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Sample records for early disease manifestation

  1. Very early disease manifestations of macular telangiectasia type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, P.C.; Heeren, T.F.C.; Kupitz, E.H.; Holz, F.G.; Berendschot, T.T.J.M.

    Background: To report very early morphologic and functional alterations in patients with macular telangiectasia type 2. Methods: Patients with asymmetric disease manifestations, in whom retinal alterations characteristic for macular telangiectasia type 2 were present in one but not in the apparently

  2. Soft tissue manifestations of early rheumatic disease. Imaging with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treitl, M.; Panteleon, A.; Koerner, M.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Reiser, M.; Wirth, S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in early rheumatic diseases manifesting at the soft tissues of the hand using a retrospective analysis. A total of 186 MRI examinations of patients with clinical suspicion of a rheumatic disease were evaluated in a consensus reading by two experienced radiologists. All imaging patterns were assessed with respect to their type and localization. Under blinded and non-blinded conditions diagnoses were correlated with final clinical diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 45.7%) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA, 15.6%). The mean correlation between clinical and MRI diagnosis (r) was 0.75 in blinded and 0.853 in non-blinded reading (p [de

  3. Abnormal resting-state connectivity of motor and cognitive networks in early manifest Huntington's disease.

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    Wolf, R C; Sambataro, F; Vasic, N; Depping, M S; Thomann, P A; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Süssmuth, S D; Orth, M

    2014-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of multiple neural networks during the brain's 'resting state' could facilitate biomarker development in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and may provide new insights into the relationship between neural dysfunction and clinical symptoms. To date, however, very few studies have examined the functional integrity of multiple resting state networks (RSNs) in manifest HD, and even less is known about whether concomitant brain atrophy affects neural activity in patients. Using MRI, we investigated brain structure and RSN function in patients with early HD (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 20). For resting-state fMRI data a group-independent component analysis identified spatiotemporally distinct patterns of motor and prefrontal RSNs of interest. We used voxel-based morphometry to assess regional brain atrophy, and 'biological parametric mapping' analyses to investigate the impact of atrophy on neural activity. Compared with controls, patients showed connectivity changes within distinct neural systems including lateral prefrontal, supplementary motor, thalamic, cingulate, temporal and parietal regions. In patients, supplementary motor area and cingulate cortex connectivity indices were associated with measures of motor function, whereas lateral prefrontal connectivity was associated with cognition. This study provides evidence for aberrant connectivity of RSNs associated with motor function and cognition in early manifest HD when controlling for brain atrophy. This suggests clinically relevant changes of RSN activity in the presence of HD-associated cortical and subcortical structural abnormalities.

  4. Skin Manifestations of Endocrine Diseases.

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    Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine diseases may result in changes in cutaneous function and morphology, which cause various skin manifestations, including nonspecific or pathognomonic signs. Some of these manifestations are already known dermatologic diseases with only increased frequency in this patient group. As a result the skin may the play role of a screen displaying endocrine disorders, either due to hormone excess or deficiency. Awareness of the skin manifestations may permit prompt and adequate approach to the patients, and therefore facilitate the early diagnosis of the endocrine disease and even be life saving. Some of these manifestations may be recognized clinically, but sometimes they need to be confirmed histopathologically. In this article, many endocrine diseases and their associated skin lesions will be reviewed briefly.

  5. A Case of Early Disseminated Neurological Lyme Disease Followed by Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations

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    Vamsi Kantamaneni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease (LD is a tick-borne illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. An 80-year-old female from Pennsylvania, USA, presented to an outside hospital with fever, confusion, lower extremity weakness, and stool incontinence. CT head and MRI spine were unremarkable. An infectious work-up including lumbar puncture was negative. She was transferred to our tertiary care hospital. Patient was noted to have mild unilateral right-sided facial droop and a diffuse macular rash throughout the body. She denied any outdoor activities, tick bites, or previous rash. Intravenous ceftriaxone was started for suspected LD. The patient’s symptoms including facial droop resolved within 24 hours of antibiotic therapy. Polymerase chain reaction of the blood, IgM ELISA, and IgM Western blot testing for LD came back positive a few days after initiation of therapy. She was treated for a total of 21 days for neurological LD with complete symptom resolution. Not all patients have the classic “targetoid” EM rash on initial presentation, rash could develop after neurological manifestations, and prompt initiation of antibiotics without awaiting serology is paramount to making a quick and a full recovery. There should be a high index of suspicion for early disseminated LD, as presentations can be atypical.

  6. Erythema multiforme and persistent erythema as early cutaneous manifestations of Lyme disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttelaar, M L; Laeijendecker, R; Heinhuis, R J; Van Joost, T

    1997-01-01

    We report two cases of borreliosis (Lyme disease) with unusual cutaneous manifestations, erythema multiforme, and persistent erythema. The lesions in both of our patients had distinctive histopathologic features. To our knowledge, this is the first report of erythema multiforme and persistent

  7. Atypical manifestations of early syphilis

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    R V Koranne

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of 36 untreated patients with early syphilis revealed atypical variations namely; long incubation period of 101 days in I patient, more than 3 chancres in 1, undermined margin of the chancre along with tenderness in 1 and moderate to severe tenderness of the ulcers in 2 cases. In 3 patients there was no indurations of the ulcers. Three patients with primary syphilis had unilateral lymphadenitis, and in I case the lymph nodes were not only tender but showed tendency towardsmatingawell. Insecondarysyphilis, 11 out of 16 patients having condylomata lata had no other muco-cutaneous lesions. Concomitant presence of other venereal disease to account for the atypical manifestations was discounted- by appropriate laboratory tests, response to therapeutic agents and follow up.

  8. THE РERSONALITY PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH EARLY MANIFESTATIONS OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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    R. R. Bogdanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders that sometimes may precede motor dysfunction have an important value in Parkinson's disease, especially at its earlier stages. Personality characteristics of patients with Parkinson's disease have not been studied enough and require a  detailed assessment, because it is a  major factor contributing to treatment efficacy. Aim: To assess personality profiles of patients with early stages of Parkinson's disease and an impact of a dopamine receptor agonist on the personality profile. Materials and methods: We assessed 33 treatment-naïve patients with early symptoms of Parkinson's disease (Hoehn-Yahr stage I and II. The following scales were used before treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 months of treatment with pramipexol: for motor disorders (UPDRS, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, depressive disorders (MADRS, Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale and anxiety disorders (HARS, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, as well as personality profile (MMPI, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Results: The personality profile assessed by MMPI in patients with early stage Parkinson's disease was characterized by highest T scores on scales 2 (pessimism (74 [64; 86], 1 (neurotic excess control (67 [63; 74], 3  (emotional instability (64 [56; 70], 7 (anxiousness (63 [52; 70], 8 (autism (64 [58; 74], 0  (introversion (63 [59; 66]. This indicates basic pathopsychological characteristics of patients with early stages of the disease. In particular, their emotional sphere demonstrated anxiety- and depression-related affective disorders. Their personality structure was characterized by dysthymic, anxious, rigid and explosive traits, and susceptibility to hypochondriasis. With a background of a dramatic motivational conflict, frustration of high-level need in self-actualization and recognition due to a chronic disease with motor dysfunction triggered a depressive response type. Pharmacological treatment with

  9. Early manifestations of type 1 Gaucher disease in presymptomatic children diagnosed after parental carrier screening.

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    Yang, Amy C; Bier, Louise; Overbey, Jessica R; Cohen-Pfeffer, Jessica; Desai, Khyati; Desnick, Robert J; Balwani, Manisha

    2017-06-01

    The overall published experience with pediatric type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) has been based on ascertainment through clinical presentation of the disease. We describe the longitudinal follow-up in a presymptomatic pediatric cohort. The cohort includes children diagnosed with GD1, either prenatally or postnatally by molecular genetic testing, and followed for clinical care at our center from 1998 to 2016. All patients' parents were GBA mutation carriers identified through carrier screening programs. Longitudinal clinical, laboratory, and imaging data were obtained through chart review. Thirty-eight patients aged 1-18 years (mean at last visit 6.9 ± 4.1 years) were followed, including 32 p.N409S homozygotes and 6 p.N409S/p.R535H compound heterozygotes. At the last evaluation, a minority had hematological (5%), bone (15%), or linear growth (19%) issues. Only 12% had splenomegaly and 74% had moderate hepatomegaly. Chitotriosidase activity varied widely (6-5,640 nmol/hour/ml) and generally increased with age. Pediatric Gaucher severity scores (GSS) remained stable and within the mild-disease range for most (95%). Treatment for progressive disease during this period was recommended for four children. Most children with the p.N409S/p.N409S and p.N409S/p.R535H GD1 genotypes have minimal disease manifestations and progression during childhood and can be monitored using limited assessments. Those with other mutations may require additional monitoring. These data are valuable for newborn screening and counseling.Genet Med advance online publication 13 October 2016.

  10. Expression of C-Reactive Protein and Serum Amyloid A in Early to Late Manifestations of Lyme Disease.

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    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Li, Xueting; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-12-01

     Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, triggers host immune responses that affect the clinical outcome and are a source of biomarkers with diagnostic utility. Although adaptive immunity to B. burgdorferi has been extensively characterized, considerably less information is available about the development of innate acute-phase responses in Lyme disease. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the expression of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA), the prototype acute-phase response proteins, in the context of the varying manifestations associated with Lyme borreliosis.  Circulating concentrations of CRP and SAA in patients with a range of early to late objective manifestations of Lyme disease and in individuals with post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome were compared with those in healthy control groups.  CRP and SAA levels were significantly elevated in early localized and early disseminated Lyme disease but not in the later stages of active infection. Levels of CRP, but not SAA, were also found to be significantly increased in patients with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis and in those with post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.  These findings indicate that circulating CRP and SAA levels are highest when the concentration of spirochetes is greatest in skin and/or blood and that levels decline after the dissemination of the organism to extracutaneous sites in subsequent stages of infection. The data also suggest that antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis and post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome are associated with elevated CRP responses that are driven by inflammatory mechanisms distinct from those in active infection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

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    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  12. Sturge-Weber syndrome. Early manifestation and visualization of disease course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranzinger, E.; Huisman, T.A.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate ultrasound, MRI, and CT investigations in children with Sturge-Weber syndrome. From 1996 to 2005, a total of 15 investigations of the brain performed in 6 children with Sturge-Weber syndrome were reviewed. We evaluated four ultrasound, five CT, and six MRI exams. With ultrasound an increase of the echogenicity of the periventricular white matter was depicted in the first days of life. MRI is the best modality to demonstrate the vascular malformation, the impaired cerebral venous drainage, and the atrophy of one hemisphere. One-sided periventricular hyperechogenicity on ultrasound can be an early sign of Sturge-Weber syndrome in children with a nevus flammeus. MRI is the method of choice to diagnose Sturge-Weber syndrome and to follow up these children if the neurological status of the patients changes. (orig.) [de

  13. Otolaryngic manifestations of Cushing disease.

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    Kuan, Edward C; Peng, Kevin A; Suh, Jeffrey D; Bergsneider, Marvin; Wang, Marilene B

    2017-08-01

    Cushing disease is a relatively rare cause of Cushing syndrome secondary to a hyperfunctioning pituitary adenoma. In addition to signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism, Cushing disease may present with diverse otolaryngic manifestations, which may guide diagnosis and management. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients who were found to have Cushing disease and who underwent transnasal transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas between January 1, 2007, and July 1, 2014, at a tertiary academic medical center. There were 37 consecutive patients in this series with Cushing disease caused by a pituitary adenoma. Fifteen (41%) patients complained of visual changes. Five (14%) patients suffered from obstructive sleep apnea. Four (11%) patients had thyroid disease. Other symptoms included hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus, epistaxis, dysphagia, and salivary gland swelling. Although Cushing disease traditionally presents with classic "Cushingoid" systemic features, it also may present with various otolaryngic manifestations. A thorough workup by otolaryngologists is critical in the comprehensive management of these patients.

  14. [Corneal manifestations in systemic diseases].

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    Zarranz Ventura, J; De Nova, E; Moreno-Montañés, J

    2008-01-01

    Systemic diseases affecting the cornea have a wide range of manifestations. The detailed study of all pathologies that cause corneal alteration is unapproachable, so we have centered our interest in the most prevalent or characteristic of them. In this paper we have divided these pathologies in sections to facilitate their study. Pulmonar and conective tissue (like colagen, rheumatologic and idiopathic inflamatory diseases), dermatologic, cardiovascular, hematologic, digestive and hepatopancreatic diseases with corneal alteration are described. Endocrine and metabolic diseases, malnutrition and carential states are also studied, as well as some otorhinolaryngologic and genetic diseases that affect the cornea. Finally, a brief report of ocular toxicity induced by drugs is referred.

  15. Breast manifestations of systemic diseases

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    Dilaveri CA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Christina A Dilaveri, Maire Brid Mac Bride, Nicole P Sandhu, Lonzetta Neal, Karthik Ghosh, Dietlind L Wahner-RoedlerDivision of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Although much emphasis has been placed on the primary presentations of breast cancer, little focus has been placed on how systemic illnesses may affect the breast. In this article, we discuss systemic illnesses that can manifest in the breast. We summarize the clinical features, imaging, histopathology, and treatment recommendations for endocrine, vascular, systemic inflammatory, infectious, and hematologic diseases, as well as for the extramammary malignancies that can present in the breast. Despite the rarity of these manifestations of systemic disease, knowledge of these conditions is critical to the appropriate evaluation and treatment of patients presenting with breast symptoms.Keywords: breast, endocrine, hematologic, infectious, vascular

  16. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases

    OpenAIRE

    LENCU, CODRU?A; ALEXESCU, TEODORA; PETRULEA, MIRELA; LENCU, MONICA

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary ? cortical, and involuntary ? metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthy...

  17. Articular manifestations in patients with Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-López, María Esther; Díez-Morrondo, Carolina; Sánchez-Andrade, Amalia; Pego-Reigosa, Robustiano; Díaz, Pablo; Castro-Gago, Manuel

    To determine the percentage of Lyme patients with articular manifestations in NW Spain and to know their evolution and response to treatment. A retrospective study (2006-2013) was performed using medical histories of confirmed cases of Lyme disease showing articular manifestations. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the treatment and evolution of the patients, were analysed. Seventeen out of 108 LD confirmed patients (15.7%) showed articular manifestations. Regarding those 17 patients, 64.7%, 29.4% and 5.9% presented arthritis, arthralgia and bursitis, respectively. The knee was the most affected joint. Articular manifestations were often associated to neurological, dermatological and cardiac pathologies. Otherwise, most patients were in Stage III. The 11.8% of the cases progressed to a recurrent chronic arthritis despite the administration of an appropriate treatment. Lyme disease patients showing articular manifestations should be included in the diagnosis of articular affections in areas of high risk of hard tick bite, in order to establish a suitable and early treatment and to avoid sequels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  18. Endocrine manifestations of celiac disease

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    R Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease can have extra gastrointestinal tract (GIT presentations, most of which are endocrine. The aim of this study was to present patients diagnosed to have celiac disease from an endocrine department and to study the prevalence of endocrinopathies in celiac disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 patients from the endocrinology department (LLRM Medical College, Meerut between January 2011 and July 2012 and who were diagnosed to have celiac disease were included in the study. Results: Short stature was the commonest presentation (25%, other presentations included short stature and delayed puberty (20%, delayed puberty (11%, screening for celiac disease in type-1 DM patients (17%, rickets (6%, anemia not responding to oral therapy (6%, type-1 DM with recurrent hypoglycaemia (6%, and osteomalacia (3%. The endocrine manifestations include (after complete evaluation short stature (58%, delayed puberty (31%, elevated alkaline phospahatase (67%, low calcium (22%, X-rays suggestive of osteomalacia or rickets (8%, capopedal spasm (6%, and night blindness (6%. Anti-TPO antibody positivity was found in 53%, hypothyroidism in 28%, subclinical hypothyroidism in 17%, and type-1 DM in 25% of the patients. A total of 14% patients had no GI symptoms. Conclusion: Celiac disease is an endocrine disrupter as well as the great masquerader having varied presentations including short stature, delayed puberty, and rickets. Some patients who have celiac disease may not have any GI symptoms, making the diagnosis all the more difficult. Also, there is significant incidence of celiac disease with hypothyroidism and type-1 DM, making screening for it important in these diseases.

  19. Cystic thymic diseases: CT manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Soon Young; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Eui Yong; Jeon, Seok Chol; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1995-01-01

    To describe CT findings and differential points of cystic thymic lesions. We evaluated retrospectively total 19 masses with well marginated cystic lesions at thymic area on CT scans. They were 10 teratomas, 3 congenital thymic cysts, 2 multilocular thymic cysts(associated with thymoma and myasthenia gravis in each), 2 cysts Assciated with thymic Hodgkin's lymphomas an ectopic parathyroid cyst, and an infected thymic cyst. The radiological abnormalities evaluated were thickness of the wall, presence or abscene of septa, mural nodule, solid component, calcification and fat component. All three cases of congenital thymic cysts and an ectopic parathyroid cyst appeared as thin-walled unilocular cyst with homogeneous internal density and without identifiable solid component. In multilocular thymic cyst, there were thick wall and solid components(n =2), thick internal septa and calcifications(n = 1). The cysts of teratomas manifested thick walls(n = 9), internal septa(n = 4), calcifications(n = 6), fat components(n = 4), and solid components(n = 4). Cysts in Hodgkin's diseases appeared as multilocular or unilocular and had thick wall and septa without calcification. Infected thymic cyst presented with multilocular cystic mass with identifiable wall and septa, calcification, and solid components. The thymic diseases with cystic lesion include teratomas, congenital thymic cysts, multilocular thymic cysts, parathyroid cyst, and Hodgkin's disease. Congenital thymic cyst and ectopic parathyroid cyst are thin-walled unilocular cystic lesions. Cystic lesions associated with teratoma, Hodgkin's disease, and multilocular thymic cyst are thick-walled cystic lesions with or without solid component

  20. Association of immune response to endothelial cell growth factor with early disseminated and late manifestations of Lyme disease but not posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

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    Tang, Kevin S; Klempner, Mark S; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor has been recently proposed as a potential autoantigen in manifestations of Lyme disease that are thought to involve immune-mediated mechanisms. Our findings indicate that a humoral immune response to this protein is not associated with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

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    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated. © 2011 Copyright the Author. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  2. Cystic thymic diseases: CT manifestations

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    Song, Soon Young; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Eui Yong; Jeon, Seok Chol; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok [School of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    To describe CT findings and differential points of cystic thymic lesions. We evaluated retrospectively total 19 masses with well marginated cystic lesions at thymic area on CT scans. They were 10 teratomas, 3 congenital thymic cysts, 2 multilocular thymic cysts(associated with thymoma and myasthenia gravis in each), 2 cysts Assciated with thymic Hodgkin's lymphomas an ectopic parathyroid cyst, and an infected thymic cyst. The radiological abnormalities evaluated were thickness of the wall, presence or abscene of septa, mural nodule, solid component, calcification and fat component. All three cases of congenital thymic cysts and an ectopic parathyroid cyst appeared as thin-walled unilocular cyst with homogeneous internal density and without identifiable solid component. In multilocular thymic cyst, there were thick wall and solid components(n =2), thick internal septa and calcifications(n = 1). The cysts of teratomas manifested thick walls(n = 9), internal septa(n = 4), calcifications(n = 6), fat components(n = 4), and solid components(n = 4). Cysts in Hodgkin's diseases appeared as multilocular or unilocular and had thick wall and septa without calcification. Infected thymic cyst presented with multilocular cystic mass with identifiable wall and septa, calcification, and solid components. The thymic diseases with cystic lesion include teratomas, congenital thymic cysts, multilocular thymic cysts, parathyroid cyst, and Hodgkin's disease. Congenital thymic cyst and ectopic parathyroid cyst are thin-walled unilocular cystic lesions. Cystic lesions associated with teratoma, Hodgkin's disease, and multilocular thymic cyst are thick-walled cystic lesions with or without solid component.

  3. Cochleovestibular Manifestations in Fabry Disease

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    Alberto Ciceran MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient α-galactosidase A activity and globotriaosylceramide accumulation throughout the body. This accumulation leads to various clinical disorders, including inner ear lesions, with sensorineural hearing loss and dizziness. Although hearing loss is recognized in these patients, its incidence and natural history have not been characterized. Hearing disorders develop mainly in adulthood, and tinnitus may be an earlier symptom in Fabry disease. A significant incidence of mid- and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss in affected males is commonly reported, whereas in female carriers, it is much less frequent. In addition, a high incidence of vestibular disorders with dizziness and chronic instability is also observed in these patients. The few studies about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT on cochleovestibular symptoms show controversial results. Based on the model of densely stained material accumulation in the inner ear, stria vascularis cell, and organ damage, an early indication of ERT may prevent hearing loss due to the reduction in substrate accumulation.

  4. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

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    Ana Peixinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine dysregulation syndrome.

  5. Intrathoracic manifestations of Rosai-Dorfman disease.

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    Cartin-Ceba, Rodrigo; Golbin, Jason M; Yi, Eunhee S; Prakash, Udaya B S; Vassallo, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Rosai-Dorfman Disease (RDD), also known as Sinus Histiocytosis with Massive Lymphadenopathy (SHML), is a rare monocyte/macrophage proliferative disorder of varied biological behavior. Although cutaneous and lymph node involvement are relatively well-described, intrathoracic manifestations of RDD have only occasionally been reported. We conducted a retrospective computer-assisted search of the Mayo Clinic record from 1976 to 2005 for patients with histopathologic evidence of RDD on organ biopsy. Clinical characteristics were abstracted from charts and thoracic manifestations recorded. Survival was estimated using the national social security database. A total of 21 patients were diagnosed with RDD over a period of 30 years; 9 had intrathoracic manifestations (43%). Main pulmonary symptoms included dyspnea and cough. Age at the time of diagnosis, gender, race, smoking history, mortality and time of survival after diagnosis were no different between RDD patients with and without intrathoracic manifestations. The most common radiographic thoracic manifestation was mediastinal lymphadenopathy (6 patients). Cystic change, interstitial lung disease, and airway disease were radiographically evident in 4 patients. Seven patients were treated at some point in the course of their disease, most commonly with oral corticosteroids. At the time of last follow-up 87% were alive, with a median (IQR) time interval since diagnosis of 8 years (4-9.7). Intrathoracic manifestations of RDD are relatively common and include mediastinal lymphadenopathy, airway disease, pleural effusion, cystic and interstitial lung disease. Although limited in size, this series suggests the prognosis of patients with RDD and intrathoracic manifestations is relatively good.

  6. Hepatic manifestations of celiac disease

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    Hugh James Freeman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hugh James FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaAbstract: Different hepatic and biliary tract disorders may occur with celiac disease. Some have been hypothesized to share genetic or immunopathogenetic factors, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis. Other hepatic changes in celiac disease may occur with malnutrition resulting from impaired nutrient absorption, including hepatic steatosis. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma.Keywords: celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, fatty liver, gluten-free diet

  7. Pulmonary manifestations of tsutsugamushi disease

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    Im, Jung Gi; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Lee, Won Jae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    Tsutsugamushi disease is an acute febrile systemic disease caused by Rickettsia tsutsugamushi. Attention to Tsutsugamushi disease is increasing as it has recently been known that Tsutsugamushi disease is one of the epidemic febrile disease that occur in late fall in Korea. We analysed chest radiographic findings of 60 serologically confirmed Tsutsugamushi disease patients. 47 infiltration, mostly reticulonodular interstitial pattern. High resolution CT in a patient strongly supported that the lesions are interstitial location. 29 patients (62%) showed findings of hilar lymphadenopathy and septal lines were seen in 22 patients (47%). Other findings were cardiomegaly (10 patients), pleural effusion (6 patients), mediastinal lymphadenopathy (3 patients). Diffuse bilateral interstitial lung infiltration, hilar lymphadenopathy and septal lines are typical chest ratio graphic findings of Tsutsugamushi disease.

  8. Pulmonary manifestations of tsutsugamushi disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jung Gi; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Lee, Won Jae

    1988-01-01

    Tsutsugamushi disease is an acute febrile systemic disease caused by Rickettsia tsutsugamushi. Attention to Tsutsugamushi disease is increasing as it has recently been known that Tsutsugamushi disease is one of the epidemic febrile disease that occur in late fall in Korea. We analysed chest radiographic findings of 60 serologically confirmed Tsutsugamushi disease patients. 47 infiltration, mostly reticulonodular interstitial pattern. High resolution CT in a patient strongly supported that the lesions are interstitial location. 29 patients (62%) showed findings of hilar lymphadenopathy and septal lines were seen in 22 patients (47%). Other findings were cardiomegaly (10 patients), pleural effusion (6 patients), mediastinal lymphadenopathy (3 patients). Diffuse bilateral interstitial lung infiltration, hilar lymphadenopathy and septal lines are typical chest ratio graphic findings of Tsutsugamushi disease.

  9. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2010-01-01

    ', 'bronchiectasis', 'bronchitis', 'cutaneous manifestations', 'erythema nodosum', 'extraintestinal manifestations', 'hyperhomocysteinemia', 'infliximab', 'iridocyclitis', 'lung disease', 'ocular manifestations', 'osteomalacia', 'pancreatitis', 'primary sclerosing cholangitis', 'renal stones', 'sulfasalazine...

  10. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  11. Early treatment with infliximab in bilateral occlusive vasculitis as a presenting manifestation of Behçet' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañeros-Rojas, P; Berrozpe-Villabona, C; Peraza-Nieves, J E; Díaz-Valle, D

    2015-06-01

    A 24 year old woman who complained of maculo-papulo rash, genital and bucal aphthous ulcers, abdominal pain, minor dyspnea and visual loss in both eyes. Funduscopy revealed a bilateral occlusive vasculitis including central vessels. Treatment was initiated with a methylprednisolone bolus (1 g/24h) and infliximab 5mg/kg/day (0-2-6 weeks and every 8 weeks). The treatment prescribed induced a fast remission. Visual acuity improved. The patient did not suffer any other relapse after one year of follow-up. An initial treatment with Infliximab should be considered in Behçet disease for serious outbreaks, such as macular occlusive vasculitis with ischemia. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-10-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison's disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet.

  13. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  14. Unusual manifestations of hydatid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, E.; Adam, T.

    1989-05-01

    Hydatid disease is mostly located in the liver. It then has a characteristic appearance allowing a definite diagnosis by means of ultrasound and/or CT examination. Isolated extrahepatic infestation is much less common. We report a number of cases of hydatid cysts in the tail of the pancreas, the adrenal, the spleen, and in bones and muscles. With reference to these examples we discuss the potential usefulness of radiological examination for the diagnosis and also its limitations and the pitfalls that may be encountered.

  15. Bilingualism delays clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Woumans, Evy; Santens, Patrick; Sieben, Anne; Versijpt, Jan; Stevens, Michaël; Duyck, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of bilingualism on the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a European sample of patients. We assessed all incoming AD patients in two university hospitals within a specified timeframe. Sixty-nine monolinguals and 65 bilinguals diagnosed with probable AD were compared for time of clinical AD manifestation and diagnosis. The influence of other potentially interacting variables was also examined. Results indicated a significant delay f...

  16. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilce Mitiko Matsuda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer.

  17. Mandibular and Dental Manifestations of Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranjam, Hamid R.; Sidransky, Ellen; Levine, William Z.; Zimran, Ari; Elstein, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a systemic lysosomal storage disorder with a high prevalence among Ashkenazi Jews. It is caused by an inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Common signs and symptoms include hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and skeletal involvement. Oral and dental manifestations are less commonly seen. These manifestations are often asymptomatic, although they may be detected by routine dental x-rays. There are several case reports and a few larger series published describing patients with Gaucher disease who have mandibulo-maxillofacial involvement. This review aims to examine the oral manifestations observed in Gaucher disease and to suggest practical guidelines for dealing with these often worrisome signs. Among the critical issues are the benign nature of Gaucher cell infiltration of the mandible and the critical importance of being prepared for post-procedure bleeding and/or infections. Therefore, it is essential that dental practitioners be aware of the possible oral and dental complications of Gaucher disease, as well as the available treatment modalities. PMID:22251146

  18. The radiological manifestations of sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madani, G.; Papadopoulou, A.M.; Holloway, B.; Robins, A.; Davis, J.; Murray, D.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited abnormality of the ss-globin chain, which causes a spectrum of haemolytic anaemias. Clinical manifestations in SCD include anaemia, jaundice, recurrent vaso-occlusive crises, and infections (particularly by encapsulated bacteria) due to functional asplenia and cerebrovascular accidents. Radiological investigations play a critical role both in the diagnosis and in the primary prevention of the complications of SCD

  19. The radiological manifestations of sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gittamadani@yahoo.com; Papadopoulou, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Holloway, B. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Robins, A. [Department of Paediatrics, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davis, J. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Murray, D. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited abnormality of the ss-globin chain, which causes a spectrum of haemolytic anaemias. Clinical manifestations in SCD include anaemia, jaundice, recurrent vaso-occlusive crises, and infections (particularly by encapsulated bacteria) due to functional asplenia and cerebrovascular accidents. Radiological investigations play a critical role both in the diagnosis and in the primary prevention of the complications of SCD.

  20. Clinical manifestations of small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major health problem worldwide. However, the mortality risk in patients with cardiovascular disease has decreased due to early detection of the disease and improved treatment possibilities. The downside of increased survival rates are higher rates of long-term functional

  1. Ocular Manifestations of Mosquito-Transmitted Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karesh, James W; Mazzoli, Robert A; Heintz, Shannon K

    2018-03-01

    Of the 3,548 known mosquito species, about 100 transmit human diseases. Mosquitoes are distributed globally throughout tropical and temperate regions where standing water sources are available for egg laying and the maturation of larva. Female mosquitoes require blood meals for egg production. This is the main pathway for disease transmission. Mosquitoes carry several pathogenic organisms responsible for significant ocular pathology and vision loss including West Nile, Rift Valley, chikungunya, dengue viruses, various encephalitis viruses, malarial parasites, Francisella tularensis, microfilarial parasites, including Dirofilaria, Wuchereria, and Brugia spp., and human botfly larvae. Health care providers may not be familiar with many of these mosquito-transmitted diseases or their associated ocular findings delaying diagnosis, treatment, and recovery of visual function. This article aims to provide an overview of the ocular manifestations associated with mosquito-transmitted diseases.

  2. Subtle abnormalities in contractile function are an early manifestation of sarcomere mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens J; Colan, Steven D

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomere mutations cause both dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM); however, the steps leading from mutation to disease are not well described. By studying mutation carriers before a clinical diagnosis develops, we characterize the early manifestations of sarcomere...... mutations in DCM and investigate how these manifestations differ from sarcomere mutations associated with HCM....

