (eyed eggs to free swimming juveniles) fall chinook salmon that might be exposed to hexavalent chromium from Hanford groundwater sources. Our exposure conditions included hexavalent chromium obtained from Hanford groundwater wells near the Columbia River, Columbia River water as the diluent, and locally adapted populations of fall chinook salmon. This report describes both a 96-hr pretest using rainbow trout eggs and an early life-stage test beginning with chinook salmon eggs

  7. Glucose and urea kinetics in patients with early and advanced gastrointestinal cancer: the response to glucose infusion, parenteral feeding, and surgical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, J.H.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    We isotopically determined rates of glucose turnover, urea turnover, and glucose oxidation in normal volunteers (n = 16), patients with early gastrointestinal (EGI) cancer (n = 6), and patients with advanced gastrointestinal (AGI) cancer (n = 10). Studies were performed in the basal state, during glucose infusion (4 mg/kg/min), and during total parenteral feeding (patients with AGI cancer only). Patients with early stages of the disease were also studied 2 to 3 months after resection of the cancer. Basal rates of glucose turnover were similar in volunteers and in patients with EGI cancer (13.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/kg/min and 13.3 +/- 0.2 mumol/kg/min, respectively) but were significantly higher in patients with AGI cancer (17.6 +/- 1.4 mumol/kg/min). Glucose infusion resulted in significantly less suppression of endogenous production in both patient groups than that seen in the volunteers (76% +/- 6% for EGI group, 69% +/- 7% for AGI group, and 94% +/- 4% for volunteers). The rate of glucose oxidation increased progressively in proportion to the tumor bulk. In the volunteers the percent of VCO2 from glucose oxidation was 23.9% +/- 0.7%, and in EGI and AGI groups the values were 32.8% +/- 2.0% and 43.0% +/- 3.0%, respectively. After curative resection of the cancer, glucose utilization decreased significantly (p less than 0.05). The rate of urea turnover was significantly higher in the AGI group (8.4 +/- 1.0 mumol/kg/min) in comparison with the volunteer group value of 5.9 +/- 0.6 mumol/kg/min (p less than 0.03). Glucose infusion resulted in a significant suppression of urea turnover in the volunteers (p less than 0.02), but in the AGI group glucose infusion did not induce a statistically significant decrease

  8. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor; Desenvolvimento de nanorradiofarmaco a base de Bevacizumabe marcado com tecnecio-99m para diagnostico precoce do tumor estromal gastrointestinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-06-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  9. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding.

  10. Early Clinical Outcomes and Toxicity of Intensity Modulated Versus Conventional Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervix Carcinoma: A Prospective Randomized Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar, E-mail: ajeetgandhi23@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Sharma, Daya Nand; Rath, Goura Kisor; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Sharma, Seema; Manigandan, Durai; Laviraj, M.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Sunesh [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Thulkar, Sanjay [Department of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) treated with whole pelvic conventional radiation therapy (WP-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (WP-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2010 and January 2012, 44 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO 2009) stage IIB-IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were randomized to receive 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions delivered via either WP-CRT or WP-IMRT with concurrent weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and late toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. The primary and secondary endpoints were acute gastrointestinal toxicity and disease-free survival, respectively. Results: Of 44 patients, 22 patients received WP-CRT and 22 received WP-IMRT. In the WP-CRT arm, 13 patients had stage IIB disease and 9 had stage IIIB disease; in the IMRT arm, 12 patients had stage IIB disease and 10 had stage IIIB disease. The median follow-up time in the WP-CRT arm was 21.7 months (range, 10.7-37.4 months), and in the WP-IMRT arm it was 21.6 months (range, 7.7-34.4 months). At 27 months, disease-free survival was 79.4% in the WP-CRT group versus 60% in the WP-IMRT group (P=.651), and overall survival was 76% in the WP-CRT group versus 85.7% in the WP-IMRT group (P=.645). Patients in the WP-IMRT arm experienced significantly fewer grade ≥2 acute gastrointestinal toxicities (31.8% vs 63.6%, P=.034) and grade ≥3 gastrointestinal toxicities (4.5% vs 27.3%, P=.047) than did patients receiving WP-CRT and had less chronic gastrointestinal toxicity (13.6% vs 50%, P=.011). Conclusion: WP-IMRT is associated with significantly less toxicity compared with WP-CRT and has a comparable clinical outcome. Further studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up times are warranted to justify

  11. Gastrointestinal System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jepson, Mark A.; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) acts as a barrier to uptake of potentially dangerous material while allowing absorption of processed food. The gut may be exposed to a diverse range of engineered nanomaterials due to their deliberate addition to food and consumer products

  12. Impacts of triclosan exposure on zebrafish early-life stage: Toxicity and acclimation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falisse, Elodie; Voisin, Anne-Sophie; Silvestre, Frédéric

    2017-08-01

    the acclimation process of larvae exposed to 100μg/L of TCS. Our integrative analysis revealed complex non-monotonic concentration-related effects on zebrafish early-life stages with increased resistance between 50 and 100μg/L exposures. This research highlighted oxidative stress and neurotoxicity as major toxicity mechanisms of TCS during development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Photo-induced toxicity in early life stage fiddler crab (Uca longisignalis) following exposure to Deepwater Horizon oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damare, Leigh M; Bridges, Kristin N; Alloy, Matthew M; Curran, Thomas E; Soulen, Brianne K; Forth, Heather P; Lay, Claire R; Morris, Jeffrey M; Stoeckel, James A; Roberts, Aaron P

    2018-05-01

    The 2010 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil rig led to the release of millions of barrels of oil in the Gulf of Mexico. Oil in aquatic ecosystems exerts toxicity through multiple mechanisms, including photo-induced toxicity following co-exposure with UV radiation. The timing and location of the spill coincided with both fiddler crab reproduction and peak yearly UV intensities, putting early life stage fiddler crabs at risk of injury due to photo-induced toxicity. The present study assessed sensitivity of fiddler crab larvae to photo-induced toxicity during co-exposure to a range of environmentally relevant dilutions of high-energy water accommodated fractions of DWH oil, and either dark recovery period (duration: 17-h) in between. Survival was significantly decreased in treatments the presence of >10% UV and relatively low concentrations of oil. Results of the present study indicate fiddler crab larvae are sensitive to photo-induced toxicity in the presence of DWH oil. These results are of concern, as fiddler crabs play an important role as ecosystem engineers, modulating sediment biogeochemical processes via burrowing action. Furthermore, they occupy an important place in the food web in the Gulf of Mexico.

  14. Combinations of Polymorphisms in Genes Involved in the 5-Fluorouracil Metabolism Pathway Are Associated with Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Chemotherapy-Treated Colorectal Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Gusella, Milena; Vainer, Ben

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether specific combinations of polymorphisms in genes encoding proteins involved in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are associated with increased risk of treatment-induced toxicity. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We analyze...

  15. Less gastrointestinal toxicity after adjuvant radiotherapy on a small pelvic field compared to a standard pelvic field in patients with endometrial carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Renske A.; Pras, Elisabeth; Boezen, H. Marike; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Arts, Henriette J. G.; Aalders, Jan G.; Slot, Annerie; Timmer, Paul R.; Hollema, Harry; Nijman, Hans W.

    Objective: Radiotherapy is associated with short-term and long-term morbidity. This study compared toxicity rates among patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC) treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on a small pelvic field (SmPF) in comparison with a standard pelvic field

  16. An early developmental vertebrate model for nanomaterial safety: bridging cell-based and mammalian toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Carl A; Di Silvio, Desire; Devarajan, Aarthi; Bigini, Paolo; Micotti, Edoardo; Giudice, Chiara; Salmona, Mario; Wheeler, Grant N; Sherwood, Victoria; Bombelli, Francesca Baldelli

    2016-03-01

    With the rise in production of nanoparticles (NPs) for an ever-increasing number of applications, there is an urgent need to efficiently assess their potential toxicity. We propose a NP hazard assessment protocol that combines mammalian cytotoxicity data with embryonic vertebrate abnormality scoring to determine an overall toxicity index. We observed that, after exposure to a range of NPs, Xenopus phenotypic scoring showed a strong correlation with cell based in vitro assays. Magnetite-cored NPs, negative for toxicity in vitro and Xenopus, were further confirmed as nontoxic in mice. The results highlight the potential of Xenopus embryo analysis as a fast screening approach for toxicity assessment of NPs, which could be introduced for the routine testing of nanomaterials.

  17. Foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Kefeli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ingested foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract are a common event which can cause serious morbidity and mortality in the children and adult population. For this reason, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing these life threatening complications. In this study, we aimed to analyze the characteristics of the patients with upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies that were treated in our department. Methods: Patients diagnosed with upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies who were admitted to our hospital between February 2010 and August2013 were evaluated retrospectively. The data regarding their age, gender, clinical profile, type and localization of the esophageal foreign body, performed endoscopic procedure and initial symptoms of the patients were noted and analyzed statistically. Results: Thirty-eight patients with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal foreign body were included in this study. Of these patients, 21 were male and 17 were female. The youngest patient was 17 years old and the oldest patient was 79 years old. Most of the foreign bodies (%55.3 detected in the stomach. Food waste and metallic objects in 21 and 16 patients respectively. The most common complaint was dysphagia (%50. After endoscopic intervention three of the patients were directed to surgery. Conclusion: Early recognition and treatment of gastrointestinal foreign bodies is important as their complications are life threatening. The best method of removal of foreign bodies is controversial. Early management with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most efficient and safe treatment method in current conditions.

  18. Toxicities of diuron and irgarol on the hatchability and early stage development of Artemia salina

    OpenAIRE

    ALYÜRÜK, Hakan; ÇAVAŞ, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Booster biocides are widely used in antifouling paints as bioactive agents against fouling organisms. In previously published reports, acute toxicity tests on Artemia salina (Linnaeus, 1758) were only focused on a part of the life cycle of the organism. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxicities of diuron and irgarol on the hatching stage of A. salina. According to the results, diuron significantly decreased the hatching percentage of A. salina cysts and prevented the hatching of...

  19. Early childhood adversity, toxic stress, and the role of the pediatrician: translating developmental science into lifelong health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Andrew S; Shonkoff, Jack P

    2012-01-01

    Advances in a wide range of biological, behavioral, and social sciences are expanding our understanding of how early environmental influences (the ecology) and genetic predispositions (the biologic program) affect learning capacities, adaptive behaviors, lifelong physical and mental health, and adult productivity. A supporting technical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) presents an integrated ecobiodevelopmental framework to assist in translating these dramatic advances in developmental science into improved health across the life span. Pediatricians are now armed with new information about the adverse effects of toxic stress on brain development, as well as a deeper understanding of the early life origins of many adult diseases. As trusted authorities in child health and development, pediatric providers must now complement the early identification of developmental concerns with a greater focus on those interventions and community investments that reduce external threats to healthy brain growth. To this end, AAP endorses a developing leadership role for the entire pediatric community-one that mobilizes the scientific expertise of both basic and clinical researchers, the family-centered care of the pediatric medical home, and the public influence of AAP and its state chapters-to catalyze fundamental change in early childhood policy and services. AAP is committed to leveraging science to inform the development of innovative strategies to reduce the precipitants of toxic stress in young children and to mitigate their negative effects on the course of development and health across the life span.

  20. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) as Predicting Marker for Clinical Outcome and Evaluation of Early Toxicity Rate after High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in Combination with Additional External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) for High Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecke, Thorsten H; Huang-Tiel, Hui-Juan; Golka, Klaus; Selinski, Silvia; Geis, Berit Christine; Koswig, Stephan; Bathe, Katrin; Hallmann, Steffen; Gerullis, Holger

    2016-11-10

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is a common treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Seventy-nine male patients (median age 71 years, range 50 to 79) with high-risk PCa underwent HDR-BT following EBRT between December 2009 and January 2016 with a median follow-up of 21 months. HDR-BT was administered in two treatment sessions (one week interval) with 9 Gy per fraction using a planning system and the Ir192 treatment unit GammaMed Plus iX. EBRT was performed with CT-based 3D-conformal treatment planning with a total dose administration of 50.4 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction and five fractions per week. Follow-up for all patients was organized one, three, and five years after radiation therapy to evaluate early and late toxicity side effects, metastases, local recurrence, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured in ng/mL. The evaluated data included age, PSA at time of diagnosis, PSA density, BMI (body mass index), Gleason score, D'Amico risk classification for PCa, digital rectal examination (DRE), PSA value after one/three/five year(s) follow-up (FU), time of follow-up, TNM classification, prostate volume, and early toxicity rates. Early toxicity rates were 8.86% for gastrointestinal, and 6.33% for genitourinary side effects. Of all treated patients, 84.81% had no side effects. All reported complications in early toxicity were grade 1. PSA density at time of diagnosis ( p = 0.009), PSA on date of first HDR-BT ( p = 0.033), and PSA on date of first follow-up after one year ( p = 0.025) have statistical significance on a higher risk to get a local recurrence during follow-up. HDR-BT in combination with additional EBRT in the presented design for high-risk PCa results in high biochemical control rates with minimal side-effects. PSA is a negative predictive biomarker for local recurrence during follow-up. A longer follow-up is needed to assess long-term outcome and toxicities.

  1. Vegetable and synthetic tannins induce hormesis/toxicity in sea urchin early development and in algal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nicola, Elena; Meric, Suereyya; Gallo, Marialuisa; Iaccarino, Mario; Della Rocca, Claudio; Lofrano, Giusy; Russo, Teresa; Pagano, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Mimosa tannin and phenol-based synthetic tannin (syntan) were tested for toxicity to sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus and Sphaerechinus granularis) early development and to marine algal growth (Dunaliella tertiolecta). Sea urchin embryogenesis was affected by vegetable tannin and syntan water extracts (VTWE and STWE) at levels ≥1 mg/L. Developmental defects were significantly decreased at VTWE and STWE levels of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/L when control cultures displayed suboptimal quality, i.e. <70% 'viable' (normal or retarded) larvae. Fertilization success of sea urchin sperm was increased up to 0.3 mg/L STWE or VTWE, then was inhibited by increasing tannin levels (1-30 mg/L). Offspring abnormalities, following sperm exposure to VTWE or STWE, showed the same shift from hormesis to toxicity. Cell growth bioassays in D. tertiolecta exposed to VTWE or STWE (0.1-30 mg/L) showed non-linear concentration-related toxicity. Novel criteria are suggested in defining control quality that should reveal hormetic effects. - Vegetable tannin and synthetic tannins were moderately toxic or displayed hormetic effects in sea urchins and in algae. Re-defining control quality is needed for evaluating hormetic effects

  2. Treatment of large stage I-II lung tumors using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Planning considerations and early toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Chin Loon; Palma, David; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric predictors of early clinical toxicity following SBRT in patients with lung tumors and planning target volumes (PTV) exceeding 80 cm 3 . Methods: Eighteen consecutive patients who were treated using volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc TM ) were assessed. All were either unfit or refused to undergo surgery or chemoradiotherapy. PTV planning objectives were as used in the ROSEL study protocol. Clinical toxicity was scored using Common Toxicity Criteria AE4.0. Lung volumes receiving 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy (V 5 , V 10 , V 15 and V 20 ) and mean lung dose were assessed and correlated to symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: Median age, age-adjusted Charlson-comorbidity score and PTV size were 74, 7.5 and 137 cm 3 , respectively. At a median follow-up of 12.8 months, 8 deaths were recorded: 5 arising from comorbidity, 2 were potentially treatment-related and 1 had local recurrence. RP was reported in 5 patients (grade 2 in 3 and grade 3 in 2). All RP occurred in plans without a high priority optimization objective on contralateral lung. Acute RP was best predicted by contralateral lung V 5 (p 80 cm 3 , the contralateral lung V 5 best predicts RP. Limiting contralateral lung V 5 to <26% may reduce acute toxicity.

  3. Vegetable and synthetic tannins induce hormesis/toxicity in sea urchin early development and in algal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nicola, Elena [Italian National Cancer Institute, G. Pascale Foundation, via M. Semmola, I-80131 Naples (Italy); Meric, Suereyya [Department of Civil Engineering, Salerno University, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Gallo, Marialuisa [Campania Regional Agency for Environmental Protection (ARPAC), I-80143 Naples (Italy); Iaccarino, Mario [Italian National Cancer Institute, G. Pascale Foundation, via M. Semmola, I-80131 Naples (Italy); Della Rocca, Claudio [Department of Civil Engineering, Salerno University, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Lofrano, Giusy [Department of Civil Engineering, Salerno University, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Russo, Teresa [Campania Regional Agency for Environmental Protection (ARPAC), I-80143 Naples (Italy); Pagano, Giovanni [Italian National Cancer Institute, G. Pascale Foundation, via M. Semmola, I-80131 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: gbpagano@tin.it

    2007-03-15

    Mimosa tannin and phenol-based synthetic tannin (syntan) were tested for toxicity to sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus and Sphaerechinus granularis) early development and to marine algal growth (Dunaliella tertiolecta). Sea urchin embryogenesis was affected by vegetable tannin and syntan water extracts (VTWE and STWE) at levels {>=}1 mg/L. Developmental defects were significantly decreased at VTWE and STWE levels of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/L when control cultures displayed suboptimal quality, i.e. <70% 'viable' (normal or retarded) larvae. Fertilization success of sea urchin sperm was increased up to 0.3 mg/L STWE or VTWE, then was inhibited by increasing tannin levels (1-30 mg/L). Offspring abnormalities, following sperm exposure to VTWE or STWE, showed the same shift from hormesis to toxicity. Cell growth bioassays in D. tertiolecta exposed to VTWE or STWE (0.1-30 mg/L) showed non-linear concentration-related toxicity. Novel criteria are suggested in defining control quality that should reveal hormetic effects. - Vegetable tannin and synthetic tannins were moderately toxic or displayed hormetic effects in sea urchins and in algae. Re-defining control quality is needed for evaluating hormetic effects.

  4. Toxicity of leather tanning wastewater effluents in sea urchin early development and in marine microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriç, Süreyya; De Nicola, Elena; Iaccarino, Mario; Gallo, Marialuisa; Di Gennaro, Annamaria; Morrone, Gaetano; Warnau, Michel; Belgiorno, Vincenzo; Pagano, Giovanni

    2005-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the composition and the toxicity of leather tanning wastewater and conditioned sludge collected at the leather tanning wastewater treatment plant (CODISO) located in Solofra, Avellino (Southern Italy). Samples were analyzed for their conventional parameters (COD, TSS, chromium and ammonia) and for metal content. Effluent samples included raw wastewater, and samples collected following coagulation/flocculation process and biological treatment. A set of toxicity endpoints were tested using sea urchin and marine microalgal bioassays by evaluating acute embryotoxicity, developmental defects, changes in sperm fertilization success and transmissible damage from sperm to the offspring, and changes in algal growth rate. Dose-related toxicity to sea urchin embryogenesis and sperm fertilization success was exerted by effluent or sludge samples according to the following rank: conditioned sludge > coagulated effluent > or = raw influent > effluent from biological treatment. Offspring quality was not affected by sperm exposure to any wastewater or to sludge samples. Algal growth was inhibited by raw or coagulated effluent to a similar extent and, again, the effluent from the biological treatment resulted in a decreased toxicity. The results suggest that coagulated effluent and conditioned sludge result in higher toxicity than raw influent in sea urchin embryos and sperm, whereas the biological wastewater treatment of coagulated effluent, in both sea urchins and algae, cause a substantial improvement of wastewater quality. Hence a final biological wastewater treatment should be operated to minimize any environmental damage from tannery wastewater.

  5. TSH-receptor-autoantibody-titers in untreated toxic diffuse goitres - an early indicator of relapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.; Reiners, C.; Boerner, W.

    1984-01-01

    TSH-receptor-auto antibodies were determined in follow-up of 30 patients with relapse of toxic diffuse goitres, i.e. patients with Graves' disease and toxic disseminated autonomy, and in 13 patients with spontaneous remission after antithyroid drug therapy by use of a commercially available TSH-radioreceptorassay (TRAK-assay). All the patients with very high receptor-autoantibody-titers in untreated thyrotoxicosis (F > 20%) had one or more periods of hyperthyroidism or a very severe course of disease. None of these patients showed a spontaneous remission of disease. They all could be identified as Graves' patients. Patients with TRAK-titers 3% [de

  6. gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolandas Vaicekauskas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Accurate diagnosis of subepithelial lesions (SELs in the gastrointestinal tract depends on a variety of methods: endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and different types of biopsy. Making an error-free diagnosis is vital for the subsequent application of an appropriate treatment. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of deep biopsy via the endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD technique for SELs in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Material and methods: It was a case series study. Deep biopsy via the ESD technique was completed in 38 patients between November 2012 and October 2014. Thirty-eight SELs in the upper gastrointestinal tract of varying size (very small ≤ 1 cm, small 1–2 cm and large ≥ 2 cm by means of the ESD technique after an incision with an electrosurgical knife of the overlying layers and revealing a small part of the lesion were biopsied under direct endoscopic view. Results: Deep biopsy via the ESD technique was diagnostic in 28 of 38 patients (73.3%; 95% CI: 59.7–89.7%. The diagnostic yield for SELs with a clear endophytic shape increased to 91.3%. An evident endophytic appearance of a subepithelial lesion, the mean number of biopsied samples (6.65 ±1.36 and the total size in length of all samples per case (19.88 ±8.07 mm were the main criteria influencing the positiveness of deep biopsy in the diagnostic group compared to the nondiagnostic one (p = 0.001; p = 0.025; p = 0.008. Conclusions : Deep biopsy via the ESD technique is an effective and safe method for the diagnosis of SELs especially with a clear endophytic appearance in a large number of biopsied samples.

  7. Antimony Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically.

  8. Una variedad genética de la UDP-glucuronosil transferasa asociada a toxicidad gastrointestinal por irinotecan A prevalent genetic variety of UDP-glycuronosyl transferase predicts high risk of irinotecan toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Valsecchi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Los avances en genética y biología molecular han impulsado la aparición de nuevas áreas de estudio en la medicina, como la farmacogenómica, la cual intenta predecir la respuesta y toxicidad a drogas en función de la variabilidad genética de cada individuo, constituyendo los llamados síndromes fármacogenómicos. La oncología podría beneficiarse debido a la gran toxicidad de sus fármacos. Hay varios loci genéticos que se están analizando por su potencial valor predictivo y hasta ahora sólo tres de ellos demostraron cierto grado de utilidad clínica. En especial, el estudio del número de repeticiones del dinucleótido timina-adenina (TA en el promotor de la enzima UDP-glucuronosil-transferasa (UGT mostró ser capaz de predecir neutropenia severa en pacientes expuestos a dosis intermedias y altas de irinotecan. Comunicamos el caso de una paciente con cáncer de pulmón de células pequeñas que padeció toxicidad hematológica y gastrointestinal grave tras haber sido tratada con dosis relativamente bajas (65 mg/m² de irinotecan, y en quien un análisis del ADN leucocitario mostró la presencia de homocigosis para siete repeticiones de TA. Este caso es un ejemplo de aplicabilidad clínica del test, se discute su utilidad como predictor de toxicidad y la conducta a tomar frente a pacientes con estas características.The advances in genetics and molecular biology have raised new areas in medicine, such as pharmacogenomics, which tries to predict drug responses and toxicities based on the individual genetic variability, describing the so called: pharmacogenomic syndromes. Oncology would find this development extremely useful because of the severe toxicity of chemotherapy. There are a lot of genetic loci under investigation for their potential in predicting drug toxicity, but only three of them have showed clinical usefulness up to now. In particular, quantification of the number of thymine-adenine (TA dinucleotics in the promoter region

  9. Toxicity of naproxen sodium and its mixture with tramadol hydrochloride on fish early life stages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sehonová, P.; Plhalová, L.; Blahová, J.; Doubková, V.; Prokeš, Miroslav; Tichý, F.; Fiorino, E.; Faggio, C.; Svobodová, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 188, December (2017), s. 414-423 ISSN 0045-6535 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Cyprinus carpio * Surface waters * Toxicity tests * Oxidative stress * LOEC Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 4.208, year: 2016

  10. Predictors of Radiation Therapy–Related Gastrointestinal Toxicity From Anal Cancer Dose-Painted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Secondary Analysis of NRG Oncology RTOG 0529

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Moughan, Jennifer; Myerson, Robert; Abitbol, Andre; Doncals, Desiree E.; Johnson, Douglas; Schefter, Tracey E.; Chen, Yuhchyau; Fisher, Barbara; Michalski, Jeff; Narayan, Samir; Chang, Albert; Crane, Christopher H.; Kachnic, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: NRG Oncology RTOG 0529 assessed the feasibility of dose-painted intensity modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) to reduce the acute morbidity of chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) for T2-4N0-3M0 anal cancer. This secondary analysis was performed to identify patient and treatment factors associated with acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs). Methods and Materials: NRG Oncology RTOG 0529 treatment plans were reviewed to extract dose-volume data for tightly contoured small bowel, loosely contoured anterior pelvic contents (APC), and uninvolved colon outside the target volume (UC). Univariate logistic regression was performed to evaluate association between volumes of each structure receiving doses ≥5 to 60 Gy (V5-V60) in 5-Gy increments between patients with and without grade ≥2 acute and late GI AEs, and grade ≥3 acute GI AEs. Additional patient and treatment factors were evaluated in multivariate logistic regression (acute AEs) or Cox proportional hazards models (late AEs). Results: Among 52 evaluable patients, grade ≥2 acute, grade ≥2 late, and grade ≥3 acute GI AEs were observed in 35, 17, and 10 patients, respectively. Trends (P 4 cm, and worse Zubrod performance status. Small bowel volumes of 186.0 cc, 155.0 cc, 41.0 cc, and 30.4 cc receiving doses greater than 25, 30, 35, and 40 Gy, respectively, correlated with increased risk of acute grade ≥2 GI AEs. Conclusions: Acute and late GI AEs from 5FU/MMC chemoradiation using DP-IMRT correlate with radiation dose to the small bowel and APC. Such associations will be incorporated in the dose-volume normal tissue constraint design for future NRG oncology anal cancer studies.

  11. Human heart-type fatty acid-binding protein as an early diagnostic marker of doxorubicin cardiac toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf H. ElGhandour

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Progressive cardiotoxicity following treatment with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL may lead to late onset cardiomyopathy. So, early prediction of toxicity can lead to prevention of heart failure in these patients. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of H-FABP as an early diagnostic marker of anthracycline-induced cardiac toxicity together with brain natriuretic peptide (BNP as an indication of ventricular dysfunction in such patients. Our study was conducted on 40 NHL patients who received 6 cycles of a doxorubicin containing chemotherapy protocol (CHOP, not exceeding the total allowed dose of doxorubicin (500 mg/m2. Ten healthy controls were included in our study. Human heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP was assessed 24 hours after the first cycle of CHOP. Plasma levels of BNP were estimated both before starting chemotherapy and after the last cycle of CHOP. Resting echocardiography was also performed before and at the end of chemotherapy cycles. The ejection fraction (EF of 8 of our patients decreased below 50% at the end of the sixth cycle. Elevated levels of both H-FABP and BNP were found in all patients wth EF below 50% and both markers showed a positive correlation with each other. We concluded that H-FABP may serve as a reliable early marker for prediction of cardiomyopathy induced by doxorubicin. Thus, in patients with elevated H-FABP, alternative treatment modalities with no cardiac toxicity may be considered in order to prevent subsequent heart failure in these patients.

  12. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: This refresher course will review the current knowledge as well as ongoing and future research strategies in lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Radiation therapy has a significant role in the adjuvant treatment of lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Furthermore, there are data to suggest that radiation therapy is an integral component of the conservative management (organ preservation) of rectal and anal cancers. 1. Colon cancer. The standard adjuvant treatment for node positive or high risk transmural colon cancer is postoperative 5-FU and Levamisole. There are retrospective data to suggest that certain subsets of high risk patients may benefit from postoperative radiation therapy. 2. Rectal cancer. Randomized trials have revealed an advantage of postoperative radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer. In the adjuvant setting the use of continuous infusion 5-FU may be more beneficial compared with bolus 5-FU. Despite the improvement in survival, postoperative therapies are associated with an approximately 35% incidence of grade 3+ toxicity. Recent data suggest that the use of preoperative combined modality therapy may be associated with less toxicity as well as increase the chance of sphincter preservation. New Intergroup trials addressing these issues will be presented. In patients with locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer, the addition of intraoperative radiation therapy may further improve local control. 3. Anal cancer. The use of combined 5-FU/Mitomycin-C and pelvic radiation therapy is effective in the treatment of anal carcinoma. The RTOG has recently completed a randomized trial addressing the question of the effectiveness and toxicity of Mitomycin-C. The replacement Intergroup Phase III trial will be presented

  13. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This refresher course will review the current knowledge as well as ongoing and future research strategies in lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Radiation therapy has a significant role in the adjuvant treatment of lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Furthermore, there are data to suggest that radiation therapy is an integral component of the conservative management (organ preservation) of rectal and anal cancers. 1. Colon cancer. The standard adjuvant treatment for node positive or high risk transmural colon cancer is postoperative 5-FU and Levamisole. There are retrospective data to suggest that certain subsets of high risk patients may benefit from postoperative radiation therapy. 2. Rectal cancer. Randomized trials have revealed an advantage of postoperative radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer. In the adjuvant setting the use of continuous infusion 5-FU may be more beneficial compared with bolus 5-FU. Despite the improvement in survival, postoperative therapies are associated with an approximately 35% incidence of grade 3+ toxicity. Recent data suggest that the use of preoperative combined modality therapy may be associated with less toxicity as well as increase the chance of sphincter preservation. New Intergroup trials addressing these issues will be presented. In patients with locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer, the addition of intraoperative radiation therapy may further improve local control. 3. Anal cancer. The use of combined 5-FU/Mitomycin-C and pelvic radiation therapy is effective in the treatment of anal carcinoma. The RTOG has recently completed a randomized trial addressing the question of the effectiveness and toxicity of Mitomycin-C. The replacement Intergroup Phase III trial will be presented

  14. Gastrointestinal Traumatic Injuries: Gastrointestinal Perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Maria A; Pugh, Marcia A; McGhee, Melanie

    2018-03-01

    The abdomen is a big place even in a small person. Gastrointestinal trauma can result in injury to the stomach, small bowel, colon, or rectum. Traumatic causes include blunt or penetrating trauma, such as gunshot wounds, stabbings, motor vehicle collisions, and crush injuries. Nontraumatic causes include appendicitis, Crohn disease, cancer, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, blockage of the bowel, and chemotherapy. The mechanism of injury will affect both the nature and severity of any resulting injuries. Treatment must address the critical and emergent nature of these injuries as well as issues that affect all trauma situations, which include management of hemodynamic instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxicity of sulfide to early life stages of wild rice (Zizania palustris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Douglas J; Todhunter, Kevin; Fort, Troy D; Mathis, Michael B; Walker, Rachel; Hansel, Mike; Hall, Scott; Richards, Robin; Anderson, Kurt

    2017-08-01

    The sensitivity of wild rice (Zizania palustris) to sulfide is not well understood. Because sulfate in surface waters is reduced to sulfide by anaerobic bacteria in sediments and historical information indicated that 10 mg/L sulfate in Minnesota (USA) surface water reduced Z. palustris abundance, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency established 10 mg/L sulfate as a water quality criterion in 1973. A 21-d daily-renewal hydroponic study was conducted to evaluate sulfide toxicity to wild rice and the potential mitigation of sulfide toxicity by iron (Fe). The hydroponic design used hypoxic test media for seed and root exposure and aerobic headspace for the vegetative portion of the plant. Test concentrations were 0.3, 1.6, 3.1, 7.8, and 12.5 mg/L sulfide in test media with 0.8, 2.8, and 10.8 mg/L total Fe used to evaluate the impact of iron on sulfide toxicity. Visual assessments (i.e., no plants harvested) of seed activation, mesocotyl emergence, seedling survival, and phytoxicity were conducted 10 d after dark-phase exposure. Each treatment was also evaluated for time to 30% emergence (ET30), total plant biomass, root and shoot lengths, and signs of phytotoxicity at study conclusion (21 d). The results indicate that exposure of developing wild rice to sulfide at ≥3.1 mg sulfide/L in the presence of 0.8 mg/L Fe reduced mesocotyl emergence. Sulfide toxicity was mitigated by the addition of Fe at 2.8 mg/L and 10.8 mg/L relative to the control value of 0.8 mg Fe/L, demonstrating the importance of iron in mitigating sulfide toxicity to wild rice. Ultimately, determination of site-specific sulfate criteria taking into account factors that alter toxicity, including sediment Fe and organic carbon, are necessary. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2217-2226. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  16. Predictors of Radiation Therapy–Related Gastrointestinal Toxicity From Anal Cancer Dose-Painted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Secondary Analysis of NRG Oncology RTOG 0529

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Jeffrey R., E-mail: Jeffrey.R.Olsen@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Abitbol, Andre [Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Doncals, Desiree E. [Summa Akron City Hospital accruals for Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Johnson, Douglas [Florida Radiation Oncology Group–Baptist Regional, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Schefter, Tracey E. [University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Chen, Yuhchyau [University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Fisher, Barbara [London Regional Cancer Program—University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Michalski, Jeff [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Narayan, Samir [Michigan Cancer Research Consortium CCOP, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chang, Albert [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Crane, Christopher H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kachnic, Lisa [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: NRG Oncology RTOG 0529 assessed the feasibility of dose-painted intensity modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) to reduce the acute morbidity of chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) for T2-4N0-3M0 anal cancer. This secondary analysis was performed to identify patient and treatment factors associated with acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs). Methods and Materials: NRG Oncology RTOG 0529 treatment plans were reviewed to extract dose-volume data for tightly contoured small bowel, loosely contoured anterior pelvic contents (APC), and uninvolved colon outside the target volume (UC). Univariate logistic regression was performed to evaluate association between volumes of each structure receiving doses ≥5 to 60 Gy (V5-V60) in 5-Gy increments between patients with and without grade ≥2 acute and late GI AEs, and grade ≥3 acute GI AEs. Additional patient and treatment factors were evaluated in multivariate logistic regression (acute AEs) or Cox proportional hazards models (late AEs). Results: Among 52 evaluable patients, grade ≥2 acute, grade ≥2 late, and grade ≥3 acute GI AEs were observed in 35, 17, and 10 patients, respectively. Trends (P<.05) toward statistically significant associations were observed between grade ≥2 acute GI AEs and small bowel dose (V20-V40), grade ≥2 late GI AEs and APC dose (V60), grade ≥3 acute GI AEs and APC dose (V5-V25), increasing age, tumor size >4 cm, and worse Zubrod performance status. Small bowel volumes of 186.0 cc, 155.0 cc, 41.0 cc, and 30.4 cc receiving doses greater than 25, 30, 35, and 40 Gy, respectively, correlated with increased risk of acute grade ≥2 GI AEs. Conclusions: Acute and late GI AEs from 5FU/MMC chemoradiation using DP-IMRT correlate with radiation dose to the small bowel and APC. Such associations will be incorporated in the dose-volume normal tissue constraint design for future NRG oncology anal cancer studies.

  17. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  18. Target or barrier? The cell wall of early- and later- diverging plants vs cadmium toxicity: differences in the response mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eParrotta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing industrialization and urbanization result in emission of pollutants in the environment including toxic heavy metals, as cadmium and lead. Among the different heavy metals contaminating the environment, cadmium raises great concern, as it is ecotoxic and as such can heavily impact ecosystems. The cell wall is the first structure of plant cells to come in contact with heavy metals. Its composition, characterized by proteins, polysaccharides and in some instances lignin and other phenolic compounds, confers the ability to bind non-covalently and/or covalently heavy metals via functional groups. A strong body of evidence in the literature has shown the role of the cell wall in heavy metal response: it sequesters heavy metals, but at the same time its synthesis and composition can be severely affected. The present review analyzes the dual property of plant cell walls, i.e. barrier and target of heavy metals, by taking Cd toxicity as example. Following a summary of the known physiological and biochemical responses of plants to Cd, the review compares the wall-related mechanisms in early- and later-diverging land plants, by considering the diversity in cell wall composition. By doing so, common as well as unique response mechanisms to metal/cadmium toxicity are identified among plant phyla and discussed. After discussing the role of hyperaccumulators’ cell walls as a particular case, the review concludes by considering important aspects for plant engineering.

  19. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and radical surgery. Early results and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibl, Bernhard J. [Klinikum Coburg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Coburg Cancer Center, Coburg (Germany); Vitz, Stephanie; Schaefer, Wolfgang; Alfrink, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [DiCura Coburg, Coburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Coburg Cancer Center, Coburg (Germany); Geschwendtner, Andreas [Klinikum Coburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Coburg Cancer Center, Coburg (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate treatment results and toxicity following a combined approach consisting of neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and radical surgery in advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. Patients and Methods: Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 41 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and the esophagogastric junction were evaluated, of whom 23 received neoadjuvant radiochemo-therapy (RCT). A total dose of 50.4 Gy with 2 cycles of simultaneous cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (FU) or Taxol/FU-chemotherapy were applied. A radical transthoracic subtotal esophageal and proximal gastric resection through a right thoracoabdominal laparotomy with intrathoracic anastomosis was performed 6-8 weeks following RCT. This was combined with a two-field lymphadenectomy of mediastinal and abdominal lymph nodes. Standard histopathological evaluation included the application of regression grading according to Werner and Hoefler. Toxicity was recorded on the basis of CTC criteria; survival curves were calculated according to Kaplan-Meier. V10, V15, and V20 data were correlated with pulmonary toxicity. Results: Overall survival for all 23 patients was 61% at 3 years. Of the original 23 patients, 18 (78%) patients proceeded to radical surgery. Reasons for no surgery included advanced age of 79, 82, and 86 years (n = 3), severe comorbidity (n = 1), and progression during radiochemotherapy (n = 1). Surgical morbidity (grade 3-4) and mortality rates were 35% and 6%, respectively. Resurgery was necessary in 3 cases (18%). Clear resection margins were achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94%). Twelve of 18 (67%) patients initially diagnosed with T3 tumors and 3 of 3 patients with T4 tumors experienced downstaging. The ypN0 rate was 12 of 18 patients (67%). Out of a total of 18 patients, regression grading revealed < 10% viable cells in 8 (44%) including 3 cases (17%) with complete regression, 10-50% viable

  20. Reproductive Toxicity of Zishen Yutai Pill in Rats: The Fertility and Early Embryonic Development Study (Segment I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was aimed to investigate the reproductive toxicity of Zishen Yutai Pill (ZYP on fertility and early embryonic development in rats. Methods. SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: vehicle control group (distilled water, i.g., positive control group (80 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide, i.p., and three ZYP-treated groups (3, 6, and 12 g/kg/d, i.e., 12x, 24x, and 48x clinical doses, i.g.. The high dose was set as the maximum gavage dosage. Results. Cyclophosphamide showed diverse hazards, such as decreased weight of male reproductive organs and sperm density (P<0.05. However, there were no obvious effects of ZYP on physical signs, animal behavior, and survival rate, as well as on weight and food intake during the premating and gestation periods. Importantly, there were no significant adverse effects of ZYP on indexes of copulation, fecundity and fertility indexes, weights and coefficients of male reproductive organs, epididymal sperm number and motility, estrous cycle, preimplantation loss rate, and implantation rate. Besides, the numbers of live and resorbed fetuses per litter were not significantly altered. Conclusions. ZYP had no reproductive toxicities on fertility and early embryonic development in rats at 48x equivalent clinical doses.

  1. Toxicity assessment of silver nanoparticles in Persian sturgeon (Acipenser persicus) and starry sturgeon (Acipenser stellatus) during early life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banan, Ashkan; Kalbassi Masjed Shahi, Mohammad Reza; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Yazdani Sadati, Mohammad Ali

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in consumer products mainly due to their antimicrobial action. The rapidly increasing use of nanoparticles (NPs) has driven more attention to their possible ecotoxicological effects. In this study, the acute toxicity of colloidal AgNPs was evaluated during the embryonic stage of Persian sturgeon (Acipenser persicus) and starry sturgeon (Acipenser stellatus) at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 mg/L. Fertilized eggs (75 eggs per replicate) were exposed to aforementioned concentrations for 96 h in triplicate. 96-h LC50 values in Persian sturgeon and starry sturgeon were calculated as 0.163 and 0.158 mg/L, respectively. Furthermore, in starry sturgeon, the short-term effects of AgNPs on the hatching rate, survival rate, and Ag accumulation during early life stages (before active feeding commences) were also analyzed at concentrations of 0, 0.025, 0.05, and 0.1 mg/L of colloidal AgNPs. The highest silver accumulation occurred in larvae exposed to 0.1 mg/L AgNPs; however, the body burden of silver did not alter survival rate, and there were no significant differences among treatments. Based on the obtained results from the acute toxicity exposures, AgNPs induced a concentration-dependent toxicity in both species during early life stages, while complementary studies are suggested for investigating their short-term effects in detail.

