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Sample records for early dorsal midbrain

  1. Identification of genes differentially expressed in dorsal and ventral chick midbrain during early development.

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    Chittka, A; Volff, Jn; Wizenmann, A

    2009-04-27

    During the development of the central nervous system (CNS), patterning processes along the dorsoventral (DV) axis of the neural tube generate different neuronal subtypes. As development progresses these neurons are arranged into functional units with varying cytoarchitecture, such as laminae or nuclei for efficient relaying of information. Early in development ventral and dorsal regions are similar in size and structure. Different proliferation rates and cell migration patterns are likely to result in the formation of laminae or nuclei, eventually. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that establish these different structural arrangements are not well understood.We undertook a differential display polymerase chain reaction (DD-PCR) screen to identify genes with distinct expression patterns between dorsal and ventral regions of the chick midbrain in order to identify genes which regulate the sculpturing of such divergent neuronal organisation. We focused on the DV axis of the early chick midbrain since mesencephalic alar plate and basal plate develop into laminae and nuclei, respectively. We identified 53 differentially expressed bands in our initial screen. Twenty-six of these could be assigned to specific genes and we could unambiguously show the differential expression of five of the isolated cDNAs in vivo by in situ mRNA expression analysis. Additionally, we verified differential levels of expression of a selected number of genes by using reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR method with gene-specific primers.One of these genes, QR1, has been previously cloned and we present here a detailed study of its early developmental time course and pattern of expression providing some insights into its possible function. Our phylogenetic analysis of QR1 shows that it is the chick orthologue of Sparc-like 1/Hevin/Mast9 gene in mice, rats, dogs and humans, a protein involved in cell adhesion. This study reveals some possible networks, which might be involved in directing

  2. Dorsal-to-Ventral Shift in Midbrain Dopaminergic Projections and Increased Thalamic/Raphe Serotonergic Function in Early Parkinson Disease.

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    Joutsa, Juho; Johansson, Jarkko; Seppänen, Marko; Noponen, Tommi; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2015-07-01

    Loss of nigrostriatal neurons leading to dopamine depletion in the dorsal striatum is the pathologic hallmark of Parkinson disease contributing to the primary motor symptoms of the disease. However, Parkinson pathology is more widespread in the brain, affecting also other dopaminergic pathways and neurotransmitter systems, but these changes are less well characterized. This study aimed to investigate the mesencephalic striatal and extrastriatal dopaminergic projections together with extrastriatal serotonin transporter binding in Parkinson disease. Two hundred sixteen patients with Parkinson disease and 204 control patients (patients without neurodegenerative parkinsonism syndromes and normal SPECT imaging) were investigated with SPECT using the dopamine/serotonin transporter ligand (123)I-N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane ((123)I-FP-CIT) in the clinical setting. The group differences and midbrain correlations were analyzed voxel by voxel over the entire brain. We found that Parkinson patients had lower (123)I-FP-CIT uptake in the striatum and ventral midbrain but higher uptake in the thalamus and raphe nuclei than control patients. In patients with Parkinson disease, the correlation of the midbrain tracer uptake was shifted from the putamen to widespread corticolimbic areas. All findings were highly significant at the voxel level familywise error-corrected P value of less than 0.05. Our findings show that Parkinson disease is associated not only with the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine neurotransmission, but also with a parallel shift toward mesolimbic and mesocortical function. Furthermore, Parkinson disease patients seem to have upregulation of brain serotonin transporter function at the early phase of the disease. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. Motherhood and infant contact regulate neuroplasticity in the serotonergic midbrain dorsal raphe.

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    Holschbach, M Allie; Lonstein, Joseph S

    2017-02-01

    The adult brain shows remarkable neuroplasticity in response to hormones and the socioemotional modifications that they influence. In females with reproductive and maternal experience, this neuroplasticity includes the birth and death of cells in several forebrain regions involved in maternal caregiving and postpartum affective state. Such plasticity in midbrain sites critical for these behavioral and emotional processes has never been examined, though. By visualizing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label mitotic cells, NeuroD for neuronal precursors, and TUNEL to identify dying cells, we found that the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DR, the source of most ascending serotoninergic projections) exhibited significant neuroplasticity in response to motherhood. Specifically, BrdU analyses revealed that DR newborn cell survival (but not proliferation) was regulated by reproductive state, such that cells born early postpartum were less likely to survive 12 days to reach the late postpartum period compared to cells born during late pregnancy that survived 12 days to reach the early postpartum period. Many of the surviving cells in the DR were NeuN immunoreactive, suggesting a neuronal phenotype. Consistent with these findings, late postpartum rats had fewer NeuroD-immunoreactive DR cells than early postpartum rats. Maternal experience contributed to the late postpartum reduction in DR newborn cell survival because removing the litter at parturition increased cell survival as well as reduced cell death. Unlike cytogenesis in the maternal hippocampus, which is reduced by circulating glucocorticoids, DR newborn cell survival was unaffected by postpartum adrenalectomy. These effects of reproductive state and motherhood on DR plasticity were associated with concurrent changes in DR levels of serotonin's precursor, 5-HTP, and its metabolite, 5-HIAA. Our results demonstrate for the first time that cytogenesis occurs in the midbrain DR of any adult mammal, that DR plasticity is

  4. Ascl1 Converts Dorsal Midbrain Astrocytes into Functional Neurons In Vivo.

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    Liu, Yueguang; Miao, Qinglong; Yuan, Jiacheng; Han, Su'e; Zhang, Panpan; Li, Sanlan; Rao, Zhiping; Zhao, Wenlong; Ye, Qian; Geng, Junlan; Zhang, Xiaohui; Cheng, Leping

    2015-06-24

    In vivo induction of non-neuronal cells into neurons by transcription factors offers potential therapeutic approaches for neural regeneration. Although generation of induced neuronal (iN) cells in vitro and in vivo has been reported, whether iN cells can be fully integrated into existing circuits remains unclear. Here we show that expression of achaete-scute complex homolog-like 1 (Ascl1) alone is sufficient to convert dorsal midbrain astrocytes of mice into functional iN cells in vitro and in vivo. Specific expression of Ascl1 in astrocytes by infection with GFAP-adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector converts astrocytes in dorsal midbrain, striatum, and somatosensory cortex of postnatal and adult mice into functional neurons in vivo. These iN cells mature progressively, exhibiting neuronal morphology and markers, action potentials, and synaptic inputs from and output to existing neurons. Thus, a single transcription factor, Ascl1, is sufficient to convert brain astrocytes into functional neurons, and GFAP-AAV is an efficient vector for generating iN cells from astrocytes in vivo. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/359336-20$15.00/0.

  5. Longitudinal midbrain changes in early Parkinson's disease: iron content estimated from R2*/MRI.

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    Wieler, Marguerite; Gee, Myrlene; Martin, W R Wayne

    2015-03-01

    To determine whether, in patients with early Parkinson's disease (PD), longitudinal changes in midbrain iron content are associated with declining motor function over a period of three years. Nineteen untreated subjects with early PD and 13 age- and sex-matched controls were followed clinically for 36 months. MRI with a 3 T magnet was performed at baseline, 18 months and 36 months with a multiple gradient echo sequence designed for rapid single-scan mapping of the proton transverse relaxation rate R2*. R2* was calculated for midbrain and forebrain basal ganglia regions. A difference in R2* between patients and controls was observed at baseline (p = 0.035) but not at 18 or 36 months in the lateral substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Linear regression indicated significant correlations between the change in R2* in the lateral SNc and the change score in UPDRS III (p = 0.008) and the PDQ-39 -mobility sub-score (p = 0.03) from baseline to 36 months. R2* tended to increase in those with more advanced disease and to decrease in those with milder disease. High field MRI demonstrates lateral SNc abnormalities that progress over 3 years in early PD consistent with increased iron content in those with more advanced disease, corresponding to the known distribution of neuronal loss occurring in this disorder, and correlating with motor symptomatology. Larger and longer investigations with more precise mapping of iron-containing midbrain structures are needed to fully evaluate the potential of R2* as a biomarker of disease progression in PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Midbrain iron content in early Parkinson disease: a potential biomarker of disease status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, W R Wayne; Wieler, Marguerite; Gee, Myrlene

    2008-04-15

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which the major pathologic substrate is a loss of dopaminergic neurons from the lateral substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Our objective was to determine whether, in patients with early PD, SNc changes evident on MRI sequences sensitive to iron content corresponded anatomically to the pathologic changes reported previously, and to correlate these changes to the duration and severity of clinical manifestations of PD. Twenty-six untreated patients with early PD and 13 age- and gender-matched control subjects had MRI with a 3 tesla magnet using a multiple gradient echo sequence designed for rapid single-scan mapping of the proton transverse relaxation rate (R(2)*). R(2)* was calculated for midbrain and forebrain basal ganglia regions. Clinical features were rated with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. A difference in measured R(2)* values between patients and controls was observed in the lateral SNc (p MRI demonstrates lateral substantia nigra pars compacta abnormalities in early Parkinson disease (PD) consistent with increased iron content and corresponding to the known distribution of neuronal loss occurring in this disorder. This may ultimately provide an imaging marker for disease progression in PD, although longitudinal studies are required.

  7. Predicting early reading skills from pre-reading measures of dorsal stream functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevan, Alison; Pammer, Kristen

    2009-12-01

    It is well documented that good reading skills may be dependent upon adequate dorsal stream processing. However, the degree to which dorsal stream deficits play a causal role in reading failure has not been established. This study used coherent motion and visual frequency doubling to examine whether dorsal stream sensitivity measured before the commencement of formal reading instruction can predict emerging literacy skills in Grade 1. We demonstrate that over age, IQ and Kindergarten Letter knowledge, pre-reading measures of dorsal stream functioning, as assessed by frequency doubling sensitivity, could predict early literacy skills. These findings suggest that the relationship between dorsal stream functioning and poor reading skills exists before children learn to read, strengthening the claim that dorsal stream deficits may play a contributing role in reading failure.

  8. Differential Sampling of Visual Space in Ventral and Dorsal Early Visual Cortex.

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    Silson, Edward H; Reynolds, Richard C; Kravitz, Dwight J; Baker, Chris I

    2018-02-28

    A fundamental feature of cortical visual processing is the separation of visual processing for the upper and lower visual fields. In early visual cortex (EVC), the upper visual field is processed ventrally, with the lower visual field processed dorsally. This distinction persists into several category-selective regions of occipitotemporal cortex, with ventral and lateral scene-, face-, and object-selective regions biased for the upper and lower visual fields, respectively. Here, using an elliptical population receptive field (pRF) model, we systematically tested the sampling of visual space within ventral and dorsal divisions of human EVC in both male and female participants. We found that (1) pRFs tend to be elliptical and oriented toward the fovea with distinct angular distributions for ventral and dorsal divisions of EVC, potentially reflecting a radial bias; and (2) pRFs in ventral areas were larger (∼1.5×) and more elliptical (∼1.2×) than those in dorsal areas. These differences potentially reflect a tendency for receptive fields in ventral temporal cortex to overlap the fovea with less emphasis on precise localization and isotropic representation of space compared with dorsal areas. Collectively, these findings suggest that ventral and dorsal divisions of EVC sample visual space differently, likely contributing to and/or stemming from the functional differentiation of visual processing observed in higher-level regions of the ventral and dorsal cortical visual pathways. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The processing of visual information from the upper and lower visual fields is separated in visual cortex. Although ventral and dorsal divisions of early visual cortex (EVC) are commonly assumed to sample visual space equivalently, we demonstrate systematic differences using an elliptical population receptive field (pRF) model. Specifically, we demonstrate that (1) ventral and dorsal divisions of EVC exhibit diverging distributions of pRF angle, which are biased

  9. Midbrain morphology reflects extent of brain damage in Krabbe disease

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    Zuccoli, Giulio; Narayanan, Srikala; Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Section of Neuroradiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Poe, Michele D.; Escolar, Maria L. [University of Pittsburgh, Program for the Study of Neurodevelopment in Rare Disorders, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    To study the relationships between midbrain morphology, Loes score, gross motor function, and cognitive function in infantile Krabbe disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were evaluated by two neuroradiologists blinded to clinical status and neurodevelopmental function of children with early or late infantile Krabbe disease. A simplified qualitative 3-point scoring system based on midbrain morphology on midsagittal MRI was used. A score of 0 represented normal convex morphology of the midbrain, a score of 1 represented flattening of the midbrain, and a score of 3 represented concave morphology of the midbrain (hummingbird sign). Spearman correlations were estimated between this simplified MRI scoring system and the Loes score, gross motor score, and cognitive score. Forty-two MRIs of 27 subjects were reviewed. Analysis of the 42 scans showed normal midbrain morphology in 3 (7.1 %) scans, midbrain flattening in 11 (26.2 %) scans, and concave midbrain morphology (hummingbird sign) in 28 (66.7 %) scans. Midbrain morphology scores were positively correlated with the Loes score (r = 0.81, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with both gross motor and cognitive scores (r = -.84, p < 0.001; r = -0.87, p < 0.001, respectively). The inter-rater reliability for the midbrain morphology scale was κ =.95 (95 % CI: 0.86-1.0), and the inter-rater reliability for the Loes scale was κ =.58 (95 % CI: 0.42-0.73). Midbrain morphology scores of midsagittal MRI images correlates with cognition and gross motor function in children with Krabbe disease. This MRI scoring system represents a simple but reliable method to assess disease progression in patients with infantile Krabbe disease. (orig.)

  10. Early and delayed treatment of dorsal transscaphoid perilunate fracture-dislocations.

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    Komurcu, Mahmut; Kürklü, Mustafa; Ozturan, Kutay Engin; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Basbozkurt, Mustafa

    2008-09-01

    Transscaphoid perilunate fracture-dislocations are complex injuries. The aim of this study is to discuss and compare open reduction and internal fixation for acute and delayed transscaphoid perilunate fracture-dislocations and review the literature. The design of this study is retrospective and randomized. Gülhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Twelve cases (6 acute and 6 delayed) of dorsal stage 2 fracture-dislocations were involved in the study. Scaphoid fractures were treated with reduction and internal fixation by using either a cannulated screw or a Herbert screw. Temporary triquetrocapitate and lunotriquetral fixation were performed in all cases using two 1.8-mm Kirschner wires after reduction of the dislocations. Range of motion (flexion and extension), grip strength evaluation with Jamar dynamometer, comparison of preoperative and early postoperative average of scapholunate (SL) and radiolunate angle (RL), and revised carpal height ratio were used for outcomes assessment. Clinical evaluation was performed according to the clinical scoring system modified from Green and O'Brien. Revised carpal height ratio, SL angle, RL angle, and appearance of midcarpal arthritis were used for radiologic analysis. Average follow-up period was 45 months (23-70). Mean clinical score of early treated group and delayed treated group was 89.2 (good) and 72.5 (fair), respectively, according to clinical scoring system of Green and O'Brien. The overall clinical score of all cases was 80.8 (good). Two of the 6 cases in the delayed group developed posttraumatic midcarpal arthritis. Mean range of motion (flexion and extension) was 129.5 +/- 20.42 degrees in the early treated group and 95.5 +/- 18.08 degrees in the delayed group. Four of the 6 patients treated in the acute group gained normal grip strength, but 2 patients had more than 50% loss in grip strength compared with the contralateral wrist. Two of the 6 patients in the delayed group had

  11. Key role for spinal dorsal horn microglial kinin B1 receptor in early diabetic pain neuropathy

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    Couture Réjean

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pro-nociceptive kinin B1 receptor (B1R is upregulated on sensory C-fibres, astrocytes and microglia in the spinal cord of streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic rat. This study aims at defining the role of microglial kinin B1R in diabetic pain neuropathy. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were made diabetic with STZ (65 mg/kg, i.p., and 4 days later, two specific inhibitors of microglial cells (fluorocitrate, 1 nmol, i.t.; minocycline, 10 mg/kg, i.p. were administered to assess the impact on thermal hyperalgesia, allodynia and mRNA expression (qRT-PCR of B1R and pro-inflammatory markers. Spinal B1R binding sites ((125I-HPP-desArg10-Hoe 140 were also measured by quantitative autoradiography. Inhibition of microglia was confirmed by confocal microscopy with the specific marker Iba-1. Effects of intrathecal and/or systemic administration of B1R agonist (des-Arg9-BK and antagonists (SSR240612 and R-715 were measured on neuropathic pain manifestations. Results STZ-diabetic rats displayed significant tactile and cold allodynia compared with control rats. Intrathecal or peripheral blockade of B1R or inhibition of microglia reversed time-dependently tactile and cold allodynia in diabetic rats without affecting basal values in control rats. Microglia inhibition also abolished thermal hyperalgesia and the enhanced allodynia induced by intrathecal des-Arg9-BK without affecting hyperglycemia in STZ rats. The enhanced mRNA expression (B1R, IL-1β, TNF-α, TRPV1 and Iba-1 immunoreactivity in the STZ spinal cord were normalized by fluorocitrate or minocycline, yet B1R binding sites were reduced by 38%. Conclusion The upregulation of kinin B1R in spinal dorsal horn microglia by pro-inflammatory cytokines is proposed as a crucial mechanism in early pain neuropathy in STZ-diabetic rats.

  12. GABAergic and glutamatergic identities of developing midbrain Pitx2 neurons.

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    Waite, M R; Skidmore, J M; Billi, A C; Martin, J F; Martin, D M

    2011-02-01

    Pitx2, a paired-like homeodomain transcription factor, is expressed in post-mitotic neurons within highly restricted domains of the embryonic mouse brain. Previous reports identified critical roles for PITX2 in histogenesis of the hypothalamus and midbrain, but the cellular identities of PITX2-positive neurons in these regions were not fully explored. This study characterizes Pitx2 expression with respect to midbrain transcription factor and neurotransmitter phenotypes in mid-to-late mouse gestation. In the dorsal midbrain, we identified Pitx2-positive neurons in the stratum griseum intermedium (SGI) as GABAergic and observed a requirement for PITX2 in GABAergic differentiation. We also identified two Pitx2-positive neuronal populations in the ventral midbrain, the red nucleus, and a ventromedial population, both of which contain glutamatergic precursors. Our data suggest that PITX2 is present in regionally restricted subpopulations of midbrain neurons and may have unique functions that promote GABAergic and glutamatergic differentiation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Focal midbrain tumors in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandertop, W. P.; Hoffman, H. J.; Drake, J. M.; Humphreys, R. P.; Rutka, J. T.; Amstrong, D. C.; Becker, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical and neuroradiological features of focal midbrain tumors in 12 children are described, and the results of their surgical management are presented. Patients with a focal midbrain tumor usually exhibit either symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure caused by an obstructive

  14. Efficiency of transabdominal ultrasound examination in aid to early diagnosis of induced right dorsal colitis in horses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bruno Santos Cândido de Andrade; Fabiane Cassou; José Ramón Martinez Aranzales; Geraldo Eleno Silveira Alves

    2016-01-01

    .... Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug associated right dorsal colitis in the horse. Prognostic significance of oxidative stress markers in colitis associated with phenylbutazone administration in draft horses...

  15. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours

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    Sun, B. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.]|[Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital (China); Wang, C.C.; Wang, J. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary midbrain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 19 refs.

  16. AP-2δ is a crucial transcriptional regulator of the posterior midbrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hesse

    Full Text Available Ap-2 transcription factors comprise a family of 5 closely related sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that play pivotal and non-redundant roles in embryonic organogenesis. To investigate the function of Ap-2δ, wδe analyzed its expression during embryogenesis and generated Ap-2δ-deficient mice. In line with the specific expression pattern of Ap-2δ in the mesencephalic tectum and the dorsal midbrain, Ap-2δ-deficient mice failed to maintain the colliculus inferior, a derivative of the dorsal midbrain, as a consequence of increased apoptotic cell death. To identify specific Ap-2δ target genes in cells of the developing dorsal midbrain, we performed whole genome analysis of cDNA expression levels. This approach identified a set of 12 putative target genes being expressed in the developing midbrain, including the transcription factors Pitx2, Mef2c, Bhlhb4 and Pou4f3. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP we showed that some of these genes are direct targets of Ap-2δ. Consistently, we demonstrate that Ap-2δ occupies and activates the Pou4f3 and Bhlhb4 promoters. In addition, known Pou4f3 target genes were downregulated in the posterior midbrain of Ap-2δ-deficient mice. Despite the absence of a central part of the auditory pathway, the presence of neuronal responses to sounds in the neocortex of Ap-2δ-deficient mice indicates that auditory information from the brainstem still reaches the neocortex. In summary, our data define Ap-2δ as an important transcription factor, specifying gene expression patterns required for the development of the posterior midbrain.

  17. Auditory Midbrain Implant: A Review

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    Lim, Hubert H.; Lenarz, Minoo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The auditory midbrain implant (AMI) is a new hearing prosthesis designed for stimulation of the inferior colliculus in deaf patients who cannot sufficiently benefit from cochlear implants. The authors have begun clinical trials in which five patients have been implanted with a single shank AMI array (20 electrodes). The goal of this review is to summarize the development and research that has led to the translation of the AMI from a concept into the first patients. This study presents the rationale and design concept for the AMI as well a summary of the animal safety and feasibility studies that were required for clinical approval. The authors also present the initial surgical, psychophysical, and speech results from the first three implanted patients. Overall, the results have been encouraging in terms of the safety and functionality of the implant. All patients obtain improvements in hearing capabilities on a daily basis. However, performance varies dramatically across patients depending on the implant location within the midbrain with the best performer still not able to achieve open set speech perception without lip-reading cues. Stimulation of the auditory midbrain provides a wide range of level, spectral, and temporal cues, all of which are important for speech understanding, but they do not appear to sufficiently fuse together to enable open set speech perception with the currently used stimulation strategies. Finally, several issues and hypotheses for why current patients obtain limited speech perception along with several feasible solutions for improving AMI implementation are presented. PMID:19762428

  18. Effect of aqueous sprays of ammonium fluoride on oxygen consumption and firmness of suture and dorsal tissues of Early Improved Elberta peaches. [Prunus persica

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    Facteau, T.J.; Rowe, K.E.

    1976-06-01

    Aqueous ammonium fluoride (NH/sub 4/F) sprays on Early Improved Elberta peaches (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) resulted in increased O/sub 2/ consumption of suture tissue and inconsistent changes in O/sub 2/ consumption of dorsal tissue as the spray concentration was increased. Flesh firmness on the suture side of treated fruit was less than non-sprayed fruit and decreased as either the NH/sub 4/F spray concentration or number of sprays increased. The effect of spray on the dorsal side differed from year to year. Levels of fluoride (F) in the fruit tissue were associated with F concentration and number of F sprays applied only within the same year. 3 references, 1 table.

  19. Risk factors for early post-operative neurological deterioration in dogs undergoing a cervical dorsal laminectomy or hemilaminectomy: 100 cases (2002-2014).

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    Taylor-Brown, F E; Cardy, T J A; Liebel, F X; Garosi, L; Kenny, P J; Volk, H A; De Decker, S

    2015-12-01

    Early post-operative neurological deterioration is a well-known complication following dorsal cervical laminectomies and hemilaminectomies in dogs. This study aimed to evaluate potential risk factors for early post-operative neurological deterioration following these surgical procedures. Medical records of 100 dogs that had undergone a cervical dorsal laminectomy or hemilaminectomy between 2002 and 2014 were assessed retrospectively. Assessed variables included signalment, bodyweight, duration of clinical signs, neurological status before surgery, diagnosis, surgical site, type and extent of surgery and duration of procedure. Outcome measures were neurological status immediately following surgery and duration of hospitalisation. Univariate statistical analysis was performed to identify variables to be included in a multivariate model. Diagnoses included osseous associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (OACSM; n = 41), acute intervertebral disk extrusion (IVDE; 31), meningioma (11), spinal arachnoid diverticulum (10) and vertebral arch anomalies (7). Overall 54% (95% CI 45.25-64.75) of dogs were neurologically worse 48 h post-operatively. Multivariate statistical analysis identified four factors significantly related to early post-operative neurological outcome. Diagnoses of OACSM or meningioma were considered the strongest variables to predict early post-operative neurological deterioration, followed by higher (more severely affected) neurological grade before surgery and longer surgery time. This information can aid in the management of expectations of clinical staff and owners with dogs undergoing these surgical procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stimulation of the midbrain periaqueductal gray modulates preinspiratory neurons in the ventrolateral medulla in the rat in vivo.

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    Subramanian, Hari H; Holstege, Gert

    2013-09-01

    The midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) is involved in many basic survival behaviors that affect respiration. We hypothesized that the PAG promotes these behaviors by changing the firing of preinspiratory (pre-I) neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex, a cell group thought to be important in generating respiratory rhythm. We tested this hypothesis by recording single unit activity of pre-Bötzinger pre-I neurons during stimulation in different parts of the PAG. Stimulation in the dorsal PAG increased the firing of pre-I neurons, resulting in tachypnea. Stimulation in the medial part of the lateral PAG converted the pre-I neurons into inspiratory phase-spanning cells, resulting in inspiratory apneusis. Stimulation in the lateral part of the lateral PAG generated an early onset of the pre-I neuronal discharge, which continued throughout the inspiratory phase, while at the same time attenuating diaphragm contraction. Stimulation in the ventral part of the lateral PAG induced tachypnea but inhibited pre-I cell firing, whereas stimulation in the ventrolateral PAG inhibited not only pre-I cells but also the diaphragm, leading to apnea. These findings show that PAG stimulation changes the activity of the pre-Bötzinger pre-I neurons. These changes are in line with the different behaviors generated by the PAG, such as the dorsal PAG generating avoidance behavior, the lateral PAG generating fight and flight, and the ventrolateral PAG generating freezing and immobility. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Expression patterns of key Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway components in the developing and adult mouse midbrain and in the MN9D cell line.

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    Feuerstein, Melanie; Chleilat, Enaam; Khakipoor, Shokoufeh; Michailidis, Konstantinos; Ophoven, Christian; Roussa, Eleni

    2017-11-01

    The temporal dynamic expression of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and signaling during early midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neuron development is one of the key players in establishing mDA progenitor diversity. However, whether SHH signaling is also required during later developmental stages and in mature mDA neurons is less understood. We study the expression of SHH receptors Ptch1 and Gas1 (growth arrest-specific 1) and of the transcription factors Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3 in mouse midbrain during embryonic development [embryonic day (E) 12.5 onwards)], in newborn and adult mice using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we examine the expression and regulation of dopaminergic neuronal progenitor markers, midbrain dopaminergic neuronal markers and markers of the SHH signaling pathway in undifferentiated and butyric acid-treated (differentiated) MN9D cells in the presence or absence of exogenous SHH in vitro by RT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Gli1 was expressed in the lateral mesencephalic domains, whereas Gli2 and Gli3 were expressed dorsolaterally and complemented by ventrolateral expression of Ptch1. Co-localization with tyrosine hydroxylase could not be observed. GAS1 was exclusively expressed in the dorsal mesencephalon at E11.5 and co-localized with Ki67. In contrast, MN9D cells expressed all the genes investigated and treatment of the cells with butyric acid significantly upregulated their expression. The results suggest that SHH is only indirectly involved in the differentiation and survival of mDA neurons and that the MN9D cell line is a valuable model for investigating early development but not the differentiation and survival of mDA neurons.

  2. Palpation and dorsal acetabular rim radiographic projection for early detection of canine hip dysplasia: a prospective study.

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    Gatineau, Matthieu; Dupuis, Jacques; Beauregard, Guy; Charette, Benoît; Breton, Luc; Beauchamp, Guy; d'Anjou, Marc-André

    2012-01-01

    To determine the value of 2 diagnostic methods: (1) the reduction angle (RA) using the Ortolani maneuver and (2) the dorsal acetabular slope (DAS) from the dorsal acetabular rim (DAR) radiographic projection, to predict osteoarthritis (OA) in dogs with hip dysplasia. Prospective study. Dogs (n = 73). Hip-extended ventrodorsal (VD) radiographic projections, RA, and DAS were evaluated when dogs were 6, 12, and 24 months of age. VD projections were qualitatively scored for OA. RA was determined using the Ortolani maneuver in dorsal recumbency and DAS using the DAR projection. Distraction index (DI) measurements from the compression-distraction radiographic projections (PennHIP method) were also performed at 6 months of age. Statistical analyses were used to establish the range of values of normal and abnormal RA and DAS, to document the temporal variation in RA and DAS, to compare the ability of the different methods to predict coxofemoral OA, to determine the influence of pure passive laxity and of the DAS on the occurrence of an Ortolani sign and on the magnitude of the RA, to establish the relationship between the DAS and subsequent development of passive laxity and coxofemoral OA, and to evaluate the influence of the DAS and RA on the occurrence of coxofemoral OA with severe, moderate, and minimal coxofemoral passive joint laxity, respectively. VD, RA, DAS, and DI methods of coxofemoral joint evaluation correlated significantly with the status of the coxofemoral joints at 2 years of age. The risk of occurrence of coxofemoral OA increased, as the RA, DAS, or DI increased. There was a significant positive linear relationship between RA and DI (P = .015, r(2) = 0.32), RA and DAS (P = .0078, r(2) = 0.38), and DAS and DI (P = .015, r(2) = 0.33). A negative Ortolani sign was at all times significantly predictive of absence of coxofemoral OA at 2 years of age. DAS best predicted coxofemoral OA for DI ≥ 0.7, whereas RA best predicted coxofemoral OA for 0.3 < DI < 0

  3. How does early maternal separation and chronic stress in adult rats affect the immunoreactivity of serotonergic neurons within the dorsal raphe nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollano, Antonella; Trujillo, Verónica; Suárez, Marta M

    2018-01-01

    Vulnerability to emotional disorders like depression derives from interactions between early and late environments, including stressful conditions. The serotonin (5HT) system is strongly affected by stress and chronic unpredictable stress can alter the 5HT system. We evaluated the distribution of active serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) through immunohistochemistry in maternally separated and chronically stressed rats treated with an antidepressant, tianeptine, whose mechanism of action is still under review. Male Wistar rats were subjected to daily maternal separation (MS) for 4.5 h between postnatal days (PND) 1-21, or to animal facility rearing (AFR). Between (PND) days 50-74, rats were exposed to chronic unpredictable stress and were treated daily with tianeptine (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. We found an interaction between the effects of MS and chronic unpredictable stress on Fos-5HT immunoreactive cells at mid-caudal level of the DR. MS-chronically stressed rats showed an increase of Fos-5HT immunoreactive cells compared with AFR-chronically stressed rats. The ventrolateral (DRL/VLPAG) and dorsal (DRD) subdivisions of the DR were significantly more active than the ventral part (DRV). At the rostral level of the DR, tianeptine decreased the number of Fos-5HT cells in DR in the AFR groups, both unstressed and stressed. Overall, our results support the idea of a match in phenotype exhibited when the early and the adult environment correspond.

  4. Cell Proliferation in the Forebrain and Midbrain of the Adult Bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Andrea Megela; Horowitz, Seth S.; Brown, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of proliferating cells in the midbrain, thalamus, and telencephalon of adult bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) was examined using immunohistochemistry for the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and DNA dot-blotting. At all time points examined (2 to 28 days post-injection), BrdU-labeled cells were located in ventricular zones at all levels of the neuraxis, but with relatively more label around the telencephalic ventricles. Labeled cells, some showing profiles indicative of dividing and migrating cells, were present in brain parenchyma from 7 to 28 days post-injection. These labeled cells were particularly numerous in the dorsal and ventral hypothalamus, preoptic area, optic tectum, and laminar and principal nuclei of the torus semicircularis, with label also present, but at qualitatively reduced levels, in thalamic and telencephalic nuclei. Double-label immunohistochemistry using glial and early neural markers indicated that gliogenesis and neurogenesis both occurred, with new neurons observed particularly in the hypothalamus, optic tectum, and torus semicircularis. In all brain areas, many cells not labeled with BrdU were nonetheless labeled with the early neural marker TOAD-64, indicating that these cells were postmitotic. Incorporation of DNA measured by dot-blotting confirms the presence of DNA synthesis in the forebrain and brainstem at all time points measured. The pattern of BrdU label confirms previous experiments based on labeling with 3H-thymidine and proliferating cell nuclear antigen showing cell proliferation in the adult ranid brain, particularly in hypothalamic nuclei. The consistent appearance of new cells in the hypothalamus of adult frogs suggests that proliferative activity may be important in mediating reproductive behaviors in these animals. PMID:17878717

  5. Involvement of midbrain tectum neurokinin-mediated mechanisms in fear and anxiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenes, J.C. [Experimental and Physiological Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Broiz, A.C.; Bassi, G.S. [Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Campus USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schwarting, R.K.W. [Experimental and Physiological Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Brandão, M.L. [Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Campus USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-09

    Electrical stimulation of midbrain tectum structures, particularly the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) and inferior colliculus (IC), produces defensive responses, such as freezing and escape behavior. Freezing also ensues after termination of dPAG stimulation (post-stimulation freezing). These defensive reaction responses are critically mediated by {sub Y}-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms in the midbrain tectum. Neurokinins (NKs) also play a role in the mediation of dPAG stimulation-evoked fear, but how NK receptors are involved in the global processing and expression of fear at the level of the midbrain tectum is yet unclear. The present study investigated the role of NK-1 receptors in unconditioned defensive behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG and IC of male Wistar rats. Spantide (100 pmol/0.2 µL), a selective NK-1 antagonist, injected into these midbrain structures had anti-aversive effects on defensive responses and distress ultrasonic vocalizations induced by stimulation of the dPAG but not of the IC. Moreover, intra-dPAG injections of spantide did not influence post-stimulation freezing or alter exploratory behavior in rats subjected to the elevated plus maze. These results suggest that NK-1 receptors are mainly involved in the mediation of defensive behavior organized in the dPAG. Dorsal periaqueductal gray-evoked post-stimulation freezing was not affected by intra-dPAG injections of spantide, suggesting that NK-1-mediated mechanisms are only involved in the output mechanisms of defensive behavior and not involved in the processing of ascending aversive information from the dPAG.

  6. Involvement of midbrain tectum neurokinin-mediated mechanisms in fear and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Brenes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation of midbrain tectum structures, particularly the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG and inferior colliculus (IC, produces defensive responses, such as freezing and escape behavior. Freezing also ensues after termination of dPAG stimulation (post-stimulation freezing. These defensive reaction responses are critically mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms in the midbrain tectum. Neurokinins (NKs also play a role in the mediation of dPAG stimulation-evoked fear, but how NK receptors are involved in the global processing and expression of fear at the level of the midbrain tectum is yet unclear. The present study investigated the role of NK-1 receptors in unconditioned defensive behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG and IC of male Wistar rats. Spantide (100 pmol/0.2 μL, a selective NK-1 antagonist, injected into these midbrain structures had anti-aversive effects on defensive responses and distress ultrasonic vocalizations induced by stimulation of the dPAG but not of the IC. Moreover, intra-dPAG injections of spantide did not influence post-stimulation freezing or alter exploratory behavior in rats subjected to the elevated plus maze. These results suggest that NK-1 receptors are mainly involved in the mediation of defensive behavior organized in the dPAG. Dorsal periaqueductal gray-evoked post-stimulation freezing was not affected by intra-dPAG injections of spantide, suggesting that NK-1-mediated mechanisms are only involved in the output mechanisms of defensive behavior and not involved in the processing of ascending aversive information from the dPAG.

  7. Enhanced midbrain response at 6-month follow-up in cocaine addiction, association with reduced drug-related choice: Midbrain in drug choice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Scott J.; Tomasi, Dardo; Woicik, Patricia A.; Maloney, Thomas; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Honorio, Jean; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Sinha, Rajita; Carise, Deni; Astone-Twerell, Janetta; Bolger, Joy; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2012-03-28

    Drug addiction is characterized by dysregulated dopamine neurotransmission. Although dopamine functioning appears to partially recover with abstinence, the specific regions that recover and potential impact on drug seeking remain to be determined. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study an ecologically valid sample of 15 treatment-seeking cocaine addicted individuals at baseline and 6-month follow-up. At both study sessions, we collected fMRI scans during performance of a drug Stroop task, clinical self-report measures of addiction severity and behavioral measures of cocaine seeking (simulated cocaine choice); actual drug use in between the two study sessions was also monitored. At 6-month follow-up (compared with baseline), we predicted functional enhancement of dopaminergically innervated brain regions, relevant to the behavioral responsiveness toward salient stimuli. Consistent with predictions, whole-brain analyses revealed responses in the midbrain (encompassing the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra complex) and thalamus (encompassing the mediodorsal nucleus) that were higher (and more positively correlated) at follow-up than baseline. Increased midbrain activity from baseline to follow-up correlated with reduced simulated cocaine choice, indicating that heightened midbrain activations in this context may be marking lower approach motivation for cocaine. Normalization of midbrain function at follow-up was also suggested by exploratory comparisons with active cocaine users and healthy controls (who were assessed only at baseline). Enhanced self-control at follow-up was suggested by a trend for the commonly hypoactive dorsal anterior cingulate cortex to increase response during a drug-related context. Together, these results suggest that fMRI could be useful in sensitively tracking follow-up outcomes in drug addiction.

  8. Midbrain and Hindbrain Involvement in Lissencephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of the midbrain and hindbrain (MHB in the various groups of lissencephalies was examined in an MRI study of 111 patients (aged 1 day to 32 years; mean 5 years 4 months studied at University of California San Francisco, and centers in France, Belgium, and Turkey.

  9. The Midbrain Periaqueductal Gray Control of Respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Balnave, Ron J.; Holstege, Gert

    2008-01-01

    The midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) organizes basic survival behavior, which includes respiration. How the PAG controls respiration is not known. We studied the PAG control of respiration by injecting D,L-homocysteic acid in the PAG in unanesthetized precollicularly decerebrated cats. Injections

  10. Dorsal Pancreatic Agenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Oya Uygur-Bayramiçli; Can Dolapçioglu; Derya Öztas; Resat Dabak; Gamze Kiliçoglu

    2007-01-01

    Context Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is a rare entity and might present with various symptoms. We report a case which presented with chronic pancreatitis. Case report The patient presented with epigastric pain and we found dorsal pancreatic agenesis causing chronic pancreatitis. Conclusions Dorsal pancreatic agenesis can be easily diagnosed with new techniques and its association with clinical syndromes can be better understood.

  11. Antidromic conduction in a direct posterior pathway from midbrain to hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastola, E F

    1983-01-01

    An average field response to electrical stimulation in the hippocampus has been recorded in dorsomedial rat midbrain. The fully developed response is triphasic. Latencies of the three components and their behavior during repetitive stimulation are compatible with the assumption that they are antidromic and originate, respectively, in proximal axons, cell bodies and dendrites. Conduction velocity is estimated to be 5 m/s. Reversal in polarity of the response at different recording points within a distance of 1 mm and abolition by small midbrain lesions confirm location of the active neural elements in that region. Lesions in the white matter of posterior cingulum and in the thalamocortical radiation abolish the response. Latencies of the response recorded in the thalamocortical radiation are in accord with the conclusion that the fibers pass in this location. The findings support results of an earlier study suggesting that visual information is transmitted without a synapse from dorsomedial midbrain to dentate gyrus by a pathway that reaches the cerebral hemisphere in the thalamocortical radiation and enters hippocampus from white matter in the posterior cingulum. A study of visual responses in the medial and dorsal wall of the cerebral hemisphere in lizards may help to evaluate the hypothesis that in these regions are the ancestral homologues for dentate gyrus and cornu ammonis, respectively, in mammalian hippocampus.

  12. The Main Symptoms in Dorsal Sleep Apnea - Hypopnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Alexandra POP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OSAHS is a chronic, multifactorial disease, accompanied by significant and complex symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between OSAHS and dorsal AHI in order to improve early diagnosis of dorsal sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. There were significant statistical differences between: the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without excessive daytime sleepiness as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with excessive daytime sleepiness; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without snoring as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with snoring; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without restless sleep as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with restless sleep; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without dyspnea as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with dyspnea; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without night sweats as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with night sweats; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without irritability as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with irritability and the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without nightmares as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with nightmares. Through this study we highlighted that excessive daytime sleepiness and snoring are prevalent symptoms in dorsal OSAHS. The presence of these symptoms in patients with sleep disorders may improve early diagnosis and the choice of an appropriate treatment for dorsal sleep apnea- hypopnea syndrome, thus participating in improving the patient’s life quality

  13. Histological changes in the midbrain around the aqueduct in congenital hydrocephalic rat LEW/Jms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H; Oi, S; Tamaki, N; Matsumoto, S; Sudo, K

    1992-10-01

    Primary aqueductal stenosis is one of the main causes of congenital hydrocephalus in humans and experimental models. The congenitally hydrocephalic rat strain LEW/Jms is one such model. In this report, we describe further detailed histological features of periaqueductal structure, including the posterior commissure, subcommissural organ (SCO), and ependyma, and discuss the changes in these structures in relation to the cause of hydrocephalus. Coronal sections of the aqueduct in normal rats showed that the usual ependyma was absent in the center of the base facing the dorsal side, which was replaced by tall columnar cells. On the other hand, in hydrocephalic rats the ependyma encircled the aqueductal cavity. In midline sagittal sections, normal and hydrocephalic rats showed the SCO, although the SCO in hydrocephalic rats was shorter than in normal rats. There was also a marked difference between normal and hydrocephalic rats in the dorsoventral dimension of the rostral midbrain. In hydrocephalus, this dimension was large in comparison with normal rats. The superior collicular commissure located caudal to the posterior commissure ran along the ventral side of the midbrain in rats with hydrocephalus, and there was a cell-depleted area just dorsal to the superior collicular commissure. The same findings were observed from the 17th day of gestation until the postnatal period. Although the role of the SCO has been widely discussed from the viewpoint of secretory function, the present study indicated that this organ might be involved in the formation of the shape of the aqueduct.

  14. Mammal-like organization of the avian midbrain central gray and a reappraisal of the intercollicular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Marcy A; Kelly, Aubrey M; Schrock, Sara E; Goodson, James L

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, rostrocaudal columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) regulate diverse behavioral and physiological functions, including sexual and fight-or-flight behavior, but homologous columns have not been identified in non-mammalian species. In contrast to mammals, in which the PAG lies ventral to the superior colliculus and surrounds the cerebral aqueduct, birds exhibit a hypertrophied tectum that is displaced laterally, and thus the midbrain central gray (CG) extends mediolaterally rather than dorsoventrally as in mammals. We therefore hypothesized that the avian CG is organized much like a folded open PAG. To address this hypothesis, we conducted immunohistochemical comparisons of the midbrains of mice and finches, as well as Fos studies of aggressive dominance, subordinance, non-social defense and sexual behavior in territorial and gregarious finch species. We obtained excellent support for our predictions based on the folded open model of the PAG and further showed that birds possess functional and anatomical zones that form longitudinal columns similar to those in mammals. However, distinguishing characteristics of the dorsal/dorsolateral PAG, such as a dense peptidergic innervation, a longitudinal column of neuronal nitric oxide synthase neurons, and aggression-induced Fos responses, do not lie within the classical avian CG, but in the laterally adjacent intercollicular nucleus (ICo), suggesting that much of the ICo is homologous to the dorsal PAG.

  15. Mammal-like organization of the avian midbrain central gray and a reappraisal of the intercollicular nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcy A Kingsbury

    Full Text Available In mammals, rostrocaudal columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG regulate diverse behavioral and physiological functions, including sexual and fight-or-flight behavior, but homologous columns have not been identified in non-mammalian species. In contrast to mammals, in which the PAG lies ventral to the superior colliculus and surrounds the cerebral aqueduct, birds exhibit a hypertrophied tectum that is displaced laterally, and thus the midbrain central gray (CG extends mediolaterally rather than dorsoventrally as in mammals. We therefore hypothesized that the avian CG is organized much like a folded open PAG. To address this hypothesis, we conducted immunohistochemical comparisons of the midbrains of mice and finches, as well as Fos studies of aggressive dominance, subordinance, non-social defense and sexual behavior in territorial and gregarious finch species. We obtained excellent support for our predictions based on the folded open model of the PAG and further showed that birds possess functional and anatomical zones that form longitudinal columns similar to those in mammals. However, distinguishing characteristics of the dorsal/dorsolateral PAG, such as a dense peptidergic innervation, a longitudinal column of neuronal nitric oxide synthase neurons, and aggression-induced Fos responses, do not lie within the classical avian CG, but in the laterally adjacent intercollicular nucleus (ICo, suggesting that much of the ICo is homologous to the dorsal PAG.

  16. Identification of embryonic stem cell-derived midbrain dopaminergic neurons for engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganat, Yosif M; Calder, Elizabeth L; Kriks, Sonja; Nelander, Jenny; Tu, Edmund Y; Jia, Fan; Battista, Daniela; Harrison, Neil; Parmar, Malin; Tomishima, Mark J; Rutishauser, Urs; Studer, Lorenz

    2012-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent a promising source of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons for applications in Parkinson disease. However, ESC-based transplantation paradigms carry a risk of introducing inappropriate or tumorigenic cells. Cell purification before transplantation may alleviate these concerns and enable identification of the specific DA neuron stage most suitable for cell therapy. Here, we used 3 transgenic mouse ESC reporter lines to mark DA neurons at 3 stages of differentiation (early, middle, and late) following induction of differentiation using Hes5::GFP, Nurr1::GFP, and Pitx3::YFP transgenes, respectively. Transplantation of FACS-purified cells from each line resulted in DA neuron engraftment, with the mid-stage and late-stage neuron grafts being composed almost exclusively of midbrain DA neurons. Mid-stage neuron cell grafts had the greatest amount of DA neuron survival and robustly induced recovery of motor deficits in hemiparkinsonian mice. Our data suggest that the Nurr1+ stage (middle stage) of neuronal differentiation is particularly suitable for grafting ESC-derived DA neurons. Moreover, global transcriptome analysis of progeny from each of the ESC reporter lines revealed expression of known midbrain DA neuron genes and also uncovered previously uncharacterized midbrain genes. These data demonstrate remarkable fate specificity of ESC-derived DA neurons and outline a sequential stage-specific ESC reporter line paradigm for in vivo gene discovery.

  17. Dicer expression is essential for adult midbrain dopaminergic neuron maintenance and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Xueyan; Hogan, Eric M.; Gao, Guangping; Gardner, Paul D.; Tapper, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    The type III RNAse, Dicer, is responsible for the processing of microRNA (miRNA) precursors into functional miRNA molecules, non-coding RNAs that bind to and target messenger RNAs for repression. Dicer expression is essential for mouse midbrain development and dopaminergic (DAergic) neuron maintenance and survival during the early post-natal period. However, the role of Dicer in adult mouse DAergic neuron maintenance and survival is unknown. To bridge this gap in knowledge, we selectively kno...

  18. Right dorsal colitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karcher, L F; Dill, S G; Anderson, W I; King, J M

    1990-01-01

    Moderate to severe ulcerative colitis of the right dorsal colon was diagnosed by necropsy or by exploratory celiotomy and biopsy in 13 horses with a primary clinical complaint of either colic, diarrhea, or weight loss...

  19. Midbrain Frequency Representation following Moderately Intense Neonatal Sound Exposure in a Precocious Animal Model (Chinchilla laniger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. D’Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory brain areas undergo reorganization resulting from abnormal sensory input during early postnatal development. This is evident from studies at the cortical level but it remains unclear whether there is reorganization in the auditory midbrain in a species similar to the human, that is, with early hearing onset. We have explored midbrain plasticity in the chinchilla, a precocious species that matches the human in terms of hearing development. Neonatal chinchillas were chronically exposed to a 2 kHz narrowband sound at 70 dB SPL for 4 weeks. Tonotopic maps in inferior colliculus (central nucleus were defined based on single neuron characteristic frequency. We hypothesized an overrepresentation of the 2 kHz region of the maps. However, we observed a significant decrease in the proportion of neurons dedicated to the 2 kHz octave band and also away from the exposure frequency at 8 kHz. In addition, we report a significant increase in low frequency representation (<1 kHz, again a change to tonotopic mapping distant to the 2 kHz region. Thus in a precocious species, tonotopic maps in auditory midbrain are altered following abnormal stimulation during development. However, these changes are more complex than the overrepresentation of exposure related frequency regions that are often reported.

  20. The midbrain periaqueductal gray control of respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hari H; Balnave, Ron J; Holstege, Gert

    2008-11-19

    The midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) organizes basic survival behavior, which includes respiration. How the PAG controls respiration is not known. We studied the PAG control of respiration by injecting D,L-homocysteic acid in the PAG in unanesthetized precollicularly decerebrated cats. Injections in different parts of the PAG caused different respiratory effects. Stimulation in the dorsomedial PAG induced slow and deep breathing and dyspnea. Stimulation in the dorsolateral PAG resulted in active breathing and tachypnea consistent with the respiratory changes during fright and flight. Stimulation in the medial part of lateral PAG caused inspiratory apneusis. Stimulation in lateral parts of the lateral and ventrolateral PAG produced respiratory changes associated with vocalization (mews, alternating mews and hisses, or hisses). D,L-homocysteic acid injections in the caudal ventrolateral PAG induced irregular breathing. These results demonstrate that the PAG exerts a strong influence on respiration, suggesting that it serves as the behavioral modulator of breathing.

  1. Developmental disorders of the midbrain and hindbrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony James Barkovich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Malformations of the midbrain and hindbrain have become topics of considerable interest in the neurology and neuroscience literature in recent years. The combined advances of imaging, and molecular biology have improved analyses of structures in these areas of the central nervous system, while advances in genetics have made it clear that malformations of these structures are often associated with dysfunction or malformation of other organ systems. This review focuses upon the importance of communication between clinical researchers and basic scientists in the advancement of knowledge of this group of disorders. Disorders of anteroposterior patterning, cerebellar hypoplasias, disorders associated with defects of the pial limiting membrane (cobblestone cortex, disorders of the Reelin pathway, and disorders of the primary cilium/basal body organelle (molar tooth malformations are the main focus of the review.

  2. Unilateral lesion of dorsal hippocampus in adult rats impairs contralateral long-term potentiation in vivo and spatial memory in the early postoperative phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjie; Wu, Xiaoyan; Bai, Yanrui; Huang, Yan; He, Wenting; Dong, Zhifang

    2012-05-01

    It is well documented that bilateral hippocampal lesions or unilateral hippocampal lesion at birth causes impairment of contralateral LTP and long-term memory. However, effects of unilateral hippocampal lesion in adults on contralateral in vivo LTP and memory are not clear. We here examined the influence of unilateral electrolytic dorsal hippocampal lesion in adult rats on contralateral LTP in vivo and spatial memory during different postoperative phases. We found that acute unilateral hippocampal lesion had no effect on contralateral LTP. However, contralateral LTP was impaired at 1 week after lesion, and was restored to the control level at postoperative week 4. Similarly, spatial memory was also impaired at postoperative week 1, and was restored at postoperative week 4. In addition, the rats at postoperative week 1 showed stronger spatial exploratory behavior in a novel open-field environment. The sham operation had no effects on contralateral LTP, spatial memory and exploration at either postoperative week 1 or week 4. These results suggest that unilateral dorsal hippocampal lesion in adult rats causes transient contralateral LTP impairment and spatial memory deficit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. GABAergic and glutamatergic identities of developing midbrain Pitx2 neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waite, M R; Skidmore, J M; Billi, A C; Martin, J F; Martin, D M

    2011-01-01

    .... Previous reports identified critical roles for PITX2 in histogenesis of the hypothalamus and midbrain, but the cellular identities of PITX2-positive neurons in these regions were not fully explored...

  4. Enhanced midbrain response at 6-month follow-up in cocaine addiction, association with reduced drug-related choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Scott J; Tomasi, Dardo; Woicik, Patricia A; Maloney, Thomas; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Honorio, Jean; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Sinha, Rajita; Carise, Deni; Astone-Twerell, Janetta; Bolger, Joy; Volkow, Nora D; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2012-11-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by dysregulated dopamine neurotransmission. Although dopamine functioning appears to partially recover with abstinence, the specific regions that recover and potential impact on drug seeking remain to be determined. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study an ecologically valid sample of 15 treatment-seeking cocaine addicted individuals at baseline and 6-month follow-up. At both study sessions, we collected fMRI scans during performance of a drug Stroop task, clinical self-report measures of addiction severity and behavioral measures of cocaine seeking (simulated cocaine choice); actual drug use in between the two study sessions was also monitored. At 6-month follow-up (compared with baseline), we predicted functional enhancement of dopaminergically innervated brain regions, relevant to the behavioral responsiveness toward salient stimuli. Consistent with predictions, whole-brain analyses revealed responses in the midbrain (encompassing the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra complex) and thalamus (encompassing the mediodorsal nucleus) that were higher (and more positively correlated) at follow-up than baseline. Increased midbrain activity from baseline to follow-up correlated with reduced simulated cocaine choice, indicating that heightened midbrain activations in this context may be marking lower approach motivation for cocaine. Normalization of midbrain function at follow-up was also suggested by exploratory comparisons with active cocaine users and healthy controls (who were assessed only at baseline). Enhanced self-control at follow-up was suggested by a trend for the commonly hypoactive dorsal anterior cingulate cortex to increase response during a drug-related context. Together, these results suggest that fMRI could be useful in sensitively tracking follow-up outcomes in drug addiction. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Upregulation of adrenomedullin in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia in the early phase of CFA-induced inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yanguo; Liu, Yushan; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Fournier, Alain; Quirion, Rémi

    2009-11-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), a member of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, has been demonstrated to be a pronociceptive mediator [28]. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of AM in a model of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain. Injection of CFA, but not of saline, in the unilateral hindpaw produced an increase in the expression of AM-like immunoreactivity (AM-IR) in laminae I-II of the spinal cord as well as in small- and medium-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at 48 h. The content of AM in DRG on the side ipsilateral to CFA injection started to increase at 4 h and remained at high levels at 24 and 48 h. The selective antagonist of AM receptors, AM(22-52), administered intrathecally (i.t.) 24 h after CFA injection inhibited inflammation-associated hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner (2, 5 and 10 nmol). Impressively, this anti-hyperalgesic effect lasted for at least 24 h. I.t. administration of AM(22-52) (10 nmol) also reversed CFA-induced increase in AM-IR in the spinal dorsal horn and DRG. Furthermore, blockade of AM receptors abolished CFA-induced changes in the expression and content of CGRP-like immunoreactivity in these regions. Taken together, our results suggest that the upregulation of AM in DRG neurons contributes to the development of inflammatory pain, and this effect is mediated, at least in part, by enhancing the expression and release of CGRP. Blocking AM receptor downstream signaling effects using antagonists has the potential of relieving pain following the induction of inflammation.

  6. Right dorsal colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, L F; Dill, S G; Anderson, W I; King, J M

    1990-01-01

    Moderate to severe ulcerative colitis of the right dorsal colon was diagnosed by necropsy or by exploratory celiotomy and biopsy in 13 horses with a primary clinical complaint of either colic, diarrhea, or weight loss. Clinical signs varied from acute fulminating diarrhea (possibly with fever), colic, dehydration, endotoxic shock and death, to a chronic condition manifested by mild intermittent colic up to several months in duration, and weight loss with or without mild diarrhea. In a large percentage of the horses, those affected had been hypovolemic and received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) or had received inappropriately high doses of phenylbutazone before the onset of illness. Experimental treatment of two horses with high doses of a phenylbutazone oral paste preparation (6 gm once daily for 5 days) and limitation of their water intake to approximately one half of maintenance requirement (for 5 days) resulted in reproduction of ulcerative colitis involving only the right dorsal colon, which was apparent at necropsy examination 11 and 15 days after initiation of drug use. It was concluded that localized ulcerative lesions in the right dorsal colon may be a previously unreported manifestation of toxicity due to the administration of NSAID.

  7. Isolated paroxysmal dysarthria caused by a single demyelinating midbrain lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codeluppi, Luca; Bigliardi, Guido; Chiari, Annalisa; Meletti, Stefano

    2013-10-16

    Paroxysmal dysarthria is an unusual condition characterised by brief episodes of dysarthria with the sudden onset and frequent recurrence. It has been mainly reported in multiple sclerosis and an association with midbrain lesions has been claimed; however, most of the reported patients had multiple brain alterations so it was difficult to associate this symptom with a specific lesion site. We illustrate the cases of two patients with an isolated demyelinating midbrain lesion presenting paroxysmal dysarthria as the only symptom; both participants had oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and an unremarkable follow-up. Both patients had benefit from carbamazepine treatment, similarly to previously reported cases. Our report confirms that a demyelinating midbrain lesion is sufficient to provoke paroxysmal dysarthria. It is noteworthy that an erroneous diagnosis of psychogenic disorders was initially made in both cases, highlighting the importance not to underestimate isolated paroxysmal symptoms in clinical practice.

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  16. A novel dopamine transporter transgenic mouse line for identification and purification of midbrain dopaminergic neurons reveals midbrain heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mia Apuschkin; Stilling, Sara; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons are a heterogeneous cell group, composed of functionally distinct cell populations projecting to the basal ganglia, prefrontal cortex and limbic system. Despite their functional significance, the midbrain population of DAergic neurons is sparse, constituting...... only 20 000-30 000 neurons in mice, and development of novel tools to identify these cells is warranted. Here, a bacterial artificial chromosome mouse line [Dat1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)] from the Gene Expression Nervous System Atlas (GENSAT) that expresses eGFP under control...

  17. Androgen decreases dopamine neurone survival in rat midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M L; Day, A E; Ho, C C; Walker, Q D; Francis, R; Kuhn, C M

    2010-04-01

    Clinical studies show that men are more likely to develop disorders affecting midbrain dopaminergic pathways, such as drug addiction and Parkinson's disease (PD). Although a great deal of focus has been given to the role of oestrogen in the maintenance of midbrain dopaminergic pathways, little is known about how testosterone influences these pathways. In the present study, we used stereological analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR) cell bodies to determine how testosterone influences the dopaminergic cell bodies of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Rats and mice were castrated at postnatal day (PN) 60, and these midbrain cell populations were counted on PN 90. One month after castration, TH-IR cell number had increased in the SNpc and VTA of rats and mice. Replacement with testosterone or the non-aromatisable analogue dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in castrated animals reduced TH-IR cell number in the SNpc and VTA in rats. In mice, the decrease of TH-IR cell number with testosterone or DHT replacement was observed only in the SNpc. The apparent increase in TH-IR neurone number after castration is not explained by an increase in TH expression because the number of nondopaminergic cells (TH-immunonegative, TH-IN) did not decrease proportionally after castration. TH-IN cell number did not change after castration or hormone replacement in rat or mouse SNpc or VTA. These findings suggest that testosterone may play a suppressive role in midbrain dopaminergic pathways.

  18. Case Report: Cotrimoxazole in the Treatment of a Midbrain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brain MRI done showed multiple ring-enhancing lesions with mass effects consistent with cerebral toxoplasmosis with the involvement of the midbrain. She was treated with cotrimoxazole, HAART and medical decompression therapy. She made significant improvement and was discharged 3 weeks after. Six month post ...

  19. Fos expression in the midbrain periaqueductal grey after trigeminovascular stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoskin, KL; Bulmer, DCE; Lasalandra, M; Jonkman, A; Goadsby, PJ

    There is an accumulating body of evidence suggesting that the periaqueductal grey (PAG) is involved in the pathophysiology of migraine. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies in humans have shown that the caudal ventrolateral midbrain, encompassing the ventrolateral PAG, has activations during

  20. Accurate sound localization in reverberant environments is mediated by robust encoding of spatial cues in the auditory midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devore, Sasha; Ihlefeld, Antje; Hancock, Kenneth; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2009-04-16

    In reverberant environments, acoustic reflections interfere with the direct sound arriving at a listener's ears, distorting the spatial cues for sound localization. Yet, human listeners have little difficulty localizing sounds in most settings. Because reverberant energy builds up over time, the source location is represented relatively faithfully during the early portion of a sound, but this representation becomes increasingly degraded later in the stimulus. We show that the directional sensitivity of single neurons in the auditory midbrain of anesthetized cats follows a similar time course, although onset dominance in temporal response patterns results in more robust directional sensitivity than expected, suggesting a simple mechanism for improving directional sensitivity in reverberation. In parallel behavioral experiments, we demonstrate that human lateralization judgments are consistent with predictions from a population rate model decoding the observed midbrain responses, suggesting a subcortical origin for robust sound localization in reverberant environments.

  1. The distribution and morphological characteristics of catecholaminergic cells in the diencephalon and midbrain of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, Paul R; Fuxe, Kjell; Ridgway, Sam H; Siegel, Jerome M

    2004-01-01

    The present study describes the distribution and cellular morphology of catecholaminergic neurons in the diencephalon and midbrain of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry was used to visualize these putatively dopaminergic neurons. The standard A1-A17, C1-C3, nomenclature is used for expediency; however, the neuroanatomical names of the various nuclei have also been given. Dolphins exhibit certain tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH-ir) catecholaminergic neuronal groups in the midbrain (A8, A9, A10) and diencephalon (A11, A12, A14), however, no neuronal clusters clearly corresponding to the A13 and A15 groups could be identified. The subdivisions of these neuronal groups are in general agreement with those of other mammals, but there is a high degree of species specificity. First, three TH-ir neuronal groups not identified in other species were found: in the ventral lateral peri-aqueductal gray matter, posterior dorsal hypothalamus, and rostral mesencephalic raphe. Second, the normal components of the substantia nigra (A9 or pars compacta, A9 lateral or pars lateralis, A9 ventral or pars reticulata) were extremely cell sparse, but there was a substantial expansion of the A9 medial and A10 lateral subdivisions forming an impressive 'ventral wing' in the posterior substantia nigra. The findings of this and previous studies suggest a distinct evolutionary trend occurring in the neuromodulatory systems in mammals. The results are discussed in relation to motor control, thermoregulation, unihemispheric sleep, and dolphin cognition. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Suppression and facilitation of auditory neurons through coordinated acoustic and midbrain stimulation: investigating a deep brain stimulator for tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offutt, Sarah J.; Ryan, Kellie J.; Konop, Alexander E.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. The inferior colliculus (IC) is the primary processing center of auditory information in the midbrain and is one site of tinnitus-related activity. One potential option for suppressing the tinnitus percept is through deep brain stimulation via the auditory midbrain implant (AMI), which is designed for hearing restoration and is already being implanted in deaf patients who also have tinnitus. However, to assess the feasibility of AMI stimulation for tinnitus treatment we first need to characterize the functional connectivity within the IC. Previous studies have suggested modulatory projections from the dorsal cortex of the IC (ICD) to the central nucleus of the IC (ICC), though the functional properties of these projections need to be determined. Approach. In this study, we investigated the effects of electrical stimulation of the ICD on acoustic-driven activity within the ICC in ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs. Main Results. We observed ICD stimulation induces both suppressive and facilitatory changes across ICC that can occur immediately during stimulation and remain after stimulation. Additionally, ICD stimulation paired with broadband noise stimulation at a specific delay can induce greater suppressive than facilitatory effects, especially when stimulating in more rostral and medial ICD locations. Significance. These findings demonstrate that ICD stimulation can induce specific types of plastic changes in ICC activity, which may be relevant for treating tinnitus. By using the AMI with electrode sites positioned with the ICD and the ICC, the modulatory effects of ICD stimulation can be tested directly in tinnitus patients.

  3. Decreased serotonin transporters in the hypothalamus and midbrain in patients with multiple systemic atrophy: a study with [{sup 123}I]-FP-CITA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, So Won; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Jon Min; Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We investigated quantification of dopaminergic transporter (DAT) and serotonergic transporter (SERT) for differentiating between multiple systemic atrophy (MSA) and idiopathic Parkinsons disease (IPD). Nfluoropropyl- 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-4-[{sup 123}I]-iodophenylnortropane SPECT ([123I]-FP-CIT SPECT) was performed in 6 patients with MSA, 18 with early IPD, and 6 healthy controls. Standard ROIs (region of interests) of striatal regions to evaluate DAT, and hypothalamus and midbrain for SERT were drawn on standard template images and applied to each image taken 4 hours after radiotracer injection. Striatal V3? for DAT and hypothalamic and midbrain V3? for SERT were calculated using region/reference ration based on the transient equilibrium method. Group differences were tested using ANOVA with the postHoc analysis. DAT in the putamen was significantly decreased in both patients groups with MSA and early IPD, compared with healthy control (p=0.03, p=0.05, respectively). A reduction of DAT in the caudate was significant in MSA patients (p=0.05) and showed a trend in early IPD patient. This implied least involvement of caudate in early IPD. Regarding SERT, MSA patients showed significant reduction of SERT in hypothalamus compared with controls as well as early IPD patients (p=0.05, 0.01, respectively), and also showed a tendency of decrease in SERT of the midbrain (p=0.058 vs, control). In patients with IPD, there was no significant reduction of SERT in the hypothalamus or midbrain when compared with controls. In this study, the decreased SERT in the hypothalamus and midbrain could be demonstrated in MSA patients using [{sup 123}I]-FP-CIT SPECT. We suggest that the quantification of SERT as well as DAT in [{sup 123}I]-FP-CIT SPECT is helpful to differentiate Parkinsonian disorders.

  4. Bursting deep dorsal horn neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Eva Meier; Rasmussen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    In a recent publication, Thaweerattanasinp et al. (J Neurophysiol 116: 1644–1653, 2016) investigated spinal cord injury and firing properties of deep dorsal horn neurons during NMDA or zolmitriptan application by employing electrophysiology in an in vitro spinal cord preparation. Deep dorsal horn...

  5. Detection of histone acetylation levels in the dorsal hippocampus reveals early tagging on specific residues of H2B and H4 histones in response to learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Bousiges

    Full Text Available The recent literature provides evidence that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modification are crucial to gene transcription linked to synaptic plasticity in the mammalian brain--notably in the hippocampus--and memory formation. We measured global histone acetylation levels in the rat hippocampus at an early stage of spatial or fear memory formation. We found that H3, H4 and H2B underwent differential acetylation at specific sites depending on whether rats had been exposed to the context of a task without having to learn or had to learn about a place or fear therein: H3K9K14 acetylation was mostly responsive to any experimental conditions compared to naive animals, whereas H2B N-terminus and H4K12 acetylations were mostly associated with memory for either spatial or fear learning. Altogether, these data suggest that behavior/experience-dependent changes differently regulate specific acetylation modifications of histones in the hippocampus, depending on whether a memory trace is established or not: tagging of H3K9K14 could be associated with perception/processing of testing-related manipulations and context, thereby enhancing chromatin accessibility, while tagging of H2B N-terminus tail and H4K12 could be more closely associated with the formation of memories requiring an engagement of the hippocampus.

  6. Midbrain circuits that set locomotor speed and gait selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caggiano, V.; Leiras, R.; Goñi-Erro, H.