  3. Neurological manifestations of Batch s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Ashjazadeh, Nahid; Nikseresht, Alireza; Shariat, Abdolhamid; Yousefipour, Gholamali; Samangooie, Shahdokht; Safari, Anahid

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence, clinical manifestations, and laboratory features of Neuro-Behcets disease. This prospective study was carried out in the Behcets Research Clinic in Shiraz (south-west Iran) and included the patients referred from 1990-1999. The patients' clinical records, images, CSF analyses, and electrodiagnostic studies were reviewed. Eighteen (15 males and 3 females) out of 690 Behcet s patients (2.6%, 95% CI = 1.4-3.8%) were found to have neurological involvement. The mean +/- standard deviation age of these patients was 34.7 +/- 8.6 years. All fulfilled the criteria of the International Study Group of Behcet s Disease. Central nervous system involvement was more common than peripheral nervous system manifestations. Headache, weakness, tingling, and numbness were the most common symptoms. Hyperreflexia, upward plantar reflex, and somatosensory findings were the most frequent signs. Hemispheral and brainstem stroke-like syndromes and cerebral venous thrombosis were the major neurologic presentations. There were also cases of myelitic, pure meningoencephalitic, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like, multiple sclerosis-like, and Guillain Barre syndromes. Neuro-Behcets disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of stroke in young adults, chronic meningitis, intracranial hypertension, multiple sclerosis, myelopathies, and peripheral neuropathies. (author)

  4. Crohn’s Disease Ocular Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koev Kr.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease which causes inflammation of the digestive tract. Crohn’s disease most frequently affects the ileum and the colon. In the active stage of the disease signs and symptoms may include diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping, blood in the stools, reduced appetite and weight loss. In patients with severe Crohn’s disease the following signs and symptoms may be observed: fever, fatigue, arthritis, eye inflammation, oral ulcers, skin disorders, inflammation of the liver or bile ducts or delayed growth. Heredity and dysfunctions of the immune system are considered to cause the development of Crohn’s disease. About 10% of people with inflammatory bowel disease have also ocular problems. The most common ocular manifestations of Crohn’s disease are uveitis, iritis, episcleritis, keratopathy, keratoconjunctivitis and retinal vasculitis. Untreated uveitis may cause glaucoma and vision loss. Uveitis and iritis are four times more common in women than in men. In patients in the active stage of the disease, episcleritis also flares. Symptoms of episcleritis include inflammation, bright red spots on the sclera and localized pain. Keratoconjunctivitis in Crohn’s disease is caused by decreased tear production or increased tear film evaporation. Dry eyes can cause itching, burning or infection. Keratopathy usually causes no pain or vision loss, therefore in most cases no treatment is needed. In retinal vasculitis tortuosity of retinal veins, retinal edema at the posterior pole and intraretinal blood near blood vessels are observed. Intravenous fluorescein angiography shows intraretinal neovascularisation and haemorrhage in the posterior pole.

  5. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical manifestations and management of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare multi-systemic metabolic disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages with damage to haematological, visceral and bone systems. Anaemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities (osteopenia, lytic lesions, pathological fractures, chronic bone pain, bone crisis, bone infarcts, osteonecrosis and skeletal deformities) are typical manifestations of the most prevalent form of the disease, the so-called non-neuronopathic type 1. However, severity and coexistence of different symptoms are highly variable. The determination of deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes or fibroblasts by enzymatic assay is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Gaucher disease. Comprehensive and reproducible evaluation and monitoring of all clinically relevant aspects are fundamental for the effective management of Gaucher disease patients. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucocerebroside storage burden and diminishing the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation. Tailored treatment plan for each patient should be directed to symptom relief, general improvement of quality of life, and prevention of irreversible damage.

  7. Texas Occurrence of Lyme Disease and Its Neurological Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandashi, Jad A; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Dayawansa, Samantha; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Huang, Jason H

    2016-06-01

    Today, Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. The culprits behind Lyme disease are the Borrelia species of bacteria. In the USA, Borrelia burgdorferi causes the majority of cases, while in Europe and Asia Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii carry the greatest burden of disease. The clinical manifestations of Lyme disease have been identified as early localized, early disseminated, and late chronic. The neurological effects of Lyme disease include both peripheral and central nervous systems involvement, including focal nerve abnormalities, cranial neuropathies, painful radiculoneuritis, meningitis, and/or toxic metabolic encephalopathy, known as Lyme encephalopathy. Given the geographic predominance of Lyme disease in the Northeast and Midwest of the USA, no major studies have been conducted regarding Southern states. Between 2005 and 2014, the Center for Disease Control has reported 582 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Texas. Because of the potential for increased incidence and prevalence in Texas, it has become essential for research and clinical efforts to be diverted to the region. The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Lyme Lab has been investigating the ecology of Lyme disease in Texas and developing a pan-specific serological test for Lyme diagnosis. This report aimed to exposure materials and raise awareness of Lyme disease to healthcare providers.

  8. Corneal manifestations of selected systemic diseases: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne D.H. Gillan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The corneal manifestations of several selected systemic diseases are reviewed. Metabolic, immunologic and inflammatory and infectious diseases are included. A brief overview of each disease and how it manifests in the cornea is discussed. The importance of conducting a slit-lamp examination on every patient is emphasised.

  9. Metabolic and hormonal signatures in pre-manifest and manifest Huntington’s disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eWang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder typified by involuntary body movements, and psychiatric and cognitive abnormalities. Many HD patients also exhibit metabolic changes including progressive weight loss and appetite dysfunction. Here we have investigated metabolic function in pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects to establish an HD subject metabolic hormonal plasma signature. Individuals at risk for HD who have had predictive genetic testing showing the cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG expansion causative of HD, but who do not yet present signs and symptoms sufficient for the diagnosis of manifest HD are said to be pre-manifest. Pre-manifest and manifest HD patients, as well as both familial and non-familial controls, were evaluated for multiple peripheral metabolism signals including circulating levels of hormones, growth factors, lipids and cytokines. Both pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects exhibited significantly reduced levels of circulating growth factors, including growth hormone and prolactin. HD-related changes in the levels of metabolic hormones such as ghrelin, glucagon and amylin were also observed. Total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C were significantly decreased in HD subjects. C-reactive protein was significantly elevated in pre-manifest HD subjects. The observation of metabolic alterations, even in subjects considered to be in the pre-manifest stage of HD, suggests that in addition, and prior, to overt neuronal damage, HD affects metabolic hormone secretion and energy regulation, which may shed light on pathogenesis, and provide opportunities for biomarker development.

  10. Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Petronic-Rosic V. Dermatitis herpetiformis: part II. Diagnosis, management, and prognosis. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2011;64( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  11. Lung Manifestations in the Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tracy J; Dellaripa, Paul F

    2017-12-01

    Lung ailments in rheumatic diseases present unique challenges for diagnosis and management and are a source of significant morbidity and mortality for patients. Unlike the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, patients with rheumatic diseases experience lung disease in the context of a systemic disease that may make it more difficult to recognize and that may present greater risks with treatment. Despite recent advances in our awareness of these diseases, there is still a significant lack of understanding of natural history to elucidate which patients will have disease that is progressive and thus warrants treatment. What we do know is that a subset of patients with rheumatic disease experience parenchymal lung disease that can prognostically resemble idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, and that others can have aggressive inflammatory lung disease in the context of autoimmune myositis, systemic sclerosis, or an undifferentiated autoimmune process. As we enter into a paradigm shift where we view lung health as a cornerstone of our care of patients with rheumatic diseases, we hopefully will improve our ability to identify those patients at highest risk for pulmonary disease and progression, and offer emerging treatments which will result in better outcomes and a better quality of life. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Manifestations and Treatment of Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Joyce L

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States and is also seen in areas of Europe and Asia. The growing deer and Ixodes species tick populations in many areas underscore the importance of clinicians to properly recognize and treat the different stages of Lyme disease. Controversy regarding the cause and management of persistent symptoms following treatment of Lyme disease persists and is highlighted in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Breastfeeding and allergic disease: a multidisciplinary review of the literature (1966-2001) on the mode of early feeding in infancy and its impact on later atopic manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odijk, J.; Kull, I.; Borres, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Strategies to prevent children from developing allergy have been elaborated on the basis of state-of-the-art reviews of the scientific literature regarding pets and allergies, building dampness and health, and building ventilation and health. A similar multidisciplinary review of infant...... concluded that breastfeeding seems to protect from the development of atopic disease. The effect appears even stronger in children with atopic heredity. If breast milk is unavailable or insufficient, extensively hydrolysed formulas are preferable to unhydrolysed or partially hydrolysed formulas in terms...

  14. Imaging findings in systemic childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Adam Z; Gittler, Julia K; Nakrani, Radhika N; Alis, Jonathan; Blumfield, Einat; Levin, Terry L

    Many childhood diseases often present with skin abnormalities with which radiologists are largely unfamiliar. Knowledge of associated dermatologic manifestations may aid the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and recommending targeted imaging of affected organs. We review the imaging findings in childhood diseases associated with dermatologic manifestations. Diseases include dermatologic findings which herald underlying malignancy (Neuroblastoma, leukemia/lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis),are associated with risk of malignancy (Epidermolysis Bullosa, basal cell nevus syndrome, Cowden's syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis),or indicate a systemic inflammatory/immune disorder (Kawasaki's disease, Henoch Schonlein Purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, sarcoidosis, dermatomyositis and immune thrombocytopenic purpura). Familiarity with pertinent findings in childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations in childhood diseases aids the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and guiding imaging workup. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Computed tomography manifestations of peritoneal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, K.; Lee, W.K.; Hennessy, O.

    2005-01-01

    The peritoneal cavity is a potential space that is divided by the peritoneal reflections into various complex subspaces. It can be involved in many disease processes including developmental, inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic conditions. Computed tomography is highly sensitive and consistent in detecting peritoneal pathology. This pictorial essay aims to emphasize and illustrate the CT features of the spectrum of peritoneal diseases. Copyright (2005) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. What rheumatologists should know about orofacial manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrão, Aline Lauria Pires; Santana, Caroline Menezes; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto; Amorim, Rivadávio Fernandes Batista de; Silva, Mariana Branco da; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da; Falcão, Denise Pinheiro

    2016-02-11

    Orofacial manifestations occur frequently in rheumatic diseases and usually represent early signs of disease or of its activity that are still neglected in clinical practice. Among the autoimmune rheumatic diseases with potential for oral manifestations, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory myopathies (IM), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), relapsing polychondritis (RP) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) can be cited. Signs and symptoms such as oral hyposalivation, xerostomia, temporomandibular joint disorders, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontal disease, dysphagia, and dysphonia may be the first expression of these rheumatic diseases. This article reviews the main orofacial manifestations of rheumatic diseases that may be of interest to the rheumatologist for diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Visual system manifestations of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusne, Yael; Wolf, Andrew B; Townley, Kate; Conway, Mandi; Peyman, Gholam A

    2017-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an increasingly common disease with massive personal and economic costs. While it has long been known that AD impacts the visual system, there has recently been an increased focus on understanding both pathophysiological mechanisms that may be shared between the eye and brain and how related biomarkers could be useful for AD diagnosis. Here, were review pertinent cellular and molecular mechanisms of AD pathophysiology, the presence of AD pathology in the visual system, associated functional changes, and potential development of diagnostic tools based on the visual system. Additionally, we discuss links between AD and visual disorders, including possible pathophysiological mechanisms and their relevance for improving our understanding of AD. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Type gaucher disease: radiographic and MRI manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yanqing; Li Kuncheng; Wang Yunzhao; Tian Ding

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To enhance the understanding of Gaucher disease (GD) type I bone involvement on imaging findings. Methods: The X-ray plain film and MRI findings of GD type I were reported, and literature reviewed. Results: The X-ray plain film of GD had characteristic change. The extent of bone involvement demonstrated could be depicted in longitudinal direction and the changes of marrow involvement on MRI. Conclusions: MRI is the best way to diagnose the bone involvement of GD

  19. Graves' disease. Manifestations and therapeutic options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, K.F.; Saleeby, G.

    1988-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Clinical features include thyroid enlargement, eye signs, tachycardia, heat intolerance, emotional lability, weight loss, and hyperkinesis. Three modes of therapy are available. The preferences of the patient and physician are usually prime considerations in devising the therapeutic plan. Radioactive iodine is the most frequently used and safest method of treatment for adults. Antithyroid drugs are preferred for children and pregnant women. Surgery is usually reserved for patients in whom the other forms of treatment are not acceptable. Considerable patient education during the decision-making process enhances the success of the therapeutic plan

  20. The Spectrum of Neurological Manifestations Associated with Gaucher Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamanna Roshan Lal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, is due to a deficiency in the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. This leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages, affecting the hematological, visceral, bone and neurologic systems. Gaucher disease is classified into three broad phenotypes based upon the presence or absence of neurological involvement: type 1 (non-neuronopathic, type 2 (acute neuronopathic, and type 3 (subacute neuronopathic. Phenotypically, there is a wide spectrum of visceral and neurological manifestations. Enzyme replacement is effective in managing the visceral disease; however, treating the neurological manifestations has proved to be more challenging. This review discusses the various neurological manifestations encountered in Gaucher disease, and provides a brief overview regarding the treatment and ongoing research challenges.

  1. Case report of Graves’ disease manifesting with odynophagia and heartburn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evsyutina, Yulia; Trukhmanov, Alexander; Ivashkin, Vladimir; Storonova, Olga; Godjello, Elina

    2015-01-01

    Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disease, which can manifest with a variety of extrathyroidal clinical syndromes like ophthalmopathy, pretibial myxedema (dermopathy), acropathy, cardiomyopathy, and encephalopathy. Though quite rare, this disease can also manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms such as dysphagia, heartburn, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. We report a clinical case of Graves’ disease manifesting with dysfunction of the esophagus and heartburn in a 61-year-old man. In the muscular layer of the esophagus we found dystrophic changes led to its atony, which was documented by endoscopy and high-resolution manometry. The pathology features of esophageal symptoms were: focal proliferation of the basal cells, vascular distension, and dystrophy of the epithelial cells. Antithyroid treatment led to decrease of all clinical symptoms after 5 d of Thiamazole administration. Complete restoration of peristalsis in the esophagus, according to manometry, was observed in 1 mo after initiation of treatment. PMID:26730171

  2. Case report of Graves' disease manifesting with odynophagia and heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evsyutina, Yulia; Trukhmanov, Alexander; Ivashkin, Vladimir; Storonova, Olga; Godjello, Elina

    2015-12-28

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease, which can manifest with a variety of extrathyroidal clinical syndromes like ophthalmopathy, pretibial myxedema (dermopathy), acropathy, cardiomyopathy, and encephalopathy. Though quite rare, this disease can also manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms such as dysphagia, heartburn, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. We report a clinical case of Graves' disease manifesting with dysfunction of the esophagus and heartburn in a 61-year-old man. In the muscular layer of the esophagus we found dystrophic changes led to its atony, which was documented by endoscopy and high-resolution manometry. The pathology features of esophageal symptoms were: focal proliferation of the basal cells, vascular distension, and dystrophy of the epithelial cells. Antithyroid treatment led to decrease of all clinical symptoms after 5 d of Thiamazole administration. Complete restoration of peristalsis in the esophagus, according to manometry, was observed in 1 mo after initiation of treatment.

  3. [Otorhinolaryngological manifestations in patients with Behçet disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Angulo, Carmelo; Vergara Pastrana, Sandra; Obeso-Agüera, Sergio; Acle, Leticia; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a systemic immune-mediated vasculitis of unknown origin characterised by recurrent orogenital ulceration, ocular inflammation and skin lesions. The aim of our study was to identify ear, nose and throat (ENT) manifestations associated with BD. Retrospective review of the medical records of all patients diagnosed with BD who attended a tertiary public hospital in Cantabria (Spain) over a period of 22 years. Clinical manifestations, in particular those concerning ENT, were retrieved from medical records. A medical literature review of ENT manifestations was conducted. Thirty-three patients (age range: 17-64 years) were included in the study. Most of them presented oral ulcers (97%). Eight patients (24%) presented oropharyngeal ulcers and 5 patients (15%) experienced audiovestibular symptoms (high frequency sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo and bilateral vestibular hypofunction). One patient had symptoms compatible with vestibular neuronitis as the presentation manifestation of Neuro-Behçet. In 4 patients (12%) the presence of odynophagia secondary to the presence of oropharyngeal lesions, initially interpreted as acute or recurrent tonsillitis, was the first manifestation of the disease, alone or associated with cutaneous or ocular lesions. In addition to the characteristic oral ulcers present in most patients with BD, ulcers in the oropharynx, occasionally interpreted as acute pharyngitis, are also common in these patients. Audiovestibular manifestations frequently appear during the course of the disease and may be the first symptom of central nervous system involvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiologic manifestations of Hippel-Lindau disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemianski, A.; Pecold, K.; Sosnowski, P.; Paprzycki, W.; Juszkat, R.

    1994-01-01

    Examinations have been performed in 15 patients from 5 families. CT of abdomen as well as MR of eyeballs and of the subtentorial part of the central nervous system were performed. Three patients who exhibited changes in MR and 2 patients who showed changes in CT underwent additional examinations with contrast media. In MR the most frequently observed changes have been found in eyeballs, in cerebellum and spinal cord. In CT kidney changes and pancreas changes were most frequently observed. In 2 patients neither CT nor MR changes have been found. It is believed that appropriate diagnostic procedure in Hippel-Lindau disease should include MR examination of the central nervous system, and CT examination of abdomen. Both examinations should be performed with contrast enhancement. (author)

  5. Extrahepatic manifestations of cholestatic liver diseases: pathogenesis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pusl, Thomas; Beuers, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Pruritus, fatigue, and metabolic bone disease are frequent complications of cholestatic liver diseases, which can be quite distressing for the patient and can considerably reduce the quality of life. The molecular pathogenesis of these extrahepatic manifestations of cholestasis is poorly understood,

  6. Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease: clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD disease is an arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP crystal deposits in articular tissues, most commonly fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. According to EULAR, four different clinical presentations can be observed: 1 asymptomatic CPPD; 2 osteoarthritis (OA with CPPD; 3 acute CPP crystal arthritis; 4 chronic CPP inflammatory crystal arthritis. Acute CPP crystal arthritis is characterized by sudden onset of pain, swelling and tenderness with overlying erythema, usually in a large joint, most often the knee, wrist, shoulder, and hip. Occasionally, ligaments, tendons, bursae, bone and the spine can be involved. CPPD of the atlanto-occipital joint (crowned dens syndrome can cause periodic acute cervico-occipital pain with fever, neck stiffness and laboratory inflammatory syndrome. Chronic inflammatory arthritis is characterized by joint swelling, morning stiffness, pain, and high ESR and CRP. The relationship between OA and CPPD is still unclear. The main problem is whether such crystals are directly involved in the pathogenesis of OA or if they are the result of joint degeneration. Diagnosis is based on evaluation of history and clinical features, conventional radiology, and synovial fluid examination. Non-polarized light microscopy should be used initially to screen for CPPD crystals based upon their characteristic morphology, and compensated polarized light microscopy, showing the crystals to be weakly positive birefringent, is recommended for definitive identification, although this last pattern only occurs in about 20% of samples. The main goals of CPPD therapy are control of the acute or chronic inflammatory reaction and prevention of further episodes.

  7. Emerging infectious diseases with cutaneous manifestations: Viral and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawas, Zeena Y; Tong, Yun; Kollipara, Ramya; Peranteau, Andrew J; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Yan, Albert C; Lupi, Omar; Tyring, Stephen K

    2016-07-01

    Given increased international travel, immigration, and climate change, bacterial and viral infections that were once unrecognized or uncommon are being seen more frequently in the Western Hemisphere. A delay in diagnosis and treatment of these diseases can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. However, the diagnosis and management of these infections is fraught with a lack of consistency because there is a dearth of dermatology literature on the cutaneous manifestations of these infections. We review the epidemiology, cutaneous manifestations, diagnosis, and management of these emerging bacterial and viral diseases. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Extra-cardiac manifestations of adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Stephen A; Ward, Cary; Krasuski, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in correction or palliation of congenital cardiac lesions has greatly improved the lifespan of congenital heart disease patients, resulting in a rapidly growing adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. As this group has increased in number and age, emerging science has highlighted the systemic nature of ACHD. Providers caring for these patients are tasked with long-term management of multiple neurologic, pulmonary, hepatic, renal, and endocrine manifestations that arise as syndromic associations with congenital heart defects or as sequelae of primary structural or hemodynamic abnormalities. In this review, we outline the current understanding and recent research into these extra-cardiac manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Subjective cognitive decline: The first clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Studart Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Mild cognitive impairment is considered as the first clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD, when the individual exhibits below performance on standardized neuropsychological tests. However, some subjects before having a lower performance on cognitive assessments already have a subjective memory complaint. Objective: A review about subjective cognitive decline, the association with AD biomarkers and risk of conversion to dementia. Methods: We performed a comprehensive non-systematic review on PubMed. The keywords used in the search were terms related to subjective cognitive decline. Results: Subjective cognitive decline is characterized by self-experience of deterioration in cognitive performance not detected objectively through formal neuropsychological testing. However, various terms and definitions have been used in the literature and the lack of a widely accepted concept hampers comparison of studies. Epidemiological data have shown that individuals with subjective cognitive decline are at increased risk of progression to AD dementia. In addition, there is evidence that this group has a higher prevalence of positive biomarkers for amyloidosis and neurodegeneration. However, Alzheimer's disease is not the only cause of subjective cognitive decline and various other conditions can be associated with subjective memory complaints, such as psychiatric disorders or normal aging. The features suggestive of a neurodegenerative disorder are: onset of decline within the last five years, age at onset above 60 years, associated concerns about decline and confirmation by an informant. Conclusion: These findings support the idea that subjective cognitive complaints may be an early clinical marker that precedes mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease.

  10. [Anorectal manifestations of sexually transmissible diseases. Kaposi's sarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libeskind, M; Malbran, J; Agard, D; Pannetier, C; Lecouillard, C; Ivanovic, A

    1984-01-01

    The proctologist is above all concerned with the known recrudescence of venereal diseases. Examples reviewed are diseases of bacterial origin (syphilis, gonorrhea, soft chancre, donovanosis and chlamydiosis), appropriate antibiotic therapy and diseases of viral origin (herpes, condyloma acuminatum). Also noted are other bacterial, viral and parasitic diseases and, indeed, cancers of which Kaposi's sarcoma is the example, even though these are not manifested anorectally. New data on Kaposi's sarcoma, its' relationships with venereal disease and AIDS are presented. With these complex problems, the central role of male homosexuality and lowered cellular immunity widens considerably the professional scope of the proctologist.

  11. COPD is a systemic disease – the ex trapulmonary manifestations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COPD is a systemic disease – the ex trapulmonary manifestations. C Smith. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  12. Hematologic manifestations of Crohn's disease: two clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Taratina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are commonly associated with extraintestinal manifestations, hematological disorders being the most special among them. In some cases, they dominate the clinical picture masking the intestinal manifestations of the underlying disease. Aplastic anemia is an extremely rare extraintestinal IBD manifestation. There are only two clinical cases of aplastic anemia associated with ulcerative colitis and non with Crohn's disease reported in the literature. Combination of Crohn's disease and В₁₂-deficient anemia is more prevalent, but is seen usually only after more than 20 cm of the ileus has been resected. The first clinical case presented in this paper is a  combination of severe fistula-forming Crohn's disease with a constriction in the terminal part of the ileus and profound pancytopenia as an outcome of aplastic anemia. This profound pancytopenia is associated with an extremely high risk of life-threatening complications both of surgical treatment, as well as of several chemotherapeutic agents, which made the management of this patient difficult. The second clinical case demonstrates the manifestation of Crohn's disease as ileocolitis starting from the symptoms of cobalamin deficiency: severe В₁₂-deficient anemia, funicular myelosis and sensory ataxia, with blunted intestinal symptoms. This made the initial diagnosis and timely treatment difficult. Replacement therapy with cobalamin injections and treatment with glucocorticoids and antibacterials led to endoscopically confirmed remission of Crohn's disease and normalization of hematological parameters, with persistent polyneuropathy. Thus, management of patients with Crohn's disease should be multidisciplinary. In the case of anemia, leucopenia and/or thrombocytopenia in IBD patients it is necessary to exclude potential myelodysplasia and bone marrow aplasia. In the event of megaloblastic anemia and/or progressive polyneuropathy one should bear in mind

  13. Ocular manifestations of Gaucher disease: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejía-Turizo, Juan Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with Gaucher disease (GD type 3b, with a homozygous GBA gene mutation (c.1448T > C p.L483P (L444P. Ocular findings characteristic of this mutation are described, including vitreous condensation and macular edema. To our knowledge this is the first case reported in Colombia with these characteristics. A review of the ocular manifestations of this disease is also presented.

  14. Extraintestinal manifestations in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isene, Rune; Bernklev, Tomm; Høie, Ole

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (Crohn's disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC]), symptoms from outside the gastrointestinal tract are frequently seen, and the joints, skin, eyes, and hepatobiliary area are the most usually affected sites (called extraintestinal......, skin, and liver) manifestations: 20.1% versus 10.4% (p colitis compared to proctitis in UC increased the risk of EIM. CONCLUSION: In a European inception cohort, EIMs in IBD...

  15. Altered brain mechanisms of emotion processing in pre-manifest Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Marianne J U; Warren, Jason D; Henley, Susie M D; Draganski, Bogdan; Frackowiak, Richard S; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2012-04-01

    Huntington's disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that causes motor, cognitive and psychiatric impairment, including an early decline in ability to recognize emotional states in others. The pathophysiology underlying the earliest manifestations of the disease is not fully understood; the objective of our study was to clarify this. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate changes in brain mechanisms of emotion recognition in pre-manifest carriers of the abnormal Huntington's disease gene (subjects with pre-manifest Huntington's disease): 16 subjects with pre-manifest Huntington's disease and 14 control subjects underwent 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanning while viewing pictures of facial expressions from the Ekman and Friesen series. Disgust, anger and happiness were chosen as emotions of interest. Disgust is the emotion in which recognition deficits have most commonly been detected in Huntington's disease; anger is the emotion in which impaired recognition was detected in the largest behavioural study of emotion recognition in pre-manifest Huntington's disease to date; and happiness is a positive emotion to contrast with disgust and anger. Ekman facial expressions were also used to quantify emotion recognition accuracy outside the scanner and structural magnetic resonance imaging with voxel-based morphometry was used to assess the relationship between emotion recognition accuracy and regional grey matter volume. Emotion processing in pre-manifest Huntington's disease was associated with reduced neural activity for all three emotions in partially separable functional networks. Furthermore, the Huntington's disease-associated modulation of disgust and happiness processing was negatively correlated with genetic markers of pre-manifest disease progression in distributed, largely extrastriatal networks. The modulated disgust network included insulae, cingulate cortices, pre- and postcentral gyri, precunei, cunei, bilateral putamena

  16. Early manifestations of replicative aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim I. Sorokin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is successfully used as a model organism to find genes responsible for lifespan control of higher organisms. As functional decline of higher eukaryotes can start as early as one quarter of the average lifespan, we asked whether S. cerevisiae can be used to model this manifestation of aging. While the average replicative lifespan of S. cerevisiae mother cells ranges between 15 and 30 division cycles, we found that resistances to certain stresses start to decrease much earlier. Looking into the mechanism, we found that knockouts of genes responsible for mitochondriato-nucleus (retrograde signaling, RTG1 or RTG3, significantly decrease the resistance of cells that generated more than four daughters, but not of the younger ones. We also found that even young mother cells frequently contain mitochondria with heterogeneous transmembrane potential and that the percentage of such cells correlates with replicative age. Together, these facts suggest that retrograde signaling starts to malfunction in relatively young cells, leading to accumulation of heterogeneous mitochondria within one cell. The latter may further contribute to a decline in stress resistances.

  17. Paranasal Manifestations of Early Stage Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Günel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common adult leukemia. A few studies have been reported about the relationship between CLL and paranasal sinuses. We aimed to investigate the paranasal manifestations of CLL and to determine the expression of nuclear factor-ĸB (NF-kB and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in the nasal mucosa in patients with CLL. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a clinical trial that involved 40 patients. Group CLL (n=20 consisted of patients with early-stage CLL who were followed-up at the hematology clinic and who did not receive any treatment. The control group (n=20 consisted of patients who had undergone concha surgery because of nasal obstruction. Paranasal sinus computer tomography scans of all patients were taken, they were scored on the basis of the Lund–Mackay system, and sinusitis findings were recorded. The biopsy material taken from the inferior concha head of all patients was immunohistochemically stained with primary antibodies against NF-kB and TNF-α. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to NF-κB (p=0.716 and TNF-α staining scores (p=1.000. The Lund–Mackay scores were significantly higher in the CLL group than in the control group (p=0.004. Fourteen patients had sinusitis at different locations, while the most common diagnosis was maxillary sinusitis (n=8 in the CLL group. CONCLUSION: This study showed that patients with early-stage CLL tend to have rhinosinusitis. However, NF-kB and TNF-α may not have a role in the inflammatory process involving the paranasal sinuses in patients with CLL.

  18. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero M, Julian F; Perez A, Maria C; Cerquera C, Fredy M

    2011-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease,which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardioinfantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  19. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero Melo, Julian Francisco; Perez Alvarado, Maria Carolina; Cerquera Cabrera, Fredy Martin

    2011-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease, which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardio infantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  20. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations occur rather frequently in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), e.g. ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The present paper provides an overview of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, diagnostic process, and management of rheumatic......, metabolic, dermatologic (mucocutaneous), ophthalmologic, hepatobiliary, hematologic, thromboembolic, urinary tract, pulmonary, and pancreatic extraintestinal manifestations related to IBD. Articles were identified through search of the PubMed and Embase databases, the Cochrane Library, and the web sites......', 'thromboembolism', and 'treatment'. The search was performed on English-language reviews, practical guidelines, letters, and editorials. Articles were selected based on their relevance, and additional papers were retrieved from their reference lists. Since some of the diseases discussed are uncommon, valid...

  1. Systemic disease manifestations associated with epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Anna; Wong, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most disabling symptoms of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in affected individuals. The relationship between systemic disease manifestations and the presence of epilepsy has not been thoroughly investigated. This study utilizes a multicenter TSC Natural History Database including 1,816 individuals to test the hypothesis that systemic disease manifestations of TSC are associated with epilepsy. Univariate analysis was used to identify patient characteristics (e.g., age, gender, race, and TSC mutation status) associated with the presence of epilepsy. Individual logistic regression models were built to examine the association between epilepsy and each candidate systemic or neurologic disease variable, controlling for the patient characteristics found to be significant on univariate analysis. Finally, a multivariable logistic regression model was constructed, using the variables found to be significant on the individual analyses as well as the patient characteristics that were significant on univariate analysis. Nearly 88% of our cohort had a history of epilepsy. After adjusting for age, gender, and TSC mutation status, multiple systemic disease manifestations including cardiac rhabdomyomas (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-3.9, p = 0.002), retinal hamartomas (OR 2.1, CI 1.0-4.3, p = 0.04), renal cysts (OR 2.1, CI 1.3-3.4, p = 0.002), renal angiomyolipomas (OR 3.0, CI 1.8-5.1, p epilepsy. In the multivariable logistic regression model, cardiac rhabdomyomas (OR 1.9, CI 1.0-3.5, p = 0.04) remained significantly associated with the presence of epilepsy. The identification of systemic disease manifestations such as cardiac rhabdomyomas that confer a higher risk of epilepsy development in TSC could contribute to disease prognostication and assist in the identification of individuals who may receive maximal benefit from potentially novel, targeted, preventative therapies. Wiley

  2. Atypical Clinical Manifestations of Graves' Disease: An Analysis in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazi, Mohamed Osama; Ahmed, Sherif

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been an increase in the number of reports about newly recognized (atypical or unusual) manifestations of Graves' disease (GD), that are related to various body systems. One of these manifestations is sometimes the main presenting feature of GD. Some of the atypical manifestations are specifically related to GD, while others are also similarly seen in patients with other forms of hyperthyroidism. Lack of knowledge of the association between these findings and GD may lead to delay in diagnosis, misdiagnosis, or unnecessary investigations. The atypical clinical presentations of GD include anemia, vomiting, jaundice, and right heart failure. There is one type of anemia that is not explained by any of the known etiological factors and responds well to hyperthyroidism treatment. This type of anemia resembles anemia of chronic disease and may be termed GD anemia. Other forms of anemia that are associated with GD include pernicious anemia, iron deficiency anemia of celiac disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Vomiting has been reported as a presenting feature of Graves' disease. Some cases had the typical findings of hyperthyroidism initially masked, and the vomiting did not improve until hyperthyroidism has been detected and treated. Hyperthyroidism may present with jaundice, and on the other hand, deep jaundice may develop with the onset of overt hyperthyroidism in previously compensated chronic liver disease patients. Pulmonary hypertension is reported to be associated with GD and to respond to its treatment. GD-related pulmonary hypertension may be so severe to produce isolated right-sided heart failure that is occasionally found as the presenting manifestation of GD. PMID:22132347

  3. Oral manifestations of connective tissue disease and novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Kenisha R; Rogers, Roy S; Fazel, Nasim

    2015-10-16

    Connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and Sjögren syndrome (SS) have presented many difficulties both in their diagnosis and treatment. Known causes for this difficulty include uncertainty of disease etiology, the multitude of clinical presentations, the unpredictable disease course, and the variable cell types, soluble mediators, and tissue factors that are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of connective tissue diseases. The characteristic oral findings seen with these specific connective tissue diseases may assist with more swift diagnostic capability. Additionally, the recent use of biologics may redefine the success rate in the treatment and management of the disease. In this review we describe the oral manifestations associated with SLE, SSc, and SS and review the novel biologic drugs used to treat these conditions.