  2. Synthesis of quinoline attached-furan-2(3H-ones having anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties with reduced gastro-intestinal toxicity and lipid peroxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhter Mymoona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 3-[2-chloroquinolin-3-ylmethylene]-5-aryl-furan-2(3H-ones {3(a-p} were synthesized. The required 3-(substitutedbenzoyl propionic acids {2(a-d} were prepared under Friedal Craft acylation reaction conditions. The substituted 2-chloroquinoline-3-carbaldehydes {1(a-d} were synthesized by reaction of substitutedphenylethanone-oxime with phosphorus oxychloride in presence of dimethyl formamide using the Vilsmeir Haack reaction method. These compounds were screened for their anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities along with their ulcerogenic and lipid peroxidation potentials. The compounds that showed significant anti-inflammatory activity were further screened for their analgesic activity. The compounds were less toxic in terms of ulcerogenicity as compared to a standard, which was also supported by lipid peroxidation studies. The antibacterial activities were performed against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Compounds 3f, 3n and 3o showed significant activity against both S. aureus and E. coli having an MIC value of 6.25μg mL-1.

  3. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Protein profiling as early detection biomarkers for TiO2 nanoparticle toxicity in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá-Pereira, Paula; Diniz, Mário S; Moita, Liliana; Pinheiro, Teresa; Mendonça, Elsa; Paixão, Susana M; Picado, Ana

    2018-05-01

    The mode of action for nanoparticle (NP) toxicity in aquatic organisms is not yet fully understood. In this work, a strategy other than toxicity testing was applied to Daphnia magna exposed to TiO 2 -NPs: the use of nuclear microscopy and the assessment of protein profile. D. magna is a keystone species broadly used as a model system in ecotoxicology. Titanium (Ti) was found in the D. magna digestive tract, mainly in the gut. The penetration of Ti into the epithelial region was greater at higher exposure levels and also observed in eggs in the brood pouch. The protein profile of individuals exposed to different concentrations showed that 2.8 and 5.6 mg/L TiO 2 -NP concentrations induced an over-expression of the majority of proteins, in particular proteins with molecular weight of ∼120, 85 and 15 kDa, while 11.2 mg/L TiO 2 -NP had an inhibitory effect on protein expression. The Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization with tandem time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) analysis of these proteins consistently identified them as vitellogenin (Vtg)-like proteins, associated with enzymes involved in redox balance. These results indicate that Vtg-like proteins are up-regulated in D. magna exposed to TiO 2 -NPs. Vitellogenesis is associated with the reproduction system, suggesting that TiO 2 -NP exposure can impair reproduction by affecting this process. The precise mode of action of TiO 2 -NPs is still unclear and the results from this study are a first attempt to identify specific proteins as potential markers of TiO 2 -NP toxicity in D. magna, providing useful information for future research.

  5. Radiosensitization In Vivo by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition with No Increase in Early Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groselj, Blaz; Ruan, Jia-Ling; Scott, Helen; Gorrill, Jessica; Nicholson, Judith; Kelly, Jacqueline; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Thompson, James; Stratford, Michael R L; Jevons, Sarah J; Hammond, Ester M; Scudamore, Cheryl L; Kerr, Martin; Kiltie, Anne E

    2018-02-01

    As the population ages, more elderly patients require radiotherapy-based treatment for their pelvic malignancies, including muscle-invasive bladder cancer, as they are unfit for major surgery. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find radiosensitizing agents minimally toxic to normal tissues, including bowel and bladder, for such patients. We developed methods to determine normal tissue toxicity severity in intestine and bladder in vivo , using novel radiotherapy techniques on a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). The effects of panobinostat on in vivo tumor growth delay were evaluated using subcutaneous xenografts in athymic nude mice. Panobinostat concentration levels in xenografts, plasma, and normal tissues were measured in CD1-nude mice. CD1-nude mice were treated with drug/irradiation combinations to assess acute normal tissue effects in small intestine using the intestinal crypt assay, and later effects in small and large intestine at 11 weeks by stool assessment and at 12 weeks by histologic examination. In vitro effects of panobinostat were assessed by qPCR and of panobinostat, TMP195, and mocetinostat by clonogenic assay, and Western blot analysis. Panobinostat resulted in growth delay in RT112 bladder cancer xenografts but did not significantly increase acute (3.75 days) or 12 weeks' normal tissue radiation toxicity. Radiosensitization by panobinostat was effective in hypoxic bladder cancer cells and associated with class I HDAC inhibition, and protein downregulation of HDAC2 and MRE11. Pan-HDAC inhibition is a promising strategy for radiosensitization, but more selective agents may be more useful radiosensitizers clinically, resulting in fewer systemic side effects. Mol Cancer Ther; 17(2); 381-92. ©2017 AACR See all articles in this MCT Focus section, "Developmental Therapeutics in Radiation Oncology." ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Rare upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage of cetuximab

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Shi-Jie; Gao, Zi-Ming; Wang, Peng-Liang; Gong, Bao-Cheng; Huang, Han-Wei; Luo, Lei; Wang, Xin; Xing, Ya-Nan; Xu, Hui-Mian; Liu, Fu-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, is a targeted therapeutic regimen of colorectal cancers. Several common adverse effects have been found, such as cutaneous or gastrointestinal toxicity. However, according to the articles had been published, upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is considered to be rare and its mechanism remains unclear. Patient concerns: In this report, we presented a 42-year-old male patient with advanced recto-sigmoid cancer. Af...

  7. Toxic effects, bioconcentration and depuration of verapamil in the early life stages of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Christoph, E-mail: steinbach@frov.jcu.cz [Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, South Bohemian Research Centre of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of Hydrocenoses, Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, CZ-38925 Vodnany (Czech Republic); Fedorova, Ganna [Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, South Bohemian Research Centre of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of Hydrocenoses, Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, CZ-38925 Vodnany (Czech Republic); Prokes, Miroslav [Institute of Vertebrate Biology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Kvetna 8, 603 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Grabicova, Katerina; Machova, Jana; Grabic, Roman; Valentova, Olga; Kroupova, Hana Kocour [Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, South Bohemian Research Centre of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of Hydrocenoses, Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, CZ-38925 Vodnany (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-01

    Verapamil is a pharmaceutical that belongs to a group of calcium channel blockers and is mainly used as a treatment of angina pectoris and arterial hypertension. Verapamil has been detected in aquatic environments in concentrations ranging from ng L{sup −1} to μg L{sup −1}. In the present study, a series of acute toxicity tests of verapamil on various developmental stages of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were conducted. As a result, 96hLC{sub 50} values of verapamil were estimated at 16.4 ± 9.2, 7.3 ± 1.5 and 4.8 ± 0.2 mg L{sup −1} for embryos (E5–E9) and common carp larvae L2 and L5, respectively. Lethal concentrations of verapamil decreased with an increase in the age of the fish. Acute exposure to verapamil significantly reduced the heart rate in the embryos and larvae. In an embryo-larval toxicity test (sub-chronic exposure), the bioconcentration, depuration, and toxic effects of verapamil were assessed in common carp. The fish were exposed to verapamil in a concentration of 0.463 (environmentally relevant), 4.63, 46.3 and 463 μg L{sup −1}. Verapamil had no effect on the accumulated mortality, hatching, condition factor, growth or ontogeny of the fish in any of the tested concentrations. In carp exposed to 463 and 46.3 μg L{sup −1} of verapamil, significantly higher occurrences of malformations and edemas were observed compared to the control. The bioconcentration factor of verapamil in whole fish homogenates ranged between 6.6 and 16.6 and was therefore below the critical value for hazard substances (BCF > 500). The half-life and the 95% depuration time for the tested compound were estimated to be 10.2 ± 1.6 days and 44.2 ± 8.6 days, respectively. No effects of verapamil on the studied endpoints were observed at environmentally relevant concentrations. - Highlights: • Study of the acute and sub-chronic toxicity of verapamil on early-life stages of common carp. • Acute exposure to verapamil reduced the heart rate in early-life stages of

  8. Toxic effects, bioconcentration and depuration of verapamil in the early life stages of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, Christoph; Fedorova, Ganna; Prokes, Miroslav; Grabicova, Katerina; Machova, Jana; Grabic, Roman; Valentova, Olga; Kroupova, Hana Kocour

    2013-01-01

    Verapamil is a pharmaceutical that belongs to a group of calcium channel blockers and is mainly used as a treatment of angina pectoris and arterial hypertension. Verapamil has been detected in aquatic environments in concentrations ranging from ng L −1 to μg L −1 . In the present study, a series of acute toxicity tests of verapamil on various developmental stages of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were conducted. As a result, 96hLC 50 values of verapamil were estimated at 16.4 ± 9.2, 7.3 ± 1.5 and 4.8 ± 0.2 mg L −1 for embryos (E5–E9) and common carp larvae L2 and L5, respectively. Lethal concentrations of verapamil decreased with an increase in the age of the fish. Acute exposure to verapamil significantly reduced the heart rate in the embryos and larvae. In an embryo-larval toxicity test (sub-chronic exposure), the bioconcentration, depuration, and toxic effects of verapamil were assessed in common carp. The fish were exposed to verapamil in a concentration of 0.463 (environmentally relevant), 4.63, 46.3 and 463 μg L −1 . Verapamil had no effect on the accumulated mortality, hatching, condition factor, growth or ontogeny of the fish in any of the tested concentrations. In carp exposed to 463 and 46.3 μg L −1 of verapamil, significantly higher occurrences of malformations and edemas were observed compared to the control. The bioconcentration factor of verapamil in whole fish homogenates ranged between 6.6 and 16.6 and was therefore below the critical value for hazard substances (BCF > 500). The half-life and the 95% depuration time for the tested compound were estimated to be 10.2 ± 1.6 days and 44.2 ± 8.6 days, respectively. No effects of verapamil on the studied endpoints were observed at environmentally relevant concentrations. - Highlights: • Study of the acute and sub-chronic toxicity of verapamil on early-life stages of common carp. • Acute exposure to verapamil reduced the heart rate in early-life stages of common carp. • The

  9. Evaluation of hypothesized adverse outcome pathway linking thyroid peroxidase inhibition to fish early life stage toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is an interest in developing alternatives to the fish early-life stage (FELS) test (OECD test guideline 210), for predicting adverse outcomes (e.g., impacts on growth and survival) using less resource-intensive methods. Development and characterization of adverse outcome pa...

  10. Effects of the toxic benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata on fertilization and early development of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Raquel A F; Contins, Mariana; Nascimento, Silvia M

    2018-04-01

    Blooms of the benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata have been recorded with increasing frequency, intensity and geographic distribution. This dinoflagellate produces potent toxins that may cause mortality of marine invertebrates. Adults of sea urchins are commonly affected by O. cf. ovata exposure with evidence of spines loss and high mortality during periods of high dinoflagellate abundances. Here, we report on the effects of the toxic dinoflagellate O. cf. ovata on fertilization and early development of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, a key ecological herbivore. Lytechinus variegatus eggs and sperm were experimentally exposed to different concentrations of Ostreopsis cf. ovata (4, 40, 400, and 4000 cells ml -1 ) to test the hypothesis that fertilization success, embryonic and larval development of the sea urchin are negatively affected by the toxic dinoflagellate even at low abundances. Reduced fertilization, developmental failures, embryo and larval mortality, and occurrence of abnormal offspring were evident after exposure to O. cf. ovata. Fertilization decreased when gametes were exposed to high O. cf. ovata abundances (400 and 4000 cells ml -1 ), but just the exposure to the highest abundance significantly reduced fertilization success. Sea urchin early development was affected by O. cf. ovata in a dose-dependent way, high dinoflagellate abundances fully inhibited the early development of L. variegatus. Ostreopsis cf. ovata significantly increased the mortality of sea urchin eggs and embryos in the first hours of exposure (∼1-3 h), regardless of dinoflagellate abundance. Abundances of 400 and 4000 O. cf. ovata cells ml -1 induced significantly higher mortality on sea urchin initial stages in the first hours, and no egg or embryo was found in these treatments after 18 h of incubation. The early echinopluteus larva was only reached in the control and in treatments with low Ostreopsis cf. ovata abundances (4 and 40 cells ml -1 ). The

  11. Acute toxicity of polyacrylamide flocculants to early life stages of freshwater mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, Sean B.; Cope, W. Gregory; McLaughlin, Richard A.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Polyacrylamide has become an effective tool for reducing construction-related suspended sediment and turbidity, which are considered to have significant adverse impacts on aquatic ecosystems and are a leading cause of the degradation of North American streams and rivers. However, little is known about the effects of polyacrylamide on many freshwater organisms, and prior to the present study, no information existed on the toxicity of polyacrylamide compounds to native freshwater mussels (family Unionidae), one of the most imperiled faunal groups globally. Following standard test guidelines, we exposed juvenile mussels (test duration 96 h) and glochidia larvae (test duration 24 h) to 5 different anionic polyacrylamide compounds and 1 non-ionic compound. Species tested included the yellow lampmussel (Lampsilis cariosa), an Atlantic Slope species that is listed as endangered in North Carolina; the Appalachian elktoe (Alasmidonta raveneliana), a federally endangered Interior Basin species; and the washboard (Megalonaias nervosa), a common Interior Basin species. We found that median lethal concentrations (LC50s) of polyacrylamide ranged from 411.7 to >1000 mg/L for glochidia and from 126.8 to >1000 mg/L for juveniles. All LC50s were orders of magnitude greater (2–3) than concentrations typically recommended for turbidity control (1–5 mg/L), regardless of their molecular weight or charge density. The results demonstrate that the polyacrylamide compounds tested were not acutely toxic to the mussel species and life stages tested, indicating minimal risk of short-term exposure from polyacrylamide applications in the environment. However, other potential uses of polyacrylamide in the environment (e.g., wastewater treatment, paper processing, mining, algae removal) and their chronic or sublethal effects remain uncertain and warrant additional investigation.

  12. Metabolomics and transcriptomics reveal the toxicity of difenoconazole to the early life stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Miaomiao; Zhu, Wentao; Wang, Dezhen; Qi, Suzhen; Wang, Yao; Yan, Jin; Dong, Kai; Zheng, Mingqi; Wang, Chengju

    2018-01-01

    Difenoconazole is widely used to inhibit the growth of fungi, but its residue in the water environment may threaten ecosystem and human health. Here, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and LC-MS/MS based metabolomics and transcriptomics approaches were used to assess the response of zebrafish to difenoconazole exposure. Early life stages of zebrafish were exposed to difenoconazole at environmentally relevant concentrations for 168h. Their comparison with the control group suggested an adverse development and disturbance of steroid hormones and VTG. KEGG pathway analysis identified five biological processes on the basis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs), as well as altered metabolites and amino acids in zebrafish following difenoconazole exposure. These affected processes included energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism, lipid metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, and an immune-related pathway. Collectively, these results bring us closer to an incremental understanding of the toxic effects of difenoconazole on zebrafish in its early development, and lend support to the continued use of the early life stages of zebrafish as a classical model to evaluate underlying environmental risks of xenobiotics in aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. State of the art in advanced endoscopic imaging for the detection and evaluation of dysplasia and early cancer of the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coda S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Coda,1,2 Andrew V Thillainayagam1,2 1Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine and Photonics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Endoscopy Unit, Charing Cross Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK Abstract: Ideally, endoscopists should be able to detect, characterize, and confirm the nature of a lesion at the bedside, minimizing uncertainties and targeting biopsies and resections only where necessary. However, under conventional white-light inspection – at present, the sole established technique available to most of humanity – premalignant conditions and early cancers can frequently escape detection. In recent years, a range of innovative techniques have entered the endoscopic arena due to their ability to enhance the contrast of diseased tissue regions beyond what is inherently possible with standard white-light endoscopy equipment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art advanced endoscopic imaging techniques available for clinical use that are impacting the way precancerous and neoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are currently detected and characterized at endoscopy. The basic instrumentation and the physics behind each method, followed by the most influential clinical experience, are described. High-definition endoscopy, with or without optical magnification, has contributed to higher detection rates compared with white-light endoscopy alone and has now replaced ordinary equipment in daily practice. Contrast-enhancement techniques, whether dye-based or computed, have been combined with white-light endoscopy to further improve its accuracy, but histology is still required to clarify the diagnosis. Optical microscopy techniques such as confocal laser endomicroscopy and endocytoscopy enable in vivo histology during endoscopy; however, although of invaluable assistance for tissue characterization, they have not

  14. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.D.; Pointon, R.C.S.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, radiotherapy is of only minor use in the management of adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract, for a number of reasons. First, an exploratory laparotomy is generally needed for diagnosis, and if possible the tumour is resected or by-passed. Second, radiotherapy planning in the upper abdomen is complicated by the proximity of small bowel, kidneys, and spinal cord. Third, it has been assumed that these tumours cause death largely as a result of distant metastases, so that local radiotherapy, even if effective, would contribute little to survival. The continued interest in radiotherapy for this group of tumours arises out of the poor survival rates following surgery, which have not changed for many years, and the morbidity associated with their resection. It was hoped that the addition of cytotoxic agents to radical surgery would improve survival rates in carcinoma of the stomach and intraperitoneal colon. Despite a large number of well-organised prospective trials, using a variety of cytotoxic drugs, there is so far no evidence that the addition of chemotherapy to radical surgery improves survival for either tumour site. The authors are therefore faced with a group of tumours which are not only common, but commonly fatal and many surgeons would accept that a new approach using modern radiotherapy techniques may well be justified. There is evidence that this movement is already taking place for carcinoma of the rectum, and the indications for radiotherapy in this condition will be dealt with below. Before considering these it is worth dwelling briefly on recent changes in surgical and radiological practices which, if they fulfil expectations, might allow radiotherapy to be used for carcinoma of the colon, stomach, and pancreas as it is now used for rectal cancer

  15. Prospective Study of Local Control and Late Radiation Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, David W.; Marvelde, Luc te; Chua, Boon H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the local recurrence rate and late toxicity of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) boost to the tumor bed using the Intrabeam System followed by external-beam whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with early-stage breast cancer in a prospective single-institution study. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer ≤3 cm were recruited between February 2003 and May 2005. After breast-conserving surgery, a single dose of 5 Gy IORT boost was delivered using 50-kV x-rays to a depth of 10 mm from the applicator surface. This was followed by WBI to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients were reviewed at regular, predefined intervals. Late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring systems. Results: Fifty-five patients completed both IORT boost and external-beam WBI. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 1.4-4.1 years). There was no reported locoregional recurrence or death. One patient developed distant metastases. Grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis was detected in 29 (53%) and 8 patients (15%), respectively. Conclusions: The use of IORT as a tumor bed boost using kV x-rays in breast-conserving therapy was associated with good local control but a clinically significant rate of grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis

  16. The Cumulative Disadvantages of Socially Toxic Family Environments: A Comparison of Early Life Experiences of Incarcerated Men and University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Michalski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the antecedents of criminal behavior through the process of retrospective family and life course histories in which incarcerated male inmates and male university students are compared. The main focus is on early childhood experiences and parental behaviors. The study data derive from intensive, face-to-face interviews with 38 men incarcerated for violent offences and a matched group of 66 men attending university at the same time. The interviews focus on the relative importance of adverse childhood experiences and linkages with adolescence. The interviews demonstrated that nearly four-fifths of the inmates experienced toxic family environments by the time they reached adolescence, as compared with only two of the university students. Qualitative analyses flesh out the major themes, experiences, and “risk factors” that helped shape the trajectories of both groups of men. The socially toxic family environments and sub-optimal parenting practices that most inmates endured produced long-term, adverse effects in reducing their capacities for resilience, forging healthy relationships with their peers, and remaining in school.

  17. Early change of thyroid hormone concentration after {sup 131}I treatment in patients with solitary toxic adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirnat, E.; Fidler, V.; Zaletel, K.; Gaberscek, S.; Hojker, S. [Univ. Medical Centre Ljubljana, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine (Slovenia)

    2002-08-01

    Aim: In spite of extensive use of {sup 131}I for treatment of hyperthyroidism, the results of early outcome are variable. In our prospective clinical study we tested whether {sup 131}I induced necrosis causing clinical aggravation of hyperthyroidism and increasing the free thyroid hormone concentration in the serum of patients with solitary toxic adenoma not pretreated with antithyroid drugs. Patients and methods: 30 consecutive patients were treated with 925 MBq {sup 131}I. Serum concentration of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (fT{sub 4}), free triiodothyronine (fT{sub 3}), thyroglobulin (Tg), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured before and after application of {sup 131}I. Results: After application of {sup 131}I no clinical worsening was observed. FT{sub 4} and fT{sub 3} concentration did not change significantly within the first five days, whereas both of them significantly decreased after 12 days (p<0.0001). Slight and clinically irrelevant increase in the level of the two thyroid hormones was observed in 9 patients. Furthermore, we observed a prolonged increase in Tg concentration and a transient increase in IL-6 concentration. Conclusion: Neither evidence of any clinical aggravation of hyperthyroidism nor any significant increase in thyroid hormone concentration by {sup 131}I induced necrosis of thyroid cells was found. Therefore, the application of {sup 131}I may be considered as a safe and effective treatment for patients with hyperthyroidism due to toxic adenoma. (orig.)

  18. Is 1H NMR metabolomics becoming the promising early biomarker for neonatal sepsis and for monitoring the antibiotic toxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Antonio; Mussap, Michele; Fanos, Vassilios

    2014-06-01

    Metabolomics, the latest of omics disciplines, has been successfully used in various fields of basic research such as pharmacology and toxicology. Recently, this new science has gained an important role in the translational research of diagnostics. In this regard, the challenge for neonatologists and medical laboratories is to diagnose neonatal sepsis, a disease with high mortality and morbidity due to the difficulty in diagnosing it. Metabolomics, through its ability to identify perturbations caused by this condition, aims at recognizing metabolites that characterize neonatal sepsis with high specificity and sensitivity. The purpose of this review is to highlight the ability of metabolomics to find early biomarkers for this condition, as well as to predict the toxic effects caused by antibiotics.

  19. Ultrastructural analysis of early toxic effects produced by bee venom phospholipase A2 and melittin in Sertoli cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilinca, Mariana; Florea, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the testicular toxicity of two molecules derived from bee venom (BV): phospholipase A2 (PlA2) and melittin (Mlt). Ultrastructural effects of purified BV PlA2 and Mlt were assessed consecutive to repeated dose (30 days) and acute toxicity studies. For the subchronic treatment, PlA2 and Mlt were injected in daily doses equivalent to those released by a bee sting (105 μg PlA2/kg/day and 350 μg Mlt/kg/day), while in the acute treatment their doses corresponded to those released by 100 bee stings (9.3 mg PlA2/kg and 31 mg Mlt/kg). Both PlA2 and Mlt affected the Leydig cells and the cells in seminiferous tubules, the Sertoli cells first of all. PlA2 injection resulted in detachment of the Sertoli cells from the surrounding cells, and extracellular vacuolations, cytoplasmic vacuolations in their basal region and in branches as well, detachment of spermatids, residual bodies and sometimes even spermatocytes into the lumen, changes that had a higher magnitude after the acute treatment. Mlt injection induced similar ultrastructural alterations, but more severe, including degeneration of cellular organelles and cellular necrosis, resulting into rarefaction of the seminiferous epithelium; the ultrastructural changes had a higher magnitude after the 30 repeated dose treatment. We concluded that either of the two molecules tested here, PlA2 and Mlt, were Sertoli cells toxicants at the used doses, and they participated both in the BV testicular toxicity. We consider the observed changes as part of a preceding mechanism of the more severe alterations produced by the BV. It also remains possible that these early unspecific changes reported here could represent the response of the SCs not only to the components of bee venom, but to molecules of other venoms as well. The Sertoli cells were the primary target of PlA2 and Mlt in the spermatogenic epithelium, and their alteration led to further degenerative changes of the germ cells. Since

  20. Radiation Therapy, Cardiac Risk Factors, and Cardiac Toxicity in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, John J.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Jacobson, Judith S.; Wang Jian; McBride, Russell; Grann, Alison; Grann, Victor R.; Hershman, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The benefits of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer may be counterbalanced by the risk of cardiac toxicity. We studied the cardiac effects of RT and the impact of pre-existing cardiac risk factors (CRFs) in a population-based sample of older patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database of women ≥65 years diagnosed with Stages I to III breast cancer from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2000, we used multivariable logistic regression to model the associations of demographic and clinical variables with postmastectomy and postlumpectomy RT. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we then modeled the association between treatment and myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia in the 10 or more years after diagnosis, taking the predictors of treatment into account. Results: Among 48,353 women with breast cancer; 19,897 (42%) were treated with lumpectomy and 26,534 (55%) with mastectomy; the remainder had unknown surgery type (3%). Receipt of RT was associated with later year of diagnosis, younger age, fewer comorbidities, nonrural residence, and chemotherapy. Postlumpectomy RT was also associated with white ethnicity and no prior history of heart disease (HD). The RT did not increase the risk of MI. Presence of MI was associated with age, African American ethnicity, advanced stage, nonrural residence, more than one comorbid condition, a hormone receptor-negative tumor, CRFs and HD. Among patients who received RT, tumor laterality was not associated with MI outcome. The effect of RT on the heart was not influenced by HD or CRFs. Conclusion: It appears unlikely that RT would increase the risk of MI in elderly women with breast cancer, regardless of type of surgery, tumor laterality, or history of CRFs or HD, for at least 10 years

  1. Toxicity implications for early life stage Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to oxyfluorfen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powe, Doris K; Dasmahapatra, Asok K; Russell, Joseph L; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the potential toxic effects of Oxyfluorfen (OXY), an herbicide used in agriculture, on the embryo-larval development of Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). Embryos (1-day postfertilization) and larvae (2-day posthatch) were exposed to OXY (0.5-8 mg/L) for 96 h and evaluated for mortality and hatching on embryos, and the mortality and growth on larvae during depuration. It was observed that the embryo-mortality was inconsistently altered by OXY; only the 2 mg/L group showed significant reduction on embryo survivability. However, larval-mortality was concentration-dependent and OXY exposure induced scoliosis-like phenotypic features in the surviving larvae; the calculated LC 50 was 5.238 mg/L. Our data further indicated that larval skeleton, both axial and appendicular, was the potential target site of OXY. Skeletal growth in larvae exposed to 2 mg/L was inhibited significantly until 1 week of depuration with regard to the linear lengths of neurocranium, Meckel's cartilage, caudal vertebrae (first 10) in the axial skeletons, and pectoral fin and urostyle in the appendicular skeletons. Moreover, the total protein content remained unaltered by OXY after 96 h exposure; while the RNA concentration was reduced significantly in larvae exposed to 2 mg/L. Expression analysis of several genes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) showed significant upregulation of zic5, a zinc-finger type transcription regulator, at the transcription level. This study indicated that the scoliosis induced by OXY in Japanese medaka larvae was the result of stunted skeletal growth, probably because of deregulation of zinc-finger type transcription regulators, at the genomic level. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Su-Ming; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Yueh-Ju; Chou, Che-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2014-08-07

    Patients with CKD receiving maintenance dialysis are at risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with early CKD who are not receiving dialysis is unknown. The hypothesis was that their risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is negatively linked to renal function. To test this hypothesis, the association between eGFR and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis was analyzed. Patients with stages 3-5 CKD in the CKD program from 2003 to 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until December of 2012 to monitor the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was analyzed using competing-risks regression with time-varying covariates. In total, 2968 patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis were followed for a median of 1.9 years. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 100 patient-years was 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 3.9) in patients with stage 3 CKD, 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 5.3) in patients with stage 4 CKD, and 13.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.1 to 14.8) in patients with stage 5 CKD. Higher eGFR was associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P=0.03), with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.99) for every 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) higher eGFR. A history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. In patients with CKD who are not receiving dialysis, lower renal function is associated with higher risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk is higher in patients with previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding history and low serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  3. Probable Gastrointestinal Toxicity of Kombucha Tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Radhika; Smolinske, Susan; Greenbaum, David

    1997-01-01

    Kombucha tea is a health beverage made by incubating the Kombucha “mushroom” in tea and sugar. Although therapeutic benefits have been attributed to the drink, neither its beneficial effects nor adverse side effects have been reported widely in the scientific literature. Side effects probably related to consumption of Kombucha tea are reported in four patients. Two presented with symptoms of allergic reaction, the third with jaundice, and the fourth with nausea, vomiting, and head and neck pain. In all four, use of Kombucha tea in proximity to onset of symptoms and symptom resolution on cessation of tea drinking suggest a probable etiologic association. PMID:9346462

  4. Toxicity and cosmetic result of partial breast high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for conservatively operated early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu Xia; Tripuraneni Prabhakar; Giap Huan; Lin Ray; Chu Colin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Objective To study the method, side effects and cosmetic outcome of high- dose-rate (HDR) accelerated partial breast interstitial irradiation (APBI) alone in early stage breast cancer' after conservative surgery. Methods: From February 2002 to June 2003,47 breast cancer lesions from 46 patients suffering from stage I/II breast cancer were treated with HDR 192 Ir APBI after conservative surgery. All patients were over 40 year-old, with T1-2N0-1 (≤3 lymph nodes positive), surgical margin > 1-2 mm, but those having lobular or inflammatory breast cancer were excluded. HDR brachytherapy with 34 Gy, 10 fractions/5 days was used after surgery, toxic reaction and cosmetic outcome were observed in one month, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results: Follow up of 1846 months, 34 months was carried out for the whole group. During the treatment, acute reactions including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection, all under I-II grade, none of III-IV grade were observed in 21 patients(46%); late toxicity reactions: skin fibrosis, breast tenderness, fat necrosis, and telangiectasia, totally 20 patients (43%) were observed: 2 patients in III grade but one patient received 6 cycle chemotherapy. The result of cosmetic outcome evaluation was excellent or good, at 6 months 95% and 12 months 98%, respectively, but there was no recurfence. Conclusions: Excellent and favorable cosmetic results are noted after APBI by interstitial alone. Acute and late reactions are few. Long term observation is necessary for the rate of' local control. (authors)

  5. Comparing the effects of conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapies on early skin toxicity and cosmetic outcomes after breast cancer conserving surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amouzegar Hashemi F

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The high number of breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy after surgery has caused many to think about a shorter period of radiotherapy, which can significantly reduce the radiotherapy machine time, labor hours, and fewer patient visits. This study was designed to evaluate the acute skin effects and cosmetic outcomes of short course radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer in comparison with the conventional treatment method.Methods: Fifty-two patients with operable breast cancer (pT1-3pN0M0 who underwent breast conservation surgery in Tehran Cancer Institute during January 2011 to January 2012, were randomly assigned to undergo radiotherapy by either receiving conventional treatment (dose: 50 Gy in 25 fractions with subsequent electron boost or a short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy (dose: 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions and a subsequent electron boost.Results: There were no skin changes during the first or the second week of treatment in the two groups. Cutaneous complications began after the third week as grade 1 skin toxicity after termination of the short-course radiotherapy but there were no difference in complication rate after four weeks of treatment. Six months and one year after treatment, there were no differences in terms of skin complications or cosmetic outcomes between the two groups.Conclusion: Although the use of a whole-breast irradiation with a hypofractionated schedule was associated with desirable outcomes, in term of skin toxicity and cosmetics, but longer follow-up periods with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm these results.

  6. Early sorafenib-induced toxicity is associated with drug exposure and UGTIA9 genetic polymorphism in patients with solid tumors: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Boudou-Rouquette

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identifying predictive biomarkers of drug response is of key importance to improve therapy management and drug selection in cancer therapy. To date, the influence of drug exposure and pharmacogenetic variants on sorafenib-induced toxicity remains poorly documented. The aim of this pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD study was to investigate the relationship between early toxicity and drug exposure or pharmacogenetic variants in unselected adult outpatients treated with single-agent sorafenib for advanced solid tumors. METHODS: Toxicity was recorded in 54 patients on days 15 and 30 after treatment initiation and sorafenib exposure was assessed in 51 patients. The influence of polymorphisms in CYP3A5, UGT1A9, ABCB1 and ABCG2 was examined in relation to sorafenib exposure and toxicity. Clinical characteristics, drug exposure and pharmacogenetic variants were tested univariately for association with toxicities. Candidate variables with p<0.1 were analyzed in a multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Gender was the sole parameter independently associated with sorafenib exposure (p = 0.0008. Multivariate analysis showed that increased cumulated sorafenib (AUC(cum was independently associated with any grade ≥ 3 toxicity (p = 0.037; UGT1A9 polymorphism (rs17868320 with grade ≥ 2 diarrhea (p = 0.015 and female gender with grade ≥ 2 hand-foot skin reaction (p = 0.018. Using ROC curve, the threshold AUC(cum value of 3,161 mg/L.h was associated with the highest risk to develop any grade ≥ 3 toxicity (p = 0.018. CONCLUSION: In this preliminary study, increased cumulated drug exposure and UGT1A9 polymorphism (rs17868320 identified patients at high risk for early sorafenib-induced severe toxicity. Further PK/PD studies on larger population are warranted to confirm these preliminary results.

  7. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sonja; Skrovanek; Katherine; DiGuilio; Robert; Bailey; William; Huntington; Ryan; Urbas; Barani; Mayilvaganan; Giancarlo; Mercogliano; James; M; Mullin

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases.

  8. Neopterin: A candidate biomarker for the early assessment of toxicity of aluminum among bauxite dust exposed mine workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingle, Shubhangi K.; Thakkar, Lucky R.; Jawade, Aruna A.; Tumane, Rajani G.; Jain, Ruchika K.; Soni, Pravin N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bauxite ore is a major source of aluminum (Al) which contains approximately 35–60% Al by weight. Occupational and environmental bauxite dust exposure may cause toxicity by interaction with human biological systems resulting in oxidative stress (OS) and cell death. A neopterin derivative as an antioxidant is able to modulate cytotoxicity by the induction of OS. Materials and Methods: A total of 273 subjects were selected for blood collection from three different major Al producing bauxite mines and were categorized into three groups as experimental (Exp) (n = 150), experimental controls (ExC) (n = 73) and control (Con) (n = 50). Whole blood and serum samples were used for measurement of Al, neopterin, urea and creatinine values. Statistical analysis was performed using R-2.15.1 programming language. Results and Discussion: The result showed that age, body mass index and the behavioral habits, that is, smoking, tobacco and alcohol consumption have possible effects on neopterin level. Serum neopterin levels were found to be significantly higher (P bauxite dust (even at low levels of Al) changes biochemical profile leading to high levels of serum neopterin. Levels of serum neopterin in workers exposed to bauxite dust were probably examined for the 1st time in India. The outcome of this study suggested that serum neopterin may be used as potential biomarker for early detection of health risks associated with bauxite dust exposed population. PMID:26500413

  9. Laparoscopy shows superiority over endoscopy for early detection of malignant atrophic papulosis gastrointestinal complications: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, A E; Shapiro, L S; Farrell, J F; Magro, C M; Polito, J

    2015-11-02

    The malignant form of atrophic papulosis (Köhlmeier-Degos disease) is a rare thrombo-occlusive vasculopathy that can affect multiple organ systems. Patients typically present with distinctive skin lesions reflective of vascular drop out. The small bowel is the most common internal organ involved, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality attributable to ischemic microperforations. Determination of the presence of gastrointestinal lesions is critical in distinguishing systemic from the benign, cutaneous only disease and in identifying candidates for treatment. We describe an 18 year old male who first presented with cutaneous atrophic papulosis but became critically ill from small bowel microperforations. He had an almost immediate and dramatic response to treatment. Prior to his presentation with acute abdomen he had upper and lower endoscopy showing areas of nonspecific patchy erythema. At laparotomy, innumerable characteristic lesions with central pearly hue and erythematous border were seen. PubMed was used for a literature search using the keywords malignant atrophic papulosis, Degos disease, endoscopy, laparoscopy and laparotomy. This search yielded 200 articles which were further analyzed for diagnostic procedures and findings. Among the 200 articles we identified only 11 cases in which endoscopy was performed. Results of endoscopy and laparotomy in our patient with malignant atrophic papulosis were compared to those in the literature. Endoscopy of the gastrointestinal tract has shown gastritis and non-specific inflammation whereas laparoscopy shows white plaques with red borders on the serosal surface of the small bowel and the peritoneum. From personal communications with other physicians worldwide, we identified three additional unpublished cases in which endoscopy revealed only minimal changes while laparoscopy showed dramatic lesions. From our experience the endoscopic findings are often subtle and nonspecific, whereas laparascopy or laparotomy

  10. Assessing the toxicity and risk of salt-impacted winter road runoff to the early life stages of freshwater mussels in the Canadian province of Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, R S; Rochfort, Q; McInnis, R; Exall, K; Gillis, P L

    2017-11-01

    In temperate urbanized areas where road salting is used for winter road maintenance, the level of chloride in surface waters has been increasing. While a number of studies have shown that the early-life stages of freshwater mussels are particularly sensitive to salt; few studies have examined the toxicity of salt-impacted winter road runoff to the early-life stages of freshwater mussels to confirm that chloride is the driver of toxicity in this mixture. This study examines the acute toxicity of field-collected winter road runoff to the glochidia of wavy-rayed lampmussels (Lampsilis fasciola) (48 h exposure) and newly released juvenile fatmucket mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea) (road run-off created with moderately hard synthetic water (∼80 mg CaCO 3 /L) were 1177 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1011-1344 mg Cl - /L) and 2276 mg Cl - /L (95% CI: 1698-2854 mg Cl - /L), respectively. These effect concentrations correspond with the toxicity of chloride reported in other studies, indicating that chloride is likely the driver of toxicity in salt-impacted road-runoff, with other contaminants (e.g., metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) playing a de minimis role. Toxicity data from the current study and literature and concentrations of chloride in the surface waters of Ontario were used to conduct a probabilistic risk assessment of chloride to early-life stage freshwater mussels. The assessment indicated that chronic exposure to elevated chloride levels could pose a risk to freshwater mussels; further investigation is warranted to ensure that the most sensitive organisms are protected. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. GASTROINTESTINAL FOOD ALLERGY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana G. Makarova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the prevalence  of food allergies. Pathological conditions associated  with a food intolerance are becoming an increasingly urgent problem of pediatrics. According to different researchers, allergic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract occurs in 25–50% of patients with such common pathology as an allergy to cow's milk proteins. The severity of diseases  associated  with food allergies and their prognosis  depend largely on early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Difficulties and errors  in the diagnosis  of gastrointestinal  food allergies  are associated  with both subjective  and objective  reasons,  primarily due to the fact that gastrointestinal  reactions to food are often delayed and non-IgE-mediated. The article describes clinical forms of gastrointestinal food allergy according to the existing classification. Diagnostic algorithms and modern approaches  to differential diagnosis of disease based on evidence-based  medicine and corresponding to international consensus papers are given.