    2018-01-01

    Locomotion is a fundamental motor function common to the animal kingdom. It is implemented episodically and adapted to behavioural needs, including exploration, which requires slow locomotion, and escape behaviour, which necessitates faster speeds. The control of these functions originates...... in brainstem structures, although the neuronal substrate(s) that support them have not yet been elucidated. Here we show in mice that speed and gait selection are controlled by glutamatergic excitatory neurons (GlutNs) segregated in two distinct midbrain nuclei: the cuneiform nucleus (Cn...... of GlutNs in the PPN and the CnF support explorative and escape locomotion, respectively. Our results identify two regions in the midbrain that act in conjunction to select context-dependent locomotor behaviours....

  7. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet′s syndrome is characterized by erythematous tender nodules and plaques over face and extremities. Fever, leukocytosis with neutrophilia, and a neutrophilic infiltrate in the dermis are characteristic features. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands is a rare localized variant of Sweet′s syndrome occurring predominantly over dorsa of hands. Various degrees of vascular damage may be observed on histopathology of these lesions. Both Sweet′s syndrome and its dorsal hand variant have been reported in association with malignancies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and drugs. We report a patient with neutrophilic dermatoses of dorsal hands associated with erythema nodosum. He showed an excellent response to corticosteroids and dapsone.

  8. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands

    OpenAIRE

    KAUR, S.; Gupta, D.; Garg, B; Sood, N.

    2015-01-01

    Sweet′s syndrome is characterized by erythematous tender nodules and plaques over face and extremities. Fever, leukocytosis with neutrophilia, and a neutrophilic infiltrate in the dermis are characteristic features. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands is a rare localized variant of Sweet′s syndrome occurring predominantly over dorsa of hands. Various degrees of vascular damage may be observed on histopathology of these lesions. Both Sweet′s syndrome and its dorsal hand variant have been r...

  9. Evidence of functional duplicity of Nestin expression in the adult mouse midbrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Farzanehfar

    2017-03-01

    . Remarkably, as early as 4 days following putative Nestin-expression, many β-gal+ or eYFP+ cells had mature neuronal morphology and were NeuN+. Furthermore, mature neuronal β-gal+ cells were immunoreactive against the self-renewal or pluripotency marker sex determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2. Overall, our data support the notion that some Nestin-expressing, presumably NPCs, have a limited capacity for proliferation, no capacity for migration, and a propensity to generate new neurons within the microenvironment of the adult midbrain. However, our data also suggest that significant numbers of extant midbrain neurons express Nestin and other classical neurogenesis markers in contexts that are presumably not neurogenic. These findings foreshadow duplicitous roles for Nestin and other molecules that are traditionally associated with neurogenesis in the adult midbrain, which should be considered in future PD research.

  10. On the origins of signal variance in FMRI of the human midbrain at high field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Barry

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI in the midbrain at 7 Tesla suffers from unexpectedly low temporal signal to noise ratio (TSNR compared to other brain regions. Various methodologies were used in this study to quantitatively identify causes of the noise and signal differences in midbrain fMRI data. The influence of physiological noise sources was examined using RETROICOR, phase regression analysis, and power spectral analyses of contributions in the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The impact of between-shot phase shifts in 3-D multi-shot sequences was tested using a one-dimensional (1-D phase navigator approach. Additionally, the effects of shared noise influences between regions that were temporally, but not functionally, correlated with the midbrain (adjacent white matter and anterior cerebellum were investigated via analyses with regressors of 'no interest'. These attempts to reduce noise did not improve the overall TSNR in the midbrain. In addition, the steady state signal and noise were measured in the midbrain and the visual cortex for resting state data. We observed comparable steady state signals from both the midbrain and the cortex. However, the noise was 2-3 times higher in the midbrain relative to the cortex, confirming that the low TSNR in the midbrain was not due to low signal but rather a result of large signal variance. These temporal variations did not behave as known physiological or other noise sources, and were not mitigated by conventional strategies. Upon further investigation, resting state functional connectivity analysis in the midbrain showed strong intrinsic fluctuations between homologous midbrain regions. These data suggest that the low TSNR in the midbrain may originate from larger signal fluctuations arising from functional connectivity compared to cortex, rather than simply reflecting physiological noise.

  11. Distribution of Fos-immunoreactive cells in rat forebrain and midbrain following social defeat stress and diazepam treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lkhagvasuren, B; Oka, T; Nakamura, Y; Hayashi, H; Sudo, N; Nakamura, K

    2014-07-11

    The anxiolytic diazepam selectively inhibits psychological stress-induced autonomic and behavioral responses without causing noticeable suppression of other central performances. This pharmacological property of diazepam led us to the idea that neurons that exhibit diazepam-sensitive, psychological stress-induced activation are potentially those recruited for stress responses. To obtain neuroanatomical clues for the central stress circuitries, we examined the effects of diazepam on psychological stress-induced neuronal activation in broad brain regions. Rats were exposed to a social defeat stress, which caused an abrupt increase in body temperature by up to 2°C. Pretreatment with diazepam (4mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the stress-induced hyperthermia, confirming an inhibitory physiological effect of diazepam on the autonomic stress response. Subsequently, the distribution of cells expressing Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was examined in 113 forebrain and midbrain regions of these rats after the stress exposure and diazepam treatment. The stress following vehicle treatment markedly increased Fos-immunoreactive (IR) cells in most regions of the cerebral cortex, limbic system, thalamus, hypothalamus and midbrain, which included parts of the autonomic, neuroendocrine, emotional and arousal systems. The diazepam treatment significantly reduced the stress-induced Fos expression in many brain regions including the prefrontal, sensory and motor cortices, septum, medial amygdaloid nucleus, medial and lateral preoptic areas, parvicellular paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, perifornical nucleus, tuberomammillary nucleus, association, midline and intralaminar thalami, and median and dorsal raphe nuclei. In contrast, diazepam increased Fos-IR cells in the central amygdaloid nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and magnocellular lateral hypothalamus. These results provide important information for elucidating the

  12. CALBINDIN CONTENT AND DIFFERENTIAL VULNERABILITY OF MIDBRAIN EFFERENT DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS IN MACAQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iria G Dopeso-Reyes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Calbindin (CB is a calcium binding protein reported to protect dopaminergic neurons from degeneration. Although a direct link between CB content and differential vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons has long been accepted, factors other than CB have also been suggested, particularly those related to the dopamine transporter. Indeed, several studies have reported that CB levels are not causally related to the differential vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons against neurotoxins. Here we have used dual stains for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and CB in 3 control and 3 MPTP-treated monkeys to visualize dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and in the dorsal and ventral tiers of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNcd and SNcv co-expressing TH and CB. In control animals, the highest percentages of co-localization were found in VTA (58.2%, followed by neurons located in the SNcd (34.7%. As expected, SNcv neurons lacked CB expression. In MPTP-treated animals, the percentage of CB-ir/TH-ir neurons in the VTA was similar to control monkeys (62.1%, whereas most of the few surviving neurons in the SNcd were CB-ir/TH-ir (88.6%. Next, we have elucidated the presence of CB within identified nigrostriatal and nigroextrastriatal midbrain dopaminergic projection neurons. For this purpose, two control monkeys received one injection of Fluoro-Gold into the caudate nucleus and one injection of cholera toxin (CTB into the postcommissural putamen, whereas two more monkeys were injected with CTB into the internal division of the globus pallidus. As expected, all the nigrocaudate- and nigroputamen-projecting neurons were TH-ir, although surprisingly, all of these nigrostriatal-projecting neurons were negative for CB. Furthermore, all the nigropallidal-projecting neurons co-expressed both TH and CB. In summary, although CB-ir dopaminergic neurons seem to be less prone to MPTP-induced degeneration, our data clearly demonstrated that these neurons are not

  13. Cerebellar Vermis and Midbrain Hypoplasia Upon Conditional Deletion of Chd7 from the Embryonic Mid-Hindbrain Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex P. A. Donovan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Reduced fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling from the mid-hindbrain or isthmus organizer (IsO during early embryonic development results in hypoplasia of the midbrain and cerebellar vermis. We previously reported evidence for reduced Fgf8 expression and FGF signaling in the mid-hindbrain region of embryos heterozygous for Chd7, the gene mutated in CHARGE (Coloboma, Heart defects, choanal Atresia, Retarded growth and development, Genitourinary anomalies and Ear defects syndrome. However, Chd7+/− animals only exhibit mild cerebellar vermis anomalies. As homozygous deletion of Chd7 is embryonic lethal, we conditionally deleted Chd7 from the early embryonic mid-hindbrain region to identify the function of CHD7 in mid-hindbrain development. Using a combination of high resolution structural MRI and histology, we report striking midbrain and cerebellar vermis hypoplasia in the homozygous conditional mutants. We show that cerebellar vermis hypoplasia is associated with reduced embryonic Fgf8 expression and an expanded roof plate in rhombomere 1 (r1. These findings identify an essential role for Chd7 in regulating mid-hindbrain development via Fgf8.

  14. Exposure to an open-field arena increases c-Fos expression in a subpopulation of neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus, including neurons projecting to the basolateral amygdaloid complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hale, M.W.; Hay-Schmidt, A.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Serotonergic systems in the dorsal raphe nucleus are thought to play an important role in the regulation of anxiety states. To investigate responses of neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus to a mild anxiety-related stimulus, we exposed rats to an open-field, under low-light or high-light conditions...... of neurons in the midbrain raphe complex that projects to forebrain circuits regulating anxiety states, we used cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) as a retrograde tracer to identify neurons projecting to the basolateral amygdaloid complex (BL) in combination with c-Fos immunostaining to identify cells...... that activated neurons were serotonergic, non-serotonergic, or both. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to anxiogenic stimuli activates a subset of neurons in the midbrain raphe complex projecting to amygdala anxiety circuits Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/10...

  15. Dorsal eye selector pannier (pnr) suppresses the eye fate to define dorsal margin of the Drosophila eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oros, Sarah M.; Tare, Meghana; Kango-Singh, Madhuri; Singh, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Axial patterning is crucial for organogenesis. During Drosophila eye development, dorso-ventral (DV) axis determination is the first lineage restriction event. The eye primordium begins with a default ventral fate, on which the dorsal eye fate is established by expression of the GATA-1 transcription factor pannier (pnr). Earlier, it was suggested that loss of pnr function induces enlargement in the dorsal eye due to ectopic equator formation. Interestingly, we found that in addition to regulating DV patterning, pnr suppresses the eye fate by downregulating the core retinal determination genes eyes absent (eya), sine oculis (so) and dacshund (dac) to define the dorsal eye margin. We found that pnr acts downstream of Ey and affect the retinal determination pathway by suppressing eya. Further analysis of the “eye suppression” function of pnr revealed that this function is likely mediated through suppression of the homeotic gene teashirt (tsh) and is independent of homothorax (hth), a negative regulator of eye. Pnr expression is restricted to the peripodial membrane on the dorsal eye margin, which gives rise to head structures around the eye, and pnr is not expressed in the eye disc proper that forms the retina. Thus, pnr has dual function, during early developmental stages pnr is involved in axial patterning whereas later it promotes the head specific fate. These studies will help in understanding the developmental regulation of boundary formation of the eye field on the dorsal eye margin. PMID:20691679

  16. Acute progressive midbrain hemorrhage after topical ocular cyclopentolate administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisaneller, Tarkan; Ozdemir, Ozgur; Sonmez, Erkin; Altinors, Nur

    2008-01-01

    Cyclopentolate is a synthetic anti-cholinergic agent widely used in ophthalmology clinics. It can cause cardiovascular side-effects such as hypertension, ventricular arrhythmias and tachycardias. A 55-year-old male lost his consciousness after topical cyclopentolate hydrocloride (1%) administration for routine fundoscopic examination in another center. An urgent cranial magnetic resonance imaging examination revealed a midbrain hemorrhage and he was transferred to our hospital. The Glasgow Coma Scale score was at 4 points at admission. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit and mechanically ventilated. Despite vigorous medical treatment, spontaneous respiration and brainstem reflexes disappeared 12 h after his administration. A control cranial computerized tomography showed enlargement and opening of the hemorrhage into the ventricular system. The patient died on the 12th day of his administration. Systemic side-effects of topical ocular cyclopentolate administration and prevention methods were discussed with regard to the current literature.

  17. Oestrogen receptors enhance dopamine neurone survival in rat midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M L; Ho, C C; Day, A E; Walker, Q D; Francis, R; Kuhn, C M

    2010-04-01

    Previous findings in our laboratory and elsewhere have shown that ovariectomy of rats in adulthood attenuates cocaine-stimulated locomotor behaviour. Ovarian hormones enhance both cocaine-stimulated behaviour and increase dopamine overflow after psychomotor stimulants. The present study aimed to determine whether ovarian hormones have these effects in part by maintaining dopamine neurone number in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) and to investigate the roles of specific oestrogen receptors (ERs) in the maintenance of mesencephalic dopamine neurones. To accomplish this goal, we used unbiased stereological techniques to estimate the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR) cell bodies in midbrain regions of intact, ovariectomised and hormone-replaced female rats and mice. Animals received active or sham gonadectomy on postnatal day 60 and received vehicle, 17beta-oestradiol (E(2)) or selective ER agonists propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT, ERalpha) or diarylpropionitrile (DPN, ERbeta) for 1 month post-surgery. In both rats and mice, ovariectomy reduced the number of TH-IR cells in the SNpc and VTA. Replacement with E(2), PPT or DPN prevented or attenuated the loss observed with ovariectomy in both rats and mice. An additional study using ER knockout mice revealed that adult female mice lacking ERalpha had fewer TH-IR cells in midbrain regions than wild-type mice, whereas mice lacking ERbeta had TH-IR cell counts comparable to wild-type. These findings suggest that, although both ER subtypes play a role in the maintenance of TH-IR cell number in the SNpc and VTA, ERalpha may play a more significant role.

  18. Brain networks involved in early versus late response anticipation and their relation to conflict processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütcke, Henry; Gevensleben, Holger; Albrecht, Björn; Frahm, Jens

    2009-11-01

    Previous electrophysiological studies have clearly identified separable neural events underlying early and late components of response anticipation. Functional neuroimaging studies, however, have so far failed to account for this separation. Here, we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of an anticipation paradigm in 12 healthy adult subjects that reliably produced early and late expectancy waves in the electroencephalogram. We furthermore compared fMRI activations elicited during early and late anticipation to those associated with response conflict. Our results demonstrate the existence of distinct cortical and subcortical brain regions underlying early and late anticipation. Although late anticipatory behavior was associated with activations in dorsal ACC, frontal cortex, and thalamus, brain responses linked to the early expectancy wave were localized mainly in motor and premotor cortical areas as well as the caudate nucleus. Additionally, late anticipation was associated with increased activity in midbrain dopaminergic nuclei, very likely corresponding to the substantia nigra. Furthermore, whereas regions involved in late anticipation proved to be very similar to activations elicited by response conflict, this was not the case for early anticipation. The current study supports a distinction between early and late anticipatory processes, in line with a plethora of neurophysiological work, and for the first time describes the brain structures differentially involved in these processes.

  19. Age and duration of inflammatory environment differentially affect the neuroimmune response and catecholaminergic neurons in the midbrain and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardou, Isabelle; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Brothers, Holly M; Hopp, Sarah C; Royer, Sarah; Wenk, Gary L

    2014-05-01

    Neuroinflammation and degeneration of ascending catecholaminergic systems occur early in the neurodegenerative process. Age and the duration of a pro-inflammatory environment induced by continuous intraventricular lipopolysaccharide (LPS) differentially affect the expression profile of pro- and anti-inflammatory genes and proteins as well as the number of activated microglia (express major histocompatibility complex II; MHC II) and the integrity and density of ascending catecholaminergic neural systems originating from the locus coeruleus (LC) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) in rats. LPS infusion increased gene expression and/or protein levels for both pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers. Although LPS infusion stimulated a robust increase in IL-1ß gene and protein expression, this increase was blunted with age. LPS infusion also increased the density of activated microglia cells throughout the midbrain and brainstem. Corresponding to the development of a pro-inflammatory environment, LC and SNpc neurons immunopositive for tyrosine-hydroxylase (the rate-limiting synthetic enzyme for dopamine and norepinephrine) decreased in number, along with a decrease in tyrosine-hydroxylase gene expression in the midbrain and/or brainstem region. Our data support the concept that continuous exposure to a pro-inflammatory environment drives exaggerated changes in the production and release of inflammatory mediators that interact with age to impair functional capacity of the SNpc and LC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The correlation between mid-brain serotonin transporter availability and intelligence quotient in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, P Y; Lee, I H; Chen, K C; Chen, P S; Chiu, N T; Yao, W J; Chu, C L; Yeh, T L; Yang, Y K

    2015-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the association between the mid-brain serotonin transporter (SERT) availability and intelligence quotient (IQ). One hundred and thirteen healthy participants, including 52 male and 61 female subjects, were recruited. We used SPECT with [(123)I]ADAM images to determine the SERT availability in the mid-brain, and measured the subjects' IQ using the WAIS-R. We found a significant positive correlation between the mid-brain SERT availability and the IQ of the participants. Even when controlling for age and sex, the significant association still existed. This result implied that the higher the SERT binding in the mid-brain, the better the IQ in healthy participants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Derivation of Human Midbrain-Specific Organoids from Neuroepithelial Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S. Monzel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Research on human brain development and neurological diseases is limited by the lack of advanced experimental in vitro models that truly recapitulate the complexity of the human brain. Here, we describe a robust human brain organoid system that is highly specific to the midbrain derived from regionally patterned neuroepithelial stem cells. These human midbrain organoids contain spatially organized groups of dopaminergic neurons, which make them an attractive model for the study of Parkinson’s disease. Midbrain organoids are characterized in detail for neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendrocyte differentiation. Furthermore, we show the presence of synaptic connections and electrophysiological activity. The complexity of this model is further highlighted by the myelination of neurites. The present midbrain organoid system has the potential to be used for advanced in vitro disease modeling and therapy development.

  2. Projections to the midbrain tectum in Salamandra salamandra L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstädt, T; Ebbesson, S O; Ewert, J P

    1983-01-01

    Following unilateral iontophoretic application of HRP into the optic tectum of Salamandra salamandra, retrogradely HRP-filled cells were found bilaterally in the pretectum, tegmentum isthmi, the reticular formation, pars medialis, and in the nucleus vestibularis magnocellularis. The area octavo-lateralis projects only to the caudal part of the tectum. Ipsilateral projections were noted from the dorsal gray columns of the cervical spinal cord, the dorsal tegmentum, the thalamus dorsalis pars medialis, thalamus dorsalis, pars anterior (to the rostral one-third of the tectum), the thalamus ventralis (in its entire rostro-caudal extent), and the preoptico-hypothalamic complex. Retrogradely filled cells were identified in deeper layers of the contralateral tectum. There are two telencephalic nuclei projecting ipsilaterally to the tectum via the lateral forebrain: the ventral part of the lateral pallium, and the posterior strioamygdalar complex.

  3. Enduring, Sexually Dimorphic Impact of In Utero Exposure to Elevated Levels of Glucocorticoids on Midbrain Dopaminergic Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda E. Gillies

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs released from the fetal/maternal glands during late gestation are required for normal development of mammalian organs and tissues. Accordingly, synthetic glucocorticoids have proven to be invaluable in perinatal medicine where they are widely used to accelerate fetal lung maturation when there is risk of pre-term birth and to promote infant survival. However, clinical and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that inappropriate exposure of the developing brain to elevated levels of GCs, either as a result of clinical over-use or after stress-induced activation of the fetal/maternal adrenal cortex, is linked with significant effects on brain structure, neurological function and behaviour in later life. In order to understand the underlying neural processes, particular interest has focused on the midbrain dopaminergic systems, which are critical regulators of normal adaptive behaviours, cognitive and sensorimotor functions. Specifically, using a rodent model of GC exposure in late gestation (approximating human brain development at late second/early third trimester, we demonstrated enduring effects on the shape and volume of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc (origins of the mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways on the topographical organisation and size of the dopaminergic neuronal populations and astrocytes within these nuclei and on target innervation density and neurochemical markers of dopaminergic transmission (receptors, transporters, basal and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release at striatal and prefrontal cortical sites that impact on the adult brain. The effects of antenatal GC treatment (AGT were both profound and sexually-dimorphic, not only in terms of quantitative change but also qualitatively, with several parameters affected in the opposite direction in males and females. Although such substantial neurobiological changes might presage marked

  4. Differential Somatic Ca2+ Channel Profile in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, Fabian; Destreel, Geoffrey; Merino-Sepúlveda, Paulina; Henny, Pablo; Engel, Dominique; Seutin, Vincent

    2016-07-06

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons located in the ventral midbrain continuously generate a slow endogenous pacemaker activity, the mechanism of which is still debated. It has been suggested that, in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), the pacemaking relies more on Ca(2+) channels and that the density of L-type Ca(2+) channels is higher in these DA neurons than in those located in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). This might lead to a higher Ca(2+) load in SNc DA neurons and explain their higher susceptibility to degeneration. However, direct evidence for this hypothesis is lacking. We found that the L-type current and channel density are indeed higher in the somata of rat SNc DA neurons and that this current undergoes less inactivation in this region. Nonstationary fluctuation analysis measurements showed a much higher number of L-type channels in the soma of SNc DA neurons, as well as a smaller single-channel conductance, pointing to a possible different molecular identity of L-type channels in DA neurons from the two areas. A major consequence of this is that pacemaking and, even more so, bursting are associated with a larger Ca(2+) entry through L-type channels in SNc DA neurons than in their VTA counterparts. Our results establish a molecular and functional difference between two populations of midbrain DA neurons that may contribute to their differential sensitivity to neurodegeneration. Dopamine neurons from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) are involved in various brain functions, such as movement initiation and goal directed behavior, respectively. This work shows that, although both neurons fire in a similar regular and slow pacemaker mode, this firing activity is supported by different calcium channel landscapes. Indeed, the L-type calcium current is larger in the soma of dopamine neurons of the SNc, leading to a higher charge transfer through L-type channels during pacemaking and bursting. Therefore, these neurons may

  5. Wnt/β-catenin signaling in midbrain dopaminergic neuron specification and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joksimovic, Milan; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2014-02-01

    Loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons underlies the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Towards cell replacement, studies have focused on mechanisms underlying embryonic mDA production, as a rational basis for deriving mDA neurons from stem cells. We will review studies of β-catenin, an obligate component of the Wnt cascade that is critical to mDA specification and neurogenesis. mDA neurons have a unique origin--the midbrain floor plate (FP). Unlike the hindbrain and spinal cord FP, the midbrain FP is highly neurogenic and Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical to this difference in neurogenic potential. In β-catenin loss-of-function experiments, the midbrain FP resembles the hindbrain FP, and key mDA progenitor genes such as Otx2, Lmx1a, Msx1, and Ngn2 are downregulated whereas Shh is maintained. Accordingly, the neurogenic capacity of the midbrain FP is diminished, resulting in fewer mDA neurons. Conversely, in β-catenin gain-of-function experiments, the hindbrain FP expresses key mDA progenitor genes, and is highly neurogenic. Interestingly, when excessive β-catenin is supplied to the midbrain FP, less mDA neurons are produced suggesting that the dosage of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical. These studies of β-catenin have facilitated new protocols to derive mDA neurons from stem cells.

  6. Interactions between the midbrain superior colliculus and the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eRedgrave

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An important component of the architecture of cortico-basal ganglia connections is the parallel, re-entrant looped projections that originate and return to specific regions of the cerebral cortex. However, such loops are unlikely to have been the first evolutionary example of a closed-loop architecture involving the basal ganglia. A phylogenetically older, series of subcortical loops can be shown to link the basal ganglia with many brainstem sensorimotor structures. While the characteristics of individual components of potential subcortical re-entrant loops have been documented, the full extent to which they represent functionally segregated parallel projecting channels remains to be determined. However, for one midbrain structure, the superior colliculus (SC, anatomical evidence for closed-loop connectivity with the basal ganglia is robust, and can serve as an example against which the loop hypothesis can be evaluated for other subcortical structures. Examination of ascending projections from the SC to the thalamus suggests there may be multiple functionally segregated systems. The SC also provides afferent signals to the other principal input nuclei of the basal ganglia, the dopaminergic neurones in substantia nigra and to the subthalamic nucleus. Recent electrophysiological investigations show that the afferent signals originating in the SC carry important information concerning the onset of biologically significant events to each of the basal ganglia input nuclei. Such signals are widely regarded as crucial for the proposed functions of selection and reinforcement learning with which the basal ganglia have so often been associated.

  7. Serotoninergic dorsal raphe neurons possess functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Charles, Luis; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Bargas, José; Garduño, Julieta; Frías-Dominguez, Carmen; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    Very few neurons in the telencephalon have been shown to express functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), among them, the noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons. However, there is no evidence for postsynaptic nAChRs on serotonergic neurons. In this study, we asked if functional nAChRs are present in serotonergic (5-HT) and nonserotonergic (non-5-HT) neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In rat midbrain slices, field stimulation at the tegmental pedunculopontine (PPT) nucleus evoked postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) with different components in DRN neurons. After blocking the glutamatergic and GABAergic components, the remaining eEPSCs were blocked by mecamylamine and reduced by either the selective alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) or the selective alpha4beta2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-eritroidine (DHbetaE). Simultaneous addition of MLA and DHbetaE blocked all eEPSCs. Integrity of the PPT-DRN pathway was assessed by both anterograde biocytin tracing and antidromic stimulation from the DRN. Inward currents evoked by the direct application of acetylcholine (ACh), in the presence of atropine and tetrodotoxin, consisted of two kinetically different currents: one was blocked by MLA and the other by DHbetaE; in both 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons. Analysis of spontaneous (sEPSCs) and evoked (eEPSCs) synaptic events led to the conclusion that nAChRs were located at the postsynaptic membrane. The possible implications of these newly described nAChRs in various physiological processes and behavioral events, such as the wake-sleep cycle, are discussed.

  8. Radiographic anatomy of the canine coxofemoral joint using the dorsal acetabular rim (DAR) view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpatori, Brian J; Mathews, Kyle G; Roe, Simon R; Robertson, Ian D

    2003-01-01

    A radiographic study of the anatomy of the canine acetabulum was performed. The relationship between the area of dorsal acetabular rim that is subject to early damage in dogs with coxofemoral joint laxity, and the "DAR point" identified on dorsal acetabular rim (DAR) radiographic views was examined. Radiographs and digital photographs were made of the pelvis harvested from each of six skeletally mature dogs. Through analysis of these images, it was determined that in the standing animal, the DAR point is located 4-6 mm (or approximately 37 degrees) caudal to the dorsal acetabular rim area that is prone to early damage in dogs with coxofemoral joint laxity. This study suggests that the DAR radiographic view may under-represent changes to the dorsal acetabular rim in dogs with coxofemoral laxity.

  9. Liposarcome dorsal: aspect clinique rare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbessi, Odry; Arrob, Adil; Fiqhi, Kamal; Khalfi, Lahcen; Nassih, Mohammed; El Khatib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Décrit la première fois par Virchow en 1860, le liposarcome est une tumeur mésenchymateuse rare. Cette rareté est relative car les liposarcomes représentent quand même 14 à 18% de l'ensemble des tumeurs malignes des parties molles et ils constituent le plus fréquent des sarcomes des parties molles. Pour la majorité des auteurs, il ne se développerait jamais sur un lipome ou une lipomatose préexistant. Nous rapportons un cas de volumineux liposarcome de la face dorsale du tronc. L'histoire de la maladie, l'aspect clinique inhabituel « de tumeur dans tumeur », l'aspect de la pièce opératoire nous fait évoquer la possibilité de la transformation maligne d'un lipome bénin préexistant. PMID:26113914

  10. Role of IL-1 beta and 5-HT2 receptors in midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) in potentiating defensive rage behavior in cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Suresh; Bhatt, Rekha; Zalcman, Steven S; Siegel, Allan

    2008-02-01

    Feline defensive rage, a form of aggressive behavior that occurs in response to a threat can be elicited by electrical stimulation of the medial hypothalamus or midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG). Our laboratory has recently begun a systematic examination of the role of cytokines in the regulation of rage and aggressive behavior. It was shown that the cytokine, interleukin-2 (IL-2), differentially modulates defensive rage when microinjected into the medial hypothalamus and PAG by acting through separate neurotransmitter systems. The present study sought to determine whether a similar relationship exists with respect to interleukin 1-beta (IL-1 beta), whose receptor activation in the medial hypothalamus potentiates defensive rage. Thus, the present study identified the effects of administration of IL-1 beta into the PAG upon defensive rage elicited from the medial hypothalamus. Microinjections of IL-1 beta into the dorsal PAG significantly facilitated defensive rage behavior elicited from the medial hypothalamus in a dose and time dependent manner. In addition, the facilitative effects of IL-1 beta were blocked by pre-treatment with anti-IL-1 beta receptor antibody, while IL-1 beta administration into the PAG had no effect upon predatory attack elicited from the lateral hypothalamus. The findings further demonstrated that IL-1 beta's effects were mediated through 5-HT(2) receptors since pretreatment with a 5-HT(2C) receptors antagonist blocked the facilitating effects of IL-1 beta. An extensive pattern of labeling of IL-1 beta and 5-HT(2C) receptors in the dorsal PAG supported these findings. The present study demonstrates that IL-beta in the dorsal PAG, similar to the medial hypothalamus, potentiates defensive rage behavior and is mediated through a 5-HT(2C) receptor mechanism.

  11. Event related potentials recorded in Dorsal Simultanagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrj, M; Fulgente, T; Thomas, A

    1995-12-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to central and lateral half field patterned stimuli of 1, 2 and 4 cycles per degree (cpd) were recorded in a patient with Dorsal Simultanagnosia due to bilateral lesions of parieto-occipital junction. VEPs consisted of the normal N1-P1-N2 components with same spatial frequency sensitivity as in controls. VEPs had similar latencies and amplitudes whether the patient could see or not the patterned stimuli. Event related potentials (ERPs) to visual and acoustic odd-ball paradigm were also recorded in the same patient. Visual ERPs consisted of an early NA-effect, and of N2-P3 components. P3 was recorded only from frontal, central and temporal derivations. The topographical P3 abnormality was, however, the same for visual and acoustic odd-ball paradigms. The amplitude of P3 was smaller when the patient missed visual stimuli. These findings show that severe bilateral lesions at the parieto-occipital junction, inducing Simultanagnosia, do not obliterate VEPs or ERPs components.

  12. Organization of cholinergic, putative catecholaminergic and serotonergic nuclei in the diencephalon, midbrain and pons of sub-adult male giraffes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bux, Faiza; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2010-05-01

    The current study describes the nuclear organization and neuronal morphology of the cholinergic, putative catecholaminergic and serotonergic systems within the diencephalon, midbrain and pons of the giraffe using immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase and serotonin. The giraffe has a unique phenotype (the long neck), a large brain (over 500 g) and is a non-domesticated animal, while previous studies examining the brains of other Artiodactyls have all been undertaken on domesticated animals. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in the nuclear organization and neuronal morphology of the above-mentioned systems compared to that seen in other Artiodactyls and mammals. The nuclear organization of all three systems within the giraffe brain was similar to that of other Artiodactyls. Some features of interest were noted for the giraffe and in comparison to other mammals studied. The cholinergic neuronal somata of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus were slightly larger than those of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, a feature not described in other mammals. The putative catecholaminergic system of the giraffe appeared to lack an A15 dorsal nucleus, which is commonly seen in other mammals but absent in the Artiodactyls, had a large and expanded substantia nigra pars reticulata (A9 ventral), a small diffuse portion of the locus coerueleus (A6d), an expansive subcoeruleus (A7sc and A7d), and lacked the A4 nucleus of the locus coeruleus complex. The nuclear organization of the serotonergic system of the giraffe was identical to that seen in all other eutherian mammals studied to date. These observations in the giraffe demonstrate that despite significant changes in life history, phenotype, brain size and time of divergence, species within the same order show the same nuclear organization of the systems investigated. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for delayed rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Doya, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    The forebrain serotonergic system is a crucial component in the control of impulsive behaviors. We previously reported that the activity of serotonin neurons in the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus increased when rats performed a task that required them to wait for delayed rewards. However, the causal relationship between serotonin neural activity and the tolerance for the delayed reward remained unclear. Here, we test whether the inhibition of serotonin neural activity by the local application of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin in the dorsal raphe nucleus impairs rats' tolerance for delayed rewards. Rats performed a sequential food-water navigation task that required them to visit food and water sites alternately via a tone site to get rewards at both sites after delays. During the short (2 s) delayed reward condition, the inhibition of serotonin neural activity did not significantly influence the numbers of reward choice errors (nosepoke at an incorrect reward site following a conditioned reinforcer tone), reward wait errors (failure to wait for the delayed rewards), or total trials (sum of reward choice errors, reward wait errors, and acquired rewards). By contrast, during the long (7-11 s) delayed reward condition, the number of wait errors significantly increased while the numbers of total trials and choice errors did not significantly change. These results indicate that the activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for long delayed rewards and suggest that elevated serotonin activity facilitates waiting behavior when there is the prospect of forthcoming rewards.

  14. Spumiform basement membrane aberrations in the microvasculature of the midbrain periaqueductal gray region in hamster: rostro-caudal pathogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, P O; Kortekaas, R; de Weerd, H; Luiten, P G M; van der Want, J J L; Veening, J G

    2013-01-03

    Spumiform basement membrane degeneration (sbmd) is a specific kind of aberration present in the capillaries of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) region of the senescent hamster. These capillaries, separated by the ependymal cell layer, are bordering the Sylvian cerebral aqueduct. The aqueduct, connecting the 3rd and 4th ventricle, may be crucial for local homeostatic as well as general autonomic functions of the PAG. Local pressure effects of the flowing and pulsating cerebrospinal fluid on the PAG-vasculature are probably different for the rostral 'entrance' and the caudal 'exit' of the aqueduct. In view of the different functions of the various divisions of the PAG, the frequency and extent of the aberrations in the rostral, intermediate and caudal dl/vlPAG-microvasculature could shed some light on the causal factors involved in the regional distribution of the particular microvascular aberrations found in the PAG during aging. In the present study we investigated the ultrastructure of capillaries in dorsal and ventral subdivisions of anterior and posterior regions of the PAG of young and old female Syrian hamsters. Sbmds were classified into four stages of spumiform severity and for each stage the frequency was determined in the rostral PAG, at two levels in the intermediate PAG and in a dorsal and a ventral part of the caudal PAG. Results of our quantitative studies showed that in aged hamster PAG various stages of sbmd were present in 91.6 ± 0.6% of all capillaries. No clear evidence was found for regional differentiation between rostral, intermediate and caudal parts of the PAG. Next to sbmd, capillary split basement membrane (sbm) and vacuolization were common features at all five PAG locations. 84.3 ± 2.3% of all screened PAG capillaries displayed sbm. In agreement with our previous findings, several other types of microvascular aberrations were observed in addition to general aspects of aging and some ependymal structural peculiarities. We conclude

  15. Cervical and middle dorsal actinomycetomas from Guerrero State, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Chávez, Guadalupe E; Estrada, Roberto; Fernandez, Ramon; Arenas, Roberto; Reyes, Alain; Guevara, Cindy; Chávez-López, Guadalupe

    2017-11-01

    Mycetomas are frequent subcutaneous mycoses with typical clinical characteristics such as sinuses, blood-stained, serous, or purulent exudates as well as local swelling. Even though the most commonly affected areas are the lower limbs, we report four cases affecting the neck and midback regions, of which three were young females. We draw attention to the importance of early identification of these cases for prevention and specific treatment in order to avoid severe consequences or irreversible complications such as quadriplegia. To document the occurrence of cervical spine and middle dorsal thoracic mycetomas, as well as their severity, clinical manifestations, and secondary complications. This was an observational and descriptive study in which we reviewed cases with neck and middle dorsal thoracic mycetomas diagnosed at the Acapulco General Hospital of Guerrero State, Mexico. We describe the cases including the mechanism of inoculation, neurological symptoms, and severity. We describe three cases initially diagnosed clinically as cervical mycetomas and one in the middle dorsal thoracic region. All the cases were diagnosed at the Acapulco General Hospital of Guerrero State in Mexico. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  16. Alzheimer disease: functional abnormalities in the dorsal visual pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bokde, Arun L W

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) have altered activation compared with age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects during a task that typically recruits the dorsal visual pathway. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki, with institutional ethics committee approval, and all subjects provided written informed consent. Two tasks were performed to investigate neural function: face matching and location matching. Twelve patients with mild AD and 14 age-matched HC subjects were included. Brain activation was measured by using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Group statistical analyses were based on a mixed-effects model corrected for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: Task performance was not statistically different between the two groups, and within groups there were no differences in task performance. In the HC group, the visual perception tasks selectively activated the visual pathways. Conversely in the AD group, there was no selective activation during performance of these same tasks. Along the dorsal visual pathway, the AD group recruited additional regions, primarily in the parietal and frontal lobes, for the location-matching task. There were no differences in activation between groups during the face-matching task. CONCLUSION: The increased activation in the AD group may represent a compensatory mechanism for decreased processing effectiveness in early visual areas of patients with AD. The findings support the idea that the dorsal visual pathway is more susceptible to putative AD-related neuropathologic changes than is the ventral visual pathway.

  17. An Lmx1b-miR135a2 regulatory circuit modulates Wnt1/Wnt signaling and determines the size of the midbrain dopaminergic progenitor pool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Anderegg

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs regulate gene expression in diverse physiological scenarios. Their role in the control of morphogen related signaling pathways has been less studied, particularly in the context of embryonic Central Nervous System (CNS development. Here, we uncover a role for microRNAs in limiting the spatiotemporal range of morphogen expression and function. Wnt1 is a key morphogen in the embryonic midbrain, and directs proliferation, survival, patterning and neurogenesis. We reveal an autoregulatory negative feedback loop between the transcription factor Lmx1b and a newly characterized microRNA, miR135a2, which modulates the extent of Wnt1/Wnt signaling and the size of the dopamine progenitor domain. Conditional gain of function studies reveal that Lmx1b promotes Wnt1/Wnt signaling, and thereby increases midbrain size and dopamine progenitor allocation. Conditional removal of Lmx1b has the opposite effect, in that expansion of the dopamine progenitor domain is severely compromised. Next, we provide evidence that microRNAs are involved in restricting dopamine progenitor allocation. Conditional loss of Dicer1 in embryonic stem cells (ESCs results in expanded Lmx1a/b+ progenitors. In contrast, forced elevation of miR135a2 during an early window in vivo phenocopies the Lmx1b conditional knockout. When En1::Cre, but not Shh::Cre or Nes::Cre, is used for recombination, the expansion of Lmx1a/b+ progenitors is selectively reduced. Bioinformatics and luciferase assay data suggests that miR135a2 targets Lmx1b and many genes in the Wnt signaling pathway, including Ccnd1, Gsk3b, and Tcf7l2. Consistent with this, we demonstrate that this mutant displays reductions in the size of the Lmx1b/Wnt1 domain and range of canonical Wnt signaling. We posit that microRNA modulation of the Lmx1b/Wnt axis in the early midbrain/isthmus could determine midbrain size and allocation of dopamine progenitors. Since canonical Wnt activity has recently been recognized as a key

  18. Neural dynamics of phonological processing in the dorsal auditory stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenthal, Einat; Sabri, Merav; Beardsley, Scott A; Mangalathu-Arumana, Jain; Desai, Anjali

    2013-09-25

    Neuroanatomical models hypothesize a role for the dorsal auditory pathway in phonological processing as a feedforward efferent system (Davis and Johnsrude, 2007; Rauschecker and Scott, 2009; Hickok et al., 2011). But the functional organization of the pathway, in terms of time course of interactions between auditory, somatosensory, and motor regions, and the hemispheric lateralization pattern is largely unknown. Here, ambiguous duplex syllables, with elements presented dichotically at varying interaural asynchronies, were used to parametrically modulate phonological processing and associated neural activity in the human dorsal auditory stream. Subjects performed syllable and chirp identification tasks, while event-related potentials and functional magnetic resonance images were concurrently collected. Joint independent component analysis was applied to fuse the neuroimaging data and study the neural dynamics of brain regions involved in phonological processing with high spatiotemporal resolution. Results revealed a highly interactive neural network associated with phonological processing, composed of functional fields in posterior temporal gyrus (pSTG), inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and ventral central sulcus (vCS) that were engaged early and almost simultaneously (at 80-100 ms), consistent with a direct influence of articulatory somatomotor areas on phonemic perception. Left hemispheric lateralization was observed 250 ms earlier in IPL and vCS than pSTG, suggesting that functional specialization of somatomotor (and not auditory) areas determined lateralization in the dorsal auditory pathway. The temporal dynamics of the dorsal auditory pathway described here offer a new understanding of its functional organization and demonstrate that temporal information is essential to resolve neural circuits underlying complex behaviors.

  19. Characterization of 3D embryonic C57BL/6 and A/J mouse midbrain micromass in vitro culture systems for developmental neurotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julie Juyoung; Weldon, Brittany A; Hong, Sungwoo; Workman, Tomomi; Griffith, William C; Park, Julie H; Faustman, Elaine M

    2017-12-18

    In vitro micromass culture systems have been proposed as an alternative method for developmental toxicity assessment to reduce the need for resource-intensive in vivo toxicity testing. In this study, a three-dimensional in vitro embryonic mouse midbrain culture system is characterized in two mouse strains to facilitate gene x environment considerations. Gestational day (GD) 11 C57BL/6 or GD 12 A/J mouse midbrain cells were isolated and cultured in high-density micromass format for 22days in vitro (DIV). Hematoxylin intensity and protein content revealed that neuronal differentiation increases linearly over time in both C57BL/6 and A/J cultures. Protein expression showed time-dependent proliferation markers (PCNA) increased significantly between DIV 4-6 compared to DIV 1. Early and late differentiation markers (e.g. β-tubulin III and NMDAɛ1) were expressed between DIV 6-8 and DIV 8-15, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and protein expression results for proliferation and differentiation markers were concordant. Protein expression patterns for the two mouse strain micromass systems were similar. This study characterizes a novel method for investigating early neurogenesis and may be used to characterize neurodevelopmental toxicity in vitro. Our findings show how the use of different mouse strains in neurodevelopmental studies may extend test systems for gene and environment interaction studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of dopamine quantal size in midbrain and hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothos, Emmanuel N

    2002-03-10

    Since the pioneering work of Bernard Katz and his colleagues decades ago, neurotransmitter quantal size (defined as the number of neurotransmitter molecules released by a single synaptic vesicle during exocytosis) is often modeled as invariant. This assumption had tremendous implications for basic research on synaptic plasticity. For instance, it focused attention on the postsynaptic rather than the presynaptic component in studies of learning and memory (the field of long-term potentiation comes to mind as the best example). Furthermore, this assumption somehow 'spilled over' onto studies of monoamine neurotransmitters, which apparently use diffusion and slow action to exert their modulatory effects, in contrast to the fast acting neurotransmitters studied by Katz. Consequently, research on dopamine-related diseases (e.g. psychotic and movement disorders) did not pay as much attention to presynaptic mechanisms that regulate dopamine release, as to postsynaptic receptor action. Part of the problem, of course, has been the lack of technology to directly measure quanta from presynaptic sites and the obligatory reliance on measurements of miniature postsynaptic potentials (minis) for reaching conclusions about presynaptic quantal events. Due to the introduction of the carbon fiber amperometric microelectrode in tissue electrophysiology, initially by Francois Gonon (University of Bordeaux) and then by Mark Wightman (University of North Carolina), we were able to directly measure dopamine quanta from neurites of cultured midbrain dopamine neurons by amperometry. This was the first approach to provide direct measurement of the number of molecules and kinetics of presynaptic quantal release from CNS neuronal terminals. The interventions altering dopamine quantal size are so far the following. (1) Alteration of neurotransmitter synthesis--an increase of cytosolic dopamine availability (e.g. by exposure to L-DOPA) increases quantal size and a decrease of cytosolic dopamine

  1. FUSIMOTOR EFFECTS OF MIDBRAIN STIMULATION ON JAW MUSCLE-SPINDLES OF THE ANESTHETIZED CAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TAYLOR, A; JUCH, PJW

    The effects of electrical stimulation within the midbrain on fusimotor output to the jaw elevator muscles were studied in anaesthetized cats. Muscle spindle afferents recorded in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus were categorised as primary or secondary by their responses to succinylcholine

  2. Tualang Honey Protects the Rat Midbrain and Lung against Repeated Paraquat Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Peng Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraquat (PQ is a dopaminergic neurotoxin and a well-known pneumotoxicant that exerts its toxic effect via oxidative stress-mediated cellular injuries. This study investigated the protective effects of Tualang honey against PQ-induced toxicity in the midbrain and lungs of rats. The rats were orally treated with distilled water (2 mL/kg/day, Tualang honey (1.0 g/kg/day, or ubiquinol (0.2 g/kg/day throughout the experimental period. Two weeks after the respective treatments, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline (1 mL/kg/week or PQ (10 mg/kg/week once per week for four consecutive weeks. After four weekly exposures to PQ, the glutathione peroxidase activity and the number of tyrosine-hydroxylase immunopositive neurons in the midbrain were significantly decreased in animals from group PQ (p<0.05. The lungs of animals from group PQ showed significantly decreased activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase. Treatment with Tualang honey ameliorated the toxic effects observed in the midbrain and lungs. The beneficial effects of Tualang honey were comparable to those of ubiquinol, which was used as a positive control. These findings suggest that treatment with Tualang honey may protect against PQ-induced toxicity in the rat midbrain and lung.

  3. Quantification of substance P mRNA expression in the midbrain of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to develop a SYBR green I-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) for quantitative detection of substance P (SP) mRNA in the midbrain of ovariectomized migraine rats and to evaluate the effects of estradiol on the mRNA expression of SP in order to shed light on the mechanisms ...

  4. Linear ensemble-coding in midbrain superior colliculus specifies the saccade kinematics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstal, A.J. van; Goossens, H.H.L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an ensemble-coding scheme of the midbrain superior colliculus (SC) in which, during a saccade, each spike emitted by each recruited SC neuron contributes a fixed minivector to the gaze-control motor output. The size and direction of this 'spike vector' depend exclusively on a

  5. The issue of ventral versus dorsal approach in bulbar urethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E. Palminteri

    increased over time the use of Ventral Graft and decreased the use of dorsal graft [7]. From surgical point of view, the Barbagli Dorsal Grafting by Dor- sal approach ... seems reduce the risk of fistula; in reality there is a similar rate of fistula with both ventral and dorsal grafting. The disadvantage of the dorsal approach is that it ...

  6. Effect of electrical vs. chemical deep brain stimulation at midbrain sites on micturition in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, E; Coote, J H; Lovick, T A

    2015-05-01

    To understand how deep brain stimulation of the midbrain influences control of the urinary bladder. In urethane-anaesthetized male rats, saline was infused continuously into the bladder to evoke cycles of filling and voiding. The effect of electrical (0.1-2.0 ms pulses, 5-180 Hz, 0.5-2.5 V) compared to chemical stimulation (microinjection of D,L-homocysteic acid, 50 nL 0.1 M solution) at the same midbrain sites was tested. Electrical stimulation of the periaqueductal grey matter and surrounding midbrain disrupted normal coordinated voiding activity in detrusor and sphincters muscles and suppressed urine output. The effect occurred within seconds was reversible and not secondary to cardiorespiratory changes. Bladder compliance remained unchanged. Chemical stimulation over the same area using microinjection of D,L-homocysteic acid (DLH) to preferentially activate somatodendritic receptors decreased the frequency of micturition but did not disrupt the coordinated pattern of voiding. In contrast, chemical stimulation within the caudal ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, in the area where critical synapses in the micturition reflex pathway are located, increased the frequency of micturition. Electrical deep brain stimulation within the midbrain can inhibit reflex micturition. We suggest that the applied stimulus entrained activity in the neural circuitry locally, thereby imposing an unphysiological pattern of activity. In a way similar to the use of electrical signals to 'jam' radio transmission, this may prevent a synchronized pattern of efferent activity being transmitted to the spinal outflows to orchestrate a coordinated voiding response. Further experiments to record neuronal firing in the midbrain during the deep brain stimulation will be necessary to test this hypothesis. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Chemical modulation of the defensive behavior in the midbrain tectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M L Brandão

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Un grupo de estructuras en el sistema nervioso central, incluyendo la amígdala, el hipotálamo medio, el periacueducto dorsal gris, el colículo inferior, y capas profundas del colículo superior, han sido tradicionalmente asociados con la integración de estados aversivos en el cerebro, debido a que las conductas de escape y los comportamientos defensivos o de miedo a menudo se presentan cuando estas áreas son estimuladas eléctrica o químicamente. En general, las respuestas conductuales inducidas por la estimulación de estas estructuras en el tacto medial son acompañadas por incrementos en la presión sanguínea, tasa cardiaca, tasa respiratoria y analgesia. Tanto las respuestas conductuales como las autonómicas son atenuadas por tranquilizantes menores, probablemente a través de un aumento en la neurotransmisión de GABA. Aparte de las interneuronas GABA, que tienen un control inhibitorio de los circuitos neurales responsables por los correlatos conductuales de la aversión, otros mecanismos diversos tales como los mecanismos opioides, neuropéptidos, serotonérgicos y aminoácidos exitatorios también han sido implicados en la regulación de estos procesos. Se han realizado esfuerzos para comprender el modo de acción de estos neurotransmisores en sus múltiples receptores y cómo interactuan entre sí para producir o regular los sustratos neurales de la aversión. En cuanto a la analgesia que acompaña a estos estados aversivos, se sabe que es mediada por mecanismos no-opioídes, particularmente por mecanismos serotonérgicos a través de receptores 5-HT.

  8. [Seasonal changes in the dorsal coloration in the lizard Aspidoscelis costata costata (Squamata: Teiidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Gallegos, Oswaldo; Domínguez-Vega, Hublester

    2012-03-01

    Color and color patterns in animals are important characteristics that bring protection, by dampening the ability of predators that depend on their sight to detect their preys. In lizards, the dorsal coloration plays a key role in communication of intraspecific signals such as social cues. In this study, we evaluated the seasonal changes in the dorsal coloration of the wide foraging lizard A. costata costata, in Tonatico, State of Mexico, Mexico. The seasonal evaluation included: the rainy season from mid June to mid September (can also include the end of May to early October); and the dry season for the rest of the year. The dorsal coloration of A. costata costata and their microhabitats were evaluated by contrasting the color pattern with an identification guide and the control colors of Pantone, during 11 samplings carried out from February-October 2007. Individual lizard analysis recorded snout-vent length, sex and stage (juveniles and adults). Besides, all animals were marked by toe-clipping, allowing to distinguish dorsal coloration between seasons, sex and stage. A total of 95 lizards were analyzed (53 and 42 for the dry and rainy seasons respectively). We found that the dorsal coloration in A. costata costata varies seasonally and with microhabitats: during the dry season individuals show a brown coloration whereas during the rainy season becomes greener, as the background dominant vegetation color. The results of the present study suggest that: 1) the variation in dorsal coloration in A. costata costata plays an important role in the survival (by cryptic camouflage) of this widely foraging species; 2) the changes in the dorsal coloration of A. costata costata are individually expressed traits, since the coloration of the same lizard is either brown or green depending on the season; and 3) the cryptic functions of the dorsal coloration in widely foraging species have been largely underestimated. We discuss the possible influence of the changes in coloration

  9. Dorsal and Ventral Pathways for Prosody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammler, Daniela; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Anwander, Alfred; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Belin, Pascal

    2015-12-07

    Our vocal tone--the prosody--contributes a lot to the meaning of speech beyond the actual words. Indeed, the hesitant tone of a "yes" may be more telling than its affirmative lexical meaning. The human brain contains dorsal and ventral processing streams in the left hemisphere that underlie core linguistic abilities such as phonology, syntax, and semantics. Whether or not prosody--a reportedly right-hemispheric faculty--involves analogous processing streams is a matter of debate. Functional connectivity studies on prosody leave no doubt about the existence of such streams, but opinions diverge on whether information travels along dorsal or ventral pathways. Here we show, with a novel paradigm using audio morphing combined with multimodal neuroimaging and brain stimulation, that prosody perception takes dual routes along dorsal and ventral pathways in the right hemisphere. In experiment 1, categorization of speech stimuli that gradually varied in their prosodic pitch contour (between statement and question) involved (1) an auditory ventral pathway along the superior temporal lobe and (2) auditory-motor dorsal pathways connecting posterior temporal and inferior frontal/premotor areas. In experiment 2, inhibitory stimulation of right premotor cortex as a key node of the dorsal stream decreased participants' performance in prosody categorization, arguing for a motor involvement in prosody perception. These data draw a dual-stream picture of prosodic processing that parallels the established left-hemispheric multi-stream architecture of language, but with relative rightward asymmetry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cooperative transcription activation by Nurr1 and Pitx3 induces embryonic stem cell maturation to the midbrain dopamine neuron phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinat, Cecile; Bacci, Jean-Jacques; Leete, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons play a central role in the regulation of voluntary movement, and their degeneration is associated with Parkinson's disease. Cell replacement therapies, and in particular embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived DA neurons, offer a potential therapeutic venue for Parkinson......'s disease. We sought to identify genes that can potentiate maturation of ES cell cultures to the midbrain DA neuron phenotype. A number of transcription factors have been implicated in the development of midbrain DA neurons by expression analyses and loss-of-function knockout mouse studies, including Nurr1......, Pitx3, Lmx1b, Engrailed-1, and Engrailed-2. However, none of these factors appear sufficient alone to induce the mature midbrain DA neuron phenotype in ES cell cultures in vitro, suggesting a more complex regulatory network. Here we show that Nurr1 and Pitx3 cooperatively promote terminal maturation...

  11. Genetic deletion of afadin causes hydrocephalus by destruction of adherens junctions in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Adherens junctions (AJs play a role in mechanically connecting adjacent cells to maintain tissue structure, particularly in epithelial cells. The major cell-cell adhesion molecules at AJs are cadherins and nectins. Afadin binds to both nectins and α-catenin and recruits the cadherin-β-catenin complex to the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion site to form AJs. To explore the role of afadin in radial glial and ependymal cells in the brain, we generated mice carrying a nestin-Cre-mediated conditional knockout (cKO of the afadin gene. Newborn afadin-cKO mice developed hydrocephalus and died neonatally. The afadin-cKO brain displayed enlarged lateral ventricles and cerebral aqueduct, resulting from stenosis of the caudal end of the cerebral aqueduct and obliteration of the ventral part of the third ventricle. Afadin deficiency further caused the loss of ependymal cells from the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces. During development, radial glial cells, which terminally differentiate into ependymal cells, scattered from the ventricular zone and were replaced by neurons that eventually covered the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Moreover, the denuded ependymal cells were only occasionally observed in the third ventricle and the cerebral aqueduct of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Afadin was co-localized with nectin-1 and N-cadherin at AJs of radial glial and ependymal cells in the control midbrain, but these proteins were not concentrated at AJs in the afadin-cKO midbrain. Thus, the defects in the afadin-cKO midbrain most likely resulted from the destruction of AJs, because AJs in the midbrain were already established before afadin was genetically deleted. These results indicate that afadin is essential for the maintenance of AJs in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain and is required for normal morphogenesis of the cerebral aqueduct and ventral third ventricle in the midbrain.

  12. Transseptal dorsal approaches to the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, Ahmed; Hoël, Gérard; Naïto, Kiyohito; Uguen, Arnaud; Liverneaux, Philippe; Le Nen, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    The dorsal approach to the wrist is the exposure of choice for most of the surgical procedures on the radiocarpal and intercarpal joints. Contrary to the volar approach, it encounters neither the main arteries nor the motor nerve branch. However, the dorsal approach goes necessarily through the extensor retinaculum. We describe two transseptal dorsal approaches that pass through the extensor retinaculum in the thickness of a septum between two compartments. A virtual space was developed beneath the infratendinous retinaculum (which is a deep layer covering the floor of the extensor compartments) to expose the periosteum, the ligaments and the joint capsule without opening the extensor compartments. Twenty cadaveric wrists have been dissected to study the feasibility of the two transseptal approaches. Ten wrists were exposed through a 3-4 transseptal approach, passing through the extensor retinaculum in the thickness of the septum between the third and fourth compartments. Ten wrists were exposed through a 4-5 transseptal approach, passing through the extensor retinaculum in the thickness of the septum between the fourth and fifth compartments. The extent of violations of extensor compartments and joint capsule, and the exposed anatomical structures were noted. At the end of each dissection, the whole extensor system was outrightly removed for histological study. The feasibility of the transseptal approaches was demonstrated for all the dissected wrists. The dissection plane beneath the infratendinous retinaculum was macroscopically and microscopically highlighted. The transseptal approaches provide a good exposure to the dorsal side of the wrist joint, without opening the extensor tendon compartments.

  13. Complex Dorsal Metacarpophalangeal Joint Dislocation of Index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complex dorsal metacarpophalangeal dislocation is uncommon. The failure of closed reduction is established. This case report highlights the problem within context of a developing country. The various factors responsible for irreducibilty are reviewed and approaches to surgical treatment discussed in the review of world ...

  14. Midbrain and hindbrain malformations: advances in clinical diagnosis, imaging, and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Dan; Millen, Kathleen J; Barkovich, A James

    2013-04-01

    Historically, the midbrain and hindbrain have been considered of secondary importance to the cerebrum, which has typically been acknowledged as the most important part of the brain. In the past, radiologists and pathologists did not regularly examine these structures-also known as the brainstem and cerebellum-because they are small and difficult to remove without damage. With recent developments in neuroimaging, neuropathology, and neurogenetics, many developmental disorders of the midbrain and hindbrain have emerged as causes of neurodevelopmental dysfunction. These research advances may change the way in which we treat these patients in the future and will enhance the clinical acumen of the practising neurologist and thereby improve the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell Proliferation in the Forebrain and Midbrain of the Adult Bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Andrea Megela; Horowitz, Seth S.; Brown, Rebecca A.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of proliferating cells in the midbrain, thalamus, and telencephalon of adult bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) was examined using immunohistochemistry for the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and DNA dot-blotting. At all time points examined (2 to 28 days post-injection), BrdU-labeled cells were located in ventricular zones at all levels of the neuraxis, but with relatively more label around the telencephalic ventricles. Labeled cells, some showing profiles indicati...

  16. Delta-like 1 participates in the specification of ventral midbrain progenitor derived dopaminergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Matthias; Szulc, Jolanta; Meyer, Morten

    2008-01-01

    function of Dlk1 in VM neuron development, we investigated the effect of soluble Dlk1 protein as well as the intrinsic Dlk1 function in the course of VM progenitor expansion and dopaminergic (DA) neuron differentiation in vitro. Dlk1 treatment during expansion increased DA progenitor proliferation...... in vitro. The study presented here is the first publication identifying Dlk1 effects on ventral midbrain-derived DA precursor differentiation....

  17. Midbrain stimulation-evoked lumbar spinal activity in the adult decerebrate mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecina, Katinka

    2017-08-15

    Genetic techniques rendering murine models a popular choice for neuroscience research has led to important insights on neural networks controlling locomotor function. Using genetically altered mouse models for in vivo, electrophysiological studies in the adult state could validate key principles of locomotor network organization that have been described in neonatal, in vitro preparations. The experimental model presented here describes a decerebrate, in vivo adult mouse preparation in which focal, electrical midbrain stimulation was combined with monitoring lumbar neural activity and motor output after pre-collicular decerebration and neuromuscular blockade. Lumbar cord dorsum potentials (in 9/10 animals) and motoneuron output (in 3/5 animals) including fictive locomotion, was achieved by focal midbrain stimulation. The stimulation electrode locations could be reconstructed (in 6/7 animals) thereby allowing anatomical identification of the stimulated supraspinal regions. This preparation allows for concomitant recording or stimulation in the spinal cord and in the mid/hindbrain of adult mice. It differs from other methods used in the past with adult mice as it does not require pharmacological manipulation of neural excitability in order to generate motor output. Midbrain stimulation can consistently be used for inducing lumbar neural activity in adult mice under neuromuscular blockade. This model is suited for examination of brain-spinal connectivity and it may benefit a wide range of fields depending on the features of the genetically modified mouse models used in combination with the presented methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and pain-related cellular reactions in the spinal cord and midbrain in a rat sciatic nerve injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumizono M

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Sumizono,1,2 Harutoshi Sakakima,1 Shotaro Otsuka,1 Takuto Terashi,1 Kazuki Nakanishi,1,2 Koki Ueda,1,2 Seiya Takada,1,2 Kiyoshi Kikuchi3 1Course of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan; 2Kirishima Orthopedics, Kirishima, Japan; 3Division of Brain Science, Department of Physiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan Background: Exercise regimens are established methods that can relieve neuropathic pain. However, the relationship between frequency and intensity of exercise and multiple cellular responses of exercise-induced alleviation of neuropathic pain is still unclear. We examined the influence of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and the intracellular responses in a sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI model. Materials and methods: Rats were assigned to four groups as follows: CCI and high-frequency exercise (HFE group, CCI and low-frequency exercise (LFE group, CCI and no exercise (No-Ex group, and naive animals (control group. Rats ran on a treadmill, at a speed of 20 m/min, for 30 min, for 5 (HFE or 3 (LFE days a week, for a total of 5 weeks. The 50% withdrawal threshold was evaluated for mechanical sensitivity. The activation of glial cells (microglia and astrocytes, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and μ-opioid receptor in the spinal dorsal horn and endogenous opioid in the midbrain were examined using immunohistochemistry. Opioid receptor antagonists (naloxone were administered using intraperitoneal injection. Results: The development of neuropathic pain was related to the activation of glial cells, increased BDNF expression, and downregulation of the μ-opioid receptor in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. In the No-Ex group, neuropathic pain showed the highest level of mechanical hypersensitivity at 2 weeks, which improved slightly until 5 weeks after CCI. In both exercise groups, the alleviation of

  19. Accelerated forgetting of contextual details due to focal medio-dorsal thalamic lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicong eTu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of thalamic nuclei damage and related white matter tracts on memory performance are still debated. This is particularly evident for the medio-dorsal thalamus which has been less clear in predicting amnesia than anterior thalamus changes. The current study addresses this issue by assessing 7 thalamic stroke patients with consistent unilateral lesions focal to the left medio-dorsal nuclei for immediate and delayed memory performance on standard visual and verbal tests of anterograde memory, and over the long-term (> 24 hrs on an object-location associative memory task. Thalamic patients showed selective impairment to delayed recall, but intact recognition memory. Patients also showed accelerated forgetting of contextual information after a 24 hour delay, compared to controls. Importantly, the mammillothalamic tract was intact in all patients, which suggests a role for the medio-dorsal nuclei in recall and early consolidation memory processes.

  20. Comparative anatomy of the dorsal hump in mature Pacific salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susuki, Kenta; Ban, Masatoshi; Ichimura, Masaki; Kudo, Hideaki

    2017-07-01

    Mature male Pacific salmon (Genus Oncorhynchus) demonstrate prominent morphological changes, such as the development of a dorsal hump. The degree of dorsal hump formation depends on the species in Pacific salmon. It is generally accepted that mature males of sockeye (O. nerka) and pink (O. gorbuscha) salmon develop most pronounced dorsal humps. The internal structure of the dorsal hump in pink salmon has been confirmed in detail. In this study, the dorsal hump morphologies were analyzed in four Pacific salmon species inhabiting Japan, masu (O. masou), sockeye, chum (O. keta), and pink salmon. The internal structure of the dorsal humps also depended on the species; sockeye and pink salmon showed conspicuous development of connective tissue and growth of bone tissues in the dorsal tissues. Masu and chum salmon exhibited less-pronounced increases in connective tissues and bone growth. Hyaluronic acid was clearly detected in dorsal hump connective tissue by histochemistry, except for in masu salmon. The lipid content in dorsal hump connective tissue was richer in masu and chum salmon than in sockeye and pink salmon. These results revealed that the patterns of dorsal hump formation differed among species, and especially sockeye and pink salmon develop pronounced dorsal humps through both increases in the amount of connective tissue and the growth of bone tissues. In contrast, masu and chum salmon develop their dorsal humps by the growth of bone tissues, rather than the development of connective tissue. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Deep dorsal vein arterialisation in vascular impotence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wespes, E; Corbusier, A; Delcour, C; Vandenbosch, G; Struyven, J; Schulman, C C

    1989-11-01

    A series of 12 patients with vasculogenic impotence (4 arterial lesions; 8 arterial and venous lesions) underwent deep dorsal vein arterialisation after pre-operative assessment by a multidisciplinary approach. Cumulative graft patency was 58% (7 of 12 patients) up to 21 months but only 4 patients developed almost normal erections. Digital angiography, with and without the intracavernous injection of papaverine, was performed during follow-up to determine the vascular physiological status. At flaccidity, the corpora cavernosa were never opacified in the absence of a venocorporeal shunt. The penile glans was always visualised. Opacification of the deep dorsal vein and the circumflex system decreased with penile rigidity, resulting from their compression between Buck's fascia and the tunica albuginea. Intracavernous pressure recorded before and after the surgical procedure showed a marked increase when a caverno-venous shunt was performed. Hypervascularisation of the glans occurred in 2 cases. The relevance of this new surgical technique and its functional mechanism are discussed.

  2. Giant cell tumor of dorsal vertebral body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Redhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old female patient presented with complaints of backache, weakness in both lower limbs and bladder/bowel dysfunction. Imaging showed an osteolytic lesion at tenth dorsal (D10 vertebra with anterior compression on the spinal cord. Complete intralesional tumor excision with reconstruction was carried out using the anterolateral extrapleural approach. Histopathological examination was suggestive of giant cell tumor (GCT. Because of complete intralesional tumor excision and fear of post-radiation osteonecrosis of bone used for delayed bony union, a conservative approach was used, and radiation therapy was not given. After one year of follow-up patient is doing well without any recurrence of the tumor and is ambulant with support. GCT of dorsal vertebral body is an uncommon entity and total en bloc excision is difficult. Therefore, the treatment strategy is not well-defined. We discuss in brief about incidence, presentation and various treatment modalities available for spinal GCT.

  3. Attentional functions in dorsal and ventral simultanagnosia.

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    Duncan, John; Bundesen, Claus; Olson, Andrew; Humphreys, Glyn; Ward, Robert; Kyllingsbæk, Søren; van Raamsdonk, Monique; Rorden, Chris; Chavda, Swarup

    2003-12-01

    Whole report of brief letter arrays is used to analyse basic attentional deficits in dorsal and ventral variants of simultanagnosia. Using Bundesen's Theory of Visual Attention (TVA), a number of previous theoretical suggestions are formalised and tested, including primary deficit in processing more than one display element, attentional stickiness, foveal bias, and global weakness of the visual representation. Interestingly, data from two cases, one dorsal and one ventral, show little true deficit in simultaneous perception, or selective deficit in those TVA parameters (short-term memory capacity, attentional weighting) specifically associated with multi-element displays. Instead there is a general reduction in speed of visual processing (processing rate in TVA), effective even for a single display element but compounded when two or more elements compete.