  4. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; COJOCARU, Manole; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system refers to parts of the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord. Systemic autoimmune diseases can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems in a myriad of ways and through a heterogeneous number of mechanisms leading to many different clinical manifestations. As a result, neurological complications of these disorders can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The most common complication of peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement ...

  5. Syphilitic hepatitis: An uncommon manifestation of a common disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukriti Baveja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis being first manifestation of secondary syphilis is rare. Here in we report a case of 39 years old male who was being treated for hepatitis and presented to us subsequently with itchy maculopapular rash. Venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL titre was 1:16. Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA was positive. He was treated with intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin. His hepatitis improved rapidly.

  6. Norrie disease: extraocular clinical manifestations in 56 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharon E; Mullen, Thomas E; Graham, Dionne; Sims, Katherine B; Rehm, Heidi L

    2012-08-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by congenital blindness, progressive sensorineural hearing loss and cognitive impairment. The ocular phenotype has been well described, while the extraocular manifestations of the disorder are not well understood. We present the data from the Norrie Disease Registry, which consists of 56 patients with detailed clinical histories and genotype data. This study represents the largest, detailed investigation into the phenotypic spectrum of ND to date and more importantly expands knowledge of the extraocular clinical manifestations. We identify several novel aspects of the syndrome that will improve the management of these patients. In particular, we expand our understanding of the neurologic manifestations in ND and identify a chronic seizure disorder in approximately 10% of all patients. In addition, details of the hearing phenotype are described including the median age of onset (12 years of age) and how genotype affects onset. Moreover, we find vascular disease to be a significant component of ND; and vascular health should be, in the future, a component of patient clinical care. In summary, the results expand our understanding of the phenotypic variability and genotypic heterogeneity in ND patients. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Lyme Disease Manifestations in the Foot and Ankle: A Retrospective Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jason R; Dunn, Karl W; Braccia, Domenick; Ciliberti, Louis J; Becker, Dina K; Hollinger, Joshua K; Brand, Shelley M

    Lyme disease is the result of Borrelia burgdorferi bacterial infection after exposure from a tick bite. A pathognomonic finding in early-stage Lyme disease is an expanding, red macular ring known as erythema migrans. Lyme arthritis is a late-stage manifestation of this disease, affecting the large, weightbearing joints with intermittent pain and swelling. The existing data on Lyme disease and subsequent arthritis have reported manifestations in the lower extremity, primarily in the knee and ankle and less commonly the small joints of the foot. We present a retrospective case series of 11 cases of painful arthritis in the foot and ankle with confirmatory Lyme disease testing. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral Crohn′s disease without intestinal manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gingisetty Harikishan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn′s disease is a granulomatous inflammatory bowel disease and was described in 1932 as a chronic granulomatous disorder of the terminal ileum and is now considered a distinct member of the inflammatory bowel disease family. It may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Oral Crohn′s disease has been reported frequently in the last three decades with or without intestinal manifestations. In the latter case, it is considered as one of the orofacial granulomatosis. There has been much doubt whether intestinal manifestations of Crohn′s disease will eventually develop in the orofacial granulomatosis. We present a female patient aged 22 years with prominent clinical findings such as persistent swelling of lower and upper lip with fissuring and angular cheilitis, granulomatous gingival enlargement, and cobblestone or corrugated appearance of labial mucosa, which are suggestive of Crohn′s disease, but with no evidence of other gastrointestinal involvement. The patient underwent surgical treatment with external gingivectomy procedure. A 6-month follow-up showed minimal recurrence.

  9. Skeletal Manifestations in Gaucher Disease: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altınay Göksel Karatepe

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Gauchers disease is the most frequent hereditary lysosomal deposit storage disorder. It is characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase that leads to an accumulation of glucocerebroside in the macrophage lysosomes. It is classified in three types, according to the presence of central nervous system involvement (type 2 and 3 or not (type 1. In the majority of patients there are hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia. Skeletal involvement is also important and it is the most disabling manifestation. In this case report, there is presented a case of Gauchers disease with multiple skeletal involvement and the literature is reviewed.

  10. MRI manifestation of Wilson's disease accompanied with central pontine myelinolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingsong; Huan Yi; Chang Yingjuan; Chang Yingjuan; Ge Yali; Zhang Guangyun; Han Yuedong; Zhao Haitao; Yang Chunmin; Yang Yan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To discuss MRI manifestation of Wilson's disease accompanied with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM), and to especially detect the value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in this disease. Methods: Two cases of Wilson's disease accompanied with CPM were performed with sequent MR examination including T 1 WI, T 2 WI, FLAIR, DWI, and contrast-enhanced MRI (CE MRI) by a 1.5 T magnetic resonance system (Philips gyroscan master). Results: Symmetric long T 1 and T 2 signals were found in central pontine region, lenticular nucleus, caudate nucleus, and thalamus. CEMRI showed no apparent enhanced lesions. DWI showed obviously high signal intensities in central pontine region with apparent diffusion coefficient values fluctuated between (100-300) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s while FLAIR images just showed slightly high signal in the same area, which suggested that cytotoxic edema did in fact exist in CPM. Meanwhile, DWI also showed high signals in bilateral lenticular nucleus with apparent diffusion coefficient values fluctuated between (300-600) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s, however, FLAIR images showed heterogeneous high signals and one case presented low DWI signals in bilateral head of caudate nucleus, all these signs might be explained by mixed-changes of cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema in long period of Wilson's disease. Conclusion: Wilson's disease and CPM have characteristic MRI manifestation and DWI may be a very useful way to confirm a correct diagnosis. (authors)

  11. Structural imaging in premanifest and manifest Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Rachael I; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Aylward, Elizabeth H

    2017-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) neuropathology has a devastating effect on brain structure and consequently brain function; neuroimaging provides a means to assess these effects in gene carriers. In this chapter we first outline the unique utility of structural imaging in understanding HD and discuss some of the acquisition and analysis techniques currently available. We review the existing literature to summarize what we know so far about structural brain changes across the spectrum of disease from premanifest through to manifest disease. We then consider how these neuroimaging findings relate to patient function and nonimaging biomarkers, and can be used to predict disease onset. Finally we review the utility of imaging measures for assessment of treatment efficacy in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Medical management of motor manifestations of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Elizabeth A; Loy, Clement T

    2017-01-01

    The motor and movement disorders of Huntington disease (HD) are managed in the context of the other disease features. Chorea and dystonia are the most common HD-associated movement disorders, and they can be assessed on research rating scales. However other motor manifestations have a significant impact. In particular, dysphagia influences choice and tolerance of treatment for the movement disorder, as will comorbidities, patient awareness, and distress related to the motor feature or movement. Treatment for other disease features may aggravate the motor disorder, e.g., increased swallowing difficulty associated with antipsychotic agents. Basic principles in deciding to institute a treatment are outlined as well as treatment of specific motor manifestations and movements. There is a paucity of evidence to support the treatments available for the motor disorder, with only one agent with class 1 evidence, tetrabenazine, for chorea. There are, however, treatments informed by expert opinion which reflect the management of a wider HD phenotype than that represented in clinical trials. Some treatments are based on evidence from use in other conditions. Medical management is usually undertaken later in the disease with concurrent nonmedical interventions after multidisciplinary assessments. Medication review with HD progression is essential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Links between Early Attachment Experiences and Manifestations of Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, John

    2011-01-01

    This essay reviews recent research about infant attachment, then discusses the implications of this research as they relate to the following specific manifestations of children's spirituality: faith, wonder, relational consciousness, flow (as in a sense of wholeness or unity), and compassion, in the light of other research on children's…

  14. Dermatitis herpetiformis: a cutaneous manifestation of coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Pekka; Salmi, Teea T; Hervonen, Kaisa; Kaukinen, Katri; Reunala, Timo

    2017-02-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an itchy blistering skin disease with predilection sites on elbows, knees, and buttocks. Diagnosis is confirmed by showing granular immunoglobulin A deposits in perilesional skin. DH is one manifestation of coeliac disease; the skin symptoms heal with gluten free diet (GFD) and relapse on gluten challenge. Of the first-degree relatives, 5% may be affected by either condition. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is the autoantigen in coeliac disease and epidermal transglutaminase (TG3) in DH. Both diseases conditions exhibit TG2-specific autoantibodies in serum and small bowel mucosa; patients with DH have IgA-TG3 in the skin. There are some divergencies between these two phenotypes. One-fourth of DH patients do not have small bowel mucosal villous atrophy, but virtually all have coeliac-type inflammatory changes. The skin symptoms respond slowly to GFD. The incidence of coeliac disease is increasing, whereas the opposite is true for DH. A female predominance is evident in coeliac disease, while DH may be more common in males. Coeliac disease carries the risk of small intestinal T-cell lymphoma; in DH B-cell lymphomas at any site may prevail. Adult coeliac disease carries a slightly increased elevated mortality risk, whereas in DH, the relative mortality rate is significantly decreased. Key messages Dermatitis herpetiformis is a cutaneous manifestation of coeliac disease; both conditions are genetically determined and gluten-dependent. Gastrointestinal symptoms and the degree of villous atrophy are less obvious in dermatitis herpetiformis than in coeliac disease. Both show tissue transglutaminase (TG2) specific autoantibodies in serum and small bowel mucosa. In addition, TG3-targeted IgA antibodies are found in the skin of DH patients Both conditions carry an increased elevated risk of lymphoma, in coeliac disease small intestinal T-cell lymphoma, in dermatitis herpetiformis mainly B-cell lymphoma at various sites. Coeliac disease is

  15. Deep Vein Thrombosis as Initial Manifestation of Whipple Disease

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    Mônica Souza de Miranda Henriques

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wipple disease (WD is a rare chronic disease caused by the bacillus Tropheryma whipplei. Constitutive, rheumatologic, gastrointestinal, cardiac, cerebral, lymphatic, cutaneous, and ophthalmological signs are possible systemic symptoms. However, thrombotic manifestations are rarely described as “stroke-like syndrome” or arterial thrombosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations and pathological examination. Laboratory findings may include anemia, leukocytosis, and thrombocytosis. Objective: We report a case of venous thrombosis as initial manifestation of WD. Case Report: We describe the case of a 53-year-old male with iliofemoral vein thrombosis followed by intermittent diarrhea, loss of appetite, abdominal distension, and bloating. A mild malnutrition state with a weight loss of 13 kg, pallor (+/4 +, presence of lower-limb edema (+/4 +, and hypertympanic distended abdomen occurred. Laboratory tests on admission revealed anemia, positive inflammatory activity tests, and normal coagulation. Endoscopic examination showed villous edema with white dotted infiltrates in the second duodenal portion and intestinal lymphangiectasia in the terminal ileum. Pathological examination revealed numerous macrophages with positive periodic acid-Schiff inclusions. Venous Doppler ultrasound showed extensive deep thrombosis on the left lower limb and recanalization of the femoral vein in the right lower limb. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone and enoxaparin sodium, which led to an improvement of gastrointestinal and thrombosis symptoms. Comments: Hypercoagulability, endothelial damage, vasculitis, and blood stasis are present in T. whipplei infection, which are associated with the activation of inflammatory mechanisms as well as procoagulant and thromboembolic events. WD should be part of the differential diagnosis of diseases that cause venous thrombosis of unknown origin.

  16. The most common otorhinolaryngologic manifestations of granulomatous diseases

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    Heshiki, Rosana Emiko

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Granulomatous diseases result from immunopathologic processes in which there is a failure in the fagocitosis of intracellular organisms. They can cause oral, nasal and pharyngeal mucosa ulcers, vocal cords lesions, otorrhoea and oropharyngeal vegetant lesions. Objective: Describing the most frequent otorhinolaryngologic manifestations in common granulomatous diseases: hanseniasis, paracoccidioidomycosis, leishmaniasis. Method: A retrospective study has been carried out from records of patients diagnosed with the abovementioned diseases between January 1, 2005 and October 31, 2007 in an infectology ambulatory of a tertiary hospital. Results: 142 patients were evaluated; 93 with leishmaniasis, 39 with paracoccidioidomycosis and 10 with hanseniasis. In 93 cases of leishmaniasis, 16 (17.2% had mucosal affection, and the most common signs were septum perforation and nasal mucosal ulcers, both with 8 cases. In paracoccidioidomycosis, oropharyngeal ulcer was the most frequent, with 15 cases (38,4%. Conclusion: Head and neck signs and symptoms are common in patients with leishmaniasis and paracoccidioidomycosis. Nasal manifestations prevail in leishmaniasis and oropharyngeal ones in paracoccidioidomycosis.

  17. Pulmonary manifestations in collagen vascular diseases; Pulmonale Manifestationen bei Kollagenosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, M.N.A. [Thoraxklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie mit Nuklearmedizin, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany); Kreuter, M. [Thoraxklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer interstitielle und seltene Lungenerkrankungen, Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, C.P. [Thoraxklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie mit Nuklearmedizin, Heidelberg (Germany); Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Pulmonary complications are frequent in patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD). Frequent causes are a direct manifestation of the underlying disease, side effects of specific medications and lung infections. The standard radiological procedure for the work-up of pulmonary pathologies in patients with CVD is multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with thin-slice high-resolution reconstruction. The accuracy of thin-slice CT for the identification of particular disease patterns is very high. The pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) representing the direct pulmonary manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be identified with a sensitivity of 45 % and a specificity of 96 %. Both direct pulmonary manifestations, drug-induced toxicity and certain infections can have a similar appearance in thin-slice MDCT in various forms of CVD. Knowledge of the patterns and causes contributes to the diagnostic certainty. At first diagnosis of a CVD and associated pulmonary symptoms thin-slice MDCT is recommended. Clinical, lung function and imaging follow-up examinations should be performed every 6-12 months depending on the results of the MDCT. In every case the individual CT morphological patterns of pulmonary involvement must be identified. The combination of information on the anamnesis, clinical and imaging results is a prerequisite for an appropriate disease management. (orig.) [German] Pulmonale Komplikationen sind bei Patienten mit Kollagenosen keine Seltenheit. Haeufig sind eine direkte Manifestation der Grunderkrankung, eine Nebenwirkung der medikamentoesen Therapie oder eine Lungeninfektion die Ursachen. Das radiologische Standardverfahren zur Klaerung pulmonaler Pathologien bei Patienten mit Kollagenosen ist die Multidetektorcomputertomographie mit duennschichtigen Rekonstruktionen (Duennschicht-MDCT). Die Treffsicherheit der Duennschicht-MDCT ist fuer die Identifikation eines Erkrankungsmusters sehr hoch. So kann beispielsweise das Muster einer

  18. Multisystem Radiologic Manifestations of Erdheim-Chester Disease

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    Umairullah Lodhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Erdheim-Chester Disease is a rare form of multiorgan non-Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis that affects individuals between the ages of 50 and 70 with an equal distribution among males and females. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality that is mostly due to infiltration of critical organs. Some of the sites that Erdheim-Chester Disease affects include the skeletal system, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, lungs, kidneys (retroperitoneum, and skin. The most common presenting symptom of Erdheim-Chester Disease is bone pain although a large majority of patients are diagnosed incidentally during a workup for a different disease process. Diagnosing Erdheim-Chester Disease is challenging due its rarity and mimicry to other infiltrative processes. Therefore, a multimodality diagnostic approach is employed with imaging being at the forefront. As of date, a comprehensive radiologic review of the manifestations of Erdheim-Chester Disease has rarely been reported. Here we present radiologic findings of an individual suffering from Erdheim-Chester Disease.

  19. Bent bone dysplasia (BBD)-FGFR2 type: the radiologic manifestations in early gestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, Atsuhiko; Okajima, Yuka; Kurihara, Yasuyuki [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Izumi, Noriko; Yamanaka, Michiko [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Integrated Women' s Health, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Bent bone dysplasia-fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 type (BBD-FGFR2) is a recently identified skeletal dysplasia caused by specific FGFR2 mutations, characterized by craniosynostosis and prenatal bowing of the long bones. Only a few cases have been published. We report an affected fetus terminated at 21 weeks of gestation. The clinical and radiologic manifestations mostly recapitulate previous descriptions; however we suggest additional hallmarks of this disorder in early gestation. These hallmarks include distinctive short, thick clavicles and wavy ribs, as well as vertebral bodies that showed striking anteroposterior shortening. Femoral fractures were also present in our case. Although craniosynostosis is a hallmark of the disease, clinicians should be aware that craniosynostosis might not be readily apparent on plain films early in gestation. (orig.)

  20. Endocrine-Manifestations of Cirrhosis and Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khalili

    2014-04-01

    cirrhosis. Here it reviews some endocrine-manifestations related to cirrhosis and the liver disease.        

  1. Intrathoracic Manifestations of IgG4-Related Disease

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    Sian Yik Lim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Intrathoracic involvement with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD is frequently overlooked in IgG4-related disease patients. In this article we review the intrathoracic findings of IgG4-RD which are variable and protean. IgG4-related disease has been reported to affect the lung parenchyma, pleura, mediastinal/hilar lymph nodes, vasculature, and pericardium within the thorax. Mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy is the most common intrathoracic manifestation of IgG4-RD. Four main patterns of pulmonary disease have been described, including the solid nodular type, the bronchovascular type, the alveolar interstitial type, and the round shaped ground glass type. When feasible, a biopsy should be obtained to confirm the diagnosis. Most lesions show characteristic pathologic findings of IgG4-RD: dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. While this helps establish the diagnosis, the interpretation of pathology findings in the clinical context is key in making an accurate diagnosis. Mimickers of IgG4-RD should be ruled out, before making a diagnosis. The intrathoracic findings of IgG4-RD can be treated effectively with prednisone, but may require additional immunosuppressive therapies, including rituximab.

  2. Oral Manifestations of Crohn’s Disease: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Victoria L. Woo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease (CD is an inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that is likely caused by an inappropriate mucosal inflammatory response to intestinal bacteria in a genetically predisposed host. The lesions of CD can involve any region of the GI tract as well as extraintestinal sites such as the skin, joints, and eyes. The most common presenting symptoms are abdominal pain and prolonged diarrhea associated with fevers, fatigue, and malaise. Delayed growth and failure to thrive may also be observed in pediatric patients. Oral manifestations of CD are known as oral CD and may precede GI involvement, thus serving as early markers of this condition. We describe a 6-year-old male who presented with oral lesions as his initial manifestation of disease and review the current literature pertaining to oral CD.

  3. Alcohol consumption and risk of recurrent cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease and diabetes mellitus: The Second Manifestations of ARTerial (SMART) disease study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Algra, A.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Visseren, F.L.J.; Grobbee, D.E.; Graaf, van der Y.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the relation between alcohol consumption and specific vascular events and mortality in a high risk population of patients with clinical manifestations of vascular disease and diabetes. METHODS: Patients with clinically manifest vascular disease or diabetes (n=5447)

  4. Pulmonary cystic disease associated with integumentary and renal manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayetano, Katherine S.; Albertson, Timothy E.; Chan, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with multiple skin lesions on his face, neck and upper torso, which first appeared in the 3rd decade of his life, was admitted to our hospital. He had cystic changes in his lungs noted on chest computed tomography (CT) scanning, as well as a left kidney mass. This patient exhibited a rare complex of renal, cutaneous and pulmonary manifestations, eponymously named Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, with characteristic skin features (fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas and acrochordons). This syndrome is due to an autosomal dominant germ-line mutation of the folliculin (FLCN) gene located at chromosome 17p11.2. Diagnosis and differentiation from other disease complexes including the skin, kidneys and lungs are important in prognostication and management of potentially life-threatening complications such as renal cell carcinoma and pneumothoraces. PMID:24285950

  5. Risk prediction and risk reduction in patients with manifest arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goessens, B.M.B.; Goessens, B.M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Risicovoorspelling en risicoverlaging bij patienten met manifest vaatlijden Engelstalig abstract The number of patients with clinical manifest arterial disease is increasing because of the aging of the population. Patients with manifest arterial disease have an increased risk of a new vascular event

  6. Endocrine manifestations related to inherited metabolic diseases in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vantyghem Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most inborn errors of metabolism (IEM are recessive, genetically transmitted diseases and are classified into 3 main groups according to their mechanisms: cellular intoxication, energy deficiency, and defects of complex molecules. They can be associated with endocrine manifestations, which may be complications from a previously diagnosed IEM of childhood onset. More rarely, endocrinopathies can signal an IEM in adulthood, which should be suspected when an endocrine disorder is associated with multisystemic involvement (neurological, muscular, hepatic features, etc.. IEM can affect all glands, but diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism are the most frequent disorders. A single IEM can present with multiple endocrine dysfunctions, especially those involving energy deficiency (respiratory chain defects, and metal (hemochromatosis and storage disorders (cystinosis. Non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter and sometimes hypoparathyroidism should steer the diagnosis towards a respiratory chain defect. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is frequent in haemochromatosis (often associated with diabetes, whereas primary hypogonadism is reported in Alström disease and cystinosis (both associated with diabetes, the latter also with thyroid dysfunction and galactosemia. Hypogonadism is also frequent in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (with adrenal failure, congenital disorders of glycosylation, and Fabry and glycogen storage diseases (along with thyroid dysfunction in the first 3 and diabetes in the last. This is a new and growing field and is not yet very well recognized in adulthood despite its consequences on growth, bone metabolism and fertility. For this reason, physicians managing adult patients should be aware of these diagnoses.

  7. Osteosarcoma of the mandible: A case report with an early radiographic manifestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samraj, Lavanya; Venkatapathy, Ramesh; Oza, Nirima [Dept. of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Mahatma Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Dental Sciences, Pondicherry (India); Kaliamoorthy, Sriram [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Chettinad Dental College and Research Institute, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is a classical malignant bone-forming neoplasm which usually presents with an aggressive clinical course. The current case is presented with the radiographic feature of widening of the periodontal ligament space of the involved teeth, which is considered to be the earliest radiographic manifestation of osteosarcoma involving the jaw bone. The main aim of this case report was to focus on the importance of early diagnosis of this tumor based on clinical and radiographic examinations, and confirmation by histopathology. Considering the rarity of the disease type and particularly taking into account the fast progression and aggressiveness of this neoplasm, it is clear that the presentation of a clinical case represents a major contribution to better understanding of osteosarcomas involving the jaw bone.

  8. Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Timothy C.; McArthur, Jason D.; Cole, Jason N.; Gillen, Christine M.; Henningham, Anna; Sriprakash, K. S.; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L.; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), causes mild human infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo and serious infections such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Furthermore, repeated GAS infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, including acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever, and rheumatic heart disease. Combined, these diseases account for over half a million deaths per year globally. Genomic and molecular analyses have now characterized a large number of GAS virulence determinants, many of which exhibit overlap and redundancy in the processes of adhesion and colonization, innate immune resistance, and the capacity to facilitate tissue barrier degradation and spread within the human host. This improved understanding of the contribution of individual virulence determinants to the disease process has led to the formulation of models of GAS disease progression, which may lead to better treatment and intervention strategies. While GAS remains sensitive to all penicillins and cephalosporins, rising resistance to other antibiotics used in disease treatment is an increasing worldwide concern. Several GAS vaccine formulations that elicit protective immunity in animal models have shown promise in nonhuman primate and early-stage human trials. The development of a safe and efficacious commercial human vaccine for the prophylaxis of GAS disease remains a high priority. PMID:24696436

  9. Prevalence of oral manifestations in soft tissues during early childhood in Brazilian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Ramos Lima PADOVANI

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at assessing the prevalence of soft tissue oral manifestations in children during early childhood, according to age group, gender, and site in the oral cavity, and at correlating these oral manifestations with systemic alterations. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 586 children from 0 to 3 years of age (12.4 ± 11.8 months, 316 (53.9% male and 270 (46.1% female, in the city of Mauá, SP, Brazil. Examination was performed by a single examiner (Kappa Index = 0.90 according to World Health Organization criteria (WHO, 1997.The prevalence of oral manifestations in the soft tissues of children during early childhood was 34.8%. The age group showing statistical significance was 0-1 months old (56.4%. Epstein’s pearls were significantly present (43.2% in 0-1-month-old babies, and gingivitis in 12-24-month-olds (15.9%. The palate was the most affected region (16.7%. Infectious alterations were the most prevalent systemic alteration (20%. An association was observed between the presence of systemic alterations and the occurrence of oral manifestations. The prevalence of oral manifestations was 34.8%, regardless of gender, and was manifested mostly in 0-1-month-old babies. The palate was the most prevalent region, and the majority of oral manifestations were associated with systemic alterations.

  10. [Heart failure as early manifestation of neonatal hyperthyroidism. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado S, Jorge Luis; Fernández V, Zhirly Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Neonatal hyperthyroidism is usually a self-limited condition frequently associated with transplacental passage of thyroid stimulating antibodies secondary to maternal autoimmune disorders. To timely detect mothers with this medical antecedents decreases the risk for fetal adverse events. To report a case of neonatal hyperthyroidism associated with intrauterine growth restriction and heart failure. A 36 week-old newborn with birth weight of 1,240 g. Symptoms were tachycardia, distal coldness, exophthalmos, hepatomegaly and tremors. Echocardiogram ruled out structural heart disorders. Due to maternal symptoms suggestive of hyperthyroidism, TSH tests were performed showing 0.01 ulU/ml, free T4 7.7 ng/dl, so the diagnosis of neonatal hyperthyroidism was confirmed. It was treated with methimazole and propanol, alleviating the symptoms and decreasing the levels of free T4. To know the maternal history helps identify and manage neonatal complications of hyperthyroidism. Heart failure and other cardiopulmonary disorders are determinants of mortality during early neonatal period. High-risk newborns should receive follow up assessments.

  11. Ocular manifestations of graft-versus-host disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Amr; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Aljurf, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has evolved over the past two decades to become the standard of care for hematologic and lymphoid malignancies. Major ocular complications after allogeneic HSCT have been increasing in number and severity. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major cause of ocular morbidity after allogeneic HSCT. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the ocular complications in patients developing GVHD following HSCT. Ocular complications secondary to GVHD are common and include dry eye syndrome, acquisition of ocular allergy from donors with allergic disorders. Eyelid changes may occur in GVHD leading to scleroderma-like changes. Patients may develop poliosis, madarosis, vitiligo, lagophthalmos, and entropion. The cornea may show filamentary keratitis, superficial punctate keratitis, corneal ulcers, and peripheral corneal melting which may lead to perforation in severe cases. Scleritis may also occur which can be anterior or posterior. Keratoconjunctivis sicca appears to be the most common presentation of GVHD. The lacrimal glands may be involved with mononuclear cell infiltration of both the major and accessory lacrimal glands and decrease in tear production. Severe dry eye syndrome in patients with GVHD may develop conjunctival scarring, keratinization, and cicatrization of the conjunctiva. Therapy of GVHD includes systemic immunosuppression and local therapy. Surgical treatment in refractory cases includes surgical intervention to improve the manifestation of GVHD of the eye. This may include tarsorrhapy, prose lenses, punctal occlusions and corneal transplantation. PMID:24227989

  12. Osteoarticular manifestations of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Stéphanie; Lioté, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune enteropathy based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The global prevalence of 1% to 2% represents only the tip of the iceberg. The diagnosis is confirmed by positive specific antibody, anti-transglutaminase or anti-endomysium, specific lesions of the small intestine and a response to strict gluten-free diet. The diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because the clinical variability is very large, ranging from digestive clinical presentation "classic" to "atypical" symptoms, often extra-intestinal, that are sometimes attributed to a concomitant disease or a complication. Among them, there are frequent musculoskeletal manifestations such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia. In the absence of risk factor, osteoporosis, in a premenopausal women or in a man less than 55 years, more is if it is severe and refractory to medications, need to rheumatologists on the track of celiac disease in the absence of digestive symptoms. Osteomalacia is related to secondary hypovitaminosis D malabsorption. Supplementation by calcifediol, water-soluble vitamin D, may be indicated. Celiac disease is associated with an autoimmune disease in almost 1/3 of the cases. Knowing these potential associations allows earlier diagnosis in patients whose only manifestation, a concomitant disease. Anemia, chronic fatigue or unexplained polyarthralgia are symptoms associated with celiac disease to look for specific antibodies. The aim of early diagnosis is to prevent the emergence of other systemic disorders and avoid complications such as bone fractures and cancer, especially intestinal lymphoma. Non-celiac gluten intolerance is a new entity defined by symptomatology similar to that of celiac disease induced by the ingestion of gluten and disappearing after crowding-out, among patients without specific antibodies and without intestinal lesion of celiac disease. This entity is a cause, at

  13. Oral manifestations of sexually transmitted diseases identified in three stomatology services in South America

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    Martha Carmona-Lorduy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sexually transmitted diseases are defined as a group of infections caused by various agents which are acquired during sexual intercourse. They also tend to generate manifestations in the mouth. Objective: To determine the typical lesions in oral cavity of sexually transmitted diseases. Materials and methods: A descriptive transversal study was conducted with 37 patients who attended the stomatology services of the University of Buenos Aires, University of Cartagena and the Aleman Hospital in Buenos Aires during 2015 and 2016. A complete clinical history was carried out with Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL and Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absortion (FTA-ABS tests in patients with presumption of syphilis. In addition, histopathological analysis and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR was made in patients with presumption of Human papillomavirus (HPV. Results: The average age of the patients was 38, where male sex predominated. 54.1% were diagnosed with syphilis and the most found lesion in them was the papule. The remaining 45.9% were diagnosed with HPV, the predominant lesion in them was a wart. Conclusions: The dentist should contribute to the early detection of sexually transmitted diseases by identifying manifestations of these in the mouth in order to prevent their evolution and prevent their transmission.

  14. Probable late lyme disease: a variant manifestation of untreated Borrelia burgdorferi infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Lyme disease, a bacterial infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, can cause early and late manifestations. The category of probable Lyme disease was recently added to the CDC surveillance case definition to describe patients with serologic evidence of exposure and physician-diagnosed disease in the absence of objective signs. We present a retrospective case series of 13 untreated patients with persistent symptoms of greater than 12 weeks duration who meet these criteria and suggest a label of ‘probable late Lyme disease’ for this presentation. Methods The sample for this analysis draws from a retrospective chart review of consecutive, adult patients presenting between August 2002 and August 2007 to the author (JA), an infectious disease specialist. Patients were included in the analysis if their current illness had lasted greater than or equal to 12 weeks duration at the time of evaluation. Results Probable late Lyme patients with positive IgG serology but no history of previous physician-documented Lyme disease or appropriate Lyme treatment were found to represent 6% of our heterogeneous sample presenting with ≥ 12 weeks of symptom duration. Patients experienced a range of symptoms including fatigue, widespread pain, and cognitive complaints. Approximately one-third of this subset reported a patient-observed rash at illness onset, with a similar proportion having been exposed to non-recommended antibiotics or glucocorticosteroid treatment for their initial disease. A clinically significant response to antibiotics treatment was noted in the majority of patients with probable late Lyme disease, although post-treatment symptom recurrence was common. Conclusions We suggest that patients with probable late Lyme disease share features with both confirmed late Lyme disease and post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. Physicians should consider the recent inclusion of probable Lyme disease in the CDC Lyme disease surveillance

  15. Bilateral pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease as unusual manifestations of kikuchi-fujimoto disease: case report and literature review

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    Magdalena Fernandez-Martinez

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease (KFD, also called histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is a rare, idiopathic and self-limited condition usually characterized by cervical lymphadenopathy and fever, most often affecting young patients. Aetiology is unknown. Differential diagnosis includes mainly malignant lymphoma, tuberculous lymphadenitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, so early diagnosis is crucial. Pleuropulmonary involvement due to isolated KFD has been seldom reported. Case Presentation a 32-year-old man, on treatment for iatrogenic hypothyroidism, was admitted due to high grade fever and painful cervical lymphadenopathies. KFD was diagnosed by lymph node biopsy. Some days after admission the patient got worse, he developed generalized lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease. All of them resolved with prednisone and after two years of following up he remains asymptomatic and without evidence of any other associated disease. Conclusion Pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease are very uncommon manifestations of KFD. In our experience, treatment with oral prednisone was effective.