  12. Influence of chemotherapeutic drug-related gene polymorphisms on toxicity and survival of early breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovini, Vienna; Antognelli, Cinzia; Rulli, Antonio; Foglietta, Jennifer; Pistola, Lorenza; Eliana, Rulli; Floriani, Irene; Nocentini, Giuseppe; Tofanetti, Francesca Romana; Piattoni, Simonetta; Minenza, Elisa; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola; Sidoni, Angelo; Tonato, Maurizio; Crinò, Lucio; Gori, Stefania

    2017-07-26

    We investigated whether GSTT1 ("null" allele), GSTM1 ("null"allele), GSTP1 (A313G), RFC1 (G80A), MTHFR (C677T), TS (2R/3R) polymorphisms were associated with toxicity and survival in patients with early breast cancer (EBC) treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (CT). This prospective trial included patients with stage I-III BC subjected to CT with CMF or FEC regimens. PCR-RFLP was performed for MTHFR, RFC1 and GSTP1, while PCR for TS, GSTT1 and GSTM1 genes. Among the 244 patients consecutively enrolled, 48.7% were treated with FEC and 51.3% with CMF. Patients with TS2R/3R genotype showed less frequently severe neutropenia (G3/G4) than those with TS2R/2R and 3R/3R genotype (p = 0.038). Patients with MTHFRCT genotype had a higher probability of developing severe neutropenia than those with MTHFR CC genotype (p = 0.043). Patients with RFC1GG or GSTT1-null genotype or their combination (GSTT1-null/RFC1GG) were significantly associated with a shorter disease free survival (DFS) (p = 0.009, p = 0.053, p = 0.003, respectively) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.036, p = 0.015, p = 0.005, respectively). Multivariate analysis confirmed the association of RFC1GG genotype with a shorter DFS (p = 0.018) and of GSTT1-null genotype of a worse OS (p = 0.003), as well as for the combined genotypes GSTT1-null/RFC1GG, (DFS: p = 0.004 and OS: p = 0.003). Our data suggest that TS2R/2R and 3R/3R or MTHFR CT genotypes have a potential role in identifying patients with greater risk of toxicity to CMF/FEC and that RFC1 GG and GSTT1-null genotypes alone or in combination could be important markers in predicting clinical outcome in EBC patients.

  13. Stromal gastrointestinal tumors (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balev, B.; Boykova, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: GIST are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract with varying tumor grade and frequency of 1: 100 000 per year. Mazur and Clark introduced the term for the first time in 1983. GIST constitute approximately 2% of the tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. The average age is 60 years. The most common locations are the stomach (60%), small intestine (30%), esophagus (1%), and rectum (5%). Learning objective: to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of the disease according to the current ESMO guidelines and to present the diagnostic accuracy of different imaging modalitiesnbased on review of literature and on own observations. GIST originate from interstitial cells (of Cajal) in the GIT wall, belonging to the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for motility. 90% of GIST show overexpression of the KIT receptor, also known as CD117 or stem cell factor receptor. those that do not express c-KIT mutations, activate mutations in PDGFRA gene. Tumor’s macromorphology determines the imaging features on different modalities. Most of these tumors are exophytic, subepithelial, reach large size and enhance inhomogeneous due to necrosis. They usually do not cause obstruction. Ultrasound as the initiation method shows low sensitivity and specificity in GIST detection, CT with intravenous contrast is the gold standard. MRI contributes with assessing the vascularisation, cellularity and pH. FDG-PET/CT registers the metabolism of intratumoral acidosis. CT is the method of choice in the early diagnosis and determination of resectability of GIST. MRI is an additional method. PET FDG-CT is useful for the monitoring of patients treated with Imatinib

  14. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang; Golzarian, Jafar

    2007-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  15. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  16. Gastrointestinal nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains paper grouped under the headings of: salivary scintigraphy, abscess detection with radionuclides; pediatric gastroenterology; liver spleen, and miscellaneous GI studies: gastrointestinal

  17. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Primary Kidney Cancer: A 3-Dimensional Conformal Technique Associated With Low Rates of Early Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.pham@petermac.org [Department of Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Thompson, Ann [Department of Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kolsky, Michal Schneider [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Devereux, Thomas; Lim, Andrew [Department of Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe our 3-dimensional conformal planning approaches and report early toxicities with stereotactic body radiation therapy for the management of primary renal cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of a phase 1 trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary inoperable renal cell carcinoma. A dose of 42 Gy/3 fractions was prescribed to targets ≥5 cm, whereas for <5 cm 26 Gy/1 fraction was used. All patients underwent a planning 4-dimensional CT to generate a planning target volume (PTV) from a 5-mm isotropic expansion of the internal target volume. Planning required a minimum of 8 fields prescribing to the minimum isodose surrounding the PTV. Intermediate dose spillage at 50% of the prescription dose (R50%) was measured to describe the dose gradient. Early toxicity (<6 months) was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (v4.0). Results: From July 2012 to August 2013 a total of 20 patients (median age, 77 years) were recruited into a prospective clinical trial. Eleven patients underwent fractionated treatment and 9 patients a single fraction. For PTV targets <100 cm{sup 3} the median number of beams used was 8 (2 noncoplanar) to achieve an average R50% of 3.7. For PTV targets >100 cm{sup 3} the median beam number used was 10 (4 noncoplanar) for an average R50% value of 4.3. The R50% was inversely proportional to decreasing PTV volume (r=−0.62, P=.003) and increasing total beams used (r=−0.51, P=.022). Twelve of 20 patients (60%) suffered grade ≤2 early toxicity, whereas 8 of 20 patients (40%) were asymptomatic. Nausea, chest wall pain, and fatigue were the most common toxicities reported. Conclusion: A 3-dimensional conformal planning technique of 8-10 beams can be used to deliver highly tolerable stereotactic ablation to primary kidney targets with minimal early toxicities. Ongoing follow-up is currently in place to assess long-term toxicities and cancer control.

  18. Online market research panel members as controls in case-control studies to investigate gastrointestinal disease outbreaks: early experiences and lessons learnt from the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, P; McCormick, J; Kanagarajah, S; Adak, G K; Cleary, P; Elson, R; Gobin, M; Hawker, J; Inns, T; Sinclair, C; Trienekens, S C M; Vivancos, R; McCarthy, N D

    2018-03-01

    Established methods of recruiting population controls for case-control studies to investigate gastrointestinal disease outbreaks can be time consuming, resulting in delays in identifying the source or vehicle of infection. After an initial evaluation of using online market research panel members as controls in a case-control study to investigate a Salmonella outbreak in 2013, this method was applied in four further studies in the UK between 2014 and 2016. We used data from all five studies and interviews with members of each outbreak control team and market research panel provider to review operational issues, evaluate risk of bias in this approach and consider methods to reduce confounding and bias. The investigators of each outbreak reported likely time and cost savings from using market research controls. There were systematic differences between case and control groups in some studies but no evidence that conclusions on the likely source or vehicle of infection were incorrect. Potential selection biases introduced by using this sampling frame and the low response rate are unclear. Methods that might reduce confounding and some bias should be balanced with concerns for overmatching. Further evaluation of this approach using comparisons with traditional methods and population-based exposure survey data is recommended.

  19. Use of various acute, sublethal and early life-stage tests to evaluate the toxicity of refinery effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherry, J.; Scott, B.; Dutka, B.

    1997-01-01

    The toxicities of effluents from three Ontario, Canada, refineries were assessed with microbes, plants, invertebrates, and fish. Acute toxicity was assessed by the Microtox test, an assay based on electron transport activity in submitochondrial particles, and Daphnia magna (water flea); growth of Selenastrum capricornutum (alga); growth of Lemna minor (aquatic plant); germination of Lactuca sativa (nonaquatic plant); survival, growth, and maturation of Panagrellus redivivus (nematode); and genotoxicity in the SOS-Chromotest. Only the Microtox test and the submitochondrial particle test detected acute toxicity in the effluent samples. Reduced survival and sublethal responses were caused by some effluents, but not all effluents were toxic, and none caused a response in all of the tests applied. The results suggest that the effluent treatment systems used at Ontario refineries have largely eliminated acute toxicity to the organisms in their test battery. Although reduced survival and sublethal effects were detected in some of the effluents, the effects were minor. Some of the tests provided evidence, albeit weak, of variations in the responses of the test organisms to a temporal series of effluent samples. Not unexpectedly, there were also minor differences in the responses of the tests to effluents from the three refineries. The fathead minnow test seems to be a sensitive indicator of the sublethal toxicity of Ontario refinery effluents

  20. A prospective phase I comparison of toxicity and cosmesis outcomes of single-fraction IORT and hypofractionated radiotherapy with IORT boost in early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Tanuja; Babaran, Wesley; Forouzannia, Afshin; Williams, Venita; Harness, Jay; Carpenter, Michele; Gobran, Maher; Khanijou, Rajesh; Wagman, Brittany; Ash, Robert; Wagman, Lawrence D

    Radiation therapy is proven to reduce local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer. To reduce toxicity, treatment time, and improve accuracy, intraoperative radiation therapy was used as definitive treatment or as a boost. The study's objective was to compare the short-term toxicity and cosmesis of single-fraction (SF) IORT and hypofractionated radiotherapy with IORT boost (HfB) given as definitive treatment. Between March 2011 and December 2013, 57 patients aged 45-91 years and 24 patients aged 43-83 years (total n = 81) with Stage 0-II were treated with SF or HfB (Mobetron, IntraOp Medical, Sunnyvale, CA). For SF treatment, 21 Gy was delivered using 4.5-6 cm applicators with electron energies from 6 to 12 MeV. For HfB, an intraoperative boost of 10 Gy was delivered using 4-7 cm applicators with energies from 4 to 12 MeV followed by whole-breast radiation with 40.5 Gy over 15 fractions. Toxicity was assessed at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute skin toxicity criteria and cosmesis. At 12 months, SF and HfB were well tolerated by all patients with no Grade 3+ toxicity. At 1 year, Grade-2 toxicity was resolved. Ninety-eight percent of SF patients and ninety percent of HfB patients had 0-1 grade toxicity. In the SF and HfB groups, 100% of patients had excellent or good cosmesis at 12-month followup interval. The SF exhibited a more favorable cosmesis with a higher percentage of excellent scores compared with HfB (80.4% vs. 45%; p = 0.0033). After breast conservation surgery, SF or HfB may be an option for patients with early-stage breast cancer compared to conventional external beam radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Precision Medicine in Gastrointestinal Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David H; Park, Jason Y

    2016-05-01

    -Precision medicine is the promise of individualized therapy and management of patients based on their personal biology. There are now multiple global initiatives to perform whole-genome sequencing on millions of individuals. In the United States, an early program was the Million Veteran Program, and a more recent proposal in 2015 by the president of the United States is the Precision Medicine Initiative. To implement precision medicine in routine oncology care, genetic variants present in tumors need to be matched with effective clinical therapeutics. When we focus on the current state of precision medicine for gastrointestinal malignancies, it becomes apparent that there is a mixed history of success and failure. -To present the current state of precision medicine using gastrointestinal oncology as a model. We will present currently available targeted therapeutics, promising new findings in clinical genomic oncology, remaining quality issues in genomic testing, and emerging oncology clinical trial designs. -Review of the literature including clinical genomic studies on gastrointestinal malignancies, clinical oncology trials on therapeutics targeted to molecular alterations, and emerging clinical oncology study designs. -Translating our ability to sequence thousands of genes into meaningful improvements in patient survival will be the challenge for the next decade.

  2. High-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer: early toxicity and biochemical outcome in 772 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Yamada, Yoshiya; Marion, Christine; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard; Venkatraman, E.S.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute and late toxicity and preliminary biochemical outcomes in 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between April 1996 and January 2001, 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT. Treatment was planned using an inverse-planning approach, and the desired beam intensity profiles were delivered by dynamic multileaf collimation. A total of 698 patients (90%) were treated to 81.0 Gy, and 74 patients (10%) were treated to 86.4 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were scored by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scales. PSA relapse was defined according to The American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology Consensus Statement. The median follow-up time was 24 months (range: 6-60 months). Results: Thirty-five patients (4.5%) developed acute Grade 2 rectal toxicity, and no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or higher rectal symptoms. Two hundred seventeen patients (28%) developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, and one experienced urinary retention (Grade 3). Eleven patients (1.5%) developed late Grade 2 rectal bleeding. Four patients (0.1%) experienced Grade 3 rectal toxicity requiring either one or more transfusions or a laser cauterization procedure. No Grade 4 rectal complications have been observed. The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 4%. Seventy-two patients (9%) experienced late Grade 2 urinary toxicity, and five (0.5%) developed Grade 3 urinary toxicity (urethral stricture). The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 urinary toxicity was 15%. The 3-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival rates for favorable, intermediate, and unfavorable risk group patients were 92%, 86%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the feasibility of high-dose IMRT in a large number of patients. Acute and late rectal toxicities seem to be

  3. Gastrointestinal helminths in migratory Camel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Rewatkar

    Full Text Available Survey of gastrointestinal helminth parasites in camel migrated from U.P., M.P., and Rajasthan at Nagpur region was carried out in early summer, 2008. Total 28 samples (12 males and 16 females were collected from different places of Nagpur region. They revealed parasites as Trichuris sp.(50%, Strongyloides sp.(32.14%, Trichostrongylus sp.(10.71%, Nematodirus sp.(10.71%, Haemonchus sp.(14.28%, Eurytrema sp.(21.42% ,Eimeria sp.(25%, Entamoeba sp.(17.85% and Balantidium sp.(7.14%.All were found positive for mixed helminthic infection. [Vet World 2009; 2(7.000: 258-258

  4. Gastrointestinal polyposis in Cowden disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullnig, P.; Steiner, H.; Porsch, G.; Smolle, J.

    1987-01-01

    A case of Cowden disease (multiple hamartoma syndrome) with marked gastrointestinal polyposis is presented. The differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes is discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Gut microbiota in early life and its influence on health and disease: A position paper by the Malaysian Working Group on Gastrointestinal Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Hassan, Siti Asma; Ismail, Intan Hakimah; Chong, Sze Yee; Raja Ali, Raja Affendi; Amin Nordin, Syafinaz; Lee, Way Seah; Majid, Noorizan Abdul

    2017-12-01

    The role of gut microbiota in early life and its impact on gut health and subsequent diseases remain unclear. There is a lack of research and awareness in this area, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, including Malaysia. This paper reports the position of a Malaysian Working Group on some key issues surrounding gut microbiota in early life and its role in gut health and diseases, as well as experts' stand on probiotics and prebiotics. The group reached a consensus that certain factors, including elective caesarean; premature deliveries; complementary feeding; use of antibiotics, prebiotics and/or probiotics; and exposure to the external environmental, have an impact on gut microbiota in early life. However, as evidence is lacking, especially from the Asia-Pacific region, further studies are needed to understand how gut microbiota in early life affects subsequent diseases, including allergy, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and infantile colic. Lastly, although beneficial in acute diarrhoeal disease and probably allergic eczema, probiotics (and/or prebiotics) should be used cautiously in other gut dysbiotic conditions until more data are available. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  6. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-hedielberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  7. The toxicity of chlorpyrifos on the early life stage of zebrafish: a survey on the endpoints at development, locomotor behavior, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Liu, Zhenzhen; Peng, Tao; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is one of the most toxic pesticides in aquatic ecosystem, but its toxicity mechanisms to fish are still not fully understood. This study examined the toxicity targets of CPF in early life stage of zebrafish on the endpoints at developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity. Firstly, CPF exposure decreased the body length, inhibited the hatchability and heart rate, and resulted in a number of morphological abnormalities, primarily spinal deformities (SD) and pericardial edema (PE), in larval zebrafish. Secondly, the free swimming activities and the swimming behaviors of the larvae in response to the stimulation of light-to-dark photoperiod transition were significantly influenced by the exposure to 100 and 300 μg/L CPF. In addition, the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the transcription of some genes related to neurotoxicity were also influenced by CPF exposure. Thirdly, CPF exposure induced oxidative stress in the larval zebrafish. The malondialdehyde (MDA) levels increased and the glutathione (GSH) contents decreased significantly in a concentration-dependent manner after the exposure to CPF for 96 hours post fertilization (hpf). CPF affected not only the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), but also the transcriptional levels of their respective genes. Finally, the mRNA levels of the main cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (Tnfα), interferon (Ifn), interleukin-1 beta (Il-1β), interleukin 6 (Il6), complement factor 4 (C4) in the larvae increased significantly after the exposure to 100 or 300 μg/L CPF for 96 hpf, suggesting that the innate immune system disturbed by CPF in larvae. Taken together, our results suggested that CPF had the potential to cause developmental toxicity, behavior alterations, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in the larval zebrafish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  8. Tolerance and toxicity levels of boron in mung bean (vigna radiata (l.) wilczek) cultivars at early growth stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnain, A.; Mahmood, S.; Akhtar, S.; Malik, S.A.; Bashir, N.

    2011-01-01

    Boron (B) toxicity has been recognized as a serious problem in arid and semi arid regions of the world. This study was aimed to determine critical levels of B by studying phenotypic variation for B-tolerance/ toxicity at the germination and seedling stage in three mung bean (Vigna radiata) cultivars; M-6, M-8 and 96009. Boron levels ranging from 0-20 ppm were applied using Boric acid. Germination, growth and photosynthetic attributes were significantly (p<0.001) influenced by varying B levels. However, the cultivars were significantly invariable for germination, seedling height and leaf number. B levels (5-10 ppm) appeared to be nutritionally critical whereas, 15-20 ppm induced B toxicity. The toxicity was expressed in terms of reduction in plant's growth as well as by visible symptoms which included chlorosis and necrosis of the foliage. The present study also demonstrated variation in B tolerance at the seedling stage in these cultivars. Among the tested cultivars, M-6 and M-8 exhibited better growth responses as compared with 96009. Fresh biomass and shoot: root ratio appeared to serve as selection criteria for B tolerance. The study further suggested screening of cultivars/ accessions on a large scale to explore more diversity of traits as well as the use of biochemical markers for mechanistic understanding of B tolerance. (author)

  9. NeemAzal T/S – toxicity to early-life stages of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chromcová, L.; Blahová, J.; Živná, D.; Plhalová, L.; Casuscelli di Tocco, F.; Divišová, L.; Prokeš, Miroslav; Faggio, C.; Tichý, F.; Svobodová, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2015), s. 23-30 ISSN 0375-8427 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Neemazal T/S * embryo-larval toxicity test * azadirachtin * oxidative stress * histopathology * insecticide Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.560, year: 2015

  10. Timing of onset of gastrointestinal bleeding in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, A; Lange, T; Anthon, C T

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Critically ill patients are at risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, but clinically important gastrointestinal bleeding is rare. The majority of intensive care unit (ICU) patients receive stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP), despite uncertainty concerning the balance between benefit and harm....... For approximately half of ICU patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, onset is early, ie within the first two days of the ICU stay. The aetiology of gastrointestinal bleeding and consequently the balance between benefit and harm of SUP may differ between patients with early vs late gastrointestinal bleeding...... will describe baseline characteristics and assess the time to onset of the first clinically important episode of GI bleeding accounting for survival status and allocation to SUP or placebo. In addition, we will describe differences in therapeutic and diagnostic procedures used in patients with clinically...

  11. Toxicity of effluents from gasoline stations oil-water separators to early life stages of zebrafish Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Romulo Nepomuceno; Mariz, Célio Freire; Paulo, Driele Ventura de; Carvalho, Paulo S M

    2017-07-01

    Used petroleum hydrocarbons and gasoline stations runoff are significant sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to aquatic ecosystems. Samples of the final effluent of oil-water-separators were collected at gasoline stations in the metropolitan region of Recife, Brazil, before release to sewage or rainwater systems. Effluent soluble fractions (ESF) were prepared and bioassays were performed according to the Fish Embryo Toxicity Test. The test involved exposing zebrafish Danio rerio embryos to dilutions of the ESFs for 96 h, with daily examination of lethality and sublethal morphological effects integrated through the General Morphology Score (GMS), based on the achievement of developmental hallmarks. Frequencies of abnormalities were recorded after exposures. ESF LC50-96h (lethal concentration to 50% of exposed embryos) in the most toxic effluent achieved 8.9% (v/v), equivalent to 11 μg phenanthrene equivalents L -1 . GMS scores indicated significantly delayed embryo-larval development at ESF dilutions of 10% and 20% from effluents of all gas stations. Major abnormalities detected after the 96 h exposure included the presence of a yolk sac not fully absorbed coupled with the lack of an inflated swim bladder, lack of both pectoral fins, and the failure to develop a protruding mouth. Effective equivalent PAH concentrations that induce a 50% frequency of larvae without an inflated swim bladder (EC50) were 4.9 μg phenanthrene L -1 , 21.8 μg naphthalene L -1 , and 34.1 μg chrysene L -1 . This study shows that PAHs in ESFs from gas stations oil water separators are toxic to zebrafish, contributing to the toxicity of urban storm waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Angiography and the gastrointestinal bleeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, S.

    1982-01-01

    The role of angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed. Three categories of gastrointestinal bleeding are considered: upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices, upper gastrointestinal bleeding of arterial or capillary origin, and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The advantages and disadvantages of angiography are compared with those of radionuclide scanning and endoscopy or colonoscopy. It is anticipated that, as radionuclide scans are more widely employed, angiography will eventually be performed only in those patients with positive scans

  13. Toxicity of road deicing salt (NaCl) and copper (Cu) to fertilization and early developmental stages of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrosh, Urma; Kleiven, Merethe; Meland, Sondre; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian

    2014-09-15

    In many countries, salting of ice or snow covered roads may affect aquatic organisms in the catchment directly or indirectly by mobilization of toxic metals. We studied the toxicity of road deicing salt and copper (Cu) on the vulnerable early life stages of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), from fertilization till hatching. Controlled episodic exposure to road salt (≥ 5,000 mg/L) during fertilization resulted in reduced swelling and less percent egg survival. Exposure to Cu both during and post fertilization caused delayed hatching. Larval deformities were, however found as an additional effect, when eggs were exposed to high salt concentration (≥ 5,000 mg/L) mixed with Cu (10 μg Cu/L) during fertilization. Thus, it appears that the sensitivity of early developmental stages of Atlantic salmon increased when exposed to these stressors, and road salt application during spawning can pose threat to Atlantic salmon in water bodies receiving road runoff. The study gives insight on assessment and management of risks on Atlantic salmon population posed by road related hazardous chemicals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Toxicity of smelter slag-contaminated sediments from Upper Lake Roosevelt and associated metals to early life stage White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus Richardson, 1836)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.D.; Linder, G.

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of five smelter slag-contaminated sediments from the upper Columbia River and metals associated with those slags (cadmium, copper, zinc) was evaluated in 96-h exposures of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus Richardson, 1836) at 8 and 30 days post-hatch. Leachates prepared from slag-contaminated sediments were evaluated for toxicity. Leachates yielded a maximum aqueous copper concentration of 11.8 μg L−1 observed in sediment collected at Dead Man's Eddy (DME), the sampling site nearest the smelter. All leachates were nonlethal to sturgeon that were 8 day post-hatch (dph), but leachates from three of the five sediments were toxic to fish that were 30 dph, suggesting that the latter life stage is highly vulnerable to metals exposure. Fish maintained consistent and prolonged contact with sediments and did not avoid contaminated sediments when provided a choice between contaminated and uncontaminated sediments. White Sturgeon also failed to avoid aqueous copper (1.5–20 μg L−1). In water-only 96-h exposures of 35 dph sturgeon with the three metals, similar toxicity was observed during exposure to water spiked with copper alone and in combination with cadmium and zinc. Cadmium ranging from 3.2 to 41 μg L−1 or zinc ranging from 21 to 275 μg L−1 was not lethal, but induced adverse behavioral changes including a loss of equilibrium. These results suggest that metals associated with smelter slags may pose an increased exposure risk to early life stage sturgeon if fish occupy areas contaminated by slags.

  15. An Evaluation of Molybdenum Toxicity to the Oligochaete, Tubifex tubifex, and Early-Life Stages of Brown Trout, Salmo trutta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Brett T; Quinteros, Claudio; Burnett-Seidel, Charlene; Elphick, James R

    2017-06-01

    Limited data are available describing the aquatic toxicity of molybdenum in freshwater environments, making it difficult to assess the aquatic risk to freshwater organisms. In order to increase available information on the aquatic toxicity of molybdenum, a 96-h LC50 test with the oligochaete Tubifex tubifex and an 85-day development test using brown trout, Salmo trutta, were conducted. The T. tubifex test resulted in an LC50 value of 2782 mg/L. No adverse effects were observed on brown trout survival or length in the concentrations tested, however an IC10 value for growth (wet weight) was determined to be 202 mg/L. Whole body fish tissue concentrations for molybdenum increased in all treatment concentrations tested, although bioconcentration factors decreased at greater exposure concentrations, and ranged from 0.13 at an exposure concentration of 20 mg/L to 0.04 at an exposure of 1247 mg/L. A body burden of 26.0 mg/kg was associated with reduced wet weight.

  16. Toxicity of sediment-associated substituted phenylamine antioxidants on the early life stages of Pimephales promelas and a characterization of effects on freshwater organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Ryan S; Parrott, Joanne L; Galicia, Melissa; Shires, Kallie; Sullivan, Cheryl; Toito, John; Bartlett, Adrienne J; Milani, Danielle; Gillis, Patty L; Balakrishnan, Vimal K

    2017-10-01

    Substituted phenylamine antioxidants (SPAs) are high production volume chemicals that are incorporated into a variety of commercial products (e.g., polymers, dyes, lubricants). There are few data on chronic toxicity of SPAs to fish and no data on the toxicity of SPAs to the early life stages of fish. The physicochemical properties of SPAs would suggest that if they were to enter an aquatic ecosystem they would partition into sediment. Therefore, the present study focused on investigating the chronic effect of sediment-associated SPAs to the early life stages of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Eggs and larvae were exposed to sediment spiked with diphenylamine (DPA), N-phenyl-1-napthylamine (PNA), N-(1,3-dimethylbutyl)-N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (DPPDA), or 4,4'-methylene-bis[N-sec-butylaniline] (MBA). The most sensitive endpoint for DPA, PNA, and DPPDA was total survival with 21-d median lethal concentrations (LC50s) based on concentration in overlying water of 1920, 74, and 35 μg/L, respectively. The most sensitive endpoint for MBA was growth with a 21-d median effective concentration (EC50) of 71 μg/L. The same endpoints were the most sensitive in terms of concentrations of DPA, PNA, DPPDA, and MBA in sediment (101, 54, 111, and 76 μg/g dry wt, respectively). Species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) were constructed for each SPA based on acute and chronic toxicity data generated in the present study and found in the literature. Overall, P. promelas was in the midrange of chronic sensitivity, with the most sensitive species being Tubifex tubifex. The SSDs indicate that DPA based on concentration in water is the least toxic to aquatic biota of the 4 SPAs investigated. The constructed SSDs indicate that a concentration in water and sediment of 1 μg/L and 1 μg/g dry weight, respectively, would be protective of >95% of the aquatic species tested. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2730-2738. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  17. Studies on the toxic effects of periodontal sustained release drug containing ornidazole and pefloxacin mesylate on early embryonic development of SD rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-mou DONG

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the toxic effects of periodontal sustained release drug containing ornidazole and pefloxacin mesylate on early embryonic development of SD rats.Methods A total of 100female SD rats were randomly divided into negative control,low-,medium-,high-dose group and intervention group(20each.Rats in low-,medium-and high-dose group were fed daily with the sustained release drug at 1,4,and 8g/kg respectively;those in negative control group were fed daily with distilled water from the 14th day before mating to the 7th day of pregnancy continuously,and those in intervention group received cyclophosphamide(40mg/kgby intraperitoneal injection for 5successive days.During this period,the general status,mating,pregnancy,coefficient of ovary and uterus,the numbers of corpus luteum,nidation,live births,stillbirths,absorbed embryo,prenidatory and postnidatory mortality,serum testosterone(Tand estradiol(E2were determined respectively.Histopathologic examination of the ovary and uterus,immunohistochemical observation of ovaries for proliferating cell nuclear antigen(PCNAand Bcl-2associated X protein(Baxwere also performed respectively.Results The general status of those rats was good except one in the low-dose group and one in the intervention group died on the 14th day of administration,and one in negative control and one in high dose group died on the 5th day of pregnancy,respectively.The body weight of animals decreased significantly(P 0.05.The serum T level in medium-and high-dose group and the E2level in high-dose group declined compared to that in negative control group(P < 0.05.Conclusions Although the periodontal sustained release drug containing ornidazole and pefloxacin mesylate shows no toxicity to the early embryonic development of SD rats,the high dose drug has certain toxicity to ovary.Declined serum concentrations of T and E2,reduced expression of PCNA,and increased Bax may be the causes of the toxicity.

  18. Early and late toxicity of involved-field radiation therapy in conjunction with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell rescue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubich, L.; Mundt, A.; Sibley, G.; Hallahan, D.; Nautiyal, J.; Weichselbaum, R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Recent reports have demonstrated a benefit to involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) in patients with relapsed/metastatic disease undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell rescue (SCR). We evaluate here the early and late toxicity of this approach. Methods: Eighty-five patients with either metastatic breast cancer (MBC) (31) or relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD) (54) underwent HDCT/SCR. HDCT in the MBC patients consisted of cytoxan, thiotepa +/- carmustine and VP-16, cytoxan, BCNU +/- thiotepa in the HD patients. Thirty-four patients (40%) received IFRT either prior to (14) or following (20) HDCT to sites of disease involvement. A total of 18 patients received chest wall/mediastinal (CWMED) RT. Median followup for the MBC and HD patients were 21.3 months and 41 months, respectively. Results: Acute sequelae were similar in the 2 groups. Only one patient (5%) treated with IFRT (HD with 5 nodal sites) required a break from therapy due to low blood counts. Seven patients (0 MBC, 7 HD) (8.2%) suffered a toxic death (TD). No difference in was seen in the rate of TD in the patients as a whole ((1(14)) vs. (6(71))) (p =0.87) nor in the HD patients alone ((1(7)) vs. (6(47))) (p =0.91) with the use of IFRT prior to HDCT. Eleven patients (12.9%) developed late toxicity: 3 myelodysplasia/acute leukemia (MAL), 2 persistent low blood counts (requiring transfusions), 4 pulmonary toxicity (PT) and 2 hypothyroidism. All 4 cases of PT occurred in the HD group of which 3 received CWMED RT. The Table below shows the 5-yr actuarial risk of PT with and without CWMED RT as well as the 5-yr actuarial risk of MAL and any hematologic sequelae with and without RT. Multivariate analysis in the HD patients demonstrated that CWMED RT was the most significant factor for PT (p =0.09). All 3 cases of MAL and the 2 cases of persistent low blood counts occurred in the HD group. The use of IFRT did not increase the incidence of MAL or of any hematologic sequelae

  19. Impact of Sequencing Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy on Long-Term Local Toxicity for Early Breast Cancer: Results of a Randomized Study at 15-Year Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnarò, Paola; Giordano, Carolina; Farneti, Alessia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Strigari, Lidia; Landoni, Valeria [Department of Physics, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Marucci, Laura; Petrongari, Maria Grazia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Sanguineti, Giuseppe, E-mail: sanguineti@ifo.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To compare long-term late local toxicity after either concomitant or sequential chemoradiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2002, women aged 18 to 75 years who underwent breast-conserving surgery and axillary dissection for early breast cancer and in whom CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy was planned were randomized between concomitant and sequential radiation therapy. Radiation therapy was delivered to the whole breast through tangential fields to 50 Gy in 20 fractions over a period of 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost. Surviving patients were tentatively contacted and examined between March and September 2014. Patients in whom progressive disease had developed or who had undergone further breast surgery were excluded. Local toxicity (fibrosis, telangiectasia, and breast atrophy or retraction) was scored blindly to the treatment received. A logistic regression was run to investigate the effect of treatment sequence after correction for several patient-, treatment-, and tumor-related covariates on selected endpoints. The median time to cross-sectional analysis was 15.7 years (range, 12.0-17.8 years). Results: Of 206 patients randomized, 154 (74.8%) were potentially eligible. Of these, 43 (27.9%) refused participation and 4 (2.6%) had been lost to follow-up, and for 5 (3.2%), we could not restore planning data; thus, the final number of analyzed patients was 102. No grade 4 toxicity had been observed, whereas the number of grade 3 toxicity events was low (<8%) for each item, allowing pooling of grade 2 and 3 events for further analysis. Treatment sequence (concomitant vs sequential) was an independent predictor of grade 2 or 3 fibrosis according to both the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-12.2; P=.013) and the SOMA (Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic

  20. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. Methods The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. Results By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). Conclusions There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer

  1. Impact of Sequencing Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy on Long-Term Local Toxicity for Early Breast Cancer: Results of a Randomized Study at 15-Year Follow-Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnarò, Paola; Giordano, Carolina; Farneti, Alessia; Strigari, Lidia; Landoni, Valeria; Marucci, Laura; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare long-term late local toxicity after either concomitant or sequential chemoradiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2002, women aged 18 to 75 years who underwent breast-conserving surgery and axillary dissection for early breast cancer and in whom CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy was planned were randomized between concomitant and sequential radiation therapy. Radiation therapy was delivered to the whole breast through tangential fields to 50 Gy in 20 fractions over a period of 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost. Surviving patients were tentatively contacted and examined between March and September 2014. Patients in whom progressive disease had developed or who had undergone further breast surgery were excluded. Local toxicity (fibrosis, telangiectasia, and breast atrophy or retraction) was scored blindly to the treatment received. A logistic regression was run to investigate the effect of treatment sequence after correction for several patient-, treatment-, and tumor-related covariates on selected endpoints. The median time to cross-sectional analysis was 15.7 years (range, 12.0-17.8 years). Results: Of 206 patients randomized, 154 (74.8%) were potentially eligible. Of these, 43 (27.9%) refused participation and 4 (2.6%) had been lost to follow-up, and for 5 (3.2%), we could not restore planning data; thus, the final number of analyzed patients was 102. No grade 4 toxicity had been observed, whereas the number of grade 3 toxicity events was low (<8%) for each item, allowing pooling of grade 2 and 3 events for further analysis. Treatment sequence (concomitant vs sequential) was an independent predictor of grade 2 or 3 fibrosis according to both the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-12.2; P=.013) and the SOMA (Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic

  2. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time.

  3. Effects of Environmental Contamination and Acute Toxicity of N-Nitrate on Early Life Stages of Endemic Arboreal Frog, Polypedates cruciger (Blyth, 1852).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balangoda, Anusha; Deepananda, K H M Ashoka; Wegiriya, H C E

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the potential toxic effects of environmentally relevant nitrate concentrations on development, growth, and mortality of early life stages of common hour-glass tree frog, Polypedates cruciger. Tadpoles from hatchlings through pre-adult were exposed to environmentally relevant nitrate concentrations detected in Mirissa, Sri Lanka. Newly hatched, external gill stage, and internal gill stage tadpoles were exposed to potassium nitrate for bioassay tests. No behavioral changes or abnormalities were observed in control and nitrate-induced group. However, detected environmental nitrate concentration significantly increased (p nitrate pollution than internal gill stage. The results suggest that environmentally relevant nitrate can cause mortality on the amphibian population in ecosystems associated with agro-pastoral activities through altering the growth and direct toxicological effects on the survivorship.

  4. Nanotechnology in gastrointestinal endoscopy: A primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar Jha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is the understanding, control of matter and development of engineered devices in nanometer range (1-100 nm. Nanoparticles have different physicochemical properties (small size, large surface area to volume ratio, and high reactivity in comparison to bulk materials of the same composition. The nanotechnology has proved its usefulness in early diagnosis, proteonomics, imaging diagnostics and multifunctional therapeutics. Recent studies have shown its role in early diagnosis and targeted therapy of various gastrointestinal disorders such as hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus related liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, gastric ulcer, and malignancy. Application of this technology appears promising in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy such as the endoscopic hemostasis of peptic ulcer bleeding, prevention of clogging of plastic stent and advance capsule endoscopy. This article will highlight the basic concepts of nanotechnology and its potential application in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

  5. Toxic effect of barium on germination and early growth of maize seedling and its reversal by nutrition and gibberellic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, J.; Ijaz, F.

    2002-01-01

    Maize seeds were soaked in 0-100 mM BaCl/sub 2/ for 24h followed by soaking of one batch of seeds in 100 mM GA/sub 3/ (Gibberellic acid) for 8h. Subsequently seeds were germinated and grown in four batches: Ba-treated in distilled water; Ba-treated in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution; Ba-GA/sub 3/ treated in distilled water; Ba-treated in half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution; Ba-GA/sub 3/ treated in distilled water and Ba-GA/sub 3/ treated in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution. There was a general decline in germination and inhibition of growth in seedlings raised from Ba-treated seeds, at all doses except at 0.1 mM, where a significant improvement in all growth parameters were observed. Both nutrient solution and GA/sub 3/ treatment reduced the toxic effects of Ba on germination and growth. The effects of GA/sub 3/ + nutrient solution were synergistic as maximum restoration to the effects of Ba were observed when GA/sub 3/ treated seeds were grown in nutrient medium. It is concluded that both nutrition solution and GA/sub 3/ were effective in reversing the Ba induced suppression of germination and inhibition in root-shoot length, and dry weights.(author)

  6. [The unicorn and the pharmacists. Early modern views on the presumed anti-toxic effects of unicorn horn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, W P

    2007-01-01

    Around 1600, the age-old belief in the anti-toxic effect of unicorn horn began to be called into question. This is evidenced by the views of two well-known French pharmaceutic authorities whose publications are discussed in this paper: the surgeon Ambroise Paré (1510-1590), court physician to four French kings, and the Montpellier pharmacist Laurent Catelan (1568-1647), who owned a famous cabinet de curiosités. Although Paré had to accept, however reluctantly, the existence of the unicorn (since it is mentioned in the Bible), he vehemently denied the supposed medicinal effect of unicorn products. He defended his position by an appeal to ancient and contemporary authorities, by rational argumentation, and by experiment. Paré's arguments failed to convince Catelan, who adhered to an alternative, so-called spagyric, medical theory of neoplatonic inspiration, as propagated by Paracelsus and Ficino. Catelan remained convinced of the efficacity of unicorn horn, which in his view could drain the human body from any poisonous substance. The medical establishment being reluctant to give up a rewarding source of income,'unicorn' remained much in demand as a prescription.

  7. Toxic effects of irgarol and diuron on sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus early development, fertilization, and offspring quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, S; Buono, S; Cremisini, C

    2006-07-01

    Irgarol and Diuron are the most representative "organic booster biocides" that replaced organotin compounds in antifouling paints. It cannot be assumed beforehand that their use will have no environmental impact: more ecotoxicological data and a significant environmental monitoring are required. Spermio and embryotoxicities of the biocides Irgarol and Diuron were investigated on Paracentrotus lividus, the dominant echinoid species of the Mediterranean Sea. Spermiotoxicity was studied by assessing the effects of sperm exposure on fertilization rate as well as on the induction of transmissible damages to the offspring. Embryotoxicity was studied by assessing the developmental defects in the exposed larvae. The experimental results show a Diuron EC50 of 2.39 (+/- 0.21) mg/L with a NOEL of 0.25 mg/L for embryos, and of 5.09 (+/- 0.45) mg/L with a NOEL of 0.5 mg/L for sperms, respectively. Data obtained from the embryotoxicity test on Irgarol [EC50 0.99 (+/- 0.69) mg/L] are of the same order of magnitude as the literature data about Japanese urchins. Spermiotoxicity tests show an Irgarol EC50 of 9.04 (+/- 0.45) mg/L with a NOEL of 0.1 mg/L. These data show the different sensitivities of the two tests: embryos are more sensitive than sperms for both the tested chemicals and Diuron seems to be the less toxic one. Moreover, as a major output of the experimental work, tested herbicides exert transmissible damage to spermatozoa evidenced by larval malformations in the offspring, mainly P1 type (skeletal alterations). The comparison of the endpoints results offers an interesting indication of a probable different mode of action (Irgarol seems to interact with calcium homeostasis) of the two biocides.

  8. Toxicity of glyphosate as Glypro and LI700 to red-eared slider (trachemys scripta elegans) embryos and early hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparling, Donald W; Matson, Cole; Bickham, John; Doelling-Brown, Paige

    2006-10-01

    More than 8.2 billion ha of cropland, gardens, and forests are treated with the herbicide glyphosate each year. Whereas the toxicity of glyphosate and associated adjuvants has been measured in other vertebrates, few, if any, studies have looked at their effects in reptiles. In some instances, management of turtle habitat requires control of successional stages through application of herbicides. Adults and juvenile turtles may be exposed directly, whereas embryos may contact the chemicals through the soil. In the present study, we exposed eggs of red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) to single applications of herbicide ranging from 0 to 11,206 ppm wet weight of glyphosate in Glypro and 0 to 678 ppm of the surfactant, LI700. Hatching success at the highest concentration was significantly lower (73%) than in other treatments (80-100%). At hatch, turtles at the highest concentration weighed less than those at other concentrations. During a 14-d holding period, we observed dose-response relationships in the ability of hatchlings to right themselves when turned on their backs. At the end of the holding period, hatchlings at the highest dose level were still lighter, and somatic indices were lower, than those in other treatments. Genetic damage, as measured by flow cytometry, increased with treatment concentration except for the highest dose. We conclude that because of the high concentrations needed to produce effects and the protection offered by several centimeters of soil or sediment, glyphosate with LI700 poses low levels of risk to red-eared slider embryos under normal field operations with regards to the endpoints measured in the present study. Carelessness in handling glyphosate or failure to follow label directions may produce adverse effects. There also is a risk that the health of turtle embryos may be affected in ways not measured in the present study.