  4. Treatment of right dorsal ulcerative colitis in a horse.

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    Simmons, T R; Gaughan, E M; Ducharme, N G; Dill, S G; King, J M; Anderson, W I

    1990-02-01

    Excessive administration of phenylbutazone was associated with development of right dorsal ulcerative colitis. The clinical signs of right dorsal colitis include chronic colic and weight loss. The laboratory abnormalities include panhypoproteinemia and a high WBC count in the abdominal fluid. Medical management of the chronic colic and protein-losing enteropathy associated with the ulcerative lesions in the right dorsal colon and surgical bypass of the right dorsal colon did not result in long-term resolution of clinical signs. Resection of the ulcerated right dorsal colon through a right lateral approach at the 16th rib resulted in resolution of intestinal protein loss and colic. The results of this case suggest that surgical resection of the ulcerated right dorsal colon may be the recommended treatment for right dorsal ulcerative colitis.

  5. Dorsal periaqueductal gray stimulation facilitates anxiety-, but not panic-related, defensive responses in rats tested in the elevated T-maze

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    Camplesi, M. Jr. [Instituto de Patologia Tropical e Saúde Pública, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Bortoli, V.C. de [Departamento de Ciências da Saúde, Centro Universitário Norte do Espírito Santo, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, São Mateus, ES (Brazil); Paula Soares, V. de [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Centro de Biociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Nogueira, R.L. [Laboratório de Psicologia Comparada, Universidade Estácio de Sá, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zangrossi, H. Jr. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-03

    The escape response to electrical or chemical stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG) has been associated with panic attacks. In order to explore the validity of the DPAG stimulation model for the study of panic disorder, we determined if the aversive consequences of the electrical or chemical stimulation of this midbrain area can be detected subsequently in the elevated T-maze. This animal model, derived from the elevated plus-maze, permits the measurement in the same rat of a generalized anxiety- and a panic-related defensive response, i.e., inhibitory avoidance and escape, respectively. Facilitation of inhibitory avoidance, suggesting an anxiogenic effect, was detected in male Wistar rats (200-220 g) tested in the elevated T-maze 30 min after DPAG electrical stimulation (current generated by a sine-wave stimulator, frequency at 60 Hz) or after local microinjection of the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonist bicuculline (5 pmol). Previous electrical (5, 15, 30 min, or 24 h before testing) or chemical stimulation of this midbrain area did not affect escape performance in the elevated T-maze or locomotion in an open-field. No change in the two behavioral tasks measured by the elevated T-maze was observed after repetitive (3 trials) electrical stimulation of the DPAG. The results indicate that activation of the DPAG caused a short-lived, but selective, increase in defensive behaviors associated with generalized anxiety.

  6. Functional Plasticity after Unilateral Vestibular Midbrain Infarction in Human Positron Emission Tomography.

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    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Baier, Bernhard; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Bartenstein, Peter; Zwergal, Andreas; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to uncover mechanisms of central compensation of vestibular function at brainstem, cerebellar, and cortical levels in patients with acute unilateral midbrain infarctions presenting with an acute vestibular tone imbalance. Eight out of 17 patients with unilateral midbrain infarctions were selected on the basis of signs of a vestibular tone imbalance, e.g., graviceptive (tilts of perceived verticality) and oculomotor dysfunction (skew deviation, ocular torsion) in F18-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET at two time points: A) in the acute stage, and B) after recovery 6 months later. Lesion-behavior mapping analyses with MRI verified the exact structural lesion sites. Group subtraction analyses and comparisons with healthy controls were performed with Statistic Parametric Mapping for the PET data. A comparison of PET A of acute-stage patients with that of healthy controls showed increases in glucose metabolism in the cerebellum, motion-sensitive visual cortex areas, and inferior temporal lobe, but none in vestibular cortex areas. At the supratentorial level bilateral signal decreases dominated in the thalamus, frontal eye fields, and anterior cingulum. These decreases persisted after clinical recovery in contrast to the increases. The transient activations can be attributed to ocular motor and postural recovery (cerebellum) and sensory substitution of vestibular function for motion perception (visual cortex). The persisting deactivation in the thalamic nuclei and frontal eye fields allows alternative functional interpretations of the thalamic nuclei: either a disconnection of ascending sensory input occurs or there is a functional mismatch between expected and actual vestibular activity. Our data support the view that both thalami operate separately for each hemisphere but receive vestibular input from ipsilateral and contralateral midbrain integration centers. Normally they have gatekeeper functions for multisensory input to the cortex and automatic

  7. Striatal and midbrain connectivity with the hippocampus selectively boosts memory for contextual novelty.

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    Kafkas, Alexandros; Montaldi, Daniela

    2015-11-01

    The role of contextual expectation in processing familiar and novel stimuli was investigated in a series of experiments combining eye tracking, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and behavioral methods. An experimental paradigm emphasizing either familiarity or novelty detection at retrieval was used. The detection of unexpected familiar and novel stimuli, which were characterized by lower probability, engaged activity in midbrain and striatal structures. Specifically, detecting unexpected novel stimuli, relative to expected novel stimuli, produced greater activity in the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA), whereas the detection of unexpected familiar, relative to expected, familiar stimuli, elicited activity in the striatum/globus pallidus (GP). An effective connectivity analysis showed greater functional coupling between these two seed areas (GP and SN/VTA) and the hippocampus, for unexpected than for expected stimuli. Within this network of midbrain/striatal-hippocampal interactions two pathways are apparent; the direct SN-hippocampal pathway sensitive to unexpected novelty and the perirhinal-GP-hippocampal pathway sensitive to unexpected familiarity. In addition, increased eye fixations and pupil dilations also accompanied the detection of unexpected relative to expected familiar and novel stimuli, reflecting autonomic activity triggered by the functioning of these two pathways. Finally, subsequent memory for unexpected, relative to expected, familiar, and novel stimuli was characterized by enhanced recollection, but not familiarity, accuracy. Taken together, these findings suggest that a hippocampal-midbrain network, characterized by two distinct pathways, mediates encoding facilitation and most critically, that this facilitation is driven by contextual novelty, rather than by the absolute novelty of a stimulus. This contextually sensitive neural mechanism appears to elicit increased exploratory behavior, leading subsequently to greater

  8. Primary cilia are critical for Sonic hedgehog-mediated dopaminergic neurogenesis in the embryonic midbrain.

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    Gazea, Mary; Tasouri, Evangelia; Tolve, Marianna; Bosch, Viktoria; Kabanova, Anna; Gojak, Christian; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Novikov, Orna; Spatz, Joachim; Pereira, Gislene; Hübner, Wolfgang; Brodski, Claude; Tucker, Kerry L; Blaess, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons modulate various motor and cognitive functions, and their dysfunction or degeneration has been implicated in several psychiatric diseases. Both Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt signaling pathways have been shown to be essential for normal development of mDA neurons. Primary cilia are critical for the development of a number of structures in the brain by serving as a hub for essential developmental signaling cascades, but their role in the generation of mDA neurons has not been examined. We analyzed mutant mouse lines deficient in the intraflagellar transport protein IFT88, which is critical for primary cilia function. Conditional inactivation of Ift88 in the midbrain after E9.0 results in progressive loss of primary cilia, a decreased size of the mDA progenitor domain, and a reduction in mDA neurons. We identified Shh signaling as the primary cause of these defects, since conditional inactivation of the Shh signaling pathway after E9.0, through genetic ablation of Gli2 and Gli3 in the midbrain, results in a phenotype basically identical to the one seen in Ift88 conditional mutants. Moreover, the expansion of the mDA progenitor domain observed when Shh signaling is constitutively activated does not occur in absence of Ift88. In contrast, clusters of Shh-responding progenitors are maintained in the ventral midbrain of the hypomorphic Ift88 mouse mutant, cobblestone. Despite the residual Shh signaling, the integrity of the mDA progenitor domain is severely disturbed, and consequently very few mDA neurons are generated in cobblestone mutants. Our results identify for the first time a crucial role of primary cilia in the induction of mDA progenitors, define a narrow time window in which Shh-mediated signaling is dependent upon normal primary cilia function for this purpose, and suggest that later Wnt signaling-dependent events act independently of primary cilia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cambio estacional en la coloración dorsal de la lagartija Aspidoscelis costata costata (Squamata: Teiidae Seasonal changes in the dorsal coloration in the lizard Aspidoscelis costata costata (Squamata: Teiidae

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    Oswaldo Hernández-Gallegos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available En lagartijas la coloración corporal es importanteen la comunicación así como en la protección contra los depredadores. Con el uso de una guía Pantone®, se analizó el cambio estacional en la coloración dorsal y los microhábitats de Aspidoscelis costata costata, una lagartija de amplio forrajeo que habita un ambiente (en el Estado de México, México que cambia drásticamente de apariencia entre sequía y lluvias. Se analizó la dependencia de la coloración dorsal de acuerdo a la estación, sexo y estadio de desarrollo. Los resultados indican que la lagartija A. costata costata presenta una coloración dorsal similar al sustrato en cada estación: parda en sequía y principalmente verde en lluvias. Este estudio sugiere: 1 Que la variación en coloración dorsal con funciones crípticas, como la registrada en A. costata costata, puede resultar importante en la supervivencia de especies de amplio forrajeo; 2 Que el cambio en la coloración dorsal en A. costata costata es a nivel individual, ya que un individuo presente en ambas estaciones manifiesta una coloración dorsal parda en la estación de sequía y una coloración dorsal verde en la estación de lluvias y 3 Que la coloración dorsal, con funciones crípticas, está subestimada en especies de amplio forrajeo.Seasonal changes in the dorsal coloration in the lizard Aspidoscelis costata costata (Squamata: Teiidae. Color and color patterns in animals are important characteristics that bring protection, by dampening the ability of predators that depend on their sight to detect their preys. In lizards, the dorsal coloration plays a key role in communication of intraspecific signals such as social cues. In this study, we evaluated the seasonal changes in the dorsal coloration of the wide foraging lizard A. costata costata, in Tonatico, State of Mexico, Mexico. The seasonal evaluation included: the rainy season from mid June to mid September (can also include the end of May to early

  10. Plasticity of Auditory Medullary-Midbrain Connectivity across Metamorphic Development in the Bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana

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    Horowitz, Seth S.; Chapman, Judith A.; Simmons, Andrea Megela

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of patterns of anterograde, retrograde, and bi-directional transport of tracers from both the superior olivary nucleus (SON) and the torus semicircularis (TS), we report anatomical changes in brainstem connectivity across metamorphic development in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. In early and late stages of larval development (Gosner stages 25–37), anterograde or bi-directional tracers injected into the SON produce terminal/fiber label in the contralateral SON and in the ipsilateral TS. Between stages 38–41 (deaf period), only sparse or no terminal/fiber label is visible in these target nuclei. During metamorphic climax (stages 42–46), terminal/fiber label reappears in both the contralateral SON and in the ipsilateral TS, and now also in the contralateral TS. Injections of retrograde tracers into the SON fail to label cell bodies in the ipsilateral TS in deaf period animals, mirroring the previously-reported failure of retrograde transport from the TS to the ipsilateral SON during this developmental time. Bilateral cell body label emerges in the dorsal medullary nucleus and the lateral vestibular nucleus bilaterally as a result of SON transport during the late larval period, while cell body label in the contralateral TS emerges during climax. At all larval stages, injections into the SON produce anterograde and retrograde label in the medial vestibular nucleus bilaterally. These data show anatomical stability in some pathways and plasticity in others during larval development, with the most dramatic changes occurring during the deaf period and metamorphic climax. Animals in metamorphic climax show patterns of connectivity similar to that of froglets and adults, indicating the maturation during climax of central anatomical substrates for hearing in air. PMID:16912473

  11. Expressions of ECE-CYC2 clade genes relating to abortion of both dorsal and ventral stamens in Opithandra (Gesneriaceae

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    Wang Yin-Zheng

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ECE-CYC2 clade genes known in patterning floral dorsoventral asymmetry (zygomorphy in Antirrhinum majus are conserved in the dorsal identity function including arresting the dorsal stamen. However, it remains uncertain whether the same mechanism underlies abortion of the ventral stamens, an important morphological trait related to evolution and diversification of zygomorphy in Lamiales sensu lato, a major clade of predominantly zygomorphically flowered angiosperms. Opithandra (Gesneriaceae is of particular interests in addressing this question as it is in the base of Lamiales s.l., an early representative of this type zygomorphy. Results We investigated the expression patterns of four ECE-CYC2 clade genes and two putative target cyclinD3 genes in Opithandra using RNA in situ hybridization and RT-PCR. OpdCYC gene expressions were correlated with abortion of both dorsal and ventral stamens in Opithandra, strengthened by the negatively correlated expression of their putative target OpdcyclinD3 genes. The complement of OpdcyclinD3 to OpdCYC expressions further indicated that OpdCYC expressions were related to the dorsal and ventral stamen abortion through negative effects on OpdcyclinD3 genes. Conclusion These results suggest that ECE-CYC2 clade TCP genes are not only functionally conserved in the dorsal stamen repression, but also involved in arresting ventral stamens, a genetic mechanism underlying the establishment of zygomorphy with abortion of both the dorsal and ventral stamens evolved in angiosperms, especially within Lamiales s.l.

  12. Plasticity of the Dorsal “Spatial” Stream in Visually Deprived Individuals

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    Giulia Dormal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on visually deprived individuals provide one of the most striking demonstrations that the brain is highly plastic and is able to rewire as a function of the sensory input it receives from the environment. In the current paper, we focus on spatial abilities that are typically related to the dorsal visual pathway (i.e., spatial/motion processing. Bringing together evidence from cataract-reversal individuals, early- and late-blind individuals and sight-recovery cases of long-standing blindness, we suggest that the dorsal “spatial” pathway is mostly plastic early in life and is then more resistant to subsequent experience once it is set, highlighting some limits of neuroplasticity.

  13. PROJECTIONS OF DORSAL AND MEDIAN RAPHE NUCLEI TO DORSAL AND VENTRAL STRIATUM

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    G. R. Hassanzadeh G. Behzadi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The ascending serotonergic projections are derived mainly from mesencephalic raphe nuclei. Topographical projections from mesencephalic raphe nuclei to the striatum were examined in the rat by the retrograde transport technique of HRP (horseradish peroxidase. In 29 rats stereotaxically injection of HRP enzyme were performed in dorsal and ventral parts of striatum separately. The extent of the injection sites and distribution of retrogradely labeled neuronal cell bodies were drawed on representative sections using a projection microscope. Following ipsilateral injection of HRP into the dorsal striatum, numerous labeled neurons were seen in rostral portion of dorsal raphe (DR nucleus. In the same level the cluster of labeled neurons were hevier through caudal parts of DR. A few neurons were also located in lateral wing of DR. More caudally some labeled neurons were found in lateral, medial line of DR. In median raphe nucleus (MnR the labeled neurons were scattered only in median portion of this nucleus. The ipsilateral injection of HRP into the ventral region of striatum resulted on labeling of numerous neurons in rostral, caudal and lateral portions of DR. Through the caudal extension of DR on 4th ventricle level, a large number of labeled neurons were distributed along the ventrocaudal parts of DR. In MnR, labeled neurons were observed only in median part of this nucleus. These findings suggest the mesencephalic raphe nuclei projections to caudo-putamen are topographically organized. In addition dorsal and median raphe nuclei have a stronger projection to the ventral striatum.

  14. Influence of oxygen tension on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal stem cells of midbrain and forebrain origin.

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    Christina Krabbe

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease (PD, but protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation are not yet available. Here we investigated the influence of oxygen on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal NSCs derived from the midbrain and forebrain. Cells were differentiated for 10 days in vitro at low, physiological (3% versus high, atmospheric (20% oxygen tension. Low oxygen resulted in upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and increased the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir cells in both types of cultures (midbrain: 9.1 ± 0.5 and 17.1 ± 0.4 (P<0.001; forebrain: 1.9 ± 0.4 and 3.9 ± 0.6 (P<0.01 percent of total cells. Regardless of oxygen levels, the content of TH-ir cells with mature neuronal morphologies was higher for midbrain as compared to forebrain cultures. Proliferative Ki67-ir cells were found in both types of cultures, but the relative proportion of these cells was significantly higher for forebrain NSCs cultured at low, as compared to high, oxygen tension. No such difference was detected for midbrain-derived cells. Western blot analysis revealed that low oxygen enhanced β-tubulin III and GFAP expression in both cultures. Up-regulation of β-tubulin III was most pronounced for midbrain cells, whereas GFAP expression was higher in forebrain as compared to midbrain cells. NSCs from both brain regions displayed less cell death when cultured at low oxygen tension. Following mictrotransplantation into mouse striatal slice cultures predifferentiated midbrain NSCs were found to proliferate and differentiate into substantial numbers of TH-ir neurons with mature neuronal morphologies, particularly at low oxygen. In contrast, predifferentiated forebrain NSCs microtransplanted using identical conditions displayed little proliferation and contained few TH-ir cells, all of which had an immature appearance. Our data may reflect

  15. White noise improves learning by modulating activity in dopaminergic midbrain regions and right superior temporal sulcus.

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    Rausch, Vanessa H; Bauch, Eva M; Bunzeck, Nico

    2014-07-01

    In neural systems, information processing can be facilitated by adding an optimal level of white noise. Although this phenomenon, the so-called stochastic resonance, has traditionally been linked with perception, recent evidence indicates that white noise may also exert positive effects on cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. The underlying neural mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Here, on the basis of recent theories, we tested the hypothesis that auditory white noise, when presented during the encoding of scene images, enhances subsequent recognition memory performance and modulates activity within the dopaminergic midbrain (i.e., substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area, SN/VTA). Indeed, in a behavioral experiment, we can show in healthy humans that auditory white noise-but not control sounds, such as a sinus tone-slightly improves recognition memory. In an fMRI experiment, white noise selectively enhances stimulus-driven phasic activity in the SN/VTA and auditory cortex. Moreover, it induces stronger connectivity between SN/VTA and right STS, which, in addition, exhibited a positive correlation with subsequent memory improvement by white noise. Our results suggest that the beneficial effects of auditory white noise on learning depend on dopaminergic neuromodulation and enhanced connectivity between midbrain regions and the STS-a key player in attention modulation. Moreover, they indicate that white noise could be particularly useful to facilitate learning in conditions where changes of the mesolimbic system are causally related to memory deficits including healthy and pathological aging.

  16. Elevated midbrain serotonin transporter availability in mixed mania: a case report

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    Kuikka Jyrki

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results obtained from brain imaging studies indicate that serotonin transporter (SERT and dopamine transporter (DAT densities are altered in major depression. However, no such studies have been published on current mania or hypomania. Case presentation In this single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT study with [123I]nor-β-CIT we present a case with simultaneous symptoms of major depression and hypomania. She had an elevated serotonin transporter availability (SERT in the midbrain and elevated dopamine transporter availability (DAT in the striatum, which normalised in a one-year follow-up period during which she received eight months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report on SERT and DAT associated with mania. In our case the availability of both SERT in the midbrain and DAT in the striatum were elevated at baseline and declined during psychotherapy, while the SERT and DAT of the depressed controls increased during psychotherapy. Symptoms of hypomania in the case were alleviated during psychotherapy. Clinical recovery was also reflected in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS scores.

  17. Niche-derived laminin-511 promotes midbrain dopaminergic neuron survival and differentiation through YAP.

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    Zhang, Dawei; Yang, Shanzheng; Toledo, Enrique M; Gyllborg, Daniel; Saltó, Carmen; Carlos Villaescusa, J; Arenas, Ernest

    2017-08-22

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain (mDA neurons) causes progressive loss of motor control and function. Using embryonic and mDA neurons, midbrain tissue from mice, and differentiated human neural stem cells, we investigated the mechanisms controlling the survival of mDA neurons. We found that the extracellular matrix protein laminin-511 (LM511) promoted the survival and differentiation of mDA neurons. LM511 bound to integrin α3β1 and activated the transcriptional cofactor YAP. LM511-YAP signaling enhanced cell survival by inducing the expression of the microRNA miR-130a, which suppressed the synthesis of the cell death-associated protein PTEN. In addition, LM511-YAP signaling increased the expression of transcription factors critical for mDA identity, such as LMX1A and PITX3, and prevented the loss of mDA neurons in response to oxidative stress, a finding that warrants further investigation to assess therapeutic potential for PD patients. We propose that by enhancing LM511-YAP signaling, it may be possible to prevent mDA neuron degeneration in PD or enhance the survival of mDA neurons in cell replacement therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  18. Diversity of bilateral synaptic assemblies for binaural computation in midbrain single neurons.

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    He, Na; Kong, Lingzhi; Lin, Tao; Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xiuping; Qi, Jiyao; Yan, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Binaural hearing confers many beneficial functions but our understanding of its underlying neural substrates is limited. This study examines the bilateral synaptic assemblies and binaural computation (or integration) in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICc) of the auditory midbrain, a key convergent center. Using in-vivo whole-cell patch-clamp, the excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs/IPSPs) of single ICc neurons to contralateral, ipsilateral and bilateral stimulation were recorded. According to the contralateral and ipsilateral EPSP/IPSP, 7 types of bilateral synaptic assemblies were identified. These include EPSP-EPSP (EE), E-IPSP (EI), E-no response (EO), II, IE, IO and complex-mode (CM) neurons. The CM neurons showed frequency- and/or amplitude-dependent EPSPs/IPSPs to contralateral or ipsilateral stimulation. Bilateral stimulation induced EPSPs/IPSPs that could be larger than (facilitation), similar to (ineffectiveness) or smaller than (suppression) those induced by contralateral stimulation. Our findings have allowed our group to characterize novel neural circuitry for binaural computation in the midbrain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Activin A protects midbrain neurons in the 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Sandy Stayte

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and a subsequent loss of dopamine (DA within the striatum. Despite advances in the development of pharmacological therapies that are effective at alleviating the symptoms of PD, the search for therapeutic treatments that halt or slow the underlying nigral degeneration remains a particular challenge. Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, has been shown to play a role in the neuroprotection of midbrain neurons against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA in vitro, suggesting that activin A may offer similar neuroprotective effects in in vivo models of PD. Using robust stereological methods, we found that intrastriatal injections of 6-OHDA results in a significant loss of both TH positive and NeuN positive populations in the SNpc at 1, 2, and 3 weeks post-lesioning in drug naïve mice. Exogenous application of activin A for 7 days, beginning the day prior to 6-OHDA administration, resulted in a significant survival of both dopaminergic and total neuron numbers in the SNpc against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity. However, we found no corresponding protection of striatal DA or dopamine transporter (DAT expression levels in animals receiving activin A compared to vehicle controls. These results provide the first evidence that activin A exerts potent neuroprotection in a mouse model of PD, however this neuroprotection may be localized to the midbrain.

  20. Direct lineage reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts to functional midbrain dopaminergic neuronal progenitors

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    Han-Seop Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The direct lineage reprogramming of somatic cells to other lineages by defined factors has led to innovative cell-fate-change approaches for providing patient-specific cells. Recent reports have demonstrated that four pluripotency factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc are sufficient to directly reprogram fibroblasts to other specific cells, including induced neural stem cells (iNSCs. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into midbrain dopaminergic neuronal progenitors (DPs by temporal expression of the pluripotency factors and environment containing sonic hedgehog and fibroblast growth factor 8. Within thirteen days, self-renewing and functional induced DPs (iDPs were generated. Interestingly, the inhibition of both Jak and Gsk3β notably enhanced the iDP reprogramming efficiency. We confirmed the functionality of the iDPs by showing that the dopaminergic neurons generated from iDPs express midbrain markers, release dopamine, and show typical electrophysiological profiles. Our results demonstrate that the pluripotency factors-mediated direct reprogramming is an invaluable strategy for supplying functional and proliferating iDPs and may be useful for other neural progenitors required for disease modeling and cell therapies for neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Electrosensory Midbrain Neurons Display Feature Invariant Responses to Natural Communication Stimuli.

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    Tristan Aumentado-Armstrong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurons that respond selectively but in an invariant manner to a given feature of natural stimuli have been observed across species and systems. Such responses emerge in higher brain areas, thereby suggesting that they occur by integrating afferent input. However, the mechanisms by which such integration occurs are poorly understood. Here we show that midbrain electrosensory neurons can respond selectively and in an invariant manner to heterogeneity in behaviorally relevant stimulus waveforms. Such invariant responses were not seen in hindbrain electrosensory neurons providing afferent input to these midbrain neurons, suggesting that response invariance results from nonlinear integration of such input. To test this hypothesis, we built a model based on the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism that received realistic afferent input. We found that multiple combinations of parameter values could give rise to invariant responses matching those seen experimentally. Our model thus shows that there are multiple solutions towards achieving invariant responses and reveals how subthreshold membrane conductances help promote robust and invariant firing in response to heterogeneous stimulus waveforms associated with behaviorally relevant stimuli. We discuss the implications of our findings for the electrosensory and other systems.

  2. Isolated dorsal dislocation of the tarsal naviculum.

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    Hamdi, Kaziz; Hazem, Ben Ghozlen; Yadh, Zitoun; Faouzi, Abid

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dislocation of the tarsal naviculum is an unusual injury, scarcely reported in the literature. The naviculum is surrounded by the rigid bony and ligamentous support hence fracture dislocation is more common than isolated dislocation. The mechanism and treatment options remain unclear. In this case report, we describe a 31 year old man who sustained an isolated dorsal dislocation of the left tarsal naviculum, without fracture, when he was involved in a motor vehicle collision. The reported mechanism of the dislocation is a hyper plantar flexion force applied to the midfoot, resulting in a transient disruption of the ligamentous support of the naviculum bone, with dorsal displacement of the bone. The patient was treated with open reduction and Krischner-wire fixation of the navicular after the failure of closed reduction. The wires were removed after 6 weeks postoperatively. Physiotherapy for stiffness and midfoot pain was recommended for 2 months. At 6 months postoperatively, limping, midfoot pain and weakness were reported, no X-ray abnormalities were found. The patient returned to his obvious activities with a normal range of motion.

  3. Isolated dorsal dislocation of the tarsal naviculum

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    Kaziz Hamdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated dislocation of the tarsal naviculum is an unusual injury, scarcely reported in the literature. The naviculum is surrounded by the rigid bony and ligamentous support hence fracture dislocation is more common than isolated dislocation. The mechanism and treatment options remain unclear. In this case report, we describe a 31 year old man who sustained an isolated dorsal dislocation of the left tarsal naviculum, without fracture, when he was involved in a motor vehicle collision. The reported mechanism of the dislocation is a hyper plantar flexion force applied to the midfoot, resulting in a transient disruption of the ligamentous support of the naviculum bone, with dorsal displacement of the bone. The patient was treated with open reduction and Krischner-wire fixation of the navicular after the failure of closed reduction. The wires were removed after 6 weeks postoperatively. Physiotherapy for stiffness and midfoot pain was recommended for 2 months. At 6 months postoperatively, limping, midfoot pain and weakness were reported, no X-ray abnormalities were found. The patient returned to his obvious activities with a normal range of motion.

  4. Relationship of vegetal cortical dorsal factors in the Xenopus egg with the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marikawa, Y; Elinson, R P

    1999-12-01

    In Xenopus, the dorsal factor in the vegetal cortical cytoplasm (VCC) of the egg is responsible for axis formation of the embryo. Previous studies have shown that VCC dorsal factor has properties similar to activators of the Wnt/beta-catenin-signaling pathway. In this study, we examined the relationship of the VCC dorsal factor with components of the pathway. First, we tested whether beta-catenin protein, which is known to be localized on the dorsal side of early embryos, accounts for the dorsal axis activity of VCC. Reduction of beta-catenin mRNA and protein in oocytes did not diminish the activity of VCC to induce a secondary axis in recipient embryos. The amount of beta-catenin protein was not enriched in VCC compared to animal cortical cytoplasm, which has no dorsal axis activity. These results indicate that beta-catenin is unlikely to be the VCC dorsal axis factor. Secondly, we examined the effects of four Wnt-pathway-interfering constructs (dominant-negative Xdsh, XGSK3, Axin, and dominant-negative XTcf3) on the ability of VCC to induce expression of the early Wnt target genes, Siamois and Xnr3. The activity of VCC was inhibited by Axin and dominant negative XTcf3 but not by dominant negative Xdsh or XGSK3. We also showed that VCC decreased neither the amount nor the activity of exogenous XGSK3, suggesting that the VCC dorsal factor does not act by affecting XGSK3 directly. Finally, we tested six Wnt-pathway activating constructs (Xwnt8, Xdsh, dominant negative XGSK3, dominant negative Axin, XAPC and beta-catenin) for their responses to the four Wnt-pathway-interfering constructs. We found that only XAPC exhibited the same responses as VCC; it was inhibited by Axin and dominant negative XTcf3 but not by dominant negative Xdsh or XGSK3. Although the connection between XAPC and the VCC dorsal factor is not yet clear, the fact that APC binds Axin suggests that the VCC dorsal factor could act on Axin rather than XGSK3.

  5. Quantitative assessment of iron deposition in the midbrain using 3D-enhanced T2 star weighted angiography (ESWAN): a preliminary cross-sectional study of 20 Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ci; Fan, Guoguang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Shanshan

    2013-09-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assesses neurodegenerative structural changes in the cerebral anatomy of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients but cannot detect non-structural abnormalities; however, enhanced T2 star weighted angiography (ESWAN) can precisely indicate PD-related substantia nigra (SN) iron deposition. The differences in ESWAN-based parameters between different PD stages were assessed using midbrain iron deposits of 20 PD patients aged 64.3±12.7 (41-85) years grouped by Hoehn and Yahr staging into minimal (stages ≤2.5) or moderate to severe (stages ≥3.0) motor impairment groups and 14 healthy control subjects. Conventional MRI and ESWAN measurements of mean phase value (MPV) and midbrain dimensions (width and diameter) revealed similar anatomical characteristics; however, ESWAN revealed the presence of smaller MPVs and SN pars compacta (SNc) (P0.05). ESWAN allows for early and accurate iron deposition determination in PD patients, particularly useful as a supplement to conventional MRI in early-stage PD patients. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential expression of CaMK-II genes during early zebrafish embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Sarah C; Lister, James A; Tombes, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    CaMK-II is a highly conserved Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expressed throughout the lifespan of all vertebrates. During early development, CaMK-II regulates cell cycle progression and "non-canonical" Wnt-dependent convergent extension. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, CaMK-II activity rises within 2 hr after fertilization. At the time of somite formation, zygotic expression from six genes (camk2a1, camk2b1, camk2g1, camk2g2, camk2d1, camk2d2) results in a second phase of increased activity. Zebrafish CaMK-II genes are 92-95% identical to their human counterparts in the non-variable regions. During the first three days of development, alternative splicing yields at least 20 splice variants, many of which are unique. Whole-mount in situ hybridization reveals that camk2g1 comprises the majority of maternal expression. All six genes are expressed strongly in ventral regions at the 18-somite stage. Later, camk2a1 is expressed in anterior somites, heart, and then forebrain. Camk2b1 is expressed in somites, mid- and forebrain, gut, retina, and pectoral fins. Camk2g1 appears strongly along the midline and then in brain, gut, and pectoral fins. Camk2g2 is expressed early in the midbrain and trunk and exhibits the earliest retinal expression. Camk2d1 is elevated early at somite boundaries, then epidermal tissue, while camk2d2 is expressed in discrete anterior locations, steadily increasing along either side of the dorsal midline and then throughout the brain, including the retina. These findings reveal a complex pattern of CaMK-II gene expression consistent with pleiotropic roles during development.

  7. TNF superfamily member APRIL enhances midbrain dopaminergic axon growth and contributes to the nigrostriatal projection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Thomas G; Howard, Laura; Wyatt, Sean; Davies, Alun M

    2017-12-01

    We have studied the role of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily member APRIL in the development of embryonic mouse midbrain dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo. In culture, soluble APRIL enhanced axon growth during a window of development between E12 and E14 when nigrostriatal axons are growing to their targets in the striatum in vivo. April transcripts were detected in both the striatum and midbrain during this period and at later stages. The axon growth-enhancing effect of APRIL was similar to that of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), but in contrast to GDNF, APRIL did not promote the survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The effect of APRIL on axon growth was prevented by function-blocking antibodies to one of its receptors, BCMA (TNFRSF13A), but not by function-blocking antibodies to the other APRIL receptor, TACI (TNFRSF13B), suggesting that the effects of APRIL on axon growth are mediated by BCMA. In vivo, there was a significant reduction in the density of midbrain dopaminergic projections to the striatum in April-/- embryos compared with wild type littermates at E14. These findings demonstrate that APRIL is a physiologically relevant factor for the nigrostriatal projection. Given the importance of the degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal connections in the pathogenesis and progression of Parkinson's disease, our findings contribute to our understanding of the factors that establish nigrostriatal integrity. Copyright © 2017 Cardiff University. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stimulation of the midbrain periaqueductal gray modulates preinspiratory neurons in the ventrolateral medulla in the rat in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Holstege, Gert

    2013-01-01

    The midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) is involved in many basic survival behaviors that affect respiration. We hypothesized that the PAG promotes these behaviors by changing the firing of preinspiratory (pre-I) neurons in the pre-Botzinger complex, a cell group thought to be important in generating

  9. Microstructure of the Midbrain and Cervical Spinal Cord in Idiopathic Restless Legs Syndrome: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Klaas; Müller, Hans-Peter; Ludolph, Albert C; Hornyak, Magdolna; Kassubek, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows the study of white matter microstructure in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to examine the DTI metrics of the cervical spinal cord and the brainstem up to the midbrain in patients with idiopathic restless legs (RLS) compared to matched healthy controls. DTI analysis of the cervical spinal cord and the brainstem up into the midbrain was performed in 25 patients with idiopathic RLS and 25 matched healthy controls. Data analysis in the brain was performed by voxelwise comparison of fractional anisotropy (FA) maps at group level. Cervical spinal cord data analysis was performed by slicewise analysis of averaged FA values in axial slices along the spinal cord. Voxelwise comparison of FA maps in the brainstem showed significant microstructural alterations in two clusters in the midbrain bilaterally. Slicewise comparison of the FA maps in the cervical spinal cord showed a trend for lower FA values at the level of the second and third vertebra area in the patient sample. The imaging data suggest that significant alterations in the midbrain in RLS can be visualized by DTI and might correlate to a macroscopically subtle process with changes of the tissue microstructure in the corresponding tracts. An additional area of interest is regionally clustered in the upper cervical spinal cord with a tendency toward altered diffusion metrics. These results might be addressed by further studies, e.g., at higher magnetic field strengths. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Dopamine Modulates Adaptive Prediction Error Coding in the Human Midbrain and Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederen, Kelly M J; Ziauddeen, Hisham; Vestergaard, Martin D; Spencer, Tom; Schultz, Wolfram; Fletcher, Paul C

    2017-02-15

    Learning to optimally predict rewards requires agents to account for fluctuations in reward value. Recent work suggests that individuals can efficiently learn about variable rewards through adaptation of the learning rate, and coding of prediction errors relative to reward variability. Such adaptive coding has been linked to midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates, and evidence in support for a similar role of the dopaminergic system in humans is emerging from fMRI data. Here, we sought to investigate the effect of dopaminergic perturbations on adaptive prediction error coding in humans, using a between-subject, placebo-controlled pharmacological fMRI study with a dopaminergic agonist (bromocriptine) and antagonist (sulpiride). Participants performed a previously validated task in which they predicted the magnitude of upcoming rewards drawn from distributions with varying SDs. After each prediction, participants received a reward, yielding trial-by-trial prediction errors. Under placebo, we replicated previous observations of adaptive coding in the midbrain and ventral striatum. Treatment with sulpiride attenuated adaptive coding in both midbrain and ventral striatum, and was associated with a decrease in performance, whereas bromocriptine did not have a significant impact. Although we observed no differential effect of SD on performance between the groups, computational modeling suggested decreased behavioral adaptation in the sulpiride group. These results suggest that normal dopaminergic function is critical for adaptive prediction error coding, a key property of the brain thought to facilitate efficient learning in variable environments. Crucially, these results also offer potential insights for understanding the impact of disrupted dopamine function in mental illness.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To choose optimally, we have to learn what to expect. Humans dampen learning when there is a great deal of variability in reward outcome, and two brain regions that

  11. Morphology and histology of dorsal spines of the xenacanthid shark Orthacanthus platypternus from the Lower Permian of Texas, USA: palaeobiological and palaeoenvironmental implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly G. Beck; Rodrigo Soler-Gijón; Jesse R. Carlucci; Willis, Ray E.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed studies on Carboniferous species of the xenacanth Orthacanthus have shown that the xenacanth dorsal fin spine can be used for skeletochronological analyses and provides valuable information about development, growth and environmental life conditions of those extinct sharks. We report here for the first time the histology and skeletochronology of Permian specimens, dorsal spines of Orthacanthus platypternus from the Craddock Bone Bed (lower Clear Fork Formation; Early Permian, Leonard...

  12. Lumbosacral Dorsal Rhizotomy for Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pron, Gaylene; Chan, Brian; Tu, Hong Anh; Xie, Xuanqian; Weir, Mark; Wells, David; Higgins, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy, a spectrum of neuromuscular conditions caused by abnormal brain development or early damage to the brain, is the most common cause of childhood physical disability. Lumbosacral dorsal rhizotomy is a neurosurgical procedure that permanently decreases spasticity and is always followed by physical therapy. The objectives of this health technology assessment were to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, safety, cost effectiveness, and family perspectives of dorsal rhizotomy. Methods We performed a systematic literature search until December 2015 with auto-alerts until December 2016. Search strategies were developed by medical librarians, and a single reviewer reviewed the abstracts. The health technology assessment included a clinical review based on functional outcomes, safety, and treatment satisfaction; an economic study reviewing cost-effective literature; a budget impact analysis; and interviews with families evaluating the intervention. Results Eighty-four studies (1 meta-analysis, 5 randomized controlled studies [RCTs], 75 observational pre-post studies, and 3 case reports) were reviewed. A meta-analysis of RCTs involving dorsal rhizotomy and physical therapy versus physical therapy confirmed reduced lower-limb spasticity and increased gross motor function (4.5%, P = .002). Observational studies reported statistically significant improvements in gross motor function over 2 years or less (12 studies, GRADE moderate) and over more than 2 years (10 studies, GRADE moderate) as well as improvements in functional independence in the short term (10 studies, GRADE moderate) and long term (4 studies, GRADE low). Major operative complications, were infrequently reported (4 studies). Bony abnormalities and instabilities monitored radiologically in the spine (15 studies) and hip (8 studies) involved minimal or clinically insignificant changes after surgery. No studies evaluated the cost effectiveness of dorsal rhizotomy. The budget impact of

  13. Persistent double dorsal aorta: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brandy; Gest, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Our discovery of a case of persistent double dorsal aorta prompted us to systematically review the literature of all previously reported cases of this anomaly. For our case, we present a completely separated double dorsal aorta, with the right accessory aorta arising from the abdominal aorta and ascending through the aortic hiatus to supply posterior intercostal arteries (PIAs) to the 9th-3rd spaces bilaterally. We examined and compiled data from the 10 previously reported cases, along with our observations from our cadaver, into a systematic review of all known cases of persistent double dorsal aorta. In addition to our case report and systematic review, we investigated the literature focusing on formation of the dorsal aorta in the embryo in order to postulate potential mechanisms for formation of this anomaly. Two variants of persistent double dorsal aorta have been reported in the literature. The first type is characterized by a double-lumen descending aorta with a central dividing septum, and the second features complete separation of the two dorsal aortae. The completely separated variant shows further heterogeneity in the origins of the PIAs and the iliac arteries, and the majority of the reported cases also demonstrate additional anatomical anomalies. We outline the events in embryonic dorsal aorta formation as well as discuss several potential mechanisms that could underlie persistent double dorsal aorta formation. Clin. Anat. 30:517-524, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Dorsal onlay graft bulbar urethroplasty using buccal mucosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It can be used for penile urethral stricture repair and different types of dorsal onlay graft urethroplasty for bulbar urethral stricture repair. The current paper describes, step by step, Barbagli technique of dorsal onlay graft bulbar urethroplasty using buccal mucosa. The preoperative patient evaluation and postoperative course ...

  15. Peripheral distribution of the human dorsal nerve of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C C; Bradley, W E

    1998-06-01

    The integrity of the dorsal nerve of the penis is crucial for normal erectile and ejaculatory function. To our knowledge a description of this nerve along the phallus has not been formally described. We illustrate the distribution of the dorsal nerve of the penis to the penile shaft, anterior urethra and glans. Neuroanatomical dissections were performed on 28 cadaver penis specimens. Electrodiagnostic testing was conducted on 10 healthy male subjects to confirm the anatomical findings. The dorsal nerve of the penis consists of 2 populations of axons, one to innervate the penile shaft and urethra, and the other to innervate the glans. Stimulation of the urethra resulted in responses recorded in the main trunk of the dorsal nerve of the penis and stimulation of the nerve evoked responses within the urethra. Bulbocavernosus muscle contraction was elicited following urethral stimulation. Urethral innervation by the dorsal nerve of the penis supports the view that urethral afferent impulses are a component of reflex ejaculatory activity. The pattern of glanular innervation by the dorsal nerve of the penis identifies the glans as a sensory end organ for sexual reflexes. The undulating character of the dorsal nerve of the penis is a mechanism by which the nerve can accommodate to significant changes in penile length with erection. Electrodiagnostic studies of the dorsal nerve of the penis should be modified to consider the anatomical findings.

  16. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the midbrain in a murine model of retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, D M; Carpenter, J L; O'Brien, J M; Kivela, T; Brauner, E; Tarkkanen, A; Virtanen, I; Albert, D M

    1991-02-01

    The first heritable model of retinoblastoma was established by retina-specific expression of simian virus 40 T-antigen (SV40 T-ag) in transgenic mice. Bilateral, multifocal ocular tumors were observed in 100% of transgene-bearing mice. Central nervous system neoplasms occurred at a lower rate (27%) and represented the murine counterpart of human trilateral retinoblastoma. The authors characterized the transgenic brain tumors and found them to be primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) of the midbrain. Murine brain tumors do not involve the pineal gland and most closely resemble undifferentiated suprasellar or parasellar tumors occasionally observed in human trilateral retinoblastoma. The murine malignancies arose from the subependymal cells of the cerebral aqueduct. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examination revealed that the transgenic brain tumors were undifferentiated and lacked all antigens associated with normal murine neuronal, glial, and ependymal cells.

  17. Palmar and dorsal fixed-angle plates in AO C-type fractures of the distal radius: is there an advantage of palmar plates in the long term?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubietz, Michael G; Gruenert, Joerg G; Jakubietz, Rafael G

    2012-02-17

    Current surgical approaches to the distal radius include dorsal and palmar plate fixation. While palmar plates have gained widespread popularity, few reports have provided data on long term clinical outcomes in comparison. This paper reports the result of a randomised clinical study comparing dorsal Pi plates and palmar, angle-stable plates for treatment of comminuted, intraarticular fractures of the distal radius over the course of twelve months. 42 patients with unilateral, intraarticular fractures of the distal radius were included and randomised to 2 groups, 22 were treated with a palmar plate, 20 received a dorsal Pi-plate. Results were evaluated after 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively focussing on functional recovery as well as radiological results. The palmar plate group demonstrated significantly better results regarding range of motion and grip strength over the course of 12 months. While a comparable increase in function was observed in both groups, the better results from the early postoperative period in the palmar plate group prevailed over the whole course. Radiological results showed a significantly increased palmar tilt and carpal sag in dorsal plates, with other radiological parameters being comparable. Pain levels were decreased in dorsal plates after hardware removal and failed to show significant differences after 12 months. However, complications such as tendon ruptures were more frequent in the dorsal plate group. Functional advantage of palmar plates gained within the first 6 weeks prevails over the course of a year. Both groups demonstrate further gradual increase of function after 6 months, although dorsal plates did not catch up completely. Improved early postoperative function seems to be the cornerstone for the best possible results. Patients with dorsal plates benefit from hardware removal more than palmar plates in terms of reduction of pain levels. The advantage of palmar plates is a faster functional recovery with lower

  18. Menthol enhances phasic and tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in midbrain periaqueductal grey neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Benjamin K; Karim, Shafinaz; Goodchild, Ann K; Vaughan, Christopher W; Drew, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Menthol, a naturally occurring compound in the essential oil of mint leaves, is used for its medicinal, sensory and fragrant properties. Menthol acts via transient receptor potential (TRPM8 and TRPA1) channels and as a positive allosteric modulator of recombinant GABAA receptors. Here, we examined the actions of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated currents in intact midbrain slices. Experimental Approach Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons in midbrain slices from rats to determine the effects of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated phasic IPSCs and tonic currents. Key Results Menthol (150–750 μM) produced a concentration-dependent prolongation of spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs, but not non-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs throughout the PAG. Menthol actions were unaffected by TRPM8 and TRPA1 antagonists, tetrodotoxin and the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil. Menthol also enhanced a tonic current, which was sensitive to the GABAA receptor antagonists, picrotoxin (100 μM), bicuculline (30 μM) and Zn2+ (100 μM), but unaffected by gabazine (10 μM) and a GABAC receptor antagonist, 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid hydrate (TPMPA; 50 μM). In addition, menthol potentiated currents induced by the extrasynaptic GABAA receptor agonist THIP/gaboxadol (10 μM). Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that menthol positively modulates both synaptic and extrasynaptic populations of GABAA receptors in native PAG neurons. The development of agents that potentiate GABAA-mediated tonic currents and phasic IPSCs in a manner similar to menthol could provide a basis for novel GABAA-related pharmacotherapies. PMID:24460753

  19. Effect of informational content of noise on speech representation in the aging midbrain and cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presacco, Alessandro; Simon, Jonathan Z; Anderson, Samira

    2016-11-01

    The ability to understand speech is significantly degraded by aging, particularly in noisy environments. One way that older adults cope with this hearing difficulty is through the use of contextual cues. Several behavioral studies have shown that older adults are better at following a conversation when the target speech signal has high contextual content or when the background distractor is not meaningful. Specifically, older adults gain significant benefit in focusing on and understanding speech if the background is spoken by a talker in a language that is not comprehensible to them (i.e., a foreign language). To understand better the neural mechanisms underlying this benefit in older adults, we investigated aging effects on midbrain and cortical encoding of speech when in the presence of a single competing talker speaking in a language that is meaningful or meaningless to the listener (i.e., English vs. Dutch). Our results suggest that neural processing is strongly affected by the informational content of noise. Specifically, older listeners' cortical responses to the attended speech signal are less deteriorated when the competing speech signal is an incomprehensible language rather than when it is their native language. Conversely, temporal processing in the midbrain is affected by different backgrounds only during rapid changes in speech and only in younger listeners. Additionally, we found that cognitive decline is associated with an increase in cortical envelope tracking, suggesting an age-related over (or inefficient) use of cognitive resources that may explain their difficulty in processing speech targets while trying to ignore interfering noise. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Compensatory effort parallels midbrain deactivation during mental fatigue: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seishu Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Fatigue reflects the functioning of our physiological negative feedback system, which prevents us from overworking. When fatigued, however, we often try to suppress this system in an effort to compensate for the resulting deterioration in performance. Previous studies have suggested that the effect of fatigue on neurovascular demand may be influenced by this compensatory effort. The primary goal of the present study was to isolate the effect of compensatory effort on neurovascular demand. Healthy male volunteers participated in a series of visual and auditory divided attention tasks that steadily increased fatigue levels for 2 hours. Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed during the first and last quarter of the study (Pre and Post sessions, respectively. Tasks with low and high attentional load (Low and High conditions, respectively were administrated in alternating blocks. We assumed that compensatory effort would be greater under the High-attentional-load condition compared with the Low-load condition. The difference was assessed during the two sessions. The effect of compensatory effort on neurovascular demand was evaluated by examining the interaction between load (High vs. Low and time (Pre vs. Post. Significant fatigue-induced deactivation (i.e., Pre>Post was observed in the frontal, temporal, occipital, and parietal cortices, in the cerebellum, and in the midbrain in both the High and Low conditions. The interaction was significantly greater in the High than in the Low condition in the midbrain. Neither significant fatigue-induced activation (i.e., Pre[PreE- PostE] may reflect suppression of the negative feedback system that normally triggers recuperative rest to maintain homeostasis.

  1. The noble gas xenon provides protection and trophic stimulation to midbrain dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaur, Jérémie; Le Nogue, Déborah; Lemaire, Marc; Pype, Jan; Farjot, Géraldine; Hirsch, Etienne C; Michel, Patrick P

    2017-07-01

    Despite its low chemical reactivity, the noble gas xenon possesses a remarkable spectrum of biological effects. In particular, xenon is a strong neuroprotectant in preclinical models of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. In this study, we wished to determine whether xenon retained its neuroprotective potential in experimental settings that model the progressive loss of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons in Parkinson's disease. Using rat midbrain cultures, we established that xenon was partially protective for DA neurons through either direct or indirect effects on these neurons. So, when DA neurons were exposed to l-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid so as to increase ambient glutamate levels and generate slow and sustained excitotoxicity, the effect of xenon on DA neurons was direct. The vitamin E analog Trolox also partially rescued DA neurons in this setting and enhanced neuroprotection by xenon. However, in the situation where DA cell death was spontaneous, the protection of DA neurons by xenon appeared indirect as it occurred through the repression of a mechanism mediated by proliferating glial cells, presumably astrocytes and their precursor cells. Xenon also exerted trophic effects for DA neurons in this paradigm. The effects of xenon were mimicked and improved by the N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist memantine and xenon itself appeared to work by antagonizing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. Note that another noble gas argon could not reproduce xenon effects. Overall, present data indicate that xenon can provide protection and trophic support to DA neurons that are vulnerable in Parkinson's disease. This suggests that xenon might have some therapeutic value for this disorder. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Expression of the LRRK2 gene in the midbrain dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Baek-Soo; Iacovitti, Lorraine; Katano, Taku; Hattori, Nobutaka; Seol, Wongi; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2008-09-19

    A hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the progressive loss of the A9 midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Recently, multiple causative mutations have been identified in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene for both familial and sporadic PD cases. Therefore, to investigate functional roles of LRRK2 in normal and/or diseased brain, it is critical to define LRRK2 expression in mDA neurons. To address whether LRRK2 mRNA and protein are expressed in mDA neurons, we purified DA neurons from the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-GFP transgenic mouse using FACS-sorting and analyzed the expression of LRRK2 and other mDA markers. We observed that all mDA markers tested in this study (TH, Pitx3, DAT, Nurr1 and Lmx1a) are robustly expressed only in GFP(+) cells, but not in GFP(-) cells. Notably, LRRK2 was expressed in both GFP(+) and GFP(-) cells. Consistent with this, our immunohistochemical analyses showed that LRRK2 is expressed in TH-positive mDA neurons as well as in surrounding TH-negative cells in the rat brain. Importantly, in the midbrain region, LRRK2 protein was preferentially expressed in A9 DA neurons of the substantia nigra, compared to A10 DA neurons of the ventral tegmental area. However, LRRK2 was also highly expressed in the cortical and hippocampal regions. Taken together, our results suggest that LRRK2 may have direct functional role(s) in the neurophysiology of A9 DA neurons and that dysfunction of these neurons by mutant LRRK2 may directly cause their selective degeneration.

  3. In a rat model of panic, corticotropin responses to dorsal periaqueductal gray stimulation depend on physical exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Armini, Rubia; Bernabé, Cristian Setúbal; Rosa, Caroline Azevedo; Siller, Carlos Antônio; Schimitel, Fagna Giacomin; Tufik, Sérgio; Klein, Donald Franklin; Schenberg, Luiz Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Panic disorder patients are exquisitely and specifically sensitive to hypercapnia. The demonstration that carbon dioxide provokes panic in fear-unresponsive amygdala-calcified Urbach-Wiethe patients emphasizes that panic is not fear nor does it require the activation of the amygdala. This is consonant with increasing evidence suggesting that panic is mediated caudally at midbrain's dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG). Another startling feature of the apparently spontaneous clinical panic is the counterintuitive lack of increments in corticotropin, cortisol and prolactin, generally considered 'stress hormones'. Here we show that the stress hormones are not changed during DPAG-evoked panic when escape is prevented by stimulating the rat in a small compartment. Neither did the corticotropin increase when physical exertion was statistically adjusted to the same degree as non-stimulated controls, as measured by lactate plasma levels. Conversely, neuroendocrine responses to foot-shocks were independent from muscular effort. Data are consonant with DPAG mediation of panic attacks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanosensory Lateral Line Nerve Projections to Auditory Neurons in the Dorsal Descending Octaval Nucleus in the Goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Catherine A; Gallagher, Shannon; Cantu-Hertzler, Evan; Woodrick, Scarlet

    2016-01-01

    The nucleus medialis is the main first-order target of the mechanosensory lateral line (LL) system. This report definitively demonstrates that mechanosensory LL inputs also terminate in the ipsilateral dorsal portion of the descending octaval nucleus (dDO) in the goldfish. The dDO, which is the main first-order auditory nucleus in bony fishes, includes neurons that receive direct input from the otolithic end organs of the inner ear and project to the auditory midbrain. There are two groups of such auditory projection neurons: medial and lateral. The medial and the lateral groups in turn contain several neuronal populations, each of which includes one or more morphological cell types. In goldfish, the exclusively mechanosensory anterior and posterior LL nerves terminate only on specific cell types of auditory projection neurons in the lateral dDO group. Single neurons in the lateral dDO group may receive input from both anterior and posterior LL nerves. It is possible that some of the lateral dDO neurons that receive LL input also receive input from one or more of the otolithic end organs. These results are consistent with functional studies demonstrating low frequency acoustic sensitivity of the mechanosensory LL in teleosts, and they reveal that the anatomical substrate for sensory integration of otolithic and LL inputs is present at the origin of the central ascending auditory pathway in an otophysine fish. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Causes and consequences of degeneration of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, James G

    2014-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is no longer considered merely a movement disorder caused by degeneration of dopamine neurons in the midbrain. It is now recognized as a widespread neuropathological syndrome accompanied by a variety of motor and nonmotor clinical symptoms. As such, any hypothesis concerning PD pathogenesis and pathophysiology must account for the entire spectrum of disease and not solely focus on the dopamine system. Based on its anatomy and the intrinsic properties of its neurons, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMV) is uniquely vulnerable to damage from PD. Fibers in the vagus nerve course throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to and from the brainstem forming a close link between the peripheral and central nervous systems and a point of proximal contact between the environment and areas where PD pathology is believed to start. In addition, DMV neurons are under high levels of oxidative stress due to their high level of α-synuclein expression, fragile axons, and specific neuronal physiology. Moreover, several consequences of DMV damage, namely, GI dysfunction and unrestrained inflammation, may propagate a vicious cycle of injury affecting vulnerable brain regions. Current evidence to suggest the vagal system plays a pivotal role in PD pathogenesis is circumstantial, but given the current state of the field, the time is ripe to obtain direct experimental evidence to better delineate it. Better understanding of the DMV and vagus nerve may provide insight into PD pathogenesis and a neural highway with direct brain access that could be harnessed for novel therapeutic interventions.

  6. Giant cavernous malformation in the ventrolateral midbrain with extension into the thalamus: a case report of a paramedian supracerebellar transtentorial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongzhou; Hara, Yosuke; Goto, Tetsuya; Chiba, Akihiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Cavernous malformations (CMs) of the midbrain and thalamus are relatively rare and particularly difficult to be resected given their location in eloquent tissues. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old boy who experienced repeated and progressive right hemiparesis. Image examinations showed a gradually enlarged CM originated in the left ventrolateral midbrain extending to the left thalamus with repeated hemorrhage. By performing a paramedian supracerebellar transtentorial approach, the CM was totally removed, and the patient recovered without any new neurological deficit. The authors' experience suggests that this approach is eminent in treating giant lesions involving the ventrolateral midbrain and thalamus.

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  15. Biomechanical Assessment of the Dorsal Spanning Bridge Plate in Distal Radius Fracture Fixation: Implications for Immediate Weight-Bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jerry I; Peterson, Bret; Bellevue, Kate; Lee, Nicolas; Smith, Sean; Herfat, Safa

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability of a 2.4-mm dorsal spanning bridge plate with a volar locking plate (VLP) in a distal radius fracture model, during simulated crutch weight-bearing. Five paired cadaveric forearms were tested. A 1-cm dorsal wedge osteotomy was created to simulate an unstable distal radius fracture with dorsal comminution. Fractures were fixed with a VLP or a dorsal bridge plate (DBP). Specimens were mounted to a crutch handle, and optical motion-tracking sensors were attached to the proximal and distal segments. Specimens were loaded in compression at 1 mm/s on a servohydraulic test frame until failure, defined as 2 mm of gap site displacement. The VLP construct was significantly more stable to axial load in a crutch weight-bearing model compared with the DBP plate (VLP: 493 N vs DBP: 332 N). Stiffness was higher in the VLP constructs, but this was not statistically significant (VLP: 51.4 N/mm vs DBP: 32.4 N/mm). With the crutch weight-bearing model, DBP failed consistently with wrist flexion and plate bending, whereas VLP failed with axial compression at the fracture site and dorsal collapse. Dorsal spanning bridge plating is effective as an internal spanning fixator in treating highly comminuted intra-articular distal radius fracture and prevents axial collapse at the radiocarpal joint. However, bridge plating may not offer advantages in early weight-bearing or transfer in polytrauma patients, with less axial stability in our crutch weight-bearing model compared with volar plating. A stiffer 3.5-mm DBP or use of a DBP construct without the central holes may be considered for distal radius fractures if the goal is early crutch weight-bearing through the injured extremity.

  16. Dorsal ulnar cutaneous nerve conduction: reference values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garibaldi Solange G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the reference values of the dorsal ulnar cutaneous nerve (DUC sensory nerve conduction (SNC in 66 healthy individuals. Measurements were processed using stimulating electrodes positioned between the ulnar bone and the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, 11-13 cm proximal to the active electrode recording. Superficial recording electrodes were placed on the fourth intermetacarpal space. The mean sensory conduction velocity (SCV in males was 63.7 -- 0.16 x age ± 3.36 m/s and in females was 57.7 ± 3.37 m/s. The mean sensory nerve action potential (SNAP amplitude in males was 19.5 ± 10.7 µV and in females was 24.6 ± 5.8 µV. The mean SNAP duration was 0.96 ± 0.13 ms. No significant differences regarding the DUC-SCV, distal latency, and SNAP duration or amplitude were found between both sides of the same subject. The amplitude of the SNAP was higher in females than males. The effects of age on DUC-SCV were distinct for each gender.

  17. Identification and mechanism of regulation of the zebrafish dorsal determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fu-I; Thisse, Christine; Thisse, Bernard

    2011-09-20

    In vertebrates, the animal-vegetal axis is determined during oogenesis and at ovulation, the egg is radially symmetric. In anamniotes, following fertilization, a microtubule-dependent movement leads to the displacement of maternal dorsal determinants from the vegetal pole to the future dorsal side of the embryo, providing the initial breaking of radial symmetry [Weaver C, Kimelman D (2004) Development 131:3491-3499]. These dorsal determinants induce β-catenin nuclear translocation in dorsal cells of the blastula. Previous work in amphibians has shown that secreted Wnt11/5a complexes, regulated by the Wnt antagonist Dkk-1, are required for the initiation of embryonic axis formation [Cha et al. (2009) Curr Biol 29:1573-1580]. In the current study, we determined that the vegetal maternal dorsal determinant in fish is not the Wnt11/5a complex but the canonical Wnt, Wnt8a. Translation of this mRNA and secretion of the Wnt8a protein result in a dorsal-to-ventral gradient of Wnt stimulation, extending across the entire embryo. This gradient is counterbalanced by two Wnt inhibitors, Sfrp1a and Frzb. These proteins are essential to restrict the activation of the canonical Wnt pathway to the dorsal marginal blastomeres by defining the domain where the Wnt8a activity gradient is above the threshold value necessary for triggering the canonical β-catenin pathway. In summary, this study establishes that the zebrafish maternal dorsal determinant, Wnt8a, is required to localize the primary dorsal center, and that the extent of this domain is defined by the activity of two maternally provided Wnt antagonists, Sfrp1a and Frzb.

  18. SPINAL DEFORMITIES AFTER SELECTIVE DORSAL RHIZOTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIO PABLO MANZONE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR used for spasticity treatment could worsen or develop spinal deformities. Our goal is to describe spinal deformities seen in patients with cerebral palsy (CP after being treated by SDR. Methods: Retrospective study of patients operated on (SDR between January/1999 and June/2012. Inclusion criteria: spinal Rx before SDR surgery, spinography, and assessment at follow-up. We evaluated several factors emphasizing level and type of SDR approach, spinal deformity and its treatment, final Risser, and follow-up duration. Results: We found 7 patients (6 males: mean age at SDR 7.56 years (4.08-11.16. Mean follow-up: 6.64 years (2.16-13, final age: 14.32 years (7.5-19. No patient had previous deformity. GMFCS: 2 patients level IV, 2 level III, 3 level II. Initial walking status: 2 community walkers, 2 household walkers, 2 functional walkers, 1 not ambulant, at the follow-up, 3 patients improved, and 4 kept their status. We found 4 TL/L laminotomies, 2 L/LS laminectomies, and 1 thoracic laminectomy. Six spinal deformities were observed: 2 sagittal, 3 mixed, and 1 scoliosis. There was no association among the type of deformity, final gait status, topographic type, GMFCS, age, or SDR approach. Three patients had surgery indication for spinal deformity at skeletal maturity, while those patients with smaller deformities were still immature (Risser 0 to 2/3 although with progressive curves. Conclusions: After SDR, patients should be periodically evaluated until they reach Risser 5. The development of a deformity does not compromise functional results but adds morbidity because it may require surgical treatment.

  19. Response characteristics of vibration-sensitive neurons in the midbrain of the grassfrog, Rana temporaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B

    1989-01-01

    of best frequencies (BF's) was bimodal with peaks at 10 and 100 Hz and the thresholds ranged from 0.02 to 1.28 cm/s2 at the BF. Twenty-three neurons showed phasic-tonic and 11 neurons phasic responses. The dynamic range of seismic intensity for most neurons was 20-30 dB. In contrast to the sharp phase...... response characteristics expressed by inhibition of their spontaneous activity by vibration or by bi- and trimodal sensory sensitivities. In conclusion, the vibration sensitive cells in the midbrain of the grassfrog can encode the frequency, intensity, onset and cessation of vibration stimuli. Seismic...... stimuli probably play a role in communication and detection of predators and the vibration-sensitive midbrain neurons may be involved in the central processing of such behaviorally significant stimuli....

  20. Response to the Dorsal Anterior Gradient of EGFR Signaling in Drosophila Oogenesis Is Prepatterned by Earlier Posterior EGFR Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Fregoso Lomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatially restricted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activity plays a central role in patterning the follicular epithelium of the Drosophila ovary. In midoogenesis, localized EGFR activation is achieved by the graded dorsal anterior localization of its ligand, Gurken. Graded EGFR activity determines multiple dorsal anterior fates along the dorsal-ventral axis but cannot explain the sharp posterior limit of this domain. Here, we show that posterior follicle cells express the T-box transcription factors Midline and H15, which render cells unable to adopt a dorsal anterior fate in response to EGFR activation. The posterior expression of Midline and H15 is itself induced in early oogenesis by posteriorly localized EGFR signaling, defining a feedback loop in which early induction of Mid and H15 confers a molecular memory that fundamentally alters the outcome of later EGFR signaling. Spatial regulation of the EGFR pathway thus occurs both through localization of the ligand and through localized regulation of the cellular response.

  1. Wnt5a cooperates with canonical Wnts to generate midbrain dopaminergic neurons in vivo and in stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andersson, E.R.; Salto, C.; Villaescusa, J.C.; Cajanek, L.; Yang, S.; Bryjová, Lenka; Nagy, I.I.; Vainio, S.J.; Ramírez, C.; Bryja, Vítězslav; Arenas, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 7 (2013), E602-E610 ISSN 0027-8424 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA204/09/0498; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/0747 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : VENTRAL MIDBRAIN * PARKINSONS-DISEASE * BETA-CATENIN Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.809, year: 2013

  2. Neurogenic contraction and relaxation of human penile deep dorsal vein

    OpenAIRE

    Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Domenech, Cristina; Martínez León, Juan B; Vila, José M.; Aldasoro, Martin; Lluch, Salvador

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize neurogenic and pharmacological responses of human penile deep dorsal vein and to determine whether the responses are mediated by nitric oxide from neural or endothelial origin.Ring segments of human penile deep dorsal vein were obtained from 22 multiorgan donors during procurement of organs for transplantation. The rings were suspended in organ bath chambers for isometric recording of tension. We then studied the contractile and relaxant respon...

  3. Role of activating transcription factor-4 in 24-hour rhythm of serotonin transporter expression in the mouse midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Kentarou; Koyanagi, Satoru; Sato, Yuuki; Ogata, Takamitsu; Matsunaga, Naoya; Fujimura, Akio; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2012-08-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) plays a key role in the control of 5-HT neuronal activity by reuptaking extracellular 5-HT from the synapse cleft. We have previously demonstrated that 5-HTT mRNA expression levels and its uptake activity in the mouse midbrain are significantly higher in the dark phase than those in the light phase. However, the molecular mechanisms of time-dependent expression of 5-HTT have not been clarified. In this study, expression of 5-HTT mRNA in the mouse midbrain showed a significant 24-h rhythm and was higher in the dark phase. Although such an oscillation was eliminated by a Clock gene mutation, CLOCK and BMAL1 did not activate 5-HTT transcription in the luciferase reporter assay. Activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), a member of the ATF/cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein family, is a component responsible for sustaining circadian oscillations of CRE-mediated gene expression. ATF4 significantly activated 5-HTT transcription in vitro and time dependently bound to the CRE site in the 5-HTT promoter in the mouse midbrain. In addition, mutation of the Clock gene disrupted temporal binding of ATF4 to the CRE site in the 5-HTT promoter. These results indicated that the circuit of circadian-basis molecular regulation between the clockwork system and mouse 5-HTT gene was connected by the ATF4 signaling pathway.

  4. Putamen–midbrain functional connectivity is related to striatal dopamine transporter availability in patients with Lewy body diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rieckmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prior work has shown that functional connectivity between the midbrain and putamen is altered in patients with impairments in the dopamine system. This study examines whether individual differences in midbrain–striatal connectivity are proportional to the integrity of the dopamine system in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss (Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. We assessed functional connectivity of the putamen during resting state fMRI and dopamine transporter (DAT availability in the striatum using 11C-Altropane PET in twenty patients. In line with the hypothesis that functional connectivity between the midbrain and the putamen reflects the integrity of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system, putamen–midbrain functional connectivity was significantly correlated with striatal DAT availability even after stringent control for effects of head motion. DAT availability did not relate to functional connectivity between the caudate and thalamus/prefrontal areas. As such, resting state functional connectivity in the midbrain–striatal pathway may provide a useful indicator of underlying pathology in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss.