  16. Early detection of multiple sclerosis: MR findings during the initial manifestations of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Baum, K.; Henkes, H.; Girke, W.; Felix, R.; Klinikum Rudolf Virchow, Berlin

    1988-01-01

    The MR results in 21 patients showing the initial manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS) were compared with those in 45 patients with a long history of MS. As in the old cases, MR proved a very sensitive technique during the early manifestations, with abnormal findings in 20 out of 21 patients. The relatively characteristic MR findings in long-standing MS (predominant peri-ventricular involvement with a relatively typical pattern) was seen in the early stages is only rare cases. The value of MR during the initial manifestations of MS is in cases where the clinical findings are not conclusive and laboratory diagnosis (evoked potentials, CSF findings) are indefinite. In these patients the finding of multiple lesions in the brain can confirm the suspected diagnosis of MS. (orig.) [de

  17. Incidences and Risk Factors of Organ Manifestations in the Early Course of Systemic Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Veronika K; Wirz, Elina G; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    risk factors associated with incident renal crisis. CONCLUSION: In SSc patients presenting early after RP onset, approximately half of all incident organ manifestations occur within 2 years and have a simultaneous rather than a sequential onset. These findings have implications for the design of new...

  18. Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia With Lung Nodules Secondary to Pulmonary Manifestation of Crohn Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufiq Zaman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Crohn disease is an immune-mediated inflammatory condition with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal manifestations in patients. Pulmonary involvement of Crohn disease is one manifestation. There have been case reports which have shown Crohn disease and lung nodules which were noted to be histopathological as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP. In our case, a 22-year-old woman with Crohn disease was seen with complaints of chest pain and cough. Computed tomographic scan of chest showed multiple bilateral lung nodules, for which biopsy was done, which showed COP. The case study is followed by a deeper discussion of COP and the extraintestinal manifestation seen in inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. The aging brain in patients with manifest arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, P.H. van der

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major health problem worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that cardiovascular disease and a high cardiovascular risk play an important role in the etiology of cognitive decline and dementia. As intermediates in this relation between cardiovascular disease and

  20. Atlantoaxial subluxation as an early manifestation in an adolescent with undifferentiated spondyloarthritis: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jea Andrew

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Atlantoaxial instability has been described as a manifestation of ankylosing spondylitis (juvenile and adult onset, reactive arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis; however, it has rarely been reported as an early manifestation of these disorders. We present this case report to increase awareness of the condition in the hope that earlier recognition of this disease may prevent further serious injury. Case presentation We report the case of a 17-year-old Hispanic adolescent woman who was initially diagnosed with undifferentiated spondyloarthritis due to peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, a positive human leukocyte antigen B27 result, and inflammatory spinal pain lasting two months. Our patient experienced persistent and worsening occipitocervical pain and signs of myelopathy three months after diagnosis; consequently, we found atlantoaxial instability along with cervical spine bone erosion and pannus formation. She was treated surgically with a C1-2 posterior instrumented fusion and at six weeks post-operatively was started on tumor necrosis factor α blockade. Her occipitocervical symptoms subsided following surgery and initiation of immunomodulation. Conclusions Our report serves to emphasize to pediatric and adult general practitioners, pediatricians, internists, family physicians, pediatric and adult rheumatologists and spine surgeons that atlantoaxial subluxation may be an early manifestation of spondyloarthritis, and that the condition is treatable by surgical intervention and immunomodulation.

  1. Spectacular manifestations of systemic diseases of the snake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Silva, Mari-Ann Otkjær; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Heegaard, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports histopathological findings in the spectacles of four snakes diagnosed with systemic gout, inclusion body disease, disseminated lymphoma and myeloproliferative disease, respectively. Gout was characterised by urate ghost tophi in the stroma and outer epithelium of the spectacle...... to four different systemic diseases with world-wide distribution........ Inclusion body disease affected all layers of the spectacle with intracytoplasmic eosinophilic inclusions. Two cases of neoplasia, lymphoma and myeloproliferative disease, affected the ocular adnexa and the spectacular transition zone. These cases provide novel insight into how the spectacle may respond...

  2. Early Lung Adenocarcinoma in Mice: Micro-Computed Tomography Manifestations and Correlation with Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Deng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common fatal malignancy for both men and women and adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can significantly improve the survival rate of patients. This study aimed to investigate the micro-computed tomography (micro-CT manifestations of early lung adenocarcinoma (LAC in mice and to provide a new perspective for early clinical diagnosis. Early LAC models in 10 mice were established by subcutaneously injecting 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG solution. Micro-CT scan and multiple planar reconstruction (MPR were used for mouse lungs. Micro-CT features of early LAC, especially the relationships between tumor and bronchus, were analyzed and correlated with pathology. Micro-CT findings of early LAC were divided into three types: non-solid (n = 8, 6%, partly solid (n = 85, 64% and totally solid (n = 39, 30%. Tumor-bronchus relationships, which could be observed in 110 of 132(83% LAC, were classified into four patterns: type I (n = 16, 15%, bronchus was truncated at the margin of the tumor; type II (n = 33, 30%, bronchus penetrated into the tumor with tapered narrowing and interruption; type III (n = 38, 35%, bronchus penetrated into the tumor with a patent and intact lumen; type IV (n = 99, 90%, bronchus ran at the border of the tumor with an intact or compressed lumen. Micro-CT manifestations of early LAC correlated well with pathological findings. Micro-CT can clearly demonstrate the features of mouse early LAC and bronchus-tumor relationships, and can also provide a new tool and perspective for the study of early LAC.

  3. Intrathoracic manifestations of collagen vascular diseases on high-resolution chest computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C. Isabela S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Vancouver General Hospital]. E-mail: isabela.silva@vch.ca; Mueller, Nestor L. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Vancouver General Hospital. Dept. of Radiology

    2008-05-15

    Intrathoracic manifestations of collagen vascular diseases are very common. The frequency of intrathoracic manifestations and the patterns of abnormality are variable depending on the type of collagen vascular disease and may simultaneously involve one or more of the following: lung parenchyma, airways, pulmonary vessels, pericardium, and pleura. The most common pulmonary manifestations are diffuse interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary hypertension which together represent the main causes of morbidity and mortality of these patients. Pulmonary, airway and pleural involvement may also be secondary to the disease therapy, or result from bacterial pneumonia or opportunistic infection. In the present review, the authors summarize the main intrathoracic manifestations of collagen vascular diseases and the differential diagnosis on high-resolution chest computed tomography. (author)

  4. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarenga Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease.

  5. Multiple sclerosis or neurological manifestations of Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS and celiac disease (CD are considered to be T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. We discuss about a known case of CD-showed relapsing - remitting neurological symptoms compatible with MS. In this rare co-occurrence subject, MS-CD patient, the interaction between MS - and CD-related inflammatory processes is open to discussion.

  6. Study on Analysis and Pattern Recognition of the Manifestation of the Pulse Detection of Cerebrovascular Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, J; Wang, Y C; Hong, W X; Zhang, W P [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Yanshan, Qinhuangdao, Hebei Province, 066004 (China)

    2006-10-15

    Cerebrovascular Disease (CVD) is also called stroke in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). CVD is a kind of frequent diseases with high incidence, high death rate, high deformity rate and high relapse rate. The pathogenesis of CVD has relation to many factors. In modern medicine, we can make use of various instruments to check many biochemical parameters. However, at present, the early detection of CVD can mostly be done artificially by specialists. In TCM the salted expert can detect the state of a CVD patient by felling his (or her) pulse. It is significant to apply the modern information and engineering techniques to the early discovery of CVD. It is also a challenge to do this in fact. In this paper, the authors presented a detection method of CVD basing on analysis and pattern recognition of Manifestation of the Pulse of TCM using wavelet technology and Neural Networks. Pulse signals from normal health persons and CVD patients were studied comparatively. This research method is flexible to deal with other physiological signals.

  7. Herpes zoster could be an early manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2016-05-01

    No formal epidemiological research based on systematic analysis has focused on the relationship between herpes zoster and immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Taiwan. Our aim was to explore whether herpes zoster is an early manifestation of undiagnosed human HIV infection in Taiwan. This was a retrospective cohort study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. A total of 35,892 individuals aged ≤ 84 years with newly diagnosed herpes zoster from 1998 to 2010 were assigned to the herpes zoster group, whereas 143,568 sex-matched and age-matched, randomly selected individuals without herpes zoster served as the non-herpes zoster group. The incidence of HIV diagnosis at the end of 2011 was estimated in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of HIV diagnosis associated with herpes zoster and other comorbidities including drug dependence and venereal diseases. The overall incidence of HIV diagnosis was 4.19-fold greater in the herpes zoster group than that in the non-herpes zoster group (3.33 per 10,000 person-years vs. 0.80 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 4.04-4.35). The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that the adjusted hazard ratio of HIV diagnosis was 4.37 (95% CI 3.10-6.15) for individuals with herpes zoster and without comorbidities, as compared with individuals without herpes zoster and without comorbidities. Herpes zoster is associated with HIV diagnosis. Patients who have risk behaviors of HIV infection should receive regular surveillance for undiagnosed HIV infection when they present with herpes zoster. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Smoking is associated with extra-intestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Severs; S.J.H. van Erp; M.E. van der Valk (Mirthe); M.J.J. Mangen; M. Fidder (Melissa); M. van der Have (Mike); A.A. van Bodegraven (Ad); D.J. de Jong; C.J. van der Woude (Janneke); M. Romberg-Camps (Mariëlle); P.R. Clemens (Paula ); J.M. Jansen (Jeroen); P.C. van de Meeberg (Paul); N. Mahmmod (Nofel); C.Y. Ponsioen (Cyril); C. Bolwerkm; J.R. Vermeijden (J. Reinoud); M. Pierik (Marieke); P.D. Siersema (Peter); M. Leenders (Max); A.E. van der Meulen-de Jong (Andrea); G. Dijkstra (Gerard); B. Oldenburg (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground and aims: Smoking affects the course of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to study the association between smoking and extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods: We cross-sectionally

  9. Smoking is Associated With Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, M.; Erp, S.J. van; Valk, M.E. van der; Mangen, M.J.; Fidder, H.H.; Have, M. van der; Bodegraven, A.A. van; Jong, D.J. de; Woude, C.J. van der; Romberg-Camps, M.J.; Clemens, C.H.; Jansen, J.M.; Meeberg, P.C. van de; Mahmmod, N.; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Bolwerk, C.; Vermeijden, J.R.; Pierik, M.J.; Siersema, P.D.; Leenders, M.; Meulen-Jong, A.E. van der; Dijkstra, G.; Oldenburg, B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Smoking affects the course of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to study the association between smoking and extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We cross-sectionally explored the

  10. Smoking is Associated With Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, M.; van Erp, S. J. H.; van der Valk, M. E.; Mangen, M. J. J.; Fidder, H. H.; van der Have, M.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; de Jong, D. J.; van der Woude, C. J.; Romberg-Camps, M. J. L.; Clemens, C. H. M.; Jansen, J. M.; van de Meeberg, P. C.; Mahmmod, N.; Ponsioen, C. Y.; Bolwerk, C.; Vermeijden, J. R.; Pierik, M. J.; Siersema, P. D.; Leenders, M.; van der Meulen-de Jong, A. E.; Dijkstra, G.; Oldenburg, B.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking affects the course of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to study the association between smoking and extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We cross-sectionally explored the association between smoking and

  11. Skin manifestations of growth hormone-induced diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Kogia, Christina; Abdel-Naser, Mohamed Badawy; Chrousos, George P

    2016-09-01

    The human skin is a well-organized organ bearing different types of cells in a well-structured interference to each other including epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, sebocytes, melanocytes, dermal papilla cells and fibroblasts, endothelial cells, sweat gland cells as well as nerves. Several hormones act on different cell types of the skin, while it is also considered an endocrine organ secreting hormones that act at several sites of the organism. GH receptors are found in almost all cell types forming the skin, while IGF-1 receptors' expression is restricted to the epidermal keratinocytes. Both Growth Hormone (GH) excess, as in the case of Acromegaly in adults, or Gigantism in growing children, and GH deficiency states lead to skin manifestations. In case of GH excess the main dermatological findings are skin thickening, coarsening of facial features, acrochordons, puffy hands and feet, oily skin and hyperhidrosis, while GH deficiency, on the contrary, is characterized by thin, dry skin and disorder of normal sweating. Moreover, special disorders associated with GH excess may have specific characteristics, as is the case of café-au-lait spots in Neurofibromatosis, or big café-au-lait skin hyperpigmented regions with irregular margins, as is the case in McCune-Albright syndrome. Meticulous examination of the skin may therefore contribute to the final diagnosis in cases of GH-induced disorders.

  12. Chikungunya fever. Rheumatic manifestations of an emerging disease in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horcada, M Loreto; Díaz-Calderón, Carlos; Garrido, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is a viral disease caused by an alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, transmitted by several species of Aedes mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (A. albopictus). It is endemic in Africa and Asia with recurrent outbreaks. It is an emerging disease and cases in Europe transmitted by A. albopictus have been established in Mediterranean areas. The first autochthonous cases detected on the Caribbean islands suppose a serious threat of spreading disease to America, which so far has been disease free. Clinical symptoms begin abruptly with fever, skin rash and polyarthritis. Although mortality is low, a high percentage of patients develop a chronic phase defined by persistent arthritis for months or even years. A severe immune response is responsible for joint inflammation. The absence of specific treatment and lack of vaccine requires detailed studies about its immunopathogenesis in order to determine the most appropriate target. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. COPD is a systemic disease – the ex trapulmonary manifestations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peripheral skeletal muscle dysfunction is an established systemic feature of COPD.12 .... vitamin A status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and ... Kempainen RR, Savik K, Whelan TP, Dunitz JM, Herrington CS, Billings. JL.

  14. Striatal hypometabolism in premanifest and manifest Huntington's disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Mora, Diego Alfonso; Camacho, Valle; Fernandez, Alejandro; Montes, Alberto; Carrio, Ignasi [Autonomous University of Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Perez-Perez, Jesus; Martinez-Horta, Sauel; Kulisevsky, Jaime [Autonomous University of Barcelona, Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Sampedro, Frederic [University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Lozano-Martinez, Gloria Andrea; Gomez-Anson, Beatriz [Autonomous University of Barcelona, Neuroradiology, Radiology Department, Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    To assess metabolic changes in cerebral {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in premanifest and manifest Huntington's disease (HD) subjects compared to a control group and to correlate {sup 18}F-FDG uptake patterns with different disease stages. Thirty-three gene-expanded carriers (Eight males; mean age: 43 y/o; CAG > 39) were prospectively included. Based on the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale Total Motor Score and the Total Functional Capacity, subjects were classified as premanifest (preHD = 15) and manifest (mHD = 18). Estimated time disease-onset was calculated using the Langbehn formula, which allowed classifying preHD as far-to (preHD-A) and close-to (PreHD-B) disease-onset. Eighteen properly matched participants were included as a control group (CG). All subjects underwent brain {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MRI. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were initially assessed by two nuclear medicine physicians identifying qualitative metabolic changes in the striatum. Quantitative analysis was performed using SPM8 with gray matter atrophy correction using the BPM toolbox. Visual analysis showed a marked striatal hypometabolism in mHD. A normal striatal distribution of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was observed for most of the preHD subjects. Quantitative analysis showed a significant striatal hypometabolism in mHD subjects compared to CG (p < 0.001 uncorrected, k = 50 voxels). In both preHD groups we observed a significant striatal hypometabolism with respect to CG (p < 0.001 uncorrected, k = 50 voxels). In mHD subjects we observed a significant striatal hypometabolism with respect to both preHD groups (p < 0.001 uncorrected, k = 50 voxels). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT might be a helpful tool to identify patterns of glucose metabolism in the striatum across the stages of HD and might be relevant in assessing the clinical status of gene-expanded HD carriers due to the fact that dysfunctional glucose metabolism begins at early preHD stages of the disease. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT appears as a

  15. Norrie disease in a family with a manifesting female carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, K B; Irvine, A R; Good, W V

    1997-04-01

    To show that Norrie disease can occur in a girl and to describe her ophthalmologic and genetic features. Amplification of DNA polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of asymmetric polymerase chain reaction for exon 3 were performed on the blood specimen obtained from a girl born with bilateral retinal detachments. A female child with bilateral retinal detachment who had 2 uncles in whom Norrie disease had already been diagnosed. The child had a mutation in the third exon (T776-->A; Ile 123-->Asn) identical to the mutation found in her uncles. Norrie disease can occur in girls. The most likely explanation is nonrandom or unfavorable X inactivation, although timing of development of the peripheral retina and its blood supply could render it vulnerable to effects of the mutant allele at a critical developmental phase.

  16. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS OF CROHN'S DISEASE: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhvić-Urek Miranda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Crohn´s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease still with unknown etiology. In 0.5-20 % of patients, extraintestinal lesions in the oral cavity can be presented in forms of orofacial granulomatosis, cobblestone and corrugated oral mucosa, mucosal tags, deep linear ulcerations with hyperplastic folds, pyostomatits vegetans, aphthous ulcers, angular cheilitis, labial/facial edema and gingival erythema/edema. We describe a case of a 28-year-old male who was presented with oral lesions of Crohn´s disease and treatment procedure. The patient was candidate for biologic treatment so dental procedures and preparation of the patient for treatment are described. Good communication and cooperation between the patient's doctor and dentist are important for successful treatment.

  17. Cancer: a single disease with a multitude of manifestions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandics Peter

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The relationships of critical nutrients such as plant phenolics, vitamins, minerals and lipids are considered with respect to the incidence of a variety of cancers, and analyzed in terms of how these nutrient deficiencies alter immune function, DNA integrity and cell proliferation. With a significant correlation found between cancer and these nutrient deficiencies, the hypothesis is presented here that nutrition could provide a unifying perception of cancer and recast it as a single disease. This further suggests that a coordinated administration of specific, critical nutrients to cancer patients could lead to the reversal of the disease. It is also proposed that the concurrent presence of a variety of nutritional deficiencies in cancer patients requires a multilevel, systemic approach to this disease as opposed to the single active therapeutic agent approach that is the cornerstone of contemporary research and pharmacology.

  18. Mantle Cell Hyperplasia of Peripheral Lymph Nodes as Initial Manifestation of Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monabbati, Ahmad; Noori, Sadat; Safaei, Akbar; Ramzi, Mani; Eghbali, Seyedsajjad; Adib, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a well known hemoglobinopathy with usual manifestations including anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and vasoocclusive complications. Despite presence of mild splenomegaly in early phase of the disease, lymphadenopathy is not an often finding of SCD. We introduce an undiagnosed case of SCD who presented in third decade of his life with multiple cervical lymphadenopathies and mild splenomegaly persistent for about five years. Histopathologic examination of the resected lymph nodes showed expansion of the mantle cell layers of secondary follicles as well as several monomorphic mantle cell nodules. To rule out possibility of a malignant process involving lymph nodes, an immunohistochemical panel was ordered which was in favor of benign mantle cell hyperplasia. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement study showed no clonal bands and confirmed benign nature of the process. Respecting mild abnormalities on Complete Blood Count, peripheral blood smear was reviewed revealing some typical sickle red blood cells as well as rare nucleated red blood cells. Solubility test for hemoglobin (HB) S was positive. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed diagnosis of homozygous HbS disease.

  19. Neurological Manifestation of Behcet's Disease: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Behcet's disease causes inflammation of blood vessels but it is of unknown aetiology. When it involves the nervous system, it may present with benign headaches, aseptic meningitis, meningoencephalitis, cranial nerve palsies, seizures, personality changes, and cerebral venous thrombosis. We present the case of A.G is a ...

  20. Race and Association With Disease Manifestations and Mortality in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Rebecca L.; Shah, Ami A.; Woods, Adrianne; Le, Elizabeth N.; Boin, Francesco; Hummers, Laura K.; Wigley, Fredrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Experience suggests that African Americans may express autoimmune disease differently than other racial groups. In the context of systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), we sought to determine whether race was related to a more adverse expression of disease. Between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2009, a total of 409 African American and 1808 white patients with scleroderma were evaluated at a single university medical center. While the distribution by sex was virtually identical in both groups, at 82% female, African American patients presented to the center at a younger mean age than white patients (47 vs. 53 yr; p scleroderma-specific autoantibody status, and for the socioeconomic measures of educational attainment and health insurance status, diminished these risk estimates (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0–1.6). The heightened risk of mortality persisted in strata defined by age at disease onset, diffuse cutaneous disease, anticentromere seropositivity, decade of care at the center, and among women. These findings support the notion that race is related to a distinct phenotypic profile in scleroderma, and a more unfavorable prognosis among African Americans, warranting heightened diagnostic evaluation and vigilant care of these patients. Further, we provide a chronologic review of the literature regarding race, organ system involvement, and mortality in scleroderma; we furnish synopses of relevant reports, and summarize findings. PMID:23793108

  1. Skin manifestations in sulfur mustard exposed victims with ophthalmologic complications: Association between early and late phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Hejazi, MD

    Full Text Available Context: Sulfur mustard (SM was used during the Iraq-Iran war (1980–1988. Exposed veterans continue to suffer from its ocular, skin, and respiratory complications. Objective: We aimed to evaluate associations between early (at the time of acute exposure and decades later skin manifestations in individuals with severe ophthalmologic complications secondary to sulfur mustard exposure. Materials and methods: One hundred forty-nine veterans with severe ocular injuries were evaluated for acute and chronic skin complications. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between early and late skin manifestations. Results: Late skin complaints were observed in nearly all survivors who had early skin lesions (131 out of 137; 95.62%. Seven out of 12 patients (58.33% who did not have early skin lesions ultimately developed late skin complications. There was a significant relationship between the presence of lesions at the time of exposure and developing late skin complaints (two-sided Fisher's exact test, OR = 15.59, p < 0.001. There was an association between having at least one early skin lesion and occurrence of late skin complications. Survivors with blisters at the time of chemical exposure were more likely to complain of itching (95% CI: 3.63–25.97, p < 0.001, burning (OR = 11.16; 95% CI: 2.97–41.89, p < 0.001, pigmentation changes (OR = 10.17; 95% CI: 2.54–40.75, p = 0.001, dryness (OR = 6.71, 95% CI: 1.22–37.01, p = 0.03 or cherry angioma (OR = 2.59; 95% CI:1.21–5.55, p = 0.01 during the late phase. Using multivariate logistic models, early blisters remained significantly associated with latent skin complaints. Of note, the genitalia and great flexure areas were the most involved anatomical sites for both early and late skin lesions in SM exposed survivors. Conclusion: According to this study, the presence of blisters at the time of exposure to SM is the most important predictor of developing

  2. Early Manifestation of Supravalvular Aortic and Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Uk Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a developmental disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities such as thickening of the vascular media layer in medium- and large-sized arteries. Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS are common vascular abnormalities in WS. The natural course of SVAS and PPAS is variable, and the timing of surgery or intervention is determined according to the progression of vascular stenosis. In our patient, SVAS and PPAS showed rapid concurrent progression within two weeks after birth. We report the early manifestation of SVAS and PPAS in the neonatal period and describe the surgical treatment for stenosis relief.

  3. Graves' disease. Manifestations and therapeutic options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, K.F.; Saleeby, G.

    1988-03-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Clinical features include thyroid enlargement, eye signs, tachycardia, heat intolerance, emotional lability, weight loss, and hyperkinesis. Three modes of therapy are available. The preferences of the patient and physician are usually prime considerations in devising the therapeutic plan. Radioactive iodine is the most frequently used and safest method of treatment for adults. Antithyroid drugs are preferred for children and pregnant women. Surgery is usually reserved for patients in whom the other forms of treatment are not acceptable. Considerable patient education during the decision-making process enhances the success of the therapeutic plan.

  4. Contribution of scanner to early detection of pleuropulmonary manifestations of asbestosis and silicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champeix, J.; Gabrillargues, D.; Caillaud, D.; Catilina, P.; Catilina, M.J.; Chamoux, A.; Pignide, L.; Puvinel, B.

    1989-01-01

    The early detection of pleuropulmonary diseases in workers previously exposed to asbestos fibers or silica dusts is of importance. Current radiology often provides insufficient data. Can the CT-scan contribute to an early diagnosis. This technique was performed on both miners exposed to silicosis hazard and asbestos exposed workers [fr

  5. Altered Markers of Brain Development in Crohn's Disease with Extraintestinal Manifestations - A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne K Thomann

    Full Text Available Alterations of brain morphology in Crohn's disease have been reported, but data is scarce and heterogenous and the possible impact of disease predisposition on brain development is unknown. Assuming a systemic course of the disease, brain involvement seems more probable in presence of extraintestinal manifestations, but this question has not yet been addressed. The present study examined the relationship between Crohn's disease and brain structure and focused on the connection with extraintestinal manifestations and markers of brain development.In a pilot study, brains of 15 patients with Crohn's disease (of which 9 had a history of extraintestinal manifestations, i.e. arthritis, erythema nodosum and primary sclerosing cholangitis were compared to matched healthy controls using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and controls were tested for depression, fatigue and global cognitive function. Cortical thickness, surface area and folding were determined via cortical surface modeling.The overall group comparison (i.e. all patients vs. controls yielded no significant results. In the patient subgroup with extraintestinal manifestations, changes in cortical area and folding, but not thickness, were identified: Patients showed elevated cortical surface area in the left middle frontal lobe (p<0.05 and hypergyrification in the left lingual gyrus (p<0.001 compared to healthy controls. Hypogyrification of the right insular cortex (p<0.05 and hypergyrification of the right anterior cingulate cortex (p<0.001 were detected in the subgroup comparison of patients with against without extraintestinal manifestations. P-values are corrected for multiple comparisons.Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that Crohn's disease is associated with aberrant brain structure and preliminary support for the hypothesis that these changes are associated with a systemic course of the disease as indicated by extraintestinal manifestations. Changes

  6. Parkinson disease: systemic and orofacial manifestations, medical and dental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Arthur H; Mahler, Michael; Norman, Keith M; Ettinger, Ronald L

    2009-06-01

    More than 1.5 million Americans have Parkinson disease (PD), and this figure is expected to rise as the population ages. However, the dental literature offers little information about the illness. The authors conducted a MEDLINE search using the key terms "Parkinson's disease," "medical management" and "dentistry." They selected contemporaneous articles published in peer-reviewed journals and gave preference to articles reporting randomized controlled trials. PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic and nondopaminergic neurons in the brain. These deficits result in tremor, slowness of movement, rigidity, postural instability and autonomic and behavioral dysfunction. Treatment consists of administering medications that replace dopamine, stimulate dopamine receptors and modulate other neurotransmitter systems. Oral health may decline because of tremors, muscle rigidity and cognitive deficits. The dentist should consult with the patient's physician to establish the patient's competence to provide informed consent and to determine the presence of comorbid illnesses. Scheduling short morning appointments that begin 90 minutes after administration of PD medication enhances the patient's ability to cooperate with care. Inclination of the dental chair at 45 degrees, placement of a bite prop, use of a rubber dam and high-volume oral evacuation enhance airway protection. To avoid adverse drug interactions with levodopa and entacapone, the dentist should limit administration of local anesthetic agents to three cartridges of 2 percent lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine per half hour, and patients receiving selegiline should not be given agents containing epinephrine or levonordefrin. The dentist should instruct the patient and the caregiver in good oral hygiene techniques.

  7. Zr-89-Bevacizumab PET Visualizes Disease Manifestations in Patients with von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosting, Sjoukje F.; van Asselt, Sophie J.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Bongaerts, Alfons H. H.; Steinberg, Julia D. J.; de Jong, Johan; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Horst-Schrivers, van der Anouk N. A.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Links, Thera P.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) are at risk to develop multiple tumors. The growth of lesions is unpredictable, and regular surveillance is critical for early treatment to control local damage. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) produced locally is supposed to play an

  8. Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Coeliac Disease – A Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Viviana Marisa Pereira; Coelho, Ana Sofia; Veloso e Silva, Diana Maria; de Andrade, David José Casimiro

    2017-01-01

    Background: Coeliac disease is a chronic enteropathy that remains a challenge for the clinician, due to its atypical manifestations and etiopathogenic complexity. Objective: This article intends to describe the oral characteristics of Coeliac Disease in children in order to facilitate their management in the dental office. Methods: A review of the literature was performed electronically in PubMed (PubMed Central, and MEDLINE) for articles published in English from 2000 to April of 2017. The article is also based on the authors' clinical experience with children with coeliac disease. The searched keywords were “coeliac disease “,”oral manifestations “, “dental enamel defects”, “recurrent aphthous stomatitis” and “oral aphthous ulcers”. Results: There are some oral manifestations which are strictly related to coeliac disease: dental enamel defects, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, delayed tooth eruption, multiple caries, angular cheilitis, atrophic glossitis, dry mouth and burning tongue. Conclusion: The complete knowledge of the oral manifestations of coeliac disease can trigger an effective change in the quality of life of the patients with this disease. PMID:29238414

  9. Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Coeliac Disease - A Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Viviana Marisa Pereira; Coelho, Ana Sofia; Veloso E Silva, Diana Maria; de Andrade, David José Casimiro

    2017-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic enteropathy that remains a challenge for the clinician, due to its atypical manifestations and etiopathogenic complexity. This article intends to describe the oral characteristics of Coeliac Disease in children in order to facilitate their management in the dental office. A review of the literature was performed electronically in PubMed (PubMed Central, and MEDLINE) for articles published in English from 2000 to April of 2017. The article is also based on the authors' clinical experience with children with coeliac disease. The searched keywords were "coeliac disease ","oral manifestations ", "dental enamel defects", "recurrent aphthous stomatitis" and "oral aphthous ulcers". There are some oral manifestations which are strictly related to coeliac disease: dental enamel defects, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, delayed tooth eruption, multiple caries, angular cheilitis, atrophic glossitis, dry mouth and burning tongue. The complete knowledge of the oral manifestations of coeliac disease can trigger an effective change in the quality of life of the patients with this disease.

  10. Extraosseous manifestation of Gaucher's disease type I: MR and histological appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Moedder, U.

    2000-01-01

    Gaucher's disease type I is the most prevalent lysosomal storage disorder caused by an autosomal-recessive inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase activity with secondary accumulation of glucocerebrosides within the lysosomes of macrophages. The storage disorder produces a multisystem disease characterized by progressive visceral enlargement and gradual replacement of bone marrow with lipid-laden macrophages. Skeletal disease is a major source of disability in Gaucher's disease. Extraosseous extension of Gaucher cells is an extremely rare manifestation of skeletal Gaucher's disease. This is a report on the MRI and histopathological findings of an extraosseous Gaucher-cell extension into the midface in a patient with Gaucher's disease. (orig.)

  11. Association of extraintestinal manifestations and anaemia with disease outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Gonczi, Lorant; Golovics, Petra Anna; Lovasz, Barbara Dorottya; Szita, Istvan; Balogh, Mihaly; Pandur, Tunde; Vavricka, Stephan R; Rogler, Gerhard; Lakatos, Laszlo; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2016-07-01

    The association between extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) and disease activity suggest a common pathogenetic link with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We report on the association of EIMs and anaemia with long-term disease outcomes, including treatment steps, hospitalization, and surgery in the prospective population-based IBD inception cohort from Veszprem province. Data of 678 incident IBD patients (Crohn's disease/ulcerative colitis(CD/UC): 331/347) diagnosed from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2012 were analyzed (CD: m/f: 176/155, median age at diagnosis: 28, IQR: 21-40 years, disease duration: 6, IQR: 2-9 years; UC: m/f: 200/147, median age at diagnosis: 36, IQR: 26-50 years, duration: 7, IQR: 4-10 years). EIMs were present in 30% of the CD and 17.3% of the UC patients. In CD, female gender (p = 0.02) need for steroid (p  < 0.001) and azathioprine (AZA) (p = 0.02), while in UC, young age at onset (p = 0.03), extensive disease (p = 0.003), female gender (p = 0.07), need for steroids (p < 0.001) and AZA (p = 0.004) and need for IBD-related hospitalization (p = 0.01) were associated with the presence of EIMs. Anaemia was present in 56.7% of the CD and 30.2% of the UC patients. In both CD and UC anaemia was associated with age at onset (pCD = 0.001, pUC = 0.04), disease location/extent (pCD = 0.02, pUC < 0.001), steroid and AZA use (for both pCD,UC < 0.001), need for surgery/colectomy (pCD < 0.001, pUC = 0.002) and hospitalization (pCD = 0.004, pUC < 0.001) and in CD, it was associated with anti TNF therapy(p = 0.002). The presence of EIMs was associated with disease phenotype in UC and with treatment strategy in both CD and UC. Additionally, anaemia was associated with hospitalization and surgery in both CD and UC, suggesting that EIMs and anaemia may be helpful in stratifying disease severity in IBD.