  9. Disease-toxicant interactions in manganese exposed Huntington disease mice: early changes in striatal neuron morphology and dopamine metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Madison

    Full Text Available YAC128 Huntington's disease (HD transgenic mice accumulate less manganese (Mn in the striatum relative to wild-type (WT littermates. We hypothesized that Mn and mutant Huntingtin (HTT would exhibit gene-environment interactions at the level of neurochemistry and neuronal morphology. Twelve-week-old WT and YAC128 mice were exposed to MnCl(2-4H(2O (50 mg/kg on days 0, 3 and 6. Striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN morphology, as well as levels of dopamine (DA and its metabolites (which are known to be sensitive to Mn-exposure, were analyzed at 13 weeks (7 days from initial exposure and 16 weeks (28 days from initial exposure. No genotype-dependent differences in MSN morphology were apparent at 13 weeks. But at 16 weeks, a genotype effect was observed in YAC128 mice, manifested by an absence of the wild-type age-dependent increase in dendritic length and branching complexity. In addition, genotype-exposure interaction effects were observed for dendritic complexity measures as a function of distance from the soma, where only YAC128 mice were sensitive to Mn exposure. Furthermore, striatal DA levels were unaltered at 13 weeks by genotype or Mn exposure, but at 16 weeks, both Mn exposure and the HD genotype were associated with quantitatively similar reductions in DA and its metabolites. Interestingly, Mn exposure of YAC128 mice did not further decrease DA or its metabolites versus YAC128 vehicle exposed or Mn exposed WT mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate Mn-HD disease-toxicant interactions at the onset of striatal dendritic neuropathology in YAC128 mice. Our results identify the earliest pathological change in striatum of YAC128 mice as being between 13 to 16 weeks. Finally, we show that mutant HTT suppresses some Mn-dependent changes, such as decreased DA levels, while it exacerbates others, such as dendritic pathology.

  10. The early toxicity of escalated versus standard dose conformal radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression for patients with localised prostate cancer: Results from the MRC RT01 trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, David P.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Langley, Ruth E.; Graham, John D.; Huddart, Robert A.; Syndikus, Isabel; Matthews, John H.L.; Scrase, Christopher D.; Jose, Chakiath C.; Logue, John; Stephens, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Five-year disease-free survival rates for localised prostate cancer following standard doses of conventional radical external beam radiotherapy are around 80%. Conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) raises the possibility that radiotherapy doses can be increased and long-term efficacy outcomes improved, with safety an important consideration. Methods: MRC RT01 is a randomised controlled trial of 862 men with localised prostate cancer comparing Standard CFRT (64 Gy/32 f) versus Escalated CFRT (74 Gy/37 f), both administered with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression. Early toxicity was measured using physician-reported instruments (RTOG, LENT/SOM, Royal Marsden Scales) and patient-reported questionnaires (MOS SF-36, UCLA Prostate Cancer Index, FACT-P). Results: Overall early radiotherapy toxicity was similar, apart from increased bladder, bowel and sexual toxicity, in the Escalated Group during a short immediate post-radiotherapy period. Toxicity in both groups had abated by week 12. Using RTOG Acute Toxicity scores, cumulative Grade ≥2 bladder and bowel toxicity was 38% and 30% for Standard Group and 39% and 33% in Escalated Group, respectively. Urinary frequency (Royal Marsden Scale) improved in both groups from pre-androgen suppression to 6 months post-radiotherapy (p < 0.001), but bowel and sexual functioning deteriorated. This pattern was supported by patient-completed assessments. Six months after starting radiotherapy the incidence of RTOG Grade ≥2 side-effects was low (<1%); but there were six reports of rectal ulceration (6 Escalated Group), six haematuria (5 Escalated Group) and eight urethral stricture (6 Escalated Group). Conclusions: The two CFRT schedules with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression have broadly similar early toxicity profiles except for the immediate post-RT period. At 6 months and compared to before hormone therapy, bladder symptoms improved, whereas bowel and sexual symptoms worsened. These assessments of early treatment safety will be

  11. Treatment of Early-Stage Unfavorable Hodgkin Lymphoma: Efficacy and Toxicity of 4 Versus 6 Cycles of ABVD Chemotherapy With Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, Jillian R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fanale, Michelle A. [Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Reddy, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Akhtari, Mani [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L.; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Milgrom, Sarah A.; Yehia, Zeinab Abou; Allen, Pamela K.; Osborne, Eleanor M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dabaja, Bouthaina S., E-mail: bdabaja@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The German Hodgkin Study Group HD11 trial validated 4 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) for early unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. However, practitioners often recommend 6 cycles followed by RT, especially for bulky disease. We compared patient outcomes after treatment with 4 or 6 cycles of ABVD followed by RT (IFRT and involved site RT [ISRT]). Methods and Materials: We identified 128 patients treated for early unfavorable HL (GHSG criteria) between 2000 and 2013. Clinical outcomes (overall survival [OS] and freedom from relapse [FFR]) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Toxicities were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.0 years. Patients received 4 (70 patients, 55%) or 6 (58 patients, 45%) cycles of chemotherapy. Bulky disease was present in 22 patients (31%; 0 stage IA, 3 stage IB, 19 stage IIA) of the 4-cycle group and 42 patients (72%; 5 stage IA, 3 stage IB, 34 stage IIA) of the 6-cycle group. For patients receiving 4 and 6 cycles, the 6-year OS was 100% and 97% (P=.35), respectively, and the 6 year FFR was 100% and 98% (P=.28), respectively. More patients received 6 cycles if they were treated before 2010 (HD11 report) (P=.01) and if they had bulky disease (P<.01). Sixty-eight percent of patients received ISRT. The 6-year FFR was 99% and 100% for patients receiving ISRT and IFRT, respectively (P=.58). More patients experienced bleomycin pulmonary toxicity in the 6-cycle group (20% vs 31%, P=.16). For patients with bulky disease, the 4-year FFR was similar with receipt of 4 (100%) or 6 (98%) cycles (P=.48) and IFRT (100%) or ISRT (98%) (P=.52). There were no deaths among patients with bulky disease. Conclusions: Patients with early unfavorable HL have excellent outcomes with 4 cycles of ABVD chemotherapy followed by ISRT. Six cycles of chemotherapy does not appear superior for disease control, even for bulky disease.

  12. Treatment of Early-Stage Unfavorable Hodgkin Lymphoma: Efficacy and Toxicity of 4 Versus 6 Cycles of ABVD Chemotherapy With Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Fanale, Michelle A.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Smith, Grace L.; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Milgrom, Sarah A.; Yehia, Zeinab Abou; Allen, Pamela K.; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Mawlawi, Osama; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The German Hodgkin Study Group HD11 trial validated 4 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) for early unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. However, practitioners often recommend 6 cycles followed by RT, especially for bulky disease. We compared patient outcomes after treatment with 4 or 6 cycles of ABVD followed by RT (IFRT and involved site RT [ISRT]). Methods and Materials: We identified 128 patients treated for early unfavorable HL (GHSG criteria) between 2000 and 2013. Clinical outcomes (overall survival [OS] and freedom from relapse [FFR]) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Toxicities were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.0 years. Patients received 4 (70 patients, 55%) or 6 (58 patients, 45%) cycles of chemotherapy. Bulky disease was present in 22 patients (31%; 0 stage IA, 3 stage IB, 19 stage IIA) of the 4-cycle group and 42 patients (72%; 5 stage IA, 3 stage IB, 34 stage IIA) of the 6-cycle group. For patients receiving 4 and 6 cycles, the 6-year OS was 100% and 97% (P=.35), respectively, and the 6 year FFR was 100% and 98% (P=.28), respectively. More patients received 6 cycles if they were treated before 2010 (HD11 report) (P=.01) and if they had bulky disease (P<.01). Sixty-eight percent of patients received ISRT. The 6-year FFR was 99% and 100% for patients receiving ISRT and IFRT, respectively (P=.58). More patients experienced bleomycin pulmonary toxicity in the 6-cycle group (20% vs 31%, P=.16). For patients with bulky disease, the 4-year FFR was similar with receipt of 4 (100%) or 6 (98%) cycles (P=.48) and IFRT (100%) or ISRT (98%) (P=.52). There were no deaths among patients with bulky disease. Conclusions: Patients with early unfavorable HL have excellent outcomes with 4 cycles of ABVD chemotherapy followed by ISRT. Six cycles of chemotherapy does not appear superior for disease control, even for bulky disease.

  13. GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eTornillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild-type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other entities, have been discovered (e.g. succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data.

  14. Radiology illustrated. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-01-01

    Radiology Illustrated: Gastrointestinal Tract is the second of two volumes designed to provide clear and practical guidance on the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. The book presents approximately 300 cases with 1500 carefully selected and categorized illustrations of gastrointestinal tract diseases, along with key text messages and tables that will help the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis., Essential points are summarized at the end of each text message to facilitate rapid review and learning. Additionally, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by case studies of both common and uncommon pathologies that illustrate the roles of the different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Radiology illustrated. Gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ihn (ed.) [Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-02-01

    Radiology Illustrated: Gastrointestinal Tract is the second of two volumes designed to provide clear and practical guidance on the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. The book presents approximately 300 cases with 1500 carefully selected and categorized illustrations of gastrointestinal tract diseases, along with key text messages and tables that will help the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis., Essential points are summarized at the end of each text message to facilitate rapid review and learning. Additionally, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by case studies of both common and uncommon pathologies that illustrate the roles of the different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Gastrointestinal Complications of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Malhi, Harmeet; Acosta, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Obesity usually is associated with morbidity related to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are many gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases for which obesity is the direct cause (eg, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) or is a significant risk factor, such as reflux esophagitis and gallstones. When obesity is a risk factor, it may interact with other mechanisms and result in earlier presentation or complicated diseases. There are increased odds ratios or relative risks of several gastrointestinal complications of obesity: gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, erosive gastritis, gastric cancer, diarrhea, colonic diverticular disease, polyps, cancer, liver disease including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallstones, acute pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. Gastroenterologists are uniquely poised to participate in the multidisciplinary management of obesity as physicians caring for people with obesity-related diseases, in addition to their expertise in nutrition and endoscopic interventions. PMID:28192107

  17. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Orexins and gastrointestinal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccari, M C

    2010-03-01

    Orexin A (OXA) and orexin B (OXB) are recently discovered neuropeptides that appear to play a role in various distinct functions such as arousal and the sleep-wake cycle as well as on appetite and regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis. Orexins were first described as neuropeptides expressed by a specific population of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, a region classically implicated in feeding behaviour. Orexin neurons project to numerous brain regions, where orexin receptors have been shown to be widely distributed: both OXA and OXB act through two subtypes of receptors (OX1R and OX2R) that belong to the G protein-coupled superfamily of receptors. Growing evidence indicates that orexins act in the central nervous system also to regulate gastrointestinal functions: animal studies have indeed demonstrated that centrally-injected orexins or endogenously released orexins in the brain stimulates gastric secretion and influence gastrointestinal motility. The subsequent identification of orexins and their receptors in the enteric nervous system (including the myenteric and the submucosal plexuses) as well as in mucosa and smooth muscles has suggested that these neuropeptides may also play a local action. In this view, emerging studies indicate that orexins also exert region-specific contractile or relaxant effects on isolated gut preparations. The aim of the proposed review is to summarize both centrally- and peripherally-mediated actions of orexins on gastrointestinal functions and to discuss the related physiological role on the basis of the most recent findings.

  19. Automated assessments of circumferential strain from cine CMR correlate with LVEF declines in cancer patients early after receipt of cardio-toxic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Jordan, Jennifer H; Meléndez, Giselle C; McNeal, Gary R; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Hundley, W Gregory

    2017-08-02

     minutes from cine bSSFP LV short-axis images (used concurrently to assess LV volumes and EF) in 98.6% of patients receiving treatment for cancer with potentially cardio-toxic chemotherapy. These cine derived measures of circumferential strain correlate with early subclinical declines in LVEF.

  20. Renal function, body surface area, and age are associated with risk of early-onset fluoropyrimidine-associated toxicity in patients treated with capecitabine-based anticancer regimens in daily clinical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulendijks, Didier; van Hasselt, J G Coen; Huitema, Alwin D R; van Tinteren, Harm; Deenen, Maarten J; Beijnen, Jos H; Cats, Annemieke; Schellens, Jan H M

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this analysis was to determine the factors associated with early onset treatment-related toxicity in patients treated with capecitabine-based anticancer regimens in daily clinical care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 1463 patients previously included in a prospective

  1. Testing lagoonal sediments with early life stages of the copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana): An approach to assess sediment toxicity in the Venice Lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Marco; Bergamin, Martina; Delaney, Eugenia; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2018-01-01

    The early-life stages of development of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa from egg to copepodite I is proposed as an endpoint for assessing sediment toxicity by exposing newly released eggs directly onto the sediment-water interface. A preliminary study of 5 sediment samples collected in the lagoon of Venice highlighted that the larval development rate (LDR) and the early-life stages (ELS) mortality endpoints with A. tonsa are more sensitive than the standard amphipod mortality test; moreover LDR resulted in a more reliable endpoint than ELS mortality, due to the interference of the sediment with the recovery of unhatched eggs and dead larvae. The LDR data collected in a definitive study of 48 sediment samples from the Venice Lagoon has been analysed together with the preliminary data to evaluate the statistical performances of the bioassay (among replicate variance and minimum significant difference between samples and control) and to investigate the possible correlation with sediment chemistry and physical properties. The results showed that statistical performances of the LDR test with A. tonsa correspond with the outcomes of other tests applied to the sediment-water interface (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryotoxicity test), sediments (Neanthes arenaceodentata survival and growth test) and porewater (S. purpuratus); the LDR endpoint did, however, show a slightly higher variance as compared with other tests used in the Lagoon of Venice, such as 10-d amphipod lethality test and larval development with sea urchin and bivalves embryos. Sediment toxicity data highlighted the high sensitivity and the clear ability of the larval development to discriminate among sediments characterized by different levels of contamination. The data of the definitive study evidenced that inhibition of the larval development was not affected by grain-size and the organic carbon content of the sediment; in contrast, a strong correlation between inhibition of the larval development

  2. Metal metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Whelton, B.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Peterson, D.P.; Oldham, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    This research focuses on the role of pregnancy and lactation in susceptibility to the toxic effects of cadmium and lead. Responses under investigation include lead-induced changes in pathways for vitamin D and calcium metabolism and cadmium-induced alterations in kidney function and skeletal structure. The second area focuses on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and other actinide elements. Studies currently being conducted in nonhuman primates to develop a procedure to determine GI absorption values of uranium and plutonium that does not require sacrifice of the animal. 6 refs

  3. Factors modifying the toxicity of total body irradiation (TBI) with bone marrow transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    In defined-flora, barrier-maintained rats, radiation nephritis is the principle late toxicity seen after single dose, high dose rate TBI with bone marrow transplant. Shielding the kidneys eliminates this late toxicity. If rats are exposed to a conventional microbiological environment during and after TBI and bone marrow transplant, the principle late toxicity is pneumonitis. Low dose rate TBI gives similar renal toxicity but at doses twice as large. Clinically, TBI and bone marrow transplant is preceded by intensive drug treatment, typically with cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and cytosine arabinoside (ara-C). Pretreatment with a standard cytoxan/ara-C regimen, has no effect on the gastrointestinal toxicity of TBI, but results in a decrease in marrow toxicity. Late renal toxicity still occurs when bone marrow transplants are given, but it is to early to determine whether drug treatment has affected late renal tolerance. Experiments are also underway to determine the effects of fractionated TBI (3, 6 and 9 fractions in 60 hours) on acute tolerance and on late tolerance after bone marrow transplantation

  4. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J.; Siech, M.

    2000-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  5. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Ulm (Germany); Siech, M. [Dept. of Abdominal Surgery, University of Ulm (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  6. in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Uzman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : There is increasing interest in sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE. Prospective randomized studies comparing sedation properties and complications of propofol and midazolam/meperidine in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE are few. Aim: To compare propofol and midazolam/meperidine sedation for UGE in terms of cardiopulmonary side effects, patient and endoscopist satisfaction and procedure-related times. Material and methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study of propofol versus midazolam and meperidine in 100 patients scheduled for diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The patients were divided into propofol and midazolam/meperidine groups. Randomization was generated by a computer. Cardiopulmonary side effects (hypotension, bradycardia, hypoxemia, procedure-related times (endoscopy time, awake time, time to hospital discharge, and patient and endoscopist satisfaction were compared between groups. Results: There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to the cost, endoscopy time, or demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients. Awake time and time to hospital discharge were significantly shorter in the propofol group (6.58 ±4.72 vs. 9.32 ±4.26 min, p = 0.030 and 27.60 ±7.88 vs. 32.00 ±10.54 min, p = 0.019. Hypotension incidence was significantly higher in the propofol group (12% vs. 0%, p = 0.027. The patient and endoscopist satisfaction was better with propofol. Conclusions : Propofol may be preferred to midazolam/meperidine sedation, with a shorter awake and hospital discharge time and better patient and endoscopist satisfaction. However, hypotension risk should be considered with propofol, and careful evaluation is needed, particularly in cardiopulmonary disorders.

  7. Radiodiagnosis of tumours of gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Yu.N.; Antonovich, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    Systematic description of X-ray picture of tumours of gastrointestinal tract organs is given. The possibilities of contemporary methods of X-ray examination in their revealing are shown. Clinical and X-ray trend of tumour diagnosis is underlined. The basic and accessory symptoms are analyzed from which X-ray semiotics of tumours is turned out. The expressiveness of X-ray symptoms is shown in relation to morphological forms and localization of the tumours. Much attention is given to radiodiagnosis of early tumours of stomach. Differential diagnosis of tumours with non-tumoural diseases is given. X-ray semiotics of lesions of gastrointestinal tract organs in malignant diseases of blood system is presented [ru

  8. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Majid T Noghani; Hossein Rezaeizadeh; Sayed Mohammad Baqer Fazljoo; Mahmoud Yousefifard; Mansoor Keshavarz

    2016-01-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which or...

  9. Gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fifth in the series of short reviews of internet-based radiological learning resources and will focus on gastrointestinal (GI) and hepatobiliary radiology. Below are details of a few of the higher quality resources currently available. Most of the sites cater for medical students and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may be also be of interest to specialists, especially for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (May 2006)

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sufliarsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumours of the digestive tract. Better understanding of the molecular characteristics of GISTs led to the clinical development of imatinib for treating patients with this disease. New immuno markers and mechanisms of primary and secondary resistance were discovered. Adjuvant imatinib in intermediate or high risk GIST has improved the recurrence-free survival. Sunitinib in patients with intolerance or progression on imatinib demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival versus placebo. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as sorafenib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, have shown activity in patients with imatinib- and sunitinib-resistant GIST. (author)

  11. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  12. Alteration of gastrointestinal transit time in the rat after bile duct cannulation surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, P.H.; Medinsky, M.A.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Bond, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Alteration of gastrointestinal (GI) transit time could affect the bioavailability of a toxicant if the toxicant is absorbed in the GI tract. The effect of surgery on GI transit time was investigated using radiographic imaging of barium during passage through the GI tract of the rat. Bile duct cannulation surgery delayed transit of barium to over 18 h, whereas in the normal animal, transit required approximately 6 h. GI transit time was only moderately affected by laparotomy after an 18-h postsurgery recovery period. These results suggest that the gastrointestinal absorption of orally administered toxicants could be affected by bile duct cannulation. 3 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  13. Gastrointestinal Eosinofilic Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Maria, Roberto; Bohorquez, Maria Amalia; Gonzalez, Irene; Torregroza, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    The gastrointestinal eosinofilic disorders are little frequent diseases, of etiopatogenia little clear, that are characterized by the presence of an infiltrated eosinofilo that can affect the different layers of the wall of the alimentary canal in absence of known causes of eosinofilia. The clinical manifestations are variable and the symptoms are conditioned by the degree of eosinofilia of the wall, the number of layers affected and the segment of the gastrointestinal tract implied. The presentations symptoms vary from diarrhea, vomits, abdominal pain and loss of weigh until the acute intestinal obstruction. They are characterized to present peripherical eosinofilia, although it is not a forced criterion. Its definite diagnosis is anatomopatologic. The steroid use is considered as the angular stone of the treatment. We present two cases, with different clinical presentation forms, with initial answer to steroids and later relapse after the suspension of these, remaining without symptoms actually with dependency of low doses of steroids. Next we will do the revision of the available literature emphasizing the pathophysiologic data, the clinical evaluation and the therapeutic aspects

  14. Gastrointestinal medications and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, T M

    1998-09-01

    Medications used to treat gastrointestinal symptoms are increasingly being used as more have been gained nonprescription status. Most of the gastrointestinal medications, such as laxatives, antacids, and antidiarrheal agents, are used short term. Women who breastfeed should be aware of the risks of taking any medications, whether prescription or nonprescription. There is little information describing transfer into breast milk for many of these products. Cimetidine, atropine, cascara, cisapride, loperamide, magnesium sulfate, and senna are the only products identified by the AAP as compatible with breast feeding. Metoclopramide is listed by the AAP as a drug whose effect on nursing infants is unknown but may be of potential concern, although studies published to date have not reported any adverse effects. The safest laxatives and antidiarrheals are those that are not absorbed and should be considered first-line therapy for conditions of constipation or loose stools. Famotidine and nizatidine are excreted into breast milk to a lesser extent than cimetidine or ranitidine and may be the preferred histamine antagonists. Despite the limited data on the use of cisapride in nursing women, it is considered safe by the AAP and may be preferred over metoclopramide for first-line prescription treatment of heartburn. Although most of these agents appear safe in the nursing infant, caretakers should be aware of the potential adverse reactions that may occur in infants whose mothers require these products.

  15. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  16. Microrobotics for future gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menciassi, Arianna; Quirini, Marco; Dario, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The impulse given by robotic technologies and imaging techniques to the development of a new way to conceive and perform surgery is clearly visible. Nowadays, minimally invasive surgical (MIS) procedures are often performed with the assistance of robots, such as the Da Vinci master-slave system, the AESOP robot with voice control, etc. In addition, mechatronic technologies are becoming the elective technologies for designing advanced hand-held surgical tools. The introduction of robotic technologies in endoscopy has been slower than in MIS, since the development of miniaturized robotic components for entering the small orifices of the human body is difficult. On the other hand, the large contribution that robotic technologies could bring to endoluminal techniques has been evident since the first development of instrumented catheters. In the 1990s, there was an increasing activity in the application of robotic technologies to improve endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of robotic colonoscopy and gastroscopy was to obtain more effective diagnoses in terms of reduced pain for the patients, and to make uniform the diagnostic procedures, which too often depended on the manual abilities of the endoscopist. Currently, the availability of more reliable robotic technologies for miniaturization of size and integration of functions has allowed to conceive and develop robotic pills for the early screening of the digestive tract, with dramatic potential advantages for patients, endoscopists, and healthcare system.

  17. Immunoscintigraphy of gastrointestinal tract carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladenov, B.; Peshev, N.

    1995-01-01

    The results of labelled monoclonal antibodies (MoA) immunoscintigraphy in malignant tumors involving the gastrointestinal tract are presented. The obtained data have an essential practical bearing on the early diagnosis and radical treatment undertaken. Immunoscintigraphy is performed with Imacis-I ( 131 I, monoclonal antibody, 19-9 F(ab') 2 anti-CEA F(ab') 2 ) obtained from the CIS company, and Jodomab-R-2( 131 I, anti-CEA monoclonal antibody F(ab') 2 ) of the Sorin Biomedica Company, inserted at activity ranging from 11 to 185 MBq. Scanning by a planar gamma-camera is performed at 72 hours. A total of twenty-four patients are examined: 14 preoperatively (with gastric cancer - 2, pancreatic cancer - 1 and location of the neoplasm in different segments of the colon - 11), and ten postoperatively. Positive results are obtained in twenty-two (92 per cent) of the total number of patients under study. In twelve (86 per cent) of those examined preoperatively intensive accumulation of labelled autoantibodies in the cancer area is documented with a negative result recorded in two cases only. Metastases are found in two patients operated on, while in the remainder the results are negative and consistent with those of the other methods of examination. 13 refs., 4 figs. (author)

  18. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid T Noghani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD, constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS, inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD, celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna and Râzi (Rhazes believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder.

  19. Sunitinib in the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: patient selection and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulet-Margalef N

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuria Mulet-Margalef, Xavier Garcia-del-Muro Sarcoma Multidisciplinary Unit and Medical Oncology Department, Institut Català d’Oncologia Hospitalet, IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. In advanced setting and after progression to imatinib, the multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib has clearly demonstrated a clinical benefit in terms of response rate and progression-free survival with an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended schedule for sunitinib administration is 50 mg per day 4 weeks ON and 2 weeks OFF; however, potential alternative schedules are also reviewed in the present article. Several biomarkers have been explored to better select candidates for sunitinib therapy, such as the value of early changes in standardized uptake value assessed by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, circulating biomarkers, clinical biomarkers such as the appearance of arterial hypertension during treatment that correlates with better outcomes, and the GIST genotype. GISTs with KIT mutations at exon 9 and the so-called wild-type GISTs seem to better respond to sunitinib. Nonetheless, further investigation is required to confirm these findings as well as to understand the mechanisms of sunitinib resistance such as the development of new KIT mutations or conformational changes in KIT receptor. Keywords: sunitinib, GIST, KIT, refractory GIST

  20. Scintigraphic assessment of gastrointestinal motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2014-01-01

    intestinal and colonic transit. This article reviews current imaging techniques, methods for data processing and principles for evaluating results when scintigraphy is used to assess gastrointestinal motility. Furthermore, clinical indications for performing scintigraphy are reviewed.......Gastrointestinal transit reflects overall gastrointestinal motor activity and is regulated by a complex interplay between neural and hormonal stimuli. Thus, transit measurements provide a measure of the combined effects of gastrointestinal muscular activity and feedback from the gut and brain....... Dysmotility in the different major segments of the gastrointestinal tract may give rise to similar symptoms; hence, localizing transit abnormalities to a specific segment is a valuable element of diagnostic evaluation. Scintigraphy is an effective noninvasive tool to assess gastric emptying as well as small...

  1. The gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else M.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has always been and remains a major source of interest in terms of both its function, and its malfunction. Our current knowledge of age-related changes in this system, as well as drug-food interactions, however, remains relatively limited. Paradoxically, the GIT......-related GIT damage and dysfunction. New and novel aspects of drug delivery and drug-dietary supplement interactions are discusses and much needed areas of focus in terms of drug GIT testing are identified....... is not one of the core battery of tests that pharmaceutical companies are obliged to investigate as part of drug development. This review aims to cover the basics of GIT function before highlighting aspects of relevance for safety pharmacology in terms of age, cancerogenesis, and noth drug and diet...

  2. Gastrointestinal infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkemüller, K E; Wilcox, C M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Children living in developing countries are particularly susceptible to infectious diarrhea because of poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Although the magnitude of diarrheal illnesses in developed countries is less, costly hospital admissions are still frequent. The causal agent of infectious diarrhea is most frequently related to age, geographical location, lifestyle habits, use of antibiotics, associated medical conditions, social circumstances, and degree of immune competence. In this article we present some of the most important articles published in the field during the last year. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease has been shown in adults and children. Information about the natural history of H. pylori, symptomatology, and diagnostic therapeutic approaches for children are being generated constantly; we discuss some of the most relevant information in this review.

  3. Estrogen and gastrointestinal malignancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    The concept that E2 exerts an effect on the gastrointestinal tract is not new and its actions on intestinal mucosa have been investigated for at least three decades. An attempt to consolidate results of these investigations generates more questions than answers, thus suggesting that many unexplored avenues remain and that the full capabilities of this steroid hormone are far from understood. Evidence of its role in esophageal, gastric and gallbladder cancers is confusing and often equivocal. The most compelling evidence regards the protective role conferred by estrogen (or perhaps ERbeta) against the development and proliferation of colon cancer. Not only has the effect been described but also many mechanisms of action have been explored. It is likely that, along with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal manipulation will play an integral role in colon cancer management in the very near future.

  4. Gastrointestinal Injuries in Blunt Abdominal Traumas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönüllü, D; Ilgun, S; Gedik, M L; Demiray, O; Öner, Z; Er, M; Köksoy, F N

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the efficiency of RTS (Revised TraumaScore), ISS (Injury Severity Score), and factors that affect mortality and morbidity in gastrointestinal injuries due to blunt trauma.Method and methods: Patients with gastrointestinal injuries due to blunt trauma operated within the last six years have been studied retrospectively in terms of demographics,injury mechanism and localization, additional injuries, RTS and ISS, operative technique, morbidity, mortality and duration of hospitalization. Of the eighteen cases, cause of injury was a traffic accident for 11 (61.1%), fall from height for 5 (27%) and physical attack for 2 (11%). Among the eighteen patients,there were 21 gastrointestinal injuries (11 intestinal, 6 colon,3 duodenum, 1 stomach). 10 (55.6%) had additional intraabdominal injuries while the number for extra-abdominal injuries were 12 (66.7%). Primary suture (10), segmentary resection (9) and pyloric exclusion (2) were the operations performed for the twenty-one gastrointestinal injuries.Although statistically not significant, 13(72.2%) patients with additional injuries compared with 5 (27.8%) patients with isolated gastrointestinal injuries, were found to have lower RTS (7.087/7.841), higher ISS (19.4/12.2), longer duration of hospitalization (11.5/8.4 day) as well as higher morbidity (7/1) and mortality (2/0) rates. Comparing the RTS (7.059/7.490) of patients who have and have not developed morbidity revealed no significant difference.However, ISS (23.9/12.2) was significantly higher in patients who have developed morbidity (p=0.003). RTS (6.085 7.445) and ISS (39.5/14.6) of patients who have survived were significantly different than patients who have not(p=0.037 and p=0.023, respectively) Additional injuries in patients with gastrointestinal injury due blunt abdominal traumas increases, although not significantly, morbidity, mortality and duration of hospitalization even when operated early. High ISS is significantly related to the risk of both

  5. Neonatal gastrointestinal involvement and congenital cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Porta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is the most common cause of congenital viral infection, affecting 0.2 to 2.3% of all live births in developed countries. Very low birth weight and extremely low birth weight newborns are at higher risk of symptomatic CMV infection, most commonly secondary and acquired through breast milk. Gastrointestinal involvement is rare in acquired CMV infections, but it could be an important manifestation of postnatal infection in preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units. Early onset of CMV gastrointestinal signs/symptoms is very rare. In a review of the literature it is described in 5 newborns in the first 24 hours of life, and 6 considering the onset in the first week of life. This review describes also a case report of congenital CMV in an immunocompetent newborn with onset of gastrointestinal signs immediately after birth: a possible association between viral infection and enteric manifestations was considered in the differential diagnosis. A review of the literature of the different case reports found has done, with description and comparison of the different patients and clinical presentations.

  6. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  7. Chloroform ingestion causing severe gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity and dermatitis confirmed with plasma chloroform concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaweera, Dushan; Islam, Shawkat; Gunja, Naren; Cowie, Chris; Broska, James; Poojara, Latesh; Roberts, Michael S; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2017-02-01

    Poisoning due to chloroform ingestion is rare. The classic features of acute chloroform toxicity include central nervous system (CNS) and respiratory depression, and delayed hepatotoxicity. A 30-year-old female ingested 20-30 mL of 99% chloroform solution, which caused rapid loss of consciousness, transient hypotension and severe respiratory depression requiring endotracheal intubation and ventilation. She was alert by 12 h and extubated 16 h post-overdose. At 38-h post-ingestion, her liver function tests started to rise and she was commenced on intravenous acetylcysteine. Her alanine transaminase (1283 U/L), aspartate transaminase (734 U/L) and international normalized ratio (2.3) peaked 67- to 72-h post-ingestion. She also developed severe abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea. An abdominal CT scan was consistent with severe enterocolitis, and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed erosive oesophagitis, severe erosive gastritis and ulceration. She was treated with opioid analgesia, proton pump inhibitors, sucralfate and total parenteral nutrition. Secretions caused a contact dermatitis of her face and back. Nine days post-ingestion she was able to tolerate food. Her liver function tests normalized and the dermatitis resolved. Chloroform was measured using headspace gas chromatograph mass spectrometry, with a peak concentration of 2.00 μg/mL, 4 h 20 min post-ingestion. The concentration-time data fitted a 1-compartment model with elimination half-life 6.5 h. In addition to early CNS depression and delayed hepatotoxicity, we report severe gastrointestinal injury and dermatitis with chloroform ingestion. Recovery occurred with good supportive care, acetylcysteine and management of gastrointestinal complications.

  8. Radiation pathomorphology of the gastrointestinal endocrine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, V.V.; Yakovleva, N.D.; Kvetnoj, I.M.; Ulitina, E.D.

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents the results of histochemical, electronmicroscopic and radioautographic analysis of the effects of a total single gamma irradiation on the functional morphology of cells of the diffuse endocrine system of the gastrointestinal tract of rats and mice. Irradiation in dosses from 5 to 20 Gy results in reduction of the detectability of argyrophilic and argentaffine cells. Changes in these cells counts are related to the irradiation dose. The reaction observed early after the irradiation is related to changes in the endocrine and endoplasmatic reticulum

  9. Introducing Toxics

    OpenAIRE

    David C. Bellinger

    2013-01-01

    With this inaugural issue, Toxics begins its life as a peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on all aspects of toxic chemicals. We are interested in publishing papers that present a wide range of perspectives on toxicants and naturally occurring toxins, including exposure, biomarkers, kinetics, biological effects, fate and transport, treatment, and remediation. Toxics differs from many other journals in the absence of a page or word limit on contributions, permitting authors to present ...

  10. Non-toxic brominated perfluorocarbons radiopaque agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, D.M. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Non-toxic bromofluorocarbon radiopaque agents are disclosed. Certain monobrominated acyclic fluorocarbons, e.g., CF 3 (CF 2 ) 6 CF 2 Br, are improved non-toxic radiopaque agents useful in diagnostic roentgenology, for example in visualizing the gastrointestinal tract, the tracheobronchial tree, the alveolar spaces or parenchyma of the lung, the spleen, the urinary bladder and ureters, the common bile duct and its radicals, the pancreatic ducts, the blood vessels, etc. 13 claims, no drawings

  11. Diversity of the human gastrointestinal tract microbiota revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.; Smidt, H.; Vos, de W.M.

    2007-01-01

    Since the early days of microbiology, more than a century ago, representatives of over 400 different microbial species have been isolated and fully characterized from human gastrointestinal samples. However, during the past decade molecular ecological studies based on ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences

  12. Early laparotomy after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Pia; Zemtsovski, Mikhail; Perch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal complications after lung transplantation have been reported with incidence rates ranging from 3% to 51%, but the reasons are poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the correlations between pulmonary diseases leading to lung transplantation and early gastrointestinal...... for time on mechanical ventilation. Among pulmonary diseases and demographics of the patients, no other risk factors were identified for laparotomy. CONCLUSIONS: A1AD was the only significant risk factor identified for gastrointestinal complications that required laparotomy within 3 months after lung...

  13. Gastrointestinal nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koblik, P.D.; Hornof, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    General localization of gastrointestinal bleeding through the use of labeled red blood cells may be performed in children, or (99m)Tc-pertechnetate may be used if a Meckel's diverticulum is suspected. As in adults, cholecystitis and biliary leak may be assessed in children via (99m)Tc-IDA derivatives. Gastroesophageal reflux can be evaluated by oral consumption of the child's usual diet labeled with (99m)Tc sulfur colloid. For the scintigraphic determination of pulmonary aspiration, a relatively high concentration of tracer within a drop of liquid is placed beneath the child's tongue followed by dynamic imaging of the respiratory tract. Colonic transit scintigraphy can aid in the identification and therapeutic decision-making in patients with functional fecal retention, the most common cause of chronic constipation in children. (18)F-DOPA positron emission tomography is useful for classifying pancreatic involvement in infantile hyperinsulinism as focal or diffuse, thereby differentiating between patients who should receive curative focal pancreatic resection versus those who should receive medical management. Assessment of protein-losing enteropathy can be conducted scintigraphically and, compared with fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin collection, the scintigraphic method can detect esophageal and gastric protein loss. Also, scintigraphic quantification of protein loss can be performed without the requirement for fecal collection. Intestinal inflammation in children with inflammatory bowel disease can be evaluated using (99m)Tc white blood cells. The scintigraphic method is safe, accurate, well-tolerated by children and complementary to endoscopy in most patients

  14. Gastrointestinal scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    An easily prepared radiolabeled gastrointestinal scanning agent is described. Technetium-99m has ideal characteristics for imaging the upper and lower GI tract and determining stomach emptying and intestinal transit time when used with an insoluble particulate material. For example, crystalline and amorphous calcium phosphate particles can be effectively labeled in a one-step process using sup(99m)TcO 4 and SnCl 2 . These labeled particles have insignificant mass and when administered orally pass through the GI tract unchanged, without affecting the handling and density of the intestinal contents. Visualization of the esophageal entry into the stomach, the greater and lesser curvatures of the stomach, ejection into the duodenum, and rates of passage through the upper and lower GI tract are obtained. The slurry of sup(99m)TC particulate can be given rectally by enema. Good images of the cecum and the ascending, transverse, and descending colon are obtained. Mucosal folds and the splenic and hepatic flexures are visualized. The resilience of the large intestine is also readily visualized by pneumocolonographic techniques. (author)

  15. [Gastrointestinal bleeding--concepts of surgical therapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoefel, W T; Rehders, A

    2006-02-01

    Bleeding of the upper gastrointestinal tract is the main symptom of a variety of possible conditions and still results in considerable mortality. Endoscopy is the first diagnostic modality, enabling rapid therapeutic intervention. In case of intractable or relapsing bleeding, surgery is often inevitable. However, emergency operations result in significantly higher mortality rates. Therefore the option of early elective surgical intervention should be considered for patients at increased risk of relapsing bleeding. If bleeding is symptomatic due to a complex underlying condition such as hemosuccus pancreaticus or hemobilia, angiography is now recognized as the definitive investigation. Angiographic hemostasis can be achieved in most cases. Due to the underlying condition, surgical management still remains the mainstay in treating these patients. This paper reviews surgical strategy in handling upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  16. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Tai; Lee, Choon Keun; Lee, Sun Wha; Choi, Woo Suk; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1988-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major diagnostic problem. Although advances have been made in the medical and surgical methods of managing gastrointestinal bleeding, the commonly employed techniques of barium radiography, endoscopy, and angiography may not successfully localize the site and define the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two widely available technetium-99m-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, sulfur colloid and red blood cells are currently used in the evaluation of patients who are bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgically confirmed 19 patients with use of 99m Tc-sulfur colloid (7 cases) and 99m Tc-RBC (12 cases) were retrospectively evaluated. The overall sensitivity of scintigraphy in detection of bleeding and localization of bleeding site was 68% and 84%, respectively. The authors conclude that bleeding scintigraphy is a safe, sensitive, and non-invasive method as an effective screening test before performing angiography or surgery.

  17. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases.

  18. Radiological Atlas of Gastrointestinal Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book is a reference to gastrointestinal disease and radiographic methods. It provides complete information for diagnosis and management and includes coverage of plain radiography, barium studies, water-soluble contrast studies, and more

  19. GASTROINTESTINAL INJURIES FROM BLUNT ABDOMINAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-04-04

    Apr 4, 2004 ... Subjects: Twenty one children managed for gastrointestinal injuries from blunt trauma ... ileus, urinary tract infection and chest infection, respectively postoperatively. .... predictive value with CT scan, (9) the positive predictive.

  20. CT of acute gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittenberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    The application of computerized tomography in gastrointestinal tract diseases are presented, including advantages in surgical belly that are: anatomic clarity, wide survey and rapid performance. (C.G.C.)

  1. Drug therapy for gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballinger, Anne; Farthing, M. J. G. (Michael J. G.)