  5. Dorsal Sural Sensory Nerve Action Potential: A Study for Reference Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Sweta Chetan; Mansukhani, Khushnuma Anil; Sharma, Alika; Balakrishnan, Lajita; Sreenivasan, Aarthika

    2017-01-01

    Dorsal sural sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) could help diagnose early or subclinical peripheral neuropathy. To establish reference data for dorsal sural SNAP amplitude, latency, and velocity in healthy participants. A prospective study was conducted in 45 nerves from healthy participants between 18 and 90 years and stratified into three age groups (a = 18-40 years, b = 41-60 years, and c>60 years). StataCorp 12.2 statistical program was used for all statistical analyses. Mean-2 standard deviation was used to generate reference values for the lower limit of amplitude and velocity in each age group. ANOVA with Bonferroni correction was used for intergroup comparisons of amplitude and velocity. Regression analysis was used to compute an equation for the predicted amplitude with age, height, and weight as the covariates. The lower limit for amplitude (uv) in Groups a, b, and c was 2.57, 1.97, and 1.01, respectively. The lower limit for velocity (m/s) was 33.6, 32, and 22.8, respectively. Statistical significance was noted between the amplitudes of participants in Groups b and c ( P = 0.039) and a and c ( P = 0.001). Similarly, velocity was significantly different between Groups b and c ( P = 0.04) and a and c ( P = 0.008). Age was the covariate with maximum effect on the dorsal sural amplitude. Gender and side-to-side comparison did not show statistical significance for amplitude and velocity measurements. Linear regression analysis of the transformed amplitude gave the predictive equation as (y) =3.338 + age (-0.0167) + height in meters (-0.209) + weight (0.001). This study provides reference data for dorsal sural SNAP in Indian population stratified by age.

  6. [Dorsal capsulodesis for the treatment of scapholunate instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Christine; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; van Schoonhoven, Jörg

    2009-11-01

    To regain stability of the proximal carpal row after scapholunate ligament rupture in order to avoid osteoarthritis and carpal collapse. As additional therapy in scapholunate ligament repair especially in patients with static, but reducible scapholunate malalignment. Fixed scapholunate malalignment. Osteoarthritis of the radiocarpal or the midcarpal joint. Dorsal approach to the carpal joint with release of the second, third and fourth extensor compartment and resection of the dorsal interosseous nerve. Opening of the radiocarpal joint for inspection of the chondral surfaces and the scapholunate ligament for possible repair. If needed, reduction of scaphoid and lunate. Repair of the scapholunate ligament. If a reduction of scaphoid and lunate is necessary, temporary Kirschner wire fixation of the scaphoid to the capitate and the lunate. The dorsal intercarpal ligament is identified and its middle third is dissected and elevated from the triquetrum remaining attached to the distal scaphoid pole. The ulnar end of the elevated part of the dorsal intercarpal ligament is pulled through a split in the dorsal radiotriquetral ligament and fixed to itself. Closure of the proximal and distal third of the dorsal intercarpal ligament. Management Immobilization in a below-elbow cast including the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb for 6 weeks. Removal of the Kirschner wires, if used, 8 weeks postoperatively. Physiotherapy to improve wrist motion. Most of the reports in the literature show an improvement of pain. The effect on radiologic parameters and the development of osteoarthritis remains uncertain.

  7. Functional connectivity of the dorsal striatum in female musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji eTanaka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen is a node of the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical (CSPTC motor circuit, which plays a central role in skilled motor learning, a critical feature of musical performance. The dorsal striatum receives input from a large part of the cerebral cortex, forming a hub in the cortical-subcortical network. This study sought to examine how the functional network of the dorsal striatum differs between musicians and nonmusicians.Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data were acquired from female university students majoring in music and nonmusic disciplines. The data were subjected to graph theoretical analysis and functional connectivity analysis. The graph theoretical analysis of the entire brain revealed that the degree, which represents the number of connections, of the bilateral putamen was significantly lower in musicians than in nonmusicians. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that compared with nonmusicians, musicians had significantly decreased connectivity between the left putamen and bilateral frontal operculum and between the left caudate nucleus and cerebellum. In conclusion, compared with nonmusicians, female musicians have a smaller functional network of the dorsal striatum, with decreased connectivity. These data are consistent with previous anatomical studies reporting a reduced volume of the dorsal striatum in musicians and ballet dancers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study suggesting that long-term musical training results in a less extensive or selective functional network of the dorsal striatum.

  8. Functional Connectivity of the Dorsal Striatum in Female Musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji; Kirino, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen) is a node of the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical (CSPTC) motor circuit, which plays a central role in skilled motor learning, a critical feature of musical performance. The dorsal striatum receives input from a large part of the cerebral cortex, forming a hub in the cortical-subcortical network. This study sought to examine how the functional network of the dorsal striatum differs between musicians and nonmusicians. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired from female university students majoring in music and nonmusic disciplines. The data were subjected to functional connectivity analysis and graph theoretical analysis. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that compared with nonmusicians, musicians had significantly decreased connectivity between the left putamen and bilateral frontal operculum (FO) and between the left caudate nucleus and cerebellum. The graph theoretical analysis of the entire brain revealed that the degrees, which represent the numbers of connections, of the bilateral putamen were significantly lower in musicians than in nonmusicians. In conclusion, compared with nonmusicians, female musicians have a smaller functional network of the dorsal striatum with decreased connectivity. These data are consistent with previous anatomical studies reporting a reduced volume of the dorsal striatum in musicians and ballet dancers, suggesting that long-term musical training reshapes the functional network of the dorsal striatum to be less extensive or selective.

  9. K-ATP channels promote the differential degeneration of dopaminergic midbrain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Birgit; Haeckel, Olga; Wildmann, Johannes; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Roeper, Jochen

    2005-12-01

    The selective degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) midbrain neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) is a hallmark of Parkinson disease. DA neurons in the neighboring ventral tegmental area (VTA) are significantly less affected. The mechanisms for this differential vulnerability of DA neurons are unknown. We identified selective activation of ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channels as a potential mechanism. We show that in response to parkinsonism-inducing toxins, electrophysiological activity of SN DA neurons, but not VTA DA neurons, is lost owing to activation of K-ATP channels. This selective K-ATP channel activation is controlled by differences in mitochondrial uncoupling between SN and VTA DA neurons. Genetic inactivation of the K-ATP channel pore-forming subunit Kir6.2 resulted in a selective rescue of SN but not VTA DA neurons in two mechanistically distinct mouse models of dopaminergic degeneration, the neurotoxicological 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model and the mutant weaver mouse. Thus, K-ATP channel activation has an unexpected role in promoting death of DA neurons in chronic disease.

  10. Formation of the zebrafish midbrain-hindbrain boundary constriction requires laminin-dependent basal constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzman, Jennifer H; Graeden, Ellie G; Lowery, Laura Anne; Holley, Heidi S; Sive, Hazel

    2008-01-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) is a highly conserved fold in the vertebrate embryonic brain. We have termed the deepest point of this fold the MHB constriction (MHBC) and have begun to define the mechanisms by which it develops. In the zebrafish, the MHBC is formed soon after neural tube closure, concomitant with inflation of the brain ventricles. The MHBC is unusual, as it forms by bending the basal side of the neuroepithelium. At single cell resolution, we show that zebrafish MHBC formation involves two steps. The first is a shortening of MHB cells to approximately 75% of the length of surrounding cells. The second is basal constriction, and apical expansion, of a small group of cells that contribute to the MHBC. In the absence of inflated brain ventricles, basal constriction still occurs, indicating that the MHBC is not formed as a passive consequence of ventricle inflation. In laminin mutants, basal constriction does not occur, indicating an active role for the basement membrane in this process. Apical expansion also fails to occur in laminin mutants, suggesting that apical expansion may be dependent on basal constriction. This study demonstrates laminin-dependent basal constriction as a previously undescribed molecular mechanism for brain morphogenesis.

  11. Auditory Midbrain Implant: Research and Development Towards a Second Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hubert H.; Lenarz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The cochlear implant is considered one of the most successful neural prostheses to date, which was made possible by visionaries who continued to develop the cochlear implant through multiple technological and clinical challenges. However, patients without a functional auditory nerve or implantable cochlea cannot benefit from a cochlear implant. The focus of the paper is to review the development and translation of a new type of central auditory prosthesis for this group of patients, which is known as the auditory midbrain implant (AMI) and is designed for electrical stimulation within the inferior colliculus. The rationale and results for the first AMI clinical study using a multi-site single-shank array will be presented initially. Although the AMI has achieved encouraging results in terms of safety and improvements in lip-reading capabilities and environmental awareness, it has not yet provided sufficient speech perception. Animal and human data will then be presented to show that a two-shank AMI array can potentially improve hearing performance by targeting specific neurons of the inferior colliculus. Modifications to the AMI array design, stimulation strategy, and surgical approach have been made that are expected to improve hearing performance in the patients implanted with a two-shank array in an upcoming clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. Positive outcomes from this clinical trial will motivate new efforts and developments toward improving central auditory prostheses for those who cannot sufficiently benefit from cochlear implants. PMID:25613994

  12. Midbrain and medullary control of postinspiratory activity of the crural and costal diaphragm in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hari H; Holstege, Gert

    2011-06-01

    Studies on brain stem respiratory neurons suggest that eupnea consists of three phases: inspiration, postinspiration, and expiration. However, it is not well understood how postinspiration is organized in the diaphragm, i.e., whether postinspiration differs in the crural and costal segments of the diaphragm and what the influence is of postinspiratory neurons on diaphragm function during eupnea. In this in vivo study we investigated the postinspiratory activity of the two diaphragm segments during eupnea and the changes in diaphragm function following modulation of eupnea. Postinspiratory neurons in the medulla were stereotaxically localized extracellularly and neurochemically stimulated. We used three types of preparations: precollicularly decerebrated unanesthetized cats and rats and anesthetized rats. In all preparations, during eupnea, postinspiratory activity was found in the crural but not in the costal diaphragm. When eupnea was discontinued in decerebrate cats in which stimulation in the nucleus retroambiguus induced activation of laryngeal or abdominal muscles, all postinspiratory activity in the crural diaphragm was abolished. In decerebrate rats, stimulation of the midbrain periaqueductal gray abolished postinspiration in the crural diaphragm but induced activation in the costal diaphragm. In anesthetized rats, stimulation of medullary postinspiratory neurons abolished the postinspiratory activity of the crural diaphragm. Vagal nerve stimulation in these rats increased the intensity of postinspiratory neuronal discharge in the solitary nucleus, leading to decreased activity of the crural diaphragm. These data demonstrate that three-phase breathing in the crural diaphragm during eupnea exists in vivo and that postinspiratory neurons have an inhibitory effect on crural diaphragm function.

  13. Motor organization of positive and negative emotional vocalization in the cat midbrain periaqueductal gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hari H; Arun, Mridula; Silburn, Peter A; Holstege, Gert

    2016-06-01

    Neurochemical microstimulation in different parts of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the cat generates four different types of vocalization, mews, howls, cries, and hisses. Mews signify positive vocal expression, whereas howls, hisses, and cries signify negative vocal communications. Mews were generated in the lateral column of the intermediate PAG and howls and hisses in the ventrolateral column of the intermediate PAG. Cries were generated in two regions, the lateral column of the rostral PAG and the ventrolateral column of the caudal PAG. To define the specific motor patterns belonging to mews, howls, and cries, the following muscles were recorded during these vocalizations: larynx (cricothyroid, thyroarytenoid, and posterior cricoarytenoid), tongue (genioglossus), jaw (digastric), and respiration (diaphragm, internal intercostal, external abdominal oblique, and internal abdominal oblique) muscles. Furthermore, the frequency, intensity, activation cascades, and turns and amplitude analyses of the electromyograms (EMGs) during these vocalizations were analyzed. The results show that each type of vocalization consists of a specific, circumscribed motor coordination. The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) in the caudal medulla serves as the final premotor interneuronal output system for vocalization. NRA neurochemical microstimulation also generated vocalizations (guttural sounds). Analysis of the EMGs demonstrated that these vocalizations consist of only small parts of the emotional voalizations generated by neurochemical stimulation in the PAG. These results demonstrate that motor organization of positive and negative emotional vocal expressions are segregated in the PAG and that the PAG uses the NRA as a tool to gain access to the motoneurons generating vocalization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Glutamate-related gene expression changes with age in the mouse auditory midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Sherif F; D'Souza, Mary; Zettel, Martha L; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Waxmonsky, Nicole C; Frisina, Robert D

    2007-01-05

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in both the peripheral and central auditory systems. Changes of glutamate and glutamate-related genes with age may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related hearing loss-presbycusis. In this study, changes in glutamate-related mRNA gene expression in the CBA mouse inferior colliculus with age and hearing loss were examined and correlations were sought between these changes and functional hearing measures, such as the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Gene expression of 68 glutamate-related genes was investigated using both genechip microarray and real-time PCR (qPCR) molecular techniques for four different age/hearing loss CBA mouse subject groups. Two genes showed consistent differences between groups for both the genechip and qPCR. Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase enzyme (Pycs) showed down-regulation with age and a high-affinity glutamate transporter (Slc1a3) showed up-regulation with age and hearing loss. Since Pycs plays a role in converting glutamate to proline, its deficiency in old age may lead to both glutamate increases and proline deficiencies in the auditory midbrain, playing a role in the subsequent inducement of glutamate toxicity and loss of proline neuroprotective effects. The up-regulation of Slc1a3 gene expression may reflect a cellular compensatory mechanism to protect against age-related glutamate or calcium excitoxicity.

  15. Long-Lasting Sound-Evoked Afterdischarge in the Auditory Midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Munenori; Bishop, Deborah C; Oliver, Douglas L

    2016-02-12

    Different forms of plasticity are known to play a critical role in the processing of information about sound. Here, we report a novel neural plastic response in the inferior colliculus, an auditory center in the midbrain of the auditory pathway. A vigorous, long-lasting sound-evoked afterdischarge (LSA) is seen in a subpopulation of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of normal hearing mice. These neurons were identified with single unit recordings and optogenetics in vivo. The LSA can continue for up to several minutes after the offset of the sound. LSA is induced by long-lasting, or repetitive short-duration, innocuous sounds. Neurons with LSA showed less adaptation than the neurons without LSA. The mechanisms that cause this neural behavior are unknown but may be a function of intrinsic mechanisms or the microcircuitry of the inferior colliculus. Since LSA produces long-lasting firing in the absence of sound, it may be relevant to temporary or chronic tinnitus or to some other aftereffect of long-duration sound.

  16. Frequency-specific adaptation and its underlying circuit model in the auditory midbrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eShen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Receptive fields of sensory neurons are considered to be dynamic and depend on the stimulus history. In the auditory system, evidence of dynamic frequency-receptive fields has been found following stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA. However, the underlying mechanism and circuitry of SSA have not been fully elucidated. Here, we studied how frequency-receptive fields of neurons in rat inferior colliculus (IC changed when exposed to a biased tone sequence. Pure tone with one specific frequency (adaptor was presented markedly more often than others. The adapted tuning was compared with the original tuning measured with an unbiased sequence. We found inhomogeneous changes in frequency tuning in IC, exhibiting a center-surround pattern with respect to the neuron’s best frequency. Central adaptors elicited strong suppressive and repulsive changes while flank adaptors induced facilitative and attractive changes. Moreover, we proposed a two-layer model of the underlying network, which not only reproduced the adaptive changes in the receptive fields but also predicted novelty responses to oddball sequences. These results suggest that frequency-specific adaptation in auditory midbrain can be accounted for by an adapted frequency channel and its lateral spreading of adaptation, which shed light on the organization of the underlying circuitry.

  17. Trapeziometacarpal joint stability: the evolving importance of the dorsal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, James D; Karl, John W; Strauch, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Trapeziometacarpal (TMC) arthritis of the thumb is a common source of hand pain and disability. TMC ligamentous instability may play a role in TMC degeneration. However, the relative importance of the TMC ligaments in the etiology of degeneration and the use of surgery to treat instability in early-stage arthritis are unclear. In this review, we addressed several questions: (1) What are the primary ligamentous stabilizers of the thumb TMC joint? (2) What is the evidence for ligament reconstruction or ligament imbrication in the treatment of thumb TMC joint osteoarthritis? And (3) what is the evidence for thumb metacarpal osteotomy in the treatment of thumb TMC joint osteoarthritis? We performed a systematic review of the literature using PubMed (MEDLINE(®)) and Scopus(®) (EMBASE(®)) for peer-reviewed articles published until November 2012. Fifty-two studies fit the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four studies were anatomic, biomechanical, or histopathologic studies on TMC joint ligamentous anatomy, 16 studies were clinical studies concerning ligament reconstruction, and 12 studies were clinical studies on thumb metacarpal osteotomy. Over the past two decades, increasing evidence suggests the dorsoradial ligament is the most important stabilizer of the TMC joint. Other ligaments consistently identified are the superficial anterior oblique, deep anterior oblique, intermetacarpal, ulnar collateral, and posterior oblique ligaments. Ligament reconstruction and metacarpal osteotomy relieve pain and improve grip strength based on Level IV studies. The dorsal ligaments are the primary stabilizers of the TMC joint. Ligament reconstruction and metacarpal osteotomy ameliorate ligamentous laxity and relieve pain based on Level IV studies.

  18. Self-mutilation in young rats after dorsal rhizotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaculin, Simon; Franek, Miloslav; Andrey, Ladislav; Rokyta, Richard

    2005-02-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the development of self-mutilation after extensive dorsal rhizotomy of the brachial plexus performed during early ontogeny in rats. The rhizotomy was performed in three groups of rats according to the central nervous system maturation: infant, young, and adult. After the surgery the occurrence of self-mutilation behavior was compared. Rats from the infant group and non-mutilating deafferentated rats from the adult group underwent extracellular recordings from intralaminar thalamic neurons. Interspikes intervals of the records were compared by means of chaodynamic methods. In the infant group self-mutilation did not develop at all. Among the young group self-mutilation developed in 40% of rats and consisted of superficial wounds in all cases. In adult self-mutilation appeared in 80% rats and consisted of both superficial wounds (75%) and amputation (25%). In the newborn group and the deafferentated adult group without any signs of self-mutilation means of the parameters were not significantly different and were significantly lower than those of intact adult rats. 1. Self-mutilation does not develop after the rhizotomy in the infant rats. 2. Neurons behave in chaotic way in adult as well as in young animals. 3. Chaodynamic parameters do not differ between infant and adult rats without any signs of self-mutilation. The results suggest that development of self-mutilation behavior in rats strongly depends on the ontogenetical period of nervous system injury, and that mature nervous system is required for the development of described pathological behavior.

  19. Dorsal and ventral language pathways in persistent developmental stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronfeld-Duenias, Vered; Amir, Ofer; Ezrati-Vinacour, Ruth; Civier, Oren; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering is a speech disorder that affects an individual's ability to fluently produce speech. While the disorder mainly manifests in situations that require language production, it is still unclear whether persistent developmental stuttering is indeed a language impairment, and if so, which language stream is implicated in people who stutter. In this study, we take a neuroanatomical approach to this question by examining the structural properties of the dorsal and ventral language pathways in adults who stutter (AWS) and fluent controls. We use diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and individualized tract identification to extract white matter volumes and diffusion properties of these tracts in samples of adults who do and do not stutter. We further quantify diffusion properties at multiple points along the tract and examine group differences within these diffusivity profiles. Our results show differences in the dorsal, but not in the ventral, language-related tracts. Specifically, AWS show reduced volume of the left dorsal stream, as well as lower anisotropy in the right dorsal stream. These data provide neuroanatomical support for the view that stuttering involves an impairment in the bidirectional mapping between auditory and articulatory cortices supported by the dorsal pathways, not in lexical access and semantic aspects of language processing which are thought to rely more heavily on the left ventral pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of Lmx1a in the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into midbrain dopamine neurons in culture and after transplantation into a Parkinson's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jingli; Donaldson, Angela; Yang, Ming; German, Michael S; Enikolopov, Grigori; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have provided important insight into the homeoprotein LIM homeobox transcription factor 1alpha (Lmx1a) and its role in the commitment of cells to a midbrain dopamine (mDA) fate in the developing mouse. We show here that Lmx1a also plays a pivotal role in the mDA differentiation of human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Thus, as indicated by small interfering RNA experiments, the transient early expression of Lmx1a is necessary for the coordinated expression of all other dopamine (DA)-specific phenotypic traits as hES cells move from multipotent human neural progenitor cells (hNPs) to more restricted precursor cells in vitro. Moreover, only Lmx1a-specified hNPs have the potential to differentiate into bona fide mDA neurons after transplantation into the 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rat striatum. In contrast, cortical human neuronal precursor cells (HNPCs) and mouse subventricular zone cells do not express Lmx1a or become mDA neurons even when placed in an environment that fosters their DA differentiation in vitro or in vivo. These findings suggest that Lmx1a may be critical to the development of mDA neurons from hES cells and that, along with other key early DA markers (i.e., Aldh1a1), may prove to be extremely useful for the selection of appropriately staged and suitably mDA-specified hES cells for cell replacement in Parkinson's disease.

  1. Music exposure improves spatial cognition by enhancing the BDNF level of dorsal hippocampal subregions in the developing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingshou; Chen, Wenxi; Wang, Yanran; Jing, Wei; Gao, Shan; Guo, Daqing; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-03-01

    Previous research has shown that dorsal hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory process. Music exposure can enhance brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression level in dorsal hippocampus (DH) and thus enhance spatial cognition ability. But whether music experience may affect different subregions of DH in the same degree remains unclear. Here, we studied the effects of exposure to Mozart K.448 on learning behavior in developing rats using the classical Morris water maze task. The results showed that early music exposure could enhance significantly learning performance of the rats in the water maze test. Meanwhile, the BDNF/TrkB level of dorsal hippocampus CA3 (dCA3) and dentate gyrus (dDG) was significantly enhanced in rats exposed to Mozart music as compared to those without music exposure. In contrast, the BDNF/TrkB level of dorsal hippocampus CA1 (dCA1) was not affected. The results suggest that the spatial memory improvement by music exposure in rats may be associated with the enhanced BDNF/TrkB level of dCA3 and dDG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Roles of subthreshold calcium current and sodium current in spontaneous firing of mouse midbrain dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puopolo, Michelino; Raviola, Elio; Bean, Bruce P

    2007-01-17

    We used a preparation of acutely dissociated neurons to quantify the ionic currents driving the spontaneous firing of substantia nigra pars compacta neurons, isolated from transgenic mice in which the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter drives expression of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) on the outer surface of the cell membrane. Dissociated neurons identified by fluorescent antibodies to PLAP showed firing properties similar to those of dopaminergic neurons in brain slice, including rhythmic spontaneous firing of broad action potentials and, in some cells, rhythmic oscillatory activity in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX). Spontaneous activity in TTX had broader, smaller spikes than normal pacemaking and was stopped by removal of external calcium. Normal pacemaking was also consistently silenced by replacement of external calcium by cobalt and was slowed by more specific calcium channel blockers. Nimodipine produced a slowing of pacemaking frequency. Pacemaking was also slowed by the P/Q-channel blocker omega-Aga-IVA, but the N-type channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA had no effect. In voltage-clamp experiments, using records of pacemaking as command voltage, cobalt-sensitive current and TTX-sensitive current were both sizeable at subthreshold voltages between spikes. Cobalt-sensitive current was consistently larger than TTX-sensitive current at interspike voltages from -70 to -50 mV, with TTX-sensitive current larger at voltages positive to -45 mV. These results support previous evidence for a major role of voltage-dependent calcium channels in driving pacemaking of midbrain dopamine neurons and suggest that multiple calcium channel types contribute to this function. The results also show a significant contribution of subthreshold TTX-sensitive sodium current.

  3. Sound-by-sound thalamic stimulation modulates midbrain auditory excitability and relative binaural sensitivity in frogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash ePonnath

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Descending circuitry can modulate auditory processing, biasing sensitivity to particular stimulus parameters and locations. Using awake in vivo single unit recordings, this study tested whether electrical stimulation of the thalamus modulates auditory excitability and relative binaural sensitivity in neurons of the amphibian midbrain. In addition, by using electrical stimuli that were either longer than the acoustic stimuli (i.e., seconds or presented on a sound-by-sound basis (ms, experiments addressed whether the form of modulation depended on the temporal structure of the electrical stimulus. Following long duration electrical stimulation (3-10 s of 20 Hz square pulses, excitability (spikes / acoustic stimulus to free-field noise stimuli decreased by 32%, but returned over 600 s. In contrast, sound-by-sound electrical stimulation using a single 2 ms duration electrical pulse 25 ms before each noise stimulus caused faster and varied forms of modulation: modulation lasted < 2 s and, in different cells, excitability either decreased, increased or shifted in latency. Within cells, the modulatory effect of sound-by-sound electrical stimulation varied between different acoustic stimuli, including for different male calls, suggesting modulation is specific to certain stimulus attributes. For binaural units, modulation depended on the ear of input, as sound-by-sound electrical stimulation preceding dichotic acoustic stimulation caused asymmetric modulatory effects: sensitivity shifted for sounds at only one ear, or by different relative amounts for both ears. This caused a change in the relative difference in binaural sensitivity. Thus, sound-by-sound electrical stimulation revealed fast and ear-specific (i.e., lateralized auditory modulation that is potentially suited to shifts in auditory attention during sound segregation in the auditory scene.

  4. Non-Monotonic Relation Between Noise Exposure Severity and Neuronal Hyperactivity in the Auditory Midbrain

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    Lara Li Hesse

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of tinnitus can be linked to hearing loss in the majority of cases, but there is nevertheless a large degree of unexplained heterogeneity in the relation between hearing loss and tinnitus. Part of the problem might be that hearing loss is usually quantified in terms of increased hearing thresholds, which only provides limited information about the underlying cochlear damage. Moreover, noise exposure that does not cause hearing threshold loss can still lead to hidden hearing loss (HHL, i.e. functional deafferentation of auditory nerve fibres (ANFs through loss of synaptic ribbons in inner hair cells. Whilst it is known that increased hearing thresholds can trigger increases in spontaneous neural activity in the central auditory system, i.e. a putative neural correlate of tinnitus, the central effects of HHL have not yet been investigated. Here, we exposed mice to octave-band noise at 100 and 105 dB SPL, to generate HHL and permanent increases of hearing thresholds, respectively. Deafferentation of ANFs was confirmed through measurement of auditory brainstem responses and cochlear immunohistochemistry. Acute extracellular recordings from the auditory midbrain (inferior colliculus demonstrated increases in spontaneous neuronal activity (a putative neural correlate of tinnitus in both groups. Surprisingly the increase in spontaneous activity was most pronounced in the mice with HHL, suggesting that the relation between hearing loss and neuronal hyperactivity might be more complex than currently understood. Our computational model indicated that these differences in neuronal hyperactivity could arise from different degrees of deafferentation of low-threshold ANFs in the two exposure groups.Our results demonstrate that HHL is sufficient to induce changes in central auditory processing, and they also indicate a non-monotonic relationship between cochlear damage and neuronal hyperactivity, suggesting an explanation for why tinnitus might

  5. Comparison of Midbrain and Thalamic Space-Specific Neurons in Barn Owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María Lucía; Peña, José Luis

    2008-01-01

    Spatial receptive fields of neurons in the auditory pathway of the barn owl result from the sensitivity to combinations of interaural time (ITD) and level differences across stimulus frequency. Both the forebrain and tectum of the owl contain such neurons. The neural pathways, which lead to the forebrain and tectal representations of auditory space, separate before the midbrain map of auditory space is synthesized. The first nuclei that belong exclusively to either the forebrain or the tectal pathways are the nucleus ovoidalis (Ov) and the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx), respectively. Both receive projections from the lateral shell subdivision of the inferior colliculus but are not interconnected. Previous studies indicate that the owl’s tectal representation of auditory space is different from those found in the owl’s forebrain and the mammalian brain. We addressed the question of whether the computation of spatial cues in both pathways is the same by comparing the ITD tuning of Ov and ICx neurons. Unlike in ICx, the relationship between frequency and ITD tuning had not been studied in single Ov units. In contrast to the conspicuous frequency independent ITD tuning of space-specific neurons of ICx, ITD selectivity varied with frequency in Ov. We also observed that the spatially tuned neurons of Ov respond to lower frequencies and are more broadly tuned to ITD than in ICx. Thus there are differences in the integration of frequency and ITD in the two sound-localization pathways. Thalamic neurons integrate spatial information not only within a broader frequency band but also across ITD channels. PMID:16424454

  6. Activation of midbrain and ventral striatal regions implicates salience processing during a modified beads task.

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    Christine Esslinger

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Metacognition, i.e. critically reflecting on and monitoring one's own reasoning, has been linked behaviorally to the emergence of delusions and is a focus of cognitive therapy in patients with schizophrenia. However, little is known about the neural processing underlying metacognitive function. To address this issue, we studied brain activity during a modified beads task which has been used to measure a "Jumping to Conclusions" (JTC bias in schizophrenia patients. METHODS: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify neural systems active in twenty-five healthy subjects when solving a modified version of the "beads task", which requires a probabilistic decision after a variable amount of data has been requested by the participants. We assessed brain activation over the duration of a trial and at the time point of decision making. RESULTS: Analysis of activation during the whole process of probabilistic reasoning showed an extended network including the prefronto-parietal executive functioning network as well as medial parieto-occipital regions. During the decision process alone, activity in midbrain and ventral striatum was detected, as well as in thalamus, medial occipital cortex and anterior insula. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that probabilistic reasoning shares neural substrates with executive functions. In addition, our finding that brain regions commonly associated with salience processing are active during probabilistic reasoning identifies a candidate mechanism that could underlie the behavioral link between dopamine-dependent aberrant salience and JTC in schizophrenia. Further studies with delusional schizophrenia patients will have to be performed to substantiate this link.

  7. Neural and response correlations to natural complex sounds in the auditory midbrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Lyzwa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available How natural communication sounds are spatially represented across the inferior colliculus, the main center of convergence for auditory information in the midbrain, is not known. The neural representation of the acoustic stimuli results from the interplay of locally differing input and the organization of spectral and temporal neural preferences that change gradually across the nucleus. This raises the question how similar the neural representation of the communication sounds is across these gradients of neural preferences, and whether it also changes gradually. Analyzed neural recordings were multi-unit cluster spike trains from guinea pigs presented with a spectrotemporally rich set of eleven species-specific communication sounds. Using cross-correlation, we analyzed the response similarity of spiking activity across a broad frequency range for neurons of similar and different frequency tuning. Furthermore, we separated the contribution of the stimulus to the correlations to investigate whether similarity is only attributable to the stimulus, or, whether interactions exist between the multi-unit clusters that lead to neural correlations and whether these follow the same representation as the response correlations. We found that similarity of responses is dependent on the neurons' spatial distance for similarly and differently frequency-tuned neurons, and that similarity decreases gradually with spatial distance. Significant neural correlations exist, and contribute to the total response similarity. Our findings suggest that for multi-unit clusters in the mammalian inferior colliculus, the gradual response similarity with spatial distance to natural complex sounds is shaped by neural interactions and the gradual organization of neural preferences.

  8. Correlation between ethanol behavioral sensitization and midbrain dopamine neuron reactivity to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didone, Vincent; Masson, Sébastien; Quoilin, Caroline; Seutin, Vincent; Quertemont, Etienne

    2016-03-01

    Repeated ethanol injections lead to a sensitization of its stimulant effects in mice. Some recent results argue against a role for ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons in ethanol behavioral sensitization. The aim of the present study was to test whether in vivo ethanol locomotor sensitization correlates with changes in either basal- or ethanol-evoked firing rates of dopamine neurons in vitro. Female Swiss mice were daily injected with 2.5 g/kg ethanol (or saline in the control group) for 7 days and their locomotor activity was recorded. At the end of the sensitization procedure, extracellular recordings were made from dopaminergic neurons in midbrain slices from these mice. Significantly higher spontaneous basal firing rates of dopamine neurons were recorded in ethanol-sensitized mice relative to control mice, but without correlations with the behavioral effects. The superfusion of sulpiride, a dopamine D2 antagonist, induced a stronger increase of dopamine neuron firing rates in ethanol-sensitized mice. This shows that the D2 feedback in dopamine neurons is preserved after chronic ethanol administration and argues against a reduced D2 feedback as an explanation for the increased dopamine neuron basal firing rates in ethanol-sensitized mice. Finally, ethanol superfusion (10-100 mM) significantly increased the firing rates of dopamine neurons and this effect was of higher magnitude in ethanol-sensitized mice. Furthermore, there were significant correlations between such a sensitization of dopamine neuron activity and ethanol behavioral sensitization. These results support the hypothesis that changes in brain dopamine neuron activity contribute to the behavioral sensitization of the stimulant effects of ethanol. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Inhibition does not affect the timing code for vocalizations in the mouse auditory midbrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G Dimitrov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many animals use a diverse repertoire of complex acoustic signals to convey different types of information to other animals. The information in each vocalization therefore must be coded by neurons in the auditory system. One way in which the auditory system may discriminate among different vocalizations is by having highly selective neurons, where only one or two different vocalizations evoke a strong response from a single neuron. Another strategy is to have specific spike timing patterns for particular vocalizations such that each neural response can be matched to a specific vocalization. Both of these strategies may occur in the auditory midbrain of mice. However, the neural mechanisms underlying rate and time coding are unclear, but it is likely that inhibition plays a role. Here, we examined whether inhibition is involved in creating neural selectivity to vocalizations via rate and/or time coding in the mouse inferior colliculus. We examined extracellular single unit responses to vocalizations before and after iontophoretically blocking GABA_A and glycine receptors in the IC of awake mice. In general, we found that pharmacologically blocking inhibitory receptors in the IC increased response rate to vocalizations but did not dramatically affect spike timing. We observed two main effects when inhibition was locally blocked: 1 Highly selective neurons maintained their selectivity and the information about the stimuli did not change, but response rate increased slightly. 2 Neurons that responded to vocalizations in the control condition, also responded to the same stimuli in the test condition, with similar timing and pattern, but with a greater number of spikes, and, in some cases, greater reliability. Interestingly, in some neurons, blocking inhibition had no effect on vocalization-evoked responses. Overall, we found that inhibition in the IC does not play a substantial role in creating the reliable neuronal temporal patterns in response to

  10. Sound-by-sound thalamic stimulation modulates midbrain auditory excitability and relative binaural sensitivity in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnath, Abhilash; Farris, Hamilton E

    2014-01-01

    Descending circuitry can modulate auditory processing, biasing sensitivity to particular stimulus parameters and locations. Using awake in vivo single unit recordings, this study tested whether electrical stimulation of the thalamus modulates auditory excitability and relative binaural sensitivity in neurons of the amphibian midbrain. In addition, by using electrical stimuli that were either longer than the acoustic stimuli (i.e., seconds) or presented on a sound-by-sound basis (ms), experiments addressed whether the form of modulation depended on the temporal structure of the electrical stimulus. Following long duration electrical stimulation (3-10 s of 20 Hz square pulses), excitability (spikes/acoustic stimulus) to free-field noise stimuli decreased by 32%, but returned over 600 s. In contrast, sound-by-sound electrical stimulation using a single 2 ms duration electrical pulse 25 ms before each noise stimulus caused faster and varied forms of modulation: modulation lasted sound-by-sound electrical stimulation varied between different acoustic stimuli, including for different male calls, suggesting modulation is specific to certain stimulus attributes. For binaural units, modulation depended on the ear of input, as sound-by-sound electrical stimulation preceding dichotic acoustic stimulation caused asymmetric modulatory effects: sensitivity shifted for sounds at only one ear, or by different relative amounts for both ears. This caused a change in the relative difference in binaural sensitivity. Thus, sound-by-sound electrical stimulation revealed fast and ear-specific (i.e., lateralized) auditory modulation that is potentially suited to shifts in auditory attention during sound segregation in the auditory scene.

  11. The Dorsal Attentional System in Oculomotor Learning of Predictive Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip eTseng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal attentional network is known for its role in directing top-down visual attention towards task-relevant stimuli. This goal-directed nature of the dorsal network makes it a suitable candidate for processing and extracting predictive information from the visual environment. In this mini review we briefly summarize some of the findings that delineate the neural substrates that contribute to predictive learning at both levels within the dorsal attentional system: including the frontal eye field and posterior parietal cortex. We also discuss the similarities and differences between these two regions when it comes to learning predictive information. The current findings from the literature suggest that the frontal eye fields may be more involved in top-down spatial attention, whereas the parietal cortex is involved in processing task-relevant attentional influences driven by stimulus salience, both contribute to the processing of predictive cues at different time points.

  12. Surgical Strategy and Techniques for Low-Profile Dorsal Plating in Treating Dorsally Displaced Unstable Distal Radius Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yoshitaka; Gotani, Hiroyuki; Hibino, Naohito; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Satoh, Ryousuke; Sasaki, Kousuke; Kanchanathepsak, Thepparat

    2017-05-01

    Background The low-profile dorsal locking plating (DLP) technique is useful for treating dorsally comminuted intra-articular distal radius fractures; however, due to the complications associated with DLP, the technique is not widely used. Methods A retrospective review of 24 consecutive cases treated with DLP were done. Results All cases were classified into two types by surgical strategy according to the fracture pattern. In type 1, there is a volar fracture line distal to the watershed line in the dorsally displaced fragment, and this type is treated by H-framed DLP. In type 2, the displaced dorsal die-punch fragment is associated with a minimally displaced styloid shearing fracture or a transverse volar fracture line. We found that the die-punch fragment was reduced by the buttress effect of small l-shaped DLP after stabilization of the styloid shearing for the volar segment by cannulated screws from radial styloid processes. At 6 months after surgery, outcomes were good or excellent based on the modified Mayo wrist scores with no serious complications except one case. The mean range of motion of each type was as follows: the palmar flexion was 50, 65 degrees, dorsiflexion was 70, 75 degrees, supination was 85, 85 degrees, and pronation was 80, 80 degrees; in type 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion DLP is a useful technique for the treatment of selected cases of dorsally displaced, comminuted intra-articular fractures of the distal radius with careful soft tissue coverage.

  13. [The dorsal nerve of the clitoris: surgical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaya, V; Aubin, A; Rogez, J-M; Douard, R; Delmas, V

    2014-03-01

    To describe the course of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris (DNC) to better define its anatomy in the human adult and to help surgeons to avoid iatrogenic injury during surgical procedures. An extensive review of the current literature was done on Medline via PubMed by using the following keywords: "anatomie du clitoris", "anatomy of clitoris", "nerf dorsal du clitoris", "dorsal nerve of clitoris", "réparation clitoridienne", "transposition clitoridienne", "surgery of the clitoris", "clitoridoplasty". This review analyzed dissection, magnetic resonance imaging, 3-dimensional sectional anatomy reconstruction and immuno-histochemical studies. The DNC comes from the pudendal nerve. He travels from under the inferior pubis ramus to the posterosuperior edge of the clitoral crus. The DNC reappears under the pubic symphysis and enters the deep component of the suspensory ligament. He runs on the dorsal face of the clitoral body at 11 and 1 o'clock. Distally, he gives many nervous ramifications, runs along the tunica and enters the glans. The NDC might be surgically injured (i) under the pubic symphysis, at the union of the two crus of clitoris and (ii) on the dorsal surface of the clitoral body. The pathway of the DNC on the dorsal face of the clitoris permits to approach the ventral face of the clitoris without risk of iatrogenic injuries. The distance between the pubic symphysis and the DNC implies that the incision should be done just under the pubic symphysis. Distally, the dissection of the DNC next the glands appears as dangerous and impossible, considering that the DNC is too close to the glandular tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Agenesis of the dorsal mesentery presenting in an adolescent

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    Anith Chacko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Agenesis of the dorsal mesentery is a rare occurrence that usually presents in children. It is associated with proximal small bowel malrotation as well as high jejunal atresia with discontinuity of the small bowel. We present a case report of an adolescent presenting with clinical features of proximal small bowel obstruction (confirmed on imaging as well as acute pancreatitis. At laparotomy, he was found to have no dorsal mesentery, without small bowel atresia, and the duodenum was fixed to the posterior abdominal wall. The patient recovered well and remained symptom-free.

  15. Dorsal approach for open reduction of complex metacarpophalangeal joint dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ryan W; Maschke, Steven D; Evans, Peter J; Lawton, Jeffrey N

    2008-11-01

    The metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint is resistant to injury due to its strong capsuloligamentous structures, which include the volar plate and deep transverse metacarpal and collateral ligaments. Complex MP joint dislocations are, by definition, irreducible by closed means and require open reduction, as the volar plate becomes entrapped between the metacarpal head and proximal phalanx. The dorsal approach may offer the following advantages: 1) reduced risk to palmarly displaced neurovascular structures, 2) facilitated management of osteochondral fractures, and 3) full exposure of the volar plate. However, the dorsal approach requires splitting of the volar plate for adequate reduction, which may delay recovery.

  16. Percutaneous fixation of selected scaphoid fractures by dorsal approach

    OpenAIRE

    Naranje, Sameer; Kotwal, P. P.; Shamshery, P.; Gupta, Vikas; Nag, H. L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate clinical, radiological and functional outcomes of selected cases of percutaneous fixation of scaphoid fractures via a dorsal approach. Percutaneous fixation by dorsal approach was done in 32 patients (mean age 32.2 years) involving both fresh and late scaphoid fracture presentations (mean 17 days). Fourteen cases of B1 type, ten cases of B2 and eight cases of C type (Herbert’s classification) were treated. The patients were prospectively followed up clinic...

  17. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Zebrafish Knock-in as a Novel Strategy to Study Midbrain-Hindbrain Boundary Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Chekuru, Avinash; Machate, Anja; Brand, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) acts as an organizer and controls the fate of neighboring cells to develop into either mesencephalic (midbrain) or metencephalic (hindbrain) cells by secreting signaling molecules like Wnt1 and Fgf8. The zebrafish is an excellent vertebrate model for studying MHB development due to the ease of gene manipulation and the possibility of following cellular dynamics and morphogenetic processes using live imaging. Currently, only very few reporter and/or Cre-driver lines are available to study gene expression at the MHB, hampering the understanding of MHB development, and traditional transgenic technologies using promoter/enhancer fragments or bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated transgenesis often do not faithfully recapitulate endogenous expression patterns. In contrast, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing technology now provides a great opportunity to efficiently knock-in or knock-out genes. We have generated four CRISPR/Cas9-based knock-in fluorescent reporter lines for two crucial genes involved in MHB development, namely otx2 and pax2a. The coding sequences of the reporters were knocked-in upstream of the corresponding ATG and are, thus, under the control of the endogenous promoter/enhancer elements. Interestingly, this strategy does not disturb endogenous gene expression. Using the fast maturing fluorescent protein reporter, Venus, enabled us to follow MHB development using cell tracking and live imaging. In addition, we show that these reporter lines label various neuronal and glial cell types in the adult zebrafish brain, making them highly suitable for investigating embryonic and adult midbrain, hindbrain, and MHB development. PMID:28713249

  18. Mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running have larger midbrains: support for the mosaic model of brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, E M; Rezende, E L; Holness, L; Radtke, A; Lee, S K; Obenaus, A; Garland, T

    2013-02-01

    Increased brain size, relative to body mass, is a primary characteristic distinguishing the mammalian lineage. This greater encephalization has come with increased behavioral complexity and, accordingly, it has been suggested that selection on behavioral traits has been a significant factor leading to the evolution of larger whole-brain mass. In addition, brains may evolve in a mosaic fashion, with functional components having some freedom to evolve independently from other components, irrespective of, or in addition to, changes in size of the whole brain. We tested whether long-term selective breeding for high voluntary wheel running in laboratory house mice results in changes in brain size, and whether those changes have occurred in a concerted or mosaic fashion. We measured wet and dry brain mass via dissections and brain volume with ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging of brains that distinguished the caudate-putamen, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum and forebrain. Adjusting for body mass as a covariate, mice from the four replicate high-runner (HR) lines had statistically larger non-cerebellar wet and dry brain masses than those from four non-selected control lines, with no differences in cerebellum wet or dry mass or volume. Moreover, the midbrain volume in HR mice was ~13% larger (PHR and control lines. We hypothesize that the enlarged midbrain of HR mice is related to altered neurophysiological function in their dopaminergic system. To our knowledge, this is the first example in which selection for a particular mammalian behavior has been shown to result in a change in size of a specific brain region.

  19. Presynaptic α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors increase glutamate release and serotonin neuron excitability in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduño, Julieta; Galindo-Charles, Luis; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Mihailescu, Stefan; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador

    2012-10-24

    Several behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by changes in serotonin (5-HT) release in brain areas that receive serotonergic afferents from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In vitro experiments have demonstrated that nicotine increases the firing activity in the majority of DRN 5-HT neurons and that DRN contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at both somata and presynaptic elements. One of the most common presynaptic effects of nicotine is to increase glutamate release. Although DRN receives profuse glutamatergic afferents, the effect of nicotine on glutamate release in the DRN has not been studied in detail. Using whole-cell recording techniques, we investigated the effects of nicotine on the glutamatergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons in rat midbrain slices. Low nicotine concentrations, in the presence of bicuculline and tetrodotoxin (TTX), increased the frequency but did not change the amplitude of glutamate-induced EPSCs, recorded from identified 5-HT neurons. Nicotine-induced increase of glutamatergic EPSC frequency persisted 10-20 min after drug withdrawal. This nicotinic effect was mimicked by exogenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh) or inhibition of ACh metabolism. In addition, the nicotine-induced increase in EPSC frequency was abolished by blockade of α4β2 nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels, or intracellular calcium signaling but not by α7 nAChR antagonists. These data suggest that both nicotine and endogenous ACh can increase glutamate release through activation of presynaptic α4β2 but not α7 nAChRs in the DRN. The effect involves long-term changes in synaptic function, and it is dependent on voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic calcium stores.

  20. Binaural response properties of low-frequency neurons in the gerbil dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siveke, Ida; Pecka, Michael; Seidl, Armin H; Baudoux, Sylvie; Grothe, Benedikt

    2006-09-01

    Differences in intensity and arrival time of sounds at the two ears, interaural intensity and time differences (IID, ITD), are the chief cues for sound localization. Both cues are initially processed in the superior olivary complex (SOC), which projects to the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL) and the auditory midbrain. Here we present basic response properties of low-frequency (neurons and their binaural sensitivity to ITDs and IIDs in the anesthetized gerbil. We found many neurons showing binaural properties similar to those reported for SOC neurons. IID-properties were similar to that of the contralateral lateral superior olive (LSO). A majority of cells had an ITD sensitivity resembling that of either the ipsilateral medial superior olive (MSO) or the contralateral LSO. A smaller number of cells displayed intermediate types of ITD sensitivity. In neurons with MSO-like response ITDs that evoked maximal discharges were mostly outside of the range of ITDs the gerbil naturally experiences. The maxima of the first derivative of their ITD-functions (steepest slope), however, were well within the physiological range of ITDs. This finding is consistent with the concept of a population rather than a place code for ITDs. Moreover, we describe several other binaural properties as well as physiological and anatomical evidence for a small but significant input from the contralateral MSO. The large number of ITD-sensitive low-frequency neurons implicates a substantial role for the DNLL in ITD processing and promotes this nucleus as a suitable model for further studies on ITD-coding.

  1. Effects of dorsal periaqueductal gray CRF1- and CRF2-receptor stimulation in animal models of panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergio, Thatiane de Oliveira; Spiacci, Ailton; Zangrossi, Hélio

    2014-11-01

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that dysregulation of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling may contribute to the etiology of anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and panic. The dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (dPAG) in the midbrain has been considered a key region involved in the physiopathology of anxiety and panic. Administration of CRF in this structure enhances the expression of anxiety-related defensive behaviors in different animal models. Controversial results have been obtained regarding the involvement of CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the regulation of panic-related responses. We report here that CRF (0.0625-1 μg) in the dPAG facilitates escape expression in two animal models that associate this behavior with panic, the elevated T-maze and the electrical stimulation of the dPAG. This effect, equally observed after CRF injection in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral columns of the PAG, is due to the activation of CRF1 receptors as revealed by its blockade by the CRF1 receptor antagonist antalarmin. In the elevated T-maze, CRF also facilitates inhibitory avoidance acquisition, suggesting an anxiogenic effect. Local administration of urocortin 2 (0.01-0.1 μg), a preferential CRF2 receptor agonist, failed to change escape expression, but impaired avoidance learning, indicating an anxiolytic effect. The results indicate that CRF1 receptors in the dPAG play a pervasive role in the regulation of defensive responses associated with both generalized anxiety and panic. Recruitment of CRF2 receptors only impacts upon the former type of behaviors, leading to an effect opposed to that caused by CRF1 receptor activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dorsal Periaqueductal gray simultaneously modulates ventral Subiculum induced-plasticity in the Basolateral Amygdala and the Nucleus Accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer eHorovitz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ventral subiculum of the hippocampus projects both to the basolateral amygdala, which is typically, associated with a response to aversive stimuli, as well as to the nucleus accumbens, which is typically associated with a response to appetitive stimuli. Traditionally, studies of the responses to emotional events focus on either negative or positive affect-related processes, however, emotional experiences often affect both. The ability of high-level processing brain regions (e.g. medial prefrontal cortex to modulate the balance between negative and positive affect-related regions was examined extensively. In contrast, the ability of low-level processing areas (e.g. periaqueductal grey - PAG to do so, has not been sufficiently studied. To address whether midbrain structures have the ability to modulate limbic regions, we first examined the ventral subiculum stimulation’s (vSub ability to induce plasticity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA and nucleus accumbens (NAcc simultaneously in rats. Further, dorsal PAG (dPAG priming ability to differentially modulate vSub stimulation induced plasticity in the BLA and the NAcc was subsequently examined. vSub stimulation resulted in plasticity in both the BLA and the NAcc simultaneously. Moreover, depending on stimulus intensity, differential dPAG priming effects on LTP in these two regions were observed. The results demonstrate that negative and positive affect-related processes may be simultaneously modulated. Furthermore, under some conditions lower-level processing areas, such as the dPAG, may differentially modulate plasticity in these regions and thus affect the long-term emotional outcome of the experience.

  3. Midbrain hematoma presenting with isolated bilateral palsy of the third cranial nerve in a Moroccan man: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Ouali Ouarda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bilateral third nerve palsy secondary to a hemorrhagic stroke is exceptional. To the best of our knowledge, no similar case has been reported in the literature. Case presentation We describe the case of a 69-year-old Moroccan man who presented with isolated sudden bilateral third nerve palsy. Computed tomography (CT of the brain revealed a midbrain hematoma. The oculomotor function gradually and completely improved over eight months of follow-up. Conclusion Stroke should be included in the differential diagnosis of sudden isolated oculomotor paralysis even when it is bilateral because of the severity of the underlying disease and the importance of its therapeutic implications.

  4. Lasting Differential Effects on Plasticity Induced by Prenatal Stress in Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayane Grigoryan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early life adversaries have a profound impact on the developing brain structure and functions that persist long after the original traumatic experience has vanished. One of the extensively studied brain structures in relation to early life stress has been the hippocampus because of its unique association with cognitive processes of the brain. While the entire hippocampus shares the same intrinsic organization, it assumes different functions in its dorsal and ventral sectors (DH and VH, resp., based on different connectivity with other brain structures. In the present review, we summarize the differences between DH and VH and discuss functional and structural effects of prenatal stress in the two sectors, with the realization that much is yet to be explored in understanding the opposite reactivity of the DH and VH to stressful stimulation.

  5. Reinnervating the penis in spina bifida patients in the United States: ilioinguinal-to-dorsal-penile neurorrhaphy in two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Micah A; Avellino, Anthony M; Shurtleff, David; Lendvay, Thomas S

    2013-10-01

    Penile sensation is absent in some patients with myelomeningocele owing to the dysfunction of the pudendal nerve. Here, we describe the introduction of penile sensation via ilioinguinal-to-dorsal-penile neurorrhaphy in two patients with penile anesthesia due to neural tube defects. To establish penile sensation via ilioinguinal-to-dorsal-penile-nerve neurorrhaphy. A 20-year-old and a 35-year-old male with L5/S1 myelomeningocele were both highly functioning and ambulatory, with intact ilioinguinal nerve distribution sensation but anesthesia of the penis and glans. They were sexually active and able to ejaculate antegrade. Both had high International Index of Erectile Function scores for confidence to achieve erection sufficient for intercourse. An incision was made from anterior superior iliac crest to the glans penis to expose the inguinal canal and ilioinguinal nerve. The ilioinguinal and dorsal penile nerve were transected and anastomosed. The anastomotic site was then wrapped in a hemostatic agent and a drain was left in place. For penile rehabilitation, both patients were instructed to stimulate the penis while looking at the genitalia to encourage redistribution of perceived sensation. Presence of erogenous penile sensation was tested by neurologic examination and patient feedback, and patients completed sexual health questionnaires. Both patients reported paresthesias of the groin with penile stimulation 1 month after surgery. Both patients are now 24 months postoperative and have erogenous sensation on the ipsilateral glans and shaft during intercourse. Neither patient has difficulty achieving or maintaining erections. We present two patients with dorsal penile reinnervation via the ilioinguinal nerve. Although nerve reinnervation has been used in urological procedures, this is the first description of an attempt to resupply penile sensation via the dorsal penile nerve in the United States with a minimum of 18 months follow-up. Early follow-up suggests

  6. δ-opioid receptor function in the dorsal striatum plays a role in high levels of ethanol consumption in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Carsten K; Simms, Jeffrey A; Li, Rui; Mill, Douglas; Yi, Henry; Feduccia, Allison A; Santos, Nathan; Bartlett, Selena E

    2012-03-28

    Binge-like patterns of excessive drinking during young adulthood increase the propensity for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) later in adult life; however, the mechanisms that drive this are not completely understood. Previous studies showed that the δ-opioid peptide receptor (DOP-R) is dynamically regulated by exposure to ethanol and that the DOP-R plays a role in ethanol-mediated behaviors. The aim of this study was to determine the role of the DOP-R in high ethanol consumption from young adulthood through to late adulthood by measuring DOP-R-mediated [(35)S]GTPγS binding in brain membranes and DOP-R-mediated analgesia using a rat model of high ethanol consumption in Long Evans rats. We show that DOP-R activity in the dorsal striatum and DOP-R-mediated analgesia changes during development, being highest during early adulthood and reduced in late adulthood. Intermittent access to ethanol but not continuous ethanol or water from young adulthood leads to an increase in DOP-R activity in the dorsal striatum and DOP-R-mediated analgesia into late adulthood. Multiple microinfusions of naltrindole into the dorsal striatum or multiple systemic administration of naltrindole reduces ethanol consumption, and following termination of treatment, DOP-R activity in the dorsal striatum is attenuated. These findings suggest that DOP-R activity in the dorsal striatum plays a role in high levels of ethanol consumption and suggest that targeting the DOP-R is an alternative strategy for the treatment of AUDs.

  7. [Effects of electroacupuncture on pain reactions, expression of spinal kappa-opioid receptor and contents of enkephalin and beta-endorphin in periaqueductal gray of midbrain in dysmenorrhea model rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Xuan; Guo, Meng-Wei; Zhao, Ya-Fang; Ding, Xi-Yan; Li, Chun-Hua; Ji, Bo; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Lu-Fen

    2012-02-01

    To observe effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on the expression of kappa-opioid receptor in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and contents of enkephalin(ENK) and beta-endorphin (beta-EP) in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) of midbrain in dysmenorrheal rats, so as to reveal its underlying mechanism in relieving dysmenorrhea. A total of 80 female SD rats were randomized into saline control (control), model, Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Xuanzhong (GB 39), non-acupoint groups (16 rats/group). Dysmenorrhea model was established by subcutaneous injection of estradiol benzoate (0.5 mg/rat on the 1st day and 10th day, 0.2 mg/rat from the 2nd day to the 9th day). One hour after the last injection, oxytocin (2 U/rat) was given intraperitoneally, for rats of the control group, the same dose of saline was given (i. p.). On the 10th day, EA (2 Hz/100 Hz, 0.1-0.3 mA) was applied to "Sanyinjiao" (SP 6), "Xuanzhong" (GB 39) and non-acupoint (the mid-point between the Stomach Meridian and Gallbladder Meridian, and in parallel with GB 39) for 20 min, respectively. Latency and number of writhing response, and writhing score (according to Schmauss's and Yaksh's method) were recorded. The expression of kappa-opioid receptor (kappa-OR) in T13, L1 , L2, L6 and S1 segments of spinal cord was determined by immunohistochemistry, and the contents of ENK and beta-EP in the midbrain PAG were assayed by ELISA. (1) Compared with the saline control group, the writhing latency of the model group was significantly shortened (P comparison with the control group, kappa-OR expression in the dorsal horn of L2 segment of spinal cord was upregulated significantly in the model group (P L1, L2, L6 and S1 segments in the SP 6 group were upregulated significantly (P L1, L2 and L6 DHs and in upregulating beta-EP content of PAG; and superior to non-acupoint in upregulating kappa-OR expression of spinal T13, L1, L2, L6 and S1 DHs and in increasing both ENK and beta-EP contents of PAG (P L1, L2 and S1 DHs, and in ENK and

  8. Development of the interpeduncular nucleus in the midbrain of Rhesus monkey and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenn, N J; Halfon, N; Rakic, P

    1978-02-20

    The development of the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) in primates was studied in rhesus monkey with 3H-thymidine autoradiographic, Nissl and Golgi methods and in humans in histological preparations from embryos and fetuses of different ages. Autoradiographic analysis demonstrated that the neurons of the monkey IPN underwent their final cell division between postconception day 36 (E36) and E42, which corresponds to Stages 17 through 21 of Hendrickx and Sawyer. Autoradiograms of monkeys sacrificed at various short intervals following exposure to a pulse of 3H-thymidine showed that IPN neurons were generated in the proximity of the ventricular surface near the confluence of the 3rd ventricle and cerebral aqueduct, migrated ventrally along the midline and then spread laterally after reaching the ventral midbrain, where IPN was first recognized at E45 (Stage 23). The distribution of successively generated neurons in autoradiograms revealed caudal to rostal and lateral to medial spatiotemporal gradients. Differentiation of IPN neuronal size and development of Nissl substance began in rhesus monkey only after postmitotic cells had reached their destination and seemed to be pronounced mainly through E104. However, growth of the dendrites and elaboration of their side branches as seen in Golgi impregnations progressed gradually from E81 to birth (E165) and perhaps even later. Analysis of histological preparations of a series of human embryos and fetuses was used to derive similar information indirectly, since the autoradiographic method cannot be applied to man. It was found that IPN neurons in human probably underwent their final division between Carnegie Stage 17 and 21. Similarly, as in monkey, postmitotic cells in human IPN displayed an inverted fountain pattern of cellular migration. IPN could first be delineated at Stage 23. There was evidence for both caudal to rostral and lateral to medial spatiotemporal gradients in the human, as in the monkey. Thus, in monkey and

  9. Role of the Dorsal Hippocampus in Object Memory Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, Sara; Russo, Fabio; Torromino, Giulia; Pendolino, Valentina; Calabresi, Paolo; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal hippocampus is crucial for mammalian spatial memory, but its exact role in item memory is still hotly debated. Recent evidence in humans suggested that the hippocampus might be selectively involved in item short-term memory to deal with an increasing memory load. In this study, we sought to test this hypothesis. To this aim we developed…

  10. Compresión medular dorsal extradural por condroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Srota

    1950-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time in Argentine bibliography a chondroma of the vertebra with extradural dorsal medular compression, is described. The clinical characteristics of the onset by intermitent medular claudication of Dejerine and the painless evolution until surgical intervention, are stressed. The bibliography is put up to date and the radiographics signs and the pathologic anatomy of the chondromas, are studied.

  11. Syntabulin, a motor protein linker, controls dorsal determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Hideaki; Rothhämel, Sophie; Shimizu, Takashi; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Marlow, Florence L; Hibi, Masahiko

    2010-03-01

    In amphibian and teleost embryos, the dorsal determinants (DDs) are believed to be initially localized to the vegetal pole and then transported to the prospective dorsal side of the embryo along a microtubule array. The DDs are known to activate the canonical Wnt pathway and thereby promote the expression of genes that induce the dorsal organizer. Here, by identifying the locus of the maternal-effect ventralized mutant tokkaebi, we show that Syntabulin, a linker of the kinesin I motor protein, is essential for dorsal determination in zebrafish. We found that syntabulin mRNA is transported to the vegetal pole during oogenesis through the Bucky ball (Buc)-mediated Balbiani body-dependent pathway, which is necessary for establishment of animal-vegetal (AV) oocyte polarity. We demonstrate that Syntabulin is translocated from the vegetal pole in a microtubule-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that Syntabulin regulates the microtubule-dependent transport of the DDs, and provide evidence for the link between AV and dorsoventral axis formation.

  12. Evolutionary genetics of dorsal wing colour in Colias butterflies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellers, J.; Boggs, C.L.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of butterfly wing colouration is strongly affected by its multiple functions and by the correlated evolution of wing colour elements. Both factors may prevent local adaptation to ecological conditions. We investigated one aspect of wing colouration, the degree of dorsal wing

  13. Dorsal striatal dopamine, food preference and health perception in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallace, D.L.; Aarts, E.; Dang, L.C.; Greer, S.M.; Jagust, W.J.; D'Esposito, M.

    2014-01-01

    To date, few studies have explored the neurochemical mechanisms supporting individual differences in food preference in humans. Here we investigate how dorsal striatal dopamine, as measured by the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [(18)F]fluorometatyrosine (FMT), correlates with food-related

  14. Treatment of acute and subacute dorsal perilunate fracture dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Kucuk

    2014-04-01

    Outcomes: Results of the perilunate fracture dislocations treated in acute or subacute phase by open reduction and internal fixation via dorsal approach are satisfactory. There is a strong demand for prospective, randomized studies to compare the results of different treatment modalities. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(1.000: 1-7

  15. Expression of interleukin-1 beta in rat dorsal root ganglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, JCVM; Mantingh, [No Value; Brouwer, N; Biber, K; Kust, BM; Liem, RSB; Huitinga, [No Value; Tilders, FJH; Van Dam, AM; Boddeke, HWGM

    2001-01-01

    The expression of interleukin-lp was examined in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from adult rats using non-radioactive in Situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. At all spinal levels, approximately 70% of the DRG neurons appeared to express IL-1 beta mRNA: about 80% of these DRG neurons

  16. A congenital mucocele of the anterior dorsal tongue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong Chung, J.E.; Ensink, R.J.H.; Thijs, H.F.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2014-01-01

    We report on a new-born with a congenital mucocele on the anterior dorsal side of the tongue. The presentation as well as the differential diagnosis of congenital oral swellings is discussed. Because of breastfeeding problems the mucinous swelling was incised and drained two days after birth.

  17. A radiologic study on the urinary bladder following dorsal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pneumocystography and positive contrast cystography using solutrast® were carried out immediately after surgery and on the second operative day following dorsal and ventral cystotomy in 22 adult mongrel dogs. In all the radiographs, there was no contrast observed in the abdominal cavity and the apex of the bladder had ...

  18. Development and functional significance of dorsal air bags in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It appears that airbags may provide an effective intermediate insulatory mechanism for the nestlings while they are developing their thermoregulatory ability. Therefore, it is suggested that the dorsal air bags evolved primarily for thermoregulatory benefits to nestlings, although further research is required. Ostrich 2009, 80(1): ...

  19. Dorsal Phalloplasty to Preserve Penis Length after Penile Prosthesis Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaeer, Osama; Shaeer, Kamal; Rahman, Islam A

    2017-02-01

    Following penile prosthesis implantation (PPI), patients may complain of a decrease in visible penis length. A dorsal phalloplasty defines the penopubic junction by tacking pubic skin to the pubis, revealing the base of the penis. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a dorsal phalloplasty in increasing the visible penis length following PPI. An inflatable penile prosthesis was implanted in 13 patients with severe erectile dysfunction (ED) at the Kamal Shaeer Hospital, Cairo, Egypt, from January 2013 to May 2014. During the surgery, nonabsorbable tacking sutures were used to pin the pubic skin to the pubis through the same penoscrotal incision. Intraoperative penis length was measured before and after the dorsal phalloplasty. Overall patient satisfaction was measured on a 5-point rating scale and patients were requested to subjectively compare their postoperative penis length with memories of their penis length before the onset of ED. Intraoperatively, the dorsal phalloplasty increased the visible length of the erect penis by an average of 25.6%. The average length before and after tacking was 10.2 ± 2.9 cm and 13.7 ± 2.8 cm, respectively (P <0.002). Postoperatively, seven patients (53.8%) reported a longer penis, five patients (38.5%) reported no change in length and one patient (7.7%) reported a slightly shorter penis. The mean overall patient satisfaction score was 4.9 ± 0.3. None of the patients developed postoperative complications. A dorsal phalloplasty during PPI is an effective method of increasing visible penis length, therefore minimising the impression of a shorter penis after implantation.

  20. Plantar and dorsal foot loading measurements in patients after rotationplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmann, A; Rosenbaum, D; Winkelmann, W

    2000-06-01

    The present study investigated the plantar and dorsal foot loading patterns inside the prosthesis of patients after rotationplasty. In vivo foot pressure distribution measurements during free walking in rotationplasty patients at an average follow-up of 10.4 years after surgery. Fourteen subjects participated in the study and were measured during free walking. Capacitive pressure sensitive insoles were worn inside the shaft of the prosthesis either on the plantar or the dorsal aspect of the foot. Between 5 and 15 steps (mean 10.5) during full gait were selected and averaged to present a typical loading pattern for the individual patient. The measurements were reproducible and indicated that the main loading areas of the rotated foot inside the prosthesis are medially on the dorsal aspect and in the heel and toe region or the heel and midfoot region on the plantar aspect. The dorsal loading area was smaller than the plantar area (P=0.003). The force was higher on the plantar than on the dorsal aspect (P=0.005) but the loading time was shorter (P=0.008). In patients with callosities the high pressure areas coincided with the affected regions. The information gained from the pressure measurements support the understanding of foot loading characteristics in this anatomically and biomechanically unusual situation. This knowledge may be used to support the fitting process of new prosthetic designs for patients after rotationplasty. Foot loading capacity is one of the main factors limiting the activity level of rotationplasty patients. Therefore, a better understanding of foot loading characteristics might help to prevent overloading of certain foot structures and eventually improve the prosthetic fit with a direct benefit to the individual patient.