  12. Diagnostic and clinical characteristics of early-manifesting females with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbornoni, Lauren; Price, Elinora T; Andrews, Jennifer; Meaney, F John; Ciafaloni, Emma; Cunniff, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    Manifestations of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD) are present in up to 40% of heterozygous females, but there are few reports of females who exhibit skeletal muscle symptoms in childhood. From the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance Tracking and Research Network, a multi-site population-based surveillance network for dystrophinopathy, nine symptomatic female heterozygotes with onset of symptoms prior to age 9 years were identified. The median age at diagnosis was 8.3 years, and the median interval from first symptoms to diagnosis was 1.35 years. Of the nine female heterozygotes, four had a positive family history, seven had intellectual disability and five had at least one mental health disorder. Mental health concerns included attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum features, bipolar disorder, and depression. The frequency of intellectual and mental health problems in this group is higher than previously reported for affected males and for symptomatic females. These findings may have implications for diagnosis of early manifesting heterozygotes and for their health supervision. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Herpes zoster in African patients: an early manifestation of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Perre, P; Bakkers, E; Batungwanayo, J; Kestelyn, P; Lepage, P; Nzaramba, D; Bogaerts, J; Serufilira, A; Rouvroy, D; Uwimana, A

    1988-01-01

    During a 3-month period, 131 cases of herpes zoster were diagnosed in Kigali, Rwanda. There were 46 female and 85 male patients. Mean age was 29 years (range 1-66). An unusually high proportion of patients presented with cranial and sacral nerve localisation of their cutaneous lesions. 55/131 patients (42%) had involvement of more than one dermatome. None of the patients had an underlying condition known to favour herpes zoster. 120/131 (92%) had antibodies to HIV detected by an immunoenzymatic assay (EIA) and indirect immunofluorescence. 92/125 adult patients (74%) had no sign or symptom related to HIV infection other than herpes zoster. This study suggests that herpes zoster in Central Africa is an early and readily detectable manifestation of HIV-induced immunosuppression.

  14. Metabolic syndrome and incidence of type 2 diabetes in patients with manifest vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, A.M.J.; Graaf, van der Y.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Spiering, W.; Visseren, F.L.J.

    2008-01-01

    Risk reduction in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease focuses on preventing new vascular events and not on prevention of type 2 diabetes. However, given the common pathophysiological pathways involved in the development of atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes, it is probable that

  15. Zika and Spondweni Viruses: Historic Evidence of Misidentification, Misdiagnosis and Serious Clinical Disease Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    isolations of 153 Zika virus from Aedes (Stegomyia) africanus (Theobald) taken in and above a Uganda Forest. 154 Bulletin of the World Health...1 Zika and Spondweni viruses : Historic evidence of misidentification, misdiagnosis, and serious clinical disease manifestations Andrew D...serogroup (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) consists of two members: Zika 3 and Spondweni viruses . Both viruses have been historically misidentified

  16. Clinical manifestations in uveitis patients with and without rheumatic disease in a Chinese population in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shi-Ting; Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Huang, Jing-Long; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Hwang, Yih-Shiou

    2017-12-01

    Uveitis can be a local eye disease or a manifestation of systemic rheumatologic disorders. However, the differences of clinical manifestations between uveitis patients with or without systemic rheumatologic disease have been seldom described in literature. We investigated the clinical features and complications of rheumatic disease-related uveitis, and compared the characteristics in patients with and without rheumatic disease in a Chinese population in Taiwan. A retrospective review was performed for all patients who had been diagnosed with uveitis between January 2009 and June 2014 at the Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. A total of 823 uveitis patients were enrolled in the study, including 123 patients with rheumatic diseases. The most frequent rheumatic diseases included ankylosing spondylitis (5.8%), followed by Behçet's disease (2.8%), sarcoidosis (1.4%), psoriasis (1.1%), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (1.1%). Compared with patients without rheumatic disease, those with rheumatic disease-related uveitis had a lower mean age at onset (35.1 ± 15.8 years vs. 44.0 ± 17.5 years), a longer follow-up period (27.1 ± 25.3 months vs. 22.2 ± 23.0 months), a higher incidence of anterior uveitis (69.0% vs. 46.3%), less frequent posterior uveitis (4.9% vs. 21.4%), a higher incidence of recurrence (26.8% vs. 14.1%), more frequent bilateral involvement (53.7% vs. 38.8%), and more frequent posterior synechiae (17.2% vs. 9.4%). The disease course and clinical manifestations of rheumatic disease-related uveitis were different from those unrelated. Patients with rheumatic disease-related uveitis had a higher recurrent rate and more frequent posterior synechiae than patients without rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Early-life rotavirus and norovirus infections in relation to development of atopic manifestation in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimerink, J.; Stelma, F.; Rockx, B.; Brouwer, D.; Stobberingh, E.; van Ree, R.; Dompeling, E.; Mommers, M.; Thijs, C.; Koopmans, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The increase in incidence of atopic diseases (ADs) in the developed world over the past decades has been associated with reduced exposure of childhood infections. Objective To investigate the relation between early intestinal viral infections in relation to the development of

  18. Early-life rotavirus and norovirus infections in relation to development of atopic manifestation in infants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimerink, J.; Stelma, F.F.; Rockx, B.; Brouwer, D.; Stobberingh, E.E.; Ree, R. van; Dompeling, E.; Mommers, M.; Thijs, C.; Koopmans, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increase in incidence of atopic diseases (ADs) in the developed world over the past decades has been associated with reduced exposure of childhood infections. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between early intestinal viral infections in relation to the development of atopic

  19. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL FEATURES OF KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS WITH CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION MANIFESTATION IN THE EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Limareva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To optimize the management of postoperative renal allograft recipients through the introduction of methods for predicting risk of manifestation of cytomegalovirus infection on the basis of a comprehensive assessment of the clinical and immunological status. Materials and methods. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 303 patients with end-stage renal disease, among them – were the recipients of renal allograft – 136, among whom 29 within 2 months after the operation had clinical signs of CMV infection. Assessable "CMV syndrome", laboratory evidence of CMV infection, the incidence of antigens (genes of HLA A, B and DRB *1, calculated goodness of fit χ2 and relative risk RR, changes MCP-1 in urine. Results. In renal allograft recipients with clinical and laboratory evidence of CMV infection in the early postoperative period, significantly more (χ2 > 3,8 met antigen B35. A positive association with CMV infection was detected also for DRB1 * 08, B21, B22, B41, A24 (9, B51 (5, DRB1*14 and DRB1*15. Protective effects possessed antigens / alleles of genes A26 (10, B14, B38 (16 B61 (40 and DRB1*16. MCP-1 levels in this group of recipients were raised to 2174,7 ± 296,3 pg/ml with a strong negative correlation with the levels of urea and creatinine in serum (r = 0,9, p < 0.001. Conclusion. Immunological markers of risk manifestation of CMV infection in recipients of kidneys in the early postoperative period are: the carriage of В35 и В55,56(22, В49(21, В41, DRB1*08 и DRB1*15, an increase of levels of MCP-1 in urine without increasing the levels of urea and creatinine in the serum. 

  20. Ventricular Septal Defect: Peculiarities of Early Neonatal and Postnatal Diagnosis, Clinical Manifestations, Treatment and Prognosis at the Contemporary Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Kalashnikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the literature data on the incidence, the main clinical manifestations, modern methods for early neonatal and postnatal diagnosis and treatment of ventricular septal defect in children, as well as the prognosis of this disease. According to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, ventricular septal defect is classified as Q21.0 Ventricular septal defect. Incidence. In the overall structure of congenital malformations of the cardiovascular system, ventricular septal defect has about 20 %. Diagnosis. Moderate ventricular septal defect is manifested by shortness of breath, rapid fatigability during feeding, delay in physical development. Significant arterial-venous shunt in the first month of life is accompanied by a transient mild cyanosis when the baby is fed and cries. Infants develop high pulmonary hypertension, circulatory failure, malnutrition. Small noise intensity is typical for newborns in the first weeks or even months of life, which is due to physiologically increased intravascular pulmonary resistance. Systolic murmur is extended to the entire systole with maximum amplitude at the left edge of the sternum at the level of III–IV intercostal spaces. Sclerotic phase of pulmonary hypertension with ventricular septal defect is defined as Eisenmenger reaction. The clinical picture of this disorder depends on the degree of hemodynamic instability caused by the defect parameters, the pressure level in the pulmonary artery, vascular pulmonary resistance, the magnitude and direction of the shunt through the defect. Diagnosis is confirmed by characteristic changes in the electrocardiogram, echocardiography and chest radiograph. Treatment. Small muscular ventricular septal defects often close spontaneously during the first 2 years of life. Drug correction is needed in the development of congestive heart failure. The optimum age for surgery — 5–9 years.

  1. Acute Myocardial Infarction: The First Manifestation of Ischemic Heart Disease and Relation to Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfroi Waldomiro Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between cardiovascular risk factors and acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease, correlating them with coronary angiographic findings. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional study of 104 patients with previous acute myocardial infarction, who were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of angina prior to acute myocardial infarction. We assessed the presence of angina preceding acute myocardial infarction and risk factors, such as age >55 years, male sex, smoking, systemic arterial hypertension, lipid profile, diabetes mellitus, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and familial history of ischemic heart disease. On coronary angiography, the severity of coronary heart disease and presence of left ventricular hypertrophy were assessed. RESULTS: Of the 104 patients studied, 72.1% were males, 90.4% were white, 73.1% were older than 55 years, and 53.8% were hypertensive. Acute myocardial infarction was the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease in 49% of the patients. The associated risk factors were systemic arterial hypertension (RR=0.19; 95% CI=0.06-0.59; P=0.04 and left ventricular hypertrophy (RR=0.27; 95% CI=0,.8-0.88; P=0.03. The remaining risk factors were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease is high, approximately 50%. Hypertensive individuals more frequently have symptoms preceding acute myocardial infarction, probably due to ventricular hypertrophy associated with high blood pressure levels.

  2. Cerebrovascular Diseases and Early Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Gündüz

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cerebrovascular disease is one of the important causes of seizures and epilepsy among the advanced age group. Seziures are found to be associated with lesion localization and size in previous studies. METHODS: Here, we aimed to detect prevelance of seizure, relation of seizure and lesion localization, and observed seizure types. RESULTS: Three hundred seventy eight patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease or intraparenchymal hemorrhage who were followed in Cerrahpasa IVIedical School clinic were studied retrospectively and probability of seizure occurence within 1 month after stroke was evaluated. CONCLUSION: Among 378 patients hospitalized by acute stroke, 339 were diagnosed as ischemic cerebrovascular disease and 39 (10.3% had primary intraparenchymal hematoma. Seizures were observed in 16 patients (4.2%, 2 (%5.1 in intraparenchymal hematoma group and 14 (%4.1 in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Early seizures were detected in 33% of patients with anterior cerebral artery, in 6.8% of posterior cerebral artery and in 3.3% of middle cerebral artery infarcts and in three patients out of 12 who were known to have epilepsy. Seizure types were secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizure in nine cases (57%. Among whole group status epilepticus was observed in four patients (1.1%. Conclusion: Early seizure rates are found to be high among patients with anterior cerebral artery infarct and known epilepsy

  3. Case Reports of Cat Scratch Disease with Typical and Atypical Clinical Manifestations: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulshan Umbreen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cat scratch disease (CSD is the most well-known zoonotic disease spread by domestic animals like cats. Cats are the source of Bartonella henselae. Most patients more than ninety percent 3-12 days after a scratch from a cat, undoubtedly a little cat with insects present with one or more erythematous injuries at the site of inoculation, the sore is typically a crusted papule or, once in a while, a pustule. More than half of cases in one study show that the systemic indications went with the lymphadenopathy. These may incorporate fever, discomfort, migraine and anorexia and frequently happen in immunocompromised patients. Atypically clinical manifestations happen are altered mental status, perplexity, prolonged fever, respiratory protestations (atypical pneumonitis, Joint pain, synovitis, Back agony is uncommon. The hypothesis of the study to find out that cat scratch disease cause typical and atypical clinical manifestation. Study was conducted July 2015 to September 2015. The methodology sections of a review article are listed all of the databases and citation indexes that were searched such as Web of Science and PubMed and any individual journals that were searched. Various case reports were mentioned in the study. Case reports of cat scratch diseases with typical and atypical clinical manifestation included in the study. The objective of review of these reporting cases is to make physicians aware about cat scratch diseases and also need to create awareness about cat scratch disease in pet owner. Although it is self-limiting needs to report to health authorities. There are few cases reported in which mostly cases reported in twain, japan, Brazil, Texas, United States, Dhaka, Spain with typical and atypical clinical manifestation

  4. Clinical and Laboratory Features and Extraintestinal Manifestations of Celiac Disease in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mete Akın

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Celiac disease an autoimmune disorder resulting from an immune response to the gluten in genetically predisposed patients. Although, diarrhea is the most common finding at presentation in adults, disease may present with extraintestinal manifestations such as anemia, osteoporosis, elevated transaminase levels and growth retardation. In this article, symptoms, extraintestinal manifestations and coexistence with other autoimmune disorders of adult patients with celiac disease were evaluated. Material and Method: 22 patients whose followed with the diagnosis of celiac disease in Suleyman Demirel University Department of Gastroenterology, between January 2007 and Semptember 2010, were evaluated retrospectively. Symptoms, extraintestinal manifestations and coexistence with other autoimmune disorders of patients at presentation were investigated. Results: 13 (59% of all cases were female and 9 (41% were male. Mean age at presentation was 38,5 years. Most common complaints were diarrhea and weakness . Tissue transglutaminase and/or antiendomysium antibody were positive, and diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic examination in all patients. Iron deficiency, vitamine B12 deficiency and folic acid deficiency were detected in 17 (77%, 8 (36% and 6 (27% patients, respectively. There were elevated transaminase levels in 8 (36% patients. Osteoporosis was detected in 4 female and 1 male patients. Sensorimotor polineuropathy was detected in 2 patients. There was growth retardation in 2 patients. Autoimmune hypothyroidism and Type 1 diabetes mellitus were detected in 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Coexistence with Crohn%u2019s disease was detected in a patient. Discussion: Celiac disease may present with extraintestinal manifestations in adults. It should be remembered, especially in patients with iron deficiency and mild to moderate transaminase elevations with unexplained etiology. It should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and

  5. Can Biomarkers Help the Early Diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weidong Le; Jie Dong; Song Li; Amos D.Korczyn

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease with progressive loss of dopamine neurons.PD patients usually manifest a series of motor and non-motor symptoms.In order to provide better early diagnosis and subsequent disease-modifying therapies for PD patients,there is an urgent need to identify sensitive and specific biomarkers.Biomarkers can be divided into four categories:clinical,imaging,biochemical,and genetic.Ideal biomarkers not only improve our understanding of PD pathogenesis and progression,but also provide benefits for early risk evaluation and clinical diagnosis of PD.Although many efforts have been made and several biomarkers have been extensively investigated,few if any have been found useful for early diagnosis.Here,we summarize recent developments in the discovered biomarkers of PD and discuss their merits and limitations for the early diagnosis of PD.

  6. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, ...

  7. Neuropsychiatric manifestation of celiac disease: A case-control study in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Nimel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated disease dependent on gluten. Prevalence of CD is about 1% and beside gastrointestinal complaints, neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent an atypical feature of CD. Some studies suggest that a gluten-free diet is effective in treating them. Settings and Design: This case-control study of 49 cases was done during the period of January to March 2013. Aim: To know the spectrum of psychiatric manifestations and cognitive functions in children with CD. Materials and Methods: We took 49 diagnosed cases of CD (based on the demonstration of IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies and duodenal biopsy and compared with demographically matched control group (n = 50 on Seguin Form Board Test for cognitive functions and Behavioral Summarized Evaluation-Revised scale for assessment of psychiatric and behavior disturbances. All possible psychiatric diagnosis was made on the basis of International Statistical Classification of Disease and Related Health Problems-Tenth Revision criteria. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analyses were done by using Chi-square test and two-tailed P-values. Results: Neuropsychiatric manifestations were seen in 29% of cases as against 4% of controls which was statistically significant (P=0.001. Only four cases and 1 control fount to be mild mental retardation (P = 0.16. Autism, dyslexia, developmental delay, disruptive behavior disorder, and tic disorder present in cases were not found. Conclusion: Clinical manifestations of CD vary from typical malabsorption syndrome to neuropsychiatric manifestations. Those psychiatric patients who are not responding to standard pharmacological modalities, a diagnosis of CD should be taken into consideration. Only behavioral problem can be the sole clinical manifestation of CD.

  8. CLINICAL MANIFESTATION, DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF KAWASAKI DISEASE: KNOWN DATA AND UNSOLVED QUESTIONS

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    G. А. Lyskina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture deals with the most common systemic vasculitis in pediatric practice — Kawasaki disease. This disorder is associated with risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death in children and young adults and at present is considered to be the main cause of the acquired heard diseases in children. The authors give historical aspects and modern opinions on etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnostics and treatment of Kawasaki disease. The data were summarized from Russian and foreign literature as well as from the own authors’ experience.

  9. Subglotic Stenosis as manifestation in Wegener’s Disease. A case report

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    Sofía VALLE-OLSEN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Subglottic stenosis in Wegener’s disease (WD represents a diagnostic challenge because it’s ability to be the unique manifestation. Description: A case of subglottic GW described in a woman 14 years. Discussion: Subglottic stenosis secondary to Wegener’s disease use to be associated with ENT symptoms, so these can give us the etiological suspicion. In the absence of these, we should include it in the differential diagnosis and try a histopathologic confirmation. Conclusions: In an isolated subglottic stenosis, rule Wegener's disease performing a biopsy of nasal mucosa and two serology tests.

  10. Oromandibular Dyskinesia as the Initial Manifestation of Late-Onset Huntington Disease

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    Dong-Seok Oh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a triad of choreoathetosis, dementia and dominant inheritance. The cause of HD is an expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the HD gene. Typical age at onset of symptoms is in the 40s, but the disorder can manifest at any time. Late-onset (≥ 60 years HD is clinically different from other adult or juvenile onset HD and characterized by mild motor problem as the initial symptoms, shorter disease duration, frequent lack of family history, and relatively low CAG repeats expansion. We report a case of an 80-year-old female with oromandibular dyskinesia as an initial manifestation of HD and 40 CAG repeats.

  11. The role of the amygdala during emotional processing in Huntington's disease: from pre-manifest to late stage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Sarah L; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Begeti, Faye; Guzman, Natalie Valle; Lazar, Alpar S; Rowe, James B; Barker, Roger A; Hampshire, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Deficits in emotional processing can be detected in the pre-manifest stage of Huntington's disease and negative emotion recognition has been identified as a predictor of clinical diagnosis. The underlying neuropathological correlates of such deficits are typically established using correlative structural MRI studies. This approach does not take into consideration the impact of disruption to the complex interactions between multiple brain circuits on emotional processing. Therefore, exploration of the neural substrates of emotional processing in pre-manifest HD using fMRI connectivity analysis may be a useful way of evaluating the way brain regions interrelate in the period prior to diagnosis. We investigated the impact of predicted time to disease onset on brain activation when participants were exposed to pictures of faces with angry and neutral expressions, in 20 pre-manifest HD gene carriers and 23 healthy controls. On the basis of the results of this initial study went on to look at amygdala dependent cognitive performance in 79 Huntington's disease patients from a cross-section of disease stages (pre-manifest to late disease) and 26 healthy controls, using a validated theory of mind task: "the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test" which has been previously been shown to be amygdala dependent. Psychophysiological interaction analysis identified reduced connectivity between the left amygdala and right fusiform facial area in pre-manifest HD gene carriers compared to controls when viewing angry compared to neutral faces. Change in PPI connectivity scores correlated with predicted time to disease onset (r=0.45, pneural networks underlying social cognition and emotional processing can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis in Huntington's disease. Connectivity between the amygdala and other brain regions is impacted by the disease process in pre-manifest HD and may therefore be a useful way of identifying participants who are approaching a clinical diagnosis

  12. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE WITH A VERY EARLY ONSET

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    E. A. Kornienko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has a tendency to manifest at earlier age. In childhood (< 6 years of age it has an especially severe course and is characterized by high grade inflammation, predominantly in the colon, by complication and extra-intestinal autoimmune injury. At younger age, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis require more aggressive treatment with frequently poor results. From genetic point of view, monogenic mutations controlling the immune response are characteristic for these diseases with an early onset; therefore, they are frequently associated with primary immunodeficiency. This implies various immunologic deficits, such as breakdown of the epithelial barrier, phagocytic dysfunction and dysfunction of Т and В lymphocytes and regulatory Т cells. Depending on this, a number of primary immunodeficiencies are identified associated with monogenic mutations of more than 50 genes. There some age-related specific features at manifestation. Thus, defects in interleukin 10 and FOXP3 manifest in the first months of life, whereas severe combined immunodeficiencies and phagocytosis defects become evident somewhat later. Virtually all 24 children with very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease, whom we examined, had immunologic defects and one child had a XIAP gene mutation. After identification of a specific immunologic defect, one can understand the mechanism of the disease and suspect one or another genetic defect with subsequent reasonable assessment of mutations in candidate genes. Detection of immunologic and genetic defects in children with a very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease allows for choosing an adequate strategy of non-conventional treatment that may differ depending on the mechanism of the disease.

  13. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE- A HOSPITALBASED STUDY

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    Shobha Ponmudy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic kidney disease affects every organ system including the eye. The aim of the study is to conduct a thorough ocular examination and to study the occurrence of various ocular manifestations exhibited by patients with chronic kidney disease and to analyse the findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 patients from Department of Nephrology, Stanley Medical College diagnosed with chronic kidney disease were examined for ocular manifestations at the Department of Ophthalmology, Stanley Medical College. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive, non-interventional, hospital-based study. The period of study was from August 2010 to October 2011. RESULTS The commonest cause of CKD was hypertension in 47 pts. (52.2% followed by both diabetes and hypertension in 30 patients. Patients with only diabetes were 6 patients (6.7% and with other causes were 7 patients (7.8%.10% of patients were legally blind with visual acuity <6/60. In this study, 65 patients belonged to less than 50 years. 49.3% of the presenile patients had cataract. A reduced Schirmer’s value was noted in 54 eyes of the 200 eyes. The incidence of ocular surface disease in the study was 27%. 92 eyes out of 200 eyes studied showed hypertensive retinopathy. Higher grades of hypertensive retinopathy was more in advanced stages of CKD, i.e. 24 eyes in stage IV and 23 eyes in stage V. 51 eyes out of 40 diabetics showed diabetic retinopathy changes of which a majority of 25 eyes belonged to stage V disease. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in CKD patients is significantly more when compared to diabetic patients without CKD. CONCLUSION Study demonstrates that routine ocular evaluation is necessary in all patients with chronic kidney disease irrespective of the presence of ocular symptoms. It also highlights the occurrence of a variety of treatable ocular manifestations, which can become vision threatening if not taken care of at the earliest.

  14. EXTRAOESOPHAGEAL MANIFESTATIONS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN THE PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGIST

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    A. I. Asmanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a chronic recurrent disorder with esophageal and extraesophageal symptoms and a variety of morphological changes of the mucous membrane of the esophagus caused by retrograde reflux of the gastric or gastro-intestinal contents. Extraesophageal (atypical symptoms are mainly complaints which indicate involvement in the process of bronchopulmonary, cardiovascular diseases and ENT-organs. This article discusses the pathogenesis of extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, and recommendations on diagnosis and treatment based on the author’s own experience and data of international publications.

  15. Single-cell analysis reveals early manifestation of cancerous phenotype in pre-malignant esophageal cells.

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    Jiangxin Wang

    Full Text Available Cellular heterogeneity plays a pivotal role in a variety of functional processes in vivo including carcinogenesis. However, our knowledge about cell-to-cell diversity and how differences in individual cells manifest in alterations at the population level remains very limited mainly due to the lack of appropriate tools enabling studies at the single-cell level. We present a study on changes in cellular heterogeneity in the context of pre-malignant progression in response to hypoxic stress. Utilizing pre-malignant progression of Barrett's esophagus (BE as a disease model system we studied molecular mechanisms underlying the progression from metaplastic to dysplastic (pre-cancerous stage. We used newly developed methods enabling measurements of cell-to-cell differences in copy numbers of mitochondrial DNA, expression levels of a set of mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in hypoxia response pathways, and mitochondrial membrane potential. In contrast to bulk cell studies reported earlier, our study shows significant differences between metaplastic and dysplastic BE cells in both average values and single-cell parameter distributions of mtDNA copy numbers, mitochondrial function, and mRNA expression levels of studied genes. Based on single-cell data analysis, we propose that mitochondria may be one of the key factors in pre-malignant progression in BE.

  16. Clinical and immunological relevance of anti-neuronal antibodies in celiac disease with neurological manifestations

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    Caio, Giacomo; Giorgio, Roberto De; Venturi, Alessandro; Giancola, Fiorella; Latorre, Rocco; Boschetti, Elisa; Serra, Mauro; Ruggeri, Eugenio; Volta, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess anti-neuronal antibodies (NA) prevalence and their correlation with neurological disorders and bowel habits in celiac disease (CD) patients. Background: Neurological manifestations are estimated to occur in about 10% of celiac disease patients and NA to central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS) are found in a significant proportion of them. Little is known about the clinical and immunological features in CD patients with neurological manifestations. Patients and methods: NA to CNS and ENS were investigated in 106 CD patients and in 60 controls with autoimmune disorders by indirect immunofluorescence on rat / primate cerebellar cortex and intestinal (small and large bowel) sections. Results: IgG NA to CNS (titer 1:50 - 1:400) were positive in 23 celiacs (21%), being more frequently detected in those with neurological disorders that in those without neurological dysfunction (49% vs. 8%, P 1:200 had severe constipation. Only one patient with cerebellar ataxia and intestinal sub-occlusion was positive for NA to CNS and ENS. NA to CNS and ENS were found in 7% and 5% of controls, respectively. Conclusion: In CD the positivity of NA to CNS can be regarded as a marker of neurological manifestations. High titer NA to ENS are associated with severe constipation. The demonstration of NA to CNS and ENS suggests an immune-mediated pathogenesis leading to central neural impairment as well as gut dysfunction (hence constipation), respectively. PMID:25926940

  17. Association between oral manifestations and inhaler use in asthmatic and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

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    Bhargavi Krishna Ayinampudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the association between oral manifestations and type, frequency and duration of inhaler usage, also type and dosage of medication used in asthmatic and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 250 patients of both sexes suffering from asthma and COPD who were using inhalers. Frequency of oral manifestation seen on the tongue, buccal mucosa, teeth, periodontium, palate, floor of the mouth, lips, and xerostomia in inhaler users depending on the type of inhaler, type and dosage of medication, frequency and duration of use of inhaler were examined. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis and P 0.05. Gingivitis/gingival enlargement (53.6% and 51.5% was almost similar but periodontitis was higher in those using >500 μg. Significant association (P < 0.05 was observed with duration <1 year; oral manifestations seen were taste alterations (53.2% in tongue, ulcerations (63.6% in the buccal mucosa, teeth affected (87%, gingivitis/gingival enlargement (66.2%, and xerostomia (89.6%. Conclusions: As asthmatics and COPD patients are at a higher risk of developing oral diseases during inhalation therapy, it is necessary to educate patients on proper oral health care and maintenance.

  18. Manifestaciones reumatológicas de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal Rheumatologic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

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    Octavio Germán Muñoz Maya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII se caracteriza por la activación inapropiada del sistema inmune de la mucosa intestinal y sus dos formas de presentación son: la colitis ulcerativa y la enfermedad de Crohn. Las manifestaciones extraintestinales se presentan hasta en el 36% de los pacientes y pueden comprometer cualquier órgano o sistema. La disfunción inmune se caracteriza por el desequilibrio entre los mediadores proinflamatorios y los antinflamatorios y se expresa como una enfermedad sistémica. Las manifestaciones reumatológicas asociadas a la EII son de tres tipos: la artritis periférica, la espondiloartropatía y una tercera categoría que incluye lesiones dérmicas, oftálmicas y del metabolismo óseo, entre otras. El manejo de estas manifestaciones se basa en la terapia sistémica para el control de la actividad inflamatoria local utilizando esteroides, derivados de la 5-ASA, inmunomoduladores y, en los últimos años, terapia anti-TNF. The main feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is the continuous activation of the mucosa-associated immune system; the disease has two major forms of presentation: ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease. The extraintestinal manifestations are present in 36% of patients, and any organ can be affected. There is an imbalance between proinflammatory and antinflammatory cytokines leading to a systemic disease. The rheumatologic manifestations of the IBD are: Peripheral arthritis, spondyloarthropathy and a third category that includes dermic and ocular lesions as well as metabolic bone disease. Control of the extraintestinal manifestations is based on systemic therapy with steroids, 5-ASA derivatives and biological anti-TNF therapy.

  19. Polycystic ovary syndrome and early-onset preeclampsia: reproductive manifestations of increased cardiovascular risk.

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    Veltman-Verhulst, Susanne M; van Rijn, Bas B; Westerveld, H Egbertine; Franx, Arie; Bruinse, Hein W; Fauser, Bart C J M; Goverde, Angelique J

    2010-01-01

    Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women is a major healthcare issue. Detection of premenopausal women with increased risk of CVD could enhance prevention strategies and reduce first event-related morbidity and mortality. In this study, we argue that an unfavorable metabolic constitution in women may present itself early in life as a reproductive complication, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and preeclampsia. We evaluated the cardiovascular risk of women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and women with PCOS and assessed their need for implementation of early risk factor-reduction strategies. We performed a standardized evaluation of 240 women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia and 456 women diagnosed with PCOS for established major CVD risk factors. Metabolic syndrome characteristics were analyzed per body mass index category. Mean age was 30.6 and 29.0 years for women with preeclampsia and PCOS, respectively. High percentages of metabolic syndrome were found in both groups (preeclampsia group, 14.6%; and PCOS group, 18.4%), with an incidence of greater than 50% in both groups of women if body mass index was greater than 30 kg/m. Overall, more than 90% of the women qualified for either lifestyle or medical intervention according to the American Heart Association guideline for CVD prevention in women. Women with PCOS and early-onset preeclampsia already show an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile with high need for lifestyle or medical intervention at a young age. We therefore recommend an active role of the gynecologist in routine screening and follow-up of women with reproductive conditions linked to future cardiovascular risk.

  20. Early and late endocrine effects in pediatric central nervous system diseases.

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    Aslan, Ivy R; Cheung, Clement C

    2014-01-01

    Endocrinopathies are frequently linked to central nervous system disease, both as early effects prior to the disease diagnosis and/or late effects after the disease has been treated. In particular, tumors and infiltrative diseases of the brain and pituitary, such as craniopharyngioma, optic pathway and hypothalamic gliomas, intracranial germ cell tumor, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis, can present with abnormal endocrine manifestations that precede the development of neurological symptoms. Early endocrine effects include diabetes insipidus, growth failure, obesity, and precocious or delayed puberty. With improving prognosis and treatment of childhood brain tumors, many survivors experience late endocrine effects related to medical and surgical interventions. Chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary axes governing growth, thyroid, gonadal, and adrenal function. In addition, obesity and metabolic alterations are frequent late manifestations. Diagnosing and treating both early and late endocrine manifestations can dramatically improve the growth, well-being, and quality of life of patients with childhood central nervous system diseases.