    2001-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Gastrointestinal bleeding Matthew R Banks, Peter D Fairclough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Inflammatory bowel...

  2. Antioxidant supplements for preventing gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, G; Nikolova, D; Simonetti, R G

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory.......Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory....

  3. Gastrointestinal Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong-Seok Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, gastrointestinal dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease (PD are well-recognized problems and are known to be an initial symptom in the pathological process that eventually results in PD. Gastrointestinal symptoms may result from the involvement of either the central or enteric nervous systems, or these symptoms may be side effects of antiparkinsonian medications. Weight loss, excessive salivation, dysphagia, nausea/gastroparesis, constipation, and defecation dysfunction all may occur. Increased identification and early detection of these symptoms can result in a significant improvement in the quality of life for PD patients.

  4. Rationale for methods of prevention and treatment of toxic infections complications of combined radiation and thermal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodugov, R.S.; Nesterenko, V.S.; Makarov, G.F.; Ul'yanova, L.P.; Khlopovskaya, E.I.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the results of experimental studies on the pathogenesis of combined radiation and thermal injuries (CRTI) helped single out the factors aggravating the outcomes of such injuries. Potentiation of the hepatotoxic effects of bacterial enteroendotoxicosis and early toxemia associated with burns is the principal factor augmenting the disorders in the reactivity of radiosensitive systems in CRTI. The authors' findings evidence the efficacy of enterosorption, of methods enhancing the gastrointestinal motoricity, and of a number of modifiers of biologic reactions and heterologous immunoglobulins for the prevention and treatment of toxic infectious complications of CRTI

  5. Regulation of UDP glucuronosyltransferases in the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Philip A.; Lewinsky, Rikke H.; Gardner-Stephen, Dione A.; Mackenzie, Peter I.

    2004-01-01

    The UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract have a crucial role in protection against the toxic effects of lipophilic chemicals in the environment. UGTs such as UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 are exclusively expressed in gastrointestinal tissues, each with a unique tissue distribution pattern that is subject to interindividual variation. The factors regulating this tissue-specific expression and that contribute to variability are beginning to be elucidated. Studies on the UGT1A7, 1A8, 1A9, and 1A10 gene promoters in Caco-2 cells, an in vitro model of enterocytes of the gastrointestinal tract, have identified the caudal homeodomain transcription factor, Cdx2, as an important regulator of the UGT1A8 and 1A10 gene proximal promoters. This transcription factor is found exclusively in the small intestine and colon: it is absent in the gastric epithelium and the esophagus. Cdx2 regulates the UGT1A8 and 1A10 promoters in cooperation with hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α). It is noteworthy that UGT1A7 is not expressed in gastrointestinal tissue distal to the gastric mucosa and does not contain a Cdx2 binding site in its proximal promoter. Transcription factors, including Sp1, which differentially bind to the initiator regions of the UGT1A8, 1A9, and 1A10 promoters, also contribute to the differences in expression of these UGTs in Caco-2 cells. The identification of important regulatory regions of UGT genes expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, and the transcription factors that bind to these regions, will aid in the elucidation of factors that contribute to interindividual differences in gastrointestinal UGT expression. In turn, this will lead to further understanding of interindividual variation in the capacity of the GI tract to metabolize lipophilic chemicals and to act as a barrier to dietary toxins and orally administered drugs

  6. Toxic Leadership in Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James E.

    2014-01-01

    While research on the traits and skills of effective leaders is plentiful, only recently has the phenomenon of toxic leadership begun to be investigated. This research report focuses on toxic leadership in educational organizations--its prevalence, as well as the characteristics and early indicators. Using mixed methods, the study found four…

  7. Haloacetonitriles: metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, John C; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Ahmed, Ahmed E

    2009-01-01

    The haloacetonitriles (HANs) exist in drinking water exclusively as byproducts of disinfection. HANs are found in drinking water more often, and in higher concentrations, when surface water is treated by chloramination. Human exposure occurs through consumption of finished drinking water; oral and dermal contact also occurs, and results from showering, swimming and other activities. HANs are reactive and are toxic to gastrointestinal tissues following oral administration. Such toxicity is characterized by GSH depletion, increased lipid peroxidation, and covalent binding of HAN-associated radioactivity to gut tissues. The presence of GSH in cells is an important protective mechanism against HAN toxicity; depletion of cellular GSH results in increased toxicity. Some studies have demonstrated an apparently synergistic effect between ROS and HAN administration, that may help explain effects observed in GI tissues. ROS are produced in gut tissues, and in vitro evidence indicates that ROS may contribute to the degradation and formation of reactive intermediates from HANs. The rationale for ROS involvement may involve HAN-induced depletion of GSH and the role of GSH in scavenging ROS. In addition to effects on GI tissues, studies show that HAN-derived radiolabel is found covalently bound to proteins and DNA in several organs and tissues. The addition of antioxidants to biologic systems protects against HAN-induced DNA damage. The protection offered by antioxidants supports the role of oxidative stress and the potential for a threshold in han-induced toxicity. However, additional data are needed to substantiate evidence for such a threshold. HANs are readily absorbed from the GI tract and are extensively metabolized. Elimination occurs primarily in urine, as unconjugated one-carbon metabolites. Evidence supports the involvement of mixed function oxidases, the cytochrome P450 enzyme family and GST, in HAN metabolism. Metabolism represents either a detoxification or

  8. Influence of ionizing radiation on gastrointestinal peptide levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysocki, J.; Esposito, V.; Linard, C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1997-03-01

    Exposure of the gut to ionising radiation may induce gastrointestinal damage and dysfunction. Early effects such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, anorexia may be observed within the first 24 h after irradiation. Such symptoms are seen even with doses as low as 1 Gy. later effects and the onset of the gastrointestinal syndrome are seen at higher doses (10 Gy) and include gastric emptying inhibition, intestinal hemorrhages, disturbances in water and electrolytes balance and septicemia. The severity of which depends on the nature, dose and dose rate received. The mechanism underlying these changes was unclear; it has long been known that exposure to ionising radiation affects intestinal morphology usually because of inhibition of mitotic activity at the level of the crypt enterocyst. The various physiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract are controlled by a wide variety of agents as neurotransmitters, neuropeptides. Radiation induces alterations in hormonal release and response. The present study carried out in the rat focuses on Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP), a gastrointestinal neuropeptide present in the central nervous system and in the gut endocrine cells were released into blood. The GRP controls food intake, pancreatic enzyme secretions, gastric emptying, intestinal motility and cellular proliferation. The aim was to investigate the effects of gamma and neutron/gamma on plasma and gastrointestinal tissue levels of GRP

  9. Multiple lymphomatous polyposis of the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isete Fares Franco

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastrointestinal multiple lymphomatous polyposis is a rare type of malignant lymphoma that has aggressive biological behavior, early systemic dissemination and poor prognosis. It is considered to be a manifestation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and represents the gastrointestinal counterpart of mantle cell nodal lymphoma. OBJECTIVE: A case of gastrointestinal multiple lymphomatous polyposis is presented and the anatomopathological, clinical, diagnostic and treatment aspects of this unusual neoplasia are discussed. CASE REPORT: The patient was a 59-year-old white male with a complaint of asthenia, night sweating, alteration in intestinal habit and weight loss over the preceding two months. The physical examination showed pallid mucosa and a palpable mass in the epigastrium and mesogastrium. Endoscopy of the upper digestive tract showed the presence of gastric and duodenal polyps. An opaque enema showed multiple polypoid lesions, especially in the cecum. A rectal biopsy revealed infiltration of the mucosa and submucosa by diffuse lymphoma consisting of small cleaved cells. Immunohistochemical study showed lymphocytes that expressed the antibody CD20 (L-26 and light-chain kappa (k immunoglobulin, but not light-chain lambda (l immunoglobulin. The patient presented a condition of acute intestinal obstruction with the presence of a mesenteric mass formed by agglutinated lymph nodes that surrounded the proximal ileum, thereby obstructing its lumen. He was submitted to a segmental enterectomy and gastrotomy with excisional biopsies of the gastric polypoid lesions. After two cycles of chemotherapy there was a worsening of the general state, with an increase in the dimensions of the abdominal masses and sepsis, accompanied by progressive respiratory insufficiency, leading to death.

  10. Rare upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage of cetuximab: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shi-Jie; Gao, Zi-Ming; Wang, Peng-Liang; Gong, Bao-Cheng; Huang, Han-Wei; Luo, Lei; Wang, Xin; Xing, Ya-Nan; Xu, Hui-Mian; Liu, Fu-Nan

    2017-12-01

    cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, is a targeted therapeutic regimen of colorectal cancers. Several common adverse effects have been found, such as cutaneous or gastrointestinal toxicity. However, according to the articles had been published, upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is considered to be rare and its mechanism remains unclear. In this report, we presented a 42-year-old male patient with advanced recto-sigmoid cancer. After palliative operation, the patient suffered from complete upper gastrointestinal (GI) obstruction, which was induced by extensive abdominal metastasis of the tumor. Considering his poor condition, we chose the targeted drug, cetuximab, as his further treatment. But after the application of cetuximab, the UGIB immediately happened twice in this patient. UGIB, as a rare complication of cetuximab, occured to the patient. We stopped the bleeding with thrombin, hemocoagulase and somatostatin and suspended the subsequent treatment plan of cetuximab. At the same time, anti-shock treatment was given immediately. He was died of respiratory and circulatory failure caused by UGIB and advanced tumor eventually. UGIB should be considered as a rare but severe complication of cetuximab. When cetuximab is applied for patients with advanced colon tumors, more cautions should be required if the patients are accompanied by upper gastrointestinal obstruction. In addition, for those patients who suffered from UGIB recently, cetuximab should be prohibited if the Rockall score ranged > 5 points. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Late effects of radiation therapy on the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coia, Lawrence R.; Myerson, Robert J.; Tepper, Joel E.

    1995-01-01

    Late gastrointestinal complications of radiation therapy have been recognized but not extensively studied. In this paper, the late effects of radiation on three gastrointestinal sites, the esophagus, the stomach, and the bowel, are described. Esophageal dysmotility and benign stricture following esophageal irradiation are predominantly a result of damage to the esophageal wall, although mucosal ulcerations also may persist following high-dose radiation. The major late morbidity following gastric irradiation is gastric ulceration caused by mucosal destruction. Late radiation injury to the bowel, which may result in bleeding, frequency, fistula formation, and, particularly in small bowel, obstruction, is caused by damage to the entire thickness of the bowel wall, and predisposing factors have been identified. For each site a description of the pathogenesis, clinical findings, and present management is offered. Simple and reproducible endpoint scales for late toxicity measurement were developed and are presented for each of the three gastrointestinal organs. Factors important in analyzing late complications and future considerations in evaluation and management of radiation-related gastrointestinal injury are discussed

  12. Targeting cancers in the gastrointestinal tract: role of capecitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Wasif SaifYale Cancer Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Capecitabine is currently the only novel, orally home-administered fluorouracil prodrug. It offers patients more freedom from hospital visits and less inconvenience and complications associated with infusion devices. The drug has been extensively studied in large clinical trials in many solid tumors, including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and many others. Furthermore, the drug compares favorably with fluorouracil in patients with such cancers, with a safe toxicity profile, consisting mainly of gastrointestinal and dermatologic adverse effects. Whereas gastrointestinal events and hand-foot syndrome occur often with capecitabine, the tolerability profile is comparatively favorable. Prompt recognition of severe adverse effects is the key to successful management of capecitabine. Ongoing and future clinical trials will continue to examine, and likely expand, the role of capecitabine as a single agent and/or in combination with other anticancer agents for the treatment of gastrointestinal as well as other solid tumors, both in the advanced palliative and adjuvant settings. The author summarizes the current data on the role of capecitabine in the management of gastrointestinal cancers. Keywords: 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, chemotherapy, adjuvant, advanced, colon cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular cancer, pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, rectal cancer, anal cancer

  13. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors to h...

  14. Analysis of in-field control and late toxicity for adults with early-stage Hodgkin's disease treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronowski, Gregory M.; Wilder, Richard B.; Tucker, Susan L.; Ha, Chul S.; Younes, Anas; Fayad, Luis; Rodriguez, Maria A.; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Barista, Ibrahim; Cabanillas, Fernando; Cox, James D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed in-field (IF) control in adults with early-stage Hodgkin's disease who received chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (RT) in terms of the (1) chemotherapeutic regimen used and number of cycles delivered, (2) response to chemotherapy, and (3) initial tumor size. Cardiac toxicity and second malignancies, particularly the incidence of solid tumors in terms of the RT field size treated, were also examined. Methods and Materials: From 1980 to 1995, 286 patients ranging in age from 16 to 88 years (median: 28 years) with Ann Arbor clinical Stage I or II Hodgkin's disease underwent chemotherapy followed 3 to 4 weeks later by RT. There were 516 nodal sites measuring 0.5 to 19.0 cm at the start of chemotherapy, including 134 cases of bulky mediastinal disease. NOVP, MOPP, ABVD, CVPP/ABDIC, and other chemotherapeutic regimens were given to 161, 67, 19, 18, and 21 patients, respectively. Patients received 1-8 (median: 3) cycles of induction chemotherapy. All 533 gross nodal and extranodal sites of disease were included in the RT fields. The median prescribed RT dose for gross disease was 40.0 Gy given in 20 daily 2.0-Gy fractions. There was little variation in the RT dose. Eighty-five patients were treated with involved-field or regional RT (to one side of the diaphragm), and 201 patients were treated with extended-field RT (to both sides of the diaphragm), based on the protocol on which they were enrolled. Results: Follow-up of surviving patients ranged from 1.3 to 19.9 years (median: 7.4 years). Based on a review of simulation films, there were 16 IF, 8 marginal, and 15 out-of-field recurrences. The chemotherapeutic regimen used and the number of cycles of chemotherapy delivered did not significantly affect IF control. IF control also did not significantly depend on the response to induction chemotherapy. In cases where there was a confirmed or unconfirmed complete response as opposed to a partial response or stable disease in response to induction

  15. Analysis of in-field control and late toxicity for adults with early-stage Hodgkin's disease treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronowski, Gregory M; Wilder, Richard B; Tucker, Susan L; Ha, Chul S; Younes, Anas; Fayad, Luis; Rodriguez, Maria A; Hagemeister, Fredrick B; Barista, Ibrahim; Cabanillas, Fernando; Cox, James D

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed in-field (IF) control in adults with early-stage Hodgkin's disease who received chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (RT) in terms of the (1) chemotherapeutic regimen used and number of cycles delivered, (2) response to chemotherapy, and (3) initial tumor size. Cardiac toxicity and second malignancies, particularly the incidence of solid tumors in terms of the RT field size treated, were also examined. From 1980 to 1995, 286 patients ranging in age from 16 to 88 years (median: 28 years) with Ann Arbor clinical Stage I or II Hodgkin's disease underwent chemotherapy followed 3 to 4 weeks later by RT. There were 516 nodal sites measuring 0.5 to 19.0 cm at the start of chemotherapy, including 134 cases of bulky mediastinal disease. NOVP, MOPP, ABVD, CVPP/ABDIC, and other chemotherapeutic regimens were given to 161, 67, 19, 18, and 21 patients, respectively. Patients received 1-8 (median: 3) cycles of induction chemotherapy. All 533 gross nodal and extranodal sites of disease were included in the RT fields. The median prescribed RT dose for gross disease was 40.0 Gy given in 20 daily 2.0-Gy fractions. There was little variation in the RT dose. Eighty-five patients were treated with involved-field or regional RT (to one side of the diaphragm), and 201 patients were treated with extended-field RT (to both sides of the diaphragm), based on the protocol on which they were enrolled. Follow-up of surviving patients ranged from 1.3 to 19.9 years (median: 7.4 years). Based on a review of simulation films, there were 16 IF, 8 marginal, and 15 out-of-field recurrences. The chemotherapeutic regimen used and the number of cycles of chemotherapy delivered did not significantly affect IF control. IF control also did not significantly depend on the response to induction chemotherapy. In cases where there was a confirmed or unconfirmed complete response as opposed to a partial response or stable disease in response to induction chemotherapy for bulky nodal disease, the 5

  16. Development of Alternatives to Chronic Ecotoxicity Tests: Predicting Early-life Stage and Endocrine-mediated Toxicity in Aquatic Vertebrate Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    In June 2010, the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) with support from sanofi-aventis, NC3Rs, the Humane Society, L’Oreal, and ECVAM, held a workshop aimed at examining critical science needs related to the development of alternatives to chronic fish toxicity...

  17. Meta-Analysis of Fish Early Life Stage Tests - Association of Toxic Ratios and Acute-To-Chronic Ratios with Modes of Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Stefan; Schreiber, Rene; Armitage, James

    2018-01-01

    formation inhibition). Four modes of action (were also found to be associated with high ACRs: (1) lysyl oxidase inhibition leading to notochord distortion, (2) putative methemoglobin formation or haemolytic anemia, (3) endocrine disruption, and (4) compounds with neuromuscular toxicity. It was discussed...

  18. Gastrointestinal physiology and digestive disorders in sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaly, Travis; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2009-11-01

    The dynamic interplay of the digestive system and sleep is an excellent example of brain-body interaction. New advances in measuring techniques provide an opportunity to evaluate physiology that is dependent upon the sleep/wake state or circadian rhythm and potentially differentiate between normal and pathological conditions. Sleep-related changes in gastrointestinal physiology create vulnerabilities to digestive issues such as reflux, whereas disorders such as duodenal ulcers raise the importance of circadian variations in digestive system function. Advances in the area of normal sleep physiology have furthered our understanding of the underlying cause of irritable bowel syndrome, and the mechanisms by which sleep disruption may aggravate inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, important early work has shown that the treatment of digestive disorders such as reflux can improve sleep quality just as the improvement in sleep may aid in the treatment of digestive disorders. For the clinician, these forward steps in our knowledge mark the start of an era in which understanding the effects of the sleep/wake state and circadian rhythms on gastrointestinal physiology promise to yield novel diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities.

  19. Introducing Toxics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Bellinger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With this inaugural issue, Toxics begins its life as a peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on all aspects of toxic chemicals. We are interested in publishing papers that present a wide range of perspectives on toxicants and naturally occurring toxins, including exposure, biomarkers, kinetics, biological effects, fate and transport, treatment, and remediation. Toxics differs from many other journals in the absence of a page or word limit on contributions, permitting authors to present their work in as much detail as they wish. Toxics will publish original research papers, conventional reviews, meta-analyses, short communications, theoretical papers, case reports, commentaries and policy perspectives, and book reviews (Book reviews will be solicited and should not be submitted without invitation. Toxins and toxicants concern individuals from a wide range of disciplines, and Toxics is interested in receiving papers that represent the full range of approaches applied to their study, including in vitro studies, studies that use experimental animal or non-animal models, studies of humans or other biological populations, and mathematical modeling. We are excited to get underway and look forward to working with authors in the scientific and medical communities and providing them with a novel venue for sharing their work. [...

  20. Allergic Mastocytic Gastroenteritis and Colitis: An Unexplained Etiology in Chronic Abdominal Pain and Gastrointestinal Dysmotility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Akhavein M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain, bloating, early satiety, and changes in bowel habits are common presenting symptoms in individuals with functional GI disorders. Emerging data suggests that these symptoms may be associated with mast cell excess and/or mast cell instability in the GI tract. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the contribution of mast cells to the aforementioned symptoms in individuals with a history of atopic disease. A retrospective chart review of individuals seen in a university GI practice was conducted and twenty-four subjects were identified. The majority had abdominal pain, early satiety, and nocturnal awakening. 66.7% and 37.5% had a history of environmental and/or food allergy. Solid gastric emptying was increased as were the mean number of mast cells reported on biopsies from the stomach, small bowel, and colon (>37/hpf by CD117 staining. Mean whole blood histamine levels were uniformly elevated. This study suggests that in individuals with these characteristics, consideration should be given to staining their gastrointestinal biopsies for mast cells as this may provide them with relatively non-toxic but highly targeted treatment options. Allergic gastroenteritis and colitis may represent a third type of GI mast cell disorder along with mast cell activation syndrome and mastocytic enterocolitis.

  1. Oncolytic virotherapy in upper gastrointestinal tract cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoda R

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Raquel Yokoda,1 Bolni M Nagalo,1 Mansi Arora,1 Jan B Egan,1 James M Bogenberger,1 Thomas T DeLeon,1 Yumei Zhou,1 Daniel H Ahn,1 Mitesh J Borad1–3 1Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 3Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA Abstract: Upper gastrointestinal tract malignancies are among the most challenging cancers with regard to response to treatment and prognosis. Cancers of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas, liver, and biliary tree have dismal 5-year survival, and very modest improvements in this rate have been made in recent times. Oncolytic viruses are being developed to address these malignancies, with a focus on high safety profiles and low off-target toxicities. Each viral platform has evolved to enhance oncolytic potency and the clinical response to either single-agent viral therapy or combined viral treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A panel of genomic alterations, chimeric proteins, and pseudotyped capsids are the breakthroughs for vector success. This article revisits developments for each viral platform to each tumor type, in an attempt to achieve maximum tumor selectivity. From the bench to clinical trials, the scope of this review is to highlight the beginnings of translational oncolytic virotherapy research in upper gastrointestinal tract malignancies and provide a bioengineering perspective of the most promising platforms. Keywords: oncolytic viruses, hepatopancreatobiliary, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, biliary cancer

  2. Technology insight: endoscopic submucosal dissection of gastrointestinal neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hironori

    2007-09-01

    Gastrointestinal neoplasms can be cured by local resection as long as the lesions are in the early stage and have not metastasized. Endoscopic resection is a minimally invasive treatment for early-stage gastrointestinal neoplasms, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is one type of endoscopic resection that has been developed in the past 10 years. For ESD to be a reliable, curative treatment for gastrointestinal neoplasms, it is necessary for the endoscopist to detect the lesion early, make a precise pretreatment diagnosis, ensure that the patient has the correct indication for endoscopic resection, and have the skill to perform ESD. For early lesion detection, endoscopists should pay attention to subtle changes in the surface structure, the color of the mucosa and the visibility of underlying submucosal vessels. Chromoendoscopy and magnifying endoscopy are useful for determining the margin of the lesions for pretreatment diagnosis, and endoscopic ultrasonography and magnifying endoscopy are useful for determining the depth of invasion. For ESD to be successful, local injection of sodium hyaluronate helps maintain mucosal elevation during dissection. Selecting the appropriate knife, using transparent hoods wisely, employing a good strategy that uses gravity, and having good control of bleeding are all needed to make ESD reliable.

  3. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer follow up is necessary to confirm these favourable results. PMID:20100335

  4. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal motility disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Jae Gol [College of Medicine, Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-02-01

    Current scintigraphic tests of gastrointestinal motor function provides relevant pathophysiologic information, but their clinical utility is controversial. Many scintigraphic methods are developed to investigate gastrointestinal motility from oral cavity to colon. These are esophageal transit scintigraphy, oropharyngeal transit study, gastric emptying test, small bowel transit time measurement, colon transit study and gastroesopahgeal reflux scintigraphy. Scintigraphy of gastrointestinal tract is the most physiologic and noninvasive method to evaluate gastrointestinal motility disorders. Stomach emptying test is regarded as a gold standard in motility study. Gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy also has a certain role in assessment of drug effect to GI motility and changes after theraphy of motility disorders. Scintigraphy provides noninvasive and quantitative assessment of physiological transit throughout the gastrointestinal tract, and it is extremely useful for diagnosing gastrointestinal motor dysfunction. This article reviews the current procedures, indications, significance and guidelines for gastrointestinal motility measurements by scintigraphy.

  5. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Jae Gol

    2001-01-01

    Current scintigraphic tests of gastrointestinal motor function provides relevant pathophysiologic information, but their clinical utility is controversial. Many scintigraphic methods are developed to investigate gastrointestinal motility from oral cavity to colon. These are esophageal transit scintigraphy, oropharyngeal transit study, gastric emptying test, small bowel transit time measurement, colon transit study and gastroesopahgeal reflux scintigraphy. Scintigraphy of gastrointestinal tract is the most physiologic and noninvasive method to evaluate gastrointestinal motility disorders. Stomach emptying test is regarded as a gold standard in motility study. Gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy also has a certain role in assessment of drug effect to GI motility and changes after theraphy of motility disorders. Scintigraphy provides noninvasive and quantitative assessment of physiological transit throughout the gastrointestinal tract, and it is extremely useful for diagnosing gastrointestinal motor dysfunction. This article reviews the current procedures, indications, significance and guidelines for gastrointestinal motility measurements by scintigraphy

  6. Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing tumors that originate in the neuroendocrine cells in the GI tract. Find evidence-based information on gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors treatment and research.

  7. GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF CLARIAS GARIEPINUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    one hundred and ninety nine (199) were infested fish samples from gills and gastrointestinal tract .... Body cavity of fish were dissected using a pair of scissors and different portion of the gut (Oesophagus, stomach, intestine and rectum) were isolated and kept in .... Arme, C. and Wakey, M. (1970): The physiology of fishes.

  8. Nutritional management of gastrointestinal malignancies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evidence connecting food and gastrointestinal cancers from epidemiological studies, case-control studies, and prospective observational studies, indicates that determining the independent effects of specific nutrients is extremely diffi cult, given the many potential environmental factors to consider. The nutritional ...

  9. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage has a variety of causes (Table 1) and is the commonest complication of peptic ulceration and portal hypertension. Peptic ulceration in the duo- denum or stomach and oesophageal varices are the conditions most often responsible for patients who have the potential to present.

  10. Immunity to gastrointestinal nematode infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorobetea, D.; Svensson Frej, M.; Grencis, R.

    2018-01-01

    Numerous species of nematodes have evolved to inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans, with over a billion of the world's population infected with at least one species. These large multicellular pathogens present a considerable and complex challenge to the host immune system give...

  11. An assessment of the toxicity of crude oils in soils using earthworms, Microtox reg-sign Solid-Phase and early plant growth methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipond, T.E.; Dorn, P.B.; Salanitro, J.P.; Huesemann, M.H.; Wisniewski, H.L.; Moore, K.O.

    1993-01-01

    The qualitative assessment of soil quality resulting from a chemical or oil spill and/or remediation effort may be obtained by evaluating the toxicity to soil organisms. To enhance the authors understanding of the soil quality resulting from oil spill remediation, they have begun a program to assess three soil toxicity test methods. A heavy, medium and light crude oil were spiked into a sandy soil and a topsoil in the laboratory. The earthworm (Eisenia foetida) 14-d lethality assay, the modified Microbics Microtox Solid-Phase method, and the 14-d agricultural plant seed germination rate and plant growth assay were exposed to combinations of crude oils and soils. Earthworms were 1.4 to 14 times more sensitive than the Microtox and 1.3 to >77 times more sensitive than the plants to the oily soils. Light crude oil in sandy soil was the most toxic to the earthworms. Six percent heavy crude oil in topsoil showed little effect on the three organisms with LC50's ranging from 6.7--7.3 for earthworms to no effects on plants. These bioassay techniques are shown to be sensitive indicators of soil quality and may be used to evaluate the soil quality of remediated oil soils

  12. Oxygen toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. van der Westhuizen

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen has been discovered about 200 years ago. Since then the vital physiological involvement of oxygen in various biologi­cal processes, mainly energy production, has been established. However, in the body molecular oxygen can be converted to toxic oxygen metabolites such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. These toxic metabolites are produced mainly in the mitochondria, plasma membranes and endoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Acute toxicity of ingested fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Gary Milton

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the characteristics and treatment of acute fluoride toxicity as well as the most common sources of overexposure, the doses that cause acute toxicity, and factors that can influence the clinical outcome. Cases of serious systemic toxicity and fatalities due to acute exposures are now rare, but overexposures causing toxic signs and symptoms are not. The clinical course of systemic toxicity from ingested fluoride begins with gastric signs and symptoms, and can develop with alarming rapidity. Treatment involves minimizing absorption by administering a solution containing calcium, monitoring and managing plasma calcium and potassium concentrations, acid-base status, and supporting vital functions. Approximately 30,000 calls to US poison control centers concerning acute exposures in children are made each year, most of which involve temporary gastrointestinal effects, but others require medical treatment. The most common sources of acute overexposures today are dental products - particularly dentifrices because of their relatively high fluoride concentrations, pleasant flavors, and their presence in non-secure locations in most homes. For example, ingestion of only 1.8 ounces of a standard fluoridated dentifrice (900-1,100 mg/kg) by a 10-kg child delivers enough fluoride to reach the 'probably toxic dose' (5 mg/kg body weight). Factors that may influence the clinical course of an overexposure include the chemical compound (e.g. NaF, MFP, etc.), the age and acid-base status of the individual, and the elapsed time between exposure and the initiation of treatment. While fluoride has well-established beneficial dental effects and cases of serious toxicity are now rare, the potential for toxicity requires that fluoride-containing materials be handled and stored with the respect they deserve. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sashidharan, Palankezhe; Matele, Apoorva; Matele, Usha; Al Felahi, Nowfel; Kassem, Khalid F.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the identification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, its molecular and immunohiostochemical basis, and its management have been a watershed in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. This paradigm shift occurred over the last two decades and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have now come to be understood as rare gastrointestinal tract tumors with predictable behavior and outcome, replacing the older terminologies like leiomyoma, schwannoma or leiomyosarcoma. This report present...

  15. The impact of alcohol om 241Am gastrointestinal absorption, distribution and metabolism kinetics in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalikin, G.A.; Moskalev, Yu.I.; Nisimov, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that alcohol may intensify gastrointestinal absorption of transuranium nuclides. Some intensification of 241 Am metabolism kinetics in rats and accelerated radionuclide excretion from skeleton are noticed that is due to toxic ethanol effect. Investigations in the above direction are thought to be interesting for development under conditions of chronic effect of different alcohol doses and transuranium nuclide incorporation

  16. Tumor del estroma gastrointestinal Tumor of the gastrointestinal stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Felipe Montero León

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Los tumores del estroma gastrointestinal, conocidos según sus siglas en inglés como GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors, son tumores mesenquimales que aparecen en cualquier lugar a lo largo del tracto intestinal. Este trabajo tiene el propósito de presentar una paciente de 60 años de edad que asiste a la consulta de ginecología del Instituto Nacional de Oncología y Radiobiología, por presentar dolor en el epigastrio, que se irradia al flanco derecho, con un aumento de volumen en la fosa iliaca derecha, y por ultrasonografía se plantea un tumor de ovario derecho, que se proyecta hacia el epigastrio y a hipocondrio derecho. Se describe la intervención quirúrgica y los hallazgos encontrados en estudios macro y microscópicos, así como en estudios posteriores por inmunohistoquímica de la lesión. Se concluye con un diagnóstico de tumor del estroma gastrointestinal y los resultados de las intervenciones quirúrgicas y medicamentosas realizadas. Se recomienda valorar la importancia de una estrecha relación entre cirujanos generales y ginecólogos frente a enfermedades inesperadas, por su difícil diagnóstico preoperatorio, que conllevan a un tratamiento quirúrgico adecuado, y que por la complejidad que requieren, necesitan de la competencia de ambas especialidades quirúrgicas.The tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma, known in English language as GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors are mesenchymal tumors appearing in any place throughout the intestinal tract. The objective of present paper is to present the case of a female patient aged 60 came to Genecology consultation of the National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology due pain in epigastrium irradiating to right flank with increase of volume in the right iliac fossa and by ultrasonography it is a tumor of right ovarium projecting to epigastrium and the right hypochondrium. The surgical intervention is described as well as the findings noted in macro- and microscopic studies

  17. Gastrointestinal hyperactivity and its importance in the formationof chronic allergic gastritis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrova V.I.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the clinical and pathogenetic role in the formation of gastrointestinal hyperactivity and chronic allergic gastritis in children. Patients and methods. We observed 82 children aged 6 to 16 years. To verify the diagnosis all the children performed endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract, intragastric pHmeter. To confirm the genesis of atopic disease of patients determined the level general IgE in the serum by ELISA. Results. As a result of studies we find, that in majority (92.7±2.9% patients examined early symptoms of gastrointestinal hyperactivity were diagnosed in the first six months of life. Gastrointestinal hyperactivity in infants is manifested by increased functional reaction of the gastrointestinal system, namely the disorders of the digestive and motorevacuation function of the gastrointestinal tract and symptoms of atopic dermatitis. In older children gastrointestinal hyperactivity transformed intoallergic gastritis, which is manifested by destructive changes of the gastric mucosa, increased production of hydrochloric acid , motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract mainly in the form of duodenogastric reflux. It was found that the determining factors of the formation of allergic inflammation should be considered a high percentage of family history as a gastroenterological and allergic diseases, disorders physiological feeding graphics and nutrition of children from the first days of life. A characteristic feature of current gastroenterological diseases in patients with gastrointestinal hyperactivity was the absence of seasonal exacerbations, severe pain in the right upper quadrant, belching and flatulence, against the background of destructive changes in the gastric mucosa. Conclusions. We have identified specific clinical symptoms is pathognomonic for children with gastrointestinal hyperactivity and provides the opportunity to be watchful for the diagnosis of allergic changes in the gastric

  18. Exercise and the gastro-intestinal tract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on perfonnance and me value of cardiovascular training in improving performance in aerobic sports is well recognised. The role of me gastro-intestinal tracr, bom as a limiting and sustaining facror in aerobic exercises, is less well appreciared. Gastro-intestinal symptoms. The spectrum of gastro-intestinal effecrs of exercise ...

  19. [Full attention to several key issues in surgical treatment for the elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenggang

    2016-05-01

    With the development of population aging in our country, the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer is increasing. The risk of developing gastrointestinal cancer in elderly over 75 years was 5-6 times and the risk of death of gastrointestinal cancer was 7-8 times of the general population. As compared to non-elderly, the incidence of gastric cancer was not decreased obviously but the total incidence of colorectal cancer was increased more quickly. Therefore, screening of gastrointestinal cancer should be performed in the elderly for early discovery, diagnosis and treatment. Because of the insidious onset of the illness in elderly patients, gastrointestinal cancers are mostly diagnosed at advanced or late stage (stage III or IV). Well differentiated cancer is more common, such as papillary or tubular adenocarcinoma. Lauren type, Borrmann II or III are more common in gastric cancer, which are relatively favorable. Compared with non-elderly patients, many elderly patients also suffer from comorbid diseases with higher operation risk and postoperative complication rates. Therefore, we must pay great attention to the perioperative management and the surgical operation for the elderly patients. In this paper, several key issues involved the development trend of incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal cancer, the clinicopathological characteristics, the comorbidity and surgical treatment in the elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer will be elaborated, aiming at promoting further attention to the clinical therapeutic strategies, management measures and prognostic factors for the elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

  20. High-dose, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy using a concurrent boost for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer: unusual toxicity and promising early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen C.; Acker, Jeffrey C.; Kussin, Peter S.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Weeks, Kenneth J.; Leopold, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with conventional radiotherapy (RT) results in inadequate local tumor control and survival. We report results of a Phase II trial designed to treat patients with a significantly increased total dose administered in a reduced overall treatment time using a hyperfractionated, accelerated treatment schedule with a concurrent boost technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with unresectable Stage IIIA/IIIB (38 patients) or medically inoperable Stage I/II (11 patients) NSCLC were prospectively enrolled in this protocol. Radiation therapy was administered twice daily, 5 days/week with > 6 h between each treatment. The primary tumor and adjacent enlarged lymph nodes were treated to a total dose of 73.6 Gy in 46 fractions of 1.6 Gy each. Using a concurrent boost technique, electively irradiated nodal regions were simultaneously treated with a dose of 1.25 Gy/fraction for the first 36 fractions to a total dose of 45 Gy. Results: Median survival for the entire group of 49 patients is 15.3 months. Actuarial survival at 2 years is 46%: 60% for 11 Stage I/II patients, 55% for 21 Stage IIIA patients, and 26% for 17 Stage IIIB patients. The actuarial rate of freedom from local progression at 2 years is 64% for the entire group of 49 patients: 62% for Stage I/II patients, 70% for Stage IIIA patients, and 55% for Stage IIIB patients. Patients who underwent serial bronchoscopic reevaluation (4 Stage I/II, 8 Stage IIIA, and 6 Stage IIIB) have an actuarial rate of local control of 71% at 2 years. The median total treatment time was 32 days. Nine of 49 patients (18%) experienced Grade III acute esophageal toxicity. The 2-year actuarial risk of Grade III or greater late toxicity is 30%. The 2-year actuarial rate of severe-late pulmonary and skin-subcutaneous toxicity is 20% and 15%, respectively. Conclusion: This treatment regimen administers a substantially higher biologically effective dose compared with

  1. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepper, Joel E.

    1997-01-01

    A great deal of new information has been generated in the past decade regarding the prevention, diagnosis, etiology, biology and treatment of cancers of the colon and rectum. Screening strategies have been demonstrated to be effective in preventing the occurrence of these tumors by finding and removing neoplasms in their premalignant state. If widely implemented this should result in an overall decrease in mortality from these diseases. Genetic predisposition syndromes and the molecular abnormalities associated with them have been defined. A large number of molecular abnormalities have been elucidated which are associated with the development of sporadic tumors of the colon and rectum. These issues will be discussed including the relevance to the practicing oncologist. In addition to the enormous changes in our basic understanding of the biology of these tumors, there have also been substantial changes in the management of rectal cancer and there is a gradually changing role of radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is now standardly combined with chemotherapy in the management of patients with tumors that are through the bowel wall or with nodal positivity. The integration of the two modalities is in evolution, and issues of radiation enhancement by 5-fluoruracil is important in design of these strategies. At the present time the relative value of preoperative vs postoperative radiation therapy is not defined, and there is disagreement as to whether a short course of preoperative radiation therapy may be as effective as the more standard longer courses. The use of preoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy to enhance the incidence of sphincter preservation has gained more widespread acceptance, but needs to be combined with surgeons experienced in these surgical approaches. For patients with early stage disease, there is more general acceptance of the use of sphincter preserving surgery and radiation therapy, but the criteria for which patients can be

  2. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palankezhe Sashidharan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the identification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, its molecular and immunohiostochemical basis, and its management have been a watershed in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. This paradigm shift occurred over the last two decades and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have now come to be understood as rare gastrointestinal tract tumors with predictable behavior and outcome, replacing the older terminologies like leiomyoma, schwannoma or leiomyosarcoma. This report presents a case of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor operated recently in a 47-year-old female patient and the outcome, as well as literature review of the pathological identification, sites of origin, and factors predicting its behavior, prognosis and treatment.

  3. Screening examinations for double cancer in patients with oral cancer. Usefulness of gastrointestinal endoscopy and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Umeda, Masahiro; Oguni, Akiko; Kataoka, Tomoko; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Shibuya, Yasuyuki; Komori, Takahide; Shigeta, Takashi; Ri, Shinsho

    2010-01-01

    Many patients with oral cancer have double cancers, especially in the upper gastrointestinal tract. We studied synchronous double cancers in 138 patients with oral cancer who underwent gastrointestinal endscopy and 161 who underwent positron emission tomography (PET) preoperatively. Fifteen patients (10.9%) had cancer or precancerous lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract on gastrointestinal endoscopy: 10 in the esophagus and 5 in the stomach. The histopathological diagnosis was severe epithelial dysplasia in 6 patients, carcinoma in situ in 4, and carcinoma in 5. These 15 lesions were asymptomatic and detected by gastrointestinal endscopy for the first time. Patients with severe epithelial dysplasia were observed, and those with carcinoma or carcinoma in situ underwent radical therapy. All of these gastrointestinal lesions were treated successfully, without any recurrence or metastasis. Double cancers were detected by PET in 3 patients (1.9%): lung and esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, and ovarian cancer in one patient each. These 3 cases also were detected by PET for the first time and were free of clinical symptoms. Radical therapy was performed in 2 patients. The other patient had advanced disease and received only palliative therapy. Although PET could not detect most cancers or precancerous lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract that could be detected by gastrointestinal endscopy, it was useful for detecting malignant lesions in sites other than the upper gastrointestinal tract. Our results suggest that preoperative gastrointestinal endscopy and PET examinations can detect double cancer in the early stage and contribute to better outcomes in patients with oral cancer. (author)

  4. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals and the gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frier, M. [Radiopharmacy Unit, Dept. of Medical Physics, Queens Medical Centre, Univ. Hospital Nottingham (United Kingdom); Perkins, A.C. [Radiopharmacy Unit, Dept. of Medical Physics, Queens Medical Centre, Univ. Hospital Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    1994-11-01

    A review is presented of the design of radiolabelled test meals for the evaluation of gastrointestinal function, including oesophageal transit, gastro-oesophageal reflux, gastric emptying, enterogastric reflux and transit through the whole bowel. Descriptions of different systems are presented, together with validations of the procedures used. Published methods for assessment of oesophageal transit show a marked degree of consistency, whereas gastric emptying studies employ a wide range of both liquid and solid test meals. Recommendations are made concerning the optimal system for investigation of each part of the gastrointestinal tract, but whichever system is adopted, it is important to employ some validation procedures, and to establish normal ranges in the population under study. (orig.)