  1. Beyond the midbrain atrophy: wide spectrum of structural MRI finding in cases of pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Keita; Tokumaru, Aya M.; Shimoji, Keigo [Tokyo Metropolitan Medical Center of Gerontology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Murayama, Shigeo; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Morimoto, Satoru [Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan); Aiba, Ikuko [National Hospital Organization Higashi Nagoya National Hospital, Department of Neurology, Nagoya (Japan); Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Matsukawa, Noriyuki [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya (Japan); Hashizume, Yoshio [Fukushimura Hospital, Choju Medical Institute, Toyohashi (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Recently, it has been recognized that pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) cases are classified into various clinical subtypes with non-uniform symptoms and imaging findings. This article reviews essential imaging findings, general information, and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for PSP and presents these MRI findings of pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases for educational purposes. With the review of literatures, notably including atypical pathologically proven PSP cases, MRI and clinical information of 15 pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases were retrospectively evaluated. In addition to typical symptoms, PSP patients can exhibit atypical symptoms including levodopa-responsive parkinsonism, pure akinesia, non-fluent aphasia, corticobasal syndrome, and predominant cerebellar ataxia. As well as clinical symptoms, the degree of midbrain atrophy, a well-known imaging hallmark, is not consistent in atypical PSP cases. This fact has important implications for the limitation of midbrain atrophy as a diagnostic imaging biomarker of PSP pathology. Additional evaluation of other imaging findings including various regional atrophies of the globus pallidus, frontal lobe, cerebral peduncle, and superior cerebellar peduncle is essential for the diagnosis of atypical PSP cases. It is necessary for radiologists to recognize the wide clinical and radiological spectra of typical and atypical PSP cases. (orig.)

  2. Differentiated human midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells express excitatory strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors containing α2β subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wegner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human fetal midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs may deliver a tissue source for drug screening and regenerative cell therapy to treat Parkinson's disease. While glutamate and GABA(A receptors play an important role in neurogenesis, the involvement of glycine receptors during human neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation as well as their molecular and functional characteristics in NPCs are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated NPCs in respect to their glycine receptor function and subunit expression using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate the ability of NPCs to express functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors after differentiation for 3 weeks in vitro. Pharmacological and molecular analyses indicate a predominance of glycine receptor heteromers containing α2β subunits. Intracellular calcium measurements of differentiated NPCs suggest that glycine evokes depolarisations mediated by strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and not by D-serine-sensitive excitatory glycine receptors. Culturing NPCs with additional glycine, the glycine-receptor antagonist strychnine, or the Na(+-K(+-Cl(- co-transporter 1 (NKCC1-inhibitor bumetanide did not significantly influence cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that NPCs derived from human fetal midbrain tissue acquire essential glycine receptor properties during neuronal maturation. However, glycine receptors seem to have a limited functional impact on neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation of NPCs in vitro.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Spontaneous and Stimulus-Evoked Calcium Transients in Proliferating and Differentiating Human Midbrain-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Johansen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients and oscillations have been reported in various tissues of nonhuman and human origin but not in human midbrain-derived stem cells. Using confocal microfluorimetry, we studied spontaneous calcium transients and calcium-regulating mechanisms in a human ventral mesencephalic stem cell line undergoing proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Spontaneous calcium transients were detected in a large fraction of both proliferating (>50% and differentiating (>55% cells. We provide evidence for the existence of intracellular calcium stores that respond to muscarinic activation of the cells, having sensitivity for ryanodine and thapsigargin possibly reflecting IP3 receptor activity and the presence of ryanodine receptors and calcium ATPase pumps. The observed calcium transient activity potentially supports the existence of a sodium-calcium antiporter and the existence of calcium influx induced by depletion of calcium stores. We conclude that the cells have developed the most important mechanisms governing cytosolic calcium homeostasis. This is the first comparative report of spontaneous calcium transients in proliferating and differentiating human midbrain-derived stem cells that provides evidence for the mechanisms that are likely to be involved. We propose that the observed spontaneous calcium transients may contribute to mechanisms involved in cell proliferation, phenotypic differentiation, and general cell maturation.

  4. α-Synuclein-induced lysosomal dysfunction occurs through disruptions in protein trafficking in human midbrain synucleinopathy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzulli, Joseph R; Zunke, Friederike; Isacson, Ole; Studer, Lorenz; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates comprised of α-synuclein (α-syn). A major barrier in treatment discovery for PD is the lack of identifiable therapeutic pathways capable of reducing aggregates in human neuronal model systems. Mutations in key components of protein trafficking and cellular degradation machinery represent important risk factors for PD; however, their precise role in disease progression and interaction with α-syn remains unclear. Here, we find that α-syn accumulation reduced lysosomal degradation capacity in human midbrain dopamine models of synucleinopathies through disrupting hydrolase trafficking. Accumulation of α-syn at the cell body resulted in aberrant association with cis-Golgi-tethering factor GM130 and disrupted the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi localization of rab1a, a key mediator of vesicular transport. Overexpression of rab1a restored Golgi structure, improved hydrolase trafficking and activity, and reduced pathological α-syn in patient neurons. Our work suggests that enhancement of lysosomal hydrolase trafficking may prove beneficial in synucleinopathies and indicates that human midbrain disease models may be useful for identifying critical therapeutic pathways in PD and related disorders.

  5. Palmar and dorsal fixed-angle plates in AO C-type fractures of the distal radius: is there an advantage of palmar plates in the long term?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubietz Michael G

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current surgical approaches to the distal radius include dorsal and palmar plate fixation. While palmar plates have gained widespread popularity, few reports have provided data on long term clinical outcomes in comparison. This paper reports the result of a randomised clinical study comparing dorsal Pi plates and palmar, angle-stable plates for treatment of comminuted, intraarticular fractures of the distal radius over the course of twelve months. Methods 42 patients with unilateral, intraarticular fractures of the distal radius were included and randomised to 2 groups, 22 were treated with a palmar plate, 20 received a dorsal Pi-plate. Results were evaluated after 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively focussing on functional recovery as well as radiological results. Results The palmar plate group demonstrated significantly better results regarding range of motion and grip strength over the course of 12 months. While a comparable increase in function was observed in both groups, the better results from the early postoperative period in the palmar plate group prevailed over the whole course. Radiological results showed a significantly increased palmar tilt and carpal sag in dorsal plates, with other radiological parameters being comparable. Pain levels were decreased in dorsal plates after hardware removal and failed to show significant differences after 12 months. However, complications such as tendon ruptures were more frequent in the dorsal plate group. Conclusions Functional advantage of palmar plates gained within the first 6 weeks prevails over the course of a year. Both groups demonstrate further gradual increase of function after 6 months, although dorsal plates did not catch up completely. Improved early postoperative function seems to be the cornerstone for the best possible results. Patients with dorsal plates benefit from hardware removal more than palmar plates in terms of reduction of pain levels. The

  6. Oscillatory interaction between dorsal root excitability and dorsal root potentials in the spinal cord of the turtle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgado-Lezama, R; Perrier, J F; Hounsgaard, J

    1999-01-01

    The response to dorsal root stimulation, at one to two times threshold, was investigated in the isolated cervical enlargement of the turtle spinal cord. At frequencies near 10 Hz the synaptic response in motoneurons and the cord dorsum potential, after an initial lag time, oscillated in amplitude...

  7. Volar versus dorsal fixed-angle fixation of dorsally unstable extra-articular distal radius fractures: a biomechanic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Todd A; Conrad, Bryan; Badman, Brian; Wright, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the biomechanic rigidity and strength of 3 fixed-angle plates used to treat extra-articular distal radius fractures that are dorsally unstable. Volar fixed-angle plates were compared with a dorsal fixed-angle nail plate. Three plate constructs were tested: the dorsal nail plate (DNP), distal volar radius (DVR) plate, and locking compression plate (LCP) volar distal radius plate. With anatomic, third-generation, artificial composite radii, dorsally unstable extra-articular distal radius fracture models were made by cutting a wedge osteotomy with an 8-mm dorsal gap 1 cm from the articular surface. These models were then fixed with the 3 implants by the method recommended by the manufacturer. The proximal radii of each specimen were attached to the base of a materials testing machine with a probe centered at the radial side of the lunate fossa. The specimens were loaded at a constant rate to failure under axial compression. Load and displacement were plotted graphically, and the resulting rigidities and strengths of each plate were assessed statistically. The DVR group had significantly greater stiffness than the LCP group. The DVR group had significantly higher maximum loads than both the DNP and LCP groups. There were no significant differences in yield loads. Both the DNP and DVR groups had significantly less displacement at yield than the LCP group. These 3 groups had similar yield loads. However, the LCP was less stiff than the DVR and had more displacement at yield than both the DVR and DNP. The yield load of all 3 implants was much higher than previously described loads for active wrist and finger motion.

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  1. File list: Oth.Lar.10.AllAg.Dorsal_mesothoracic_disc [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Dorsal finger texture recognition: Investigating fixed-length SURF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Daniel; Kückelhahn, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We seek to create fixed-length features from dorsal finger skin images extracted by the SURF interest point detector to combine it in the privacy enhancing helper data scheme. The source of the biometric samples is the GUC45 database which features finger vein, fingerprint and dorsal finger skin...... images for modality fusion. First, the region of interest (ROI) is extracted, after which SURF features are extracted, and finally two different approaches for creating fixed length feature vectors are applied. SURF performance on the ROI is comparable to the PolyU database reported in the literature...... the complexity of the SURF matching scheme, a reduction in run-time of 75%–80% has been achieved, with only minimal precision loss; EER increases from 0.74% to 1%. The complexity of the matching can be reduced from O(n2) to constant time, but at a higher precision cost and resulting in an EER of 16.51%....

  4. The dorsal approach to the distal radioulnar joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoonhoven, Joerg; Herbert, Timothy

    2004-03-01

    A number of different disorders or injuries require surgical intervention at the distal radioulnar joint. Depending on the underlying condition, the distal radioulnar joint is traditionally exposed via a dorsal or, less commonly, a palmar approach. Occasionally, as in the case of fractures of the distal ulna or ulnar styloid process, a lateral approach may be chosen. We describe an operative technique for a dorsal approach to the distal radioulnar joint that we have found to be extremely useful for a wide range of different pathologies. This technique not only allows excellent visualization of the head of the ulna and the distal radioulnar joint, but also the triangular fibrocartilage complex and the ulnocarpal joint as well. Furthermore, it provides a simple means of restoring normal alignment and stability to the distal radioulnar joint and the ulnar side of the carpus.

  5. Wernekink Commissure Syndrome Secondary to Bilateral Caudal Paramedian Midbrain Infarction Presenting with a Unique “Heart or V” Appearance Sign: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Wernekink commissure syndrome secondary to caudal paramedian midbrain infarction (CPMI is a rare midbrain syndrome involving the decussation of the superior cerebellar peduncle in the caudal paramedian midbrain tegmentum. The central characteristics are constant bilateral cerebellar dysfunction, variable eye movement disorders, and rare delayed palatal myoclonus. Following is a description of the case of a 60-year-old man who presented with dizziness, slurred speech, and difficulty walking. Neurological examination revealed bilateral cerebellar dysfunction and bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (bilateral INO. Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a lesion in the caudal paramedian midbrain with a “heart-shaped” sign on fluid-attenuation inversion recovery images and a “V-shaped” appearance on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI. An acute CPMI with a “heart or V” appearance sign was diagnosed. Upon follow-up evaluation 3 months later, a palatal tremor accompanied by involuntary head tremor was discovered. Hypertrophy and increased signal of the bilateral inferior olivary nucleus, compatible with hypertropic olivary degeneration (HOD were revealed during a subsequent MRI study.

  6. Purification of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons from Rat by Immunopanning

    OpenAIRE

    Zuchero, J. Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGs) are sensory neurons that facilitate somatosensation and have been used to study neurite outgrowth, regeneration, and degeneration and PNS and CNS myelination. Studies of DRGs have relied on cell isolation strategies that generally involve extended culture in the presence of antimitotic agents or other cytotoxic treatments that target dividing cells. The surviving cells typically are dependent on serum for growth. Other methods, involving purification of DRG...

  7. Mitotic activity in dorsal epidermis of Rana pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Arce, H.; Mizell, S.

    1972-01-01

    Study of statistically significant rhythms of mitotic division in dorsal epidermis of frogs, Rana pipiens, exposed to a 12:12 light:dark environment for 14 days. The results include the findings that (1) male animals have a primary period of 22 hr in summer and 18 hr in winter, (2) female animals have an 18 hr period, and (3) parapinealectomy and blinding abolish the rhythm.

  8. Complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas: Case report with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas 73 http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/mmj.v27i2.9. Introduction. A 35-year-old male presented with a three-day history of epigastric pain and vomiting. Six months prior to presentation, the patient was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and was on an insulin therapy regimen. He had no relevant.

  9. A cellular Potts model of germband retraction and dorsal closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, M. Shane; Rohner, Jason; Crews, Sarah; McCleery, W. Tyler; Robinson, W. Bradley

    2011-03-01

    Germband retraction and dorsal closure are critical morphogenetic events in fruit fly embryogenesis. Both involve the coordinated reshaping of two epitheloid tissues -- germband (GB) and amnioserosa (AS). The GB is initially curled into a U-shape with the AS between the arms of the U. Retraction leaves the embryo's dorsal surface covered by AS cells which then contract to pull lateral parts of the GB up to cover the dorsal surface. We have simulated these events using a cellular Potts model. The model is 3D with several generalized cell types: a central yolk; a surrounding monolayer of AS and GB cells with epithelial polarization; and an outer vitelline membrane enclosing the cells and a perivitelline fluid. The model also incorporates several critical cell behaviors: polarized apical constriction of AS cells; controlled relaxation of stretched GB cells; and differentiation of GB cells at the GB-AS interface so that these cells then contract a supracellular purse-string and extend filopodia that reach across the AS and zip together the GB's approaching lateral flanks. We will discuss how all of these components are necessary to reproduce normal tissue motions and those observed during laser microsurgery experiments. Supported by NSF Grant IOB-0545679.

  10. Bulbar urethroplasty using the dorsal approach: current techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbagli Guido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of flaps or grafts is mandatory in patients with longer and complex strictures. In 1995-96 we described a new dorsal onlay graft urethroplasty. Over time, our original technique was better defined and changed. Now this procedure (also named Barbagli technique has been greeted with a fair amount of enthusiasm in Europe and in the United States. SURGICAL TECHNIQUE: The patient is placed in normal lithotomy position, and a midline perineo-scrotal incision is made. The bulbar urethra is then free from the bulbo-cavernous muscles, and is dissected from the corpora cavernosa. The urethra is completely mobilized from the corpora cavernosa, it is rotated 180 degrees, and is incised along its dorsal surface. The graft (preputial skin or buccal mucosa or the flap is fixed and quilted to the tunica albuginea of the corporal bodies. The right mucosal margin of the opened urethra is sutured to the right side of the patch-graft. The urethra is rotated back into its original position. The left urethral margin is sutured to the left side of the patch graft and to the corporal bodies, and the grafted area is entirely covered by the urethral plate. The bulbo-cavernous muscles are approximated over the grafted area. A 16F silicone Foley catheter is left in place. COMMENTS: Dorsal onlay graft urethroplasty is a versatile procedure that may be combined with various substitute materials like preputial skin, buccal mucosa grafts or pedicled flaps.

  11. Dorsal prevertebral lesions in Wegener granulomatosis: report on four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Paulo; Pagnoux, Christian; Luca, Luminata; Aouizerate, Jessie; Ortigueira, Isabel; Cohen, Pascal; Muller, Géraldine; Guillevin, Loïc

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis has been reported in several patients with Wegener granulomatosis (WG), but only three isolated cases of dorsal prevertebral lesions, closely resembling fibrosing mediastinitis, have been published so far. We describe four new WG patients (two men, two women), 49-59 years old at diagnosis, with dorsal prevertebral lesions, mainly right-sided, and with adjacent pleural thickening in two. These lesions were detected on computed-tomography scans at diagnosis in two patients, and occurred later in the two others. Only one of them had mild back pain. Two patients' lesions were biopsied, revealing granulomatous inflammation. In one patient, the lesion regressed under WG treatment. Lesion size did not change in the remainings. Intralesional calcifications appeared in two. None of the patients had local bone erosion, vascular or neurological complications. These prevertebral lesions might represent a dorsal form of retroperitoneal fibrosis in WG, but usually with a more benign presentation and course. WG should be included in the differential diagnosis of fibrosing mediastinitis (with tuberculosis, neoplastic diseases, sarcoidosis, histiocytosis and inflammatory pseudotumor), which may have a similar radiological appearance. Copyright © 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Compound dorsal dislocation of lunate with trapezoid fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Sung Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We report about a dorsal dislocation of the lunate accompanied by a trapezoid fracture in a 41-year old male patient after a motorcycle accident. The lunate dislocation with no dorsal or volar intercalated segment instability (DISI, VISI was diagnosed by x-ray whereas the trapezoid fracture was only diagnosable by computed tomography. A closed reduction and internal fixation of the lunate by two Kirschner wires was performed, the trapezoid fracture was conservatively treated. Surgery was followed by immobilization, intense physiotherapy and close follow-up. Even though complaints such as swelling and pain subsided during the course of rehabilitation, partial loss of strength and range of motion remained even after 16 months. In conclusion, a conservative treatment of trapezoid fractures seems to be sufficient in most cases. Closed reduction with Kwire fixation led to an overall satisfactory result in our case. For dorsal lunate dislocations in general, open reduction should be performed when close reduction is unsuccessful or DISI/VISI are observed in radiographs after attempted close reduction.

  13. Dorsal penile nerve stimulation elicits left-hemisphere dominant activation in the second somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, J P; Illman, M; Jousmäki, V; Numminen, J; Lehecka, M; Salenius, S; Forss, N; Hari, R

    2003-02-01

    Activation of peripheral mixed and cutaneous nerves activates a distributed cortical network including the second somatosensory cortex (SII) in the parietal operculum. SII activation has not been previously reported in the stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN). We recorded somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) to DPN stimulation from 7 healthy adults with a 122-channel whole-scalp neuromagnetometer. Electrical pulses were applied once every 0.5 or 1.5 sec to the left and right DPN. For comparison, left and right median and tibial nerves were stimulated alternatingly at 1.5-sec intervals. DPN stimuli elicited weak, early responses in the vicinity of responses to tibial nerve stimulation in the primary somatosensory cortex. Strong later responses, peaking at 107-126 msec were evoked in the SII cortices of both hemispheres, with left-hemisphere dominance. In addition to tactile processing, SII could also contribute to mediating emotional effects of DPN stimuli. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Involvement of pregnane xenobiotic receptor in mating-induced allopregnanolone formation in the midbrain and hippocampus and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus among female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, C A; Koonce, C J; Walf, A A

    2014-09-01

    Given that the pregnane neurosteroid, 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (3α,5α-THP), is increased following behavioral challenges (e.g., mating), and that there is behavioral-induced biosynthesis of 3α,5α-THP in midbrain and mesocorticolimbic structures, 3α,5α-THP likely has a role in homeostasis and motivated reproduction and reproduction-related behaviors (e.g., affect, affiliation). The role of pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), involved in cholesterol metabolism, for these effects is of continued interest. We hypothesized that there would be differences in brain levels of 3α,5α-THP following varied behavioral experiences, an effect abrogated by knockdown of PXR in the midbrain. Proestrous rats were infused with PXR antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODNs) or vehicle to the ventral tegmental area before different behavioral manipulations and assessments. Endpoints were expression levels of PXR in the midbrain, 3α,5α-THP, and ovarian steroids (estradiol, progesterone, dihydroprogesterone) in the midbrain, striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex, and plasma. Across experiments, knocking down PXR reduced PXR expression and 3α,5α-THP levels in the midbrain and hippocampus. There were differences in terms of the behavioral manipulations, such that paced mating had the most robust effects to increase 3α,5α-THP levels and reduce open field exploration and social interaction. An additional question that was addressed is whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a downstream factor for regulating effects of behavioral-induced 3α,5α-THP biosynthesis. Rats infused with PXR AS-ODNs had lower levels of BDNF in the hippocampus. Thus, PXR may be a regulator of mating-induced 3α,5α-THP formation and behavioral changes and neural plasticity, such as BDNF.

  15. Age-related hearing loss: Aquaporin 4 gene expression changes in the mouse cochlea and auditory midbrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Nathan; D'Souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Presbycusis – age-related hearing loss, is the number one communication disorder, and one of the top three chronic medical conditions of our aged population. Aquaporins, particularly aquaporin 4 (Aqp4), are membrane proteins with important roles in water and ion flux across cell membranes, including cells of the inner ear and pathways of the brain used for hearing. To more fully understand the biological bases of presbycusis, 39 CBA mice, a well-studied animal model of presbycusis, underwent non-invasive hearing testing as a function of sound frequency (auditory brainstem response – ABR thresholds, and distortion-product otoacoustic emission – DPOAE magnitudes), and were clustered into four groups based on age and hearing ability. Aqp4 gene expression, as determined by genechip microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR, was compared to the young adult control group in the three older groups: middle aged with good hearing, old age with mild presbycusis, and old age with severe presbycusis. Linear regression and ANOVA showed statistically significant changes in Aqp4 gene expression and ABR and DPOAE hearing status in the cochlea and auditory midbrain – inferior colliculus. Down-regulation in the cochlea was seen, and an initial down-, then up-regulation was discovered for the inferior colliculus Aqp4 expression. It is theorized that these changes in Aqp4 gene expression represent an age-related disruption of ion flux in the fluids of the cochlea that are responsible for ionic gradients underlying sound transduction in cochlear hair cells necessary for hearing. In regard to central auditory processing at the level of the auditory midbrain, aquaporin gene expression changes may affect neurotransmitter cycling involving supporting cells, thus impairing complex sound neural processing with age. PMID:19070604

  16. Age-related hearing loss: aquaporin 4 gene expression changes in the mouse cochlea and auditory midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Nathan; D'Souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D

    2009-02-09

    Presbycusis -- age-related hearing loss, is the number one communication disorder, and one of the top three chronic medical conditions of our aged population. Aquaporins, particularly aquaporin 4 (Aqp4), are membrane proteins with important roles in water and ion flux across cell membranes, including cells of the inner ear and pathways of the brain used for hearing. To more fully understand the biological bases of presbycusis, 39 CBA mice, a well-studied animal model of presbycusis, underwent non-invasive hearing testing as a function of sound frequency (auditory brainstem response -- ABR thresholds, and distortion-product otoacoustic emission -- DPOAE magnitudes), and were clustered into four groups based on age and hearing ability. Aqp4 gene expression, as determined by genechip microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR, was compared to the young adult control group in the three older groups: middle aged with good hearing, old age with mild presbycusis, and old age with severe presbycusis. Linear regression and ANOVA showed statistically significant changes in Aqp4 gene expression and ABR and DPOAE hearing status in the cochlea and auditory midbrain -- inferior colliculus. Down-regulation in the cochlea was seen, and an initial down-, then up-regulation was discovered for the inferior colliculus Aqp4 expression. It is theorized that these changes in Aqp4 gene expression represent an age-related disruption of ion flux in the fluids of the cochlea that are responsible for ionic gradients underlying sound transduction in cochlear hair cells necessary for hearing. In regard to central auditory processing at the level of the auditory midbrain, aquaporin gene expression changes may affect neurotransmitter cycling involving supporting cells, thus impairing complex sound neural processing with age.

  17. Demonstration of decreased gray matter concentration in the midbrain encompassing the dorsal raphe nucleus and the limbic subcortical regions in major depressive disorder: an optimized voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Tae, Woo Suk; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Byeong-Taek; Paik, Jong-Woo; Son, Kyu-Ri; Oh, Yu-Whan; Lee, Min-Soo; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2011-09-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have reported changes in several brain areas, such as the medial and dorsolateral orbital cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, and basal ganglia. However, the results of these studies are inconsistent, and relatively few studies have been conducted using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to detect gray matter concentration (GMC) abnormalities in patients with MDD. We examined 47 MDD patients and 51 healthy controls to investigate structural abnormalities using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system, which was normalized to a customized T1 template and segmented with optimized VBM. Analysis of covariance with age and gender as covariates was adopted for the VBM statistics; the level of statistical significance was set at Pemotion regulation was lower in MDD patients. In particular, we found decreased GMC in the DRN. These findings may provide a better understanding of the anatomical properties of the neural mechanisms underlying the etiology of MDD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dorsal scapular nerve neuropathy: a narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Brad

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to elucidate this little known cause of upper back pain through a narrative review of the literature and to discuss the possible role of the dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) in the etiopathology of other similar diagnoses in this area including cervicogenic dorsalgia (CD), notalgia paresthetica (NP), SICK scapula and a posterolateral arm pain pattern. Dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) neuropathy has been a rarely thought of differential diagnosis for mid scapular, upper to mid back and costovertebral pain. These are common conditions presenting to chiropractic, physiotherapy, massage therapy and medical offices. The methods used to gather articles for this paper included: searching electronic databases; and hand searching relevant references from journal articles and textbook chapters. One hundred-fourteen articles were retrieved. After removing duplicates, there were 57 articles of which 29 were retrieved. There were 26 articles and textbook chapters retrieved by hand searching equaling 55 articles retrieved of which 47 relevant articles were used in this report. The anatomy, pathway and function of the dorsal scapular nerve can be varied and exceptionally rarely may include a sensory component. The signs and symptoms, therefore, may include pain, atrophy, scapular winging, and dysesthesia. The mechanism of injury to the DSN is also quite varied ranging from postural to overuse in overhead work and sport. Other conditions in this area, including CD, NP, SICK scapula and a posterolateral arm pain pattern bear a striking resemblance to DSN neuropathy. DSN neuropathy should be included in the list of common differential diagnoses of upper and mid-thoracic pain, stiffness, dysesthesia and dysfunction. The study also brings forward interesting connections between DSN neuropathy, CD, NP, SICK scapula and a posterolateral arm pain pattern.

  19. Pulsed Radiofrequency to the Dorsal Root Ganglion in Acute Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Koohyun; Jo, Daehyun; Kim, EungDon

    2017-03-01

    Latent varicella zoster virus reactivates mainly in sensory ganglia such as the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) or trigeminal ganglion. The DRG contains many receptor channels and is an important region for pain signal transduction. Sustained abnormal electrical activity to the spinal cord via the DRG in acute herpes zoster can result in neuropathic conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Although the efficacy of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the DRG in various pain conditions has been previously reported, the application of PRF to the DRG in patients with herpes zoster has not yet been studied. The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical effects of PRF to the DRG in patients with herpes zoster to those of PRF to the DRG in patients with PHN. Retrospective comparative study. University hospital pain center in Korea. The medical records of 58 patients who underwent PRF to the DRG due to zoster related pain (herpes zoster or PHN) were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the timing of PRF after zoster onset: an early PRF group (within 90 days) and a PHN PRF group (more than 90 days). The efficacy of PRF was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS) and by recording patient medication doses before PRF and at one week, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after PRF. Pain intensity was decreased after PRF in all participants. However, the degree of pain reduction was significantly higher in the early PRF group. Moreover, more patients discontinued their medication in the early PRF group, and the PRF success rate was also higher in the early PRF group. The relatively small sample size from a single center, short duration of review of medical records, and the retrospective nature of the study. PRF to the DRG is a useful treatment for treatment-resistant cases of herpes zoster and PHN. Particularly in herpes zoster patients with intractable pain, application of PRF to the DRG should be considered for pain control

  20. Dorsal hand coverage with free serratus fascia flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotopoulos, Peter; Holmer, Per; Leicht, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    In reconstructing a defect on the dorsum of the hand, with the extensor tendons exposed or even missing, functional, as well as cosmetic, goals are of major importance. The authors present three cases of extensor tendon reconstruction, combined with soft-tissue reconstruction, with the free...... in the flap, leaving the long thoracic nerve intact on the serratus muscle. Coverage of the flap with split-thickness skin graft is done immediately. The free serratus fascia flap is an ideal flap for dorsal hand coverage when the extensor tendons are exposed, especially because of low donor-site morbidity....

  1. Congenital dorsal urethral diverticulum: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral diverticulum in males can be congenital or acquired (secondry to stricture, stenosis. Congenital urethral diverticulae of male urethra are rare. Most of them occur ventral to the native urethra, arising from the cystic dilatation of the Cowper′s gland ducts. Ours is the report of urethral diverticulum, which was present on the dorsal side of the urethra, with splaying of the two corpora cavernosa and thinning of the corpus spongiosum. The diverticulum was excised and urethroplasty was done. Postoperatively there was a marked improvement in the symptoms, with good cosmesis

  2. Keyhole interlaminar dorsal rhizotomy for spastic diplegia in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindou, Marc; Georgoulis, George

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency and safety of dorsal rhizotomies for cerebral palsy lie in the accuracy of radicular identification together with selectivity of root sectioning. Two different exposures are currently in use. The first is extended laminotomy/laminectomy from the upper lumbar level to the sacrum, which allows accurate identification of all L2-S2 roots/rootlets. The second is limited laminotomy exposing the conus/cauda equina at the thoracolumbar junction; this less invasive method limits accessibility to the roots. To optimize the accuracy and selectivity while minimizing invasiveness, the authors developed a tailored interlaminar procedure targeting the radicular levels involved in the harmful components of spasticity directly and individually. Six patients with spastic diplegia at different levels of the Gross Motor Functional Classification System were selected. In each patient, two to three interlaminar spaces, preselected according to planning, were enlarged in the "keyhole" fashion, respecting the spinous processes and interspinous ligaments. Ventral root stimulation identified the radicular level. Dorsal root stimulation evaluated its implication in the hyperactive segmental circuits, helping quantify the percentage of rootlets to be cut. There were neither wound-related nor general complications. At 1 year of follow-up, X-ray examination did not reveal kyphosis or instability. In all children, the excess of spasticity was reduced. The Ashworth score decreased from 3.2 on average to 0.6 postoperatively (range: 2-4 to 0-2). Regarding the functional status at 1 year of follow-up for the three ambulatory children, the Gillette ability-to-walk score increased from 3/10 on average to 7.3/10 postoperatively (range: 2-4 to 7-8). For the three non-ambulatory children, abnormal postures, painful contractures and ease of care were much improved. Keyhole interlaminar dorsal rhizotomy (KIDr) offers direct intradural access to each of the ventral/dorsal roots, thus

  3. Covering the Dorsal Finger Defect with Reverse Cross Finger Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Gurbuz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of finger extensor zone defects with or without tendon gaps still remains a challenge for surgeons. Although surgical treatments may differ, and range from the use of local, regional, to free flaps, the outcomes for all cases are not satisfactory. In this case report, we present a case of a 3rd finger extensor side crush injury including a defect of Dd (Digit Dorsal 1, Dd2 and Dd3 defects of extensor zones with tendon gap. Tendon gap was reconstructed using m. palmaris longus tendon graft and the defect was covered with reversed cross-finger flap (random pattern with good cosmetic and excellent functional results.

  4. The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex modulates dialectical self-thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Fei eWang; Kaiping ePeng; Yang eBai; Rui eLi; Ying eZhu; Pei eSun; Hua eGuo; Chun eYuan; Pia eRotshtein; Jie eSui

    2016-01-01

    Dialectical self-thinking involves holding the view that one can possess contradictory traits such as extraverted and introverted. Prior work has demonstrated that the dorsal part of anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) plays a crucial role in conflict monitoring as well as self-related processing. Here, we tested the function of dACC in dialectical self-thinking using a modified classical self-referential paradigm (self- vs. other-referential thinking), in which participants had to make a judgme...

  5. Dorsal dimelia in patau syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, A; Pickford, M A

    2007-10-01

    We present a case of a child with Patau syndrome that exhibits features consistent with congenital palmar nail syndrome. The literature is reviewed and evidence presented to demonstrate that this is a defect in the dorso-ventral patterning of the limb and thus a form of dorsal dimelia. In order to differentiate this from other instances of ectopic nail tissue we suggest congenital palmar nail syndrome should be more specifically defined as duplicated nails, absent flexion creases, non-glabrous skin on the palmar surface, reduced movement at the interphalangeal joints and hypoplastic terminal phalanges.

  6. The Cellular and Synaptic Architecture of the Mechanosensory Dorsal Horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraira, Victoria E; Kuehn, Emily D; Chirila, Anda M; Springel, Mark W; Toliver, Alexis A; Zimmerman, Amanda L; Orefice, Lauren L; Boyle, Kieran A; Bai, Ling; Song, Bryan J; Bashista, Karleena A; O'Neill, Thomas G; Zhuo, Justin; Tsan, Connie; Hoynoski, Jessica; Rutlin, Michael; Kus, Laura; Niederkofler, Vera; Watanabe, Masahiko; Dymecki, Susan M; Nelson, Sacha B; Heintz, Nathaniel; Hughes, David I; Ginty, David D

    2017-01-12

    The deep dorsal horn is a poorly characterized spinal cord region implicated in processing low-threshold mechanoreceptor (LTMR) information. We report an array of mouse genetic tools for defining neuronal components and functions of the dorsal horn LTMR-recipient zone (LTMR-RZ), a role for LTMR-RZ processing in tactile perception, and the basic logic of LTMR-RZ organization. We found an unexpectedly high degree of neuronal diversity in the LTMR-RZ: seven excitatory and four inhibitory subtypes of interneurons exhibiting unique morphological, physiological, and synaptic properties. Remarkably, LTMRs form synapses on between four and 11 LTMR-RZ interneuron subtypes, while each LTMR-RZ interneuron subtype samples inputs from at least one to three LTMR classes, as well as spinal cord interneurons and corticospinal neurons. Thus, the LTMR-RZ is a somatosensory processing region endowed with a neuronal complexity that rivals the retina and functions to pattern the activity of ascending touch pathways that underlie tactile perception. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in Spinal Dorsal Horn Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Patrick M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Removing and sequestering synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space is carried out by specific plasma membrane transporters that are primarily located in astrocytes. Glial glutamate transporter function can be monitored by recording the currents that are produced by co-transportation of Na+ ions with the uptake of glutamate. The goal of this study was to characterize glutamate transporter function in astrocytes of the spinal cord dorsal horn in real time by recording synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents. Results Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from astrocytes in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG area in spinal slices of young adult rats. Glutamate transporter currents were evoked in these cells by electrical stimulation at the spinal dorsal root entry zone in the presence of bicuculline, strychnine, DNQX and D-AP5. Transporter currents were abolished when synaptic transmission was blocked by TTX or Cd2+. Pharmacological studies identified two subtypes of glutamate transporters in spinal astrocytes, GLAST and GLT-1. Glutamate transporter currents were graded with stimulus intensity, reaching peak responses at 4 to 5 times activation threshold, but were reduced following low-frequency (0.1 – 1 Hz repetitive stimulation. Conclusion These results suggest that glutamate transporters of spinal astrocytes could be activated by synaptic activation, and recording glutamate transporter currents may provide a means of examining the real time physiological responses of glial cells in spinal sensory processing, sensitization, hyperalgesia and chronic pain.

  8. Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas and its association with pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakpal, Sujit Vijay; Sexcius, Lucretia; Babel, Nitin; Chamberlain, Ronald Scott

    2009-05-01

    Morphogenesis of the pancreas is a complex process; nevertheless, congenital anomalies are rare. At embryogenesis, the pancreas develops from the endoderm-lined dorsal and ventral buds of the duodenum. The ventral bud gives rise to the lower head and uncinate process of the pancreas; whereas, the dorsal bud gives rise to the upper head, isthmus, body, and tail of the pancreas. Rarely, developmental failure of the dorsal pancreatic bud at embryogenesis results in the agenesis of the dorsal pancreas--neck, body, and tail. Even rarer is the association of pancreatic tumors with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas. In addition to citing our case, we provide a comprehensive review on agenesis of the dorsal pancreas and its association with pancreatic tumors.

  9. Plasticity of Auditory Medullary-Midbrain Connectivity across Metamorphic Development in the Bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana

    OpenAIRE

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Chapman, Judith A.; Simmons, Andrea Megela

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of patterns of anterograde, retrograde, and bi-directional transport of tracers from both the superior olivary nucleus (SON) and the torus semicircularis (TS), we report anatomical changes in brainstem connectivity across metamorphic development in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. In early and late stages of larval development (Gosner stages 25–37), anterograde or bi-directional tracers injected into the SON produce terminal/fiber label in the contralateral SON and in the ipsilate...

  10. Dorsale Internet ouverte en République démocratique du Congo ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    En ce qui concerne la RDC, les participants ont retenu les trois priorités suivantes: la dorsale nationale, les réseaux urbains et le parc informatique. La dorsale nationale a été jugée priorité numéro un. Ce projet vise à faire une étude de faisabilité portant sur la mise en place d'une dorsale Internet nationale en RDC.

  11. Engaging in paced mating, but neither exploratory, anti-anxiety, nor social behavior, increases 5α-reduced progestin concentrations in midbrain, hippocampus, striatum, and cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Cheryl A; Paris, Jason J; Rhodes, Madeline E

    2010-01-01

    Sequential actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) in the hypothalamus and the P4 metabolite, 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (3α,5α-THP), in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) respectively mediate the initiation and intensity of lordosis of female rats and mayalso modulate anxiety and social behaviors, through actions in these, and/or other brain regions. Biosynthesis of E2, P4, and 3α,5α-THP can also occur in brain, independent of peripheral gland secretion, in response to environmental/behavioral stimuli. The extent to which engaging in tasks related to reproductive behaviors and/or mating increased E2 or progestin concentrations in brain was investigated. In Experiment 1, proestrous rats were randomly assigned to be tested in individual tasks, including the open field, elevated plus maze, partner preference, social interaction, or no test control, in conjunction with paced mating or no mating. Engaging in paced mating, but not other behaviors, significantly increased dihydroprogesterone (DHP) and 3α,5α-THP levels in midbrain, hippocampus, striatum, and cortex. In Experiment 2, proestrous rats were tested in the combinations of the above tasks (open field and elevated plus maze, partner preference, and social interaction) with or without paced mating. As in Experiment 1, only engaging in paced mating increased DHP and 3α,5α-THP concentrations in midbrain, hippocampus, striatum, and cortex. Thus, paced mating enhances concentrations of 5α-reduced progestins in brain areas associated with reproduction (midbrain), as well as exploration/anxiety (hippocampus and striatum) and social behavior (cortex). PMID:17379660

  12. Morphology of physiologically identified retinal X and Y axons in the cat's thalamus and midbrain as revealed by intraaxonal injection of biocytin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamaki, N; Uhlrich, D J; Sherman, S M

    1995-04-17

    Prior morphological studies of individual retinal X and Y axon arbors based on intraaxonal labeling with horseradish peroxidase have been limited by restricted diffusion or transport of the label. We used biocytin instead as the intraaxonal label, and this completely delineated each of our six X and 14 Y axons, including both thalamic and midbrain arbors. Arbors in the lateral geniculate nucleus appeared generally as has been well documented previously. Interestingly, all of the labeled axons projected a branch beyond thalamus to the midbrain. Each X axon formed a terminal arbor in the pretectum, but none continued to the superior colliculus. In contrast, 11 of 14 Y axons innervated both the pretectum and the superior colliculus, one innervated only the pretectum, and two innervated only the superior colliculus. Two of the Y axons were quite unusual in that their receptive fields were located well into the hemifield ipsilateral with respect to the hemisphere into which they were injected. These axons exhibited remarkable arbors in the lateral geniculate nucleus, diffusely innervating the C-laminae and medial interlaminar nucleus, but, unlike all other X and Y arbors, they did not innervate the A-laminae at all. In addition to these qualitative observations, we analyzed a number of quantitative features of these axons in terms of numbers and distributions of terminal boutons. We found that Y arbors contained more boutons than did X arbors in both thalamus and midbrain. Also, for axons with receptive fields in the contralateral hemifield (all X and all but two Y axons), 90-95% of their boutons terminated in the lateral geniculate nucleus; the other two Y axons had more of their arbors located in midbrain.

  13. Viral vector mediated expression of mutant huntingtin in the dorsal raphe produces disease-related neuropathology but not depressive-like behaviors in wildtype mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Mark; Lueras, Jordan; Warden, Anna; Weber, Sydney; McBride, Jodi

    2015-05-22

    Huntington׳s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the HTT gene (mHTT) encoding the protein huntingtin. An expansion in the gene׳s CAG repeat length renders a misfolded, dysfunctional protein with an abnormally long glutamine (Q) stretch at the N terminus that often incorporates into inclusion bodies and leads to neurodegeneration in many regions of the brain. HD is characterized by motor and cognitive decline as well as mood disorders, with depression being particularly common. Approximately 40% of the HD population suffers from depressive symptoms. Because these symptoms often manifest a decade or more prior to the knowledge that the person is at risk for the disease, a portion of the early depression in HD appears to be a consequence of the pathology arising from expression of the mutant gene. While the depression in HD patients is often treated with serotonin agonists, there is scant experimental evidence that the depression in HD responds well to these serotonin treatments or in a similar manner to how non-HD depression tends to respond. Additionally, at very early sub-threshold depression levels, abnormal changes in several neuronal populations are already detectable in HD patients, suggesting that a variety of brain structures may be involved. Taken together, the serotonin system is a viable candidate. However, at present there is limited evidence of the precise nuclei or circuits that play a role in HD depression. With this in mind, the current study was designed to control for the widespread brain neuropathology that occurs in HD and in transgenic mouse models of HD and focuses specifically on the influence of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The DRN provides the majority of the serotonin to the forebrain and exhibits cell loss in non-HD depression. Therefore, we employed a viral vector delivery system to investigate whether the over-expression of mHTT in the DRN׳s ventral sub-nuclei alone is sufficient to produce

  14. Position of dorsal root ganglia in the lumbosacral region in patients with radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyun Seog; Kim, Yeon Dong; Song, Bang Hoon; Cha, Young Deog; Song, Jang Ho; Lee, Mi Hyeon

    2010-12-01

    When applying pulsed radiofrequency on dorsal root ganglia for treating chronic lower back pain, maximum efficiency can be expected when a needle is placed 1-2 cm peripheral to the dorsal root ganglion. The object of this study is to analyze images taken after adding contrast to transforaminal epidural injection, categorize root ganglia according to anatomical position, and provide a reference for efficient needle positioning in applying pulsed radiofrequency on dorsal root ganglia. From January 2008 to January 2009, 457 patients who visited our hospital for root pain or radiculopathy were treated with transforaminal epidural injection on the nerve roots based on the dermatome of the painful area. Anteroposterior views were taken after injection of contrast. A virtual line was made by connecting the internal and external parts of the spinal pedicle from the contrast images. Then the dorsal root ganglia were categorized as intraspinal (IS), intraforaminal (IF), or extraforaminal (EF). In the fourth lumbar spine, dorsal root ganglia positions were 48% IF, 41% IS, and 6% EF. In the fifth lumbar spine, dorsal root ganglia positions were 75% IF, 10% IS, and 6% EF. In the first sacral spine, dorsal root ganglia locations were 8% IF and 83% IS. Positional categorization of dorsal root ganglia according to contrast images was proven to be good anatomical references for effective radiofrequency or blocking of dorsal root ganglia.

  15. Core promoter functions in the regulation of gene expression of Drosophila dorsal target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kuznetsov, Olga; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-04-25

    Developmental processes are highly dependent on transcriptional regulation by RNA polymerase II. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters consist of core promoter motifs, e.g. the initiator, TATA box, and the downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. Here, we explored the importance of core promoter functions in the dorsal-ventral developmental gene regulatory network. This network includes multiple genes that are activated by different nuclear concentrations of Dorsal, an NFκB homolog transcription factor, along the dorsal-ventral axis. We show that over two-thirds of Dorsal target genes contain DPE sequence motifs, which is significantly higher than the proportion of DPE-containing promoters in Drosophila genes. We demonstrate that multiple Dorsal target genes are evolutionarily conserved and functionally dependent on the DPE. Furthermore, we have analyzed the activation of key Dorsal target genes by Dorsal, as well as by another Rel family transcription factor, Relish, and the dependence of their activation on the DPE motif. Using hybrid enhancer-promoter constructs in Drosophila cells and embryo extracts, we have demonstrated that the core promoter composition is an important determinant of transcriptional activity of Dorsal target genes. Taken together, our results provide evidence for the importance of core promoter composition in the regulation of Dorsal target genes.

  16. Comparison of efficacy between dorsal root entry zone lesioning and selective dorsal rhizotomy for spasticity of cerebral origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitthinamsuwan, Bunpot; Phonwijit, Luckchai; Khampalikit, Inthira; Nitising, Akkapong; Nunta-Aree, Sarun; Suksompong, Sirilak

    2017-12-01

    Severe spasticity adversely affects patient functional status and caregiving. No previous study has compared efficacy between dorsal root entry zone lesioning (DREZL) and selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for reduction of spasticity. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of DREZL and SDR for attenuating spasticity, and to compare efficacy between these two methods. All patients who underwent DREZL, SDR, or both for treatment of intractable spasticity caused by cerebral pathology at Siriraj Hospital during 2009 to 2016 were recruited. Severity of spasticity was assessed using Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and Adductor Tone Rating Scale (ATRS). Ambulatory status was also evaluated. Fifteen patients (13 males) with a mean age of 30.3 ± 17.5 years were included. Eight, six, and one patient underwent DREZL, SDR, and combined cervical DREZL and lumbosacral SDR, respectively. Eight of ten patients with preoperative bed-bound status had postoperative improvement in ambulatory status. Spasticity was significantly reduced in the DREZL group (p SDR group (p SDR was effective in both pediatric and adult spasticity patients. A significantly greater reduction in spasticity as assessed by MAS score (p SDR. DREZL is more effective for reducing spasticity, but is more destructive than SDR. DREZL should be preferred for bed-ridden patients, and SDR for ambulatory patients. Both operations are helpful for improving ambulatory status. Gait improvement was observed only in patients who underwent SDR. Adult patients with spasticity of cerebral origin benefit from SDR.

  17. Network profiles of the dorsal anterior cingulate and dorsal prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia during hippocampal-based associative memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eWoodcock

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a disorder characterized by brain network dysfunction, particularly during behavioral tasks that depend on frontal and hippocampal mechanisms. Here, we investigated network profiles of the regions of the frontal cortex during memory encoding and retrieval, phases of processing essential to associative memory. Schizophrenia patients (n=12 and healthy control subjects (n=10 participated in an established object-location associative memory paradigm that drives frontal-hippocampal interactions. Network profiles were modeled of both the dorsal prefrontal (dPFC and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC as seeds using psychophysiological interaction analyses, a robust framework for investigating seed-based connectivity in specific task contexts. The choice of seeds was motivated by previous evidence of involvement of these regions during associative memory. Differences between patients and controls were evaluated using second-level analyses of variance with seed (dPFC vs. dACC, group (patients vs. controls, and memory process (encoding vs. retrieval as factors. Patients showed a pattern of exaggerated modulation by each of the dACC and the dPFC during memory encoding and retrieval. Furthermore, group by memory process interactions were observed within regions of the hippocampus. In schizophrenia patients, relatively diminished modulation during encoding was associated with increased modulation during retrieval. These results suggest a pattern of complex dysfunctional network signatures of critical forebrain regions in schizophrenia. Evidence of dysfunctional frontal-medial temporal lobe network signatures in schizophrenia is consistent with the illness’ characterization as a disconnection syndrome.

  18. Network Profiles of the Dorsal Anterior Cingulate and Dorsal Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia During Hippocampal-Based Associative Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Eric A; Wadehra, Sunali; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disorder characterized by brain network dysfunction, particularly during behavioral tasks that depend on frontal and hippocampal mechanisms. Here, we investigated network profiles of the regions of the frontal cortex during memory encoding and retrieval, phases of processing essential to associative memory. Schizophrenia patients (n = 12) and healthy control (HC) subjects (n = 10) participated in an established object-location associative memory paradigm that drives frontal-hippocampal interactions. Network profiles were modeled of both the dorsal prefrontal (dPFC) and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as seeds using psychophysiological interaction analyses, a robust framework for investigating seed-based connectivity in specific task contexts. The choice of seeds was motivated by previous evidence of involvement of these regions during associative memory. Differences between patients and controls were evaluated using second-level analyses of variance (ANOVA) with seed (dPFC vs. dACC), group (patients vs. controls), and memory process (encoding and retrieval) as factors. Patients showed a pattern of exaggerated modulation by each of the dACC and the dPFC during memory encoding and retrieval. Furthermore, group by memory process interactions were observed within regions of the hippocampus. In schizophrenia patients, relatively diminished modulation during encoding was associated with increased modulation during retrieval. These results suggest a pattern of complex dysfunctional network signatures of critical forebrain regions in schizophrenia. Evidence of dysfunctional frontal-medial temporal lobe network signatures in schizophrenia is consistent with the illness' characterization as a disconnection syndrome.

  19. Unstable dorsal proximal interphalangeal joint fracture-dislocations treated with extension-block pinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, David M; Weichbrodt, Matthew T; Huang, Chris; Hagberg, William C; Balk, Marshall L

    2015-03-01

    Unstable proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint fracture-dislocations, which can cause significant disability, can be treated with multiple techniques. Extension-block pinning (EBP) allows for early motion and is less technically demanding than alternative surgical treatments. In the study reported here, 12 patients with unstable dorsal PIP fracture-dislocations were treated with closed reduction of the PIP joint followed by percutaneous insertion of a Kirschner wire (K-wire) into the distal aspect of the proximal phalanx. For these patients, extent of articular surface involvement averaged 43% (range, 25%-75%). Active motion was initiated early after surgery, and the K-wire was removed a mean of 25 days after pinning. Radiographic reduction of joint dislocation was achieved and maintained for 11 of the 12 patients at a mean follow-up of 35.5 months. At follow-up, mean visual analog scale (VAS) score was 0.64 (scale, 0-10). Mean score on the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire was 5.7, suggesting minimal functional impairment. Mean PIP active motion was 84° (range, 50°-110°). Grip strength was equal between operative and contralateral hands. Patient satisfaction most closely correlated with low VAS and QuickDASH scores. One patient developed a malunion, which was treated with corrective osteotomy. EBP is a simple, safe, and reproducible technique for unstable PIP fracture-dislocations. This technique yields outcomes similar to those reported for more complex surgical procedures.

  20. Properties of sodium currents in neonatal and young adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Melissa A; Farrell, Kristen E; Graham, Brett A; Brichta, Alan M; Callister, Robert J

    2015-03-28

    Superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons process nociceptive information and their excitability is partly determined by the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Recently, we showed the excitability and action potential properties of mouse SDH neurons change markedly during early postnatal development. Here we compare sodium currents generated in neonate (P0-5) and young adult (≥P21) SDH neurons. Whole cell recordings were obtained from lumbar SDH neurons in transverse spinal cord slices (CsF internal, 32°C). Fast activating and inactivating TTX-sensitive inward currents were evoked by depolarization from a holding potential of -100 mV. Poorly clamped currents, based on a deflection in the IV relationship at potentials between -60 and -50 mV, were not accepted for analysis. Current density and decay time increased significantly between the first and third weeks of postnatal development, whereas time to peak was similar at both ages. This was accompanied by more subtle changes in activation range and steady state inactivation. Recovery from inactivation was slower and TTX-sensitivity was reduced in young adult neurons. Our study suggests sodium channel expression changes markedly during early postnatal development in mouse SDH neurons. The methods employed in this study can now be applied to future investigations of spinal cord sodium channel plasticity in murine pain models.

  1. Loss of Ezh2 promotes a midbrain-to-forebrain identity switch by direct gene derepression and Wnt-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, Martina; Draganova, Kalina; Klug, Annika; Schöler, Anne; Zurkirchen, Luis; Gay, Max Hans-Peter; Cheng, Phil; Koseki, Haruhiko; Valenta, Tomas; Schübeler, Dirk; Basler, Konrad; Sommer, Lukas

    2015-11-30

    Precise spatiotemporal control of gene expression is essential for the establishment of correct cell numbers and identities during brain development. This process involves epigenetic control mechanisms, such as those mediated by the polycomb group protein Ezh2, which catalyzes trimethylation of histone H3K27 (H3K27me3) and thereby represses gene expression. Herein, we show that Ezh2 plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of the midbrain. Conditional deletion of Ezh2 in the developing midbrain resulted in decreased neural progenitor proliferation, which is associated with derepression of cell cycle inhibitors and negative regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Of note, Ezh2 ablation also promoted ectopic expression of a forebrain transcriptional program involving derepression of the forebrain determinants Foxg1 and Pax6. This was accompanied by reduced expression of midbrain markers, including Pax3 and Pax7, as a consequence of decreased Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Ezh2 is required for appropriate brain growth and maintenance of regional identity by H3K27me3-mediated gene repression and control of canonical Wnt signaling.

  2. Lower availability of midbrain serotonin transporter between healthy subjects with and without a family history of major depressive disorder - a preliminary two-ligand SPECT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, P C; Chen, K C; Yeh, T L; Lee, I H; Chen, P S; Yao, W J; Chiu, N-T; Chen, C-C; Liao, M-H; Yang, Y K

    2014-09-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and dopamine transporter (DAT) levels differ in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who are in a depressed state in comparison with healthy controls. In addition, a family history of depression is a potent risk factor for developing depression, and inherited vulnerability to serotonergic and dopaminergic dysfunction is suspected in this. The aim of this study was to examine the availabilities of midbrain SERT and striatal DAT in healthy subjects with and without a first-degree family history of MDD. Eight healthy subjects with first-degree relatives with MDD and 16 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were recruited. The availabilities of SERT and DAT were approximated using SPECT, employing [¹²³I] 2-((2-((dimethylamino) methyl) phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine (ADAM) and [(⁹⁹m)Tc] TRODAT-1 as the ligands, respectively. There are missing data for one participant with a first-degree family history of MDD from the ADAM study, due to a lack of the radio-ligand at the time of experiment. SERT availability in the midbrain was significantly lower in subjects with a first-degree family history of MDD than in healthy subjects. However, DAT availability was no different between two groups. The results with regard to the midbrain SERT level suggest the heritability of MDD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Vitamin C-Induced Epigenetic Modifications in Donor NSCs Establish Midbrain Marker Expressions Critical for Cell-Based Therapy in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noviana Wulansari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cultured neural stem/precursor cells (NSCs are regarded as a potential systematic cell source to treat Parkinson's disease (PD. However, the therapeutic potential of these cultured NSCs is lost during culturing. Here, we show that treatment of vitamin C (VC enhances generation of authentic midbrain-type dopamine (mDA neurons with improved survival and functions from ventral midbrain (VM-derived NSCs. VC acted by upregulating a series of mDA neuron-specific developmental and phenotype genes via removal of DNA methylation and repressive histone code (H3K9m3, H3K27m3 at associated gene promoter regions. Notably, the epigenetic changes induced by transient VC treatment were sustained long after VC withdrawal. Accordingly, transplantation of VC-treated NSCs resulted in improved behavioral restoration, along with enriched DA neuron engraftment, which faithfully expressed midbrain-specific markers in PD model rats. These results indicate that VC treatment to donor NSCs could be a simple, efficient, and safe therapeutic strategy for PD in the future.

  4. Neurogenic contraction and relaxation of human penile deep dorsal vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Domenech, Cristina; Martínez León, Juan B; Vila, José M; Aldasoro, Martin; Lluch, Salvador

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize neurogenic and pharmacological responses of human penile deep dorsal vein and to determine whether the responses are mediated by nitric oxide from neural or endothelial origin.Ring segments of human penile deep dorsal vein were obtained from 22 multiorgan donors during procurement of organs for transplantation. The rings were suspended in organ bath chambers for isometric recording of tension. We then studied the contractile and relaxant responses to electrical field stimulation and to vasoactive agents.Electrical field stimulation (0.5–2 Hz) and noradrenaline (3×10−10–3×10−5 M) caused frequency- and concentration-dependent contractions that were of greater magnitude in veins denuded of endothelium. The inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 10−4 M) increased the adrenergic responses only in rings with endothelium.In preparations contracted with noradrenaline in the presence of guanethidine (10−6 M) and atropine (10−6 M), electrical stimulation induced frequency-dependent relaxations. This neurogenic relaxation was prevented by L-NAME, methylene blue (3×10−5 M) and tetrodotoxin (10−6 M), but was unaffected by removal of endothelium.Acetylcholine (10−8–3×10−5 M) and substance P (3×10−11–3×10−7 M) induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. In contrast, sodium nitroprusside (10−9–3×10−5 M) and papaverine (10−8–3×10−5 M) caused endothelium-independent relaxations.The results provide functional evidence that the human penile deep dorsal vein is an active component of the penile vascular resistance through the release of nitric oxide from both neural and endothelial origin. Dysfunction in any of these sources of nitric oxide should be considered in some forms of impotence. PMID:9690872

  5. Barbagli's dorsal urethroplasty. Analysis of results and factors for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Cristobal; Pérez, Juan Enrique; Herrera, Bernardo; Saez, Felipe; Castillo, Elisabeth; Antuña, Francisco; Julve, Emilio; Machuca, Francisco Javier

    2010-09-01

    Dorsal urethroplasty as described by Barbagli has gained wide acceptance in the treatment of urethral stricture, given the simplification afforded by obtaining a free graft versus a flap. We present a series of 50 patients treated in our department of urethral stricture by dorsal onlay free graft urethroplasty (Barbagli's technique), in combination or not to other techniques in more complex strictures. The average age of patients was 48.8 years (23-77), the mean follow up 42.9 months (12-96) and the most frequently observed etiology has been the inflammatory urethral stricture (50%). Overall success rate was 82% (41 cases) and failure 18% (9 cases). In the longer follow-up group, there was a slight drop in success rate of 80% (24 cases) without any significant differences between groups (p= 0.9). Analyzing the variables length of free graft (p= 0.50, p> 36= 0.53), age (p= 0.12, p>36= 0.59), etiology of stricture (p= 0.77, p>36 = 0.77) and type of graft used (p=0.24, p>36= 0.38) did not show any influence on the final outcome of surgery, both in the total sample and the subgroup with follow-up > 36 months. The location of the stricture in bulbar urethra has shown better functional outcome than those operated on for strictures affecting also other urethral locations (p= 0.001) maintaining that result in the group of longer follow up (p>36= 0,001). The lack of treatment prior to urethral surgery has influenced the success of it, since 90.6% of patients without prior treatment before urethroplasty have seen a good functional outcome, compared to treatment prior to surgery that obtained a 66.7% (p= 0.03). This significance is also demonstrated in the group of follow-up > 36 months (p>36= 0.01). The dorsal onlay free graft urethroplasty is a versatile and reproducible technique with acceptable results which allows combination with other techniques when the stenosis extends to the penile urethra. In exceptional cases of panurethral strictures secondary to lichen sclerosus

  6. Altered nicotine reward-associated behavior following α4 nAChR subunit deletion in ventral midbrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Peng

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4 subunits (α4β2* nAChRs are critical for nicotinic cholinergic transmission and the addictive action of nicotine. To identify specific activities of these receptors in the adult mouse brain, we coupled targeted deletion of α4 nAChR subunits with behavioral and and electrophysiological measures of nicotine sensitivity. A viral-mediated Cre/lox approach allowed us to delete α4 from ventral midbrain (vMB neurons. We used two behavioral assays commonly used to assess the motivational effects of drugs of abuse: home-cage oral self-administration, and place conditioning. Mice lacking α4 subunits in vMB consumed significantly more nicotine at the highest offered nicotine concentration (200 μg/mL compared to control mice. Deletion of α4 subunits in vMB blocked nicotine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP without affecting locomotor activity. Acetylcholine-evoked currents as well as nicotine-mediated increases in synaptic potentiation were reduced in mice lacking α4 in vMB. Immunostaining verified that α4 subunits were deleted from both dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA. These results reveal that attenuation of α4* nAChR function in reward-related brain circuitry of adult animals may increase nicotine intake by enhancing the rewarding effects and/or reducing the aversive effects of nicotine.

  7. Context-dependent fluctuation of serotonin in the auditory midbrain: the influence of sex, reproductive state and experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jessica L.; Hurley, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    In the face of changing behavioral situations, plasticity of sensory systems can be a valuable mechanism to facilitate appropriate behavioral responses. In the auditory system, the neurotransmitter serotonin is an important messenger for context-dependent regulation because it is sensitive to both external events and internal state, and it modulates neural activity. In male mice, serotonin increases in the auditory midbrain region, the inferior colliculus (IC), in response to changes in behavioral context such as restriction stress and social contact. Female mice have not been measured in similar contexts, although the serotonergic system is sexually dimorphic in many ways. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sex, experience and estrous state on the fluctuation of serotonin in the IC across contexts, as well as potential relationships between behavior and serotonin. Contrary to our expectation, there were no sex differences in increases of serotonin in response to a restriction stimulus. Both sexes had larger increases in second exposures, suggesting experience plays a role in serotonergic release in the IC. In females, serotonin increased during both restriction and interactions with males; however, the increase was more rapid during restriction. There was no effect of female estrous phase on the serotonergic change for either context, but serotonin was related to behavioral activity in females interacting with males. These results show that changes in behavioral context induce increases in serotonin in the IC by a mechanism that appears to be uninfluenced by sex or estrous state, but may depend on experience and behavioral activity. PMID:24198252

  8. Wnt5a-treated midbrain neural stem cells improve dopamine cell replacement therapy in parkinsonian mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parish, Clare L; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Rawal, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) cell replacement therapy in Parkinson disease (PD) can be achieved using human fetal mesencephalic tissue; however, limited tissue availability has hindered further developments. Embryonic stem cells provide a promising alternative, but poor survival and risk of teratoma formation h...... and functional integration of stem cell-derived DA neurons in vivo and define Wnt5a-treated neural stem cells as an efficient and safe source of DA neurons for cell replacement therapy in PD.......Dopamine (DA) cell replacement therapy in Parkinson disease (PD) can be achieved using human fetal mesencephalic tissue; however, limited tissue availability has hindered further developments. Embryonic stem cells provide a promising alternative, but poor survival and risk of teratoma formation...... have prevented their clinical application. We present here a method for generating large numbers of DA neurons based on expanding and differentiating ventral midbrain (VM) neural stem cells/progenitors in the presence of key signals necessary for VM DA neuron development. Mouse VM neurospheres (VMNs...

  9. Subdivisions of the auditory midbrain (n. mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis in zebra finches using calcium-binding protein immunocytochemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Logerot

    Full Text Available The midbrain nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd is thought to be the avian homologue of the central nucleus of the mammalian inferior colliculus. As such, it is a major relay in the ascending auditory pathway of all birds and in songbirds mediates the auditory feedback necessary for the learning and maintenance of song. To clarify the organization of MLd, we applied three calcium binding protein antibodies to tissue sections from the brains of adult male and female zebra finches. The staining patterns resulting from the application of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin antibodies differed from each other and in different parts of the nucleus. Parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity was distributed throughout the whole nucleus, as defined by the totality of the terminations of brainstem auditory afferents; in other words parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity defines the boundaries of MLd. Staining patterns of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin defined two regions of MLd: inner (MLd.I and outer (MLd.O. MLd.O largely surrounds MLd.I and is distinct from the surrounding intercollicular nucleus. Unlike the case in some non-songbirds, however, the two MLd regions do not correspond to the terminal zones of the projections of the brainstem auditory nuclei angularis and laminaris, which have been found to overlap substantially throughout the nucleus in zebra finches.

  10. Altered nicotine reward-associated behavior following α4 nAChR subunit deletion in ventral midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Can; Engle, Staci E; Yan, Yijin; Weera, Marcus M; Berry, Jennifer N; Arvin, Matthew C; Zhao, Guiqing; McIntosh, J Michael; Chester, Julia A; Drenan, Ryan M

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4 subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) are critical for nicotinic cholinergic transmission and the addictive action of nicotine. To identify specific activities of these receptors in the adult mouse brain, we coupled targeted deletion of α4 nAChR subunits with behavioral and and electrophysiological measures of nicotine sensitivity. A viral-mediated Cre/lox approach allowed us to delete α4 from ventral midbrain (vMB) neurons. We used two behavioral assays commonly used to assess the motivational effects of drugs of abuse: home-cage oral self-administration, and place conditioning. Mice lacking α4 subunits in vMB consumed significantly more nicotine at the highest offered nicotine concentration (200 μg/mL) compared to control mice. Deletion of α4 subunits in vMB blocked nicotine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) without affecting locomotor activity. Acetylcholine-evoked currents as well as nicotine-mediated increases in synaptic potentiation were reduced in mice lacking α4 in vMB. Immunostaining verified that α4 subunits were deleted from both dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). These results reveal that attenuation of α4* nAChR function in reward-related brain circuitry of adult animals may increase nicotine intake by enhancing the rewarding effects and/or reducing the aversive effects of nicotine.

  11. Differentiation between vergence and saccadic functional activity within the human frontal eye fields and midbrain revealed through fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda Alkan

    Full Text Available Eye movement research has traditionally studied solely saccade and/or vergence eye movements by isolating these systems within a laboratory setting. While the neural correlates of saccadic eye movements are established, few studies have quantified the functional activity of vergence eye movements using fMRI. This study mapped the neural substrates of vergence eye movements and compared them to saccades to elucidate the spatial commonality and differentiation between these systems.The stimulus was presented in a block design where the 'off' stimulus was a sustained fixation and the 'on' stimulus was random vergence or saccadic eye movements. Data were collected with a 3T scanner. A general linear model (GLM was used in conjunction with cluster size to determine significantly active regions. A paired t-test of the GLM beta weight coefficients was computed between the saccade and vergence functional activities to test the hypothesis that vergence and saccadic stimulation would have spatial differentiation in addition to shared neural substrates.Segregated functional activation was observed within the frontal eye fields where a portion of the functional activity from the vergence task was located anterior to the saccadic functional activity (z>2.3; p0.2.Functional MRI can elucidate the differences between the vergence and saccade neural substrates within the frontal eye fields and midbrain.

  12. Facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in dorsal periaqueductal grey matter accounts for the panicolytic-like effect of chronic fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoveli, Janaina M; Pobbe, Roger L H; de Bortoli, Valquiria C; Carvalho, Milene C; Brandão, Marcus L; Zangrossi, Helio

    2010-09-01

    Chronic administration of antidepressants such as fluoxetine and imipramine increases the responsiveness of 5-HT(1A) receptors in dorsal periaqueductal grey matter (DPAG), a midbrain area consistently implicated in the pathogenesis of panic disorder. This effect has been related to the clinically relevant anti-panic action of these drugs. In this study we determined whether long-term administration of fluoxetine also affects 5-HT efflux in DPAG. As a comparison, the effect of chronic treatment with the anxiolytic 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist buspirone on DPAG 5-HT levels was assessed. We also investigated whether the inhibitory effect of chronic fluoxetine on escape behaviour in the rat elevated T-maze, considered as a panicolytic-like effect, is counteracted by intra-DPAG injection of the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY 100635. Male Wistar rats were treated (1 or 21 d, i.p.) with fluoxetine, buspirone or vehicle, once daily. After treatment, 5-HT in DPAG was measured by in-vivo microdialysis coupled to HPLC. In another study, rats treated (21 d, i.p.) with either fluoxetine or vehicle also received intra-DPAG injection of WAY 100635 or saline 10 min before being tested in the elevated T-maze. Chronic, but not acute, administration of fluoxetine significantly raised extracellular levels of 5-HT in DPAG. Long-term treatment with buspirone was ineffective. In the elevated T-maze, intra-DPAG injection of WAY 100635 fully blocked the anti-escape effect of chronic administration of fluoxetine. Therefore, chronic fluoxetine facilitates 5-HT(1A)-mediated neurotransmission within DPAG and this effect accounts for the panicolytic-like effect of this antidepressant in the elevated T-maze.