  1. A case of membranous nephropathy as a manifestation of graft-versus-host disease

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    Jae Hyun Han

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome (NS rarely occurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT as a late manifestation of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Herein, we report a case of HSCT-associated membranous nephropathy in a female patient with aplastic anemia. The patient received an allogeneic HSCT from her human leukocyte antigen-identical brother following myeloablative conditioning chemotherapy. NS occurred 21 months after HSCT without any concurrent features of chronic GVHD. The patient was treated with prednisolone and cyclosporine after renal biopsy confirmed membranous nephropathy, and achieved complete remission. Our report contradicts previous assumptions that concomitant chronic GVHD is responsible for the development of NS, suggesting that NS can develop as a new, independent manifestation of GVHD.

  2. Tics as an initial manifestation of juvenile Huntington's disease: case report and literature review.

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    Cui, Shi-Shuang; Ren, Ru-Jing; Wang, Ying; Wang, Gang; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-08-08

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder, typically characterized by chorea due to a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the HTT gene, although the clinical manifestations of patients with juvenile HD (JHD) are atypical. A 17-year-old boy with initial presentation of tics attended our clinic and his DNA analysis demonstrated mutation in the HTT gene (49 CAG repeats). After treatment, his symptoms improved. Furthermore, we performed literature review through searching the databases and summarized clinical features in 33 JHD patients. The most prevalent symptoms are ataxia, and two cases reported that tics as initial and prominent manifestation in JHD. Among them, 88% patients carried CAG repeats beyond 60 and most of them have family history. This case here illustrates the variable range of clinical symptoms of JHD and the necessity of testing for the HD mutation in young patients with tics with symptoms unable to be explained by Tourette's syndrome (TS).

  3. Gaucher disease in children: radiology of non-central nervous system manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, K.; Olsen, Oe.E.; Vellodi, A.

    2004-01-01

    The radiological findings in paediatric Gaucher disease (GD) are reviewed and future challenges for radiology are discussed. This overview is based on a literature review and our experience of children with GD in one of two national institutions for paediatric GD in the UK. GD is known to progress more rapidly in childhood. Current imaging is mainly suitable for ascertaining the complications of GD. The UK recommendations for routine radiological surveillance are discussed. With enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which dramatically modifies the course of the disorder, the challenge for radiology in the future is likely to be assessing treatment efficacy rather than the detection of disease complications. Disease manifestations are likely to change in those on ERT and the most notable recent alteration in the disease profile in childhood is the virtual disappearance of the acute bone crisis in this population

  4. Gaucher disease in children: radiology of non-central nervous system manifestations

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    McHugh, K. E-mail: kmchugh@gosh.nhs.uk; Olsen, Oe.E.; Vellodi, A

    2004-02-01

    The radiological findings in paediatric Gaucher disease (GD) are reviewed and future challenges for radiology are discussed. This overview is based on a literature review and our experience of children with GD in one of two national institutions for paediatric GD in the UK. GD is known to progress more rapidly in childhood. Current imaging is mainly suitable for ascertaining the complications of GD. The UK recommendations for routine radiological surveillance are discussed. With enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which dramatically modifies the course of the disorder, the challenge for radiology in the future is likely to be assessing treatment efficacy rather than the detection of disease complications. Disease manifestations are likely to change in those on ERT and the most notable recent alteration in the disease profile in childhood is the virtual disappearance of the acute bone crisis in this population.

  5. Coronary heart disease clinical manifestation and risk factors in Japanese immigrants and their descendents in the city of São Paulo

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    Amato Reynaldo Vicente

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether a difference exists in coronary heart disease clinical manifestations and the prevalence of risk factors between Japanese immigrants and their descendents in the city of São Paulo. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of coronary artery disease clinical manifestations and the prevalence of risk factors, comparing 128 Japanese immigrants (Japanese group with 304 Japanese descendents (Nisei group. RESULTS: The initial manifestation of the disease was earlier in the Nisei group (mean = 53 years, a difference of 12 years when compared with that in the Japanese group (mean = 65 years (P<0.001. Myocardial infarction was the first manifestation in both groups (P = 0.83. The following parameters were independently associated with early coronary events: smoking (OR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.35-3.77; P<0.002; Nisei group (OR = 10.22; 95% CI = 5.64-18.5; P<0.001; and female sex (OR = 5.04; 95% CI = 2.66-9.52; P<0.001. CONCLUSION: The clinical presentation of coronary heart disease in the Japanese and their descendents in the city of São Paulo was similar, but coronary heart disease onset occurred approximately 12 years earlier in the Nisei group than in the Japanese group.

  6. The Forgotten Plague: Psychiatric Manifestations of Ebola, Zika, and Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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    Tucci, Veronica; Moukaddam, Nidal; Meadows, Jonathan; Shah, Suhal; Galwankar, Sagar C; Kapur, G Bobby

    2017-01-01

    The media and public health generally focus on the biological and physical ramifications of epidemics. Mental health issues that coincide with emerging diseases and epidemics are rarely examined and sometimes, even eschewed due to cultural considerations. Psychiatric manifestations of various infectious diseases, especially with a focus on Ebola Virus disease (EVD) and Zika Virus, are discussed in this commentary to illustrate the continued need of care after the resolution of the actual illness. Various infectious diseases have associations with mental illness, such as an increased risk of obsessive-compulsive disorders and Tourette syndrome in children with Group B streptococcal infection. Current EVD literature does not demonstrate a strong association of mental illness symptoms or diseases but there is a necessity of care that extends beyond the illness. Patients and their families experience depression, anxiety, trauma, suicidal ideation, panic and other manifestations. Zika virus has been associated neuronal injury, genetic alteration that affects fetal development and detrimental maternal mental health symptoms are being documented. While funding calls from the international community are present, there are no specific epidemiological data or fiscal estimates solely for mental health during or after infectious diseases epidemics or disasters that support health care providers and strengthen policies and procedures for responding to such situations. Therefore, those on the frontlines of epidemics including emergency physicians, primary care providers and infectious disease specialists should serve communicate this need and advocate for sustained and increased funding for mental health programs to heighten public awareness regarding acute psychiatric events during infectious diseases outbreaks and offer treatment and support when necessary.

  7. Emotional face recognition deficits and medication effects in pre-manifest through stage-II Huntington's disease.

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    Labuschagne, Izelle; Jones, Rebecca; Callaghan, Jenny; Whitehead, Daisy; Dumas, Eve M; Say, Miranda J; Hart, Ellen P; Justo, Damian; Coleman, Allison; Dar Santos, Rachelle C; Frost, Chris; Craufurd, David; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Stout, Julie C

    2013-05-15

    Facial emotion recognition impairments have been reported in Huntington's disease (HD). However, the nature of the impairments across the spectrum of HD remains unclear. We report on emotion recognition data from 344 participants comprising premanifest HD (PreHD) and early HD patients, and controls. In a test of recognition of facial emotions, we examined responses to six basic emotional expressions and neutral expressions. In addition, and within the early HD sample, we tested for differences on emotion recognition performance between those 'on' vs. 'off' neuroleptic or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications. The PreHD groups showed significant (precognition, compared to controls, on fearful, angry and surprised faces; whereas the early HD groups were significantly impaired across all emotions including neutral expressions. In early HD, neuroleptic use was associated with worse facial emotion recognition, whereas SSRI use was associated with better facial emotion recognition. The findings suggest that emotion recognition impairments exist across the HD spectrum, but are relatively more widespread in manifest HD than in the premanifest period. Commonly prescribed medications to treat HD-related symptoms also appear to affect emotion recognition. These findings have important implications for interpersonal communication and medication usage in HD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cross sectional PET study of cerebral adenosine A1 receptors in premanifest and manifest Huntington's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusch, Andreas; Elmenhorst, David; Saft, Carsten; Kraus, Peter H.; Gold, Ralf; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Bauer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    To study cerebral adenosine receptors (AR) in premanifest and manifest stages of Huntington's disease (HD). We quantified the cerebral binding potential (BP ND ) of the A 1 AR in carriers of the HD CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion using the radioligand [ 18 F]CPFPX and PET. Four groups were investigated: (i) premanifest individuals far (preHD-A; n = 7) or (ii) near (preHD-B; n = 6) to the predicted symptom onset, (iii) manifest HD patients (n = 8), and (iv) controls (n = 36). Cerebral A 1 AR values of preHD-A subjects were generally higher than those of controls (by up to 31 %, p 1 AR BP ND was observed to the levels of controls in preHD-B and undercutting controls in manifest HD by down to 25 %, p 1 AR BP ND and years to onset. Before onset of HD, the assumed annual rates of change of A 1 AR density were -1.2 % in the caudatus, -1.7 % in the thalamus and -3.4 % in the amygdala, while the corresponding volume losses amounted to 0.6 %, 0.1 % and 0.2 %, respectively. Adenosine receptors switch from supra to subnormal levels during phenoconversion of HD. This differential regulation may play a role in the pathophysiology of altered energy metabolism. (orig.)

  9. Natural variation in sensory-motor white matter organization influences manifestations of Huntington's disease.

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    Orth, Michael; Gregory, Sarah; Scahill, Rachael I; Mayer, Isabella Sm; Minkova, Lora; Klöppel, Stefan; Seunarine, Kiran K; Boyd, Lara; Borowsky, Beth; Reilmann, Ralf; Bernhard Landwehrmeyer, G; Leavitt, Blair R; Roos, Raymund Ac; Durr, Alexandra; Rees, Geraint; Rothwell, John C; Langbehn, Douglas; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2016-12-01

    While the HTT CAG-repeat expansion mutation causing Huntington's disease (HD) is highly correlated with the rate of pathogenesis leading to disease onset, considerable variance in age-at-onset remains unexplained. Therefore, other factors must influence the pathogenic process. We asked whether these factors were related to natural biological variation in the sensory-motor system. In 243 participants (96 premanifest and 35 manifest HD; 112 controls), sensory-motor structural MRI, tractography, resting-state fMRI, electrophysiology (including SEP amplitudes), motor score ratings, and grip force as sensory-motor performance were measured. Following individual modality analyses, we used principal component analysis (PCA) to identify patterns associated with sensory-motor performance, and manifest versus premanifest HD discrimination. We did not detect longitudinal differences over 12 months. PCA showed a pattern of loss of caudate, grey and white matter volume, cortical thickness in premotor and sensory cortex, and disturbed diffusivity in sensory-motor white matter tracts that was connected to CAG repeat length. Two further major principal components appeared in controls and HD individuals indicating that they represent natural biological variation unconnected to the HD mutation. One of these components did not influence HD while the other non-CAG-driven component of axial versus radial diffusivity contrast in white matter tracts were associated with sensory-motor performance and manifest HD. The first component reflects the expected CAG expansion effects on HD pathogenesis. One non-CAG-driven component reveals an independent influence on pathogenesis of biological variation in white matter tracts and merits further investigation to delineate the underlying mechanism and the potential it offers for disease modification. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4615-4628, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A rare cardiac manifestation in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

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    Meriam Hajji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a systemic disorder associated with various extrarenal complications. There is little information regarding the occurrence and distribution of cardiovascular abnormalities during the course of ADPKD. The major cardiovascular complications of ADPKD include valvulopathies and vascular ectasia. Aneurysm of the atrial septum (ASA is a very rare manifestation in ADPKD. A 37-year-old woman who was diagnosed with ADPKD was admitted to our hospital for advanced renal failure. Pelvic computed tomography revealed multiple variable-sized cysts in both kidneys. Trans-thoracic echocardiography showed ASA while the patient was completely asymptomatic.

  11. Mood and anxiety disorders as early manifestations of medical illness: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Fiammetta; Fava, Giovanni A; Sonino, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Affective disturbances involving alterations of mood, anxiety and irritability may be early symptoms of medical illnesses. The aim of this paper was to provide a systematic review of the literature with qualitative data synthesis. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane, and ISI Web of Science were systematically searched from inception to February 2014. Search terms were 'prodrome/early symptom', combined using the Boolean 'AND' operator with 'anxiety/depression/mania/hypomania/irritability/irritable mood/hostility', combined with the Boolean 'AND' operator with 'medical illness/medical disorder'. PRISMA guidelines were followed. A total of 21 studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Depression was found to be the most common affective prodrome of medical disorders and was consistently reported in Cushing's syndrome, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, pancreatic and lung cancer, myocardial infarction, Wilson's disease, and AIDS. Mania, anxiety and irritability were less frequent. Physicians may not pursue medical workup of cases that appear to be psychiatric in nature. They should be alerted that disturbances in mood, anxiety and irritability may antedate the appearance of a medical disorder.

  12. Is there a role for scintigraphic imaging of bone manifestations in Gaucher disease? A review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikosch, P.; State Hospital Klagenfurt; Kohlfuerst, S.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Kresnik, E.; Lind, P.; Mehta, A.B.; Hughes, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most prevalent inherited, lysosomal storage disease and is caused by deficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase. Bone and bone marrow alterations are frequent in the most prevalent non-neuronopathic form of Gaucher disease. Imaging of bone manifestations in Gaucher disease is performed by a variety of imaging methods, conventional X-ray and MRI as the most frequently and most important ones. However, different modalities of scintigraphic imaging have also been used. This article gives an overview on scintigraphic imaging with respect to bone manifestations in Gaucher disease discussing the advantages and limitations of scintigraphic imaging in comparison to other imaging methods. (orig.)

  13. A case of celiac disease with neurologic manifestations misdiagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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    Hyoju Ham

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy and is a rare disease in Asia, including in Korea. However, the ingestion of wheat products, which can act as a precipitating factor of CD, has increased rapidly. CD is a common cause of malabsorption, but many patients can present with various atypical manifestations as first presented symptoms, including anemia, osteopenia, infertility, and neurological symptoms. Thus, making a diagnosis is challenging. We report a case of CD that mimicked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. The patient was a sexagenary man with a history of progressive motor weakness for 2 years. He was highly suspected as having ALS. During evaluation of his neurological symptoms, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD was performed because he had experienced loose stools and weight loss for the previous 7 months. On EGD, the duodenal mucosa appeared smooth. A biopsy revealed severe lymphoplasma cell infiltration with flattened villi. His serum endomysial antibody (immunoglobulin A titer was 1:160 (reference, <1:40. Finally, he was diagnosed as having CD, and a gluten-free diet was immediately begun. At a 4-month follow-up, his weight and the quality of his stool had improved gradually, and the neurological manifestations had not progressed.

  14. [Limb lymphedema as a first manifestation of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursier, V; Vignes, S

    2004-05-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is characterized by protein-losing enteropathy occurring more frequently in childhood. Chronic diarrhea and diffuse edema are the main clinical manifestations. Peripheral lymphedema may also be associated. Lymphedema is usually present at the time of diagnosis or appears later in the course of the disease. We report the observation of a 31-year-old man suffering from an upper, lower limb and genital lymphedema many years before diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia was established. Lower limb lymphoscintigraphy confirmed lymphedema and duodenal biopsies lymphangiectasia. Hypoproteinemia, lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia were also noted. Treatment of lymphedema included low stretch bandaging and elastic stocking. No dietary management with a low-fat diet was added. Search for primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with biological parameters would be useful when primary lymphedema is present. Especially since primary intestinal lymphangiectasia may be complicated by occurrence of B cell lymphoma.

  15. Langerhans Cells Histiocytosis: Features of Clinical and Laboratory Manifestations and Course of the Disease

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    O.I. Dorosh

    2014-08-01

    Results of the Study. An analysis of 25 cases of LCH in children was presented. Monosystem LCH most often affects the skeletal system. Multisystem LCH is characterized by diversity of clinical manifestations, more severe course and high risk of death. One third of patients with multisystem LCH are infants. In children with monosystem LCH we observed complete clinical response to first-line therapy. At the same time, complete response to polychemotherapy is observed only in 30 % of children with multisystem LCH. Prognosis of the disease depends on the initial affection of risk organs (bone marrow, liver, lungs, spleen, their dysfunction and the child’s age at the time of diagnosis. Process reactivation in children with multisystem LCH occurs in the first 12 months from the onset of the disease.

  16. MRI manifestation for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yonggang; Qi Ji; Xia Shuang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the MRI features of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Methods: Three patients with clinically diagnosed sCJD underwent MR study, including SE T 1 WI, FSE T 2 WI, and DWI sequences. The MR imaging features were analyzed. Results: The lesions were not definite either in SE T 1 WI or in FSE T 2 WI, but were prominent in DWI. Abnormal hyperintensive signal appeared in the cerebral cortex, with the frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes being the mostly involved region. The subcortical white matter was normal. The bilateral caudate nuclei and thalami could also be involved. The abnormal signal could be either symmetrical or asymmetrical. There was diffuse atrophy of the brain parenchyma in the late phase of disease, especially in the cortex. Conclusion: With the application of MR study, especially the DWI, combined with its characteristic clinical manifestation, the diagnosis of sCJD can be made definitely. (authors)

  17. Differential Diagnoses of Overgrowth Syndromes: The Most Important Clinical and Radiological Disease Manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, L.S.; Alves, U.D.; Zanier, J.F.C.; Machado, D.C.; Camilo, G.B.; Machado, D.C.; Camilo, G.B.; Lopes, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that are characterized by excessive tissue development. Some of these syndromes may be associated with dysfunction in the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/PI3K/AKT pathway, which results in an increased expression of the insulin receptor. In the current review, four overgrowth syndromes were characterized (Proteus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome, Made lung’s disease, and neurofibromatosis type I) and illustrated using cases from our institution. Because these syndromes have overlapping clinical manifestations and have no established genetic tests for their diagnosis, radiological methods are important contributors to the diagnosis of many of these syndromes. The correlation of genetic discoveries and molecular pathways that may contribute to the phenotypic expression is also of interest, as this may lead to potential therapeutic interventions

  18. 20 CFR 702.603 - Determining the payrate for compensating occupational disease claims which become manifest after...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... occupational disease claims which become manifest after retirement. 702.603 Section 702.603 Employees' Benefits... AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Occupational Disease Which Does Not Immediately Result in Death or Disability § 702.603 Determining the payrate for compensating occupational disease...

  19. 20 CFR 702.604 - Determining the amount of compensation for occupational disease claims which become manifest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... occupational disease claims which become manifest after retirement. 702.604 Section 702.604 Employees' Benefits... AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Occupational Disease Which Does Not Immediately Result in Death or Disability § 702.604 Determining the amount of compensation for occupational disease...

  20. Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease: Investigation of the IL-10 signaling pathway in Iranian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemati, Shahram; Teimourian, Shahram; Tabrizi, Mina; Najafi, Mehri; Dara, Naghi; Imanzadeh, Farid; Ahmadi, Mitra; Aghdam, Maryam Kazemi; Tavassoli, Mohmoud; Rohani, Pejman; Madani, Seyyed Ramin; de Boer, Martin; Kuijpers, T. W.; Roos, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Background & aim: Comparing to adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), those with early onset manifestations have different features in terms of the underlying molecular pathology, the course of disease and the response to therapy. We investigated the IL-10 signaling pathway previously reported as

  1. Frosted branch angiitis, neuroretinitis as initial ocular manifestation in Behçet disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet disease is an idiopathic, multisystem disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of orogenital ulceration and vasculitis of the veins and arteries of all calibers. Ocular involvement may affect the conjunctiva, sclera, uveal tract, vitreous, blood vessels, and retina. Many theories have pointed toward an autoimmune response behind its pathogenesis, which may be triggered by exposure to an infectious agent. Frosted branch angiitis is characterized by vascular inflammation, sheathing, retinal edema, and retinal hemorrhages. The disease may be idiopathic in a majority of the cases or may be associated with ocular and systemic pathology. Association between Behηet disease, Frosted branch angiitis, and neuroretinitis is not reported in literature. This uncommon combination reflects the varied systemic and ocular manifestations in Behηet disease, especially in patients who are not diagnosed and treated in time. We hereby report a case of bilateral frosted branch angiitis and neuroretinitis in a young male from Middle-east, suffering from Behçet disease.

  2. Disease outcome for children who present with oral manifestations of Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussey, S

    2011-06-01

    To describe the outcome for children with oral Crohn\\'s disease (OCD) at diagnosis, and to determine if there was a difference in the Paediatric Crohn\\'s Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) scores between those with and those without oral lesions at follow-up.

  3. Psychological Manifestations of Early Childhood Adversity in the Context of Chronic Hematologic Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel C; Shen, Megan Johnson; Polizzi, Heather; Mascarenhas, John; Kremyanskaya, Marina; Holland, Jimmie; Hoffman, Ronald

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), a group of chronic hematologic malignancies, carry significant physical and psychological symptom burdens that significantly affect patients' quality of life. We sought to identify the relationship between early childhood adversity (ECA) and psychological distress in patients with MPNs, as ECA may compound symptom burden. Patients with MPNs were assessed for ECA (i.e., the Risky Families Questionnaire-subscales include abuse/neglect/chaotic home environment), distress (i.e., Distress Thermometer and Problem List), anxiety (i.e., Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety [HADS-A]), depression (i.e., Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression [HADS-D]), meeting standardized cutoff thresholds for distress (i.e., Distress Thermometer and Problem List≥ 4 or ≥ 7)/anxiety (HADS-A ≥8)/depression (HADS-D ≥ 8), and demographic factors. A total of 117 participants completed the study (78% response rate). ECA was associated with depression (p psychological outcomes. ECA was higher based on disease subtypes with greater symptom burden (other > polycythemia vera > myelofibrosis > essential thrombocythemia) (p = 0.047) and taking an antidepressant (p = 0.011). ECA is associated with psychological distress and meets screening criteria for anxiety and depression in patients with MPNs. ECA may help to explain individual patient trajectories, and further understanding may enhance patient-centered care among patients with MPNs. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Is type 2 diabetes mellitus a vascular disease (atheroscleropathy with hyperglycemia a late manifestation? The role of NOS, NO, and redox stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Suresh C

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease accounts for at least 85 percent of deaths for those patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Additionally, 75 percent of these deaths are due to ischemic heart disease. Hypothesis Is type 2 diabetes mellitus a vascular disease (atheroscleropathy with hyperglycemia a late manifestation? The role of NOS, NO, and redox stress. Testing of the hypothesis The vulnerable three arms of the eNOS reaction responsible for the generation of eNO is discussed in relation to the hypothesis: (1. The L-arginine substrate. (2. The eNOS enzyme. (3. The BH4 cofactor. Implications of the hypothesis If we view T2DM as a vascular disease initially with a later manifestation of hyperglycemia, we may be able to better understand and modify the multiple toxicities associated with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, overt T2DM, and accelerated atherosclerosis (atheroscleropathy. The importance of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, endothelial nitric oxide, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4, L-arginine, and redox stress are discussed in relation to endothelial cell dysfunction and the development and progression of atheroscleropathy and T2DM. In addition to the standard therapies to restore endothelial cell dysfunction and stabilization of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, this article will discuss the importance of folic acid (5MTHF supplementation in this complex devastating disease process. Atheroscleropathy and hyperglycemia could be early and late manifestations, respectively, in the natural progressive history of T2DM.

  5. Specificity of the STAT4 Genetic Association for Severe Disease Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kimberly E.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Lee, Annette T.; Ortmann, Ward A.; Plenge, Robert M.; Tian, Chao; Chung, Sharon A.; Nititham, Joanne; Hom, Geoffrey; Kao, Amy H.; Demirci, F. Yesim; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Petri, Michelle; Manzi, Susan; Kastner, Daniel L.; Seldin, Michael F.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Criswell, Lindsey A.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a genetically complex disease with heterogeneous clinical manifestations. A polymorphism in the STAT4 gene has recently been established as a risk factor for SLE, but the relationship with specific SLE subphenotypes has not been studied. We studied 137 SNPs in the STAT4 region genotyped in 4 independent SLE case series (total n = 1398) and 2560 healthy controls, along with clinical data for the cases. Using conditional testing, we confirmed the most significant STAT4 haplotype for SLE risk. We then studied a SNP marking this haplotype for association with specific SLE subphenotypes, including autoantibody production, nephritis, arthritis, mucocutaneous manifestations, and age at diagnosis. To prevent possible type-I errors from population stratification, we reanalyzed the data using a subset of subjects determined to be most homogeneous based on principal components analysis of genome-wide data. We confirmed that four SNPs in very high LD (r2 = 0.94 to 0.99) were most strongly associated with SLE, and there was no compelling evidence for additional SLE risk loci in the STAT4 region. SNP rs7574865 marking this haplotype had a minor allele frequency (MAF) = 31.1% in SLE cases compared with 22.5% in controls (OR = 1.56, p = 10−16). This SNP was more strongly associated with SLE characterized by double-stranded DNA autoantibodies (MAF = 35.1%, OR = 1.86, p<10−19), nephritis (MAF = 34.3%, OR = 1.80, p<10−11), and age at diagnosis<30 years (MAF = 33.8%, OR = 1.77, p<10−13). An association with severe nephritis was even more striking (MAF = 39.2%, OR = 2.35, p<10−4 in the homogeneous subset of subjects). In contrast, STAT4 was less strongly associated with oral ulcers, a manifestation associated with milder disease. We conclude that this common polymorphism of STAT4 contributes to the phenotypic heterogeneity of SLE, predisposing specifically to more severe disease. PMID

  6. Specificity of the STAT4 genetic association for severe disease manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly E Taylor

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a genetically complex disease with heterogeneous clinical manifestations. A polymorphism in the STAT4 gene has recently been established as a risk factor for SLE, but the relationship with specific SLE subphenotypes has not been studied. We studied 137 SNPs in the STAT4 region genotyped in 4 independent SLE case series (total n = 1398 and 2560 healthy controls, along with clinical data for the cases. Using conditional testing, we confirmed the most significant STAT4 haplotype for SLE risk. We then studied a SNP marking this haplotype for association with specific SLE subphenotypes, including autoantibody production, nephritis, arthritis, mucocutaneous manifestations, and age at diagnosis. To prevent possible type-I errors from population stratification, we reanalyzed the data using a subset of subjects determined to be most homogeneous based on principal components analysis of genome-wide data. We confirmed that four SNPs in very high LD (r(2 = 0.94 to 0.99 were most strongly associated with SLE, and there was no compelling evidence for additional SLE risk loci in the STAT4 region. SNP rs7574865 marking this haplotype had a minor allele frequency (MAF = 31.1% in SLE cases compared with 22.5% in controls (OR = 1.56, p = 10(-16. This SNP was more strongly associated with SLE characterized by double-stranded DNA autoantibodies (MAF = 35.1%, OR = 1.86, p<10(-19, nephritis (MAF = 34.3%, OR = 1.80, p<10(-11, and age at diagnosis<30 years (MAF = 33.8%, OR = 1.77, p<10(-13. An association with severe nephritis was even more striking (MAF = 39.2%, OR = 2.35, p<10(-4 in the homogeneous subset of subjects. In contrast, STAT4 was less strongly associated with oral ulcers, a manifestation associated with milder disease. We conclude that this common polymorphism of STAT4 contributes to the phenotypic heterogeneity of SLE, predisposing specifically to more severe disease.

  7. Emerging infectious diseases with cutaneous manifestations: Fungal, helminthic, protozoan and ectoparasitic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Ramya; Peranteau, Andrew J; Nawas, Zeena Y; Tong, Yun; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Yan, Albert C; Lupi, Omar; Tyring, Stephen K

    2016-07-01

    Given increased international travel, immigration, changing climate conditions, and the increased incidence of iatrogenic immunosuppression, fungal, protozoan, helminthic, and ectoparasitic infections that were once uncommon are being seeing more frequently in the Western hemisphere. However, the diagnosis and management of these infections is fraught with a lack of consistency because there is a dearth of dermatology literature on the cutaneous manifestations of these infections. In addition, delays in the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. We review the epidemiology, cutaneous manifestations, diagnostic modalities, and treatment options for emerging fungal, protozoan, helminthic, and ectoparasitic infections. It should be noted, however, that throughout this review we cite statistics documenting their increased incidence to back-up these infections as emerging, and although some of the diagnoses are clinical, others rely on newer laboratory tests, and the possibility exists that the increased incidence could be caused by better detection methods. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mucocutaneous manifestations in patients with chronic kidney disease: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattan S Rashpa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD-associated mucocutaneous manifestations significantly impair the quality of life but often remain understudied. They may also vary across regions, socioeconomic and nutritional status, and racial differences. Objectives: To study the patterns of mucocutaneous disorders and their prevalence in CKD patients irrespective of clinical stage or dialysis status. Materials and Methods: 122 (M:F = 77:45 patients aged 21‒85 (Mean ± SD = 57.5 ± 14.0 years having CKD for 3 month to 5 years were studied for mucocutaneous manifestations. Fifty (41% patients were on hemodialysis for 1‒42 months. Detailed medical history, clinical and mucocutaneous examination, and lab investigations were performed. KOH mounts, skin biopsy, Gram's and Giemsa staining, bacterial or fungal cultures were performed as required. Results: Xerosis in 93 (76.2%, skin pallor in 61 (50%, pruritus in 57 (46.7%, pigmentation in 47 (38.5%, and purpura in 18 (14.8% patients were the major dermatoses. Bullous lesions and perforating folliculitis occurred in 3 (2.5% patients each. Major nail abnormalities were pallor (in 35.2%, absent lunula (in 23.8%, nail discoloration (in 18%, and “half-and-half nails” in 16.4% patients, respectively. Hair abnormalities included sparse scalp and body hairs (in 35.2% and 13.1%, respectively and lusterless hair in 12.3% patients. Coated tongue (in 14.8%, xerostomia (in 12.3%, and macroglossia with teeth indention (in 7.4% patients were the mucosal manifestations. Conclusions: Xerosis, pruritus, skin pallor/pigmentary changes, nail pallor, absent lunula, nail discoloration, sparse hairs, coated tongue, xerostomia, macroglossia, and infections were the most common mucocutaneous manifestations in the studied patients irrespective of hemodialysis status. Cold and dry climates might be additional aggravators for xerosis/pruritus. Lifelong follow-up may be needed to reduce the morbidity associated with CKD

  9. [Subclinical and manifested hypothyroidism as a consequence of thyroid autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Dragoslav P; Djurica, Snezana; Davidović, Mladen; Stević, Radmila; Rajić, Miodrag; Marković, Natasa

    2005-10-01

    Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) is a slowly developing persistent inflamation of the thyroid gland, which frequently leads to hypothyroidism. Some of the up-to-date knowledge about hypothyroidism, both subclinical and manifested, caused by autoimmune disease, was presented. Autoimmune thyroid gland disease can occur at any age, but predominantly affects women after periods of high emotional and physical stress or accidents, as well as during periods of hormonal changes. It can also develop in families, and having an autoimmune disease slightly increases the risk of developing another. This paper showed an increasing incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism (4.17%) in elderly, and, at the same time, the incidence of primary hypothyroidism accounting for 1%. It is very usefull to estimate the stimulated thyrotropin (TSH) response, as well as the value of fast, short time thyroid gland reserves, analyzed by T3 and T4 serum level at 60th minute after TRH stimulation. Treatment of choice for HT (hypothyroidism of any cause) is thyroid hormone replacement. Drug of choice is orally administered levothyroxine sodium, usually for life-time. The standard dose is 1.6-1.8 mcg/kg body weight per day, but is in most cases patient dependent. Elderly patients usually require smaller replacement dose of levothyroxine, sometimes less than 1 mcg/kg body weight per day with coronary dilatator at the same time.

  10. Protean manifestations of vitamin D deficiency, part 3: association with cardiovascular disease and disorders of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David S H

    2011-05-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with the risk factors of inflammation, insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, and left ventricular hypertrophy. As a result there is an increase in cardiovascular events (CVEs) associated with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency itself or secondary hyperparathyroidism or both may be responsible for the increase in CVEs. Correction of vitamin D deficiency may decrease the incidence of CVEs. Vitamin D deficiency is also associated with Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, depression, and chronic pain and muscle weakness. Vitamin D deficiency is early treated with oral vitamin D supplements which may improve the manifestations of the diseases associated with vitamin D deficiency.