  6. Gastrointestinal hormones and their targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes...... it feasible to conceive the hormones under five headings: The structural homology groups a majority of the hormones into nine families, each of which is assumed to originate from one ancestral gene. The individual hormone gene often has multiple phenotypes due to alternative splicing, tandem organization......, or differentiated maturation of the prohormone. By a combination of these mechanisms, more than 100 different hormonally active peptides are released from the gut. Gut hormone genes are also widely expressed in cells outside the gut, some only in extraintestinal endocrine cells and neurons but others also in other...

  7. Behavioural medicine and gastrointestinal disorders: the promise of positive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Laurie

    2018-04-12

    Psychosocial risk factors linked to brain-gut dysregulation are prevalent across the spectrum of gastrointestinal disorders and are associated with poor patient outcomes. Robust and reproducible data in the areas of behavioural intervention science and the brain-gut axis have led to major advances in patient care, including the routine use of brain-gut psychotherapies to manage digestive symptoms and optimize coping. The logical next step for the emerging field of psychogastroenterology is to develop a scientific framework that enables the identification of those individual characteristics and coping styles that buffer patients against the negative psychological effects of chronic gastrointestinal disorders. A shift towards a strength-based, positive psychological science of gastrointestinal disorders could facilitate the integration of early, effective psychological care into gastroenterology practice. In this Perspective, I discuss the potential role of three human strengths with relevance to gastrointestinal health - resilience, optimism and self-regulation - and how these three constructs can be cultivated through existing or emerging brain-gut psychotherapies.

  8. Foreign Material in the Gastrointestinal Tract: Cocaine Packets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurten Turkel Kucukmetin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smuggling drugs by swallowing or inserting into a body cavity is not only a serious and growing international crime, but can also lead to lethal medical complications. The most common cause of death in ‘body packers', people transporting drugs by ingesting a packet into the gastrointestinal tract, is acute drug toxicity from a ruptured packet. However, more than 30 years after the initial report of body packing, there is still no definitive treatment protocol for the management of this patient group. The treatment strategy is determined according to the particular condition of the patient and the clinical experience of the treatment center. Surgical intervention is also less common now, due to both the use of improved packaging materials among smugglers and a shift towards a more conservative medical approach. Herein, we report a case of toxicity from ingested packets of cocaine that leaked and, despite surgery, resulted in exitus of the patient.

  9. Acute toxicity of adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide for early breast cancer - a retrospective review of Chinese patients and comparison with an historic Western series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Brigette; Yeo, Winnie; Hui, Pun; Ho, Wing M.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    A cohort of 85 Chinese breast cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide was found to have a significantly higher incidence of grade 3 (n=44, 52%) and grade 4 (n=21, 25%) neutropenia when compared with an historic Western cohort. Also noted was a higher incidence of hepatotoxicity (n=8, 9%). When compared to Caucasian patients, the higher myelotoxicity in our patients may be related to ethnic variation in susceptibility to chemotherapy-related toxicity, lower body mass index with higher percentage of body fat composition, and the popular practice of concurrent alternative medicine during chemotherapy. The higher incidence of hepatoxicity was possibly associated with endemic chronic hepatitis B infection in this geographical area

  10. Comparative toxic effects of some xenobiotics on the germination and early seedling growth of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb. ) and white birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberger, P; Vladut, R

    1981-12-01

    Seeds of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) and white birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) were germinated in homogeneous emulsions or aqueous tank-mix solutions of fenitrothion or Matacil and their respective adjuvants: Atlox and Aerotex, or diluent oil No. 585 and nonylphenol. Percentage and peak germination values, water uptake, sprout length, ATP content, and morphological modifications were recorded from 0 to 14 or 21 days. Apart from 100 ppm fenitrothion which stimulated germination values, germination in jack pine was only marginally affected by any of the treatments; in contrast, white birch was negatively affected by all treatments. The most sensitive parameters of toxicity were the sprout length and ATP content after 14 days growth. Aberrant hypocotyl/root length ratios were evidenced in pine seeds after exposure to xenobiotic treatments which did not affect the germinative capacity of seeds. ATP content in the 14-day-old pine and birch seedlings was consistently higher than controls in all treatment sets. (Refs. 29).

  11. Early toxicity from preoperative radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil for resectable adenocarcinoma of the rectum: a Phase II trial for the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngan, Samuel Y.K.; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Fisher, Richard; Rischin, Danny; Schache, David J.; Kneebone, Andrew; MacKay, John R.; Joseph, David; Bell, Andrew; Goldstein, David

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity and the efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had newly diagnosed localized adenocarcinoma of the rectum within 12 cm of the anal verge, Stage T3-4, and were suitable for curative resection. Eighty-two patients were treated with radiotherapy--50.4 Gy in 28 fractions in 5.6 weeks, given concurrently with continuous infusion 5-FU, using either 96-h/week infusion at 300 mg/m 2 /day or 7-days/week infusion at 225 mg/m 2 /day. Results: The median age was 59 years (range, 27-87), and 67% of patients were male. Pretreatment stages of the rectal cancer were T3, 89% and resectable T4, 11%, with endorectal ultrasound confirmation in 67% of patients. Grade 3 acute toxicity occurred in 5 of 82 patients (6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2-14%). Types of surgical resection were anterior resection, 61%; abdominoperineal resection, 35%; and other procedures, 4%. There was no operative mortality. Anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection occurred in 3 of 50 patients (6%; 95% CI, 1-17%). The pathologic complete response rate was 16% (95% CI, 9-26%). Pathologic Stages T2 or less occurred in 51%. Conclusion: Preoperative radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-FU for locally advanced rectal cancer is a safe regimen, with a significant downstaging effect. It does not seem to lead to a significant increase in serious surgical complications

  12. Liquid biopsies in gastrointestinal malignancies: when is the big day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anthony; Harada, Kazuto; Mizrak Kaya, Dilsa; Dong, Xiaochuan; Song, Shumei; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2018-01-01

    Tumor tissue sample is currently the gold standard for diagnosing gastrointestinal cancers, but also for genomic/immune component analyses that can help in the selection of therapy. However, this approach of studying a 'representative' sample of the tumor does not address inherent heterogeneity. Liquid biopsies, mainly represented by circulating tumor cells, circulating tumor DNA, tumor exosomes, and microRNAs, have the potential to assess various biomarkers for early detection of cancer, carrying out genomic/immune profiling for not only selection of appropriate therapy but also to monitor effect of therapy. Areas covered: This review summarizes the current evidence in the literature on liquid biopsies in gastrointestinal cancers concerning diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy. The following terms were used in PubMed: 'esophageal', 'gastric', 'colorectal', 'cancer', 'circulating tumor cells', 'circulating tumor DNA', microRNA', 'diagnosis', 'prognosis', 'response', 'resistance'. Expert commentary: Data increasingly supports the potential of liquid biopsies for early detection, selection of therapy, and monitoring response to therapy. One major question is whether assaying various components of the blood would accommodate considerable context-dependent heterogeneity of gastrointestinal tumors. There are many potential strategies to exploit liquid biopsy use. To put them in to perspective, well-designed and meticulous prospective studies will be needed to prove their usefulness.

  13. Current management and prognostic features for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamba Gurpreet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stromal or mesenchymal neoplasms affecting the gastrointestinal (GI tract have undergone a remarkable evolution in how they are perceived, classified, approached, diagnosed and managed over the last 30 years. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST account for approximately 1% to 3% of all malignant GI tumors. The clinical features can vary depending on the anatomic location, size and aggressiveness of the tumor. Metastatic GIST represents a successful example of molecular targeted therapy. In this comprehensive review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical features and diagnostic modalities for GIST. We also describe treatment options for early stage, locally advanced and metastatic GIST. Indications for neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy along with duration of therapy are also explained. A brief discussion of latest biomarkers and updates from recent meetings is also provided.

  14. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders and Their Clinical Implications in Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Theocharidou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal motility is impaired in a substantial proportion of patients with cirrhosis. Cirrhosis-related autonomic neuropathy, increased nitric oxide production, and gut hormonal changes have been implicated. Oesophageal dysmotility has been associated with increased frequency of abnormal gastro-oesophageal reflux. Impaired gastric emptying and accommodation may result in early satiety and may have an impact on the nutritional status of these patients. Small intestinal dysmotility might be implicated in small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation. The latter has been implicated in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Enhanced colonic motility is usually associated with the use of lactulose. Pharmacological interventions aiming to alter gastrointestinal motility in cirrhosis could potentially have a beneficial effect reducing the risk of hepatic decompensation and improving prognosis.

  15. Toxicity of systems for energy generation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    This section contains summaries of research on assessment of health and environmental effects of electric storage systems, and the metabolism and toxicity of metal compounds associated with energy production and storage. The first project relates to the production and use of electric storage battery systems. The second project deals with the effects of pregnancy and lactation on the gastrointestinal absorption, tissue distribution, and toxic effects of metals (Cd). Also included in this study is work on the absorption of actinides ( 239 Pu)

  16. Gastrointestinal obstruction in penguin chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpiñán, David; Curro, Thomas G

    2009-12-01

    A 7-day-old gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) was found dead and postmortem examination revealed impaction of the ventriculus with feathers. A review of mortality in gentoo penguin chicks from 1997 to 2007 at that institution revealed another case of feather impaction of the ventriculus in a 4-week-old chick, a sibling of the previous chick. A third case of gastrointestinal impaction occurred in a 24-day-old king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) with omphallitis and enteritis. In this chick, a fibrin mat produced a complete obstruction of the intestine at the level of Meckel's diverticulum.

  17. Fraccionando la microbiota gastrointestinal humana

    OpenAIRE

    Peris Bondia, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    La microbiota gastrointestinal humana es una de las comunidades microbianas más diversa y compleja que se puede encontrar en la naturaleza. Las nuevas tecnologías de secuenciación permiten obtener una amplia visión de la diversidad microbiana, lo que ha revelado una gran cantidad de bacterias no cultivables. A pesar del potencial de estas tecnologías de alto rendimiento la metagenómica no muestra la imagen completa. La citometría de flujo es una metodología que permite describir y/o separa...

  18. Toxic Stress: Effects, Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillary A. Franke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Children who experience early life toxic stress are at risk of long-term adverse health effects that may not manifest until adulthood. This article briefly summarizes the findings in recent studies on toxic stress and childhood adversity following the publication of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP Policy Report on the effects of toxic stress. A review of toxic stress and its effects is described, including factors of vulnerability, resilience, and the relaxation response. An integrative approach to the prevention and treatment of toxic stress necessitates individual, community and national focus.

  19. Bleeding and starving: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jorge; Meira, Tânia; Nunes, Ana; Santos, Carla Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. The aim of this study was obtaining objective data on refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. From 1 year span records of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients that underwent urgent endoscopy: clinical features; rockall score; endoscopic data, including severity of lesions and therapy; feeding related records of seven days: liquid diet prescription, first liquid intake, soft/solid diet prescription, first soft/solid intake. From 133 patients (84 men) Rockall classification was possible in 126: 76 score ≥5, 50 score bleeding, eight rebled, two underwent surgery, 13 died. Ulcer was the major bleeding cause, 63 patients underwent endoscopic therapy. There was 142/532 possible refeeding records, no record 37% patients. Only 16% were fed during the first day and half were only fed on third day or later. Rockall upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients must be refed earlier, according to guidelines.

  20. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy delivered in two fractions within one day for favorable/intermediate-risk prostate cancer: preliminary toxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye, Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-07-01

    To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a single implant HDR-BT to 24-27 Gy in two fractions

  1. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable

  2. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6–40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with

  3. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-03-14

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs.

  4. Does Hypothyroidism Affect Gastrointestinal Motility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Yaylali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastrointestinal motility and serum thyroid hormone levels are closely related. Our aim was to analyze whether there is a disorder in esophagogastric motor functions as a result of hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods. The study group included 30 females (mean age ± SE 45.17 ± 2.07 years with primary hypothyroidism and 10 healthy females (mean age ± SE 39.40 ± 3.95 years. All cases underwent esophagogastric endoscopy and scintigraphy. For esophageal scintigraphy, dynamic imaging of esophagus motility protocol, and for gastric emptying scintigraphy, anterior static gastric images were acquired. Results. The mean esophageal transit time (52.56 ± 4.07 sec for patients; 24.30 ± 5.88 sec for controls; P=.02 and gastric emptying time (49.06 ± 4.29 min for the hypothyroid group; 30.4 ± 4.74 min for the control group; P=.01 were markedly increased in cases of hypothyroidism. Conclusion. Hypothyroidism prominently reduces esophageal and gastric motor activity and can cause gastrointestinal dysfunction.

  5. Radiological diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Gross-Fengels, W.; Lorenz, R.

    1990-01-01

    In the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopy holds the first place today. Radiological investigations are indispensable whenever endoscopy cannot precisely localise the bleeding site, whenever a tumour is present or suspected, in all cases of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and in haemobilia. A tailored radiological approach is recommended. The radiological basis programme should be at least a complete abdominal ultrasound study and plain abdominal radiograms. CT and ERCP scans may become necessary in selected cases. As a rule, angiographical localisation of the bleeding site will be successful only in the acute stage; selective visceral arteriograms have to be obtained, which may be executed in the digital subtraction technique in patients who are cooperating and clinically stable. Angiodysplasias and aneurysms, however, may be demonstrated angiographically in the interval as well. Upper and/or lower G.I. tract studies with barium or water-soluble contrast media may be indicated in the interval in order to demonstrate tumours, metastatic lesions, diverticula and gut malformations. (orig.) [de

  6. Postoperative pain and gastro-intestinal recovery after colonic resection with epidural analgesia and multimodal rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, M U; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Basse, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate initial postoperative pain intensity and the association with recovery of gastrointestinal function and length of stay (LOS) in a multimodal programme with epidural analgesia, early oral nutrition and mobilisation with a 48 h planned hospital stay. One hundred......, respectively. Gastrointestinal recovery and LOS did not differ between patients with high (3-6) versus low (0-2) dynamic pain scores (P > 0.4 and P > 0.1, respectively). It is concluded that a multimodal rehabilitation program including continuous thoracic epidural analgesia leads to early recovery...

  7. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  8. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    all chemicals and impact pathways characterizes the contribution of each factor to the total variation of 10–12 orders of magnitude in impacts per kg across all chemicals. This large variation between characterisation factors for different chemicals as well as the 3 orders of magnitude uncertainty....... As a whole, the assessment of toxicity in LCA has progressed on a very sharp learning curve during the past 20 years. This rapid progression is expected to continue in the coming years, focusing more on direct exposure of workers to chemicals during manufacturing and of consumers during product use...

  9. Precision-cut intestinal slices as an in vitro model to predict NSAID induced intestinal toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; van der Bijl, Henk; Groothuis, Geny; de Graaf, Inge

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with high prevalence of gastro-intestinal side-effects. In vivo studies suggest that uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation is an important cause of the toxicity and that the toxicity is aggravated by enterohepatic circulation.

  10. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ( 99m Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  11. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, E.K.; Jones, B.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters and five case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: CT of the Stomach; CT and Other Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Evaluation of Crohn's Disease; Periotoneal Metastasis; CT and MRI Correlation of the Gastrointestinal Tract; CT of Acute Gastrointestinal Abnormlities; and CT of Colorectal Cancer

  12. Possible Waardenburg syndrome with gastrointestinal anomalies.

    OpenAIRE

    Nutman, J; Steinherz, R; Sivan, Y; Goodman, R M

    1986-01-01

    We describe a patient with possible Waardenburg syndrome associated with anal atresia and oesophageal atresia with tracheooesophageal fistula. Three other published cases with atretic gastrointestinal anomalies associated with the Waardenburg syndrome are reviewed. We conclude that the association between atretic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and the Waardenburg syndrome may be a significant one.

  13. Possible Waardenburg syndrome with gastrointestinal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutman, J; Steinherz, R; Sivan, Y; Goodman, R M

    1986-01-01

    We describe a patient with possible Waardenburg syndrome associated with anal atresia and oesophageal atresia with tracheooesophageal fistula. Three other published cases with atretic gastrointestinal anomalies associated with the Waardenburg syndrome are reviewed. We conclude that the association between atretic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and the Waardenburg syndrome may be a significant one. Images PMID:3712396

  14. Unsedated Flexible Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Need for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To determine the incidence of oxygen desaturation and whether routine oxygen monitoring is necessary during unsedated diagnostic flexible upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods: A prospective study involving 54 consecutive in and out patients who had diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at ...

  15. Peptide Hormones in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasi...

  16. Mammalian gastrointestinal parasites in rainforest remnants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, we studied the gastrointestinal parasites of nonhuman mammalian hosts living in 10 rainforest patches of the Anamalai Tiger Reserve, India. We examined 349 faecal samples of 17 mammalian species and successfully identified 24 gastroin-testinal parasite taxa including 1 protozoan, 2 trematode, 3 cestode and 18 ...

  17. Antidepressants and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general Dutch adult population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, B.; Tielemans, M.M.; Aaldering, B.R.; Eikendal, T.; Jaspers Focks, J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Oijen, M.G.H. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms are frequently reported adverse effects of antidepressants, but antidepressants are also a treatment modality in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We aimed to assess the association between antidepressant use and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general

  18. HIV-Associated Gastrointestinal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Björn E-O; Oette, Mark; Haes, Johannes; Häussinger, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    People living nowadays with HIV and AIDS may be treated effectively regarding virus replication and immunology. However, non-AIDS-defining cancer is of growing relevance due to high incidence and unfavorable outcome. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge on gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoma. Although literature on GI cancer is rare, an increased incidence of esophageal, gastric, pancreatic, hepatocellular, and colorectal carcinoma has been demonstrated. However, there are only few reports on therapy strategies and outcome, so that, despite increased occurrence of many GI carcinomas, only little is known about individualized treatment options and outcome in HIV-positive patients. More efforts have to be undertaken to close this gap. © 2017 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  19. Malignant tumors of gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    International histological classification and classification according to TNM systems, domestic clinical classification according to stages of carcinoma of stomach, large intestine and rectum are presented. Diagnosis of tumoral processes of the given localizations should be based on complex application of diagnostic methods: clinical, ultrasonic, radiological and others. Surgical method and variants of surgical method with preoperative radiotherapy play a leading role in treatment of mentioned tumors. Combined method of treatment-surgical intervention with postoperation intravenous injection of colloid 198 Au - is applied for preventing propagation of stomach cancer metastases. Advisability of combining operations with radiological and antitumoral medicamentous therapy is shown. Reliable results of treatment of malignant tumors of gastrointestinal tract are presented

  20. Partial breast irradiation as sole therapy for low risk breast carcinoma: Early toxicity, cosmesis and quality of life results of a MammoSite brachytherapy phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Chauvet, Marie-Pierre; Giard, Sylvia; Villette, Sylviane; Lacornerie, Thomas; Bonodeau, Francois; Baranzelli, Marie-Christine; Bonneterre, Jacques; Lartigau, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The MammoSite is a device that was developed with the goal of making breast-conserving surgery (BCT) more widely available. Our objective was to evaluate the MammoSite device performances after an open cavity placement procedure and quality of life in highly selected patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and materials: From March 2003 to March 2005, 43 patients with T1 breast cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. The median age was 72 years. Twenty-five (58%) patients were treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy using the MammoSite applicator to deliver 34 Gy in 10 fractions. The main disqualifying factor was pathologic sentinel node involvement (10/43; 23%). There were no device malfunctions, migration or rupture of the balloon. Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, there were no local recurrences and one contralateral lobular carcinoma. Seventeen (68%), 13 (52%), 8 (32%), 5 (20%) and 2 (8%) patients had erythema, seroma, inflammation, hematoma and sever infection, respectively. Only 2 patients developed telangiectasia. At 1 year the rate of 'good to excellent' cosmetic results was 84%. Significant changes in QoL were observed for emotional and social well-being between 3 and 12 months. At 24 months, only emotional well-being subscore changes were statistically significant (p = 0.015). Conclusions: Our data in patients older than 60 years support the previously published data. Histologic features were the main disqualifying criteria. With higher skin spacing levels we observed very low incidence of telangiectasia. QoL evaluation indicates that baseline scores were satisfactory. Changes concerned emotional and social well-being

  1. A STUDY ON ENDOSCOPIC EVALUATION OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranaya Kumar

    2016-03-01

    of upper gastrointestinal bleeding as early as possible to facilitate accurate diagnosis and plan out an appropriate therapeutic measure.

  2. Exosomes: novel implications in diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari, Mohammad; Rahbari, Nuh; Reissfelder, Christoph; Weitz, Juergen; Kahlert, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Amongst all cancer subtypes, gastrointestinal tumours are responsible for most cancer-related deaths. In most of the cases, the limitation of the prognosis of patients with malignant gastrointestinal tumours can be attributed to delayed diagnosis of the disease. In the last decade, secondary prevention strategies, in particular tumour screenings, have been identified to significantly improve the identification of patients with early-stage disease, leading to more effective therapeutic interventions. Therefore, new screening methods and further innovative treatment approaches may lead to an increase in progression-free and overall survival rates. Exosomes are small microvesicles with a size of 50-150 nm. They are formed in the endosomal system of many different cell types, where they are packed with nucleotides and proteins from the parental cell. After their release into the extracellular space, exosomes can deliver their cargo into recipient cells. By this mechanism, tumour cells can recruit and manipulate the adjacent and systemic microenvironment in order to support invasion and dissemination. Cancer-derived exosomes in the blood may provide detailed information about the tumour biology of each individual patient. Moreover, tumour-derived exosomes can be used as targetable factors and drug delivery agents in clinical practice. In this review, we summarise new aspects about novel implications in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer and show how circulating exosomes have come into the spotlight of research as a high potential source of 'liquid biopsies'.

  3. Transcatheter arterial embolization for upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Širvinskas, Audrius; Smolskas, Edgaras; Mikelis, Kipras; Brimienė, Vilma; Brimas, Gintautas

    2017-12-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization is a possible treatment for patients with recurrent bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract after failed endoscopic management and is also an alternative to surgical treatment. To analyze the outcomes of transcatheter arterial embolization and identify the clinical and technical factors that influenced the rates of morbidity and mortality. A retrospective analysis was carried out, based on the data of 36 patients who underwent transcatheter arterial embolization for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 2013 to 2015 in our center. An analysis was performed between early rebleeding rates, mortality and the following factors: patient sex, age, number of units of packed red blood cells and packed plasma administered to the patients, length of hospital stay, therapeutic or prophylactic embolization. The technical success rate of the embolization procedure was 100%. There were 15 (41.70%) therapeutic embolizations and 21 (58.3%) prophylactic embolizations. There was a 77.8% clinical success rate. Following embolization, 10 (27.80%) patients had repeated bleeding and 9 (25.0%) patients died. Significant associations were found between rebleeding and prophylactic embolization (OR = 10.53; p = 0.04) and between mortality and prophylactic embolization (OR = 10.53; p = 0.04) and units of packed red blood cells (OR = 1.25; p < 0.01). In our experience, transcatheter arterial embolization is a safe treatment method for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and a possible alternative to surgery for high-risk patients.

  4. DISORDERS OF GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT FUNCTION IN INFANTS: THE PROBLEM AND THE ANALYSIS OF GENERALIZED DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Ursova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The review analyzes the modern opinion on the problem of functional disorders of gastrointestinal tract, which are peculiar to infants. The peculiarities of nutrition and intestinal microbiocenosis in healthy infants are discussed. Authors observe the ways of its correction and propose the principles of a choice of medications, having proven clinical effectiveness in children on early stages of postnatal development. The advantages of natural smectite dioctaedric (Smecta in prophylaxis and treatment of functional disorders of gastrointestinal system, acute and chronic diseases in children are presented.Key words: children of early age, gastrointestinal tract, function, nutrition, probiotics, smectite.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(6:48-54

  5. Reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy position statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bretthauer, Michael; Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F.; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    To develop standards for high quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures is

  6. Russula subnigricans Poisoning: From Gastrointestinal Symptoms to Rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shide; Mu, Maoyuan; Yang, Fangwan; Yang, Chunfei

    2015-09-01

    Wild mushroom poisoning is often reported to cause acute liver or renal failure. However, acute rhabdomyolysis caused by wild mushroom poisoning has rarely been reported. We describe 7 patients of 1 family with Russula subnigricans Hongo poisoning. Their clinical manifestations varied from gastrointestinal symptoms to rhabdomyolysis, with 1 fatality. Our report provides supporting evidence that rhabdomyolysis may result from ingestion of R subnigricans mushrooms. A key to survival for patients with rhabdomyolysis caused by R subnigricans poisoning may be early recognition and intensive supportive care. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of systemic immune responses through commensal gastrointestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M Schachtschneider

    Full Text Available Colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI tract is initiated during birth and continually seeded from the individual's environment. Gastrointestinal microorganisms play a central role in developing and modulating host immune responses and have been the subject of investigation over the last decades. Animal studies have demonstrated the impact of GI tract microbiota on local gastrointestinal immune responses; however, the full spectrum of action of early gastrointestinal tract stimulation and subsequent modulation of systemic immune responses is poorly understood. This study explored the utility of an oral microbial inoculum as a therapeutic tool to affect porcine systemic immune responses. For this study a litter of 12 pigs was split into two groups. One group of pigs was inoculated with a non-pathogenic oral inoculum (modulated, while another group (control was not. DNA extracted from nasal swabs and fecal samples collected throughout the study was sequenced to determine the effects of the oral inoculation on GI and respiratory microbial communities. The effects of GI microbial modulation on systemic immune responses were evaluated by experimentally infecting with the pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Coughing levels, pathology, toll-like receptors 2 and 6, and cytokine production were measured throughout the study. Sequencing results show a successful modulation of the GI and respiratory microbiomes through oral inoculation. Delayed type hypersensitivity responses were stronger (p = 0.07, and the average coughing levels and respiratory TNF-α variance were significantly lower in the modulated group (p<0.0001 and p = 0.0153, respectively. The M. hyopneumoniae infection study showed beneficial effects of the oral inoculum on systemic immune responses including antibody production, severity of infection and cytokine levels. These results suggest that an oral microbial inoculation can be used to modulate microbial communities, as well as

  8. Long-term tolerance and outcomes for dose escalation in early salvage post-prostatectomy radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safdieh, Joseph; Schwartz, David; Weiner, Joseph; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Madeb, Isaac; Rotman, Marvin; Schreiber, David; Rineer, Justin

    2014-01-01

    To study the long-term outcomes and tolerance in our patients who received dose escalated radiotherapy in the early salvage post-prostatectomy setting. The medical records of 54 consecutive patients who underwent radical prostatectomy subsequently followed by salvage radiation therapy (SRT) to the prostate bed between 2003-2010 were analyzed. Patients included were required to have a pre-radiation prostate specific antigen level (PSA) of 2 ng/mL or less. The median SRT dose was 70.2 Gy. Biochemical failure after salvage radiation was defined as a PSA level >0.2 ng/mL. Biochemical control and survival endpoints were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis were used to identify the potential impact of confounding factors on outcomes. The median pre-SRT PSA was 0.45 ng/mL and the median follow-up time was 71 months. The 4- and 7-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 75.7% and 63.2%, respectively. The actuarial 4- and 7-year distant metastasis-free survival was 93.7% and 87.0%, respectively, and the actuarial 7-year prostate cancer specific survival was 94.9%. Grade 3 late genitourinary toxicity developed in 14 patients (25.9%), while grade 4 late genitourinary toxicity developed in 2 patients (3.7%). Grade 3 late gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 1 patient (1.9%), and grade 4 late gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 1 patient (1.9%). In this series with long-term follow-up, early SRT provided outcomes and toxicity profiles similar to those reported from the three major randomized trials studying adjuvant radiation therapy.

  9. Tomotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma: A report on acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiler, Louis; Dobbins, Donald; Kulasekere, Ravi; Einstein, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the impact of Tomotherapy (TOMO) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity in prostate cancer. Materials and methods: The records of 55 consecutively treated TOMO patients were reviewed. Additionally a well-matched group of 43 patients treated with LINAC-based step and shoot IMRT (LINAC) was identified. Acute toxicity was scored according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity criterion. Results: The grade 2-3 acute GU toxicity rates for the TOMO vs. LINAC groups were 51% vs. 28% (p = 0.001). Acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 25% vs. 40% (p = 0.024), with no grade 3 GI toxicity in either group. In univariate analysis, androgen deprivation, prostate volume, pre-treatment urinary toxicity, and prostate dose homogeneity correlated with acute GI and GU toxicity. With multivariate analysis use of Tomotherapy, median bladder dose and bladder dose homogeneity remained significantly correlated with GU toxicity. Conclusions: Acute GI toxicity for prostate cancer is improved with Tomotherapy at a cost of increased acute GU toxicity possibly due to differences in bladder and prostate dose distribution

  10. Clinical outcomes and toxicity of proton beam therapy for advanced cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makita, Chiyoko; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Hareyama, Masato; Murakami, Masao; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hata, Masaharu; Inoue, Tomio; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Suzuki, Motohisa; Ishikawa, Yojiro; Azami, Yusuke; Kato, Takahiro; Tsukiyama, Iwao

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy and toxicity of proton beam therapy (PBT) for treating advanced cholangiocarcinoma. The clinical data and outcomes of 28 cholangiocarcinoma patients treated with PBT between January 2009 and August 2011 were retrospectively examined. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to estimate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) rates, and the log-rank test to analyze the effects of different clinical and treatment variables on survival. Acute and late toxicities were assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. The median age of the 17 male and 11 female patients was 71 years (range, 41 to 84 years; intrahepatic/peripheral cholangiocarcinoma, n = 6; hilar cholangiocarcinoma/Klatskin tumor, n = 6; distal extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, n = 3; gallbladder cancer, n = 3; local or lymph node recurrence, n = 10; size, 20–175 mm; median 52 mm). The median radiation dose was 68.2 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) (range, 50.6 to 80 Gy (RBE)), with delivery of fractions of 2.0 to 3.2 Gy (RBE) daily. The median follow-up duration was 12 months (range, 3 to 29 months). Fifteen patients underwent chemotherapy and 8 patients, palliative biliary stent placement prior to PBT. OS, PFS, and LC rates at 1 year were 49.0%, 29.5%, and 67.7%, respectively. LC was achieved in 6 patients, and was better in patients administered a biologically equivalent dose of 10 (BED10) > 70 Gy compared to those administered < 70 Gy (83.1% vs. 22.2%, respectively, at 1 year). The variables of tumor size and performance status were associated with survival. Late gastrointestinal toxicities grade 2 or greater were observed in 7 patients <12 months after PBT. Cholangitis was observed in 11 patients and 3 patients required stent replacement. Relatively high LC rates after PBT for advanced cholangiocarcinoma can be achieved by delivery of a BED10 > 70 Gy. Gastrointestinal

  11. Diagnostic evaluatuin of gastrointestinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, R.; Tatsch, K.

    1998-01-01

    Prior to surgery of gastrointestinal tumors exact information about tumor localization, extent and possible infiltration in adjacent structures are important. The task for radiological and scintigraphic methods is predominantly the preoperative tumor staging. The upper (esophagus, stomach, duodenum) and the lower (colon, rectum) gastrointestinal tract should be routinely investigated by endoscopy and endosonography. CT or MRI imaging may add information about tumor extent, infiltration in adjacent structures and pathologically enlarged lymph nodes. The latter may be detected with similar or higher sensitivity by PET as well. Furthermore, with PET it is possible to differentiate a tumor recurrence from postoperative scar tissue earlier than with conventional morphological imaging techniques, for example in colorectal cancer. Liver tumors should primarily be inspected sonographically followed by an MRI scan if dignity is uncertain. The receptor scintigraphy with radioactive ligands allows to further characterize a detected tumor. Benigne liver lesions can be distinguished from malignant tumors (metastasis, hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC]) by the neogalactoalbumin-(NGA-)scintigraphy, because NGA binds exclusively to the liver galactose receptors of normally functioning hepatocytes. For the differentiation between liver metastasis and HCC insulin scintigraphy can be used, since insulin binds significantly in HCC due to an overexpression of insulin receptors in these tumors. If a malignant process is suspected, additionally CT-arterioportography may be recommended, because this newer radiological technique is capable to visualize lesions smaller than 1 cm. In such cases PET is sensitive as well and due to increased glucose metabolism even small foci can be detected with comparably high sepcificity. The method of choice for the detection of a pancreatic tumor is endoscopic sonography. In most cases the dignity of the tumor can be verified by ERCP, but sometimes it is very

  12. The potential role of respiratory motion management and image guidance in the reduction of severe toxicities following stereotactic ablative radiation therapy for patients with centrally located early stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Image guidance allows delivery of very high doses of radiation over a few fractions, known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR. This treatment is associated with excellent outcome for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and metastases to the lungs. In the delivery of SABR, central location constantly poses a challenge due to the difficulty of adequately sparing critical thoracic structures that are immediately adjacent to the tumor if an ablative dose of radiation is to be delivered to the tumor target. As of current, various respiratory motion management and image guidance strategies can be used to ensure accurate tumor target localization prior and/ or during daily treatment, which allows for maximal and safe reduction of set up margins. The incorporation of both may lead to the most optimal normal tissue sparing and the most accurate SABR delivery. Here, the clinical outcome, treatment related toxicities, and the pertinent respiratory motion management/image guidance strategies reported in the current literature on SABR for central lung tumors are reviewed.

  13. Dietary zinc and its toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantzsch, H J

    1973-01-01

    First signs of Zn-toxicity in rats appeared at 1000 to 2000 ppm Zn in food. They were characterized by growth inhibition by the appearance of a microcytic hypochromic anemia by a reversible impairment of the ability to reproduce by disturbances in fat metabolism and by Zn-accumulation especially in the liver and the skeleton. Available results in the literature concerning alimentary Zn-toxicity in horses are few. At a daily doses of 8000 mg Zn during gestation there were no noticeable adverse effects either in the mare or the foal. While with young lambs addition of Zn of up to 1000 ppm enhanced growth, food intake and feed efficiency, with older lambs it gave rise to depressions. Available results of experiments with milk cows are equally insufficient. At Zn-concentration of 40 to 80 ppm, which may be reached in normal foodstuff, there appears to be a disturbance in the metabolism of cellulose in the rumen. In spite of this fact and notwithstanding the insufficiently examined influence of high Zn-concentrations in food on the Cu-metabolism, the limit of Zn-tolerance can be given at 1000 mg per kg of food. If dissolved, Zn is far more toxic. With calves there wre no signs of clinical toxicity up to Zn-concentrations in the food of 3000 ppm. Above 900 ppm there appeared depression in growth and deterioration in the feed efficiency. Ae 1700 ppm there was a decrease infood intake. Increased Zn-intake lead to a growing Zn-accumulation in several organs and tissues, with the accumulation in the liver, bones, kidneys, pancreas and the gastrointestinal tract being of special significance. With cessation of Zn-intake in food, Zn-accumulation slowly disappeared. As a result of high Zn-intake there appears to be synergistic and antagonistic interdependent effects with the metabolism of other trace elements (Cu, Fe) and minerals (Ca, Na, P).

  14. Early Experience with Stapled Gastrointestinal Anastomoses in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indications. Procedure. Anastomoses performed. Number performed. Antral gastric cancer. Distal partial gastrectomy. Roux‑en‑Y gastrojejunostomy. 4. Right colon cancer. Right hemicolectomy. Functional end to end ileocolic. 4. Benign ileal perforations. Ileal resection. Functional end to end ileo‑ileal. 3. Left colonic cancer.

  15. Early Experience with Stapled Gastrointestinal Anastomoses in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %), ileal perforations in 3 (15.8%) while 2 (10.5%) each had left colon cancer, common bile duct obstruction, rectal cancer and ruptured appendix. Mean duration of operation was 108 ± 46 min and mean duration of postoperative stay was 5 ...

  16. Forty cases of gastrointestinal neurosis treated by acupunture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yaping; Ding, Min; Wang, Yanjun

    2008-03-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect of acupuncture for gastrointestinal neurosis with that of oral remedy. Eighty cases were randomly divided into the following 2 groups. In the treatment group, acupuncture was given for one month at the main points of Zhongwan (CV 12), Zusanli (ST 36), Taichong (LR 3) and Shenmen (HT 7), with the auxiliary points selected according to TCM differentiation. In the control group, Domperidone was orally administered for one month. The total effective rate was 92.5% in the treatment group and 75.0% in the control group, with a significant difference between the 2 groups (chi2 = 4.423, P neurosis and with less toxic side effects.

  17. Phytotherapy in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelber, Olaf; Bauer, Rudolf; Kubelka, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Phytotherapy is an important therapeutic option in functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGID). It has a large tradition, with different approaches in different regions of the world, some of which have made their way into modern evidence-based medicine (EBM). Taking into account the number of herbs in use, and also the cumulated scientific evidence on them, FGID are possibly the most important indication in phytotherapy. This does not only apply for European phytotherapy, but also for other regions, such as Asia. Within European phytotherapy, herbs active in FGID are usually classified according to their main active constituents and their activities. Typically, the herbs used in FGID are grouped into amara, aromatica, amara aromatica combining both properties, herbs stimulating gastric secretion, herbs containing spasmolytic and carminative essential oils or spasmolytic alkaloids, mucilaginosa soothing the mucosa, and flavonoid containing drugs with anti-inflammatory properties. In phytotherapy, different plants are frequently combined to maximize effectiveness and specificity of action. Very potent combination products can be developed when the mechanisms of action of the combination partners are complementary. This approach can be demonstrated by the example of STW 5. For this herbal combination product, therapeutic efficacy in FGID has been clinically proven according to the highest standards of EBM. This example also underlines that modern rational phytotherapy is definitely part of modern EBM. Key Messages: FGID is one of the most important indications in phytotherapy and rationally combined herbal preparations are established evidence-based therapeutic options. © 2018 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Probiotics: defenders of gastrointestinal habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desh D. Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal microbiota play an important role in maintaining normal gastrointestinal (GI function and ensuring that changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota can promote GI function. The digestive tract is full of bacteria and many of these, including probiotics, are necessary for optimal digestive function. During bacterial gastroenteritis, harmful bacteria invade the digestive tract causing unpleasant symptoms and upsetting the balance between good and bad bacteria. Supplemental probiotics can help restore this balance. Studies have demonstrated that probiotics can often help reduce the severity of symptoms such as diarrhea and may help accelerate recovery. Probiotics are therapeutic preparations of live microorganisms administered in sufficient dosage to be beneficial to health. The therapeutic effects of these microorganisms appear to be strain specific. Primal Defense®, a unique, probiotic, bacterial compound, contains probiotics that support gut flora balance, promote consistent bowel function, control stomach acid levels to quickly eliminate burning sensation in the stomach and maintain immune system response. The probiotics in Primal Defense® maximize the benefits of a healthy diet by supporting normal absorption and assimilation of nutrients in the gut. Nearly 75% of our immune defenses are located in the digestive tract, so maintaining a favorable bacterial balance in the intestines (ideally 80% good or neutral bacteria to 20% bad or harmful bacteria is crucial to achieving and maintaining optimum health.