  13. Contrasting effects of nitric oxide and corticotropin-releasing factor within the dorsal periaqueductal gray on defensive behavior and nociception in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, T.T. [Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos and Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Gomes, K.S. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Nunes-de-Souza, R.L. [Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos and Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-30

    The anxiogenic and antinociceptive effects produced by glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation within the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) matter have been related to nitric oxide (NO) production, since injection of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors reverses these effects. dPAG corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRFr) activation also induces anxiety-like behavior and antinociception, which, in turn, are selectively blocked by local infusion of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRFr1) antagonist, NBI 27914 [5-chloro-4-(N-(cyclopropyl)methyl-N-propylamino)-2-methyl-6- (2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)aminopyridine]. Here, we determined whether i) the blockade of the dPAG by CRFr1 attenuates the anxiogenic/antinociceptive effects induced by local infusion of the NO donor, NOC-9 [6-(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-nitrosohydrazino)-N-methyl-1-hexanamine], and ii) the anxiogenic/antinociceptive effects induced by intra-dPAG CRF are prevented by local infusion of N{sup ω}-propyl-L-arginine (NPLA), a neuronal NOS inhibitor, in mice. Male Swiss mice (12 weeks old, 25-35 g, N = 8-14/group) were stereotaxically implanted with a 7-mm cannula aimed at the dPAG. Intra-dPAG NOC-9 (75 nmol) produced defensive-like behavior (jumping and running) and antinociception (assessed by the formalin test). Both effects were reversed by prior local infusion of NBI 27914 (2 nmol). Conversely, intra-dPAG NPLA (0.4 nmol) did not modify the anxiogenic/antinociceptive effects of CRF (150 pmol). These results suggest that CRFr1 plays an important role in the defensive behavior and antinociception produced by NO within the dPAG. In contrast, the anxiogenic and antinociceptive effects produced by intra-dPAG CRF are not related to NO synthesis in this limbic midbrain structure.

  14. Cadaveric Evaluation of Dorsal Intermetatarsal Approach for Plantar Plate and Lateral Collateral Ligament Repair of the Lesser Metatarsophalangeal Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phisitkul, Phinit; Hosuru Siddappa, Vinay; Sittapairoj, Tinnart; Goetz, Jessica E; Den Hartog, Bryan D; Femino, John E

    2017-07-01

    Access to the plantar plate has been described using either a plantar approach or an extensive dorsal approach that required complete joint destabilization and often a metatarsal osteotomy. Clinical scenarios related to plantar plate tear vary and the pathologies in early stages are frequently limited to unilateral soft tissue structures; a less invasive operative approach may be possible. A novel approach requiring a release of only the lateral collateral ligament and the lateral half of the plantar plate is presented in this cadaver model; the extent of joint exposure possible is described. The ability to place a secure suture through the lateral collateral ligament and the plantar plate was analyzed. Nine fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were dissected in a randomized fashion across the second to fourth metatarsophalangeal joints through the intermetatarsal space dorsally. Under distraction, soft tissue was sequentially released, including dorsal capsule, lateral collateral ligament, and the lateral half of the plantar plate. Integrity of the extensor tendons, deep transverse intermetatarsal ligament, proximal attachment of the plantar plate, and osseous structures was carefully preserved. The joint exposure was quantified after each step with sizing rods. Using a suture passer, 2-0 nonabsorbable braided sutures were passed into the lateral collateral ligament and the plantar plate, and the construct strength was measured using a tensiometer. Progressive increase in mean joint exposure was noted after each step of soft tissue release with the final exposure of 6 mm after release of the lateral half of the plantar plate. Joint exposures after a capsulotomy and a lateral collateral release were 3 mm and 4 mm, respectively. Under distraction, the unilateral release of soft tissue created a lateral opening of the joint while the proximal phalangeal base adducted and medially deviated. Successful suture passage was noted in all specimens that could sustain a minimum

  15. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PaperClip PMID:26871628

  16. [Dorsal medulla oblongata stroke after a wasp sting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, G; Canneva-Bourel, M L; Delafosse, J-M; Poirier, J; Merienne, M

    2006-03-01

    Although wasp stings can cause local reactions such as pain, flare, edema, swelling and severe reactions, including anaphylaxis; neurological vascular complications are rare. We report a case of a 36-year-old male who developed focal neurological symptoms after a wasp sting. The brain MRI showed an infarct in the left dorsal medulla. The blood test has showed an elevated level of venom-specific IgE antibodies and the skin test with wasp venom was highly positive. Improvement occurred rapidly after treatment with methylprednisone. The postulated mechanisms include vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation secondary to an injection of distinct allergens contained in wasp venom. It would thus be important to ask patients about any recent wasp sting, in order to provide appropriate treatment.

  17. Spinal dorsal horn astrocytes: New players in chronic itch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Tsuda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic itch is a debilitating symptom of inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis, and systemic diseases, for which existing treatment is largely ineffective. Recent studies have revealed the selective neuronal pathways that are involved in itch sensations; however, the mechanisms by which itch turns into a pathological chronic state are poorly understood. Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms producing chronic itch have been made by defining causal roles for astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn in mouse models of chronic itch including atopic dermatitis. Understanding the key roles of astrocytes may provide us with exciting insights into the mechanisms for itch chronicity and lead to a previously unrecognized target for treating chronic itch.

  18. Functional specialization in dorsal and ventral premotor areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Eiji; Tanji, Jun

    2004-01-01

    The premotor cortex (PM) in the bilateral lateral hemisphere of nonhuman primates and the human has been implicated in the sensorial guidance of movements. This is in contrast to more medial motor areas that are involved more in the temporal structuring of movements based on memorized information. The PM is further subdivided into dorsal (PMd) and ventral (PMv) parts. In this chapter, we describe our attempts to find differences in the use of these two areas in a nonhuman primate for programming future motor actions based on visual signals. We show that neurons in the PMv are involved primarily in receiving visuospatial signals and in specifying the spatial location of the target to be reached. In contrast, neurons in the PMd are involved more in integrating information about which arm to use and the target to be reached. Thus, PMd neurons are more implicated than those of the PMv in the preparation for a future motor action.

  19. [The crooked nose: correction of dorsal and caudal septal deviations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, H M T

    2010-09-01

    The deviated nose represents a complex cosmetic and functional problem. Septal surgery plays a central role in the successful management of the externally deviated nose. This study included 800 patients seeking rhinoplasty to correct external nasal deviations; 71% of these suffered from variable degrees of nasal obstruction. Septal surgery was necessary in 736 (92%) patients, not only to improve breathing, but also to achieve a straight, symmetric external nose. A graduated surgical approach was adopted to allow correction of the dorsal and caudal deviations of the nasal septum without weakening its structural support to the nasal dorsum or nasal tip. The approach depended on full mobilization of deviated cartilage, followed by straightening of the cartilage and its fixation in the corrected position by using bony splinting grafts through an external rhinoplasty approach.

  20. Pulsed and continuous radiofrequency current adjacent to the cervical dorsal root ganglion of the rat induces late cellular activity in the dorsal horn.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zundert, J. van; Louw, A.J. de; Joosten, E.A.J.; Kessels, A.G.H.; Honig, W.; Dederen, P.J.W.C.; Veening, J.G.; Vles, J.S.; Kleef, M. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulsed radiofrequency treatment has recently been described as a non-neurodestructive or minimally neurodestructive alternative to radiofrequency heat lesions. In clinical practice long-lasting results of pulsed radiofrequency treatment adjacent to the cervical dorsal root ganglion for

  1. Selective resection of dorsal nerves of penis for premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-X; Yu, L-P; Bai, W-J; Wang, X-F

    2012-12-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is one of the most prevalent male sexual dysfunctions. Selective resection of the dorsal nerve (SRDN) of penis has recently been used for the treatment of PE and has shown some efficacy. To further clarify the efficacy and safety of SRDN on PE, we performed a preliminary, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical observational study. Persons with the complaints of rapid ejaculation, asking for circumcision because of redundant foreskin, intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) within 2 min, not responding to antidepressant medication or disliking oral medication were randomly enrolled in two groups. From April 2007 to August 2010, a total of 101 eligible persons were enrolled, 40 of them received SRDN which dorsal nerves of the penis were selectively resected, and those (n = 61) enrolled in the control group were circumcised only. IELT and the Brief Male Sexual Function Inventory (BMSFI) questionnaire were implemented pre- and post-operatively for the evaluation of the effect and safety of the surgery. There are no statistically significant differences in the baseline data including mean ages, mean IELTs, perceived control abilities and the BMSFI mean scores between the two groups. With regard to the post-operative data of the surgery, both IELTs and perceived control abilities were significantly increased after SRDN (1.1 ± 0.9 min vs. 3.8 ± 3.1 min for pre- and post-operative IELT, respectively, p 0.05). Also, there were no statistically significant differences both in BMSFI composite and subscale scores between the two groups after surgery. Hence, we conclude that SRDN is effective in delaying ejaculation and improving ejaculatory control, whereas erectile function is not affected. The results imply that SRDN may be an alternative method for the treatment of PE for some patients. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2012 European Academy of Andrology.

  2. Menthol Alone Upregulates Midbrain nAChRs, Alters nAChR Subtype Stoichiometry, Alters Dopamine Neuron Firing Frequency, and Prevents Nicotine Reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brandon J; Wall, Teagan R; Henley, Beverley M; Kim, Charlene H; Nichols, Weston A; Moaddel, Ruin; Xiao, Cheng; Lester, Henry A

    2016-03-09

    Upregulation of β2 subunit-containing (β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is implicated in several aspects of nicotine addiction, and menthol cigarette smokers tend to upregulate β2* nAChRs more than nonmenthol cigarette smokers. We investigated the effect of long-term menthol alone on midbrain neurons containing nAChRs. In midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons from mice containing fluorescent nAChR subunits, menthol alone increased the number of α4 and α6 nAChR subunits, but this upregulation did not occur in midbrain GABAergic neurons. Thus, chronic menthol produces a cell-type-selective upregulation of α4* nAChRs, complementing that of chronic nicotine alone, which upregulates α4 subunit-containing (α4*) nAChRs in GABAergic but not DA neurons. In mouse brain slices and cultured midbrain neurons, menthol reduced DA neuron firing frequency and altered DA neuron excitability following nAChR activation. Furthermore, menthol exposure before nicotine abolished nicotine reward-related behavior in mice. In neuroblastoma cells transfected with fluorescent nAChR subunits, exposure to 500 nm menthol alone also increased nAChR number and favored the formation of (α4)3(β2)2 nAChRs; this contrasts with the action of nicotine itself, which favors (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs. Menthol alone also increases the number of α6β2 receptors that exclude the β3 subunit. Thus, menthol stabilizes lower-sensitivity α4* and α6 subunit-containing nAChRs, possibly by acting as a chemical chaperone. The abolition of nicotine reward-related behavior may be mediated through menthol's ability to stabilize lower-sensitivity nAChRs and alter DA neuron excitability. We conclude that menthol is more than a tobacco flavorant: administered alone chronically, it alters midbrain DA neurons of the nicotine reward-related pathway. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362957-18$15.00/0.

  3. Phosphorylation of tyrosine receptor kinase B in the dorsal striatum and dorsal hippocampus is associated with response learning in a water plus maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahng, Amanda R; Colombo, Paul J

    2017-02-01

    The dorsal hippocampus and dorsal striatum have dissociable roles in learning and memory that are related to region-specific changes in proteins necessary for neuronal plasticity and memory formation. There is additional evidence that the hippocampus and striatum can interact during memory formation. Phosphorylation of tyrosine receptor kinase B is important for memory formation in the hippocampus, but whether or not it has a role in striatum-dependent learning, or in interactions between the hippocampus and striatum, has not been examined. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that response training increases pTrkB in the dorsal striatum, but decreases pTrkB in dorsal hippocampus, due to an interaction between the systems during memory formation. Results show a significant decrease in pTrkB levels in the dorsal hippocampus of rats trained on the response task compared with swim controls. Response training did not increase pTrkB levels in the dorsal striatum. Positive correlations were found between response learning and the total area of cells expressing pTrkB in the dorsal striatum, while no correlations were found in swim controls. Our results partially support our hypothesis and indicate that response learning is associated with a decrease in hippocampal pTrkB, while phosphorylation of TrkB in the dorsal striatum remains constant. This indicates that suppression of hippocampal pTrkB during response learning may be involved in striatum-dependent memory formation. Additionally, our findings suggest that activation of TrkB in a sparse arrangement of cells may be associated with faster acquisition of a response task. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. [Expression of Sema3A and NP-1 in spinal cord and spared dorsal root ganglion after partial dorsal root rhizotomy of cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Qian; Peng, Jin; Zhao, Xiu-jun; Xu, Ai-li; Zhou, Xue

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the expression of semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) and neuropilin 1 (NP-1) in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion after partial dorsal root rhizotomy. 15 adult cats were used for this study and divided into 3 groups: normal control group, 7 d and 14 d postoperative groups (7Th day and 14th day groups) undergoing unilateral partial dorsal root rhizotomy. The L3, L5 and L6 segments of spinal cord and L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in operated side were made into frozen sections. By immunohistochemistry ABC method, the sections of spinal cord were stained with specific Sema3A antibody, and L6 DRG were stained with NP-1 antibody. The mean optical density (OD) of Sema3A immunoreactivity in dorsal horn was measured and the number of NP-1 positive medium-small sized neurons in spared DRG was counted. After partial dorsal root rhizotomy, in L3 segment the expression of Sema3A decreased in 7th day group (0.25 +/- 0. 14) compared with that in normal group(0. 37 +/- 0.87) (P P NP-1 positive medium-small sized neurons in spared DRG (30.85 +/- 10.26) was decreased in 7th day group (P P NP-1 in L6 DRG after partial root rhizotomy may be involved in collateral sprouting of spared root in superficial lamina.

  5. Recruitment of dorsal columm fibers in spinal cord stimulation: influence of collateral branching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, J.J.; Struijk, Johannes J.; Holsheimer, J.; van der Heide, Gerlof G.; van der Heide, G.G.; Boom, H.B.K.

    1992-01-01

    An electrical network model of myelinated dorsal column nerve fibers is presented. The effect of electrical simulation was investigated using both a homogeneous volume conductor and a more realistic model of the spinal cord. An important feature of dorsal column nerve fibers is the presence of

  6. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mediates the dynamic maintenance of nuclear Dorsal levels during Drosophila embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLotto, Robert; DeLotto, Yvonne; Steward, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    In Drosophila, the NF-kappaB/REL family transcription factor, Dorsal, redistributes from the cytoplasm to nuclei, forming a concentration gradient across the dorsoventral axis of the embryo. Using live imaging techniques in conjunction with embryos expressing a chimeric Dorsal-GFP, we demonstrate...

  7. Role of the right dorsal anterior insula in the urge to tic in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinaz, Sule; Malone, Patrick; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G

    2015-08-01

    The mid-posterior part of the insula is involved in processing bodily sensations and urges and is activated during tic generation in Tourette syndrome. The dorsal anterior part of the insula, however, integrates sensory and emotional information with cognitive valuation and is implicated in interoception. The right dorsal anterior insula also participates in urge suppression in healthy subjects. This study examined the role of the right dorsal anterior insula in the urge to tic in Tourette syndrome. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 13 adult Tourette patients and 13 matched controls. The role of the right dorsal anterior insula within the urge-tic network was investigated using graph theory-based neural network analysis. The functional connectivity of the right dorsal anterior insula was also correlated with urge and tic severity. Even though the patients did not exhibit any overt tics, the right dorsal anterior insula demonstrated higher connectivity, especially with the frontostriatal nodes of the urge-tic network in patients compared with controls. The functional connectivity between the right dorsal anterior insula and bilateral supplementary motor area also correlated positively with urge severity in patients. These results suggest that the right dorsal anterior insula is part of the urge-tic network and could influence the urge- and tic-related cortico-striato-thalamic regions even during rest in Tourette syndrome. It might be responsible for heightened awareness of bodily sensations generating premonitory urges in Tourette syndrome. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. The interaction between the locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe nucleus studied with dual-probe microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudovkina, OL; Cremers, TIFH; Westerink, BHC

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between the locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe nucleus was investigated by means of dual-probe microdialysis in conscious rats. The release of noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) after inhibition or stimulation of locus cocruleus and dorsal raphe activity was sampled in both

  9. Pattern of hair distribution on the dorsal phalanges of the hand in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The distribution of hair in the dorsal aspect of the hand digits were investigated in this study. Aim: To determine dorsal phalengeal hair pattern in an African ethnic group. Methods: The study involved 160 male and 140 female of Urhobo volunteers whose ages ranged between 18 and 38 years. Results: Hair ...

  10. Effectiveness of selective dorsal rhizotomy in 2 patients with progressive spasticity due to neurodegenerative disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunt, Sebastian; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J. R.; Strijers, Rob L. M.; Becher, Jules G.; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy at the lumbar level is a neurosurgical procedure, which reduces spasticity in the legs. Its effect has mainly been studied in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Little is known about the outcome of selective dorsal rhizotomy in patients with neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. The ventral stream offers more affordance and the dorsal stream more memory than believed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Albert; van der Lubbe, Robert Henricus Johannes; Zuidhoek, Sander

    2002-01-01

    Opposed to Norman's proposal, processing of affordance is likely to occur not solely in the dorsal stream but also in the ventral stream. Moreover, the dorsal stream might do more than just serve an important role in motor actions. It supports egocentric location coding as well. As such, it would

  12. The function of the long dorsal sacroiliac ligament : its implications for understanding low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Vleeming, A; Hammudoghlu, D; Stoeckart, R.; Snijders, C.; Mens, Jan M A

    1996-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: In embalmed human bodies the tension of the long dorsal sacroiliac ligament was measured during incremental loading of anatomical structures that are biomechanically relevant. OBJECTIVES: To assess the function of the long dorsal sacroiliac ligament. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In many

  13. Monosynaptic connections between primary afferents and giant neurons in the turtle spinal dorsal horn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, A; Radmilovich, M; Russo, R E

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the occurrence of monosynaptic connections between dorsal root afferents and a distinct cell type-the giant neuron-deep in the dorsal horn of the turtle spinal cord. Light microscope studies combining Nissl stain and transganglionic HRP-labeling of the primary afferents have re...

  14. Effects of Citalopram on Serotonin and CRF Systems in the Midbrain of Primates with Differences in Stress Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Lima, Fernanda B.; Centeno, Maria L.; Weissheimer, Karin V.; Senashova, Olga; Reddy, Arubala P.; Cameron, Judy L.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews the neurobiological effects of stress sensitivity and CIT treatment observed in our nonhuman primate model of Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea (FHA). This type of infertility, also known as stress-induced amenorrhea, is exhibited by cynomolgus macaques. In small populations, some individuals are stress sensitive (SS) and others are highly stress resilient (HSR). The SS macaques have suboptimal secretion of estrogen and progesterone during normal menstrual cycles. SS monkeys also have decreased serotonin gene expression and increased CRF expression compared to HSR monkeys. Recently, we found that s-citalopram (CIT) treatment improved ovarian steroid secretion in SS monkeys, but had no effect in HSR monkeys. Examination of the serotonin system revealed that SS monkeys had significantly lower Fev (fifth Ewing variant, rodent Pet1), TPH2 (tryptophan hydroxylase 2), 5HT1A autoreceptor and SERT (serotonin reuptake transporter) expression in the dorsal raphe than SR monkeys. However, CIT did not alter the expression of either Fev, TPH2, SERT or 5HT1A mRNAs. In contrast, SS monkeys tended to a higher density of CRF fiber innervation of the dorsal raphe than HSR monkeys, and CIT significantly decreased the CRF fiber density in SS animals. In addition, CIT increased CRF-R2 gene expression in the dorsal raphe. We speculate that in a 15-week time frame, the therapeutic effect of S-citalopram may be achieved through a mechanism involving extracellular serotonin inhibition of CRF and stimulation of CRF-R2, rather than alteration of serotonin-related gene expression. PMID:21683135

  15. The dorsal prefrontal and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices exert complementary network signatures during encoding and retrieval in associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Eric A; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive control includes processes that facilitate execution of effortful cognitive tasks, including associative memory. Regions implicated in cognitive control during associative memory include the dorsal prefrontal (dPFC) and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). Here we investigated the relative degrees of network-related interactions originating in the dPFC and dACC during oscillating phases of associative memory: encoding and cued retrieval. Volunteers completed an established object-location associative memory paradigm during fMRI. Psychophysiological interactions modeled modulatory network interactions from the dPFC and dACC during memory encoding and retrieval. Results were evaluated in second level analyses of variance with seed region and memory process as factors. Each seed exerted differentiable modulatory effects during encoding and retrieval. The dACC exhibited greater modulation (than the dPFC) on the fusiform and parahippocampal gyrus during encoding, while the dPFC exhibited greater modulation (than the dACC) on the fusiform, hippocampus, dPFC and basal ganglia. During retrieval, the dPFC exhibited greater modulation (than the dACC) on the parahippocampal gyrus, hippocampus, superior parietal lobule, and dPFC. The most notable finding was a seed by process interaction indicating that the dACC and the dPFC exerted complementary modulatory control on the hippocampus during each of the associative memory processes. These results provide evidence for differentiable, yet complementary, control-related modulation by the dACC and dPFC, while establishing the primacy of dPFC in exerting network control during both associative memory phases. Our approach and findings are relevant for understanding basic processes in human memory and psychiatric disorders that impact associative memory-related networks. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Repetitive TMS Suggests a Role of the Human Dorsal Premotor Cortex in Action Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Waltraud; Ott, Derek V. M.; Springer, Anne; Schubotz, Ricarda I.; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the actions of other individuals is crucial for our daily interactions. Recent evidence suggests that the prediction of object-directed arm and full-body actions employs the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd). Thus, the neural substrate involved in action control may also be essential for action prediction. Here, we aimed to address this issue and hypothesized that disrupting the PMd impairs action prediction. Using fMRI-guided coil navigation, rTMS (five pulses, 10 Hz) was applied over the left PMd and over the vertex (control region) while participants observed everyday actions in video clips that were transiently occluded for 1 s. The participants detected manipulations in the time course of occluded actions, which required them to internally predict the actions during occlusion. To differentiate between functional roles that the PMd could play in prediction, rTMS was either delivered at occluder-onset (TMS-early), affecting the initiation of action prediction, or 300 ms later during occlusion (TMS-late), affecting the maintenance of an ongoing prediction. TMS-early over the left PMd produced more prediction errors than TMS-early over the vertex. TMS-late had no effect on prediction performance, suggesting that the left PMd might be involved particularly during the initiation of internally guided action prediction but may play a subordinate role in maintaining ongoing prediction. These findings open a new perspective on the role of the left PMd in action prediction which is in line with its functions in action control and in cognitive tasks. In the discussion, the relevance of the left PMd for integrating external action parameters with the observer’s motor repertoire is emphasized. Overall, the results are in line with the notion that premotor functions are employed in both action control and action observation. PMID:22363279

  17. A randomised clinical study comparing palmar and dorsal fixed-angle plates for the internal fixation of AO C-type fractures of the distal radius in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubietz, R G; Gruenert, J G; Kloss, D F; Schindele, S; Jakubietz, M G

    2008-10-01

    Current surgical treatments for distal radial fractures include dorsal and palmar plate fixation. We report results of a randomised study comparing these methods for AO C1-3 fractures. The emphasis was placed on the early postoperative functional recovery within the first 6 months as this interval is of decisive importance for elderly patients. Thirty patients with unilateral AO C1-3 fractures were enroled, 15 were treated with a palmar plate and 15 received a dorsal Pi-plate. Results were assessed 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months postoperatively focusing on functional recovery. The palmar plate group demonstrated significantly better results in range of motion, grip strength and pain.

  18. Amnioserosa cell constriction but not epidermal actin cable tension autonomously drives dorsal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Frei, Erich; Caussinus, Emmanuel; Affolter, Markus; Brunner, Damian

    2016-11-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires coordination of multiple force-producing components. During dorsal closure in fly embryogenesis, an epidermis opening closes. A tensioned epidermal actin/MyosinII cable, which surrounds the opening, produces a force that is thought to combine with another MyosinII force mediating apical constriction of the amnioserosa cells that fill the opening. A model proposing that each force could autonomously drive dorsal closure was recently challenged by a model in which the two forces combine in a ratchet mechanism. Acute force elimination via selective MyosinII depletion in one or the other tissue shows that the amnioserosa tissue autonomously drives dorsal closure while the actin/MyosinII cable cannot. These findings exclude both previous models, although a contribution of the ratchet mechanism at dorsal closure onset remains likely. This shifts the current view of dorsal closure being a combinatorial force-component system to a single tissue-driven closure event.

  19. The effect of intrathecal administration of glial activation inhibitors on dorsal horn BDNF overexpression and hind paw mechanical allodynia in spinal nerve ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yongming; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Quanhong; Pu, Shaofeng; Jiang, Wei; Du, Dongping

    2012-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that activated glia in the spinal cord may play a vital role at different times during spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain; therefore, glial activation inhibitors have been used as effective painkillers. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is also known to be a powerful pain modulator, but it remains unclear how it contributes to the glial activation inhibitor-based treatment. This study revealed the following results: (1) intrathecal administration of minocycline (a microglial activation inhibitor) could prevent mechanical allodynia during the initiation of SNL-induced neuropathic pain, and its action was associated with the elimination of BDNF overexpression in the dorsal horn; (2) the spinal injection of fluorocitrate (an astrocytic activation inhibitor) but not minocycline could reverse mechanical allodynia during the maintenance phase of SNL-induced pain, and its action was also related to a decrease in BDNF overexpression in the dorsal horn; and (3) treatment with TrkB/Fc (a BDNF-sequestering protein) had a similar effect during both the early development and maintenance periods. These results led to the following conclusions: (1) elevated BDNF expression in the dorsal horn was required to develop and maintain neuropathic pain; (2) minocycline could only prevent mechanical allodynia in the early stages, possibly by inhibiting BDNF release from microglia; and (3) fluorocitrate could reverse existing mechanical allodynia, and its action was associated with the inhibition of BDNF upregulation induced by astrocytic activation.

  20. Arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair in the treatment of chronic scapho-lunate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L; Mathoulin, Christophe L

    2013-05-01

    Introduction Scapholunate ligament injuries usually result due to a fall on the outstretched hand leading to scapholunate instability. The natural history of untreated scapholunate instability remains controversial and usually results in late arthritic changes- the so-called "SLAC" wrist. The advent of wrist arthroscopy helps in early diagnosis and treatment of these serious injuries. In selected cases with reducible scapholunate instability (Garcia-Elias stages 2, 3 and 4) we propose a new "all arthroscopic dorsal capsulo- ligamentous repair" with the added advantage of early rehabilitation and prevention of post-operative stiffness. Material and Methods We report the results of our series of 57 consecutive patients suffering from chronic wrist pain refractory to conservative measures. All patients underwent a thorough clinical examination in addition to a standard set of radiographs and MRI exam; and they were treated by an all-arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair under loco-regional anesthesia on an ambulatory basis. All patients were available for follow-up at regular intervals during the post-operative period. At follow-up, the wrist ROM in all directions, the grip strength, DASH questionnaire and pain relief based on the VAS were recorded for both- the operated and contra-lateral sides. Results There were 34 males & 23 females with a mean age of 38.72 ± 11.33 years (range 17-63 years). The dominant side was involved in 52 cases. The mean time since injury was 9.42 ± 6.33 months (range 3-24 months) and the mean follow-up was 30.74 ± 7.05 months (range 18-43 months). The mean range of motion improved in all directions. The mean difference between the post- and pre-operative extension was 14.03° (SEM = 1.27°; p < 0.001); while the mean difference between the post-and pre-operative flexion was 11.14° (SEM = 1.3°; p < 0.0001) with flexion and radial deviation reaching 84.3% and 95.72% respectively of the

  1. Differentiation between vergence and saccadic functional activity within the human frontal eye fields and midbrain revealed through fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Yelda; Biswal, Bharat B; Alvarez, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    Eye movement research has traditionally studied solely saccade and/or vergence eye movements by isolating these systems within a laboratory setting. While the neural correlates of saccadic eye movements are established, few studies have quantified the functional activity of vergence eye movements using fMRI. This study mapped the neural substrates of vergence eye movements and compared them to saccades to elucidate the spatial commonality and differentiation between these systems. The stimulus was presented in a block design where the 'off' stimulus was a sustained fixation and the 'on' stimulus was random vergence or saccadic eye movements. Data were collected with a 3T scanner. A general linear model (GLM) was used in conjunction with cluster size to determine significantly active regions. A paired t-test of the GLM beta weight coefficients was computed between the saccade and vergence functional activities to test the hypothesis that vergence and saccadic stimulation would have spatial differentiation in addition to shared neural substrates. Segregated functional activation was observed within the frontal eye fields where a portion of the functional activity from the vergence task was located anterior to the saccadic functional activity (z>2.3; pvergence but not the saccade data set. Similar functional activation was observed within the following regions of interest: the supplementary eye field, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, ventral lateral prefrontal cortex, lateral intraparietal area, cuneus, precuneus, anterior and posterior cingulates, and cerebellar vermis. The functional activity from these regions was not different between the vergence and saccade data sets assessed by analyzing the beta weights of the paired t-test (p>0.2). Functional MRI can elucidate the differences between the vergence and saccade neural substrates within the frontal eye fields and midbrain.

  2. Auditory distance coding in rabbit midbrain neurons and human perception: monaural amplitude modulation depth as a cue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duck O; Zahorik, Pavel; Carney, Laurel H; Bishop, Brian B; Kuwada, Shigeyuki

    2015-04-01

    Mechanisms underlying sound source distance localization are not well understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that a novel mechanism can create monaural distance sensitivity: a combination of auditory midbrain neurons' sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) depth and distance-dependent loss of AM in reverberation. We used virtual auditory space (VAS) methods for sounds at various distances in anechoic and reverberant environments. Stimulus level was constant across distance. With increasing modulation depth, some rabbit inferior colliculus neurons increased firing rates whereas others decreased. These neurons exhibited monotonic relationships between firing rates and distance for monaurally presented noise when two conditions were met: (1) the sound had AM, and (2) the environment was reverberant. The firing rates as a function of distance remained approximately constant without AM in either environment and, in an anechoic condition, even with AM. We corroborated this finding by reproducing the distance sensitivity using a neural model. We also conducted a human psychophysical study using similar methods. Normal-hearing listeners reported perceived distance in response to monaural 1 octave 4 kHz noise source sounds presented at distances of 35-200 cm. We found parallels between the rabbit neural and human responses. In both, sound distance could be discriminated only if the monaural sound in reverberation had AM. These observations support the hypothesis. When other cues are available (e.g., in binaural hearing), how much the auditory system actually uses the AM as a distance cue remains to be determined. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355360-13$15.00/0.

  3. Neural representation in the auditory midbrain of the envelope of vocalizations based on a peripheral ear model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo eRode

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The auditory midbrain implant (AMI consists of a single shank array (20 sites for stimulation along the tonotopic axis of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC and has been safely implanted in deaf patients who cannot benefit from a cochlear implant (CI. The AMI improves lip-reading abilities and environmental awareness in the implanted patients. However, the AMI cannot achieve the high levels of speech perception possible with the CI. It appears the AMI can transmit sufficient spectral cues but with limited temporal cues required for speech understanding. Currently, the AMI uses a CI-based strategy, which was originally designed to stimulate each frequency region along the cochlea with amplitude-modulated pulse trains matching the envelope of the bandpass-filtered sound components. However, it is unclear if this type of stimulation with only a single site within each frequency lamina of the ICC can elicit sufficient temporal cues for speech perception. At least speech understanding in quiet is still possible with envelope cues as low as 50 Hz. Therefore, we investigated how ICC neurons follow the bandpass-filtered envelope structure of natural stimuli in ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs. We identified a subset of ICC neurons that could closely follow the envelope structure (up to ~100 Hz of a diverse set of species-specific calls, which was revealed by using a peripheral ear model to estimate the true bandpass-filtered envelopes observed by the brain. Although previous studies have suggested a complex neural transformation from the auditory nerve to the ICC, our data suggest that the brain maintains a robust temporal code in a subset of ICC neurons matching the envelope structure of natural stimuli. Clinically, these findings suggest that a CI-based strategy may still be effective for the AMI if the appropriate neurons are entrained to the envelope of the acoustic stimulus and can transmit sufficient temporal cues to higher

  4. Dorsal clitoral nerve injury following transobturator midurethral sling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss CF

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chailee F Moss,1 Lynn A Damitz,2 Richard H Gracely,3 Alice C Mintz,3 Denniz A Zolnoun,2–4 A Lee Dellon5 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3Department of Endodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 5Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Transobturator slings can be successfully used to treat stress urinary incontinence and improve quality of life through a minimally invasive vaginal approach. Persistent postoperative pain can occur and pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Following a sling procedure, a patient complained of pinching clitoral and perineal pain. Her symptoms of localized clitoral pinching and pain became generalized over the ensuing years, eventually encompassing the entire left vulvovaginal region.Aim: The aim of this study was to highlight the clinical utility of conventional pain management techniques used for the evaluation and management of patients with postoperative pain following pelvic surgery. Methods: We described a prototypical patient with persistent pain in and around the clitoral region complicating the clinical course of an otherwise successful sling procedure. We specifically discussed the utility of bedside sensory assessment techniques and selective nerve blocks in the evaluation and management of this prototypical patient. Results: Neurosensory assessments and a selective nerve block enabled us to trace the source of the patient’s pain to nerve entrapment along the dorsal nerve of the clitoris. We then utilized a nerve stimulator-guided hydrodissection technique to release the scar contracture Conclusion: This case

  5. TWIK-Related Spinal Cord K+ Channel Expression Is Increased in the Spinal Dorsal Horn after Spinal Nerve Ligation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hwang, Hee Youn; Zhang, Enji; Park, Sangil; Chung, Woosuk; Lee, Sunyeul; Kim, Dong Woon; Ko, Youngkwon; Lee, Wonhyung

    2015-01-01

    .... Because there have been no reports on the TRESK expression or its function in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in neuropathic pain, we analyzed TRESK expression in the spinal dorsal horn in a spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model...

  6. Dorsal arthrodesis in prepubertal New Zealand white rabbits followed to skeletal maturity: Effect on thoracic dimensions, spine growth and neural elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canavese Federico

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that severe spinal deformity and early arthrodesis can adversely affect the development of the spine and thorax by changing their shape and reducing their normal function. This article analyzes the consequences of posterior fusion on the growth of spine, thorax and neural elements in New Zealand white rabbits and compares with similar human data. Materials and Methods : The first section of the article analyzes the consequences of T1-T6 dorsal arthrodesis on the growth of the spine, sternum, thorax volume and neural elements in 12 prepubertal female New Zealand white rabbits, through a study of CT scans and histology specimens. The second part, evaluates thoracic dimensions in 21 children with spinal arthrodesis for treatment of deformity performed prior to nine years of age. Results: Dorsal arthrodesis in prepubertal rabbits changes thoracic growth patterns. In operated rabbits thoracic depth grows more slowly than thoracic width. The sternum as well as length of thoracic vertebral bodies in the spinal segment T1-T6 show reduced growth. Children undergoing spinal arthrodesis before nine years of age were noted to have shortened height, short trunk and disproportionate body habitus at skeletal maturity. Observed spine height and chest dimension values were reduced compared to the expected norms. The ratio between chest width and chest depth was below normal values. Conclusions: The first part of the study shows that thoracic dorsal arthrodesis in prepubertal New Zealand white rabbit influences thoracic, spine growth and affects the shape of pseudo unipolar neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. The second part demonstrates that children treated before nine years of age have significantly reduced spine height and thoracic dimensions. The thorax becomes elliptical as chest depth grows less than chest width. Both experimental and clinical findings contribute to explain reduced chest growth and subsequent thoracic

  7. Noninvasive evaluation of the vascular response to transplantation of alginate encapsulated islets using the dorsal skin-fold model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Rahul; Arora, Rajan P.; Alexander, Michael; White, Sean M.; Lamb, Morgan W.; Foster, Clarence E.; Choi, Bernard; Lakey, Jonathan R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Alginate encapsulation reduces the risk of transplant rejection by evading immune-mediated cell injury and rejection; however, poor vascular perfusion results in graft failure. Since existing imaging models are incapable of quantifying the vascular response to biomaterial implants after transplantation, in this study, we demonstrate the use of in vivo laser speckle imaging (LSI) and wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) to monitor the microvascular environment surrounding biomaterial implants. The vascular response to two islet-containing biomaterial encapsulation devices, alginate microcapsules and a high-guluronate alginate sheet, was studied and compared after implantation into the mouse dorsal window chamber (N = 4 per implant group). Images obtained over a 14-day period using LSI and WiFI were analyzed using algorithms to quantify blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density. Using our method, we were able to monitor the changes in the peri-implant microvasculature non-invasively without the use of fluorescent dyes. Significant changes in blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density were noted as early as the first week post-transplant. The dorsal window chamber model enables comparison of host responses to transplanted biomaterials. Future experiments will study the effect of changes in alginate composition on the vascular and immune responses. PMID:24176195

  8. The role of the transcription factor Rbpj in the development of dorsal root ganglia

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    Chen Jia-Yin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dorsal root ganglion (DRG is composed of well-characterized populations of sensory neurons and glia derived from a common pool of neural crest stem cells (NCCs, and is a good system to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis and gliogenesis. Notch signaling is known to play important roles in DRG development, but the full scope of Notch functions in mammalian DRG development remains poorly understood. Results In the present study, we used Wnt1-Cre to conditionally inactivate the transcription factor Rbpj, a critical integrator of activation signals from all Notch receptors, in NCCs and their derived cells. Deletion of Rbpj caused the up-regulation of NeuroD1 and precocious neurogenesis in DRG early development but led to an eventual deficit of sensory neurons at later stages, due to reduced cell proliferation and abnormal cell death. In addition, gliogenesis was delayed initially, but a near-complete loss of glia was observed finally in Rbpj-deficient DRG. Furthermore, we found P75 and Sox10, which are normally expressed exclusively in neuronal and glial progenitors of the DRG after the NCCs have completed their migration, were co-expressed in many cells of the DRG of Rbpj conditional knock-out mice. Conclusions Our data indicate that Rbpj-mediated canonical Notch signaling inhibits DRG neuronal differentiation, possibly by regulating NeuroD1 expression, and is required for DRG gliogenesis in vivo.

  9. Postembryonic neuronal addition in Zebrafish dorsal root ganglia is regulated by Notch signaling

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    McGraw Hillary

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sensory neurons and glia of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG arise from neural crest cells in the developing vertebrate embryo. In mouse and chick, DRG formation is completed during embryogenesis. In contrast, zebrafish continue to add neurons and glia to the DRG into adulthood, long after neural crest migration is complete. The molecular and cellular regulation of late DRG growth in the zebrafish remains to be characterized. Results In the present study, we use transgenic zebrafish lines to examine neuronal addition during postembryonic DRG growth. Neuronal addition is continuous over the period of larval development. Fate-mapping experiments support the hypothesis that new neurons are added from a population of resident, neural crest-derived progenitor cells. Conditional inhibition of Notch signaling was used to assess the role of this signaling pathway in neuronal addition. An increase in the number of DRG neurons is seen when Notch signaling is inhibited during both early and late larval development. Conclusions Postembryonic growth of the zebrafish DRG comes about, in part, by addition of new neurons from a resident progenitor population, a process regulated by Notch signaling.

  10. Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Thickness Is Related to Alexithymia in Childhood Trauma-Related PTSD.

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    Lauren A Demers

    Full Text Available Alexithymia, or "no words for feelings", is highly prevalent in samples with childhood maltreatment and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC has been identified as a key region involved in alexithymia, early life trauma, and PTSD. Functional alterations in the dACC also have been associated with alexithymia in PTSD. This study examined whether dACC morphology is a neural correlate of alexithymia in child maltreatment-related PTSD. Sixteen adults with PTSD and a history of childhood sexual abuse, physical abuse, or exposure to domestic violence, and 24 healthy controls (HC completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale 20 (TAS-20 and underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Cortical thickness of the dACC was measured using FreeSurfer, and values were correlated with TAS-20 scores, controlling for sex and age, in both groups. Average TAS-20 score was significantly higher in the PTSD than the HC group. TAS-20 scores were significantly positively associated with dACC thickness only in the PTSD group. This association was strongest in the left hemisphere and for TAS-20 subscales that assess difficulty identifying and describing feelings. We found that increasing dACC gray matter thickness is a neural correlate of greater alexithymia in the context of PTSD with childhood maltreatment. While findings are correlational, they motivate further inquiry into the relationships between childhood adversity, emotional awareness and expression, and dACC morphologic development in trauma-related psychopathology.

  11. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush.

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    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E; Detloff, Megan R; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  12. Dorsal defect of the patella with fracture in a teenager.

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    Villas, Carlos; Pons-Villanueva, Juan

    2010-11-01

    We report the case of a young boy who presented a dorsal defect of the patella (DDP) with fracture after a small sport trauma. The patient's parents (professional of health care) had been warned on a possible tumoral disease in a previous consultation and claimed for an accurate diagnosis. Although fracture is rarely reported in DDP, the radiographic image strongly suggested this condition; nevertheless, the diagnosis accuracy requested by the parents lead to indicate a biopsy that showed irregular fragments of laminar bone and hyaline cartilage islands similar to articular cartilage compatible with a non-specific developmental ossification defect. The lytic defect was filled with morselized cancellous bone graft, the fracture having a normal consolidation. With a follow-up of 4 years, the patient is asymptomatic, and the radiological morphology of the patella is normal. Although DDP is accepted to be a radiologically well-defined condition, images may perhaps not get accuracy enough for diagnosis and biopsy may be indicated by clinical and radiological features different than the typical ones. Although fracture is rarely reported in case of DDP, it has not to be considered as indicative of tumor or malignancy.

  13. Alexander disease with mild dorsal brainstem atrophy and infantile spasms.

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    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yamaguchi-Takada, Yui; Yano, Tamami; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sawaishi, Yukio; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a Japanese male infant with Alexander disease who developed infantile spasms at 8 months of age. The patient had a cluster of partial seizures at 4 months of age. He presented with mild general hypotonia and developmental delay. Macrocephaly was not observed. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings fulfilled all MRI-based criteria for the diagnosis of Alexander disease and revealed mild atrophy of the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata with abnormal intensities. DNA analysis disclosed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.1154 C>T, p.S385F) in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. At 8 months of age, tonic spasms occurred, and electroencephalography (EEG) revealed hypsarrhythmia. Lamotrigine effectively controlled the infantile spasms and improved the abnormal EEG findings. Although most patients with infantile Alexander disease have epilepsy, infantile spasms are rare. This comorbid condition may be associated with the distribution of the brain lesions and the age at onset of Alexander disease. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nicotinic modulation of serotonergic activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

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    Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Garduño, Julieta; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling mediated by nicotinic receptors has been associated to a large number of physiological and behavioral processes such as learning, memory, attention, food-intake and mood disorders. Although it is well established that many nicotinic actions are mediated through an increase in serotonin (5-HT) release, the physiological mechanisms by which nicotine produces these effects are still unclear. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains the major amount of 5-HT neurons projecting to different parts of the brain. DRN also contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at somatic and presynaptic elements. Nicotine produces both inhibitory and excitatory effects on different subpopulations of 5-HT DRN neurons. In this review, we describe the presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms by which nicotine increases the excitability of DRN neurons as well as the subtypes of nAChRs involved. We also describe the inhibitory effects of nicotine and the role of 5-HT1A receptors in this effect. These nicotinic actions modulate the activity of different neuronal subpopulations in the DRN, changing the 5-HT tone in the brain areas where these groups of neurons project. Some of the physiological implications of nicotine-induced 5-HT release are discussed.

  15. Assessment of radiographer CT-guided dorsal ganglion block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, T.C., E-mail: tombooth@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, Pond Street, London NW3 2QG (United Kingdom); Edwards, D.; Platts, A.D.; Savy, L.E. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, Pond Street, London NW3 2QG (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Radiographer-performed, CT-guided, therapeutic dorsal ganglion block (DGB) for lumbar radiculopathy was prospectively evaluated for firstly, short-term pain outcomes and secondly, complications. Methods: A prospective outcome audit was undertaken for all patients with radiculopathic pain undergoing radiographer-performed CT-guided DGB over a 12 month period. The indicators and standards were derived from published evidence. The complications were analysed by a neuroradiologist retrospectively. Findings: The pain indicator was defined as 'the percentage of patients referred for CT-guided DGB experiencing improvement or resolution of pain at two weeks post-procedure'. The standard chosen was 64% thus with an outcome of 67% the target was achieved. The complication indicator was defined as 'the percentage of all patients referred for CT-guided DGB who were complication-free over two weeks'. The standard chosen was 97% thus with an outcome of 81% the target was not achieved. Complications resulted from positioning or inaccurate nerve root selection. Conclusion: Radiographer CT-guided DGB is effective in improving or removing pain at two weeks post-procedure. It is safe and not associated with major complications. However, less patients were complication-free following DGB than would be expected. Pre-procedural review of the patient's MRI by a neuroradiologist is recommended to avoid incorrect nerve root selection.

  16. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and the value of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenhav, Amitai; Cohen, Jonathan D; Botvinick, Matthew M

    2016-09-27

    Debates over the function(s) of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) have persisted for decades. So too have demonstrations of the region's association with cognitive control. Researchers have struggled to account for this association and, simultaneously, dACC's involvement in phenomena related to evaluation and motivation. We describe a recent integrative theory that achieves this goal. It proposes that dACC serves to specify the currently optimal allocation of control by determining the overall expected value of control (EVC), thereby licensing the associated cognitive effort. The EVC theory accounts for dACC's sensitivity to a wide array of experimental variables, and their relationship to subsequent control adjustments. Finally, we contrast our theory with a recent theory proposing a primary role for dACC in foraging-like decisions. We describe why the EVC theory offers a more comprehensive and coherent account of dACC function, including dACC's particular involvement in decisions regarding foraging or otherwise altering one's behavior.

  17. On Parallel Streams through the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

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    Daniel eDenman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mouse visual system is an emerging model for the study of cortical and thalamic circuit function. To maximize the usefulness of this model system, it is important to analyze the similarities and differences between the organization of all levels of the murid visual system with other, better studied systems (e.g., non-human primates and the domestic cat. While the understanding of mouse retina and cortex has expanded rapidly, less is known about mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN. Here, we study whether parallel processing streams exist in mouse dLGN. We use a battery of stimuli that have been previously shown to successfully distinguish parallel streams in other species: electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm, contrast-reversing stationary gratings at varying spatial phase, drifting sinusoidal gratings, dense noise for receptive field reconstruction, and frozen contrast-modulating noise. As in the optic nerves of domestic cats and non-human primates, we find evidence for multiple conduction velocity groups after optic chiasm stimulation. As in so-called ‘visual mammals’, we find a subpopulation of mouse dLGN cells showing non-linear spatial summation. However, differences in stimulus selectivity and sensitivity do not provide sufficient basis for identification of clearly distinct classes of relay cells. Nevertheless, consistent with presumptively homologous status of dLGNs of all mammals, there are substantial similarities between response properties of mouse dLGN neurons and those of cats and primates.

  18. The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex modulates dialectical self-thinking

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    Fei eWang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dialectical self-thinking involves holding the view that one can possess contradictory traits such as extraverted and introverted. Prior work has demonstrated that the dorsal part of anterior cingulate cortex (dACC plays a crucial role in conflict monitoring as well as self-related processing. Here we tested the function of dACC in dialectical self-thinking using a modified classical self-referential paradigm (self- vs. other-referential thinking, in which participants had to make a judgment whether a simultaneously presented pair of contradictory or non-contradictory traits properly described them while brain activity was recording using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The data showed that activity in the dACC during the processing of self-relevant conflicting information was positively correlated with participants' dispositional level of naïve dialecticism (measured with the Dialectical Self Scale. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI analyses further revealed increased functional connectivity between the dACC and the caudate, middle temporal gyrus and hippocampus during the processing of self-relevant conflicting information for dialectical thinkers. These results support the hypothesis that the dACC has a key role in dialectical self-thinking.

  19. The Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex Modulates Dialectical Self-Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Peng, Kaiping; Bai, Yang; Li, Rui; Zhu, Ying; Sun, Pei; Guo, Hua; Yuan, Chun; Rotshtein, Pia; Sui, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Dialectical self-thinking involves holding the view that one can possess contradictory traits such as extraverted and introverted. Prior work has demonstrated that the dorsal part of anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) plays a crucial role in conflict monitoring as well as self-related processing. Here, we tested the function of dACC in dialectical self-thinking using a modified classical self-referential paradigm (self- vs. other-referential thinking), in which participants had to make a judgment whether a simultaneously presented pair of contradictory or non-contradictory traits properly described them while brain activity was recording using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The data showed that activity in the dACC during the processing of self-relevant conflicting information was positively correlated with participants' dispositional level of naïve dialecticism (measured with the Dialectical Self Scale). Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analyses further revealed increased functional connectivity between the dACC and the caudate, middle temporal gyrus and hippocampus during the processing of self-relevant conflicting information for dialectical thinkers. These results support the hypothesis that the dACC has a key role in dialectical self-thinking.

  20. The Molecular Fingerprint of Dorsal Root and Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

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    Douglas M. Lopes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal root ganglia (DRG and trigeminal ganglia (TG are clusters of cell bodies of highly specialized sensory neurons which are responsible for relaying information about our environment to the central nervous system. Despite previous efforts to characterize sensory neurons at the molecular level, it is still unknown whether those present in DRG and TG have distinct expression profiles and therefore a unique molecular fingerprint. To address this question, we isolated lumbar DRG and TG neurons using fluorescence-activated cell sorting from Advillin-GFP transgenic mice and performed RNA sequencing. Our transcriptome analyses showed that, despite being overwhelmingly similar, a number of genes are differentially expressed in DRG and TG neurons. Importantly, we identified 24 genes which were uniquely expressed in either ganglia, including an arginine vasopressin receptor and several homeobox genes, giving each population a distinct molecular fingerprint. We compared our findings with published studies to reveal that many genes previously reported to be present in neurons are in fact likely to originate from other cell types in the ganglia. Additionally, our neuron-specific results aligned well with a dataset examining whole human TG and DRG. We propose that the data can both improve our understanding of primary afferent biology and help contribute to the development of drug treatments and gene therapies which seek targets with unique or restricted expression patterns.

  1. A biomechanical comparison of four fixed-angle dorsal plates in a finite element model of dorsally-unstable radius fracture.

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    Knežević, Josip; Kodvanj, Janoš; Čukelj, Fabijan; Pamuković, Frane; Pavić, Arsen

    2017-11-01

    To compare the finite element models of two different composite radius fracture patterns, reduced and stabilised with four different fixed-angle dorsal plates during axial, dorsal and volar loading conditions. Eight different plastic models representing four AO/ASIF type 23-A3 distal radius fractures and four AO/ASIF 23-C2 distal radius fractures were obtained and fixed each with 1 of 4 methods: a standard dorsal non-anatomical fixed angle T-plate (3.5mm Dorsal T-plate, Synthes), anatomical fixed-angle double plates (2.4mm LCP Dorsal Distal Radius, Synthes), anatomical fixed angle T-plate (2.4mm Acu-Loc Dorsal Plate, Acumed) or anatomical variable-angle dorsal T-plate (3.5mm, Dorsal Plate, Zrinski). Composite radius with plate and screws were scanned with a 3D optical scanner and later processed in Abaqus Software to generate the finite element model. All models were axially loaded at 3 points (centrally, volarly and dorsally) with 50 N forces to avoid the appearance of plastic deformations of the models. Total displacements at the end of the bone and the stresses in the bones and plates were determined and compared. Maximal von Mises stress in bone for 3-part fracture models was very similar to that in 2-part fracture models. The biggest difference between models and the largest displacements were seen during volar loading. The stresses in all models were the highest above the fracture gap. The best performance in all parameters tested was with the Zrinski plate and the most modest results were with the Synthes T-plate. There was no significant difference between 2-part (AO/ASIF type 23-A3) and 3-part (AO/ASIF 23-C2) fracture models. Maximal stresses in the plates appeared above the fracture gap; therefore, it is worth considering the development of plates without screw holes above the gap. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Dorsal Foot: An Update and Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Tiffany Y; Rubin, Ashley G; Jiang, Shang I Brian

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a well-known risk factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Therefore, the high incidence of BCCs in sun-exposed areas such as the head and neck is unsurprising. However, unexpectedly, BCCs on the sun-protected dorsal foot have also been reported, and tumor occurrence here suggests that other factors besides ultraviolet radiation may play a role in BCC pathogenesis. Because only few dorsal foot BCCs have been reported, data on their clinical features and management are limited. To perform an updated review of the literature on clinical characteristics and treatment of dorsal foot BCCs. We conducted a comprehensive literature review by searching the PubMed database with the key phrases "basal cell carcinoma dorsal foot," "basal cell carcinoma foot," and "basal cell carcinoma toe." We identified 20 cases of dorsal foot BCCs in the literature, 17 of which had sufficient data for analysis. Only 1 case was treated with Mohs micrographic surgery. We present 8 additional cases of dorsal foot BCCs treated with Mohs micrographic surgery. Basal cell carcinomas on the dorsal foot are rare, and potential risk factors include Caucasian descent and personal history of skin cancer. Mohs micrographic surgery seems to be an effective treatment option.

  3. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Dorsal Hand: An Update and Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Tiffany Y; Rubin, Ashley G; Brian Jiang, Shang I

    2016-04-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary predisposing factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC). However, surprisingly, BCCs occur very rarely on the dorsal hand, which is subject to intense sun exposure, and their infrequent presentation in this location suggests that other factors besides UVR may play a role in BCC pathogenesis. Because dorsal hand BCCs are uncommon, knowledge of their characteristics is limited, and more data are needed to describe their clinical presentation and treatment. To perform an updated review of the literature on the management of dorsal hand BCCs. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review by searching the PubMed database with the key phrases "basal cell carcinoma dorsal hand," "basal cell carcinoma hand," and "basal cell carcinoma finger," and "basal cell carcinoma thumb." The authors identified 176 cases of dorsal hand BCCs in the literature, 120 of which had sufficient data for analysis. Only 4 cases were treated with Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The authors present 14 additional cases of dorsal hand BCCs treated with MMS. Basal cell carcinomas on the dorsal hand occur infrequently, and potential risk factors include being a male of white descent and personal history of skin cancer. Mohs micrographic surgery seems to be an effective treatment method.

  4. Insect wing membrane topography is determined by the dorsal wing epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belalcazar, Andrea D; Doyle, Kristy; Hogan, Justin; Neff, David; Collier, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila wing consists of a transparent wing membrane supported by a network of wing veins. Previously, we have shown that the wing membrane cuticle is not flat but is organized into ridges that are the equivalent of one wing epithelial cell in width and multiple cells in length. These cuticle ridges have an anteroposterior orientation in the anterior wing and a proximodistal orientation in the posterior wing. The precise topography of the wing membrane is remarkable because it is a fusion of two independent cuticle contributions from the dorsal and ventral wing epithelia. Here, through morphological and genetic studies, we show that it is the dorsal wing epithelium that determines wing membrane topography. Specifically, we find that wing hair location and membrane topography are coordinated on the dorsal, but not ventral, surface of the wing. In addition, we find that altering Frizzled Planar Cell Polarity (i.e., Fz PCP) signaling in the dorsal wing epithelium alone changes the membrane topography of both dorsal and ventral wing surfaces. We also examined the wing morphology of two model Hymenopterans, the honeybee Apis mellifera and the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis. In both cases, wing hair location and wing membrane topography are coordinated on the dorsal, but not ventral, wing surface, suggesting that the dorsal wing epithelium also controls wing topography in these species. Because phylogenomic studies have identified the Hymenotera as basal within the Endopterygota family tree, these findings suggest that this is a primitive insect character.

  5. Induction of oligodendrocyte progenitors in dorsal forebrain by intraventricular microinjection of FGF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Masae; Nakahira, Eiko; Miyata, Takaki; Hitoshi, Seiji; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Bansal, Rashmi

    2006-09-01

    During embryonic development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) originate from the ventral forebrain under the regulation of Sonic hedgehog (Shh). Shh controls the expression of transcription factor Olig2, which is strongly implicated in OLP generation. Studies of mice deficient in Shh expression suggest, however, that an alternative pathway for OLP generation may exist. The generation of OLPs in dorsal forebrain has been suggested since treatment of dorsal-neural progenitor cells in culture with fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) results in OLP induction. To ask if dorsal induction of OLPs in embryonic forebrain can occur in vivo and if FGF-2 could initiate an alternative pathway of regulation, we used in utero microinjection of FGF-2 into the lateral ventricles of mouse fetal forebrain. A single injection of FGF-2 at E13.5 resulted in the expression of the OLP markers Olig2 and PDGFRalpha mRNA in dorsal forebrain ventricular and intermediate zones. However, FGF-2 did not induce dorsal expression of Shh, Patched1 or Nkx2.1, and co-injection of FGF-2 and a Shh inhibitor did not attenuate the induction of Olig2 and PDGFRalpha, suggesting that Shh signaling was not involved in this FGF-2-mediated dorsal induction. These results demonstrate that the dorsal embryonic forebrain in vivo has the potential to generate OLPs in the presence of normal positional cues and that this can be driven by FGF-2 independent of Shh signaling.

  6. Long-term outcomes after selective dorsal rhizotomy: a retrospective matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Meghan E; Aldahondo, Nanette; Krach, Linda E; Novacheck, Tom F; Schwartz, Michael H

    2017-11-01

    To examine long-term outcomes of selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) 10 to 17 years after surgery. Participants who underwent SDR had spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP), completed baseline gait analysis, and were 16 to 25 years old at follow-up. Non-SDR participants (i.e. controls) were matched on important clinical parameters at baseline but did not undergo SDR. All study participants completed six surveys assessing pain, quality of life, participation, function, and mobility. Treatment history for lower extremity surgery and antispasticity injections was tabulated. A subset of each study group returned for three-dimensional gait analysis, including kinematics, metabolic energy cost, and physical examination. Gait Deviation Index (GDI) was calculated to measure gait quality. The study cohort had 24 participants with SDR and 11 without SDR. Of these, 13 patients with SDR (five males, eight females; median [IQR] age 17y 2mo [16y 8mo-17y 9mo]) and eight without SDR (three males, five females; median [IQR] age 19y 2mo [17y 3mo-21y 11mo]) completed baseline and follow-up gait analysis. Spasticity significantly decreased in those with SDR (pSDR than those with SDR (Δnon-SDR =12.8 vs ΔSDR =9.1; p=0.01). Compared with the SDR group, participants without SDR underwent significantly more subsequent interventions (pSDR and non-SDR groups showed improved gait quality more than 10 years after surgery. Participants without SDR had a larger improvement in gait pathology but underwent significantly more intervention. There were no differences between groups in survey measures. These results suggest differing treatment courses provide similar outcomes into early adulthood. Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) and non-SDR groups had significant improvement in gait pathology over time. The non-SDR group had significantly better gait compared with the SDR group at follow-up. The groups had similar levels of energy cost, pain, and quality of life. Non-SDR participants underwent

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  15. The Maternal Maverick/GDF15-like TGF-β Ligand Panda Directs Dorsal-Ventral Axis Formation by Restricting Nodal Expression in the Sea Urchin Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haillot, Emmanuel; Molina, Maria Dolores; Lapraz, François; Lepage, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Specification of the dorsal-ventral axis in the highly regulative sea urchin embryo critically relies on the zygotic expression of nodal, but whether maternal factors provide the initial spatial cue to orient this axis is not known. Although redox gradients have been proposed to entrain the dorsal-ventral axis by acting upstream of nodal, manipulating the activity of redox gradients only has modest consequences, suggesting that other factors are responsible for orienting nodal expression and defining the dorsal-ventral axis. Here we uncover the function of Panda, a maternally provided transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) ligand that requires the activin receptor-like kinases (Alk) Alk3/6 and Alk1/2 receptors to break the radial symmetry of the embryo and orient the dorsal-ventral axis by restricting nodal expression. We found that the double inhibition of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptors Alk3/6 and Alk1/2 causes a phenotype dramatically more severe than the BMP2/4 loss-of-function phenotype, leading to extreme ventralization of the embryo through massive ectopic expression of nodal, suggesting that an unidentified signal acting through BMP type I receptors cooperates with BMP2/4 to restrict nodal expression. We identified this ligand as the product of maternal Panda mRNA. Double inactivation of panda and bmp2/4 led to extreme ventralization, mimicking the phenotype caused by inactivation of the two BMP receptors. Inhibition of maternal panda mRNA translation disrupted the early spatial restriction of nodal, leading to persistent massive ectopic expression of nodal on the dorsal side despite the presence of Lefty. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that Panda is not a prototypical BMP ligand but a member of a subfamily of TGF-β distantly related to Inhibins, Lefty, and TGF-β that includes Maverick from Drosophila and GDF15 from vertebrates. Indeed, overexpression of Panda does not appear to directly or strongly activate phosphoSmad1

  16. The Maternal Maverick/GDF15-like TGF-β Ligand Panda Directs Dorsal-Ventral Axis Formation by Restricting Nodal Expression in the Sea Urchin Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haillot, Emmanuel; Molina, Maria Dolores; Lapraz, François; Lepage, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Specification of the dorsal-ventral axis in the highly regulative sea urchin embryo critically relies on the zygotic expression of nodal, but whether maternal factors provide the initial spatial cue to orient this axis is not known. Although redox gradients have been proposed to entrain the dorsal-ventral axis by acting upstream of nodal, manipulating the activity of redox gradients only has modest consequences, suggesting that other factors are responsible for orienting nodal expression and defining the dorsal-ventral axis. Here we uncover the function of Panda, a maternally provided transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) ligand that requires the activin receptor-like kinases (Alk) Alk3/6 and Alk1/2 receptors to break the radial symmetry of the embryo and orient the dorsal-ventral axis by restricting nodal expression. We found that the double inhibition of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptors Alk3/6 and Alk1/2 causes a phenotype dramatically more severe than the BMP2/4 loss-of-function phenotype, leading to extreme ventralization of the embryo through massive ectopic expression of nodal, suggesting that an unidentified signal acting through BMP type I receptors cooperates with BMP2/4 to restrict nodal expression. We identified this ligand as the product of maternal Panda mRNA. Double inactivation of panda and bmp2/4 led to extreme ventralization, mimicking the phenotype caused by inactivation of the two BMP receptors. Inhibition of maternal panda mRNA translation disrupted the early spatial restriction of nodal, leading to persistent massive ectopic expression of nodal on the dorsal side despite the presence of Lefty. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that Panda is not a prototypical BMP ligand but a member of a subfamily of TGF-β distantly related to Inhibins, Lefty, and TGF-β that includes Maverick from Drosophila and GDF15 from vertebrates. Indeed, overexpression of Panda does not appear to directly or strongly activate phosphoSmad1

  17. Time-dependent effects of repeated THC treatment on dopamine D2/3 receptor-mediated signalling in midbrain and striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournier, Benjamin B; Tsartsalis, Stergios; Dimiziani, Andrea; Millet, Philippe; Ginovart, Nathalie

    2016-09-15

    This study examined the time-course of alterations in levels and functional sensitivities of dopamine D2/3 receptors (D2/3R) during the course and up to 6 weeks following cessation of chronic treatment with Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rats. THC treatment led to an increase in D2/3R levels in striatum, as assessed using [(3)H]-(+)-PHNO, that was readily observable after one week of treatment, remained stably elevated during the subsequent 2 weeks of treatment, but fully reversed within 2 weeks of THC discontinuation. THC-induced D2/3R alterations were more pronounced and longer lasting in the dopamine cell body regions of the midbrain, wherein [(3)H]-(+)-PHNO binding was still elevated at 2 weeks but back to control values at 6 weeks after THC cessation. Parallel analyses of the psychomotor effects of pre- and post-synaptic doses of quinpirole also showed a pattern of D2/3R functional supersensitivity indicative of more rapid subsidence in striatum than in midbrain following drug cessation. These results indicate that chronic THC is associated with a biochemical and functional sensitization of D2/3R signaling, that these responses show a region-specific temporal pattern and are fully reversible following drug discontinuation. These results suggest that an increased post-synaptic D2/3R function and a decreased DA presynaptic signaling, mediated by increased D2/3R autoinhibition, may predominate during distinct phases of withdrawal and may contribute both to the mechanisms leading to relapse and to cannabinoid withdrawal symptoms. The different rates of normalization of D2/3R function in striatum and midbrain may be critical information for the development of new pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dorsal horn-enriched genes identified by DNA microarray, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koblan Kenneth S

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons in the dorsal spinal cord play important roles in nociception and pain. These neurons receive input from peripheral sensory neurons and then transmit the signals to the brain, as well as receive and integrate descending control signals from the brain. Many molecules important for pain transmission have been demonstrated to be localized to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Further understanding of the molecular interactions and signaling pathways in the dorsal horn neurons will require a better knowledge of the molecular neuroanatomy in the dorsal spinal cord. Results A large scale screening was conducted for genes with enriched expression in the dorsal spinal cord using DNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. In addition to genes known to be specifically expressed in the dorsal spinal cord, other neuropeptides, receptors, ion channels, and signaling molecules were also found enriched in the dorsal spinal cord. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed the cellular expression of a subset of these genes. The regulation of a subset of the genes was also studied in the spinal nerve ligation (SNL neuropathic pain model. In general, we found that the genes that are enriched in the dorsal spinal cord were not among those found to be up-regulated in the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain. This study also provides a level of validation of the use of DNA microarrays in conjunction with our novel analysis algorithm (SAFER for the identification of differences in gene expression. Conclusion This study identified molecules that are enriched in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and provided a molecular neuroanatomy in the spinal cord, which will aid in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms important in nociception and pain.

  19. asunder is required for dynein localization and dorsal fate determination during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaram, Poojitha; Merkle, Julie A; Lee, Ethan; Lee, Laura A

    2014-02-01

    We previously showed that asunder (asun) is a critical regulator of dynein localization during Drosophila spermatogenesis. Because the expression of asun is much higher in Drosophila ovaries and early embryos than in testes, we herein sought to determine whether ASUN plays roles in oogenesis and/or embryogenesis. We characterized the female germline phenotypes of flies homozygous for a null allele of asun (asun(d93)). We find that asun(d93) females lay very few eggs and contain smaller ovaries with a highly disorganized arrangement of ovarioles in comparison to wild-type females. asun(d93) ovaries also contain a significant number of egg chambers with structural defects. A majority of the eggs laid by asun(d93) females are ventralized to varying degrees, from mild to severe; this ventralization phenotype may be secondary to defective localization of gurken transcripts, a dynein-regulated step, within asun(d93) oocytes. We find that dynein localization is aberrant in asun(d93) oocytes, indicating that ASUN is required for this process in both male and female germ cells. In addition to the loss of gurken mRNA localization, asun(d93) ovaries exhibit defects in other dynein-mediated processes such as migration of nurse cell centrosomes into the oocyte during the early mitotic divisions, maintenance of the oocyte nucleus in the anterior-dorsal region of the oocyte in late-stage egg chambers, and coupling between the oocyte nucleus and centrosomes. Taken together, our data indicate that asun is a critical regulator of dynein localization and dynein-mediated processes during Drosophila oogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [The role of the central substantia grisea of the midbrain in regulating the sound emission process in the bat Rhinolophus ferrumequinum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movchan, E V; Burikova, N V

    1994-01-01

    Using axonal transport of HRP, relatively small region of the lateral part of the central gray matter of the midbrain was revealed the neurones of which send afferents to motoneurones of the vagal nucleus. It was shown that practically complete damage of the central gray matter does not affect temporal and frequency parameters of echo-sounding signals produced by animals during total location, do es not affect complex mechanism of stabilization of the filling frequency of these signals, as well as does not affect the ability of animals to decrease the filling frequency in relation to the rate of approaching the target.