  11. Sensory nerve degeneration in a mouse model mimicking early manifestations of familial amyloid polyneuropathy due to transthyretin Ala97Ser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, H-W; Chiang, H; Lin, W-M; Yu, I-S; Lin, S-W; Hsieh, S-T

    2018-02-08

    Sensory nerve degeneration and consequent abnormal sensations are the earliest and most prevalent manifestations of familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) due to amyloidogenic transthyretin (TTR). FAP is a relentlessly progressive degenerative disease of the peripheral nervous system. However, there is a lack of mouse models to replicate the early neuropathic manifestations of FAP. We established human TTR knock-in mice by replacing one allele of the mouse Ttr locus with human wild-type TTR (hTTR wt ) or human TTR with the A97S mutation (hTTR A97S ). Given the late onset of neuropathic manifestations in A97S-FAP, we investigated nerve pathology, physiology, and behavioural tests in these mice at two age points: the adult group (8 - 56 weeks) and the ageing group (> 104 weeks). In the adult group, nerve profiles, neurophysiology and behaviour were similar between hTTR wt and hTTR A97S mice. By contrast, ageing hTTR A97S mice showed small fibre neuropathy with decreased intraepidermal nerve fibre density and behavioural signs of mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, significant reductions in sural nerve myelinated nerve fibre density and sensory nerve action potential amplitudes in these mice indicated degeneration of large sensory fibres. The unaffected motor nerve physiology replicated the early symptoms of FAP patients, that is, sensory nerves were more vulnerable to mutant TTR than motor nerves. These results demonstrate that the hTTR A97S mouse model develops sensory nerve pathology and corresponding physiology mimicking A97S-FAP and provides a platform to develop new therapies for the early stage of A97S-FAP. © 2018 British Neuropathological Society.

  12. Celiac disease manifesting as isolated cobalamin deficiency megaloblastic anemia: Case series and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Sakaleshpur Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. It has been identified as one of the most common lifelong disorders on a worldwide basis. Enteropathy in CD is thought to be the final consequence of an abnormal immune reaction, showing features of both an innate and adaptive response to gluten prolamins. The clinical spectrum is wide, including cases with either typical intestinal or atypical extra intestinal features, or silent forms. Anemia has frequently been reported as the only manifestation or the most frequent extra-intestinal symptom of CD. The only available treatment consists in dietary exclusion of grains containing gluten.

  13. Clinical manifestations of severe enterovirus 71 infection and early assessment in a Southern China population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si-da; Li, Pei-Qing; Li, Yi-Min; Li, Wei; Lai, Wen-Ying; Zhu, Cui-Ping; Tao, Jian-Ping; Deng, Li; Liu, Hong-Sheng; Ma, Wen-Cheng; Lu, Jia-Ming; Hong, Yan; Liang, Yu-Ting; Shen, Jun; Hu, Dan-Dan; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Yi; Situ, Min-Xiong; Chen, Yan-Ling

    2017-02-17

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) shows a potential of rapid death, but the natural history of the infection is poorly known. This study aimed to examine the natural history of EV-A71 infection. This was a prospective longitudinal observational study performed between January 1 st and October 31 st , 2012, at three hospitals in Guangdong, China. Subjects with positive EV-A71 RNA laboratory test results were included. Disease progression was documented with MRI, autopsies, and follow-up. Symptoms/signs with potential association with risk of death were analyzed. Among the 288 patients, neurologic symptoms and signs were observed (emotional movement disorders, dyskinesia, involuntary movements, autonomic dysfunction, and disturbance of consciousness). Some of them occurred as initial symptoms. Myoclonic jerks/tremors were observed among >50% of the patients; nearly 40% of patients presented fatigue and 25% were with vomiting. Twenty-eight patients (9.7%) presented poor peripheral perfusion within 53.4 ± 26.1 h; 23 patients (8.0%) presented pulmonary edema and/or hemorrhage within 62.9 ± 28.6 h. Seventeen (5.9%) patients were in a coma. Seven (2.4%) patients died within 62.9 ± 28.6 h. Seventy-seven survivors underwent head and spinal cord MRI and 37.7% (29/77) showed abnormalities. Two fatal cases showed neuronal necrosis, softening, perivascular cuffing, colloid, and neuronophagia phenomenon in the brainstem. Patients with EV-A71 infection showed high complexity of symptoms and onset timing. Death risk may be indicated by autokinetic eyeball, eyeball ataxia, severe coma, respiratory rhythm abnormality, absent pharyngeal reflex, ultrahyperpyrexia, excessive tachycardia, pulmonary edema and/or hemorrhage, and refractory shock and ataxic respiration. Early assessment of these symptoms/signs is important for proper management.

  14. Two cases of possible neuro-Sweet disease with meningoencephalitis as the initial manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Makimoto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases that were considered to be neuro-Sweet disease. They initially manifested with meningoencephalitis and no skin lesions, and rapidly improved with corticosteroid therapy. In both cases, patients complained of meningitic symptoms such as fever and headache, and HLA-B54 and -Cw1 turned out to be positive over the clinical course. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed increased levels of lymphocytes and protein. In case #1, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and diffusion-weighted images (DWI showed high-intensity signals in the right dorsal medulla oblongata, bilateral dorsal midbrain, and left thalamus. In case #2, FLAIR and DWI showed high-intensity signals in the bilateral cerebellar cortex and left caudate nucleus. Symptoms and MRI images were markedly improved in both cases after corticosteroid pulse therapy. According to published diagnostic criteria, these 2 cases were considered possible neuro-Sweet disease. These cases suggest that the combination of meningoencephalitis and HLA specificity is important to consider the possibility of neuro-Sweet disease, even without skin lesions.

  15. Rosai-Dorfman disease manifesting as a solitary lesion of the radius in a 41-year-old woman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.; Stacy, G.; Peabody, T.; Montag, A.

    2003-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare entity predominantly affecting children and young adults, characterized in 83-95% of cases by painless bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. We report the unusual case of a 41-year-old woman with Rosai-Dorfman disease that presented as a solitary lesion of the radius without other clinical manifestations. (orig.)

  16. Delayed traumatic hematomas of the brain: the early manifestations of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuyan; Tang Guangjian; Fu Jiazhen; Xu Bing; Yin Yanyu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT manifestations of delayed traumatic hematomas of the brain and evaluate their diagnostic significance in predicting the delayed traumatic brain hematoma. Methods: The manifestations of initial CT studies and follow-up CT examinations of 31 delayed traumatic brain hematomas were analyzed. Another 50 CT studies of head trauma without delayed brain hematomas were included randomly as control. Results: The abnormal findings of CT studies of the 31 delayed traumatic brain hematomas included: (1) Decreased density of the local brain parenchyma and disappeared difference between gray and white matter of the same area in 18 cases; (2) Local subarachnoid space hemorrhage in 24 cases; (3) Slight mass effect of local brain parenchyma in 16 cases. (4) Subdural hematoma in 9 cases. The locations of the abnormalities were roughly the same with the delayed hematoma except one local subarachnoid space hemorrhage, which was in the opposite of the delayed hematoma. The appearing rate of those abnormal findings in the control group was low and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: The decrease of density of local brain parenchyma, the disappeared difference between the gray and white matter, local subarachnoid space hemorrhage, and local swollen of brain presented in the initial CT study of the patient with heat trauma should be taken as indicators of delayed hemorrhage of the same area of brain, and it is necessary to do follow-up CT studies to exclude it

  17. Early Renal Involvement in a Girl with Classic Fabry Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perretta, Fernando; Antongiovanni, Norberto; Jaurretche, Sebastián

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the deficiency or absence of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A; this defect leads to the systemic accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and its metabolites. Organic involvement in men is well known, but in women it is controversial, mainly due to the random X-chromosome inactivation in each of their cells (Lyon hypothesis). This would explain why women (heterozygotes) present a wide variability in the severity of their phenotype. The manifestations are multisystemic and begin in early childhood, reaching a severe compromise in adulthood. Typical acroparesthesia in hands and feet, gastrointestinal symptoms, angiokeratomas, dyshidrosis, hearing loss, arrhythmias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular accidents, and renal failure can be observed. Nephropathy is one of the major complications of Fabry disease. Glomerular and vascular changes are present before progression to overt proteinuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate, even in pediatric patients. A case of incipient renal involvement in a girl with classic Fabry disease is reported.

  18. Neurological manifestations of Behçet's disease: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Bravo, Alba; Parra Soto, Carlos; Bellosta Diago, Elena; Cecilio Irazola, Álvaro; Santos-Lasaosa, Sonia

    2017-05-22

    Neurological involvement in Behçet's disease is rare, especially at the onset. It can present in the form of parenchymal changes or as damage to the vascular structures in its nonparenchymal form. The coexistence of both kinds of manifestations in the same patient is exceptional. We report the case of a 32-year-old patient with a history of deep venous thrombosis, who was being treated for holocranial headache, apathy, and oral and genital ulcers. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense lesions in the basal ganglia and white matter, and the vascular study evidenced venous thrombosis of the left transverse sinus. After confirming the diagnosis of Behçet's disease with parenchymal and nonparenchymal cerebral involvement, immunosuppressive and corticosteroid therapy was started, resulting in the remission of the symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Pompe Disease: Early Diagnosis and Early Treatment Make a Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hsiu Chien

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease (glycogen storage disease type II or acid maltase deficiency is a lysosomal disorder in which acid α-glucosidase (GAA deficiencies lead to intralysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues; most notably in skeletal muscles. Both the patient's age at the onset of Pompe disease symptoms and the rate of deterioration caused by the disease can vary considerably. In classical infant-onset Pompe disease (IOPD, symptoms start very early in life, and death occurs soon afterward if the disease remains untreated. In later-onset Pompe disease, symptoms are slower to appear, and patients often progress to wheelchair confinement and eventual respiratory failure. A diagnosis can be made by screening for GAA in dried blood samples, followed either by GAA assessment in lymphocytes or in fibroblasts or by the genetic analysis of mutations. Treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with alglucosidase alfa was approved for human use in 2006. In classical IOPD, treatment significantly lengthens survival and improves motor development and cardiac function. The sooner ERT begins, the better are the results. Newborn screening aims to take advantage of different technologies for diagnosing and treating newborns early on and it yields better outcomes. However, newborns diagnosed early and other long-term survivors may encounter fresh problems, making up a new phenotype of IOPD patients. Further modifications of the treatment, such as a decrease in immune responses to ERT, a higher dosage, a better uptake formulation, and gene therapy delivered locally or systemically are being explored.

  20. Early Lyme disease with spirochetemia - diagnosed by DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones William

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A sensitive and analytically specific nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT is valuable in confirming the diagnosis of early Lyme disease at the stage of spirochetemia. Findings Venous blood drawn from patients with clinical presentations of Lyme disease was tested for the standard 2-tier screen and Western Blot serology assay for Lyme disease, and also by a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR for B. burgdorferi sensu lato 16S ribosomal DNA. The PCR amplicon was sequenced for B. burgdorferi genomic DNA validation. A total of 130 patients visiting emergency room (ER or Walk-in clinic (WALKIN, and 333 patients referred through the private physicians' offices were studied. While 5.4% of the ER/WALKIN patients showed DNA evidence of spirochetemia, none (0% of the patients referred from private physicians' offices were DNA-positive. In contrast, while 8.4% of the patients referred from private physicians' offices were positive for the 2-tier Lyme serology assay, only 1.5% of the ER/WALKIN patients were positive for this antibody test. The 2-tier serology assay missed 85.7% of the cases of early Lyme disease with spirochetemia. The latter diagnosis was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Conclusion Nested PCR followed by automated DNA sequencing is a valuable supplement to the standard 2-tier antibody assay in the diagnosis of early Lyme disease with spirochetemia. The best time to test for Lyme spirochetemia is when the patients living in the Lyme disease endemic areas develop unexplained symptoms or clinical manifestations that are consistent with Lyme disease early in the course of their illness.

  1. Longitudinal changes in the antecedent and early manifest course of bipolar disorder-A narrative review of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, Andrea; Leopold, Karolina; Ritter, Philipp; Böhme, Anne; Severus, Emanuel; Bauer, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Prospective study designs ideally allow patients to be followed from the first manifestations of the illness or even from an at-risk stage. It can thus provide data on the predictive value of changes in clinical symptomatology, cognition or further biological markers to broaden our understanding of the etiopathology and symptomatic trajectory of bipolar disorders. The scope of this narrative review is to summarize evidence from prospectively collected data on psychopathological and other clinical and biological changes in the early developmental course of bipolar disorders. The narrative review was based on a literature search conducted in February 2016 within the PubMed library for prospective study data of persons in antecedent and early manifest stages of manifest bipolar disorder published within the last 15 years. A total of 19 prospective studies were included. Regarding psychopathological features; personality, temperament and character traits as well as changes in sleep and circadian rhythm, the evidence suggests that risk factors for the development of bipolar disorder can already be described and should be studied further to understand their interaction, mediation with other factors and timing in the developmental process of bipolar disorder. Apart from the positive family history, childhood anxiety, sleep problems, subthreshold (hypo)manic symptoms and certain character traits/emotionality should be identified and monitored already in clinical practice as their presence likely increases risk of bipolar disorder. Up to date no substantiated evidence was found from prospective studies addressing cognitive features, life events, immunological parameters and morphological central nervous system changes as potential risk factors for bipolar disorder. For an improved understanding of episodic disorders, longitudinal data collection is essential. Since the etiology of bipolar disorders is complex, a number of potential risk factors have been proposed

  2. Serum Homocysteine Level in Parkinson's Disease and Its Association with Duration, Cardinal Manifestation, and Severity of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Payam; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan; Samaei, Seyed Ehsan; Firozjaie, Alireza; Abbaspour, Fatemeh; Khafri, Sorrayya; Khoddami, Azam

    2018-01-01

    Due to the high prevalence of Parkinson's disease (PD) in the elderly, a large financial burden is imposed on the families and health systems of countries in addition to the problems related to the mobility impairment caused by the disease for the patients. Studies on controversial issues in this disease are taken into consideration, and one of these cases is the role of serum homocysteine level in Parkinson's patients. In this study, the serum level of homocysteine and its association with various variables in relation to this disease was compared with healthy individuals. In this study, 100 patients with PD and 100 healthy individuals as control group were investigated. Serum homocysteine level and demographic and clinical data were included in the checklist. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 23. In all tests, the significance level was below 0.05. The mean level of serum homocysteine in case and control groups was 14.93 ± 8.30 and 11.52 ± 2.86  µ mol/L, respectively (95% CI: 1.68; 5.14, P level, while 15 had high serum homocysteine level. In controls, the homocysteine level was 98 and 2, respectively ( P =0.002). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, serum homocysteine level higher than 20  µ mol/L was accompanied by 8.64-fold in Parkinson's disease involvement (95% CI: 1.92; 38.90, P =0.005). Increasing serum homocysteine level elevates the rate to having PD. Serum homocysteine levels did not have any relationship with the duration of the disease, type of cardinal manifestation, and the severity of Parkinson's disease.

  3. Serum Homocysteine Level in Parkinson’s Disease and Its Association with Duration, Cardinal Manifestation, and Severity of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Saadat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Due to the high prevalence of Parkinson’s disease (PD in the elderly, a large financial burden is imposed on the families and health systems of countries in addition to the problems related to the mobility impairment caused by the disease for the patients. Studies on controversial issues in this disease are taken into consideration, and one of these cases is the role of serum homocysteine level in Parkinson’s patients. In this study, the serum level of homocysteine and its association with various variables in relation to this disease was compared with healthy individuals. Materials and Methods. In this study, 100 patients with PD and 100 healthy individuals as control group were investigated. Serum homocysteine level and demographic and clinical data were included in the checklist. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 23. In all tests, the significance level was below 0.05. Results. The mean level of serum homocysteine in case and control groups was 14.93 ± 8.30 and 11.52 ± 2.86 µmol/L, respectively (95% CI: 1.68; 5.14, P<0.001. In total patients, 85 had normal serum homocysteine level, while 15 had high serum homocysteine level. In controls, the homocysteine level was 98 and 2, respectively (P=0.002. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, serum homocysteine level higher than 20 µmol/L was accompanied by 8.64-fold in Parkinson’s disease involvement (95% CI: 1.92; 38.90, P=0.005. Conclusion. Increasing serum homocysteine level elevates the rate to having PD. Serum homocysteine levels did not have any relationship with the duration of the disease, type of cardinal manifestation, and the severity of Parkinson’s disease.

  4. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes in ...

  5. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes in ...

  6. Factors affecting dermatological manifestations in patients with end stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Gull, S.; Nazeer, A.

    2018-01-01

    To determine skin changes in patients of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) and factors affecting these changes. Study Design:Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study:Nephrology Department, Mayo Hospital, Lahore in collaboration with Dermatology Department, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from October 2015 to January 2016. Methodology:Two hundred patients who were undergoing MHD for more than three months were included in the study. Patients' demographic data, laboratory reports and dialysis records were noted in a predesigned questionnaire. Skin examination was carried out by consultant dermatologist after patient's permission. Results:Among 200 patients included in study, 105 were males and rest of them were females. Major causes of ESRD were Diabetes Mellitus (n=83, 41.5%, followed by Hypertension (n=80, 40%), Nephrolithiasis (n=15, 7.5%) and Chronic glomerulonephritis (n=5, 2.5%). At least one cutaneous finding was present in every patient. Common skin findings observed were pigmentation (86%), xerosis (83%), pallor (79%), pruritus (69%), acquired ichthyosis (50.5%), and bacterial skin infections (18.5%). Among them, nail manifestations were half-and-half nails (52%), nychomycosis (30.5%), onycholysis (20.5%), subungual hyperkeratosis (23.5%), and Mee's lines (7.5). Among hair changes were sparse scalp hair (38.5%), brittle and lustreless hair (28%). The factors contributing to skin changes were patient's age, cause of ESRD, anti HCV positivity, high urea and creatinine levels, duration and frequency of hemodialysis, hemoglobin levels, calcium phosphate product and socioeconomic status. Some skin manifestations were interrelated with each other like xerosis with pruritus (p<0.001), pruritus with bacterial infection (p<0.022), acquired Ichthyosis (p=0.008) and hair changes (p=0.035). Conclusion:ESRD patients on hemodialysis develop various skin changes during the course of disease

  7. Methotrexate in ocular manifestations of Behcet's disease: a longitudinal study up to 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatchi, Fereydoun; Shams, Hormoz; Shahram, Farhad; Nadji, Abdolhadi; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda; Sadeghi Abdollahi, Bahar; Faezi, Tahereh; Akhlaghi, Massoomeh; Ashofteh, Farimah

    2013-10-01

    Ocular manifestations of Behcet's disease (BD) need aggressive treatment to prevent severe loss of vision or blindness. Cytotoxic drugs are the main therapeutic agents and the first line treatment. Methotrexate is the least toxic, used mainly for posterior uveitis. We present here the outcome of eye lesions with methotrexate and prednisolone, in a longitudinal study of up to 15 years, on 682 patients (5447 eye-years of follow-up). Methotrexate was started at 7.5-15 mg/week. Prednisolone was added at 0.5 mg/kg/daily, then adjusted as needed. (i) fulfilling the International Criteria for Behcet's Disease; and (ii) having active posterior uveitis (PU). Visual acuity (VA) was calculated on a scale of 10. Activity indexes were calculated for PU and retinal vasculitis (RV) for each eye. Total Inflammatory Activity Index (TIAI) demonstrating the inflammatory index of both eyes of the patient, and Total Adjusted Disease Activity Index (TADAI) showing both TIAI + VA were also calculated. Overall results: the mean VA improvement was 0.4 (P < 001), PU 1.2 (P < 0.001) and RV 0.6 (P < 0.001). VA improved in 46.5%, PU in 75.4%, and RV in 53.7% of eyes. TIAI improved in 74% of patients and TADAI in 69.4%. VA was aggravated in 37.2%, PU in 11.1%, and RV in 30.3% of eyes. TIAI was aggravated in 17.4% and TADAI in 21.6% of the patients. The remaining kept their baseline values. All parameters improved, PU better than RV. Improvement of VA was the least, mainly due to secondary cataracts. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. 'Non-neuronopathic' Gaucher disease reconsidered. Prevalence of neurological manifestations in a Dutch cohort of type I Gaucher disease patients and a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegstraaten, M.; van Schaik, I. N.; Aerts, J. M. F. G.; Hollak, C. E. M.

    2008-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disorder, which is classically divided into three types. Type I Gaucher disease is differentiated from types II and III disease by the absence of nervous system involvement. However, an increasing number of reports has emerged on neurological manifestations in

  9. Ethnicity and association with disease manifestations and mortality in Behçet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savey, Lea; Resche-Rigon, Mathieu; Wechsler, Bertrand; Comarmond, Cloé; Piette, Jean Charles; Cacoub, Patrice; Saadoun, David

    2014-03-27

    Behçet's disease (BD) significantly increases morbidity and mortality. BD mainly affects young adults with a peculiar geographical distribution. It has been suggested that BD varies in its phenotypic expression in different ethnic groups. We investigated potential ethnicity-related differences relative to phenotype and prognosis of BD patients in a French multiethnic country. We included 769 consecutive patients fulfilling the international criteria of classification for BD, in the 3 largest ethnic groups of our cohort [European (n = 369), North African (n = 350) and sub Saharan African (n = 50)]. Factors that affect prognosis were assessed by multivariate analysis. 535 (69.6%) patients were male and the median (IQR) age at diagnosis was of 30.9 (24.9-37.2) years. Sub Saharan African BD patients had a higher frequency of CNS involvement (48% vs 32.3% vs 29.5%, p = 0 .035), a higher rate of death (12% vs 6% vs 3.5%, p = 0.029) and a lower frequency of HLA B51 allele (29.4% vs 49.2% vs 55.8%, p = 0.009) compared to those from North Africa and Europe, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that male gender (HR: 5.01, CI: 1.51-16.65), cardiovascular involvement (HR: 2.24, CI: 1.15-4.36), and sub Saharan African origin (HR 2.62 (0.98-6.97) were independently associated with mortality. The 15-year mortality rate was of 19%, 9% and 6% in sub Saharan African, North African and European BD patients, respectively (p = 0.015). We reported ethnicity-related differences with respect to phenotype of BD. Sub Saharan Africans patients exhibited a worse prognosis.

  10. Estrogen and early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.C. Slooter (Arjen); J.B. Bronzova (Juliana); A. Hofman (Albert); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEstrogen use may be protective for Alzheimer's disease with late onset. However, the effects on early onset Alzheimer's disease are unclear. This issue was studied in a population based setting. For each female patient, a female control was matched on age (within 5 years) and place of

  11. Incidence and predictors of cutaneous manifestations during the early course of systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirz, Elina G; Jaeger, Veronika K; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To longitudinally map the onset and identify risk factors for skin sclerosis and digital ulcers (DUs) in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) from an early time point after the onset of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) in the European Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) cohort. METHODS...

  12. Carcinoid Syndrome and Carcinoid Heart Disease as Manifestations of Non-Metastatic Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Simões-Pereira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The carcinoid syndrome is rare but it is associated with carcinoid heart disease in more than a half of the cases. Carcinoid heart disease is typically characterised by morphological and functional modifications of right-sided valves. Its aetiology is probable multifactorial but serotonin appears to play a key role in the development of this valvular disease. Unlike gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours, ovarian neuroendocrine tumours can present with carcinoid syndrome and carcinoid heart disease in the absence of liver metastases; such ovarian neuroendocrine tumours are a unique clinical entity. The additional burden of cardiac impairment in these patients represents a significant reduction in survival. Early recognition and surgical valve replacement before advanced heart failure is established may improve the clinical outcome. We report the case of a woman with an ovarian neuroendocrine tumour and highly symptomatic carcinoid heart disease who was submitted to tumour resection followed by valvuloplasty. She demonstrated an outstanding clinical improvement and has remained free of tumour and symptomatology.

  13. Early vitrectomy effective for Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark K; Drenser, Kimberly A; Capone, Antonio; Trese, Michael T

    2010-04-01

    To review our experience with Norrie disease to determine if early vitrectomy abrogates the natural history of this rare disease; namely, bilateral no light perception visual acuity and phthisis bulbi. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients seen in our tertiary care pediatric retinal clinical practice from 1988 through 2008 with a potential diagnosis of Norrie disease. Inclusion required not only clinical findings consistent with Norrie disease but also genetics and/or a family history consistent with Norrie disease. Medical record review revealed 14 boys with clinically diagnosed Norrie disease and either Norrie disease gene (NDP) mutations noted on genetic testing (13 patients) and/or a clear family history consistent with Norrie disease (4 patients). All 14 boys with definite Norrie disease had vitrectomy with or without lensectomy in at least 1 eye prior to 12 months of age. Of the 14 boys with definite Norrie disease, 7 maintained at least light perception visual acuity in 1 eye and 3 had no light perception visual acuity bilaterally; visual acuity data were not available for 4 patients. Only 2 of 24 (8%) eyes became phthisical. Historically, no treatment has been offered to mitigate the dismal natural history of Norrie disease. We recommend consideration of early vitrectomy in Norrie disease.

  14. Enterocolic lymphocytic phlebitis as a newly recognized manifestation of IgG4-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laco, Jan; Örhalmi, Július; Bártová, Jolana; Zimandlová, Dana

    2015-04-01

    Herein we present a case of a 65-year-old woman with enterocolic lymphocytic phlebitis (ELP) who presented with anemic syndrome and in whom severe stenosis of the right flexure of large bowel was detected. The microscopic examination revealed fibrosis of the submucosa and lymphoplasmacytic phlebitis of small veins and venules, whereas arteries were spared. There were 110 IgG4-positive and 160 IgG-positive plasma cells in 1 high-power field, respectively, with corresponding IgG4/IgG ratio of 0.69. The IgG4 serum level was 2.42 g/L. According to the currently proposed criteria, this ELP case is the first that may be diagnosed as definite IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). Although based on the sole case description, taken together with a recent review and a case report, we presume that a subset of ELPs is a manifestation of IgG4-RD. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Peripheral neuropathy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial diseases: a single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luigetti, M; Sauchelli, D; Primiano, G; Cuccagna, C; Bernardo, D; Lo Monaco, M; Servidei, S

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy in mitochondrial diseases (MDs) may vary from a subclinical finding in a multisystem syndrome to a severe, even isolated, manifestation in some patients. To investigate the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in MDs extensive electrophysiological studies were performed in 109 patients with morphological, biochemical and genetic diagnosis of MD [12 A3243G progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO)/mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), 16 myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF), four mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), 67 PEO with single or multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA, 10 others]. A neuropathy was found in 49 patients (45%). The incidence was very high in MNGIE (100%), MELAS (92%) and MERRF (69%), whilst 28% of PEO patients had evidence of peripheral involvement. The most frequent abnormality was a sensory axonal neuropathy found in 32/49 patients (65%). A sensory-motor axonal neuropathy was instead detected in 16% of the patients and sensory-motor axonal demyelinating neuropathy in 16%. Finally one Leigh patient had a motor axonal neuropathy. It is interesting to note that the great majority had preserved tendon reflexes and no sensory disturbances. In conclusion, peripheral involvement in MD is frequent even if often mild or asymptomatic. The correct identification and characterization of peripheral neuropathy through electrophysiological studies represents another tile in the challenge of MD diagnosis. © 2016 EAN.

  16. Ocular manifestations of graft-versus-host disease: 10 years’ experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin X

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Xihui Lin, Harrison Dwight Cavanagh Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Purpose: To evaluate the ocular presentation, treatment, and clinical course of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Design: Retrospective case series. Participants: Two hundred and forty-nine patients with systemic GVHD were included in the study. Methods: Ocular and systemic data were collected from 2003 to 2013. Main outcome measures: Mortality, visual acuity, and response of ocular symptoms. Results: Sixty-four patients had ocular manifestations (25.7%. At presentation, the mean age was 44.5 years and mean latency was 16.4 months. The most common presentations were keratoconjunctivitis sicca, cataract, blepharitis, ocular hypertension, and filamentary keratitis. Visual acuity at presentation was 20/49; at the worst point in the disease was 20/115; and at most recent visit was 20/63. When topical anti-inflammatory drops were used in addition to tears, 54.3% of patients’ ocular symptoms stabilized. When autologous serum was used in addition, 80% stabilized. The overall 10-year mortality of GVHD was 29.7%. For those with ocular involvement, it was 21.9%. Conclusion: Systemic GVHD has a high mortality rate, but ocular involvement does not suggest a worse prognosis. The main ocular presentations were keratoconjunctivitis sicca, cataracts, and ocular hypertension. Dry eyes in this population were very severe with overall worsening in visual acuity. However, with a step-wise approach involving topical anti-inflammatory medications and autologous serum tears, ocular symptoms do improve. It is important to monitor these patients closely, as they are prone to serious ocular complications such as corneal perforation and endophthalmitis. Keywords: dry eye, keratitis, corneal ulceration

  17. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Celiac Disease: Effectiveness of the Gluten-Free Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jericho, Hilary; Sansotta, Naire; Guandalini, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the gluten-free diet (GFD) on extraintestinal symptoms in pediatric and adult celiac populations at the University of Chicago. We conducted a retrospective chart review of the University of Chicago Celiac Center clinic charts from January 2002 to October 2014. Demographics, serologic testing, intestinal biopsies, and extraintestinal symptoms at presentation, 12, 24, and >24 months were recorded. Extraintestinal symptoms included abnormal liver enzymes, arthralgia/arthritis, dermatitis herpetiformis, alopecia, fatigue, headache, anemia, stomatitis, myalgias, psychiatric disorders, rashes, seizures, neuropathy, short stature, delayed puberty, osteoporosis, and infertility. A total of 737 patients with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease or skin biopsy-confirmed dermatitis herpetiformis were included. Patients lost to follow-up, or with insufficient data were excluded leaving 328 patients (157 pediatrics younger than 18 years). For pediatrics, the female to male ratio was 2:1 and the mean age at diagnosis was 8.9 years. For adults, 4:1 and 40.6 years old. Extraintestinal symptom rates were similar in children (60%) and adults (62%). Short stature (33%), fatigue (28%), and headache (20%) were most common in children. Iron deficiency anemia (48%), fatigue (37%), and headache/psychiatric disorders (24%) were common in adults. Children had faster/higher rates of symptom resolution compared with adults. Twenty-eight percent of children with unresolved short stature on a GFD were found to have other comorbidities. Children and adults with celiac disease have similar rates of extraintestinal manifestations. In children short stature, fatigue, and headache were most common, whereas anemia, fatigue, and headache/psychiatric disorders were most common in adults. Children on a strict GFD showed faster and higher rates of symptom resolution as compared to adults. Unresponsive children with short stature must be assessed for

  18. The early electroclinical manifestations of infantile spasms: A video EEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Iype

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Infantile spasms are described as flexor extensor and mixed; but more features of their semiology and ictal electroencephalography (EEG changes are sparse in the literature. The purpose of the study was to describe the clinical and ictal video-EEG characteristics of consecutive cases with infantile spasms and to try to find an association with the etiology. Materials and Methods: The clinical phenomenology and EEG characteristics on video-EEG were analyzed in 16 babies with infantile spasms. Results: A total of 869 spasms were reviewed. Nine (56.3% showed focal seizures at least once during the recording and 1 (6.3% had multifocal myoclonus in addition to the spasms. The duration of the cluster and interval between spasms was totally variable in all patients. Lateralizing phenomena were present in at least some of the spasms in all patients. Unilateral manual automatism in the form of holding the pinna was noted in three patients following the spasm. The ictal EEG activity in the majority (75% was the slow wave. Four (25% showed fast generalized spindle-like ictal discharges. Spikes, spike and wave activity, or electrodecremental pattern alone during the ictus was seen in none. On bivariate analysis, no factor noted on the video EEG had association with the etiology. Conclusion: Infantile spasms could be associated with focal and other seizures, has unique, non-uniform and variable semiology from patient to patient. The ictal EEG manifestation in the majority (75% of our patients was the slow wave transient with 25% showing generalized fast spindle-like activity.