  19. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Shailaja; Singh, Sanjeet K; Pujani, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST. We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS). Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. (author)

  20. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at Digestive Diseases Week (DDW), 2015. Researchers are still seeking biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome and have presented new data. One study confirmed that the use of low-dose antidepressants has an antinociceptive effect without altering the psychological features of patients with functional dyspepsia. A contribution that could have immediate application is the use of transcutaneous electroacupuncture, which has demonstrated effectiveness in controlling nausea in patients with gastroparesis. New data have come to light on the importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome, although the effectiveness of a low-FODMAP diet seems to be losing momentum with time. Multiple data were presented on the long-term efficacy of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. In addition, among other contributions, and more as a curiosity, a study evaluated the effect of histamine in the diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Gastrointestinal disturbances in marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddoch, C; Trinick, T

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this survey was to investigate the prevalence of running-induced gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances in marathon runners. A questionnaire was completed by 471 of the estimated 1,750 competitors in the 1986 Belfast City Marathon. Eighty-three per cent of respondents indicated that they occasionally or frequently suffered one or more GI disturbances during or immediately after running. The urge to have a bowel movement (53%) and diarrhoea (38%) were the most common symptoms, especially among female runners (74% and 68% respectively). Upper GI tract symptoms were experienced more by women than men (p less than 0.05) and more by younger runners than older runners (p less than 0.01). Women also suffered more lower GI tract symptoms than men (p less than 0.05) with younger runners showing a similar trend. Both upper and lower tract symptoms were more common during a "hard" run than an "easy" run (p less than 0.01) and were equally as common both during and after running. Of those runners who suffered GI disturbances, 72% thought that running was the cause and 29% believed their performance to be adversely affected. There was no consensus among sufferers as to the causes of symptoms and a wide variety of "remedies" were suggested. GI disturbances are common amongst long-distance runners and their aetiology is unknown. Medical practitioners should be aware of this when dealing with patients who run.

  2. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alongi Filippo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Methods Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeamTM treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc. We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments. Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. Results All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Conclusions Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes.

  3. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Lin [Henan Cancer Hospital, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology (China); Shin, Ji Hoon, E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Han, Kichang; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jong-Soo [Kyunghee University, College of Medicine, Kangdong Kyunghee University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Kyu-Bo [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by GI lymphoma.Materials and MethodsThe medical records of 11 patients who underwent TAE for GI bleeding caused by GI lymphoma between 2001 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively.ResultsA total of 20 TAE procedures were performed. On angiography, contrast extravasation, and both contrast extravasation and tumor staining were seen in 95 % (19/20) and 5 % (1/20) of the procedures, respectively. The most frequently embolized arteries were jejunal (n = 13) and ileal (n = 5) branches. Technical and clinical success rates were 100 % (20/20) and 27 % (3/11), respectively. The causes of clinical failure in eight patients were rebleeding at new sites. In four patients who underwent repeat angiography, the bleeding focus was new each time. Three patients underwent small bowel resection due to rebleeding after one (n = 2) or four (n = 1) times of TAEs. Another two patients underwent small bowel resection due to small bowel ischemia/perforation after three or four times of TAEs. The 30-day mortality rate was 18 % due to hypovolemic shock (n = 1) and multiorgan failure (n = 1).ConclusionAngiogram with TAE shows limited therapeutic efficacy to manage GI lymphoma-related bleeding due to high rebleeding at new sites. Although TAE can be an initial hemostatic measure, surgery should be considered for rebleeding due to possible bowel ischemic complication after repeated TAE procedures.

  4. Drugs Approved for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Spontaneous neonatal gastrointestinal perforation: surgical or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... cases of spontaneous gastrointestinal perforation in neonates at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City. The perinatal stress factors were caesarian delivery, prematurity and fetal distress due to prolonged obstructed labour.

  6. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  7. Gastro-intestinal phytobezoars in Zimbabwean Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, C M; Gelfand, M

    1985-01-01

    The clinical features of 10 African patients with gastro-intestinal phytobezoars are described. These were similar to those described with persimmon bezoars and we postulate that the fruit of locally found trees, also of the genus Diospyros, are responsible.

  8. International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Survey Corner News Medical and Treatment News Events Press Releases Commentary For Media ... IFFGD is your resource for reliable digestive health knowledge, support, and assistance about functional gastrointestinal (GI) and ...

  9. Gastrointestinal Epithelial Organoid Cultures from Postsurgical Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Soojung; Yoo, Jongman

    2017-08-17

    An organoid is a cellular structure three-dimensionally (3D) cultured from self-organizing stem cells in vitro, which has a cell population, architectures, and organ specific functions like the originating organs. Recent advances in the 3D culture of isolated intestinal crypts or gastric glands have enabled the generation of human gastrointestinal epithelial organoids. Gastrointestinal organoids recapitulate the human in vivo physiology because of all the intestinal epithelial cell types that differentiated and proliferated from tissue resident stem cells. Thus far, gastrointestinal organoids have been extensively used for generating gastrointestinal disease models. This protocol describes the method of isolating a gland or crypt using stomach or colon tissue after surgery and establishing them into gastroids or colonoids.

  10. Prolonged parenteral nutrition after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estmann, Anne; Qvist, Niels; Husby, Steffen

    2002-01-01

    to diagnosis and clinical course. METHODOLOGY: This study reviews the clinical course of infants with gastrointestinal disease (gastroschisis, intestinal atresia, omphalocele, volvulus, Hirschsprung's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis) with a prolonged need for parenteral nutrition in the Western part...

  11. Comparative Molecular Analysis of Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yang; Sethi, Nilay S; Hinoue, Toshinori; Schneider, Barbara G; Cherniack, Andrew D; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Seoane, Jose A; Farshidfar, Farshad; Bowlby, Reanne; Islam, Mirazul; Kim, Jaegil; Chatila, Walid; Akbani, Rehan; Kanchi, Rupa S; Rabkin, Charles S; Willis, Joseph E; Wang, Kenneth K; McCall, Shannon J; Mishra, Lopa; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Bullman, Susan; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Lazar, Alexander J; Sakai, Ryo; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Bass, Adam J; Laird, Peter W; de Krijger, RR

    2018-01-01

    We analyzed 921 adenocarcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and rectum to examine shared and distinguishing molecular characteristics of gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas (GIACs). Hypermutated tumors were distinct regardless of cancer type and comprised those enriched for

  12. Appropriateness of Referrals for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appropriateness of Referrals for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. ... Accra between January and December, 2008 were interviewed and evaluated for this study. ... Presentations with bleeding and suspicion of malignancy showed statistical ...

  13. New techniques in gastrointestinal endoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Antonio Luengas Tello

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal endoscopic surgery has been making great progress since the seventies in the management paradigms of conditions such as gastrointestinal bleeding, polyp resection and diagnostic and therapeutic management of the biliary tract. The current challenge is the development of techniques that allow endoscopic treatment of emerging diseases such as cancer, morbid obesity, gastro-esophageal reflux and achalasia. This article reports on new techniques and expectations for the future in the endoscopic management of these diseases.

  14. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk fa...

  15. Digestive tract neural control and gastrointestinal disorders in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Liubiana A; Silva, Luciana R; Mendes, Fabiana A A

    2012-01-01

    To examine the neural control of digestive tract and describe the main gastrointestinal disorders in cerebral palsy (CP), with attention to the importance of early diagnosis to an efficient interdisciplinary treatment. Systematic review of literature from 1997 to 2012 from Medline, Lilacs, Scielo, and Cochrane Library databases. The study included 70 papers, such as relevant reviews, observational studies, controlled trials, and prevalence studies. Qualitative studies were excluded. The keywords used were: cerebral palsy, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, constipation, recurrent respiratory infections, and gastrostomy. The appropriate control of the digestive system depends on the healthy functioning and integrity of the neural system. Since CP patients have structural abnormalities of the central and peripheral nervous system, they are more likely to develop eating disorders. These range from neurological immaturity to interference in the mood and capacity of caregivers. The disease has, therefore, a multifactorial etiology. The most prevalent digestive tract disorders are dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and constipation, with consequent recurrent respiratory infections and deleterious impact on nutritional status. Patients with CP can have neurological abnormalities of digestive system control; therefore, digestive problems are common. The issues raised in the present study are essential for professionals within the interdisciplinary teams that treat patients with CP, concerning the importance of comprehensive anamnesis and clinical examination, such as detailed investigation of gastrointestinal disorders. Early detection of these digestive problems may lead to more efficient rehabilitation measures in order to improve patients' quality of life.

  16. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Esophagus: Report of a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Erol

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are rare neoplasms to be thought to arise from mesenchymal cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) of the esophagus are well documented but are very much rarer than gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach and small bowel. We describe a case of GIST of the esophagus that was resected with wide surgical resection.

  17. Dosimetry of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    In order to obtain information on radiation doses to the intestine, doses were determined in dogs for beta-emitters ( 106 Ru- 106 Rh, 147 Pm and 91 Y) that might be delivered to critical cells in the bowel in the event of an accident. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were implanted beneath the large-bowel mucose of dogs. Results were related to toxicity in the dogs and extrapolated to toxicity observed in other experiments with suckling, weanling and adult rats similarly treated. With that information the depth of the critical cells in both dogs and rats could be calculated. Studies with isotopes of thorium, uranium, protactinium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium showed that substantial amounts of these alpha-emitting actinides were retained in the intestines of neonatal rats, guinea pigs, dogs and swine after gavage. Despite high doses retained by mucosal cells on the villous tips, (some epithelial cells in the ileum received 100 Gy/day) gross injury was seldom observed at necropsy. 26 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  18. Specific Radiological Findings of Traumatic Gastrointestinal Tract Injuries in Patients With Blunt Chest and Abdominal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokabi, Nima; Harmouche, Elie; Xing, Minzhi; Shuaib, Waqas; Mittal, Pardeep K; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal hollow viscus injury after blunt chest and abdominal trauma is uncommon and complicates 0.6%-1.2% of all cases of trauma. Early recognition of such injuries significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Since physical examination is not accurate in detecting such injuries, contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the mainstay for diagnosis in many emergency departments. This pictorial essay aims to review the incidence, mechanisms, and signs of gastrointestinal hollow viscus injuries in the setting of blunt chest and abdominal trauma. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) online resource provides high quality chemical structures and annotations in association with toxicity data....

  20. Deep Learning in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vivek; Armstrong, David; Ganguli, Malika; Roopra, Sandeep; Kantipudi, Neha; Albashir, Siwar; Kamath, Markad V

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy is used to inspect the lumen or interior of the GI tract for several purposes, including, (1) making a clinical diagnosis, in real time, based on the visual appearances; (2) taking targeted tissue samples for subsequent histopathological examination; and (3) in some cases, performing therapeutic interventions targeted at specific lesions. GI endoscopy is therefore predicated on the assumption that the operator-the endoscopist-is able to identify and characterize abnormalities or lesions accurately and reproducibly. However, as in other areas of clinical medicine, such as histopathology and radiology, many studies have documented marked interobserver and intraobserver variability in lesion recognition. Thus, there is a clear need and opportunity for techniques or methodologies that will enhance the quality of lesion recognition and diagnosis and improve the outcomes of GI endoscopy. Deep learning models provide a basis to make better clinical decisions in medical image analysis. Biomedical image segmentation, classification, and registration can be improved with deep learning. Recent evidence suggests that the application of deep learning methods to medical image analysis can contribute significantly to computer-aided diagnosis. Deep learning models are usually considered to be more flexible and provide reliable solutions for image analysis problems compared to conventional computer vision models. The use of fast computers offers the possibility of real-time support that is important for endoscopic diagnosis, which has to be made in real time. Advanced graphics processing units and cloud computing have also favored the use of machine learning, and more particularly, deep learning for patient care. This paper reviews the rapidly evolving literature on the feasibility of applying deep learning algorithms to endoscopic imaging.

  1. Molecular Testing for Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Seung Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With recent advances in molecular diagnostic methods and targeted cancer therapies, several molecular tests have been recommended for gastric cancer (GC and colorectal cancer (CRC. Microsatellite instability analysis of gastrointestinal cancers is performed to screen for Lynch syndrome, predict favorable prognosis, and screen patients for immunotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor has been approved in metastatic CRCs with wildtype RAS (KRAS and NRAS exon 2–4. A BRAF mutation is required for predicting poor prognosis. Additionally, amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 and MET is also associated with resistance to EGFR inhibitor in metastatic CRC patients. The BRAF V600E mutation is found in sporadic microsatellite unstable CRCs, and thus is helpful for ruling out Lynch syndrome. In addition, the KRAS mutation is a prognostic biomarker and the PIK3CA mutation is a molecular biomarker predicting response to phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and response to aspirin therapy in CRC patients. Additionally, HER2 testing should be performed in all recurrent or metastatic GCs. If the results of HER2 immunohistochemistry are equivocal, HER2 silver or fluorescence in situ hybridization testing are essential for confirmative determination of HER2 status. Epstein-Barr virus–positive GCs have distinct characteristics, including heavy lymphoid stroma, hypermethylation phenotype, and high expression of immune modulators. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies enable us to examine various genetic alterations using a single test. Pathologists play a crucial role in ensuring reliable molecular testing and they should also take an integral role between molecular laboratories and clinicians.

  2. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  3. Patient health communication mediating effects between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the effects of patient health communication regarding their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to their health care providers and significant others in their daily life as a mediator in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients. ...

  4. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Establishing the key unanswered research questions within gastrointestinal endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rees, Colin J; Ngu, Wee Sing; Regula, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a rapidly evolving research field. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) plays a key role in shaping opinion and endoscopy activity throughout Europe and further afield. Establishing key unanswered questions within the fi...

  5. Toxic stress and child refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John S

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the phenomenon of toxic stress and its impact on the physical and mental health of child refugees. Almost two decades ago, researchers found that recurring adverse childhood events (ACEs; e.g., physical, psychological, and sexual abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction such as substance abuse, mental illness, and criminal behavior) were associated with a significant increase in serious illnesses during adulthood. Illnesses include heart, lung, and liver disease, cancer, and bone fractures. The scientists reported that experiencing four or more ACEs during childhood significantly increases the risk for toxic stress. Toxic stress is defined as the exposure to extreme, frequent, and persistent adverse events without the presence of a supportive caretaker. There is a paucity of literature related to toxic stress and child refugees. However, it has been clearly established that the prolonged brutal and traumatizing war in Syria is having a profound impact on the physical and mental health of child refugees at a distressing rate. Prevention of toxic stress should be a primary goal of all pediatric healthcare professionals working with child refugees. While this seems daunting given the population, and the seemingly insurmountable stressors they experience, some basic interventions should be considered. Providing basic anticipatory guidance to parents and caregivers of child refugees, to encourage positive parenting and strengthening support networks, will be highly effective in developing the requisite buffers that mitigate the effects of stress and avoid toxic stress. Efforts should also be focused on addressing caregiver stress and improving their ability to provide safe, reliable, and nurturing care that will help to mitigate any stress response experienced by a child. It is critical that greater awareness be placed on the effects of toxic stress on child refugees who are exposed to significant adverse events early in life

  6. Monitoring and treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenjani, Basri; Zeka, Sadik; Krasniqi, Salih; Bunjaku, Ilaz; Jakupi, Arianit; Elshani, Besni; Xhafa, Agim

    2012-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding-massive acute bleeding from gastrointestinal section is one of the most frequent forms of acute abdomen. The mortality degree in emergency surgery is about 10%. It's very difficult to identify the place of bleeding and etiology. The important purpose of this research is to present the cases of acute gastrointestinal bleeding from the patients which were monitored and treated at The University Clinical Center of Kosova-Emergency Center in Pristina. These inquests included 137 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding who were treated in emergency center of The University Clinical Center in Pristina for the period from January 2005 until December 2006. From 137 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding 41% or 29% was female and 96% or 70.1% male. Following the sex we gained a high significant difference of statistics (p < 0.01). The gastrointestinal bleeding was two times more frequent in male than in female. Also in the age-group we had a high significant difference of statistics (p < 0.01) 63.5% of patients were over 55 years old. The mean age of patients with an acute gastrointestinal bleeding was 58.4 years SD 15.8 age. The mean age for female patients was 56.4 age SD 18.5 age. The patients with arterial systolic pressure under 100 mmHg have been classified as patients with hypovolemic shock. They participate with 17.5% in all prevalence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. From the number of prevalence 2 {1.5%} patients have been diagnosed with peptic ulcer, 1 {0.7%} as gastric perforation and 1 {0.7%} with intestine ischemia. Abdominal Surgery and Intensive Care 2 or 1.5% died, 1 at intensive care unit and 1 at nephrology. As we know the severe condition of the patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and etiology it is very difficult to establish, we need to improve for the better conditions in our emergency center for treatment and initiation base of clinic criteria.

  7. Point-of-care testing in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers: current technology and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddy, Jeremy R; Ni, Melody Z; Markar, Sheraz R; Hanna, George B

    2015-04-14

    Point-of-care (POC) tests enable rapid results and are well established in medical practice. Recent advances in analytical techniques have led to a new generation of POC devices that will alter gastrointestinal diagnostic pathways. This review aims to identify current and new technologies for the POC diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer. A structured search of the Embase and Medline databases was performed. Papers reporting diagnostic tests for gastrointestinal cancer available as a POC device or containing a description of feasibility for POC application were included. Studies recovered were heterogeneous and therefore results are presented as a narrative review. Six diagnostic methods were identified (fecal occult blood, fecal proteins, volatile organic compounds, pyruvate kinase isoenzyme type M2, tumour markers and DNA analysis). Fecal occult blood testing has a reported sensitivity of 66%-85% and specificity greater than 95%. The others are at a range of development and clinical application. POC devices have a proven role in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer. Barriers to their implementation exist and the transition from experimental to clinical medicine is currently slow. New technologies demonstrate potential to provide accurate POC tests and an ability to diagnose gastrointestinal cancer at an early stage with improved clinical outcome and survival.

  8. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms in autoimmune gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Sacchi, Maria Carlotta; Severi, Carola; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune gastritis is often suspected for its hematologic findings, and rarely the diagnosis is made for the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess in a large cohort of patients affected by autoimmune gastritis the occurrence and the pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms and to evaluate whether symptomatic patients are characterized by specific clinical features. Gastrointestinal symptoms of 379 consecutive autoimmune gastritis patients were systematically assessed and classified following Rome III Criteria. Association between symptoms and anemia pattern, positivity to gastric autoantibodies, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant autoimmune disease were evaluated. In total, 70.2% of patients were female, median age 55 years (range 17–83). Pernicious anemia (53.6%), iron deficiency anemia (34.8%), gastric autoantibodies (68.8%), and autoimmune disorders (41.7%) were present. However, 56.7% of patients complained of gastrointestinal symptoms, 69.8% of them had exclusively upper symptoms, 15.8% only lower and 14.4% concomitant upper and lower symptoms. Dyspepsia, subtype postprandial distress syndrome was the most represented, being present in 60.2% of symptomatic patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that age gastritis is associated in almost 60% of cases with gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is strictly related to younger age, no smoking, and absence of anemia. PMID:28072728

  9. Milk diets influence doxorubicin-induced intestinal toxicity in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, R. L.; Pontoppidan, P. E.; Rathe, M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity is a common adverse effect of cancer treatment. We used preweaned piglets as models to test our hypothesis that the immunomodulatory and GI trophic effects of bovine colostrum would reduce the severity of GI complications associated with doxorub......Chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity is a common adverse effect of cancer treatment. We used preweaned piglets as models to test our hypothesis that the immunomodulatory and GI trophic effects of bovine colostrum would reduce the severity of GI complications associated...... to assess markers of small intestinal function and inflammation. All DOX-treated animals developed diarrhea, growth deficits, and leukopenia. However, the intestines of DOX-Colos pigs had lower intestinal permeability, longer intestinal villi with higher activities of brush border enzymes, and lower tissue...

  10. New advances in gastrointestinal motility research

    CERN Document Server

    Pullan, A; Farrugia, G

    2013-01-01

    Research into gastrointestinal motility has received renewed interest in part due to recent advances in the techniques for measuring the structure and function of gastrointestinal cells, tissue and organs. The integration of this wealth of data into biophysically based computation models can aid in interpretation of experimental and clinical measurements and the refinement of measurement techniques. The contents of this book span multiple scales - from cell, tissue, organ, to whole body and is divided into four broad sections covering: i) gastrointestinal cellular activity and tissue structure; (ii) techniques for measuring, analyzing and visualizing high-resolution extra-cellular recordings; (iii) methods for sensing gastroelectrical activity using non-invasive bio-electro-magnetic fields and for modulating the underlying gastric electrical activity, and finally; (iv) methods for assessing manometric and videographic motility patterns and the application of these data for predicting the flow and mixing behav...

  11. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilce Mitiko Matsuda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer.

  12. Transfusion strategy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, James; Lang, Eddy

    2015-09-01

    Clinical question Does a hemoglobin transfusion threshold of 70 g/L yield better patient outcomes than a threshold of 90 g/L in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding? Article chosen Villanueva C, Colomo A, Bosch A, et al. Transfusion strategies for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. N Engl J Med 2013;368(1):11-21. Study objectives The authors of this study measured mortality, from any cause, within the first 45 days, in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, who were managed with a hemoglobin threshold for red cell transfusion of either 70 g/L or 90 g/L. The secondary outcome measures included rate of further bleeding and rate of adverse events.

  13. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  14. Hemostatic powder TC-325 in the management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding: a two-year experience at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan; Nolan, Sabrina

    2015-02-01

    TC-325 is a novel endoscopic hemostatic powder. Our aim was to describe a single-center experience with the use of TC-325 in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, while for the first time attempting to determine how long the powder remains on a lesion. The charts of consecutive patients receiving TC-325 therapy between July 2011 and July 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Primary endpoints included immediate hemostasis and early rebleeding (≤ 72 hours). Overall, 60 patients received 67 treatments with TC-325: 21 for nonmalignant nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 19 for malignant upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 11 for lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and 16 for intra-procedural bleeding. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in 66 cases (98.5 %), with 6 cases (9.5 %) of early rebleeding. No serious adverse events were noted. No TC-325 powder was identified in the 11 patients who underwent second-look endoscopy, performed within 24 hours in 4 patients. TC-325 appears safe and effective for managing bleeding in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract with a variety of causes. The time during which the powder remains in the gastrointestinal tract is short, with complete elimination from the gastrointestinal tract as early as within 24 hours after use. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Curcumin ameliorates gastrointestinal dysfunction and oxidative damage in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Indarchandji Kochar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is known to be associated with gastrointestinal complications characterized by nausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating, and abdominal discomfort or pain commonly occurring in the advanced stages of the disease. Curcumin is the lipid-soluble antioxidant obtained from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa Linn, also known as turmeric. Curcumin targets multiple chemotherapeutic and oxidative stress pathways and has demonstrated safety and tolerability in humans, supporting its potential as a therapeutic agent; however, literature lacks conclusive evidence supporting its use as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of diabetes induced gastrointestinal complications. Hence, Curcumin was given in different doses to SD rats after 4 weeks of diabetic GI complication induction. At the end of 4 weeks, significant GI dysfunction characterized by weight loss, delayed gastric emptying and intestinal transit associated with reduction in antioxidant enzyme levels and increased lipid peroxidation was observed.  Upon treatment with Curcumin for further 4 weeks, reversal of GI dysfunction evidenced by restoration of body weight, GI emptying, intestinal transit, and restoration of antioxidant enzyme level and lipid peroxidation proves the beneficial role of Curcumin in diabetes induced GI complications due to its antioxidant potential.     

  16. Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, D; Ng, T; Ahmad, C; Alfakeeh, A; Alruzug, I; Biagi, J; Brierley, J; Chaudhury, P; Cleary, S; Colwell, B; Cripps, C; Dawson, L A; Dorreen, M; Ferland, E; Galiatsatos, P; Girard, S; Gray, S; Halwani, F; Kopek, N; Mahmud, A; Martel, G; Robillard, L; Samson, B; Seal, M; Siddiqui, J; Sideris, L; Snow, S; Thirwell, M; Vickers, M; Goodwin, R; Goel, R; Hsu, T; Tsvetkova, E; Ward, B; Asmis, T

    2016-12-01

    The annual Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2016 was held in Montreal, Quebec, 5-7 February. Experts in radiation oncology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, and infectious diseases involved in the management of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies participated in presentations and discussion sessions for the purpose of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses multiple topics: ■ Follow-up and survivorship of patients with resected colorectal cancer■ Indications for liver metastasectomy■ Treatment of oligometastases by stereotactic body radiation therapy■ Treatment of borderline resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer■ Transarterial chemoembolization in hepatocellular carcinoma■ Infectious complications of antineoplastic agents.

  17. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia with gastrointestinal symptomatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siroka, M.; Bilicky, J.; Hernesniemi, B.

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a case of 6-week-old baby boy with congenital diaphragmatic hernia(CDH). He presented with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. CDH is commonly manifested by nonspecific respiratory problems. The symptoms of CDH in older infants are atypical and misleading. Children may have only gastrointestinal problems even the acute abdomen. In our case, the ultrasound examination of abdomen did not detect the exact cause of vomiting and intolerance of oral intake, but the explanation has brought classic chest X-ray. (author)

  18. Gastrointestinal complications of leukemia and its treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, T.B.; Bjelland, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Leukemia represents 4% of all cancer deaths and is the leading cause of death from malignancy for all patients under 30 years of age. Various rare, usually preterminal gastrointestinal complications of leukemia have been reported. These complications are becoming more common and no longer should be considered unusual. Their increasing incidence is the result of new, more aggressive treatment methods and increased patient lifespan. The authors describe the relative incidence and common radiographic presentations of leukemia-related gastrointestinal disease and emphasize that its prognosis is favorable with prompt diagnosis and treatment

  19. Effects of radiation upon gastrointestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary F Otterson

    2007-01-01

    Whether due to therapeutic or belligerent exposure, the gastrointestinal effects of irradiation produce symptoms dreaded by a majority of the population. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping are hallmarks of the prodromal phase of radiation sickness, occurring hours to days following radiation exposure. The prodromal phase is distinct from acute radiation sickness in that the absorptive, secretory and anatomic changes associated with radiation damage are not easily identifiable. It is during this phase of radiation sickness that gastrointestinal motility significantly changes. In addition, there is evidence that motor activity of the gut contributes to some of the acute and chronic effects of radiation.

  20. Gastrointestinal hormone research - with a Scandinavian annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from neuroendocrine cells in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gut, which makes it the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasible to conceive the hormones...... as a blood-borne hormone, a neurotransmitter, a local growth factor or a fertility factor. The targets of gastrointestinal hormones are specific G-protein-coupled receptors that are expressed in the cell membranes also outside the digestive tract. Thus, gut hormones not only regulate digestive functions...

  1. Diagnosis of liver, biliary tract and gastrointestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburano, Tamio

    1981-01-01

    The role of RI imaging in the diagnosis of lesions of the liver, biliary tracts and gastrointestinal tracts are reviewed, and representative cases are shown. Liver scintigraphy was of value for the diagnosis of lesions limitted to the liver such as primary and metastatic liver cancer and inflammatory liver diseases. However, RI methods were less useful in the diagnosis of lesions of the biliary tracts and stomach. RI scintigraphy was more sensitive than angiography in the detection of Meckel's deverticulum, Ballet's esophagus, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (Tsunoda, M.)

  2. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Carlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser.

  3. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding - state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a condition requiring immediate medical intervention, with high associated mortality exceeding 10%. The most common cause of upper GI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, which largely corresponds to the intake of NSAIDs and Helicobacter pylori infection. Endoscopy is the essential tool for the diagnosis and treatment of active upper GI hemorrhage. Endoscopic therapy together with proton pump inhibitors and eradication of Helicobacter pylori significantly reduces rebleeding rates, mortality and number of emergency surgical interventions. This paper presents contemporary data on the diagnosis and treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  4. Scintigraphic demonstration of acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, A.

    1980-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding may be localized using noninvasive radionuclide methods. We have favored the use of technetium-99m sulfur colloid with sequential imaging because of the rapid clearance of background activity. Definition of the site of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, however, may be obscured by intense uptake of radioactivity by liver and spleen. The sensitivity of the method is such that the bleeding rates of 0.05-0.1 ml/min can be detected compared to a sensitivity of 0.5 ml/min for angiography.

  5. Wnt Signalling in Gastrointestinal Epithelial Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin J. Flanagan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signalling regulates several cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and migration, and is critical for embryonic development. Stem cells are defined by their ability for self-renewal and the ability to be able to give rise to differentiated progeny. Consequently, they are essential for the homeostasis of many organs including the gastrointestinal tract. This review will describe the huge advances in our understanding of how stem cell functions in the gastrointestinal tract are regulated by Wnt signalling, including how deregulated Wnt signalling can hijack these functions to transform cells and lead to cancer.

  6. Granular cells Tumor in the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano LL, Rodrigo; Gaitan B, Maria H; Juliao E, Fabian

    2005-01-01

    Granular cells tumors are ubiquitous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract, are rare and asymptomatic and they are generally an incidental discovery at gastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. In the gastrointestinal tract they are more frequently located in the esophagus, right colon and rectum, stomach, appendix, small intestine or biliopancreatic tract. This article describes three patients with four tumors of granular cells in rectum, esophagus (2 lesions) and appendix. It becomes special emphasis in their neural origin, their benign behavior that justifies the endoscopic resections or limited surgical excisions and the necessity of a pursuit for the possibility, although little, of malignant transformation

  7. [Neurological and psychiatric aspects of some gastrointestinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszalós, Zsuzsa

    2008-11-02

    The gastrointestinal tract is controlled by the independent enteric nervous system. It is also closely connected to the central nervous system, and bi-directional communication exists between them. The communication involves neural pathways as well as immune and endocrine mechanisms. The brain-gut axis plays a prominent role in the modulation of gut functions. Signals from different sources (e.g. sound, sight, smell, somatic and visceral sensations, pain) reach the brain. These inputs are modified by memory, cognition and affective mechanisms and integrated within the neural circuits of the central nervous system, spinal cord, autonomic and enteral nervous systems. These inputs can have physiologic effects, such as changes in motility, secretion, immune function, and blood flow to the gastrointestinal tract. One of the most important neurotransmitters is serotonin that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of the most common chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder: the irritable bowel syndrome. It is a biopsychosocial disease, resulting from the dysregulation of the brain-gut axis. Endogenous pain facilitation rather than inhibition, pathologic gradation of visceral perception and reduced threshold for pain are all evident in these patients. Abuse history is common in their anamnesis. Exaggerated conscientiousness, perfectionism, oversensitivity, feeling of deficiency in effectiveness, and higher demand for social parity, neuroticism and alexithymia have been detected among their constant personality features. Females are also characterized by gender role conflict and low assertiveness. Antidepressants and psychotherapy have important roles in their treatment. Also patients with inflammatory bowel disease are characterized by neuroticism and alexithymia and altered mother-child attachment is often described in their anamnesis. Autonomic neuropathy is a frequent and early neurological complication. Reflux disease and obstructive sleep apnea mutually generate

  8. Oral adverse effects of gastrointestinal drugs and considerations for dental management in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal disease is associated with alterations in the mouth or influence the course of the dental diseases, and the dental health care workers are expected to recognize, diagnose, and treat oral conditions associated with gastrointestinal diseases and also provide safe and appropriate dental care for afflicted individuals. Drugs used in the management of these diseases result in oral adverse effects and also are known to interact with those prescribed during dental care. Hence, this article has reviewed the drug considerations and guidelines for drug use during dental management of patients with gastrointestinal diseases.

  9. A patient with metastatic melanoma presenting with gastrointestinal perforation after dacarbazine infusion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hospers Geke AP

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report a rare case of gastrointestinal perforation following dacarbazine infusion for metastatic melanoma. The condition is attributed to a responding malignant melanoma in the gastrointestinal tract. Case presentation A 52-year-old Caucasian man presented with abdominal pain and distension, malaise, night sweats, dysphagia and early satiety. A computed tomography scan showed massive ascites, lymphadenopathy and liver lesions suspect for metastases. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed and revealed multiple dark lesions of 5 mm to 10 mm in his stomach and duodenum. When his skin was re-examined, an irregular pigmented lesion over the left clavicle measuring 15 mm × 8 mm with partial depigmentation was found. Histological examination of a duodenal lesion was consistent with a diagnosis of metastatic melanoma. The patient deteriorated and his level of lactate dehydrogenase rapidly increased. The patient was started on systemic treatment with dacarbazine 800 mg/m2 every three weeks and he was discharged one day after the first dose. On the sixth day he was readmitted with severe abdominal pain. A chest X-ray showed the presence of free intraperitoneal air that was consistent with gastrointestinal perforation. His lactate dehydrogenase level had fallen from 6969U/L to 1827U/L, supporting the conclusion that the response of gastrointestinal metastases to dacarbazine had resulted in the perforation of the patient's bowel wall. A laparotomy was discussed with the patient and his family but he decided to go home with symptomatic treatment. He died 11 days later. Conclusion Melanoma can originate in, as well as metastasize to, the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal perforations due to responding tumors are a well-known complication of systemic treatment of gastrointestinal lymphomas. However, as the response rate of metastatic melanoma to dacarbazine is only 10% to 20%, and responses are usually only partial

  10. Toxicity alarm: Case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, D.; Retallack, J.

    1993-01-01

    In late fall 1991, the Novacor petrochemical plant near Joffre, Alberta experienced a toxicity alarm, the first since its startup 14 years ago. Fish exposed to a normal toxicity test were stressed within 2 h and showed 100% mortality after 24 h. A history of the events leading up to, during, and after the toxicity alarm is presented. The major effluent sources were three cooling water systems. Although these sources are well characterized, the event causes were not immediately clear. Initial toxic screening indicated that one was very toxic, another moderately toxic, and the third not toxic at all. All three systems utilized the same chemical treatment program to avoid fouling: stabilized phosphates with minor variants. The most toxic of the cooling systems operated at 10-12 cycles, had three chemicals for biocide control, and had three makeup streams. Toxic and nontoxic system characteristics were compared. An in-depth modified toxicity identification and evaluation program was then performed to identify and evaluate the cause of the toxicity alarm for future prevention. The most probable causes of toxicity were identified by elimination. The combination of high numbers of cycles, hydrocarbons in the makeup water, and bromine added as an antifoulant resulted in formation of aromatic bromamines which are capable of causing the toxic condition experienced. 2 tabs

  11. Breast and gastrointestinal cancer updates from ASCO 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Shaheenah

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the updates presented at the ASCO 2015 symposium in breast and gastrointestinal malignancies. Some were practice changing while others gave us an exciting glimpse into what's to come in the very near future. Immunotherapy was the buzz word this year with data presented on every tumor site. Data on the efficacy of anti PD-1 agents in colorectal, hepatocellular and gastric cancer were presented. In breast cancer we saw data on a new and exciting therapeutic target in the form of androgen receptor among triple receptor negative breast tumors presented. Positive results of the PALOMA 3 trial were presented that has given women with hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer another therapeutic option. Furthermore data on strategies to further improve anti her2 therapy, optimizing of chemotherapy in the early and advanced stage and various strategies to improve endocrine therapy among patients with breast cancer were presented.

  12. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytunlu Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  13. Gastro-Intestinal Parasites of Warthogs (Phacochoerus Africanus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastro-Intestinal Parasites of Warthogs (Phacochoerus Africanus) from the Nazinga Game Ranch of Burkina Faso. ... the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in warthogs from the Nazinga Game Ranch of ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  14. Gastrointestinal estromal tumor: Presentation of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Gonzalez, Alexis; Hernandez Perez, Arnaldo; Gonzalez Rodriguez, Diana; Hernandez Fernandez, Diana M; Castanneda Munnoz, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Since the first descriptions made by Golden and Stout, this group of mesenchymal lesions is considered of muscular origin and they were named as leiomyoma, cellular leiomyoma, epithelioid leiomyoma, leiomyoblastoma, bizarre leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma. But Mazur and Clark created the term estromal tumor only after they began to use the inmunohistochemistry and subsequently showed the absence of muscular markers, and the occasional presence of neural markers. Nowadays, gastrointestinal estromal tumors are called the primary mesenchymal CD117 positive, fusiform or epithelioid tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, epiplon, mesenterio, and retroperitoneum. The gastrointestinal estromal tumors appear at the wall of the digestive tube: stomach (50-60 %), small intestine (20-30 %), large intestine (10 %) and esophagus (5 %), and occasionally in epiplon, mesenterio, and retroperineum (5 %). In our work we present a 67 year-old patient, entered in our hospital for presenting high digestive bleeding. We studied the case, and found a 6 cm tumor of the gastric fundus. The tumor was operated and the definitive results of the pathologic anatomy showed a gastrointestinal estromal tumor

  15. Emergency readmission following acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömdahl, Martin; Helgeson, Johan; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the occurrence, clinical predictors, and associated mortality of all-cause emergency readmissions after acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB). PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients with AUGIB from an area of 600 000 inhabitants in Sweden admitted in a single institution...

  16. Therapy for obesity based on gastrointestinal hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jonatan I; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that peptide hormones from the gastrointestinal tract have significant impact on the regulation of nutrient metabolism. Among these hormones, incretins have been found to increase insulin secretion, and thus incretin-based therapies have emerged as new modalities...

  17. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings and prevalence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings and prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among adult patients with dyspepsia in northern Tanzania. ... Endoscopy (EGD) for initial work up. Study on antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of H. pylori is recommended to guide choices for evidence based treatment option.

  18. Nutrition in the prevention of gastrointestinal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Diet has been hypothesized to play a role in the etiology of gastrointestinal cancer for a long time. Initially, strong evidence of such effects was found in retrospective epidemiological studies. Dietary habits, in particular those from the distant past, are difficult to measure, however. Results

  19. Sleep, immunity and inflammation in gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tauseef; Choe, James; Awab, Ahmed; Wagener, Theodore L; Orr, William C

    2013-12-28

    Sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many research endeavors. An estimated 70 million Americans suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Certain sleep disorders have been shown to cause neurocognitive impairment such as decreased cognitive ability, slower response times and performance detriments. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. Several research studies support the associations among sleep, immune function and inflammation. Here, we review the current research linking sleep, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases and discuss the interdependent relationship between sleep and these gastrointestinal disorders. Different physiologic processes including immune system and inflammatory cytokines help regulate the sleep. The inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 have been shown to be a significant contributor of sleep disturbances. On the other hand, sleep disturbances such as sleep deprivation have been shown to up regulate these inflammatory cytokines. Alterations in these cytokine levels have been demonstrated in certain gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, gastro-esophageal reflux, liver disorders and colorectal cancer. In turn, abnormal sleep brought on by these diseases is shown to contribute to the severity of these same gastrointestinal diseases. Knowledge of these relationships will allow gastroenterologists a great opportunity to enhance the care of their patients.

  20. [Biomorphology of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetto, S

    2006-09-01

    Under the term gastrointestinal nematodes are included numerous parasites species of livestock belonging to the families Strongyloididae (Strongyloides), Strongylidae (Chabertia, Oesophagostomum) Trichostrongylidae (Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia, Teladorsagia, Cooperia, Marshallagia), Molineidae (Nematodirus), Ancylostomatidae (Bunostomum) and Trichuridae (Trichuris). This paper reviews the biomorphology aspects of these parasites as well as the controversy by the taxonomists in the classifications.

  1. Pattern of gastrointestinal opportunistic infections among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-two per cent (22%) of these had mixed parasitosis of cryptosporidium and hookworm. There was no significant association of CD4 cells count with intestinal parasitosis. x2 = 5.286 and p=0.259. However marital status was significantly associated with gastrointestinal opportunistic parasitosis with x2 of 12.693, ...

  2. [Fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkoudakis, Emmanouil; Realdi, Giuseppe; Dore, Maria Pina

    2005-06-01

    In immunocompetent subjects fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon. Candida esophagitis remains the single most common fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts or in H. pylori- infected patients who receive antibiotic therapy. Enteric fungal infections are uncommon even in HIV-infected patients. Antifungal agents such as amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and the various formulations of itraconazole are effective for most cases.

  3. Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Disease in Sjogren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Yevgeniy; Salomon-Escoto, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SS) is a lymphocyte-mediated, infiltrative autoimmune disorder characterized by destruction of exocrine glands leading to secretory dysfunction. The typical manifestations include xerostomia and xerophthalmia; however, extensive gastrointestinal involvement is increasingly being recognized, emphasizing the variable and systemic nature of SS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Primary (AL) amyloidosis with gastrointestinal involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone Galmstrup; Gimsing, Peter; Schiødt, Frank V

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is a rare disease that can affect several organs. The aim of this study was to characterize patients with gastrointestinal manifestations of AL amyloidosis, in terms of symptoms, biochemistry, and outcome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospectivel...