  1. Engaging in paced mating, but neither exploratory, anti-anxiety, nor social behavior, increases 5α-reduced progestin concentrations in midbrain, hippocampus, striatum, and cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Frye, Cheryl A; Paris, Jason J; Rhodes, Madeline E.

    2007-01-01

    Sequential actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) in the hypothalamus and the P4 metabolite, 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (3α,5α-THP), in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) respectively mediate the initiation and intensity of lordosis of female rats and mayalso modulate anxiety and social behaviors, through actions in these, and/or other brain regions. Biosynthesis of E2, P4, and 3α,5α-THP can also occur in brain, independent of peripheral gland secretion, in response to enviro...

  2. Persistent dorsal ophthalmic artery arising from the internal carotid artery: Report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae Hwan; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Normally, the ophthalmic artery (OA) arises from the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and enters the orbit via the optic canal. A persistent dorsal OA is a rare variation that originates from the cavernous segment of the ICA and enters the orbit via the superior orbital fissure. To the best of our knowledge, persistent dorsal OA has not been described in the Korean literature. In this paper, we report three cases of persistent dorsal OA with review of the literature on embryogenesis and other origins of the OA.

  3. Relocation of mitochondria to the prospective dorsal marginal zone during Xenopus embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, H. J.; Phillips, C. R.; Boore, J. L.; Bertman, J.; Whalon, B.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1995-01-01

    Dorsal-ventral axis formation in Xenopus laevis begins with a cytoplasmic rotation during the first cell cycle and culminates in a series of cell interactions and movements during gastrulation and neurulation that lead to the formation of dorsal-anterior structures. Evidence reported here indicates that mitochondria are differentially redistributed along the prospective dorsal-ventral axis as a consequence of the cortical-cytoplasmic rotation during the first cell cycle. This finding reinvigorates a possibility that has been considered for many years: asymmetries in cytoplasmic components and metabolic activities contribute to the development of morphological asymmetries.

  4. Multiple neural tube defects: a rare combination of limited dorsal myeloschisis, diplomyelia with dorsal bony spur, sacral meningocoele, syringohydromyelia, and tethered cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashank R, Ramdurg; Shubhi, Dubey; Vishal, Kadeli

    2017-04-01

    Multiple neural tube defects are relatively rare. They account for less than 1% reported neural tube defects. Cases of limited dorsal myeloschisis (LDM) and diplomyelia (two cords in single sac without intervening bony or fibrous septae) with dorsal bony spur are also a rare event. Here, the authors report a rare case of neonate with thoracic LDM, diplomyelia with dorsal bony spur, sacral meningocoele with syringohydromyelia, and low-lying tethered cord. The child also had a ventricular septal defect (VSD) and bilateral rocker bottom feet. Various environmental factors and genetic mutations in transmembrane proteins have been studied in animal models explaining the origin of neural tube defects. To the best of author's knowledge, this is the first case of varied multiple neural tube defects with diplomyelia reported in world literature.

  5. Reassessment of the wing feathers of Archaeopteryx lithographica suggests no robust evidence for the presence of elongated dorsal wing coverts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Nudds

    Full Text Available Recently it was proposed that the primary feathers of Archaeopteryx lithographica (HMN1880 were overlaid by long covert feathers, and that a multilayered feathered wing was a feature of early fossils with feathered forelimbs. The proposed long covert feathers of Archaeopteryx were previously interpreted as dorsally displaced remiges or a second set of impressions made by the wing. The following study shows that the qualitative arguments forwarded in support of the elongated covert hypothesis are neither robust nor supported quantitatively. The idea that the extant bird wing with its single layer of overlapping primaries evolved from an earlier multilayered heavily coveted feathered forelimb as seen in Anchiornis huxleyi is reasonable. At this juncture, however, it is premature to conclude unequivocally that the wing of Archaeopteryx consisted of primary feathers overlaid with elongated coverts.

  6. Long-term outcomes five years after selective dorsal rhizotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagergren Jan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR is a well accepted neurosurgical procedure performed for the relief of spasticity interfering with motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP. The goal is to improve function, but long-term outcome studies are rare. The aims of this study were to evaluate long-term functional outcomes, safety and side effects during five postoperative years in all children with diplegia undergoing SDR combined with physiotherapy. Methods This study group consisted of 35 children, consecutively operated, with spastic diplegia, of which 26 were Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS levels III–V. Mean age was 4.5 years (range 2.5–6.6. They were all assessed by the same multidisciplinary team at pre- and at 6, 12, 18 months, 3 and 5 years postoperatively. Clinical and demographic data, complications and number of rootlets cut were prospectively registered. Deep tendon reflexes and muscle tone were examined, the latter graded with the modified Ashworth scale. Passive range of motion (PROM was measured with a goniometer. Motor function was classified according to the GMFCS and measured with the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-88 and derived into GMFM-66. Parent's opinions about the children's performance of skills and activities and the amount of caregiver assistance were measured with Pediatric Evaluation Disability Inventory (PEDI. Results The mean proportion of rootlets cut in S2-L2 was 40%. Muscle tone was immediately reduced in adductors, hamstrings and dorsiflexors (p Conclusion SDR is a safe and effective method for reducing spasticity permanently without major negative side effects. In combination with physiotherapy, in a group of carefully selected and systematically followed young children with spastic diplegia, it provides lasting functional benefits over a period of at least five years postoperatively.

  7. Selective dorsal rhizotomy: A multidisciplinary approach to treating spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; Imtiaz, Muhammad Tariq; Alhalabi, Hazem; Alsubaie, Shara M; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity is a motor disorder that interferes with mobility and affects the quality of life. Different approaches have been utilized to address patients with spastic diplegia, among which is selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR). Although SDR has been shown to be efficacious in treating spastic patients, many neurologists and neurosurgeons are not well aware of the procedure, its indications, and expected outcomes due to the limited number of centers performing this procedure. The aim of this study is to describe the collaborative multidisciplinary approach between neurosurgeons, neurophysiologists, and physiotherapists in performing SDR. In addition, we delineate three illustrative cases in which SDR was performed in our patients. A retrospective review and analysis of the clinical records of our three patients who underwent SDR was conducted and reported. Patients' outcomes were evaluated and compared to preoperative measurements based on clinical examination of power, tone (Ashworth scale), gait, and range of motion, as well as subjective functional assessment, gross motor function classification system, and gross motor function measure with follow-up at 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. A detailed description of our neurosurgical technique in performing SDR in collaboration with neurophysiology and physiotherapy monitoring is provided. The three patients who underwent SDR using our multidisciplinary approach improved both functionally and objectively after the procedure. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were encountered. All patients were doing well over a long postoperative follow-up period. A multidisciplinary approach to treating spastic diplegia with SDR can provide good short-term and long-term outcomes in select patients suffering from spastic diplegia.

  8. Controlling the dorsal venous complex during robotic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talug, Can; Josephson, David Y; Ruel, Nora H; Lau, Clayton; Kawachi, Mark H; Wilson, Timothy G

    2012-02-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether dorsal venous complex (DVC) control technique influences positive apical margins following robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP). One thousand fifty-eight patients who underwent RALRP at City of Hope from June 2007 to October 2009 were assessed. Endoscopic stapling and suture ligature of the DVC were compared. Positive apical margins were identified and compared based on DVC-control technique. Recurrence probability was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and logistic regression analysis was used to predict the odds of positive apical margins. Of 1058 patients, 633 (60%) underwent endoscopic stapling, and 425 (40%) had suture ligature. The groups had similar baseline characteristics including age and body mass index. We observed a statistically different PSA (5.4 ng/mL versus 5.2 ng/mL, p = 0.03) and operative time (2.8 hours versus 2.7 hours, p = 0.02) between stapling and suture groups, but the actual difference was small. Operative time, Gleason score, pathologic stage, and overall positive margin rates were not significantly different between groups. Positive apical margins were observed in 39 (6%) and 27 (6%) patients in the staple and suture groups, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the positive apical margin rate was greater in patients with higher pathologic stage and final pathological Gleason score. During RALRP, there is no difference in positive apical margin rate when the DVC is controlled using either endoscopic stapling or suture ligature. However, patients with a higher pathologic stage and final pathologic Gleason score are at higher risk for positive apical surgical margins.

  9. Intramedullary solitary fibrous tumor of dorsal spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappetta, Pasqualino; D'Urso, Pietro Ivo; Cimmino, Antonia; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Rossi, Roberta; Colamaria, Antonio; D'Urso, Oscar Fernando

    2010-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are rare neoplasms of mesenchymal origin involving soft tissues, mainly serosal sites; the spinal cord location is uncommon. We report a case of SFT occurring in the thoracic spinal cord, discussing histological, ultrastructural and molecular aspects. A 75-year-old woman with an MRI suggesting a dorsal intracanalar lesion was admitted to our institution. T5-T7 laminectomies were performed and an intramedullary tumor was discovered. The tumor arose within the spinal cord and was completely removed. Tumor samples were processed for histological, ultrastructural and molecular analysis (comparative genomic hybridization [CGH], methylation status of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase [MGMT], p16, deleted in colorectal cancer [DCC] and death-associated protein kinase 1 [DAPK1]). The histological examination demonstrated a proliferation of spindle-shaped cells with a collagen-matrix background. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for vimentin and CD34 and negative for S-100 and epithelial membrane antigen. A histological diagnosis of SFT was made. The ultrastructural examination showed undifferentiated cells within a collagenous matrix and sparse extravascular basement membrane. CGH analysis revealed deletion of 9p21 and losses on 2q, 3p, 16q and 19q and gains on 7q; furthermore, no aberrant methylation pattern was found in the promoter region of MGMT, p16, DCC and DAPK1 genes. On the second-year follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact. The occurrence of SFT within the spinal cord parenchyma and its histological characteristics demonstrate that SFTs are not restricted to serosal surfaces. The course of spinal cord SFT is unknown and long-term follow-up is necessary. The histological, ultrastructural and molecular findings are important for the diagnosis and the authors provide a literature review of these aspects.

  10. Dorsal visual pathway changes in patients with comitant extropia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohe Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Strabismus is a disorder in which the eyes are misaligned. Persistent strabismus can lead to stereopsis impairment. The effect of strabismus on human brain is not unclear. The present study is to investigate whether the brain white structures of comitant exotropia patients are impaired using combined T1-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirteen patients with comitant strabismus and twelve controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with acquisition of T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images. T1-weighted images were used to analyze the change in volume of white matter using optimized voxel-based morphology (VBM and diffusion tensor images were used to detect the change in white matter fibers using voxel-based analysis of DTI in comitant extropia patients. VBM analysis showed that in adult strabismus, white matter volumes were smaller in the right middle occipital gyrus, right occipital lobe/cuneus, right supramarginal gyrus, right cingulate gyrus, right frontal lobe/sub-gyral, right inferior temporal gyrus, left parahippocampa gyrus, left cingulate gyrus, left occipital lobe/cuneus, left middle frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, and left postcentral gyrus, while no brain region with greater white matter volume was found. Voxel-based analysis of DTI showed lower fractional anisotropy (FA values in the right middle occipital gyrus and right supramarginal gyrus in strabismus patients, while brain region with increased FA value was found in the right inferior frontal gyrus. CONCLUSION: By combining VBM and voxel-based analysis of DTI results, the study suggests that the dorsal visual pathway was abnormal or impaired in patients with comitant exotropia.

  11. Magnesium-induced vasodilation in the dorsal hand vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Ruth; Scott, Jason A; Smiley, Richard M

    2004-05-01

    Magnesium affects blood pressure by modulating vascular tone and reactivity. In obstetric patients, magnesium is administered to prevent eclamptic seizures and as a tocolytic to treat preterm labour. Prior to studying vascular sensitivity in women with pre-eclampsia, we sought to determine the effect of magnesium on venous tone in healthy women of childbearing age. Dose-response study. Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York. Ten healthy non-pregnant women (age range 21-47 years). Vascular response to magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) was measured in a dorsal hand vein using the linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) technique. Complete dose-response curves to MgSO4 (0.0000275-0.088 mmol/min) were determined after 50% preconstriction of the vein with phenylephrine. The ED50 of MgSO4 (dose resulting in 50% of maximal effect, Emax) was determined. Blood samples from the contralateral upper extremity were obtained to assess total plasma magnesium levels at baseline and at the highest infused dose of magnesium. ED50 results are expressed as geometric mean (95% confidence interval, CI). Emax results and magnesium plasma concentrations are expressed as mean [SD]. The ED50 of MgSO4 was 0.000307 mmol/min (95% CI 0.138, 0.666) and Emax was 102% [20%]. Magnesium induces dose-dependent venodilation in healthy women in the absence of systemic haemodynamic effects. The dose resulting in vasodilation using the LVDT/hand vein model is two to three orders of magnitude less than the therapeutic doses of magnesium used for tocolysis or seizure prophylaxis. Studies of the effect of systemically administered therapeutic doses of magnesium on vascular reactivity in pre-eclampsia will be of interest.

  12. Snca and Bdnf gene expression in the VTA and raphe nuclei of midbrain in chronically victorious and defeated male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia N Kudryavtseva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn is a small neuronal protein that has been found to be expressed throughout the brain. It has been shown that α-Syn regulates the homeostasis of monoamine neurotransmitters and is involved in various degenerative and affective disorders. There is indication that α-Syn may regulate expression of the brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF which plays an important role in the mood disorders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study aimed to analyze the mRNA levels of Snca and Bdnf genes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and raphe nuclei of the midbrain in male mice that had each won or defeated 20 encounters (20-time winners and 20-time losers, respectively in daily agonistic interactions. Groups of animals that had the same winning and losing track record followed by a no-fight period for 14 days (no-fighting winners and no-fighting losers were also studied. Snca mRNA levels were increased in the raphe nuclei in the 20-time losers and in the VTA of the 20-time winners. After no-fight period Snca mRNA levels decreased in both groups. Snca mRNA levels were similar to the control level in the VTA of the 20-time losers and in the raphe nuclei of the 20-time winners. However Snca gene expression increased in these areas in the no-fighting winners and no-fighting losers in comparison with respective mRNA levels in animals before no-fight period. Bdnf mRNA levels increased in VTA of 20-time winners. Significant positive correlations were found between the mRNA levels of Snca and Bdnf genes in the raphe nuclei. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Social experience affects Snca gene expression depending on brain areas and functional activity of monoaminergic systems in chronically victorious or defeated mice. These findings may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of forming different alpha-synucleinopathies.

  13. Contribution of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Signaling within Midbrain Periaqueductal Gray to Pain Sensitivity in Parkinson's disease via GABAergic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbo Zhuang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hypersensitive pain response is often observed in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD; however, the mechanisms responsible for hyperalgesia are not well understood. Chronic neuroinflammation is one of the hallmarks of PD pathophysiology. Since the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG is an important component of the descending inhibitory pathway controlling on central pain transmission, we examined the role for pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs system of PAG in regulating exaggerated pain evoked by PD. Methods: We used a rat model of PD to perform the experimental protocols. PD was induced by microinjection of 6-hydroxydopamine to lesion the left medial forebrain bundle. Pain responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation were first examined in control rats and PD rats. Then, ELISA and Western Blot analysis were used to determine PIC levels and their receptors expression. Results: Protein expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α receptors (namely, IL-1R, IL-6R and TNFR subtype TNFR1 in the plasma membrane PAG of PD rats was upregulated, whereas the total expression of PIC receptors was not significantly altered. The ratio of membrane protein and total protein (IL-1R, IL-6R and TNFR1 was 1.48±0.15, 1.59±0.18 and 1.67±0.16 in PAG of PD rats (P < 0.05 vs. their respective controls. This was accompanied with increases of PICs of PAG, and decreases of GABA (623±21 ng/mg in control rats and 418±18 ng/mg in PD rats; P < 0.05 vs. control rats and withdrawal thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli. Our data further showed that the concentrations of GABA and withdrawal thresholds were largely restored by blocking those PIC receptors in PAG of PD rats. Stimulation of GABA receptors in PAG of PD rats also blunted a decrease in withdrawal thresholds. Conclusions: Our data suggest that upregulation of the membrane PIC receptor in the PAG of PD rats is likely to impair the descending inhibitory pathways in regulating pain transmission

  14. Responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to foot movements in rats with a sprained ankle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jae Hyo Kim; Hee Young Kim; Kyungsoon Chung; Jin Mo Chung

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are common problems and often lead to persistent pain. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ankle sprain pain, the response properties of spinal dorsal horn neurons were examined after ankle sprain...

  15. The dorsal root ganglion as a therapeutic target for chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Liem (Liong); Van Dongen, E. (Eric); F.J.P.M. Huygen (Frank); P. Staats (Peter); J. Kramer (Jeffery)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractChronic neuropathic pain is a widespread problem with negative personal and societal consequences. Despite considerable clinical neuroscience research, the goal of developing effective, reliable, and durable treatments has remained elusive. The critical role played by the dorsal root

  16. The treatment of ventral penile chordee without hypospadias by dorsal midline plication in an adolescent boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Coban

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report of a case with isolated ventral penile chordee who underwent dorsal midline plication procedure. We aimed to present our experience and to review of the literature on current management.

  17. Transcallosal connection patterns of opposite dorsal premotor regions support a lateralized specialization for action and perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoorn, Anouk; Potgieser, Adriaan R. E.; de Jong, Bauke M.

    Lateralization of higher brain functions requires that a dominant hemisphere collects relevant information from both sides. The right dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), particularly implicated in visuomotor transformations, was hypothesized to be optimally located to converge visuospatial information

  18. SPATIAL DIFFERENCES IN FATIGUE-ASSOCIATED ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC BEHAVIOR OF THE HUMAN FIRST DORSAL INTEROSSEUS MUSCLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJDEWIND, Inge; KERNELL, D; KUKULKA, CG

    1995-01-01

    1. Fatigue-associated electromyographic (EMG) reactions of intrinsic hand muscles were studied during maintained isometric voluntary contractions of normal subjects. Most measurements concerned actions of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI). In a smaller number of subjects, complementary measurements

  19. Effects of different shoe-lacing patterns on dorsal pressure distribution during running and perceived comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Marco; Hömme, Ann-Kathrin; Umlauf, Tim; Hennig, Ewald M

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of four lacing patterns (one regular, one tight, and two seven-eyelet lacings) on dorsal foot pressures during running and the perception of comfort and stability with 14 male rearfoot runners. By using a pressure insole, peak dorsal pressures were measured under the shoe's tongue. Highest peak pressures were found above the talus, the navicular bone, and the first ray. Seven-eyelet lacings showed a significant enhancement of perceived stability without differences in perceived comfort compared with a regular six-eyelet technique. Reduction of pressure on the talus, the navicular bone, and the extensor tendons is related to better comfort. With individually chosen special seven-eyelet lacings runners can improve foot-shoe coupling without increasing peak dorsal pressures on the tarsus. Knowledge of the location of the dorsal pressure distribution is useful for new tongue and lacing constructions to improve comfort in running shoes while maintaining stability.

  20. Gating of the dorsal penile nerve inputs by norepinephrine at the medial preoptic area in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, H N; Kumar, V M

    2005-01-01

    The medial preoptic area neurons related to male sexual behaviour in rats were identified by their responses to dorsal penile nerve stimulation. These neurons were further tested with norepinephrine applied iontophoretically. From the 21 medial preoptic area neurons recorded in urethane anaesthetized rats, 17 neurons responded to dorsal penile nerve stimulation. Excitatory and inhibitory responses were found in almost equal number of neurons. 14 neurons responded to norepinephrine application, out of which six neurons were excited and eight were inhibited. The direction of changes produced by dorsal penile nerve stimulation and norepinephrine application were similar in 10 neurons. The results suggest that the sensory inputs from the genitalia are possibly gated by norepinephrine at the level of the medial preoptic area. Afferent information from the genitalia carried by dorsal penile nerve and the availability of norepinephrine at the level of the medial preoptic area probably help in maintaining adequate level of sexual arousal.

  1. Management of Intra-Articular Distal Radius Fractures: Volar or Dorsal Locking Plate-Which Has Fewer Complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yoshihiro; Tokunaga, Susumu; Moriya, Takuro

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the functional outcomes and complications of volar and dorsal plating for the management of intra-articular distal radius fractures, with special regard to indications for dorsal plating. Furthermore, we examine the rationale for choosing dorsal plating and its frequency of use. Clinical assessments included range of motion measurements at the wrist; grip strength; the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score; and the Gartland and Werley score. Clinical results were compared with those achieved using a volarly placed locking plate system. According to Lutsky's plate theory, the rationale for choosing dorsal plating was based on 4 types of pathologic fractures. Of 112 patients, 38 patients were treated with open reduction internal fixation via a dorsal approach and 68 patients were treated using a volar approach. Except for wrist flexion, there were no other statistical differences in the clinical results between groups for both subjective and objective parameters. There were no statistically significant differences in the complication rates between the volar and dorsal plated groups. One serious complication occurred after volar plating. The most common reason for choosing dorsal plating was irreducible dorsal die-punch fractures. The treatment of displaced intra-articular distal radius fractures with a dorsally versus a volarly placed interlocking plate system demonstrated similar clinical results. Postoperative complications were not readily observed in the patients treated with a dorsal locking plate. Certain fracture patterns are more appropriately stabilized using a dorsal plate fixation.

  2. The morphology and clinical significance of the dorsal meningovertebra ligaments in the cervical epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Benchao; Zheng, Xuefeng; Min, Shaoxiong; Zhou, Zhilai; Ding, Zihai; Jin, Anmin

    2014-11-01

    The dural sac is anchored within the vertebral canal by connective tissue called meningovertebral ligaments in the epidural space. During flavectomy and laminectomy, inadvertent disruption of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments may lead to dura laceration and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. All the described dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were located in the lumbar region. A rare study is available about dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the cervical spinal dura to the adjacent vertebrae. To identify and describe the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments at each cervical level and discuss their clinical significance. A dissection-based study of 22 embalmed cadavers. The anatomy was studied in 22 whole cervical cadavers (11 females, 11 males), prepared with formaldehyde, whose ages at the time of death ranged from 55 to 78 years. The vertebral canal was divided to expose the dural sac and the spinal nerve roots. At all levels of the cervical vertebra, the morphology, quantity, origin, insertion, and spatial orientation of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were determined and the length, width or diameter, and thickness of the ligaments were measured with vernier calipers. The dorsal meningovertebral ligaments in the cervical region anchored the posterior dural sac to the ligamentum flavum or laminae. The number of attachment points on the ligamentum flavum was relatively larger than that on the lamina, and the occurrence rate of dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was 100% at C1-C2 and C4--C5. The thickest ligaments were observed at the C1 and C2 vertebrae. The length of the ligaments varied from 1.50 to 35.22 mm, and the orientation of the ligaments mostly was craniocaudal. The morphology of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was divided into four types: strip type, cord type, grid type, and thin slice type. In the cervical spine, the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments exist between the posterior dural sac and the ligamentum flavum or lamina. The dorsal

  3. Dorsal buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for anterior urethral stricture by Asopa technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisapati, V L N Murthy; Paturi, Srimannarayana; Bethu, Suresh; Jada, Srikanth; Chilumu, Ramreddy; Devraj, Rahul; Reddy, Bhargava; Sriramoju, Vidyasagar

    2009-07-01

    Buccal mucosal graft (BMG) substitution urethroplasty has become popular in the management of intractable anterior urethral strictures with good results. Excellent long-term results have been reported by both dorsal and ventral onlay techniques. Asopa reported a successful technique for dorsal placement of BMG in long anterior urethral strictures through a ventral sagittal approach. To evaluate prospectively the results and advantages of dorsal BMG urethroplasty for recurrent anterior urethral strictures by a ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach (Asopa technique). From December 2002 to December 2007, a total of 58 men underwent dorsal BMG urethroplasty by a ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach for recurrent urethral strictures. Forty-five of these patients with a follow-up period of 12-60 mo were prospectively evaluated, and the results were analysed. The urethra was split twice at the site of the stricture both ventrally and dorsally without mobilising it from its bed, and the buccal mucosal graft was secured in the dorsal urethral defect. The urethra was then retubularised in one stage. The overall results were good (87%), with a mean follow-up period of 42 mo. Seven patients developed minor wound infection, and five patients developed fistulae. There were six recurrences (6:45, 13%) during the follow-up period of 12-60 mo. Two patients with a panurethral stricture and four with bulbar or penobulbar strictures developed recurrences and were managed by optical urethrotomy and self-dilatation. The medium-term results were as good as those reported with the dorsal urethrotomy approach. Long-term results from this and other series are awaited. More randomised trials and meta-analyses are needed to establish this technique as a procedure of choice in future. The ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach is easier to perform than the dorsal urethrotomy approach, has good results, and is especially useful in long anterior urethral strictures.

  4. Electroacupuncture reduces the evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in ankle-sprained rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture is shown to be effective in producing analgesia in ankle sprain pain in humans and animals. To examine the underlying mechanisms of the acupuncture-induced analgesia, the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on weight-bearing forces (WBR) of the affected foot and dorsal horn neuron activities were examined in a rat model of ankle sprain. Ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending ligaments of the left ankle in the rat. Dorsal horn neuron responses to ankle movements or compr...

  5. Single-unit analysis of the spinal dorsal horn in patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenot, Marc; Bullier, Jean; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Lansky, Petr; Mertens, Patrick; Sindou, Marc

    2003-04-01

    Despite the key role played by the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in pain modulation, single-unit recordings have only been performed very rarely in this structure in humans. The authors report the results of a statistical analysis of 64 unit recordings from the human dorsal horn. The recordings were done in three groups of patients: patients with deafferentation pain resulting from brachial plexus avulsion, patients with neuropathic pain resulting from peripheral nerve injury, and patients with pain resulting from disabling spasticity. The patterns of neuronal activities were compared among these three groups. Nineteen neurons were recorded in the dorsal horns of five patients undergoing DREZotomy for a persistent pain syndrome resulting from peripheral nerve injury (i.e., nondeafferented dorsal horns), 31 dorsal horn neurons were recorded in nine patients undergoing DREZotomy for a persistent pain syndrome resulting from brachial plexus avulsion (i.e., deafferented dorsal horns), and 14 neurons were recorded in eight patients undergoing DREZotomy for disabling spasticity. These groups were compared in terms of mean frequency, coefficient of variation of the discharge, other properties of the neuronal discharge studied by the nonparametric test of Wald-Wolfowitz, and the possible presence of bursts. The coefficient of variation tended to be higher in the deafferented dorsal horn group than in the other two groups. Two neurons displaying burst activity could be recorded, both of which belonged to the deafferented dorsal horn group. A significant difference was found in term of neuronal behavior between the peripheral nerve trauma group and the other groups: The brachial plexus avulsion and disabling spasticity groups were very similar, including various types of neuronal behavior, whereas the peripheral nerve lesion group included mostly neurons with "nonrandom" patterns of discharge (i.e., with serial dependency of interspike intervals).

  6. Dorsal root ganglion compression as an animal model of sciatica and low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiao-Yu; Yang, Jing; LI, HUI-MING; Hu, San-Jue; Xing, Jun-Ling

    2012-01-01

    As sciatica and low back pain are among the most common medical complaints, many studies have duplicated these conditions in animals. Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) is one of these models. The surgery is simple: after exposing the L4/L5 intervertebral foramina, stainless steel rods are implanted unilaterally, one rod for each vertebra, to chronically compress the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Then, CCD can be used to simulate the clinical conditions caused by steno...

  7. Heterotaxy syndrome with associated agenesis of dorsal pancreas and polysplenia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Althaf Ali1

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotaxy syndrome is a rare embryological disorder comprising of polysplenia, partial agenesis of dorsal pancreas, malrotation of gut, cardiac and vascular anomalies resulting from failure of development of the usual left–right asymmetry of organs. We report a rare case of heterotaxy syndrome with polysplenia, partial agenesis of dorsal pancreas and malrotation of gut in a 28 year female presenting with subacute intestinal obstruction along with imaging illustrations, brief discussion and thorough review of literature.

  8. Human pluripotent stem cell derived midbrain PITX3eGFP/w neurons: a versatile tool for pharmacological screening and neurodegenerative modelling

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    Bradley eWatmuff

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPITX3 expression is confined to adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons. In this study we describe the generation and basic functional characteristics of midbrain dopaminergic neurons derived from a human pluripotent stem cell line expressing eGFP under the control of the PITX3 promoter. Flow cytometry shows that eGFP is evident in 15% of the neuron population at day 12 of differentiation and this level is maintained until at least day 80. From day 20-80 of differentiation intracellular chloride decreases and throughout this period around ~20% of PITX3eGFP/w neurons exhibit spontaneous Ca2+ transients (from 3.3+/-0.3 to 5.0+/-0.1 min-1, respectively. These neurons also respond to any of ATP, glutamate, acetylcholine or noradrenaline with elevations of intracellular calcium. As neuronal cultures mature more dopamine is released and single PITX3eGFP/w neurons begin to respond to more than one neurotransmitter. MPP+ and tumor necrosis factor(TNF, but not prostaglandin E2, caused death of the ~50% of PITX3eGFP/w neurons (day 80. Tracking eGFP using time lapse confocal microscopy over 24 hours demonstrated significant TNF-mediated neurite retraction over time. These PITX3eGFP/w neurons are amenable to flow cytometry, release dopamine and respond to multiple neurotransmitters with elevations of intracellular calcium, we believe that they represent a versatile system for neuropharmacological and neurotoxicological studies.

  9. Dorsal stream involvement in recognition of objects with transient onset but not with ramped onset

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    Lourenco Tomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the ventral visual stream is understood to be responsible for object recognition, it has been proposed that the dorsal stream may contribute to object recognition by rapidly activating parietal attention mechanisms, prior to ventral stream object processing. Methods To investigate the relative contribution of the dorsal visual stream to object recognition a group of tertiary students were divided into good and poor motion coherence groups and assessed on tasks classically assumed to rely on ventral stream processing. Participants were required to identify simple line drawings in two tasks, one where objects were presented abruptly for 50 ms followed by a white-noise mask, the other where contrast was linearly ramped on and off over 325 ms and replaced with a mask. Results Although both groups only differed in motion coherence performance (a dorsal stream measure, the good motion coherence group showed superior contrast sensitivity for object recognition on the abrupt, but not the ramped presentation tasks. Conclusions We propose that abrupt presentation of objects activated attention mechanisms fed by the dorsal stream, whereas the ramped presentation had reduced transience and thus did not activate dorsal attention mechanisms as well. The results suggest that rapid dorsal stream activation may be required to assist with ventral stream object processing.

  10. Human dorsal striatal activity during choice discriminates reinforcement learning behavior from the gambler's fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, Ryan K; O'Doherty, John P

    2011-04-27

    Reinforcement learning theory has generated substantial interest in neurobiology, particularly because of the resemblance between phasic dopamine and reward prediction errors. Actor-critic theories have been adapted to account for the functions of the striatum, with parts of the dorsal striatum equated to the actor. Here, we specifically test whether the human dorsal striatum--as predicted by an actor-critic instantiation--is used on a trial-to-trial basis at the time of choice to choose in accordance with reinforcement learning theory, as opposed to a competing strategy: the gambler's fallacy. Using a partial-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning protocol focused on the striatum and other ventral brain areas, we found that the dorsal striatum is more active when choosing consistent with reinforcement learning compared with the competing strategy. Moreover, an overlapping area of dorsal striatum along with the ventral striatum was found to be correlated with reward prediction errors at the time of outcome, as predicted by the actor-critic framework. These findings suggest that the same region of dorsal striatum involved in learning stimulus-response associations may contribute to the control of behavior during choice, thereby using those learned associations. Intriguingly, neither reinforcement learning nor the gambler's fallacy conformed to the optimal choice strategy on the specific decision-making task we used. Thus, the dorsal striatum may contribute to the control of behavior according to reinforcement learning even when the prescriptions of such an algorithm are suboptimal in terms of maximizing future rewards.

  11. Sustained attentional states require distinct temporal involvement of the dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex

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    Antonio Luchicchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Attending the sensory environment for cue detection is a cognitive operation that occurs on a time scale of seconds. The dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC contribute to separate aspects of attentional processing. Pyramidal neurons in different parts of the mPFC are active during cognitive behavior, yet whether this activity is causally underlying attentional processing is not known. We aimed to determine the precise temporal requirements for activation of the mPFC subregions during the seconds prior to cue detection. To test this, we used optogenetic silencing of dorsal or ventral mPFC pyramidal neurons at defined time windows during a sustained attentional state. We find that the requirement of ventral mPFC pyramidal neuron activity is strictly time-locked to stimulus detection. Inhibiting the ventral mPFC two seconds before or during cue presentation reduces response accuracy and hampers behavioral inhibition. The requirement for dorsal mPFC activity on the other hand is temporally more loosely related to a preparatory attentional state, and short lapses in pyramidal neuron activity in dorsal mPFC do not affect performance. This only occurs when the dorsal mPFC is inhibited during the entire preparatory period. Together, our results reveal that a dissociable temporal recruitment of ventral and dorsal mPFC is required during attentional processing.

  12. Sustained Attentional States Require Distinct Temporal Involvement of the Dorsal and Ventral Medial Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchicchi, Antonio; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; Terra, Huub; Bruinsma, Bastiaan; de Kloet, Sybren F; Obermayer, Joshua; Heistek, Tim S; de Haan, Roel; de Kock, Christiaan P J; Deisseroth, Karl; Pattij, Tommy; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2016-01-01

    Attending the sensory environment for cue detection is a cognitive operation that occurs on a time scale of seconds. The dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) contribute to separate aspects of attentional processing. Pyramidal neurons in different parts of the mPFC are active during cognitive behavior, yet whether this activity is causally underlying attentional processing is not known. We aimed to determine the precise temporal requirements for activation of the mPFC subregions during the seconds prior to cue detection. To test this, we used optogenetic silencing of dorsal or ventral mPFC pyramidal neurons at defined time windows during a sustained attentional state. We find that the requirement of ventral mPFC pyramidal neuron activity is strictly time-locked to stimulus detection. Inhibiting the ventral mPFC 2 s before or during cue presentation reduces response accuracy and hampers behavioral inhibition. The requirement for dorsal mPFC activity on the other hand is temporally more loosely related to a preparatory attentional state, and short lapses in pyramidal neuron activity in dorsal mPFC do not affect performance. This only occurs when the dorsal mPFC is inhibited during the entire preparatory period. Together, our results reveal that a dissociable temporal recruitment of ventral and dorsal mPFC is required during attentional processing.

  13. Medical management of right dorsal colitis in 5 horses: a retrospective study (1987-1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N D; Carter, G K; Mealey, R H; Taylor, T S

    1995-01-01

    Right dorsal colitis in horses has been associated with administration of phenylbutazone. Although reports of right dorsal colitis in this species have described surgical treatment associated with a poor prognosis, we have had success treating this condition medically. This report describes 5 horses with right dorsal colitis confirmed during celiotomy that were initially managed medically. All horses had a history of intermittent abdominal pain; weight loss was noted in only 1 horse. The doses (2.0 to 4.6 mg/kg PO bid) and duration (5 to 30 days) of administration of phenylbutazone were not unusually high relative to those recommended (4.4 mg/kg PO bid). Hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia were observed in all horses at the time of admission; packed cell volume was low in 4 horses, and hypocalcemia was also observed in 4 horses. Three of 5 horses (60%) appeared to respond to dietary management and discontinuation of administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Dietary management consisted of feeding pelleted feed, and restricting or eliminating roughage for a period of at least 3 months. Two horses developed strictures of the right dorsal colon. One horse that developed a colonic stricture, possibly because its owners did not comply with recommendations for management, was subsequently treated surgically. The remaining horse that developed a stricture of the right dorsal colon was euthanized. These data indicate that some horses with right dorsal colitis can be successfully managed with medical treatment.

  14. Beneficial Effects of Childhood Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, T S; Edwards, Caleb; Liu, Jenny L; Walter, Deanna M; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2017-03-05

     Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) has been used to treat children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) for over three decades. However, little is known about the outcomes of childhood SDR in adults.  Objectives: 1) To study the effects of childhood SDR on the quality of life and ambulatory function in adult life. 2) To determine late side effects of SDR in adults.   Methods: Adults (> 17.9 years) who underwent SDR in childhood (2 - 17.9 years) between 1987 and 2013 were surveyed in 2015. Patients completed a survey, including questions on demographic information, quality of life, health, surgical outcomes, motor function, manual ability, pain, braces/orthotics, post-SDR treatment, living situation, education level, work status, and side effects of SDR.  Results: In our study population of 294 patients (18.0 - 37.4 years), patients received SDR during the ages of 2.0 - 17.9 years and were followed up 2.2 to 28.3 years after surgery. Eighty-four percent had spastic diplegia, 12% had spastic quadriplegia, and 4% had spastic triplegia. The majority (88%) of patients reported improved post-SDR quality of life and 1% considered the surgery detrimental. Most (83%) would recommend the procedure to others and 3% would not. However, patients who would not recommend SDR to others ambulated with a walker or were not ambulatory at all prior to SDR. The majority (83%) of patients improved (30%) or remained stable (53%) in ambulation. Twenty-nine percent of patients reported pain, mostly in the back and lower limbs, with a mean pain level of 4.4 ± 2.4 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). Decreased sensation in small areas of the lower limbs was reported by 8% of patients, though this did not affect daily life. Scoliosis was diagnosed in 28%, with 40% of these patients pursuing treatment. Whether scoliosis was related to SDR is not clear, though scoliosis is known to occur in patients with CP and also in the general population. Only 4% of patients underwent spinal fusion

  15. Clinical outcomes after selective dorsal rhizotomy in an adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Ray, Wilson Z; Strom, Russell G; Blackburn, Spiros L; Lee, Amy; Park, Tae Sung

    2011-01-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is a highly effective and well-established surgical tool for correction of lower-extremity spasticity in children with spastic diplegia caused by cerebral palsy (CP). Although the literature demonstrates considerable immediate and long-term functional benefits in children treated with SDR, the effects of SDR on adults with spastic diplegia have not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the objective and subjective clinical outcomes of SDR on an adult population. We reviewed the charts of 21 consecutive adult patients who underwent SDR for treatment of CP-related spastic diplegia between the years of 1989 and 2007. All patients were treated by a single surgeon (T.S.P.) and underwent formal pre- and postoperative physical therapy assessments to examine joint range of motion (ROM), gross motor function measure (GMFM), and muscle tone. The majority of patients (15/21) exhibited preoperative ambulatory independence without an assistive device. Postoperative assessments were performed at 4 months, but most patients (11/21) had longer follow-up periods (mean, 17.6 ± 30.2 months). All patients were assessed with a telephone survey to estimate pre- and postoperative function with the Katz and Lawton Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Scale. After SDR surgery, patients experienced significant improvements in lower-extremity passive joint ROM (namely, decreases in hamstring and gastrocnemius tightness) as well as in GMFM crawling and kneeling scores. In addition, spasticity in all measured lower-extremity muscle groups was decreased as compared with preoperative levels. On the basis of our patient self-assessments conducted via telephone, each patient demonstrated subjective improvements in ambulatory ability, spasticity, coordination, joint ROM, pain, overall quality of life, and independence. Also, the Lawton total instrumental ADL scale scores were subjectively improved from preoperative levels

  16. Systemic daily morphine enhances the analgesic effect of intrathecal dexmedetomidine via up-regulation of alpha 2 adrenergic receptor subtypes A, B and C in dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagaki, Shinji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hagihira, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yukio; Mashimo, Takashi

    2010-12-01

     It has been reported that the effect of intrathecally administered α2 adrenergic receptor (α2 AR) agonists is enhanced in mice that are chronically tolerant to systemic morphine. However, contributory factors have not been identified. Here we examined whether repeated systemic morphine affected the analgesic potency of intrathecal dexmedetomidine and the expression of subtype A, B and C α2 AR (α2A, α2B and α2C AR) in the dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn in mice. After subcutaneous injection of morphine or saline for two weeks, dexmedetomidine was administered intrathecally to evaluate its antinociceptive effect. Also, the α2 AR subtypes and µ-opioid receptor mRNA expression in lumbar dorsal root ganglion was quantified using PCR, and α2A and α2C AR in lumbar dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn were examined by immunohistochemistry. Daily morphine enhanced the antinociceptive effect of intrathecal dexmedetomidine, increased all the α2 AR subtypes but decreased the µ-opioid receptor mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglion and increased immunoreactivity of α2A and α2C AR in dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn. These results suggest that systemic daily morphine enhances the analgesic effect of intrathecal dexmedetomidine via up-regulation of the α2A, α2B and α2C AR in lumbar dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn. © 2010 The Authors. JPP © 2010 Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

  17. Dissociated repetition deficits in aphasia can reflect flexible interactions between left dorsal and ventral streams and gender-dimorphic architecture of the right dorsal stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, Marcelo L.; Froudist Walsh, Seán; Dávila, Guadalupe; Nabrozidis, Alejandro; Juárez y Ruiz de Mier, Rocío; Gutiérrez, Antonio; De-Torres, Irene; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; Alfaro, Francisco; García-Casares, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of brain-damaged subjects presenting with dissociated repetition deficits after selective injury to either the left dorsal or ventral auditory pathways can provide further insight on their respective roles in verbal repetition. We evaluated repetition performance and its neural correlates using multimodal imaging (anatomical MRI, DTI, fMRI, and18FDG-PET) in a female patient with transcortical motor aphasia (TCMA) and in a male patient with conduction aphasia (CA) who had small contiguous but non-overlapping left perisylvian infarctions. Repetition in the TCMA patient was fully preserved except for a mild impairment in nonwords and digits, whereas the CA patient had impaired repetition of nonwords, digits and word triplet lists. Sentence repetition was impaired, but he repeated novel sentences significantly better than clichés. The TCMA patient had tissue damage and reduced metabolism in the left sensorimotor cortex and insula. DTI showed damage to the left temporo-frontal and parieto-frontal segments of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) and part of the left ventral stream together with well-developed right dorsal and ventral streams, as has been reported in more than one-third of females. The CA patient had tissue damage and reduced metabolic activity in the left temporoparietal cortex with additional metabolic decrements in the left frontal lobe. DTI showed damage to the left temporo-parietal and temporo-frontal segments of the AF, but the ventral stream was spared. The direct segment of the AF in the right hemisphere was also absent with only vestigial remains of the other dorsal subcomponents present, as is often found in males. fMRI during word and nonword repetition revealed bilateral perisylvian activation in the TCMA patient suggesting recruitment of spared segments of the left dorsal stream and right dorsal stream with propagation of signals to temporal lobe structures suggesting a compensatory reallocation of resources via the ventral streams. The CA

  18. The predominantly HEAT-like motif structure of huntingtin and its association and coincident nuclear entry with dorsal, an NF-kB/Rel/dorsal family transcription factor

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    Gusella James F

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD pathogenesis is due to an expanded polyglutamine tract in huntingtin, but the specificity of neuronal loss compared with other polyglutamine disorders also implies a role for the protein's unknown inherent function. Huntingtin is moderately conserved, with 10 HEAT repeats reported in its amino-terminal half. HD orthologues are evident in vertebrates and Drosophila, but not in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans or Arabidopsis thaliana, a phylogenetic profile similar to the NF-kB/Rel/dorsal family transcription factors, suggesting a potential functional relationship. Results We initially tested the potential for a relationship between huntingtin and dorsal by overexpression experiments in Drosophila S2 cells. Drosophila huntingtin complexes via its carboxyl-terminal region with dorsal, and the two enter the nucleus concomitantly, partly in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS- and Nup88-dependent manner. Similarly, in HeLa cell extracts, human huntingtin co-immunoprecipitates with NF-kB p50 but not with p105. By cross-species comparative analysis, we find that the carboxyl-terminal segment of huntingtin that mediates the association with dorsal possesses numerous HEAT-like sequences related to those in the amino-terminal segment. Thus, Drosophila and vertebrate huntingtins are composed predominantly of 28 to 36 degenerate HEAT-like repeats that span the entire protein. Conclusion Like other HEAT-repeat filled proteins, huntingtin is made up largely of degenerate HEAT-like sequences, suggesting that it may play a scaffolding role in the formation of particular protein-protein complexes. While many proteins have been implicated in complexes with the amino-terminal region of huntingtin, the NF-kB/Rel/dorsal family transcription factors merit further examination as direct or indirect interactors with huntingtin's carboxyl-terminal segment.

  19. Melodic Priming of Motor Sequence Performance: The Role of the Dorsal Premotor Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Brown, Rachel; Lega, Carlotta; Penhune, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to specific auditory sequences leads to the induction of new motor memories and to investigate the role of the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC) in this crossmodal learning process. Fifty-two young healthy non-musicians were familiarized with the sound to key-press mapping on a computer keyboard and tested on their baseline motor performance. Each participant received subsequently either continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) or sham stimulation over the dPMC and was then asked to remember a 12-note melody without moving. For half of the participants, the contour of the melody memorized was congruent to a subsequently performed, but never practiced, finger movement sequence (Congruent group). For the other half, the melody memorized was incongruent to the subsequent finger movement sequence (Incongruent group). Hearing a congruent melody led to significantly faster performance of a motor sequence immediately thereafter compared to hearing an incongruent melody. In addition, cTBS speeded up motor performance in both groups, possibly by relieving motor consolidation from interference by the declarative melody memorization task. Our findings substantiate recent evidence that exposure to a movement-related tone sequence can induce specific, crossmodal encoding of a movement sequence representation. They further suggest that cTBS over the dPMC may enhance early offline procedural motor skill consolidation in cognitive states where motor consolidation would normally be disturbed by concurrent declarative memory processes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of auditory-motor system interactions and have implications for the development of new motor rehabilitation approaches using sound and non-invasive brain stimulation as neuromodulatory tools. PMID:27242414

  20. Neuronal intrinsic properties shape naturally evoked sensory inputs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reali, Cecilia; Russo, Raúl E

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic electrophysiological properties arising from specific combinations of voltage-gated channels are fundamental for the performance of small neural networks in invertebrates, but their role in large-scale vertebrate circuits remains controversial. Although spinal neurons have complex intrinsic properties, some tasks produce high-conductance states that override intrinsic conductances, minimizing their contribution to network function. Because the detection and coding of somato-sensory information at early stages probably involves a relatively small number of neurons, we speculated that intrinsic electrophysiological properties are likely involved in the processing of sensory inputs by dorsal horn neurons (DHN). To test this idea, we took advantage of an integrated spinal cord-hindlimbs preparation from turtles allowing the combination of patch-clamp recordings of DHN embedded in an intact network, with accurate control of the extracellular milieu. We found that plateau potentials and low threshold spikes (LTS) -mediated by L- and T-type Ca(2+)channels, respectively- generated complex dynamics by interacting with naturally evoked synaptic potentials. Inhibitory receptive fields could be changed in sign by activation of the LTS. On the other hand, the plateau potential transformed sensory signals in the time domain by generating persistent activity triggered on and off by brief sensory inputs and windup of the response to repetitive sensory stimulation. Our findings suggest that intrinsic properties dynamically shape sensory inputs and thus represent a major building block for sensory processing by DHN. Intrinsic conductances in DHN appear to provide a mechanism for plastic phenomena such as dynamic receptive fields and sensitization to pain.

  1. The C-terminal binding protein (CTBP-1) regulates dorsal SMD axonal morphology in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A; Sherry, T J; Yücel, D; Llamosas, E; Nicholas, H R

    2015-12-17

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are transcriptional co-repressors which cooperate with a variety of transcription factors to repress gene expression. Caenorhabditis elegans CTBP-1 expression has been observed in the nervous system and hypodermis. In C. elegans, CTBP-1 regulates several processes including Acute Functional Tolerance to ethanol and functions in the nervous system to modulate both lifespan and expression of a lipase gene called lips-7. Incorrect structure and/or function of the nervous system can lead to behavioral changes. Here, we demonstrate reduced exploration behavior in ctbp-1 mutants. Our examination of a subset of neurons involved in regulating locomotion revealed that the axonal morphology of dorsal SMD (SMDD) neurons is altered in ctbp-1 mutants at the fourth larval (L4) stage. Expressing CTBP-1 under the control of the endogenous ctbp-1 promoter rescued both the exploration behavior phenotype and defective SMDD axon structure in ctbp-1 mutants at the L4 stage. Interestingly, the pre-synaptic marker RAB-3 was found to localize to the mispositioned portion of SMDD axons in a ctbp-1 mutant. Further analysis of SMDD axonal morphology at days 1, 3 and 5 of adulthood revealed that the number of ctbp-1 mutants showing an SMDD axonal morphology defect increases in early adulthood and the observed defect appears to be qualitatively more severe. CTBP-1 is prominently expressed in the nervous system with weak expression detected in the hypodermis. Surprisingly, solely expressing CTBP-1a in the nervous system or hypodermis did not restore correct SMDD axonal structure in a ctbp-1 mutant. Our results demonstrate a role for CTBP-1 in exploration behavior and the regulation of SMDD axonal morphology in C. elegans. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Melodic Priming of Motor Sequence Performance: The Role of the Dorsal Premotor Cortex

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    Marianne Anke Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to specific auditory sequences leads to the induction of new motor memories and to investigate the role of the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC in this crossmodal learning process. Fifty-two young healthy non-musicians were familiarized with the sound to key-press mapping on a computer keyboard and tested on their baseline motor performance. Each participant received subsequently either continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS or sham stimulation over the dPMC and was then asked to remember a 12-note melody without moving. For half of the participants, the contour of the melody memorized was congruent to a subsequently performed, but never practiced, finger movement sequence (Congruent group. For the other half, the melody memorized was incongruent to the subsequent finger movement sequence (Incongruent group. Hearing a congruent melody led to significantly faster performance of a motor sequence immediately thereafter compared to hearing an incongruent melody. In addition, cTBS speeded up motor performance in both groups, possibly by relieving motor consolidation from interference by the declarative melody memorization task. Our findings substantiate recent evidence that exposure to a movement-related tone sequence can induce specific, crossmodal encoding of a movement sequence representation. They further suggest that cTBS over the dPMC may enhance early offline procedural motor skill consolidation in cognitive states where motor consolidation would normally be disturbed by concurrent declarative memory processes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of auditory-motor system interactions and have implications for the development of new motor rehabilitation approaches using sound and non-invasive brain stimulation as neuromodulatory tools.

  3. Volar plating for unstable proximal interphalangeal joint dorsal fracture-dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Andre E J; Tan, David M K; Chong, Alphonsus K S; Chew, Winston Y C

    2012-01-01

    To report our results of open reduction internal fixation with volar mini plate and screw fixation for unstable dorsal fracture dislocations (DFDs) of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint. We performed a retrospective review of 13 consecutive DFDs of the PIP joint treated with volar mini plate and screw fixation, measuring both clinical and radiological outcomes. The age range of our patients was 15 to 56 years (average, 33 y). Six injuries were related to work, 5 to sports, and 2 to motor vehicle accidents. Of the 13 DFDs, 6 were comminuted. Articular involvement ranged from 30% to 70% (average, 44%). The average time to surgery was 7 days (range, 0-23 d). Patients had follow-up of 12 to 60 months (average, 25 mo). Four patients had a postoperative course complicated by plate and screw removal at an average of 4 months later, either as part of a secondary procedure to improve range of motion or owing to patient request. All patients returned to their original occupation. Of the 13 patients, 11 were satisfied with the result, and 12 of 13 had either no or mild pain. All 13 DFDs united in good alignment but 3 showed degenerative changes. Average grip strength was 85% of the unaffected side, and average active PIP joint and distal interphalangeal joint motion arcs were 75° and 65°, respectively. Average Quick Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score was 4 (range, 0-9). All patients had non-tender swelling of the proximal interphalangeal joints but no signs of flexor tenosynovitis or infection. Fixation of unstable PIP joint DFDs via a volar approach is technically feasible with mini plates and screws. This treatment allows early active range of motion and provides good objective and subjective outcomes; however, noteworthy complications occurred in 39% of patients. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dorsal column sensory axons degenerate due to impaired microvascular perfusion after spinal cord injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Johongir M.; Ewan, Eric E.; Hagg, Theo

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to axon loss after spinal cord injury (SCI) are largely unknown but may involve microvascular loss as we have previously suggested. Here, we used a mild contusive injury (120 kdyn IH impactor) at T9 in rats focusing on ascending primary sensory dorsal column axons, anterogradely traced from the sciatic nerves. The injury caused a rapid and progressive loss of dorsal column microvasculature and oligodendrocytes at the injury site and penumbra and a ~70% loss of the sensory axons, by 24 hours. To model the microvascular loss, focal ischemia of the T9 dorsal columns was achieved via phototoxic activation of intravenously injected rose bengal. This caused an ~53% loss of sensory axons and an ~80% loss of dorsal column oligodendrocytes by 24 hours. Axon loss correlated with the extent and axial length of microvessel and oligodendrocyte loss along the dorsal column. To determine if oligodendrocyte loss contributes to axon loss, the glial toxin ethidium bromide (EB; 0.3 µg/µl) was microinjected into the T9 dorsal columns, and resulted in an ~88% loss of dorsal column oligodendrocytes and an ~56% loss of sensory axons after 72 hours. EB also caused an ~72% loss of microvessels. Lower concentrations of EB resulted in less axon, oligodendrocyte and microvessel loss, which were highly correlated (R2 = 0.81). These data suggest that focal spinal cord ischemia causes both oligodendrocyte and axon degeneration, which are perhaps linked. Importantly, they highlight the need of limiting the penumbral spread of ischemia and oligodendrocyte loss after SCI in order to protect axons. PMID:23978615

  5. Gene expression suggests decoupled dorsal and ventral segmentation in the millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ralf; Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Damen, Wim G M

    2004-04-01

    Diplopods (millipedes) are known for their irregular body segmentation. Most importantly, the number of dorsal segmental cuticular plates (tergites) does not match the number of ventral structures (e.g., sternites). Controversial theories exist to explain the origin of this so-called diplosegmentation. We have studied the embryology of a representative diplopod, Glomeris marginata, and have analyzed the segmentation genes engrailed (en), hedgehog (hh), cubitus-interruptus (ci), and wingless (wg). We show that dorsal segments can be distinguished from ventral segments. They differ not only in number and developmental history, but also in gene expression patterns. engrailed, hedgehog, and cubitus-interruptus are expressed in both ventral and dorsal segments, but at different intrasegmental locations, whereas wingless is expressed only in the ventral segments, but not in the dorsal segments. Ventrally, the patterns are similar to what has been described from Drosophila and other arthropods, consistent with a conserved role of these genes in establishing parasegment boundaries. On the dorsal side, however, the gene expression patterns are different and inconsistent with a role in boundary formation between segments, but they suggest that these genes might function to establish the tergite borders. Our data suggest a profound and rather complete decoupling of dorsal and ventral segmentation leading to the dorsoventral discrepancies in the number of segmental elements. Based on gene expression, we propose a model that may resolve the hitherto controversial issue of the correlation between dorsal tergites and ventral leg pairs in basal diplopods (e.g., Glomeris) and is suggestive also for derived, ring-forming diplopods (e.g., Juliformia).

  6. P2-8: Applications of the Magnocellular Advantage Model: Developmental Aspects of Dorsal Stream Processing

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    Melanie Murphy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Differential timing of the development of the dorsal and ventral visual streams is well accepted, with the latency of the M pathway to V1 not reaching adult levels until 10 years of age (Crewther et al., 1999 Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 49 123–128. This could have major consequences for how children perceive and attend to the environment. Thus, how the later development of the dorsal visual stream impacts the transient visual processing abilities in children was investigated within a framework of the Magnocellular Advantage model of the mature visual system. Typically developing participants (N= 110 grouped as Younger Children (4–7 yrs, Older Children (10–13 yrs, and Adults (18–30 yrs completed a series of customised computer motion and form coherence tasks designed to provide a functional measure of dorsal/ventral pathway performance. Dorsal involvement in a traditionally ventrally dominated object-recognition task was achieved by biasing onset/offset conditions to preferentially stimulate the temporal characteristics of both pathways. Adults performed better than children on all tasks except motion coherence thresholds. A significant improvement in performance was seen between younger children and older groups on dorsal tasks (Motion Coherence and Navon Global Accuracy but not on all ventral tasks (Form Coherence and Navon Local Exposure Time. Results support earlier psychophysical and electrophysiological investigations indicating that the dorsal stream matures later than the ventral stream. Therefore, in young children the underdeveloped dorsal visual pathway may rely more on slower ventral stream visual processing, which has important implications for the perception and attentional processing of transient events.

  7. Sox5 controls dorsal progenitor and interneuron specification in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Alejandra C; Stolt, C Claus; Diez del Corral, Ruth; Dimitrov, Spas; Pérez-Alcalá, Siro; Sock, Elisabeth; Barbas, Julio A; Wegner, Michael; Morales, Aixa V

    2015-05-01

    The basic organization of somatosensory circuits in the spinal cord is already setup during the initial patterning of the dorsal neural tube. Extrinsic signals, such as Wnt and TGF-β pathways, activate combinatorial codes of transcription factors that are responsible for generating a pattern of discrete domains of dorsal progenitors (dp). These progenitors will give rise to distinct dorsal interneurons (dI). The Wnt/ βcatenin signaling pathway controls specification of dp/dI1-3 progenitors and interneurons. According to the current model in the field, Wnt/βcatenin activity seems to act in a graded fashion in the spinal cord, as different relative levels determine the identity of adjacent progenitors. However, it is not clear how this activity gradient is controlled and how the identities of dI1-3 are differentially regulated by Wnt signalling. We have determined that two SoxD transcription factors, Sox5 and Sox6, are expressed in restricted domains of dorsal progenitors in the neural tube. Using gain- and loss-of function approaches in chicken embryos, we have established that Sox5 controls cell fate specification of dp2 and dp3 progenitors and, as a result, controls the correct number of the corresponding dorsal interneurons (dI2 and dI3). Furthermore, Sox5 exerts its function by restricting dorsally Wnt signaling activity via direct transcriptional induction of the negative Wnt pathway regulator Axin2. By that way, Sox5 acts as a Wnt pathway modulator that contributes to sharpen the dorsal gradient of Wnt/βcatenin activity to control the distinction of two functionally distinct types of interneurons, dI2 and dI3 involved in the somatosensory relay. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Parkin deficiency increases the resistance of midbrain neurons and glia to mild proteasome inhibition: the role of autophagy and glutathione homeostasis.

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    Casarejos, Maria J; Solano, Rosa M; Rodriguez-Navarro, José A; Gómez, Ana; Perucho, Juan; Castaño, Jose G; García de Yébenes, Justo; Mena, Maria A

    2009-09-01

    Parkin mutations in humans produce parkinsonism whose pathogenesis is related to impaired protein degradation, increased free radicals and abnormal neurotransmitter release. In this study, we have investigated whether partial proteasomal inhibition by epoxomicin, an ubiquitin proteasomal system (UPS) irreversible inhibitor, further aggravates the cellular effects of parkin suppression in midbrain neurons and glia. We observed that parkin null (PK-KO) midbrain neuronal cultures are resistant to epoxomicin-induced cell death. This resistance is due to increased GSH and DJ-1 protein levels in PK-KO mice. The treatment with epoxomicin increases, in wild type (WT) cultures, the pro-apoptotic Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the phosphorylation of tau, and the levels of chaperones heat-shock protein 70 and C-terminal Hsc-interacting protein, but none of these effects took place in epoxomicin-treated PK-KO cultures. Poly-ubiquitinated proteins increased more in WT than in PK-KO-treated neuronal cultures. Parkin accumulated in WT neuronal cultures treated with epoxomicin. Markers of autophagy, such as LC3II/I, were increased in naïve PK-KO cultures, and further increased after treatment with epoxomicin, implying that the blockade of the proteasome in PK-KO neurons triggers the enhancement of autophagy. The treatment with l-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine and the inhibition of autophagy, however, reverted the increase resistance to epoxomicin of the PK-KO cultures. We also found that PK-KO glial cells, stressed by growth in defined medium and depleted of GSH, were more susceptible to epoxomicin induced cell death than WT glia treated similarly. This susceptibility was linked to reduced GSH levels and less heat-shock protein 70 response, and to activation of p-serine/threonine kinase protein signaling pathway as well as to increased poly-ubiquitinated proteins. These data suggest that mild UPS inhibition is compensated by other mechanisms in PK-KO midbrain neurons. However the depletion of GSH

  9. Synaptic connections of PDF-immunoreactive lateral neurons projecting to the dorsal protocerebrum of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuyama, Kouji; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies in Drosophila melanogaster indicate that the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) is an important output signal from a set of major clock neurons, s-LN(v)s (small ventral lateral neurons), which transmit the circadian phase to subsets of other clock neurons, DNs (dorsal neurons). Both s-LN(v)s and DNs have fiber projections to the dorsal protocerebrum of the brain, so that this area is a conspicuous locus for coupling between different subsets of clock neurons. To unravel the neural circuits underlying the fly's circadian rhythms, we examined the detailed subcellular morphology of the PDF-positive fibers of the s-LN(v)s in the dorsal protocerebrum, focusing on their synaptic connections, using preembedding immunoelectron microscopy. To examine the distribution of synapses, we also reconstructed the three-dimensional morphology of PDF-positive varicosities from fiber profiles in the dorsal protocerebrum. The varicosities contained large dense-core vesicles (DCVs), and also numerous small clear vesicles, forming divergent output synapses onto unlabeled neurites. The DCVs apparently dock at nonsynaptic sites, suggesting their nonsynaptic release. In addition, a 3D reconstruction revealed the presence of input synapses onto the PDF-positive fibers. These were detected less frequently than output sites. These observations suggest that the PDF-positive clock neurons receive neural inputs directly through synaptic connections in the dorsal protocerebrum, in addition to supplying dual outputs, either synaptic or via paracrine release of the DCV contents, to unidentified target neurons.

  10. Dorsal sensory impairment in hands and feet of people affected by Hansen's disease in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Ruth; Melchior, Hanna

    2007-12-01

    Sensory testing in people affected by Hansen's disease is usually performed on palms and soles only. In Israel, both palmar/plantar and dorsal aspects of limbs are routinely tested. The aim of this study was to describe the magnitude of dorsal sensory impairment (SI) in limbs and compare the frequency of SI on palms and soles with that on the dorsum of hands and feet. In a cross-sectional study, limbs of 140 patients registered at The Israel Hansen's Disease Centre during the years 1999-2003 were tested for their sensory status. Both palmar/plantar and dorsal aspects were tested using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. SI was defined as not feeling stimuli applied with the 2 g monofilament. SI was detected on the dorsum in 43% of sites on hands and only in 27% on palms. 64% of sites on dorsum of feet had SI compared to 53% on the soles. SI was detected in up to 18% in hands with no palmar SI, and in 6% of feet with no plantar SI. Furthermore, SI on palms and soles was found to be accompanied by dorsal SI in all hands and in 97% of feet. SI on dorsum of limbs occurs more frequently than SI on palms and soles. Therefore sensory testing should also consider inclusion of the dorsal aspect of hands and feet.

  11. Electroacupuncture reduces the evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in ankle-sprained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2011-05-01

    Acupuncture is shown to be effective in producing analgesia in ankle sprain pain in humans and animals. To examine the underlying mechanisms of the acupuncture-induced analgesia, the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on weight-bearing forces (WBR) of the affected foot and dorsal horn neuron activities were examined in a rat model of ankle sprain. Ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending ligaments of the left ankle in the rat. Dorsal horn neuron responses to ankle movements or compression were recorded from the lumbar spinal cord using an in vivo extracellular single unit recording setup 1 day after ankle sprain. EA was applied to the SI-6 acupoint on the right forelimb (contralateral to the sprained ankle) by trains of electrical pulses (10 Hz, 1-ms pulse width, 2-mA intensity) for 30 min. After EA, WBR of the sprained foot significantly recovered and dorsal horn neuron activities were significantly suppressed in ankle-sprained rats. However, EA produced no effect in normal rats. The inhibitory effect of EA on hyperactivities of dorsal horn neurons of ankle-sprained rats was blocked by the α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (5 mg/kg ip) but not by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (10 mg/kg ip). These data suggest that EA-induced analgesia in ankle sprain pain is mediated mainly by suppressing dorsal horn neuron activities through α-adrenergic descending inhibitory systems at the spinal level.

  12. Dorsal stabilization of atlantoaxial subluxation using non-absorbable sutures in toy breed dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Masian, D; Luján-Feliu-Pascual, A; Font, C; Mascort, J

    2014-01-01

    To describe a novel dorsal technique for stabilization of atlantoaxial subluxation in toy breed dogs using 3-metric nylon suture. Retrospective study. Fifteen toy breed dogs with a body weight of 2 kg or less with atlantoaxial subluxation. The atlantoaxial joint of each dog was surgically stabilized through a dorsal approach by placing a double strand of non-absorbable, 3-metric, nylon suture material between the dorsal muscles of the atlanto-occipital and the atlantoaxial joint muscles. Pre- and postoperative neurological status, diagnostic imaging, and complications were reviewed. Clinical follow-up examination was performed at six months. For long-term assessment, a telephone follow-up was performed. No intra-operative complications were observed. Functional improvement occurred in 12 dogs. One dog did not improve and four dogs required revision surgery. In two of those four cases, suture material breakage was proven and it was suspected in the other two. Two cases underwent a second dorsal approach with the same suture material and two cases underwent a ventral approach (transarticular fixation and multiple implants embedded with polymethylmethacrylate). Dorsal stabilization using 3-metric nylon may be adequate as a safe, effective, and simple alternative technique for atlantoaxial stabilization in toy breed dogs of ≤1.5 kg of weight, in which the use of ventral screws and pins is challenging.

  13. Morphological and immunohistochemical comparison of three rat prostate lobes (lateral, dorsal and ventral in experimental hyperprolactinemia.