  5. Association between Khat Chewing and Gastrointestinal Disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of gastritis was 580 (57.7%); constipation 235 (23.4%); hemorrhoids 54 (5.4%) and that of dental problems (carries, decay, filling and extraction) was 225 (22.4%) of all study participants. Gastrointestinal disorders were found to be higher among khat chewers, where 64(36.2%) of them had dental problems; ...

  6. Gastrointestinal Injuries Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment included segmental resection with end to end anastomosis, wedge resection with anastomosis, exteriorizations stomas, simple excision of the perforation and closure in two layers (gastric perforation). The total mortality was four (21.1%), two of them due to associated injuries. Conclusion: Gastrointestinal injuries ...

  7. Sensory testing of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brock, C.; Arendt-Nielsen, L.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this appraisal is to shed light on the various approaches to screen sensory information in the human gut. Understanding and characterization of sensory symptoms in gastrointestinal disorders is poor. Experimental methods allowing the investigator to control stimulus intensity and

  8. Gastrointestinal immune responses in HIV infected subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LRR Castello-Branco

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The gut associated lymphoid tissue is responsible for specific responses to intestinal antigens. During HIV infection, mucosal immune deficiency may account for the gastrointestinal infections. In this review we describe the humoral and cellular mucosal immune responses in normal and HIV-infected subjects.

  9. Gastrointestinal diseases in HIV/AIDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    an estimated 65 million people believed to be infected and an estimated. 14 000 new infections ... HIV is a staggering 10 - 20% of the population.1 Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases ... Oral fluconazole is a very successful treatment for ... candidiasis should be started on voriconazole.7 .... habits point to further investigation. An.

  10. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other...

  11. Angiography and angiotherapy of gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, R.; Grassot, A.; Souchon, R.

    1982-03-01

    In selected patients with upper and lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage there is an indication for angiography. Vasoconstrictive drugs or embolization materials can be submitted through the catheter to stop the hemorrhage (angiotherapy). 81 patients were diagnosed by this method. Treatment through the angiographic catheter followed the diagnostic procedure in 41 cases. The hemorrhage was controlled in 36 patients.

  12. Gastrointestinal bleeding following NSAID ingestion in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both presented with a history of fever and passage of bloody stools. There was a positive history of NSAID ingestion in both patients that was prescribed in the referring hospitals. ..... Bostwick HE, Halata MS, Feerick J, Newman LJ, Medow MS. Gastrointestinal bleeding in children following ingestion of low-dose. Ibuprofen.

  13. The Health Problems, Gastrointestinal and Blood Parasites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The report on the disease conditions in donkeys in most West African countries is scanty in literature. This study was conducted to identify the health related problems including gastrointestinal and blood parasites of donkeys at the Bolgatanga livestock market in the Upper East region of Ghana from July to December, 2012.

  14. Gastrointestinal tract sonography in fetuses and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Alain; Baud, Catherine; Ferran, Jean Louis; Saguintaah, Magali; Veyrac, Corinne [Hopital Arnaud de Villeneuve, 34 - Montpellier (France). Service de Radiologie Pediatrique

    2008-07-01

    Sonography of the gastrointestinal tract in fetuses, neonates and children entails no known biological risk, permits serial scanning and can provide information unobtainable with any other imaging modality. In experienced hands it can be used as the initial imaging technique in a number of gastrointestinal diseases and conditions. This book provides a comprehensive account of the current state of the art regarding sonography in this context. An introductory chapter compares the merits of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal gastrointestinal tract. Subsequent chapters focus on the technique, pitfalls and findings in a wide variety of applications, including antropyloric diseases, bowel obstruction, bowel wall thickening, colitis, appendicitis, some types of intussusception, abdominal wall and umbilical abnormalities, intraperitoneal tumors, and trauma. In each case the sonographic morphology is considered in depth with the aid of high-quality illustrations. A concluding chapter comprises a quiz based on 15 case reports. Gastrointestinal Tract Sonography in Fetuses and Children will be of value to all with an interest in this field. (orig.)

  15. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as gastroduodenal intussusception.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, Mark H

    2012-08-01

    Gastroduodenal intussusception secondary to gastrointestinal stromal tumour is a very rare cause for intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis of this condition can be challenging, as symptoms are often non-specific and intermittent. This article reports a case where the diagnosis was made preoperatively with abdominal imaging and was treated by a combination of endoscopic reduction and laparoscopic resection.

  16. Stem Cells in Repair of Gastrointestinal Epithelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Zilbauer, Matthias; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Clevers, Hans

    Among the endodermal tissues of adult mammals, the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium exhibits the highest turnover rate. As the ingested food moves along the GI tract, gastric acid, digestive enzymes, and gut resident microbes aid digestion as well as nutrient and mineral absorption. Due to the harsh

  17. Gastrointestinal cancer after treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdwell, Sandra H.; Hancock, Steven L.; Varghese, Anna; Cox, Richard S.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the risk of gastrointestinal cancer following Hodgkin's disease treatment according to age at treatment, type of treatment, and anatomic sites. Methods and Materials: Cases were identified from the records of 2,441 patients treated for Hodgkin's disease between 1961 and 1994. Follow-up averaged 10.9 years, representing 26,590 person-years of observation. Relative risks (RR) for gastrointestinal cancer incidence and mortality were computed by comparison with expected annualized rates for a general population matched for age, sex, and race. Results: Gastrointestinal cancers developed in 25 patients. The incidence RR was 2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5-3.5] and mortality RR was 3.8 (CI, 2.4-4.7). Sites associated with significantly increased risks included the stomach [RR 7.3 (CI, 3.4-13.8)], small intestine [RR 11.6 (CI, 1.9-38.3)], and pancreas [RR 3.5 (CI, 1.1-8.5)]. Risk was significantly elevated after combined modality therapy, RR 3.9 (CI, 2.2-5.6). The risk after radiotherapy alone was 2.0 (CI, 1.0-3.4), not a statistically significant elevation. The RR for gastrointestinal cancer was greatest after treatment at young age and decreased with advancing age. It was significantly elevated within 10 years after treatment [RR 2.0 (CI, 1.1-3.5)] and increased further after 20 years [RR 6.1 (CI, 2.5-12.7)]. Risk assessed by attained age paralleled risk according to age at treatment. Fifteen cases of gastrointestinal cancers arose within the irradiation fields. Conclusion: Patients treated for Hodgkin's disease are at modestly increased risk for secondary gastrointestinal cancer, especially after combined modality therapy and treatment at a young age. Risk was highest more than 20 years after treatment, but was significantly elevated within 10 years. Gastrointestinal sites with increased risk included the stomach, pancreas, and small intestine

  18. Gastrointestinal symptoms in children with acute neuroinfections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Markov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. In cases of severe forms of infectious di­seases, in addition to local inflammation, secondary lesions of the gastrointestinal organs may occur. We aimed to study the semiotics and epidemiology of gastrointestinal symptoms in children with acute neuroinfection. Materials and methods. This observational, retrospective, case-control study. We analyzed cases of in-patient treatment of children aged 1 month to 18 years with acute neuroinfections (meningitis, encephalitis and encephalomyelopolyneuropathy. Results. The study included 117 patients with acute central nervous system infections. Clinical symptoms of gastrointestinal infection were observed in 83 (70.9 % children. Among revealed symptoms, disorders of intestinal moti­lity, such as constipation and diarrhea, were prevalent. Manifestations of hepatobiliary system dysfunction included increased transaminase level (alanine aminotransferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGTF and/or ultrasound changes (enlargement, diffuse structural changes and were observed in 39.1 % of patients. Among the laboratory parameters, elevated ALT level was observed in 8.3 % of patients, bilirubin was elevated in only one child, alkaline phosphatase was above the age norm in 11.8 %, an increased GGTF above the age norm was observed in 31.3 % of patients. The level of intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP was elevated in 86.4 %, and L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP — in all (100 % children. Clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction (the presence of at least one of the gastrointestinal symptoms had an inverse relationship with the child’s age (rpb = –0.19, p = 0.033, correlated with staying in intensive care unit (odds ratio (OR = +5.25; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.62–16.97, artificial ventilation (OR = +4.5; 95% CI 1.00–21.69 and level of I-FABP (rpb = 0.34, p = 0.019. Conclusions. Among gastrointestinal symptoms in children with

  19. Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in the development of radiotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Richard M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucositis is a toxic side effect of anti-cancer treatments and is a major focus in cancer research. Pro-inflammatory cytokines have previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis. However, whether they play a key role in the development of radiotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the gastrointestinal tract using a rat model of fractionated radiotherapy-induced toxicity. Methods Thirty six female Dark Agouti rats were randomly assigned into groups and received 2.5 Gys abdominal radiotherapy three times a week over six weeks. Real time PCR was conducted to determine the relative change in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF in the jejunum and colon. Protein expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF in the intestinal epithelium was investigated using qualitative immunohistochemistry. Results Radiotherapy-induced sub-acute damage was associated with significantly upregulated IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF mRNA levels in the jejunum and colon. The majority of pro-inflammatory cytokine protein expression in the jejunum and colon exhibited minimal change following fractionated radiotherapy. Conclusions Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in radiotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in the sub-acute onset setting.

  20. Rectal toxicity profile after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy: Use of a comprehensive toxicity scoring system and identification of rectal dosimetric toxicity predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Jinesh N.; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To better understand rectal toxicity after prostate brachytherapy, we employed the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0), a comprehensive system with distinct and separately reported gastrointestinal adverse event items (unlike Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring), to evaluate item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 135 patients treated with brachytherapy ± hormonal therapy, using CTCAE v3.0 to score acute/late rectal toxicities (median follow-up, 41 months). Dosimetric parameters were evaluated for ability to predict toxicities. Results: Use of CTCAE yielded a novel rectal toxicity profile consisting of diarrhea, incontinence, urgency, proctitis, pain, spasms, and hemorrhage event rates. No item had a 25 (percent of rectal volume receiving 25% of prescribed prostate dose) ≤ 25% vs. 60% for %V 25 > 25% (p 1 ≤ 40% vs. 44% for %V 1 > 40% (p = 0.007). Conclusions: A comprehensive understanding of item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities was obtained using CTCAE. Rectal %V 25 > 25% and %V 1 > 40% predicted worse late diarrhea and maximum toxicity, respectively

  1. Toxic substances handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  2. Computed tomography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, Nadir; Altehoefer, Carsten; Winterer, Jan; Schaefer, Oliver; Springer, Oliver; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Furtwaengler, Alex

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the imaging characteristics of primary and recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in computed tomography with respect to the tumor size. Computed tomography was performed in 35 patients with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed retrospectively by two experienced and independent radiologist. The following morphologic tumor characteristics of primary (n=20) and (n=16) recurrent tumors were evaluated according to tumor size, shape, homogeneity, density compared with liver, contrast enhancement, presence of calcifications, ulcerations, fistula or distant metastases and the anatomical relationship to the intestinal wall, and the infiltration of adjacent visceral organs. Small GIST ( 5-10 cm) demonstrated an irregular shape, inhomogeneous density on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, a combined intra- and extraluminal tumor growth with aggressive findings, and infiltration of adjacent organs in 9 primary diagnosed and 2 recurrent tumors. Large GIST (>10 cm), which were observed in 8 primary tumors and 11 recurrent tumors, showed an irregular margin with inhomogeneous density and aggressive findings, and were characterized by signs of malignancy such as distant and peritoneal metastases. Small recurrent tumors had a similar appearance as compared with large primary tumors. Computed tomography gives additional information with respect to the relationship of gastrointestinal stromal tumor to the gastrointestinal wall and surrounding organs, and it detects distant metastasis. Primary and recurrent GIST demonstrate characteristic CT imaging features which are related to tumor size. Aggressive findings and signs of malignancy are found in larger tumors and in recurrent disease. Computed tomography is useful in detection and characterization of primary and recurrent tumors with regard to tumor growth pattern, tumor size, and varied appearances of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and indirectly

  3. [Antithrombotic therapy and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanová, Veronika; Gřiva, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is about 85-108/100,000 inhabitants per year, nonvariceal bleeding accounts for 80-90%. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation treatment are the significant risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To evaluate the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the general community of patients in a county hospital. And to compare the role played by antiplatelet and anticoagulation drugs and other risk medication. Retrospective analysis of patients over 18 years of age who underwent endoscopy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia (haemoglobinupper gastrointestinal tract during a hospital stay in 2013 (from January to June). We included 111 patients of average age 69±15 years, men 60%. Nonvariceal bleeding accounted for 90% of the cases. None of the patients with variceal bleeding (10% of patients) took antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy. There were 100 patients with nonvariceal bleeding of average age 70±15, 61% men. With the symptoms of acute bleeding (hematemesis, melena) presented in 73% of patients. The most frequent cause of bleeding was gastric and duodenal ulcer (54%). 32% of patients with nonvariceal bleeding had antiplatelets, 19% anticoagulants and 10% used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or corticosteroids. 30-days mortality of patients with nonvariceal bleeding was 11%, annual mortality was 23%. There was no significant difference in mortality, blood transfusion requirements or surgical intervention between the patients with antithrombotic agents and without them. 25% of patients (8 patients) using acetylsalicylic acid did not fulfil the indication for this treatment. Among the patients examined by endoscopy for symptomatic nonvariceal bleeding and/or anaemia (haemoglobingastrointestinal bleeding. With regard to that, it is alarming, that there still exists a nonnegligible percentage of patients taking acetylsalicylic acid even

  4. Risk Management for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Elderly Patients: Questionnaire for Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Umegaki, Eiji; Abe, Shinya; Tokioka, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Nozomi; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Yoda, Yukiko; Murano, Mitsuyuki; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2009-01-01

    More elderly patients now undergo gastrointestinal endoscopy following recent advances in endoscopic techniques. In this study, we conducted a high-risk survey of endoscopies in Japan, using a questionnaire administered prior to upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (UGITE), and identified anticholinergic agents and glucagon preparations as high-risk premedication. We also evaluated the cardiovascular effects of anticholinergic agents and glucagon through measurements of plasma levels of hum...

  5. Postoperative pain and gastro-intestinal recovery after colonic resection with epidural analgesia and multimodal rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, M U; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Basse, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate initial postoperative pain intensity and the association with recovery of gastrointestinal function and length of stay (LOS) in a multimodal programme with epidural analgesia, early oral nutrition and mobilisation with a 48 h planned hospital stay. One hundred...... of change in the surgical procedures (2), surgical morbidity (6), medical factors (4) and psychosocial or other factors (5) all independent of pain. Pain data were incomplete in two patients and therefore excluded. In the remaining 91 patients, median time to defaecation and LOS were 24 and 48 h......, respectively. Gastrointestinal recovery and LOS did not differ between patients with high (3-6) versus low (0-2) dynamic pain scores (P > 0.4 and P > 0.1, respectively). It is concluded that a multimodal rehabilitation program including continuous thoracic epidural analgesia leads to early recovery...

  6. The prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode infection and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GIN infection was associated with 1.4 litres per cow per day less milk and this ... Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infections in cattle are of considerable economic importance .... Table 2. Mean faecal egg counts of gastrointestinal nematodes and the 95% confidence ... 3.2 Gastrointestinal nematode species. The pooled ...

  7. Psychophysiological Associations with Gastrointestinal Symptomatology in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Bradley J.; Marler, Sarah; Altstein, Lily L.; Lee, Evon Batey; Akers, Jill; Sohl, Kristin; McLaughlin, Aaron; Hartnett, Kaitlyn; Kille, Briana; Mazurek, Micah; Macklin, Eric A.; McDonnell, Erin; Barstow, Mariah; Bauman, Margaret L.; Margolis, Kara Gross

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often accompanied by gastrointestinal disturbances, which also may impact behavior. Alterations in autonomic nervous system functioning are also frequently observed in ASD. The relationship between these findings in ASD is not known. We examined the relationship between gastrointestinal symptomatology, examining upper and lower gastrointestinal tract symptomatology separately, and autonomic nervous system functioning, as assessed by heart rate variability and...

  8. Gastrointestinal motility during cardiopulmonary bypass : A sonomicrometric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; de Kroon, TL; Elstrodt, JM; Rakhorst, G

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is known to impair the integrity of the gastrointestinal tract. However, little is known about the movement behavior of the gastrointestinal tract during CPB. This study was aimed to assess the gastrointestinal motility with sonomicrometry, a distance measurement using

  9. Gastrointestinal Fistula: Audit of management in a remote hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The management of gastrointestinal fistula continues to present considerable challenge to the surgeon in general and gastrointestinal surgeon in particular. Objectives: To audit the management and report the outcome of the gastrointestinal fistula in a remote hospital. Setup: Eldamazeen Hospital is a regional ...

  10. BLEEDING AND STARVING: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    FONSECA,Jorge; MEIRA,Tânia; NUNES,Ana; SANTOS,Carla Adriana

    2014-01-01

    This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. See more: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0//deed.en "Context - Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. Objective - The aim of this study was obtain...

  11. DISORDERS OF GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT FUNCTION IN INFANTS: THE PROBLEM AND THE ANALYSIS OF GENERALIZED DATA

    OpenAIRE

    N.I. Ursova

    2009-01-01

    The review analyzes the modern opinion on the problem of functional disorders of gastrointestinal tract, which are peculiar to infants. The peculiarities of nutrition and intestinal microbiocenosis in healthy infants are discussed. Authors observe the ways of its correction and propose the principles of a choice of medications, having proven clinical effectiveness in children on early stages of postnatal development. The advantages of natural smectite dioctaedric (Smecta) in prophylaxis and t...

  12. Association Between Proton Pump Inhibitors and Metronomic Capecitabine as Salvage Treatment for Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Tumors: A Randomized Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Paolo; Milano, Annalisa; D'Antonio, Chiara; Romiti, Adriana; Falcone, Rosa; Roberto, Michela; Fais, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The acidification of extracellular compartment represents a conceivable mechanism of drug resistance in malignant cells. In addition, it has been reported to drive proliferation and promote invasion and metastasis. Experimental evidence has shown that proton pump inhibitors can counteract tumor acidification and restore sensitivity to anticancer drugs. Moreover, early clinical data have supported the role of proton pump inhibitors in anticancer treatments. Metronomic capecitabine has demonstrated beneficial effects as salvage chemotherapy for heavily pretreated or frail patients with gastrointestinal cancer. The present study (EudraCT Number: 2013-001096-20) was aimed at investigating the activity and safety of high-dose rabeprazole in combination with metronomic capecitabine in patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer refractory to standard treatment. A total of 66 patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive capecitabine 1500 mg/daily, continuously with or without rabeprazole 1.5 mg/kg twice a day, 3 days a week until disease progression, undue toxicity, or withdrawal of informed consent. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival. The secondary endpoints are clinical benefit, which reflects the proportion of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease, and overall survival. Progression-free and overall survival will be evaluated using a log-rank test to determine the effect of rabeprazole independently at the 2-sided α-level of 0.05. Other assessments will include the frequency and severity of adverse events and changes in laboratory parameters to measure the safety, and the pharmacokinetics of capecitabine. The results are expected in 2016. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [The composition of the gastrointestinal bacterial flora of mouse embryos and the placenta tissue bacterial flora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, D; Lin, Y; Jiang, X; Lan, L; Zhang, W; Wang, B X

    2017-03-02

    Objective: To explore the composition of the gastrointestinal bacterial flora of mouse embryos and the placenta tissue bacterial flora. Method: Twenty-four specimens were collected from pregnant Kunming mouse including 8 mice of early embryonic (12-13 days) gastrointestinal tissues, 8 cases of late embryonic (19-20 days)gastrointestinal tissues, 8 of late pregnancy placental tissues.The 24 samples were extracted by DNeasy Blood & Tissue kit for high-throughput DNA sequencing. Result: The level of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actino-bacteria and Firmicutes were predominantin all specimens.The relative content of predominant bacterial phyla in each group: Proteobacteria (95.00%, 88.14%, 87.26%), Bacteroidetes(1.71%, 2.15%, 2.63%), Actino-Bacteria(1.16%, 4.10%, 3.38%), Firmicutes(0.75%, 2.62%, 2.01%). At the level of family, there were nine predominant bacterial families in which Enterobacteriaeae , Shewanel laceae and Moraxellaceae were dominant.The relative content of dominant bacterial family in eachgroup: Enterobacteriaeae (46.99%, 44.34%, 41.08%), Shewanellaceae (21.99%, 21.10%, 19.05%), Moraxellaceae (9.18%, 7.09%, 5.64%). From the species of flora, the flora from fetal gastrointestinal in early pregnancy and late pregnancy (65.44% and 62.73%) were the same as that from placenta tissue in the late pregnancy.From the abundance of bacteria, at the level of family, the same content of bacteria in three groups accounted for 78.16%, 72.53% and 65.78% respectively. Conclusion: It was proved that the gastrointestinal bacterial flora of mouse embryos and the placenta tissue bacterial flora were colonized. At the same time the bacteria are classified.

  14. Feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of short induction chemotherapy of docetaxel plus cisplatin or carboplatin (TP) followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy for organ preservation in advanced cancer of the hypopharynx, larynx, and base of tongue. Early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semrau, Sabine; Klautke, Gunther; Fietkau, Rainer; Waldfahrer, Frank; Iro, Heinrich; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael; Linke, Rainer; Kuwert, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard treatment for advanced head and neck cancer. Whether short induction chemotherapy (ICT) provides additional benefit or, in particular, predictive benefit for the response to chemoradiotherapy is an open question. The present study aimed to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of induction with docetaxel and platinum salt (TP) and subsequent CRT. A total of 25 patients with functionally inoperable cancer of the base of the tongue, hypopharynx, or larynx received 1 cycle of docetaxel (75 mg/m 2 , day 1) combined with either cisplatin (30 mg/m 2 , days 1-3; n = 23) or carboplatin (AUC 1.5 days 1-3; n = 2). Responders (n = 22, > 30% tumor reduction, graded by endoscopy) and 1 non-responder received CRT (target dose: 69-72 Gy) with cisplatin/paclitaxel, carboplatin/paclitaxel, or cisplatin/docetaxel. All patients completed ICT with acceptable toxicity (leukocytopenia grade 4: 8%). The remission rate of the primary tumor was 88% (22/25 patients). There was no need to delay CRT due to toxicity in any case. Each patient received the full radiation dose. Of the patients, 56% received > 80% of the chemotherapy. The acute toxicity of CRT was moderate, no grade 4 toxicities occurred, while grade 3 toxicities included the following: infection (39%), dermatitis (13%), leukocytopenia (30%), and thrombocytopenia (4%). The local control rate was 84.6% ± 8.5% and the survival rate was 89.6% ± 7.2% at 12 months. Organ preservation was possible in 22/23 (95%) cases. Short induction with a TP regimen and subsequent CRT with a taxan is feasible and associated with an encouraging local control rate. (orig.)

  15. Respiratory-Gated Proton Beam Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Adjacent to the Gastrointestinal Tract without Fiducial Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miu Mizuhata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of proton beam therapy (PBT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been reported, but insertion of fiducial markers in the liver is usually required. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of respiratory-gated PBT without fiducial markers for HCC located within 2 cm of the gastrointestinal tract. From March 2011 to December 2015 at our institution, 40 patients were evaluated (median age, 72 years; range, 38–87 years. All patients underwent PBT at a dose of 60 to 80 cobalt gray equivalents (CGE in 20 to 38 fractions. The median follow-up period was 19.9 months (range, 1.2–72.3 months. The median tumor size was 36.5 mm (range, 11–124 mm. Kaplan–Meier estimates of the 2-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local tumor control rates were 76%, 60%, and 94%, respectively. One patient (2.5% developed a grade 3 gastric ulcer and one (2.5% developed grade 3 ascites retention; none of the remaining patients developed grade >3 toxicities (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.0.. This study indicates that PBT without fiducial markers achieves good local control without severe treatment-related toxicity of the gastrointestinal tract for HCC located within 2 cm of the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Research methods of ″18 incompatible medicaments″incompatibilitytoxicitycharacterizationoftraditional Chinese medicine based on early evaluation of overall toxicity%基于毒性整体早期评价的“十八反”中药配伍禁忌毒性表征的研究思路及方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李遇伯; 局亮; 邓皓月; 张振珠; 王磊; 侯治国; 尹佳; 张艳军

    2015-01-01

    Currently,the toxicity study of traditional Chinese medicine is faced with the following problems. Firstly,the evaluation in vitro cannot fully reflect the true state of the body. Secondly,the traditional method is not sensitive enough to the early toxicity. Lastly,the toxicity evaluation indexes cannot determine whether the compatibility of traditional Chinese medicine produces toxicity or increases toxicity systematically. The paper proposed a synthesized early evaluation research method for target organ toxicity induced by traditional Chinese medicine:screening,validation,optimization and application. This method mainly inoolves early target organ toxicity biomarkers in screening,optimi⁃zation,validation,biological significance explanation,and application to the traditional Chinese medicine incompatibility based on the metabolic dynamic fingerprint spectrum in order to obtain biomarkers of target organ toxicity that are sensitive and precede conventional biochemical indices for early evaluation . We attempted to analyze the pattern of chang of the biomarkers for animals acted by″18 incompatible medicaments″compatibility combination. We found that Radix Aconiti Lateralis Preparata with cardiotoxicity were compatible with Rhizoma Pinelliae,and that Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim,Fritillaria,Ampelopsis Radix and Bletilla striata without non-cardiotoxicity produced and increased cardiotoxicity systematically.%鉴于目前中药毒性研究主要存在的体外评价不能全面真实地反映机体状态、传统的检查方法对毒性早期评价不敏感和毒性评价指标不能综合判断中药配伍是否致毒、增毒的问题,本文通过构建“毒性整体早期评价筛选-验证及优化-应用”的中药靶器官毒性早期评价的研究方法,主要包括基于代谢动态指纹谱对靶器官毒性整体早期评价生物标志物的筛选、优化和验证、生物学意义的阐释以及在中药配伍禁忌中的应用等研究内

  17. The application of PET-CT in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Weijun; Feng Yanlin

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal neoplasm of uncertain malignant potential that arises predominantly in the gastrointestinal tract. Due to lack of specific physical signs, imagin g-x examination is an important auxiliary means in diagnosing gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Compared to other conventional imaging examinations, PET-CT has demonstrated unique superiority in staging, response evaluation and follow-up of gastrointestinal stromal tumor. And now it presents an overview of the application valuation of PET-CT and related imaging technology in gastrointestinal stromal tumor as follow. (authors)

  18. Diclofenac toxicity in human intestine ex vivo is not related to the formation of intestinal metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Horvatovich, Peter; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    The use of diclofenac (DCF), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is associated with a high prevalence of gastrointestinal side effects. In vivo studies in rodents suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF produced by the liver or the intestine might be responsible for this toxicity. In the

  19. The role of metabolism in diclofenac-induced intestinal toxicity in rat and human in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; Makkinje, Miriam; de Graaf, Inge; Groothuis, Genoveva

    The use of Diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is associated with severe gastro-intestinal side-effects. The mechanisms of drug-induced intestinal toxicity are largely unknown due to the lack of in vitro models. In vivo rat studies suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF

  20. Early versus deferred treatment for smoldering multiple myeloma: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjie Gao

    Full Text Available Whether patients with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM needed to receive early interventional treatment remains controversial. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis comparing the efficacy and safety of early treatment over deferred treatment for patients with SMM.MEDLINE and Cochrane Library were searched to May 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs that assessed the effect of early treatment over deferred treatment. Primary outcome measure was mortality, and secondary outcome measures were progression, response rate, and adverse events.Overall, 5 trials including 449 patients were identified. There was a markedly reduced risk of disease progression with early treatment (Odds Ratio [OR] = 0.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07 to 0.24. There were no significant differences in mortality and response rate (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.45 to 1.60, and OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.32 to 1.23, respectively. More patients in the early treatment arm experienced gastrointestinal toxicities (OR = 10.02, 95%CI = 4.32 to 23.23, constipation (OR = 8.58, 95%CI = 3.20 to 23.00 and fatigue or asthenia (OR = 2.72, 95%CI = 1.30 to 5.67. No significant differences were seen with the development of acute leukemia (OR = 2.80, 95%CI = 0.42 to 18.81, hematologic cancer (OR = 2.07, 95%CI = 0.43 to 10.01, second primary tumors (OR = 3.45, 95%CI = 0.81 to 14.68, nor vertebral compression (OR = 0.18, 95%CI = 0.02 to 1.59.Early treatment delayed disease progression but increased the risk of gastrointestinal toxicities, constipation and fatigue or asthenia. The differences on vertebral compression, acute leukemia, hematological cancer and second primary tumors were not statistically significant. Based on the current evidence, early treatment didn't significantly affect mortality and response rate. However, further much larger trials were needed to provide more evidence.

  1. Toxicity and survival results of a phase II study investigating the role of postoperative chemoradioimmunotherapy for gastric adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bese, N.S.; Yildirim, A.; Oeber, A. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul Univ., Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Bueyuekuenal, E.; Oezgueroglu, M.; Demir, G.; Mandel, N.M.; Demirelli, F.; Serdengecti, S. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology Section, Istanbul Univ., Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-10-01

    Background and purpose: to investigate the role of postoperative concomitant chemoradioimmunotherapy in gastric adenocarcinoma patients. Patients and methods: 59 pateints, who underwent total or subtotal gastrectomy, with lymph node involvement, positive microscopic surgical margins or serosal involvement were included in the study. Radiotherapy started concomitantly with chemotherapy and levamisole. Extended-field radiotherapy was given to gastric bed and regional lymphatics via two anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fields. A total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions with a fraction size of 1.8 Gy was planned. In 28 patients (48%) with positive surgical margins a 10-Gy boost dose was given to the anastomosis site. An adjuvant i.v. bolus of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/day 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was administered concomitantly during the first 3 days and at the 20th day of irradiation. After completion of radiotherapy, i.v. boluses of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/day 5-FU and 25 mg/m{sup 2}/day rescuvorin were continued for 6 months once a week. Levamisole 40 mg/day orally was started at the 1st day of radiotherapy and also continued for 6 months. Median follow-up was 37 months (7-112 months). Results: median survival was 23 months. Overall 3- and 5-year survival rates amounted to 35% and 14%, respectively. Median survival of the patients with positive surgical margins was 22 months. The 3- and 5-year locoregional control rates were 59% and 55%, respectively. The most common toxicity was upper gastrointestinal system toxicity, which was observed in 42 patients (71%). Four patients (7%) died on account of early toxic effects, and six (10%) could not complete treatment. Conclusion: although 48% of the study population involved patients with microscopic residual disease, the survival results as a whole were satisfactory. However, due to high toxicity, radiotherapy must be delivered with the most proper techniques along with adequate nutrition and supportive care. (orig.)

  2. Effects of ageing on gastrointestinal motor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Graff, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Existing data on the effect of ageing on gastrointestinal motility are few. In this study, we assessed the propulsive effect of all main segments of the gastrointestinal tract in a group of healthy older people. METHODS: 16 healthy volunteers (eight women, eight men) of mean age 81...... mass index and smoking on the motility variables. The results were compared with data from 16 healthy individuals (eight women, eight men) of mean age 24 years (range 20-30 years). RESULTS: Advanced age did not influence gastric emptying or small intestinal transit rate. Older individuals had a slower.......0022). CONCLUSION: Normal ageing seems to reduce the propulsive capacity of the colon, whereas gastric and small intestinal motility is not affected....

  3. Characteristics of Emergency Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Ahmet Deniz; Oymaci, Erkan; Carti, Erdem Bariş; Yakan, Savaş; Vardar, Enver; Erkan, Nazif; Mehmet, Yildirim

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Importance of GISTs is increasing while surgeons are facing with more frequent either in emergency setting of elective cases. Delineating the presentation and management of emergency GIST is important. From 2005 to 2014, emergency cases with final diagnosis of GIST were examined retrospectively. Total of 13 operated cases were evaluated by patients characteristics, clinical presentation, operational findings and postoperative prognosis. There were 9 male and 4 female with the mean age of 48.15 years. The most frequent presentations are ileus and GIT hemorrhage both covering the 84% of patients. Small bowel was the dominating site with ileus. Stomach was the second frequent site of the disease with the finding of hemorrhage. Emergency patients are more likely to come with small bowel GIST and obstruction symptoms. Hemorrhage is the most frequent symptom for emergency GIST of stomach and duodenum.

  4. Dermatologic symptoms associated with gastrointestinal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Młynarczyk-Bonikowska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal tumors are among the most common neoplastic causes of death worldwide. Presence of characteristic skin lesions can allow faster diagnosis and therapy and this way can increase the probability of a cure. In the paper we present the most important paraneoplastic syndromes that can coexist with gastrointestinal malignancy including colon, gastric, esophagus and pancreatic cancers. We take into account genetic syndromes such as Cowden syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome (FAMMM (melanoma/pancreatic cancer, Clarke Howel-Evans, Peutz-Jeghers, Muir-Torre, Gardner syndromes and acquired syndromes such as acantosis nigricans maligna, tripe palms, Leser-Trelat, Bazex, hypertrichosis languinosa, erythema gyratum repens , carcinoid and glucagonoma syndrome. We also include cutaneous metastases and coexistence of neoplasia in some cases of dermatomyositis.

  5. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in irbid, jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banisalamah, A.A.; Mraiat, Z.M.

    2007-01-01

    To define the various causes of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, to outline management modalities and to determine the final outcome of patients. A retrospective analysis of patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding from January 2003 to December 2006 (4 years) was conducted. Patients with endoscopically proven variceal bleeding were excluded. Out of the 120 patients, most of the patients belonged to an age group of more than 50 years (mean 48.5 years). Haematemesis was the most common presentation and Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesion (AGML) was the most frequently encountered lesion. The cause of bleeding was not identified in 10 patients (undetermined group). Twenty-two (18.3%) underwent surgery and we had an overall mortality of 15.8%. AGML being the leading cause can be managed conservatively most of the time. There is a male preponderance and the incidence and mortality increases with advancing age. The undetermined group remains a diagnostic problem. (author)

  6. Detoxification of carbaryl by anaerobic gastrointestinal organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laszewski, S.J.; Harkin, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Bacteria originating from the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) were tested in vitro for their ability to hydrolyze carbaryl, the most widely used carbamate insecticide. Carbaryl hydrolysis prevents acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Degradation of [1- 14 C]naphthyl N-methylcarbamate was assessed through the use of carbon-and nitrogen-free enrichment cultures as well as a cometabolic enrichment culture. The carbon-free enrichment culture showed the greatest ability to hydrolyze carbaryl. Two facultative anaerobes, identified as DF-3 and Citrobacter freundii were isolated. Cell-free extracts from these bacteria were able to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl acetate, 1-naphthyl acetate and carbaryl. This investigation suggests carbaryl degradation could occur prior to gastrointestinal absorption. Human GIT organisms are also widespread in anaerobic environments. Microbial hydrolysis of a xenobiotic can be an important reaction in the anaerobic environments of man or nature

  7. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megibow, A.J.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    New generation CT scans combined with high-detail barium studies have now allowed radiologists to see and gain a more complete understanding of the wall and surrounding structures of the gastrointestinal tract. The editors state that their intent is to ''present in a comprehensive volume an up-to-date evaluation o the role, significance, indications, and limitations of computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract.'' There is an initial chapter on CT scanning techniques and the use of oral contrast agents. Chapters follow on Ct of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, small bowel, and colon. The chapters start with a description of the anatomic structures and then cover in detail common pathologic conditions that affect the organ. Indications for examinations are also included in many chapters. There are final chapters on percutaneous drainage of abscesses and fluid collections and on radiologic-patholoic correlation of some of the more common entities

  8. Imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, S.; Tam, K.F.; Kam, C.K.; Lui, C.Y.; Siu, C.W.; Lam, H.S.; Mak, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) represents the most common kind of mesenchymal tumour that arises from the alimentary tract. GIST is currently defined as a gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal tumour containing spindle cells (or less commonly epithelioid cells or rarely both) and showing CD117 (c-kit protein) positivity. Targeted molecular therapy of non-resectable GIST using imatinib, a specific tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, represents a real milestone in the management of solid malignancy. Imaging studies, both anatomical and functional, are playing an increasingly important role in management of patients with GIST. This review illustrates the radiological appearance of GISTs and the site-specific roles of each imaging tool. Clinical features and radiological differential diagnosis of GIST are also discussed

  9. Effects of Kampo on functional gastrointestinal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Oka, Takakazu; Okumi, Hirokuni; Nishida, Shinji; Ito, Takashi; Morikiyo, Shinichi; Kimura, Yoko; Murakami, Masato

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the effectiveness of Kampo (traditional Japanese herbal medicine) in the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders, especially functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The results of four randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) suggested the usefulness of rikkunshito in relieving the subjective symptoms of patients with FD. Rikkunshito significantly improved not only gastric symptoms, such as epigastiric discomfort, but also extra-gastric sympto...

  10. Plutonium gastrointestinal absorption by adults baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lataillade, G.; Madic, C.; Willemot, J.M.; Germain, P.; Colle, C.; Metivier, H.

    1991-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium was investigated in baboons after ingestion of plutonium solution (oxidation states III; IV; V; VI), and plutonium incorporated in soya bean and winkles. We studied the effects of oxidation state and ingested mass for masses ranging from 0.35 μg to 51.6 x 10 +3 μg (4 x 10 -2 to 7776 μg of plutonium per kg of body weight). No clear increase in plutonium retention was shown for concentrations of plutonium smaller than 1 μg/kg. From 1 μg/kg to 1 mg/kg no effects of mass or oxidation state was observed and the mean fractional retention value was 10 -4 . For ingested masses higher than 1 mg/kg the fractional retention values respectively increased for Pu(V) and Pu(III) to (0.9 + 0.2) x 10 -2 and (7.4 + 4.1) x 10 -4 of the ingested mass. This increase might be due to the weak hydrolysis of these oxidation states which would increase gastrointestinal absorption by decrease of hydroxide formation. The fraction of plutonium retained after ingestion of soya bean was (3.0 + 0.5) x 10 -4 about 3 fold higher than the value for 238 Pu nitrate solution. No clear increase in plutonium retention was shown after ingestion of winkles containing 238 Pu. In conclusion, except for high masses of ingested Pu, the retention of which could reach 1% of the ingested dose, our results show that the gastrointestinal transfer factor of 10 -4 proposed by ICRP for gastrointestinal absorption of soluble form of Pu is acceptable, but 10 -3 would provide better safety margin [fr

  11. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Diagnosis and Prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M. T.; Olmedilla, P.; Gonzalez, S.; Oliver, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are mesenquimal tumors derived from cell precursors. They have the capacity for myogenic and neurogenic differentiation and are characterized by expression of KIT protein /tyrosine kinase growth factor). Clinically, they exhibit various biological behaviors. We present 8 cases of GIST, describing both their radiological manifestation through computerized tomography (CT) and most accepted criteria for benignity and malignancy. We also describe the response of one meta statically diagnosed tumor to tyrosine kinase inhibitor. (Author) 9 refs

  12. Course NICER in gastrointestinal and urogenital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksel Kruse; Nolan, D.J.; Allison, D.J.; Jackson, J.; Gibson, R.

    1998-01-01

    Course of NICER (Nycomed Intercontinental Continuing Education in Radiology) in gastrointestinal and urogenital radiology in the frameworks of NICER program. This program is one of the best educational programs the purpose of which consists in education of maximum good quality, free of marketing and advertisement accessible to roentgenologists of all the countries. The above course was presented in Hua Dong Hospital, Shanghai, China, April 18-21, 1996

  13. Informational needs of gastrointestinal oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakos, Janet; Urowitz, Sara; Olmstead, Craig; Jusko Friedman, Audrey; Zhu, Jason; Catton, Pamela

    2015-12-01

    In response to the dearth of consumer health information for patients with gastrointestinal cancers, this study examined the informational needs of these patients to build a plan for future resource development. Although studies have examined informational needs of some such cancers, no published literature has investigated the comprehensive informational needs across all sites of gastrointestinal cancer. A cross-sectional needs assessment comprising a self-administered questionnaire was conducted at an ambulatory gastrointestinal oncology clinic in Toronto, Canada. Patient informational needs were measured, including importance of information, amount desired and preferred mode of delivery. Informational needs were grouped into six domains: medical, practical, physical, emotional, social and spiritual. Eighty-two surveys were analysed. The majority of the respondents were male (53.8%), over the age of 50 (77.8%), and born outside of Canada (51.9%). While many did not speak English as a child (46.3%), and do not speak English