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    Dariusz Gącarzewicz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The prolactin plays an important role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of prostate gland besides androgens. The goal of this study was to reveal the influence of elevated prolactin concentration on epithelial cells of prostate. We compared the morphology of epithelial cells of prostate dorsal, lateral and ventral lobes and expression of androgen receptors in these cells in rats with hyperprolactinemia and in control rats. We used sexually mature male Wistar rats. The experimental rats received metoclopramide; the control group received saline in the same way. The prostate dorsal, lateral and ventral lobes were collected routinely for light and electron microscopy. The intensity of immunohistochemical reaction of androgen receptor in epithelial cells of dorsal, lateral and ventral lobes was evaluated by measure of optical density with computer image analysis. The light and electron (transmission and scanning microscopes were used for morphological observations. Results: In experimental rats twofold increase in prolactin and twofold decrease in testosterone found. In experimental group the expression of androgen receptor was lower in columnar epithelial cells of dorsal and ventral lobes but higher in lateral one. We observed morphological abnormalities in columnar epithelial cells of lateral and dorsal lobes. The columnar epithelial cells of ventral lobes didn't show any morphological changes in hyperprolactinemia.

  14. Electroacupuncture reduces the evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in ankle-sprained rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture is shown to be effective in producing analgesia in ankle sprain pain in humans and animals. To examine the underlying mechanisms of the acupuncture-induced analgesia, the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on weight-bearing forces (WBR) of the affected foot and dorsal horn neuron activities were examined in a rat model of ankle sprain. Ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending ligaments of the left ankle in the rat. Dorsal horn neuron responses to ankle movements or compression were recorded from the lumbar spinal cord using an in vivo extracellular single unit recording setup 1 day after ankle sprain. EA was applied to the SI-6 acupoint on the right forelimb (contralateral to the sprained ankle) by trains of electrical pulses (10 Hz, 1-ms pulse width, 2-mA intensity) for 30 min. After EA, WBR of the sprained foot significantly recovered and dorsal horn neuron activities were significantly suppressed in ankle-sprained rats. However, EA produced no effect in normal rats. The inhibitory effect of EA on hyperactivities of dorsal horn neurons of ankle-sprained rats was blocked by the α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (5 mg/kg ip) but not by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (10 mg/kg ip). These data suggest that EA-induced analgesia in ankle sprain pain is mediated mainly by suppressing dorsal horn neuron activities through α-adrenergic descending inhibitory systems at the spinal level. PMID:21389301

  15. Dorsal hippocampus is necessary for novel learning but sufficient for subsequent similar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Szu-Han; Finnie, Peter S B; Hardt, Oliver; Nader, Karim

    2012-11-01

    Our current understanding of brain mechanisms involved in learning and memory has been derived largely from studies using experimentally naïve animals. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that not all identified mechanisms may generalize to subsequent learning. For example, N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate (NMDA) receptors in the dorsal hippocampus are required for contextual fear conditioning in naïve animals but not in animals previously trained in a similar task. Here we investigated how animals learn contextual fear conditioning for a second time-a response which is not due to habituation or generalization. We found that dorsal hippocampus infusions of voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers or the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist impaired the first, not the second contextual learning. Only manipulations of the entire hippocampus led to an impairment in second learning. Specifically, inactivation of either the dorsal or ventral hippocampus caused the remaining portion of the hippocampus to acquire and consolidate the second learning. Thus, dorsal hippocampus seems necessary for initial contextual fear conditioning, but either the dorsal or ventral hippocampus is sufficient for subsequent conditioning in a different context. Together, these findings suggest that prior training experiences can change how the hippocampus processes subsequent similar learning. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Do visual illusions probe the visual brain? Illusions in action without a dorsal visual stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Yann; Danckert, James; Blangero, Annabelle; Rossetti, Yves

    2007-04-09

    Visual illusions have been shown to affect perceptual judgements more so than motor behaviour, which was interpreted as evidence for a functional division of labour within the visual system. The dominant perception-action theory argues that perception involves a holistic processing of visual objects or scenes, performed within the ventral, inferior temporal cortex. Conversely, visuomotor action involves the processing of the 3D relationship between the goal of the action and the body, performed predominantly within the dorsal, posterior parietal cortex. We explored the effect of well-known visual illusions (a size-contrast illusion and the induced Roelofs effect) in a patient (IG) suffering bilateral lesions of the dorsal visual stream. According to the perception-action theory, IG's perceptual judgements and control of actions should rely on the intact ventral stream and hence should both be sensitive to visual illusions. The finding that IG performed similarly to controls in three different illusory contexts argues against such expectations and shows, furthermore, that the dorsal stream does not control all aspects of visuomotor behaviour. Assuming that the patient's dorsal stream visuomotor system is fully lesioned, these results suggest that her visually guided action can be planned and executed independently of the dorsal pathways, possibly through the inferior parietal lobule.

  17. Spiny Prey, Fortunate Prey. Dorsal Spines Are an Asset in Intraguild Interactions among Lady Beetles

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    Louis Hautier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Multicolored Asian Ladybird, Harmonia axyridis, is an extremely successful invasive species. Here we suggest that, in addition to many other traits, the dorsal spines of its larvae contribute to their success, as suggested by behavioral observations of agonistic interactions between H. axyridis and European coccinellids. In coccinellids, the role of dorsal spines in these interactions has been poorly studied and they could be a physical protection against intraguild predators. Dorsal spines of second instar H. axyridis larvae were removed with micro-scissors, which resulted in spineless larvae after molting (spineless group. These larvae were then exposed to starved Coccinella septempunctata larvae. Two control categories were also submitted to interactions: H. axyridis larvae with all their spines (control group and with their spines, but injured by pin stings (injured group. Spine removal at the second instar did not hamper H. axyridis development. The bite rate by C. septempunctata was significantly higher on the spineless H. axyridis and more dorsally located compared to the control and injured groups, while no bite rate difference was observed between the injured and the control group. Our results suggest that in addition to behavioral and chemical defenses, the dorsal spines play a significant protective role against bites. Therefore, spines in ladybirds could be considered as a morphological defense against intraguild predation. In H. axyridis, these defenses might contribute to its success in food resources already exploited by other guild members and thus further facilitate the invasion of new areas.

  18. Morphology and histology of dorsal spines of the xenacanthid shark Orthacanthus platypternus from the Lower Permian of Texas, USA: palaeobiological and palaeoenvironmental implications

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    Kimberly G. Beck

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Detailed studies on Carboniferous species of the xenacanth Orthacanthus have shown that the xenacanth dorsal fin spine can be used for skeletochronological analyses and provides valuable information about development, growth and environmental life conditions of those extinct sharks. We report here for the first time the histology and skeletochronology of Permian specimens, dorsal spines of Orthacanthus platypternus from the Craddock Bone Bed (lower Clear Fork Formation; Early Permian, Leonardian age of northern Baylor County (north-central Texas, USA. Twelve dorsal spines of O. platypternus preserve a highly vascularized wall mainly composed of centrifugally growing dentine in a succession of dentine layers, probably deposited with an annual periodicity. As expected, spines of individuals with 1–2 dentine layers, presumably juveniles, present the smallest sizes. However, spines of individuals showing at least 3–4 dentine layers and interpreted to be subadults/young adults, are distributed in two spine-size clusters corresponding to females (probably the largest spines and males, in agreement with the hypothesis of sexual size dimorphism proposed in a previous biometric analysis. Our comparative study of O. platypternus and the Stephanian species O. meridionalis further suggests that spine denticulation can be useful for distinguishing between species of Orthacanthus and sexually dimorphic forms (juvenile to adults in each species. Total body length estimations of O. platypternus from the Craddock Bone Bed point to relatively large juveniles and small subadults/young adults (less than 2 m in total length, living as opportunistic predators in the pond-channel coastal plain environments represented by the bone bed deposits. The com-parative analyses of the ontogenetic stages of the recorded specimens of O. platypternus and their distribution along different facies and localities indicate that this species was euryhaline, diadromous with a

  19. Dynamics of BMP and Hes1/Hairy1 signaling in the dorsal neural tube underlies the transition from neural crest to definitive roof plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Erez; Avraham, Oshri; Kahane, Nitza; Ofek, Shai; Kumar, Deepak; Kalcheim, Chaya

    2016-03-24

    The dorsal midline region of the neural tube that results from closure of the neural folds is generally termed the roof plate (RP). However, this domain is highly dynamic and complex, and is first transiently inhabited by prospective neural crest (NC) cells that sequentially emigrate from the neuroepithelium. It only later becomes the definitive RP, the dorsal midline cells of the spinal cord. We previously showed that at the trunk level of the axis, prospective RP progenitors originate ventral to the premigratory NC and progressively reach the dorsal midline following NC emigration. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the end of NC production and formation of the definitive RP remain virtually unknown. Based on distinctive cellular and molecular traits, we have defined an initial NC and a subsequent RP stage, allowing us to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the transition between the two phases. We demonstrate that in spite of the constant production of BMP4 in the dorsal tube at both stages, RP progenitors only transiently respond to the ligand and lose competence shortly before they arrive at their final location. In addition, exposure of dorsal tube cells at the NC stage to high levels of BMP signaling induces premature RP traits, such as Hes1/Hairy1, while concomitantly inhibiting NC production. Reciprocally, early inhibition of BMP signaling prevents Hairy1 mRNA expression at the RP stage altogether, suggesting that BMP is both necessary and sufficient for the development of this RP-specific trait. Furthermore, when Hes1/Hairy1 is misexpressed at the NC stage, it inhibits BMP signaling and downregulates BMPR1A/Alk3 mRNA expression, transcription of BMP targets such as Foxd3, cell-cycle progression, and NC emigration. Reciprocally, Foxd3 inhibits Hairy1, suggesting that repressive cross-interactions at the level of, and downstream from, BMP ensure the temporal separation between both lineages. Together, our data suggest that BMP signaling is

  20. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required to rescue midbrain dopaminergic progenitors and promote neurorepair in ageing mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Episcopo, Francesca; Tirolo, Cataldo; Testa, Nunzio; Caniglia, Salvatore; Morale, Maria Concetta; Serapide, Maria Francesca; Pluchino, Stefano; Marchetti, Bianca

    2014-08-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for specification and neurogenesis of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons, the pivotal neuronal population that degenerates in Parkinson's disease (PD), and in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a vital role in adult neurogenesis but whether it might engage DA neurogenesis/neurorepair in the affected PD brain is yet unresolved. Recently, the adult midbrain aqueduct periventricular regions (Aq-PVRs) were shown to harbor multipotent clonogenic neural stem/progenitor cells (mNPCs) with DA potential in vitro, but restrictive mechanisms in vivo are believed to limit their DA regenerative capacity. Using in vitro mNPC culture systems we herein demonstrate that aging is one most critical factor restricting mNPC neurogenic potential via dysregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Coculture paradigms between young/aged (Y/A) mNPCs and Y/A astrocytes identified glial age and a decline of glial-derived factors including Wnts as key determinants of impaired neurogenic potential, whereas Wnt activation regimens efficiently reversed the diminished proliferative, neuronal, and DA differentiation potential of A-mNPCs. Next, in vivo studies in wild (Wt) and transgenic β-catenin reporter mice uncovered Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation and remarkable astrocyte remodeling of Aq-PVR in response to MPTP-induced DA neuron death. Spatio-temporal analyses unveiled β-catenin signaling in predopaminergic (Nurr1(+)/TH(-)) and imperiled or rescuing DAT(+) neurons during MPTP-induced DA neuron injury and self-repair. Aging inhibited Wnt signaling, whereas β-catenin activation in situ with a specific GSK-3β antagonist promoted a significant degree of DA neurorestoration associated with reversal of motor deficit, with implications for neurorestorative approaches in PD. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  1. A potential role for the midbrain in integrating fat-free mass determined energy needs: An H2 (15) O PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Christopher M; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Little is known on how sensing of energy needs is centrally represented, integrated, and translated into the behavioral aspects of energy homeostasis. Fat free mass (FFM) is the major determinant of energy expenditure. We investigated how interindividual variances in FFM relate to neuronal activity in humans. Healthy adults (n = 64, 21F/43M; age 31.3 ± 9.1y; percentage of body fat [PFAT] 25.6 ± 10.7%; BMI 30.4 ± 9) underwent a 36h fast and subsequent H(2) (15) O positron emission tomographic (PET) measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Multiple variable regression analysis revealed significant associations of FFM with rCBF within the midbrain [including parts of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), ventral tegmental area (VTA), thalamic and hypothalamic regions], the bilateral parahippocampal region, left anterior cingulate, left insular cortex, right cerebellum, and distinct regions within the temporal and occipital cortex. In contrast, no significant associations were found for fat mass (FM). We investigated the potential functional-anatomical link between FFM and central regulation of food intake by performing a conjunction analysis of FFM and the perceived hunger feelings. This showed a significant overlap within the midbrain PAG. Mediation analysis demonstrated a significant indirect effect of FFM on hunger with PAG rCBF as mediator. Most regions we found to be associated with FFM form part in ascending homeostatic pathways and cortical circuitries implicated in the regulation of basic bodily functions indicating a potential role of these central networks in the integration of FFM determined energy needs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Short-term plasticity in turtle dorsal horn neurons mediated by L-type Ca2+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1994-01-01

    Windup--the gradual increase of the response--of dorsal horn neurons to repeated activation of primary afferents is an elementary form of short-term plasticity that may mediate central sensitization to pain. In deep dorsal horn neurons of the turtle spinal cord in vitro we report windup of the re......Windup--the gradual increase of the response--of dorsal horn neurons to repeated activation of primary afferents is an elementary form of short-term plasticity that may mediate central sensitization to pain. In deep dorsal horn neurons of the turtle spinal cord in vitro we report windup...

  3. Mapping dermatomes during selective dorsal rhizotomy: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemecek, Andrew N; Avellino, Anthony M; Goodkin, Robert; Little, James; Kliot, Michel

    2003-10-01

    Studies suggest that the pattern of dermatomal segmental innervation in any given patient, may differ from the classic dermatomal maps first described in the 1890s. Such variability may limit the effectiveness of selective dorsal rhizotomy for treatment of neurogenic pain. A 46-year-old male presented with a 27-year history of intractable pain in his left arm after being shot during the Vietnam War; multiple surgical and medical therapeutic modalities failed to produce durable pain relief. The patient underwent selective dorsal rhizotomy, with intraoperative dermatomal and mixed somatosensory evoked potential recordings. Pre- and postrhizotomy recordings were compared, effectively mapping this patient's dermatomal pattern. At 4 years' follow-up, the patient remains pain free. Intraoperative monitoring of somatosensory evoked potentials during dorsal rhizotomy for neurogenic pain can be used to establish the degree to which an individual's pattern of segmental innervation conforms to the traditionally described dermatomes.

  4. Reconstruction of the bulbar urethra using dorsal onlay buccal mucosal grafts: New concepts and surgical tricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Barbagli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Buccal mucosa onlay graft urethroplasty represents one of the most widespread methods for the repair of strictures in the bulbar urethra, because of its thick and highly vascular spongiosum tissue. Recently the location of the patch has become a contentious issue, since we described our original techniques of dorsal onlay graft urethroplasty. The design rationale for this approach was based on the concept that the corporeal body remains a healthy host for receiving a free transplanted tissues. Moreover, graft fixation onto a defined surface may decrease graft shrinkage and sacculation. The success rate using buccal mucosa grafts for the repair of bulbar urethral strictures has generally been high with dorsal or ventral onlay grafts or using an augmented roof-strip anastomotic urethroplasty. We describe here the fundamental concepts of the bulbar urethra reconstruction using buccal mucosal grafts, presenting a new surgical technique of dorsal onlay buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty using fibrin glue.

  5. [Trombosis of the dorsal penis vein (of Mondor's phlebitis). Presentation of a new case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Faba, O; Parra Muntaner, L; Gómez Cisneros, S C; Martín Benito, J L; Escaf Barmadah, S

    2006-01-01

    We present a new case of trombosis of the superficial dorsal penis vein called Penile Mondor's disease. The characteristics of the disease are reviewed and the most usual diagnostic and therapeutic methods. The case of a 41 year old man is reviewed who consulted for pain and induration on the proximal part of the penis. After phisical examination and Eco-doppler was made the diagnosis of Mondor's disease. He receibed treatment with non steroidal antiinflamatories and antibiotics. The dorsal vein thrombosis is a rare disease with pain an induration of the dorsal part of the penis. The ethiology can be traumatic, neoplasic, excesive sexual activity or abstinence. Is necesary the diferencial diagnosis with esclerosant linphangitis and the most important imaging is the Eco-doppler. The treatment is based in non steroidal antiinflamatories and antibiotics wit infection. The local aplication of heparine can be useful and the surgery with thrombectomy and resection is for persistent cases.

  6. Top-down modulations from dorsal stream in lexical recognition: an effective connectivity FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Deng

    Full Text Available Both the ventral and dorsal visual streams in the human brain are known to be involved in reading. However, the interaction of these two pathways and their responses to different cognitive demands remains unclear. In this study, activation of neural pathways during Chinese character reading was acquired by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI technique. Visual-spatial analysis (mediated by the dorsal pathway was disassociated from lexical recognition (mediated by the ventral pathway via a spatial-based lexical decision task and effective connectivity analysis. Connectivity results revealed that, during spatial processing, the left superior parietal lobule (SPL positively modulated the left fusiform gyrus (FG, while during lexical processing, the left SPL received positive modulatory input from the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and sent negative modulatory output to the left FG. These findings suggest that the dorsal stream is highly involved in lexical recognition and acts as a top-down modulator for lexical processing.

  7. Here, there and everywhere: higher visual function and the dorsal visual stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sarah Anne; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The dorsal visual stream, often referred to as the 'where' stream, represents the pathway taken by visual information from the primary visual cortex to the posterior parietal lobe and onwards. It partners the ventral or 'what' stream, the subject of a previous review and largely a temporal-based system. Here, we consider the dorsal stream disorders of perception (simultanagnosia, akinetopsia) along with their consequences on action (eg, optic ataxia and oculomotor apraxia, along with Balint's syndrome). The role of the dorsal stream in blindsight and hemispatial neglect is also considered. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Spinal Fos labeling and penile erection elicited by stimulation of dorsal nerve of the rat penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampin, O; Gougis, S; Giuliano, F; Rousseau, J P

    1997-05-01

    Penile afferents present in the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) convey sensory information from the penis to the spinal cord and represent the afferent limb of reflexive erections. Immunocytochemical staining of Fos was used to identify spinal neurons that receive excitatory inputs from the DNP in anesthetized rats. Intracavernous pressure (ICP) was recorded as an index of erection. Dissection as well as stimulation of the DNP elicited a comparable increase in Fos staining. Labeling was present in the dorsal horn, the dorsal gray commissure, and the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, supporting the hypothesis of direct or indirect afferent projection from the penis and penile sheath in these areas. No change in ICP was observed in these rats. Stimulation of the DNP elicited both increased Fos labeling and ICP after spinalization, demonstrating the presence of a supraspinal inhibitory control exerted on the polysynaptic intraspinal circuitry responsible for reflexive penile erection.

  9. [Effect of triptolide on iNOS and SP expressions in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion of rats with adjuvant arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Xu-Dong; Lu, Zhuo-Hui; Wei, Deng-Ming

    2014-05-01

    To observe the analgesic effect of triptolide (TP) of high, middle and low doses on rats with adjuvant arthritis (AA), and the expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and substance P (SP) in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of corresponding sections, in order to discuss the possible mechanism for the analgesic effect of TP on rats with adjuvant arthritis. Fifty SD rats were selected and randomly divided into the normal group (group A), the model group (group B), and TP low (group C), middle (group D), high (group E) dose groups. Except for the group A, all of the remaining groups were injected with 0.1 mL of Freund's complete adjuvant through their right rear toes to establish the model. At 14 d after the model establishment, rats in C, D and E groups were intraperitoneally injected with different doses of TP (0.1 mg x kg(-1) for the group C, 0.2 mg x kg(-1) for the group D, 0.4 mg x kg(-1) for the group E) once a day for 9 days. Then the 50% mechanical withdraw threshold (MWT) was determined. And the expressions of iNOS and SP in lumbar5 (L5) spinal dorsal horn and DRG were detected with the immunohistochemical method. The 50% MWT of rats in the group B was significantly lower than that of the group A (P effect relationship. The immunohistochemical results indicated that the iNOS and SP expressions significantly increased in the group B (P effect relationship. TP shows a good analgesic effect on AA, and could inhibit the iNOS and SP expressions in spinal dorsal horn and DRG in rats with adjuvant arthritis, which may be one of action mechanisms for the analgesic effect of TP.

  10. Influence of sectioning location on age estimates from common carp dorsal spines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Carson J.; Klein, Zachary B.; Terrazas, Marc M.; Quist, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal spines have been shown to provide precise age estimates for Common CarpCyprinus carpio and are commonly used by management agencies to gain information on Common Carp populations. However, no previous studies have evaluated variation in the precision of age estimates obtained from different sectioning locations along Common Carp dorsal spines. We evaluated the precision, relative readability, and distribution of age estimates obtained from various sectioning locations along Common Carp dorsal spines. Dorsal spines from 192 Common Carp were sectioned at the base (section 1), immediately distal to the basal section (section 2), and at 25% (section 3), 50% (section 4), and 75% (section 5) of the total length of the dorsal spine. The exact agreement and within-1-year agreement among readers was highest and the coefficient of variation lowest for section 2. In general, age estimates derived from sections 2 and 3 had similar age distributions and displayed the highest concordance in age estimates with section 1. Our results indicate that sections taken at ≤ 25% of the total length of the dorsal spine can be easily interpreted and provide precise estimates of Common Carp age. The greater consistency in age estimates obtained from section 2 indicates that by using a standard sectioning location, fisheries scientists can expect age-based estimates of population metrics to be more comparable and thus more useful for understanding Common Carp population dynamics.

  11. A role for biliverdin IXα in dorsal axis development of Xenopus laevis embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchuk, Kenneth H.; Contin, Jennifer M.; Dziedzic, T. Scott; Feng, Zhongling; French, Thayer C.; Heffron, Gregory J.; Montorzi, Marcelo

    2002-01-01

    The determinants of Xenopus laevis embryos that act before their first cell division are mandatory for the formation of mRNas required to establish the dorsal axis. Although their chemical identities are unknown, a number of their properties have long been recognized. One of the determinants is present in the cytoplasm and is sensitive to UV light. Thus, exposing stage 1 embryos to either standard 254-nm or, as shown here, to 366-nm UV light during the 0.3–0.4 time fraction of their first cycle inactivates the cytoplasmic determinant. As a consequence, both types of irradiated embryos fail to express dorsal markers, e.g., goosecoid and chordin, without affecting formation of ventral markers, e.g., Vent-1. The developmental outcome is dorsal axis-deficient morphology. We report here that biliverdin IXα, a normal constituent of cytoplasmic yolk platelets, is photo-transformed by irradiation with either 254- or 366-nm UV light and that the transformation triggers the dorsal axis deficiency. When the 254- or 366-nm UV-irradiated embryos, fated to dorsal axis deficiency, are incubated solely with μM amounts of biliverdin, they recover and form the axis. In contrast, incubation with either in vitro photo-transformed biliverdin or biliverdin IXα dimethyl ester does not induce recovery. The results define an approach to produce dorsal axis-deficient embryos by photo-transforming its biliverdin by irradiation with 366-nm UV light and identify an unsuspected role for biliverdin IXα in X. laevis embryogenesis. PMID:11782548

  12. Hypothalamic and Other Connections with the Dorsal CA2 Area of the Mouse Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhenzhong; Gerfen, Charles R.; Young, W. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The CA2 area is an important, although relatively unexplored, component of the hippocampus. We used various tracers to provide a comprehensive analysis of CA2 connections in C57BL/6J mice. Using various adeno-associated viruses that express fluorescent proteins, we found a vasopressinergic projection from the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus (PVN) to the CA2, as well as a projection from pyramidal neurons of the CA2 to the supramammillary nuclei. These projections were confirmed by retrograde tracing. As expected, we observed CA2 afferent projections from neurons in ipsilateral entorhinal cortical layer II as well as from bilateral dorsal CA2 and CA3 using retrograde tracers. Additionally, we saw CA2 neuronal input from bilateral medial septal nuclei, vertical and horizontal limbs of the nucleus of diagonal band of Broca, supramammillary nuclei (SUM) and median raphe nucleus. Dorsal CA2 injections of adeno-associated virus expressing green fluorescent protein revealed axonal projections primarily to dorsal CA1, CA2 and CA3 bilaterally. No projection was detected to the entorhinal cortex from the dorsal CA2. These results are consistent with recent observations that the dorsal CA2 forms disynaptic connections with the entorhinal cortex to influence dynamic memory processing. Mouse dorsal CA2 neurons send bilateral projections to the medial and lateral septal nuclei, vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca and the SUM. Novel connections from the PVN and to the SUM suggest important regulatory roles for CA2 in mediating social and emotional input for memory processing. PMID:23172108

  13. Anatomic study and clinical significance of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the thoracic dura mater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongzi; Shi, Benchao; Zheng, Xuefeng; Zhou, Zhilai; Jin, Anmin; Ding, Zihai; Lv, Hai; Zhang, Hui

    2015-05-15

    A dissection-based study of 18 embalmed thoracic specimens. To investigate the properties and clinical significance of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the thoracic dura mater. Previously, we performed a comprehensive anatomic study on the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments in the lumbosacral and cervical regions, whereby we concluded that the ligaments were an anatomic factor leading to dural laceration and hemorrhage during flavectomy and laminectomy. Unfortunately, thus far, no systematic anatomic study has been undertaken to examine the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the thoracic dura mater. Eighteen adult embalmed cadavers were studied, and the morphology, orientation, attachment site, and distribution traits of the dorsal meningovertebal ligaments were observed. In addition, the length, width, or diameter and thickness of the ligaments were measured using a Vernier caliper. Two meningovertebal ligaments were removed for histological examination. In the thoracic region, the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments anchored the dura mater to the lamina or ligamentum flavum. The meningovertebral ligaments displayed a relatively even distribution along the upper thoracic region (T1-T7) and a gradual increase in frequency in the lower thoracic region from T7 to T12. The meningovertebral ligaments protrude into the dura and correspondingly become an integral part of the dura. Some ligaments are accompanied by or are attached to blood vessels. Histological examination of the meningovertebral ligaments revealed fibrous connective tissue. The dorsal meningovertebral ligaments exist between the dural sac and ligamentum flavum or lamina in the thoracic spine. Based on their anatomic features, meningovertebral ligaments may be one potential cause for dural laceration and epidural hemorrhage. We propose that, during thoracic flavectomy and laminectomy, the meningovertebral ligaments should first be identified and properly handled, thereby minimizing the occurrence

  14. Intradural communication between dorsal rootlets of spinal nerves: their clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Bilgehan; Tatarlı, Necati; Ceylan, Davut; Keleş, Evren; Çavdar, Safiye

    2015-06-01

    Anatomical and surgical textbooks give almost no attention to the intradural communications between dorsal rootlets of adjacent spinal nerves. These communications can be of significance in various neurosurgical procedures and clinical conditions of the region. The spinal cord of six formaldehyde-fixed cadavers was dissected from C1-S5. The dorsal rootlets of the spinal nerves were exposed via a posterior approach and communications between adjacent spinal nerves were documented. The frequency of communication between adjacent dorsal rootlets of the spinal nerves showed variations among spinal levels. Thirty-eight dorsal rootlet communications were observed in six cadavers (12 sides) and 20 (52.6%) were at cervical levels, 14 (36.8%) at thoracic levels, and four (10.5%) at lumbar levels. The majority of communications were observed on the left side (65.8%). Communications were most frequently observed at cervical (C4-C5, C5-C6) and upper thoracic (T1-T2) levels and seen least frequently at lower thoracic and lumbar levels. No communications were observed at sacral levels. Five types of communication were observed: I. oblique ascending, II. oblique descending III. short Y, IV. long Y and V shaped. None of the communication extended beyond one segment at any spinal level. The occurrence of such dorsal rootlet communications ranged from 3 to 7 for each cadaver and the mean was 4.8 ± 1.3. Histological sections from various levels of the dorsal rootlet communications showed that all consisted of myelinated fibers of varying diameters. Such communications may lead to misinterpretation of the pathology on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms and also should be considered in rhizotomy.

  15. Sobre el vaciado dorsal de la Dama de Elche: otra observación

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Fernández, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    La Dama de Elche y la Dama de Caudete presentan cavidades en sus zonas dorsales con capacidades relativamente pequeñas y con las paredes sin restos de haber contenido algo que, como los restos de las cremaciones de difuntos, pudieran dejar testimonio de lo en ellas depositado. Ello sugiere aludir a su posible relación con ciertas esculturas egipcias de época ptolomaica que también presentan cavidades dorsales contenedoras de papiros con textos del Libro de los Muertos, de tejidos o de figuril...

  16. [Comparison of ventral and dorsal lymph node metastases of obturator nerve in radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Kato, Haruaki; Inoue, Hiroo; Komiyama, Itsuki; Yoneyama, Takehisa; Nakazawa, Koh; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the significance of complete dissection of the dorsal lymph node of the obturator nerve during radical prostatectomy. Fifty-six patients undergoing open radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection for treatment of prostate cancer were included in this study. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy and radiation therapy were not performed in any of the patients. First, pelvic lymph node dissection was performed between the external iliac vein and obturator nerve and classified as "ventral lymph node of the obturator nerve". Then, the tissue located in the area between the obturator nerve and the surface of the obturator internus muscle was removed and classified as "dorsal lymph node of the obturator nerve". Both lymph nodes were meticulously examined by identical pathologist. Lymph node yields, lymph node positive rate, and the factors associated with lymph node metastasis were studied. Eight of the 56 patients had pelvic lymph node metastases (6 were high risk and 2 were intermediate risk according to the D'Amico's criteria). In the 8 node-positive patients, only 1 patient had positive lymph node in "ventral lymph node of the obturator nerve" exclusively. Four patients had positive lymph node exclusively in "dorsal lymph node of the obturator nerve" and 3 patients had in both "ventral and dorsal lymph nodes of the obturator nerve". The total lymph node yields from "ventral lymph node of the obturator nerve" and "dorsal lymph node of the obturator nerve" were 459 (8.2 per patient) and 117 (2.1 per patient), respectively. The total numbers of positive lymph nodes from "ventral lymph node of the obturator nerve" and "dorsal lymph node of the obturator nerve" were 6 and 12, respectively. Lymph node positive rate was significantly higher in "dorsal lymph node of the obturator nerve" (10%) than "ventral lymph node of the obturator nerve" (1.3%) (P or = 20 ng ml), Gleason score sum at prostate biopsy (> or = 9), and lymph node yield (> or = 16

  17. Fanconi anemia with concurrent thumb polydactyly and dorsal dimelia: a case report with discussion of embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is known to be associated with radial ray deficiency (thumb and radius hypoplasia), and its embryological basis remains to be poorly understood. We describe a rare case of Fanconi anemia with concurrent thumb polydactyly and dorsal dimelia. The embryological basis of limb abnormalities in Fanconi anemia patients is thought to be based on the complex interactions between the apical ectodermal ridge (where Fanconi anemia genes are expressed) and both the mesoderm (where Spalt-like 4 (SALL4) and Sonic hedgehog (SHH) are located and which are responsible for radial ray deficiency, thumb polydactyly, and triphalangism) and the dorsoventral axis (an error in that axis leads to dorsal dimelia).

  18. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damodaran, T.V., E-mail: tdamodar@nccu.edu [Dept of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Dept of Biology, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707 (United States); Attia, M.K. [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Abou-Donia, M.B., E-mail: donia@mc.duke.edu [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    analysis revealed that the order of severity of damage declines from the spino-cerebellar, ventral, and dorsal tract respectively, suggesting neuroanatomical specificity. Thus, early activation of cell death and cell survival processes may play significant role in the clinical progression and syndromic clinical feature presentation of OPIDN. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple mechanisms of neurodegeneration were indicated in a study on OPIDN model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Altered expressions of BCL2 and GADD45 were recorded in various tissues of CNS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple anomalous cellular (neuronal and astroglial) features were recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anatomical specificity of the neurodegeneration was described.

  19. Functional Outcomes of Childhood Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy 20 to 28 Years Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, T S; Liu, Jenny L; Edwards, Caleb; Walter, Deanna M; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2017-05-17

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is a surgical method used to treat childhood spastic cerebral palsy (CP). However, the effects of early SDR on functional outcomes and quality of life decades later in adulthood remains to be elucidated. To evaluate the long-term outcomes in terms of satisfaction and mobility of adult patients who received childhood SDR. Adult patients who received SDR in childhood were surveyed. The survey questionnaire asked about demographic information, quality of life, health outcomes, SDR surgical outcomes, ambulation, manual ability, pain, braces/orthotics, post-SDR treatment, living situation, education level, and work status. Our study included 95 patients. The age that patients received SDR was between two and 18 years. The age at the time of survey was between 23 and 37 years (mean ± S.D., 30.2 ± 3.6 years). Post-SDR follow-up ranged from 20 to 28 years (mean ± S.D., 24.3 ± 2.2 years). Seventy-nine percent of patients had spastic diplegia, 20% had spastic quadriplegia, and one percent had spastic triplegia. Ninety-one percent of patients felt that SDR impacted positively the quality of life and two percent felt that the surgery impacted negatively the quality of life after SDR. Compared to pre-operative ambulatory function, 42% reported higher level of ambulation and 42% ambulated in the same level. Eighty-eight percent of patients would recommend the procedure to others and two percent would not. Thirty-eight percent reported pain, mostly in the back and lower limbs, with mean pain level 4.2 ± 2.3 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). Decreased sensation in patchy areas of the lower limbs that did not affect daily life was reported by eight percent of patients. Scoliosis was diagnosed in 31%. The severity of scoliosis is unknown. Only three percent of them underwent spinal fusion. Fifty-seven percent of patients required some orthopedic surgery after SDR. The soft-tissue tendon lengthening procedures included lengthening on

  20. Local field potential correlates of auditory working memory in primate dorsal temporal pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, James; Ng, Chi-Wing; Poremba, Amy

    2016-06-01

    Dorsal temporal pole (dTP) is a cortical region at the rostral end of the superior temporal gyrus that forms part of the ventral auditory object processing pathway. Anatomical connections with frontal and medial temporal areas, as well as a recent single-unit recording study, suggest this area may be an important part of the network underlying auditory working memory (WM). To further elucidate the role of dTP in auditory WM, local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the left dTP region of two rhesus macaques during an auditory delayed matching-to-sample (DMS) task. Sample and test sounds were separated by a 5-s retention interval, and a behavioral response was required only if the sounds were identical (match trials). Sensitivity of auditory evoked responses in dTP to behavioral significance and context was further tested by passively presenting the sounds used as auditory WM memoranda both before and after the DMS task. Average evoked potentials (AEPs) for all cue types and phases of the experiment comprised two small-amplitude early onset components (N20, P40), followed by two broad, large-amplitude components occupying the remainder of the stimulus period (N120, P300), after which a final set of components were observed following stimulus offset (N80OFF, P170OFF). During the DMS task, the peak amplitude and/or latency of several of these components depended on whether the sound was presented as the sample or test, and whether the test matched the sample. Significant differences were also observed among the DMS task and passive exposure conditions. Comparing memory-related effects in the LFP signal with those obtained in the spiking data raises the possibility some memory-related activity in dTP may be locally produced and actively generated. The results highlight the involvement of dTP in auditory stimulus identification and recognition and its sensitivity to the behavioral significance of sounds in different contexts. This article is part of a Special

  1. Dorsal root potential produced by a TTX-insensitive micro-circuitry in the turtle spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Delgado-Lezama, R; Hounsgaard, J

    2000-01-01

    1, The mechanisms underlying the dorsal root potential (DRP) were studied in transverse slices of turtle spinal cord. DRPs were evoked by stimulating one filament in a dorsal root and were recorded from another such filament. 2. The DRP evoked at supramaximal stimulus intensity was reduced...

  2. Burst-generating neurones in the dorsal horn in an in vitro preparation of the turtle spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1996-01-01

    1. In transverse slices of the spinal cord of the turtle, intracellular recordings were used to characterize and analyse the responses to injected current and activation of primary afferents in dorsal horn neurones. 2. A subpopulation of neurones, with cell bodies located centrally in the dorsal...

  3. [Anatomical study of muscular latissimus dorsi surface vascularized by the transverse branch of thoraco-dorsal artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, F; Pinatel, B; Shipkov, H; Mertens, P; Rouviere, O; Braye, F; Mojallal, A

    2014-10-01

    The latissimus dorsi muscle flap is a type V according to Mathes and Nahai. It is vascularized by a proximal main pedicle represented by the thoraco-dorsal pedicle and pedicle distal accessory represented by the dorsal branches of the posterior intercostal arteries. The main thoraco-dorsal pedicle has a descending branch and a transverse branch. This anatomical study clarifies the muscular territory vascularized by the transverse branch of thoraco-dorsal artery for a secondary use after harvesting a thoraco-dorsal artery perforator flap or a muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap. Our study focused on ten dissections latissimus dorsi muscle taken from five fresh cadavers chest, carried out within the University Department of Anatomy. The descending branch of thoraco-dorsal artery was ligated, the transverse branch was cannulated and injected with a mixture of barium sulfate/gelatin. After freezing, a static angiotomodensitometry (3D) of each flap was performed. The average muscular surface vascularized by the transverse branch is measured at 80% (77% minimum value, maximum value 83%) of the complete latissimus dorsi muscle. Intermuscular connections between the two branches of thoraco-dorsal pedicle were shown. The use of a ipsilateral latissimus dorsi muscle is a therapeutic option after harvesting a thoraco-dorsal artery perforator flap (TAP) or a muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap (MSLD-flap). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The double dipole model of theta rhythm generation: Simulation of laminar field potential profiles in dorsal hippocampus of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.; Boer, J.; Lopes da silva, F.H.; van Rotterdam, A.

    1982-01-01

    A set of compartmental models of CA1 pyramidal, granular and polymorph cells of the dorsal hippocampus have been used to simulate membrane potentials generated by synaptic activation at various levels along these cells. From the membrane potential distributions the field potentials in dorsal CA1 and

  5. THE USE OF SPONGOSTAN-WRAPPED DICED CARTILAGE GRAFT FOR OBTANINING A REGULAR DORSAL CONTOUR IN RHINOPLASTY: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Tuncel

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: As a result, we can say that spongostan wrapped diced cartilages graft seems to be a cheap, safe and effective method for obtaining a nice nasal dorsal contouring as well as for correcting and preventing of dorsal irregularities in rhinoplasty. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 12-16

  6. Preterm Birth Affects Dorsal-Stream Functioning Even after Age 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A.; Duret, M.; Mancini, J.; Gire, C.; Deruelle, C.

    2009-01-01

    With increasing numbers of preterm infants surviving, the impact of preterm birth on later cognitive development presents a major interest. This study investigates the impact of preterm birth on later dorsal- and ventral-stream functioning. An atypical pattern of performance was found for preterm children relative to full-term controls, but in the…

  7. Up-regulation of Robo1 in dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-05

    Jan 5, 2012 ... peripheral nervous system, this study investigated the expression profile of Robo1 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats following sciatic nerve transection (SNT). Adult Sprague-Dawley rats that were untreated (n = 8), or received SNT (n = 40), were analyzed. DRG from each treatment group at days.

  8. Up-regulation of Robo1 in dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To better understand the role of Robo in peripheral nervous system, this study investigated the expression profile of Robo1 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats following sciatic nerve transection (SNT). Adult Sprague-Dawley rats that were untreated (n = 8), or received SNT (n = 40), were analyzed. DRG from each ...

  9. Preoperative MRI findings and functional outcome after selective dorsal rhizotomy in children with bilateral spasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunt, S.; Becher, J.G.S.J.S.; van Schie, P.E.M.; van Ouwerkerk, W.J.R.; Ahmadi, N.; Vermeulen, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify MRI characteristics that may predict the functional effect of selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) in children with bilateral spastic paresis. Methods: We performed SDR in a group of 36 patients. The gross motor functioning measure-66 (GMFM-66) was applied before and after SDR.

  10. Uncovering a context-specific connectional fingerprint of human dorsal premotor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moisa, Marius; Siebner, Hartwig R; Pohmann, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Primate electrophysiological and lesion studies indicate a prominent role of the left dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) in action selection based on learned sensorimotor associations. Here we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to human left PMd at low or high intensity while right-handed ...

  11. The Dorsal Attention Network Reflects Both Encoding Load and Top-down Control during Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerus, Steve; Péters, Frédéric; Bouffier, Marion; Cowan, Nelson; Phillips, Christophe

    2018-02-01

    The dorsal attention network is consistently involved in verbal and visual working memory (WM) tasks and has been associated with task-related, top-down control of attention. At the same time, WM capacity has been shown to depend on the amount of information that can be encoded in the focus of attention independently of top-down strategic control. We examined the role of the dorsal attention network in encoding load and top-down memory control during WM by manipulating encoding load and memory control requirements during a short-term probe recognition task for sequences of auditory (digits, letters) or visual (lines, unfamiliar faces) stimuli. Encoding load was manipulated by presenting sequences with small or large sets of memoranda while maintaining the amount of sensory stimuli constant. Top-down control was manipulated by instructing participants to passively maintain all stimuli or to selectively maintain stimuli from a predefined category. By using ROI and searchlight multivariate analysis strategies, we observed that the dorsal attention network encoded information for both load and control conditions in verbal and visuospatial modalities. Decoding of load conditions was in addition observed in modality-specific sensory cortices. These results highlight the complexity of the role of the dorsal attention network in WM by showing that this network supports both quantitative and qualitative aspects of attention during WM encoding, and this is in a partially modality-specific manner.

  12. Role of sequence encoded κB DNA geometry in gene regulation by Dorsal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrinal, Nirotpal; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins of the Rel family can act as both transcriptional activators and repressors. However, mechanism that discerns the ‘activator/repressor’ functions of Rel-proteins such as Dorsal (Drosophila homologue of mammalian NFκB) is not understood. Using genomic, biophysical and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that the underlying principle of this functional specificity lies in the ‘sequence-encoded structure’ of the κB-DNA. We show that Dorsal-binding motifs exist in distinct activator and repressor conformations. Molecular dynamics of DNA-Dorsal complexes revealed that repressor κB-motifs typically have A-tract and flexible conformation that facilitates interaction with co-repressors. Deformable structure of repressor motifs, is due to changes in the hydrogen bonding in A:T pair in the ‘A-tract’ core. The sixth nucleotide in the nonameric κB-motif, ‘A’ (A6) in the repressor motifs and ‘T’ (T6) in the activator motifs, is critical to confer this functional specificity as A6 → T6 mutation transformed flexible repressor conformation into a rigid activator conformation. These results highlight that ‘sequence encoded κB DNA-geometry’ regulates gene expression by exerting allosteric effect on binding of Rel proteins which in turn regulates interaction with co-regulators. Further, we identified and characterized putative repressor motifs in Dl-target genes, which can potentially aid in functional annotation of Dorsal gene regulatory network. PMID:21890896

  13. Dorsal-ventral patterning in amphioxus: current understanding, unresolved issues, and future directions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozmiková, Iryna; Yu, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 10-12 (2017), s. 601-610 ISSN 0214-6282 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-21285J Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : dorsal-ventral patterning * organizer * signaling pathway * chordate * evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.981, year: 2016

  14. Percutaneous Dorsal Instrumentation of Vertebral Burst Fractures: Value of Additional Percutaneous Intravertebral Reposition—Cadaver Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Krüger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The treatment of vertebral burst fractures is still controversial. The aim of the study is to evaluate the purpose of additional percutaneous intravertebral reduction when combined with dorsal instrumentation. Methods. In this biomechanical cadaver study twenty-eight spine segments (T11-L3 were used (male donors, mean age 64.9 ± 6.5 years. Burst fractures of L1 were generated using a standardised protocol. After fracture all spines were allocated to four similar groups and randomised according to surgical techniques (posterior instrumentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device without cement; and intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation. After treatment, 100000 cycles (100–600 N, 3 Hz were applied using a servohydraulic loading frame. Results. Overall anatomical restoration was better in all groups where the intravertebral reduction device was used (p0.05. All techniques decreased narrowing of the spinal canal. After loading, clearance could be maintained in all groups fitted with the intravertebral reduction device. Narrowing increased in the group treated with dorsal instrumentation. Conclusions. For height and anatomical restoration, the combination of an intravertebral reduction device with dorsal instrumentation showed significantly better results than sole dorsal instrumentation.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Dorsal Proximal Synovial Plica of the Equine Metacarpo-/Metatarsophalangeal Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauspie, S; Vanderperren, K; Gielen, I; Pardon, B; Kromhout, K; Martens, A; Saunders, J H

    2016-02-01

    A synovial plica is present at the dorsoproximal aspect of the fetlock joint. The objective of this study was to describe the location of the synovial plica during induced hyperextension using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. For this study 20 cadaver limbs from five Warmblood horses were used. Measurements were made of the dorsal; palmar/plantar length and the thickness of the plica with the joint in a normal position. During induced hyperextension of the joint, the position of the plica was described; the dorsal angle of extension and angle of contact between the proximal phalanx (P1) and the condyle were measured. The dorsal length differed between front/hind limbs and between the medial/lateral aspect of the joint. The angle of contact between P1 and condyle differed between front/hind limbs; between the lateral and medial aspect of the joint and between different positions of the plica. Four different positions of the plica were observed: shortened with the tip curved towards palmar/plantar; projecting distally; projecting towards dorsal and projecting distally with the tip interposed between P1 and the condyle. During induced hyperextension, a close relation is present between the synovial plica, P1 and the condyle with a variable position of the plica; which is suggestive for a contact interface between P1 and the metacarpal/metatarsal bone. However the plica does not seem to act consistently as a cushioning surface. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Human Dorsal Striatum Encodes Prediction Errors during Observational Learning of Instrumental Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jeffrey C.; Dunne, Simon; Furey, Teresa; O'Doherty, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a key role in the learning and expression of instrumental reward associations that are acquired through direct experience. However, not all learning about instrumental actions require direct experience. Instead, humans and other animals are also capable of acquiring instrumental actions by observing the experiences of…

  17. Modified first dorsal metacarpal artery island flap for sensory reconstruction of thumb pulp defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Chen, C; Li, J; Yang, X; Zhang, H; Wang, Z

    2016-02-01

    Restoration of tactile sensation after reconstruction of a thumb pulp defect is import for hand function. We describe our clinical experience using a modified first dorsal metacarpal artery island flap innervated by the radial dorsal branch of the proper digital nerve and the terminal branch of the superficial radial nerve in 20 consecutive cases. The results were compared with 25 patients treated by the conventional Foucher's first dorsal metacarpal artery flap without nerve repair. At the final follow-up, flap sensation was assessed using static two-point discrimination and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing. All flaps survived uneventfully in both groups. At the final follow-up, the mean values for static two-point discrimination and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing in the study group were significantly different from the values in the control group. The modified first dorsal metacarpal artery island flap provides a reliable and simple option for sensory reconstruction of thumb pulp defects. Therapeutic, level III. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Reconciling Time, Space and Function: A New Dorsal-Ventral Stream Model of Sentence Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We present a new dorsal-ventral stream framework for language comprehension which unifies basic neurobiological assumptions (Rauschecker & Scott, 2009) with a cross-linguistic neurocognitive sentence comprehension model (eADM; Bornkessel & Schlesewsky, 2006). The dissociation between (time-dependent) syntactic structure-building and…

  19. Whole transcriptome expression of trigeminal ganglia compared to dorsal root ganglia in Rattus Norvegicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette Johanna Antonia; Christensen, Rikke Elgaard; Pedersen, Sara Hougaard

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal ganglia (TG) subserving the head and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) subserving the rest of the body are homologous handling sensory neurons. Differences exist, as a number of signaling substances cause headache but no pain in the rest of the body. To date, very few genes involved in...

  20. The Role of the Ventral and Dorsal Pathways in Reading Chinese Characters and English Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yafeng; Yang, Yanhui; Desroches, Amy S.; Liu, Li; Peng, Danling

    2011-01-01

    Previous literature in alphabetic languages suggests that the occipital-temporal region (the ventral pathway) is specialized for automatic parallel word recognition, whereas the parietal region (the dorsal pathway) is specialized for serial letter-by-letter reading (and). However, few studies have directly examined the role of the ventral and…

  1. Flight performance, energetics and water turnover of tippler pigeons with a harness and dorsal load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessaman, J.A.; Workman, G.W.; Fuller, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    We measured carbon dioxide production and water efflux of 12 tippler pigeons (Columba spp.) during seven experimental flights using the doubly labeled water (DLW) method. Prior to the experiment birds were randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group flew as controls (no load or harness) on all seven flights. The other group wore a harness on two flights, a dorsal load/harness package (weighing about 5% of a bird's mass) on two flights, and they were without a load in three flights. Flight duration of pigeons with only a harness and with a dorsal load/harness package was 21 and 26% less, respectively, than the controls. Pigeons wearing a harness, or wearing a dorsal load/harness package lost water 50-90%, and 57-100% faster, respectively, than control pigeons. The mean CO2 production of pigeons wearing a harness or a load/harness package was not significantly different than pigeons without a harness or load. The small sample sizes and large variability in DLW measuremets precluded a good test of the energetic cost of flying with a harness and dorsal load.

  2. fMRI Evidence for Dorsal Stream Processing Abnormality in Adults Born Preterm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaminade, Thierry; Leutcher, Russia Ha-Vinh; Millet, Veronique; Deruelle, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the consequences of premature birth on the functional neuroanatomy of the dorsal stream of visual processing. fMRI was recorded while sixteen healthy participants, 8 (two men) adults (19 years 6 months old, SD 10 months) born premature (mean gestational age 30 weeks), referred to as Premas, and 8 (two men) matched controls (20…

  3. Ventilation induced apnea and its effect on dorsal brainstem inspiratory neurones in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Balnave, Ron J.; Chow, Chin M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of mechanical ventilation (MV) on inherent breathing and on dorsal brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) respiratory cell function. In pentobarbitone-anaesthetised rats, application of MV at combined high frequencies and volumes (representing

  4. Stimulus selectivity in dorsal and ventral prefrontal cortex after training in working memory tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Travis; Qi, Xue-Lian; Stanford, Terrence R.; Constantinidis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is known to represent different types of information in working memory. Contrasting theories propose that the dorsal and ventral regions of the lateral prefrontal cortex are innately specialized for the representation of spatial and non-spatial information respectively (Goldman-Rakic, 1996), or that the two regions are shaped by the demands of cognitive tasks imposed on them (Miller, 2000). To resolve this issue, we recorded from neurons in the two regions, prior to and at multiple stages of training monkeys on visual working memory tasks. Prior to training, substantial functional differences were present between the two regions. Dorsal prefrontal cortex exhibited higher overall responsiveness to visual stimuli and higher selectivity for spatial information. After training, stimulus selectivity generally decreased, though dorsal prefrontal cortex retained higher spatial selectivity regardless of task performed. Ventral prefrontal cortex appeared to be affected to a greater extent by the nature of task performed. Our results indicate that regional specialization for stimulus selectivity is present in the primate prefrontal cortex regardless of training. Dorsal areas of the prefrontal cortex are inherently organized to represent spatial information and training has little influence on this spatial bias. Ventral areas are biased toward non-spatial information although they are more influenced by training both in terms of activation and changes in stimulus selectivity. PMID:21525266

  5. Dissociation of retinal and headcentric disparity signals in dorsal human cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnoldussen, D.M.; Goossens, J.; Berg, A.V. van den

    2015-01-01

    Recent fMRI studies have shown fusion of visual motion and disparity signals for shape perception (Ban et al., 2012), and unmasking camouflaged surfaces (Rokers et al., 2009), but no such interaction is known for typical dorsal motion pathway tasks, like grasping and navigation. Here, we investigate

  6. Phenotypic variation in dorsal fin morphology of coastal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) off Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morteo, Eduardo; Rocha-Olivares, Axayácatl; Morteo, Rodrigo; Weller, David W

    2017-01-01

    Geographic variation in external morphology is thought to reflect an interplay between genotype and the environment. Morphological variation has been well-described for a number of cetacean species, including the bottlenose dolphin ( Tursiops truncatus ). In this study we analyzed dorsal fin morphometric variation in coastal bottlenose dolphins to search for geographic patterns at different spatial scales. A total of 533 dorsal fin images from 19 available photo-identification catalogs across the three Mexican oceanic regions (Pacific Ocean n  = 6, Gulf of California n  = 6 and, Gulf of Mexico n  = 7) were used in the analysis. Eleven fin shape measurements were analyzed to evaluate fin polymorphism through multivariate tests. Principal Component Analysis on log-transformed standardized ratios explained 94% of the variance. Canonical Discriminant Function Analysis on factor scores showed separation among most study areas ( p  < 0.05) with exception of the Gulf of Mexico where a strong morphometric cline was found. Possible explanations for the observed differences are related to environmental, biological and evolutionary processes. Shape distinction between dorsal fins from the Pacific and those from the Gulf of California were consistent with previously reported differences in skull morphometrics and genetics. Although the functional advantages of dorsal fin shape remains to be assessed, it is not unlikely that over a wide range of environments, fin shape may represent a trade-off among thermoregulatory capacity, hydrodynamic performance and the swimming/hunting behavior of the species.

  7. Phenotypic variation in dorsal fin morphology of coastal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus off Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Morteo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Geographic variation in external morphology is thought to reflect an interplay between genotype and the environment. Morphological variation has been well-described for a number of cetacean species, including the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus. In this study we analyzed dorsal fin morphometric variation in coastal bottlenose dolphins to search for geographic patterns at different spatial scales. A total of 533 dorsal fin images from 19 available photo-identification catalogs across the three Mexican oceanic regions (Pacific Ocean n = 6, Gulf of California n = 6 and, Gulf of Mexico n = 7 were used in the analysis. Eleven fin shape measurements were analyzed to evaluate fin polymorphism through multivariate tests. Principal Component Analysis on log-transformed standardized ratios explained 94% of the variance. Canonical Discriminant Function Analysis on factor scores showed separation among most study areas (p < 0.05 with exception of the Gulf of Mexico where a strong morphometric cline was found. Possible explanations for the observed differences are related to environmental, biological and evolutionary processes. Shape distinction between dorsal fins from the Pacific and those from the Gulf of California were consistent with previously reported differences in skull morphometrics and genetics. Although the functional advantages of dorsal fin shape remains to be assessed, it is not unlikely that over a wide range of environments, fin shape may represent a trade-off among thermoregulatory capacity, hydrodynamic performance and the swimming/hunting behavior of the species.

  8. Coexistence of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Somatostatin in Nonpyramidal Neurons of the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Benoit, R.; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    This study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the neuropeptide somatostatin (SOM) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus. SOM and mAChRs were identified by immunocytochemistry employing antibody S309 and M35, respectively. Half of the

  9. Nicotinic receptors in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus differentially modulate contextual fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Justin W; Raybuck, Jonathan D; Gould, Thomas J

    2012-08-01

    Nicotine administration alters various forms of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Increasing work has found that the dorsal and ventral hippocampus differentially contribute to multiple behaviors. Thus, the present study examined whether the effects of nicotine in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus have distinct influences on contextual fear learning in male C57BL/6J mice. Direct infusion of nicotine into the dorsal hippocampus resulted in an enhancement of contextual fear learning, whereas nicotine infused into the ventral hippocampus resulted in deficits. Nicotine infusions into the ventral hippocampus did not alter hippocampus-independent cued fear conditioning or time spent in the open arm of the elevated plus maze, a measure of anxiety, suggesting that the effects are due to alterations in contextual learning and not other general processes. Finally, results from using direct infusions of MLA, a low-affinity α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, in conjunction with systemic nicotine, provide evidence that α7-nAChRs in the ventral hippocampus mediate the detrimental effect of ventral hippocampal nicotine on contextual fear learning. These results suggest that with systemic nicotine administration, competition exists between the dorsal and ventral hippocampus for behavioral control over contextual learning. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Sexual Dimorphism and Geographic Variation in Dorsal Fin Features of Australian Humpback Dolphins, Sousa sahulensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexander M; Bejder, Lars; Parra, Guido J; Cagnazzi, Daniele; Hunt, Tim; Smith, Jennifer L; Allen, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Determining the sex of free-ranging cetaceans can be challenging. Sexual dimorphism among external features may allow inferences on sex, but such patterns may be difficult to detect and are often confounded by age and geographic variation. Dorsal fin images of 107 female and 54 male Australian humpback dolphins, Sousa sahulensis, from Western Australia (WA) and Queensland (QLD) were used to investigate sex, age and geographic differences in colouration, height/length quotient and number of notches. Adult males exhibited more dorsal fin notches (pdolphins, which could potentially be applied to populations throughout their range. In contrast to adults, presumed immature animals showed little or no loss of pigmentation or spotting; however, the rate of development of these features remains unknown. There were pronounced differences between QLD and WA in the intensity of spotting on dorsal fins and the extent of pigmentation loss around the posterior insertion and trailing edge of the dorsal fin. While based on a limited sample size, these geographic differences may have conservation implications in terms of population subdivision and should be investigated further. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reward Processing by the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus: 5-HT and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Minmin; Zhou, Jingfeng; Liu, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) represents one of the most sensitive reward sites in the brain. However, the exact relationship between DRN neuronal activity and reward signaling has been elusive. In this review, we will summarize anatomical, pharmacological, optogenetics, and electrophysiological studies on the functions and circuit mechanisms of…

  12. New understanding of dorsal dysraphism with lipoma (lipomyeloschisis): radiologic evaluation and surgical correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidich, T.P. (Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL); McLone, D.G.; Mutluer, S.

    1983-06-01

    The spinal anomaly designated dorsal dysraphism with lipoma (lipomyeloschisis) consists of skin-covered, focal spina bifida; focal partial clefting of the dorsal half of the spinal cord; continuity of the dorsal cleft with the central canal of the cord above (and occasionally below) the cleft; deficiency of the dura underlying the spina bifida; deep extension of subcutaneous lipoma through the spina bifida and the dural deficiency to insert directly into the cleft on the dorsal half of the cord; variable cephalic extension of lipoma into the contiguous central canal of the cord; and variable ballooning of the subarachnoid space to form an associated meningocele. The variable individual expressions of the anomaly are best understood by reference to their archetypal concept. Careful analysis of radiographic and surgical findings in human lipomyeloschisis and correlation with an animal model of lipomyeloschisis indicate that plain spine radiographs and high-resolution metrizamide computed tomographic myelography successfully delineate the precise anatomic derangements associated with lipomyeloschisis and provide the proper basis for planning surgical therapy of this condition.

  13. Xenon inhibits excitatory but not inhibitory transmission in rat spinal cord dorsal horn neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The molecular targets for the promising gaseous anaesthetic xenon are still under investigation. Most studies identify N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors as the primary molecular target for xenon, but the role of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors is less clear. In this study we evaluated the effect of xenon on excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord using in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat spinal cord slices. We further evaluated the effects of xenon on innocuous and noxious stimuli using in vivo patch-clamp method. Results In vitro, xenon decreased the amplitude and area under the curve of currents induced by exogenous NMDA and AMPA and inhibited dorsal root stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents. Xenon decreased the amplitude, but not the frequency, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. There was no discernible effect on miniature or evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents or on the current induced by inhibitory neurotransmitters. In vivo, xenon inhibited responses to tactile and painful stimuli even in the presence of NMDA receptor antagonist. Conclusions Xenon inhibits glutamatergic excitatory transmission in the superficial dorsal horn via a postsynaptic mechanism. There is no substantial effect on inhibitory synaptic transmission at the concentration we used. The blunting of excitation in the dorsal horn lamina II neurons could underlie the analgesic effect of xenon. PMID:20444263

  14. Fatigue-associated changes in the electromyogram of the human first dorsal interosseous muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Zwarts, MJ; Kernell, D

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a clinically important symptom, often analyzed using electromyography (EMG). We analyzed fatigue reactions of the first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) during a maintained contraction at half-maximal force (1/2-MVC test). EMGs were recorded with large surface electrodes and,

  15. LOCUS-COERULEUS PROJECTIONS TO THE DORSAL MOTOR VAGUS NUCLEUS IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TERHORST, GJ; TOES, GJ; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1991-01-01

    The origin of the noradrenergic innervation of the preganglionic autonomic nuclei in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord is still controversial. In this investigation descending connections of the locus coeruleus to the dorsal motor vagus nucleus in the rat are studied with Phaseolus vulgaris

  16. Direct tactile stimulation of dorsal occipito-temporal cortex in a visual agnosic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Harriet A; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2009-06-23

    The human occipito-temporal cortex is preferentially activated by images of objects as opposed to scrambled images. Touching objects (versus textures) also activates this region. We used neuropsychological fMRI to probe whether dorsal regions of the lateral occipital cortex (LO) are activated in tactile recognition without mediation through visual recognition. We tested a patient (HJA) with visual agnosia due to bilateral lesions of the ventral occipito-temporal cortex but spared dorsal LO. HJA's recognition of visual objects was impaired. Nevertheless, his tactile recognition was preserved. We measured brain activity while participants viewed and touched objects and textures. There was overlapping activity in regions including LO and cerebellum for both stimuli for control participants, including new regions not before considered bimodal. For HJA, there were overlapping regions in the intact dorsal LO. Within a subset of the regions found in control participants, HJA showed activity only for tactile objects, suggesting that these regions are specifically involved in successful multimodal recognition. Activation of dorsal LO by tactile input is not secondary to visual recognition but can operate directly through tactile input.

  17. Effects of chronic dorsal column lesions on pelvic viscerosomatic convergent medullary reticular formation neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubscher, Charles H; Johnson, Richard D

    2004-12-01

    Single medullary reticular formation (MRF) neurons receive multiple somatovisceral convergent inputs originating from many different spinal and cranial nerves, including the pelvic nerve (PN), dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP), and the abdominal branches of the vagus. In a previous study, the input to MRF from the male genitalia was shown to be eliminated with chronic 30-day dorsal hemisection at the T8 spinal level. In this study, the effect of a smaller chronic lesion [dorsal column lesion (DCx)] on MRF neuronal responses was examined. Responses to bilateral electrical stimulation of the DNP remained. MRF neuronal responses to non-noxious (touch/stroke) levels of penile stimulation, however, were eliminated; only responses to noxious pinch remained. No differences were found for the number of neurons responding to noxious distention of the colon between the DCx and control groups. Although no differences were found across these groups for the percent MRF responses to vagal stimulation, the mean response latency for the DCx group was twice the sham-DCx/intact control group. Taken together, these results indicate that the MRF receives at least some of its input from the male genitalia via pathways located within the dorsal columns at the mid-thoracic spinal level.

  18. BMP regulates vegetal pole induction centres in early xenopus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachaliel, N; Re'Em-Kalma, Y; Eshed, O; Elias, S; Frank, D

    1998-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) plays an important role in mesoderm patterning in Xenopus. The ectopic expression of BMP-4 protein hyperventralizes embryos, whereas embryos expressing a BMP-2/4 dominant-negative receptor (DNR) are hyperdorsalized. Mesoderm is initially induced in the marginal zone by cells in the underlying vegetal pole. While much is known about BMP's expression and role in patterning the marginal zone, little is known about its early role in regulating vegetal mesoderm induction centre formation. The role of BMP in regulating formation of vegetal mesoderm inducing centres during early Xenopus development was examined. Ectopic BMP-4 expression in vegetal pole cells inhibited dorsal mesoderm induction but increased ventral mesoderm induction when recombined with animal cap ectoderm in Nieuwkoop explants. 32-cell embryos injected with BMP-4 RNA in the most vegetal blastomere tier were not hyperdorsalized by LiCl treatment. The ectopic expression of Smad or Mix.1 proteins in the vegetal pole also inhibited dorsal mesoderm induction in explants and embryos. Expression of the BMP 2/4 DNR in the vegetal pole increased dorsal mesoderm induction and inhibited ventral mesoderm induction in explants and embryos. These results support a role for BMP signalling in regulating ventral vegetal and dorsal vegetal mesoderm induction centre formation during early Xenopus development.

  19. Cost and quality of life outcome analysis of postoperative infections after subaxial dorsal cervical fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Benjamin D; Lubelski, Daniel; Alvin, Matthew D; Taub, Jason S; McGirt, Matthew J; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2015-04-01

    Infections following spine surgery negatively affect patient quality of life (QOL) and impose a significant financial burden on the health care system. Postoperative wound infections occur at higher rates following dorsal cervical procedures than ventral procedures. Quantifying the health outcomes and costs associated with infections following dorsal cervical procedures may help to guide treatment strategies to minimize the deleterious consequences of these infections. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine the cost and QOL outcomes affecting patients who developed deep wound infections following subaxial dorsal cervical spine fusions. The authors identified 22 (4.0%) of 551 patients undergoing dorsal cervical fusions who developed deep wound infections requiring surgical debridement. These patients were individually matched with control patients who did not develop infections. Health outcomes were assessed using the EQ-5D, Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and visual analog scale (VAS). QOL outcome measures were collected preoperatively and after 6 and 12 months. Health resource utilization was recorded from patient electronic medical records over an average follow-up of 18 months. Direct costs were estimated using Medicare national payment amounts, and indirect costs were based on patients' missed workdays and income. No significant differences in preoperative QOL scores were found between the 2 cohorts. At 6 months postsurgery, the noninfection cohort had significant pre- to postoperative improvement in EQ-5D (p = 0.02), whereas the infection cohort did not (p = 0.2). The noninfection cohort also had a significantly higher 6-month postoperative EQ-5D scores than the infection cohort (p = 0.04). At 1 year postsurgery, there was no significant difference in EQ-5D scores between the groups. Health care-associated costs for the infection cohort were significantly higher ($16,970 vs $7658; p financial burden of

  20. Assessing dorsal scute microchemistry for reconstruction of shortnose sturgeon life histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenritter, Matthew E.; Kinnison, Michael T.; Zydlewski, Gayle B.; Secor, David H.; Zydlewski, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    The imperiled status of sturgeons worldwide places priority on the identification and protection of critical habitats. We assessed the micro-structural and micro-chemical scope for a novel calcified structure, dorsal scutes, to be used for reconstruction of past habitat use and group separation in shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum). Dorsal scutes contained a dual-layered structure composed of a thin multi-layered translucent zone lying dorsally above a thicker multi-layered zone. Banding in the thick multi-layered zone correlated strongly with pectoral fin spine annuli supporting the presence of chronological structuring that could contain a chemical record of past environmental exposure. Trace element profiles (Sr:Ca), collected using both wavelength dispersive electron microprobe analysis and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry, suggest scutes record elemental information useful for tracing transitions between freshwater and marine environments. Moreover, mirror-image like Sr:Ca profiles were observed across the dual-zone structuring of the scute that may indicate duplication of the microchemical profile in a single structure. Additional element:calcium ratios measured in natal regions of dorsal scutes (Ba:Ca, Mg:Ca) suggest the potential for further refinement of techniques for identification of river systems of natal origin. In combination, our results provide proof of concept that dorsal scutes possess the necessary properties to be used as structures for reconstructions of past habitat use in sturgeons. Importantly, scutes may be collected non-lethally and with less injury than current structures, like otoliths and fin spines, affording an opportunity for broader application of microchemical techniques.