  19. Imaging manifestations of acquired elastopathy resembling pseudoxanthoma elasticum in patients with beta thalassaemia major and sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, Harish; Cheng, Ken; Lau, Ken; Harish, Radhika; Bowden, Donald K.

    2016-01-01

    Development of an acquired systemic elastopathy resembling pseudoxanthoma elasticum in patients with chronic haemoglobinopathies such as beta thalassaemia major and sickle cell disease is well documented. There is paucity of any comprehensive literature on the radiological manifestations of this entity. This pictorial review aims to describe and illustrate the multi system and multi modality imaging findings of this condition.

  20. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and changes in cerebral blood flow : The Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Pieternella H.; Muller, Majon; Vincken, Koen L.; Westerink, Jan; Mali, Willem P. T. M.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Doevendans, PAFM

    Hemoglobin and hematocrit are important determinants of blood viscosity and arterial oxygen content and may therefore influence cerebral blood flow (CBF). We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations of hemoglobin and hematocrit with CBF in 569 patients with manifest arterial disease

  1. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of unusual manifestations of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Adrian; Pérez-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa; Nodar, Andrés; Martínez-Lamas, Lucía; Vasallo, Francisco Jose; Álvarez-Fernández, Maximiliano; Crespo, Manuel

    2017-06-22

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) typically presents as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia. However, Streptococcus pneumoniae can produce infection at any level of the body (endocarditis, arthritis, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, etc.), which is also known as unusual IPD (uIPD). There are very limited data available about the clinical and microbiological profile of these uncommon manifestations of pneumococcal disease. Our aim was to analyse clinical forms, microbiological profile, epidemiology and prognosis of a cohort of patients with unusual invasive pneumococcal disease (uIPD). We present a retrospective study of 389 patients (all adult and paediatric patients diagnosed during the period) diagnosed with IPD at our hospital (Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo) between 1992 and 2014. We performed an analysis of clinical, microbiological and demographical characteristics of patients comparing the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) period with the post-vaccination phase. IPD and uIPD were defined as follows; IPD: infection confirmed by the isolation of S. pneumoniae from a normally sterile site, which classically presented as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia; uIPD: any case of IPD excluding pneumonia, meningitis, otitis media, rhinosinusitis or primary bacteraemia. A total of 22 patients (6%) met the criteria of uIPD. A Charlson index >2 was more prevalent in uIPD patients than IPD patients (45% vs 24%; p=0.08). The most common clinical presentation of uIPD was osteoarticular infection (8 patients, 36%), followed by gastrointestinal disease (4 patients, 18%). Infection with serotypes included in PCV-13 was significantly higher in IPD patients (65%) than in patients with uIPD, 35% (p=0.018). Conversely, infection with multidrug-resistant strains was higher among patient with uIPD (27% vs 9%; p=0.014). The all-cause mortality rate was 15%, 13% in the IPD group and 32% among patients with uIPD (p=0

  2. Early manifestation of Yersinia colitis demonstrated by the double-contrast barium enema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspestrand, F.

    1986-11-01

    A 19-year old female with a bloody, diarrheal illness of acute onset where Crohn's disease primarly was suspected is presented. The double-contrast barium enema revealed multiple, diffusely scattered aphthous erosions of the colonic mucosa: the rectum was scarcely affected. Biopsies taken by endoscopy demonstrated nonspecific inflammatory changes of the mucous membrane. However, routinely taken stool cultures revealed an infectious colitis due to Yersinia enterocolitica. Our case demonstrates the necessity to consider Yersinia enterocolitis in the radiographic differential diagnosis when the diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis seems obvious.

  3. The early manifestation of Yersinia colitis demonstrated by the double-contrast barium enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspestrand, F.

    1986-01-01

    A 19-year old female with a bloody, diarrheal illness of acute onset where Crohn's disease primarly was suspected is presented. The double-contrast barium enema revealed multiple, diffusely scattered aphthous erosions of the colonic mucosa: the rectum was scarcely affected. Biopsies taken by endoscopy demonstrated nonspecific inflammatory changes of the mucous membrane. However, routinely taken stool cultures revealed an infectious colitis due to Yersinia enterocolitica. Our case demonstrates the necessity to consider Yersinia enterocolitis in the radiographic differential diagnosis when the diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis seems obvious. (orig.) [de

  4. THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND COURSE OF DUODENAL ULCER DISEASE AFTER PERFORATED ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Lyubskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare clinical manifestations, course, mental status in duodenal ulcer (DU patients with a history of perforated ulcer and its uncomplicated course.Subjects and methods. One hundred and thirteen patents with DU were examined. Group 1 included 61 patients with uncomplicated DUand Group 2 comprised 52 patients with a history of perforated ulcer. A comparison group consisted of 20 patients who had undergone laparotomy. Physical and mental status examinations, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS, and 24-hour pH-metry were performed.Results. Classical pain syndrome was observed in 75 % of the patients with uncomplicated DU. Prior to perforation, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes were distinguished only by a significantly lower degree in Group 2; following perforation, the pain syndrome was recorded more frequently, it was more extensive, meal-unrelated, and similar to that in the patients who had undergone laparotomy and had diminished appetite (36.5 %. EGDS showed that the complicated course was accompanied by the significantly higher incidence of erosive esophagitis (21.2 %, gastritis (51.9 %, duodenitis (25.0 %, multiple ulcers (28.8 %, and larger ulcers. 24-hour pH-metry indicated that the level of hyperacidity in Group 2 was higher and the circadian intragastric pH variations were less marked than those in uncomplicated DU. The patients with a history of perforated ulcer showed a high rate of anxiety and depressive changes. Conclusion. In complicated DU, marked monotonic hyperacidity causes common erosive-ulcerative lesions in the gastroduodenal area in relatively mild pain syndrome, late referrals, and long-term ulcer healing. After perforation followed by wound closure, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes become more pronounced, which is associated with anxiety and depressive changes in the mental status, as well as with early referrals and less healing time.

  5. Polycystic ovary syndrome and early-onset preeclampsia : reproductive manifestations of increased cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman-Verhulst, Susanne M.; van Rijn, Bas B.; Westerveld, H. Egbertine; Franx, Arie; Bruinse, Hein W.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Goverde, Angelique J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women is a major healthcare issue. Detection of premenopausal women with increased risk of CVD could enhance prevention strategies and reduce first event-related morbidity and mortality. In this study, we argue that an unfavorable

  6. Gitelman syndrome manifesting in early childhood and leading to delayed puberty: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Farhan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Gitelman syndrome is an inherited autosomal recessive renal salt-wasting disorder. It presents with variable clinical symptoms including muscle weakness and fatigue, and the diagnosis is based on metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. It is usually diagnosed incidentally in early adulthood. There are rare cases of Gitelman syndrome presenting in early childhood; however, to the best of our knowledge it has not previously been associated with delayed puberty. Case presentation A 17-year-old South Asian man with recurrent episodes of generalized muscle weakness, fatigue and cramps from the age of two years was admitted for further workup. Before the age of 12 years, the episodes had been mild, but they then got progressively worse. Other symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, nocturia, paresthesia and occasional watery diarrhea. He also had a history of short stature, poor weight gain and delayed developmental landmarks. His family history was unremarkable except for the consanguineous marriage of his parents. An examination revealed a thin and lean man with blood pressure of 95/60mmHg. His height and weight were below the third percentile and his sexual development was at Tanner Stage II. Laboratory work revealed serum sodium of 124mmol/L, potassium 2.4mmol/L, calcium 6.5mmol/L and magnesium of 1.2mg/dL. His testosterone level was low (0.85ng/mL, normal for his age 2.67 to 10.12ng/mL with normal levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. The sex hormone findings were attributed to delayed puberty. A 24-hour urinary analysis revealed decreased excretion of calcium (25.9mg/24 hours. Based on the findings of hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis without hypertension, severe hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria, a diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome was made. Treatment was started with oral supplementation of potassium, magnesium and calcium along with spironolactone and liberal salt intake

  7. Gitelman syndrome manifesting in early childhood and leading to delayed puberty: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Farhan; Sultan, Mubashar; Qamar, Khola; Jawad, Ali; Jawa, Ali

    2012-10-02

    Gitelman syndrome is an inherited autosomal recessive renal salt-wasting disorder. It presents with variable clinical symptoms including muscle weakness and fatigue, and the diagnosis is based on metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. It is usually diagnosed incidentally in early adulthood. There are rare cases of Gitelman syndrome presenting in early childhood; however, to the best of our knowledge it has not previously been associated with delayed puberty. A 17-year-old South Asian man with recurrent episodes of generalized muscle weakness, fatigue and cramps from the age of two years was admitted for further workup. Before the age of 12 years, the episodes had been mild, but they then got progressively worse. Other symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, nocturia, paresthesia and occasional watery diarrhea. He also had a history of short stature, poor weight gain and delayed developmental landmarks. His family history was unremarkable except for the consanguineous marriage of his parents. An examination revealed a thin and lean man with blood pressure of 95/60mmHg. His height and weight were below the third percentile and his sexual development was at Tanner Stage II. Laboratory work revealed serum sodium of 124mmol/L, potassium 2.4mmol/L, calcium 6.5mmol/L and magnesium of 1.2mg/dL. His testosterone level was low (0.85ng/mL, normal for his age 2.67 to 10.12ng/mL) with normal levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. The sex hormone findings were attributed to delayed puberty. A 24-hour urinary analysis revealed decreased excretion of calcium (25.9mg/24 hours). Based on the findings of hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis without hypertension, severe hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria, a diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome was made. Treatment was started with oral supplementation of potassium, magnesium and calcium along with spironolactone and liberal salt intake. Diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome is usually made incidentally

  8. A case of Becker muscular dystrophy with early manifestation of cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Hyun Doo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-old boy was admitted with chest discomfort, nausea, and dyspnea at rest. At the age of 3 years, he underwent muscle biopsy and dystrophin gene analysis owing to an enlarged calf muscle and elevated serum kinase level (6,378 U/L without overt weakness; based on the results, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD was diagnosed. The dystrophin gene showed deletion of exons 45 to 49. He remained ambulant and could step upstairs without significant difficulties. A chest roentgenogram showed cardiomegaly (cardiothoracic ratio, 54%, and his electrocardiogram (ECG showed abnormal ST-T wave, biatrial enlargement, and left ventricular hypertrophy. The 2-dimensional and M-mode ECGs showed a severely dilated left ventricular cavity with diffuse hypokinesis. The systolic indices were reduced, including fractional shortening (9% and ejection fraction (19%. Despite receiving intensive medical treatment, he died from congestive heart failure 5 months after the initial cardiac symptoms. We report a case of BMD with early-onset dilated cardiomyopathy associated with deletion of exons 45 to 49. Early cardiomyopathy can occur in BMD patients with certain genotypes; therefore, careful follow-up is required even in patients with mild phenotypes of BMD.

  9. Pathologic features of early inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Sydney D; Sasatomi, Eizaburo; Regueiro, Miguel

    2002-03-01

    Often the pathologic changes of IBD are subtle and may not be present in a proportion of biopsy specimens. In cases of early disease, the changes may be missed, and additional specimens should be taken after a period of time. Modifying factors, such as prebiopsy treatment and coexisting disease, should be considered. A forum to review cases and allow for communication between gastroenterologists and pathologists is especially useful for clinicopathologic correlation and assignment of a working diagnosis to each case. Careful attention to the pathologic features of early UC and CD would be most useful when evaluating new therapies for IBD.

  10. Circulating mutational portrait of cancer: manifestation of aggressive clonal events in both early and late stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solid tumors residing in tissues and organs leave footprints in circulation through circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor DNAs (ctDNA. Characterization of the ctDNA portraits and comparison with tumor DNA mutational portraits may reveal clinically actionable information on solid tumors that is traditionally achieved through more invasive approaches. Methods We isolated ctDNAs from plasma of patients of 103 lung cancer and 74 other solid tumors of different tissue origins. Deep sequencing using the Guardant360 test was performed to identify mutations in 73 clinically actionable genes, and the results were associated with clinical characteristics of the patient. The mutation profiles of 37 lung cancer cases with paired ctDNA and tumor genomic DNA sequencing were used to evaluate clonal representation of tumor in circulation. Five lung cancer cases with longitudinal ctDNA sampling were monitored for cancer progression or response to treatments. Results Mutations in TP53, EGFR, and KRAS genes are most prevalent in our cohort. Mutation rates of ctDNA are similar in early (I and II and late stage (III and IV cancers. Mutation in DNA repair genes BRCA1, BRCA2, and ATM are found in 18.1% (32/177 of cases. Patients with higher mutation rates had significantly higher mortality rates. Lung cancer of never smokers exhibited significantly higher ctDNA mutation rates as well as higher EGFR and ERBB2 mutations than ever smokers. Comparative analysis of ctDNA and tumor DNA mutation data from the same patients showed that key driver mutations could be detected in plasma even when they were present at a minor clonal population in the tumor. Mutations of key genes found in the tumor tissue could remain in circulation even after frontline radiotherapy and chemotherapy suggesting these mutations represented resistance mechanisms. Longitudinal sampling of five lung cancer cases showed distinct changes in ctDNA mutation portraits that

  11. Nephrolithiasis as a common urinary system manifestation of inflammatory bowel diseases; a clinical review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji-Arjenaki, Mahboube; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    The extra-intestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are common and involve other organs or systems for example; urinary system. For this review, we used a variety of sources by searching through Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and directory of open access journals (DOAJ). Urinary complications may occur in up to 22% of patients and nephrolithiasis or renal/kidney stones have been suggested to be a common manifestation of disease in forms of uric acid, calcium phosphate or calcium oxalate. We performed a meta-analysis on five clinical trials and reported that correlation between IBD and formation of stone in renal system is positive and significant (Fix-effect model; CI: 95%, P <0.001, and randomeffect model; CI: 95%, P = 0.03). Based on the reports of the clinical trials, calcium oxalate is more prevalent in Crohn's disease (CD) than in ulcerative colitis (UC).

  12. Genetic and Early Clinical Manifestations of Females Heterozygous for Duchenne/Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Riccardo; Madia, Francesca; Bartolomeo, Domenico; Trucco, Federica; Pedemonte, Marina; Traverso, Monica; Broda, Paolo; Bruno, Claudio; Zara, Federico; Minetti, Carlo; Fiorillo, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    Female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), although usually asymptomatic, develop muscle weakness up to 17% of the time, and a third present cardiac abnormalities or cognitive impairment. Clinical features of DMD carriers during childhood are poorly known. We describe a cohort of pediatric DMD carriers, providing clinical, genetic, and histopathologic features, with a mean follow-up of 7 years. Fifteen females with a DMD mutation (age range 5 to 18 years) were included. Seven patients (46%) presented with clinically evident symptoms and signs such as limb girdle weakness, abnormal gait, and exercise intolerance. The other eight patients (53%) were evaluated because of an incidental finding of elevated level of creatine kinase. Creatine kinase level was elevated in all, ranging from 392 to 13,000 U/L. Calf hypertrophy was observed in eight patients (53%). No patient developed respiratory or cardiac involvement. The most frequent complication was scoliosis (46%). Four patients (29%) also presented minor learning disabilities or behavioral problems. We performed electromyography in half of patients, showing myopathic pattern in four (53%). Muscle biopsy revealed a mosaic reduction of dystrophin in nine available cases. DMD gene mutations were mostly deletions (71%), resulting in loss of reading frame in five patients (36%). The three patients who experienced the most severe disease course were affected either by a nonsense or frameshift mutation. Our analysis suggests that DMD gene mutations may be suspected in a female child with persistently elevated levels of creatine kinase. Evidence of scoliosis, calf hypertrophy, or myopathic pattern at electromyography may also be helpful, and muscle biopsy is always indicative. DMD carriers should be followed for subtle orthopedic and psychiatric complications during childhood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical manifestations of scrub typhus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Weeratunga, Praveen; Sivayoganathan, Sriharan; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2017-02-01

    The mite-borne rickettsial zoonosis scrub typhus is widely prevalent in parts of Southeast and Far East Asia, and northern Australia. The disease is an acute febrile illness, associated with rash and often an eschar, which responds dramatically to treatment with antibiotics. In some cases it results in a serious illness leading to multiple organ involvement and death. The disease manifestations are thought to result from a systemic vasculitis, caused by both direct effects of the organisms as well as an exaggerated immune response, although little is understood about its pathogenesis. A wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, affecting nearly every organ system, have been described with scrub typhus. Some of these manifestations are serious and life threatening. In this systematic review, we summarise the typical and atypical manifestations of scrub typhus reported in the literature. Awareness of these unusual manifestations will hopefully guide clinicians towards diagnosing the condition early, and initiating early appropriate antibiotics and other supportive measures. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Latent Lymphocytic Enterocolitis Associated with Celiac Disease Manifesting after Resection for Colon Cancer: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Tangri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytic colitis, a cause of chronic watery diarrhea, is histologically characterized by increased intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Studies have associated this disorder with celiac disease, although there are no reports of patients with both lymphocytic colitis and colon cancer. The present case report describes a patient with lymphocytic colitis, which manifested five years after he presented with a cecal adenocarcinoma, and three years following a diagnosis of celiac disease. Pathological review of his initial resection specimen demonstrated lymphocytic enterocolitis, indicating a five-year latency in the presentation of this disease.

  15. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Analysis of disease manifestation by region-based quantification of lung parenchyma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilig, D., E-mail: dorothea.theilig@charite.de [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Doellinger, F. [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Kuhnigk, J.M. [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, B.; Huebner, R.H. [Charité, Department of Pneumology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Schreiter, N.; Poellinger, A. [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The distribution of cystic lesions in LAM was evaluated with quantitative CT. •There were more cystic lesions in the central lung compared to peripheral areas. •Cystic changes were more frequent in apical two thirds compared to lower third. •Results might help to obviate the need for biopsy in more cases. -- Abstract: Purpose: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is characterized by proliferation of smooth muscle tissue that causes bronchial obstruction and secondary cystic destruction of lung parenchyma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the typical distribution of cystic defects in LAM with quantitative volumetric chest computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: CT examinations of 20 patients with confirmed LAM were evaluated with region-based quantification of lung parenchyma. Additionally, 10 consecutive patients were identified who had recently undergone CT imaging of the lung at our institution, in which no pathologies of the lung were found, to serve as a control group. Each lung was divided into three regions (upper, middle and lower thirds) with identical number of slices. In addition, we defined a “peel” and “core” of the lung comprising the 2 cm subpleural space and the remaining inner lung area. Computerized detection of lung volume and relative emphysema was performed with the PULMO 3D software (v3.42, Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen, Germany). This software package enables the quantification of emphysematous lung parenchyma by calculating the pixel index, which is defined as the ratio of lung voxels with a density <−950 HU to the total number of voxels in the lung. Results: Cystic changes accounted for 0.1–39.1% of the total lung volume in patients with LAM. Disease manifestation in the central lung was significantly higher than in peripheral areas (peel median: 15.1%, core median: 20.5%; p = 0.001). Lower thirds of lung parenchyma showed significantly less cystic changes than upper and middle lung areas combined (lower

  16. [The relationship between extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease, the frequency of heartburn and severity of oesophagitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We performed clinico-epidemiologic screening for the heartburn in a representative sample from a total of 1138 subjects and for oesophagitis from 371 ones. In a separate study 120 patients were divided into groups differing in the severity of oesophagitis based on the Savary-Miller classification. The extraesophageal manifestations were diagnosed by clinical and instrumental methods. The close relationship of these manifestations with heartburn and oesophagitis was more pronounced in men than in women. Enhanced severity of the lesions in eosophageal mucosa in patients with oesophagitis was related to increased frequency of ENT diseases and cardialgia but not respiratory disorders. The data obtained give evidence of direct association of heartburn and eosophagitis with coughing, ENT diseases and cardialgia.

  17. Quality of life, fatigue and mental health in patients with the m.3243A > G mutation and its correlates with genetic characteristics and disease manifestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, Christianne; de Laat, Paul; Koene, Saskia; Tibosch, Marijke; Rodenburg, Richard; de Groot, Imelda; Knoop, Hans; Janssen, Mirian; Smeitink, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial disorders belong to the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases with the m.3243A > G mutation reflecting being one of the most common mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Previous studies showed little relationship between mitochondrial genetics and disease manifestation.

  18. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Pedersen, Simon Glerup; Gesslein, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments...... sex hormone cycle and the glutamate system and a link to co-morbid psychiatric manifestations of FHM2....

  19. Characterisation of an atypical manifestation of black band disease on Porites lutea in the Western Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Séré

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent surveys conducted on Reunion Island coral reefs revealed an atypical manifestation of black band disease on the main framework building coral, Porites lutea. This BBD manifestation (PorBBD presented a thick lighter-colored band, which preceded the typical BBD lesion. Whilst BBD aetiology has been intensively described worldwide, it remains unclear if corals with apparently similar lesions across coral reefs are affected by the same pathogens. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach involving field surveys, gross lesion monitoring, histopathology and 454-pyrosequencing was employed to provide the first comprehensive characterization of this particular manifestation. Surveys conducted within two geomorphological zones over two consecutive summers and winters showed spatial and seasonal patterns consistent with those found for typical BBD. Genetic analyses suggested an uncharacteristically high level of Vibrio spp. bacterial infection within PorBBD. However, microscopic analysis revealed high densities of cyanobacteria, penetrating the compromised tissue as well as the presence of basophilic bodies resembling bacterial aggregates in the living tissue, adjacent to the bacterial mat. Additionally, classical BBD-associated cyanobacterial strains, genetically related to Pseudoscillatoria coralii and Roseofilum reptotaenium were identified and isolated and the presence of sulfate-reducers or sulfide-oxidizers such as Desulfovibrio and Arcobacter, previously shown to be associated with anoxic microenvironment within typical BBD was also observed, confirming that PorBBD is a manifestation of classical BBD.

  20. Preoperative multidetector CT manifestations of perigastric lymph nodes in patients with early gastric cancer and pN0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Hyun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Chung, Jae Joon; Lim, Joo Hee; Cho, Eun Suk; Kim, Ki Whang [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    To find the determinant of lymph node (LN) manifestations on preoperative multidetector CT (MDCT) in early gastric cancer (EGC) patients with pN0. One hundred and eighty-six consecutive patients with pT1pN0, the largest perigastric LN on preoperative MDCT, were categorized into two groups according to 8 different parameters [short (SD) and long diameter (LD) 4/6/8 mm, average attenuation 100 Hounsfield unit, short-to-long diameter-ratio (SLR) 0.7], and correlated with the size, gross type, depth of invasion and microscopic type of their primary lesions by the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis. When the primary lesion was larger than 3 cm, the LNs were larger in 4 parameters (SD or LD, 4/6 mm; p < 0.05); gross type IIb patients showed smaller LNs in 5 parameters (SD 4/6 mm, LD 4/6/8 mm; p < 0.05); and patients with microscopically-undifferentiated lesions showed larger LNs in SD 4 mm or LD 8 mm by the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis. The depth of invasion showed no significant difference in LN size. No factors revealed significant difference in LN attenuation or SLR. Benign regional LN enlargement is more frequent in EGC patients with larger size primary lesions or lesion with poor microscopic differentiation. However, this condition is less frequent in gross type IIb patients.

  1. Whole-body and pinhole bone scintigraphic manifestations of Reiter`s syndrome: distribution patterns and early and characteristic signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chung, Soo-Kyo; Park, Young-Ha; Lee, Sung-Yong; Sohn, Hyung-Sun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University Hospitals, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bahk, Yong-Whee [Department of Radiology, Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    The characteristic whole-body and pinhole scintigraphic manifestations of osteo-enthesopathy and arthropathy in Reiter`s syndrome (RS) are described, with an emphasis on early diagnosis. We analysed 59 sets of whole-body and pinhole bone scintigrams of 59 patients with RS. The population comprised 47 men and 12 women with an age range from 15 to 53 years (mean=29.4). Bone scintigraphy was carried out 2-2.5 h after intravenous injection of technetium-99m hydroxydiphosphonate using a single-head gamma camera (Siemens Orbiter Model 6601) with a low-energy high-resolution and a 4-mm pinhole collimator for whole-body and pinhole scintigraphy, respectively. In total 262 lesions of osteo-enthesopathy and arthritis were detected on 59 whole-body scintigrams, an incidence of 4.4 lesions per patient. As anticipated, the lesional distribution was asymmetrical: 68% were in the lower limb skeleton and 32% in the axial and upper limb skeleton. Pinhole bone scintigraphy, applied selectively to one region of interest in each case, enabled us to accurately diagnose arthritis and osteo-enthesopathy. It was noteworthy that osteo-enthesopathy, alone or in combination with arthritis, occurred in 78.9%, and had a strong predilection for the foot bones, especially the calcaneus (25.6%). Pinhole scintigraphy detected enthesopathy in the absence of radiographic alteration in 14.1% of cases and portrayed characteristic signs of RS in 6.9%. Whole-body bone scintigraphy augmented with pinhole scintigraphy was found to be useful in order to panoramically display the systemic involvement pattern, to assess the characteristic bone and articular alterations and to detect early signs of RS. (orig.) With 10 figs., 3 tabs., 19 refs.

  2. Febrile urticaria in a family: uncommon manifestation of a common disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishal; Singhal, Mayank; Sharma, Alka; Kumar, Vivek

    2012-12-15

    Cutaneous manifestations are uncommon with malaria. These include urticaria, purpura fulminans, and petechial rash. We report on a series of three patients from a single family who had an urticarial rash with fever that was subsequently diagnosed to be caused by malaria. Urticarial rash has been previously reported with both falciparum and vivax malaria infections. Although the exact pathogenesis is not clear urticarial rash might be related with IgE mediated mast cell degranulation.

  3. Significance of Haemodynamic and Haemostatic Factors in the Course of Different Manifestations of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: The SHEF-CSVD Study—Study Rationale and Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Staszewski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. This paper describes the rationale and design of the SHEF-CSVD Study, which aims to determine the long-term clinical and radiological course of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD and to evaluate haemostatic and haemodynamic prognostic factors of the condition. Design. This single-centre, prospective, non-interventional cohort study will follow 150 consecutive patients with different clinical manifestations of CSVD (lacunar ischaemic stroke, vascular dementia, vascular parkinsonism or spontaneous deep, intracerebral haemorrhage and 50 age- and sex-matched controls over a period of 24 months. The clinical and radiological course will be evaluated basing on a detailed neurological, neuropsychological and MRI examinations. Haemodynamic (cerebral vasoreactivity, 24 h blood pressure control and haemostatic factors (markers of endothelial and platelet dysfunction, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation test will be determined. Discussion. The scheduled study will specifically address the issue of haemodynamic and haemostatic prognostic factors and their course over time in various clinical manifestations of CSVD. The findings may aid the development of prophylactic strategies and individualised treatment plans, which are critical during the early stages of the disease.

  4. Perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid or early azathioprine/biological therapy are predictors of disease behavior change in patients with Crohn’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Czegledi, Zsofia; Szamosi, Tamas; Banai, Janos; David, Gyula; Zsigmond, Ferenc; Pandur, Tunde; Erdelyi, Zsuzsanna; Gemela, Orsolya; Papp, Janos; Lakatos, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the combined effect of disease phenotype, smoking and medical therapy [steroid, azathioprine (AZA), AZA/biological therapy] on the probability of disease behavior change in a Caucasian cohort of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: Three hundred and forty well-characterized, unrelated, consecutive CD patients were analyzed (M/F: 155/185, duration: 9.4 ± 7.5 years) with a complete clinical follow-up. Medical records including disease phenotype according to the Montreal classification, extraintestinal manifestations, use of medications and surgical events were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were interviewed on their smoking habits at the time of diagnosis and during the regular follow-up visits. RESULTS: A change in disease behavior was observed in 30.8% of patients with an initially non-stricturing, non-penetrating disease behavior after a mean disease duration of 9.0 ± 7.2 years. In a logistic regression analysis corrected for disease duration, perianal disease, smoking, steroid use, early AZA or AZA/biological therapy use were independent predictors of disease behavior change. In a subsequent Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and a proportional Cox regression analysis, disease location (P = 0.001), presence of perianal disease (P < 0.001), prior steroid use (P = 0.006), early AZA (P = 0.005) or AZA/biological therapy (P = 0.002), or smoking (P = 0.032) were independent predictors of disease behavior change. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid use, early AZA or AZA/biological therapy are all predictors of disease behavior change in CD patients. PMID:19630105

  5. Perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid or early azathioprine/biological therapy are predictors of disease behavior change in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Czegledi, Zsofia; Szamosi, Tamas; Banai, Janos; David, Gyula; Zsigmond, Ferenc; Pandur, Tunde; Erdelyi, Zsuzsanna; Gemela, Orsolya; Papp, Janos; Lakatos, Laszlo

    2009-07-28

    To assess the combined effect of disease phenotype, smoking and medical therapy [steroid, azathioprine (AZA), AZA/biological therapy] on the probability of disease behavior change in a Caucasian cohort of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Three hundred and forty well-characterized, unrelated, consecutive CD patients were analyzed (M/F: 155/185, duration: 9.4 +/- 7.5 years) with a complete clinical follow-up. Medical records including disease phenotype according to the Montreal classification, extraintestinal manifestations, use of medications and surgical events were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were interviewed on their smoking habits at the time of diagnosis and during the regular follow-up visits. A change in disease behavior was observed in 30.8% of patients with an initially non-stricturing, non-penetrating disease behavior after a mean disease duration of 9.0 +/- 7.2 years. In a logistic regression analysis corrected for disease duration, perianal disease, smoking, steroid use, early AZA or AZA/biological therapy use were independent predictors of disease behavior change. In a subsequent Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and a proportional Cox regression analysis, disease location (P = 0.001), presence of perianal disease (P < 0.001), prior steroid use (P = 0.006), early AZA (P = 0.005) or AZA/biological therapy (P = 0.002), or smoking (P = 0.032) were independent predictors of disease behavior change. Our data suggest that perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid use, early AZA or AZA/biological therapy are all predictors of disease behavior change in CD patients.

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of primary immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Abdelhakim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs are a group of rare, chronic disorders with deficient or malfunctioning immune system. It commonly affects the hematopoietic system, with skin the second most affected organ. Skin involvement is observed in half of pediatric PID cases and often precedes the final diagnosis. Skin infections and eczemas are the two most common manifestations in PID.[1] Skin manifestations associated with PIDs can be of infectious and noninfectious causes. Common noninfectious causes are eczema, erythroderma, cutaneous granulomas, dysplasia, vasculitis, and telangiectasia. It is important to be aware of skin manifestations in pediatric patients as early detection of PID may aid in the management of serious immunologic conditions and prevent associated morbidity and mortality.

  7. Extrahepatic manifestations of cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasova, Helena; Beuers, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Pruritus, fatigue and metabolic bone disease represent three major extrahepatic manifestations of chronic cholestatic liver disease that considerably affect the patient's quality of life. The present article reviews pathogenetic aspects of and current therapeutic approaches to extrahepatic

  8. Clinical and pathological manifestations of cardiovascular disease in rat models: the influence of acute ozone exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper shows that rat models of cardiovascular diseases have differential degrees of underlying pathologies at a young age. Rodent models of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and metabolic disorders are used for examining susceptibility variations to environmental exposures. How...

  9. Fabry Disease in Families With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Clinical Manifestations in the Classic and Later-Onset Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalsteinsdottir, Berglind; Palsson, Runolfur; Desnick, Robert J; Gardarsdottir, Marianna; Teekakirikul, Polakit; Maron, Martin; Appelbaum, Evan; Neisius, Ulf; Maron, Barry J; Burke, Michael A; Chen, Brenden; Pagant, Silvere; Madsen, Christoffer V; Danielsen, Ragnar; Arngrimsson, Reynir; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E; Gunnarsson, Gunnar Th

    2017-08-01

    The screening of Icelandic patients clinically diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulted in identification of 8 individuals from 2 families with X-linked Fabry disease (FD) caused by GLA (α-galactosidase A gene) mutations encoding p.D322E (family A) or p.I232T (family B). Familial screening of at-risk relatives identified mutations in 16 family A members (8 men and 8 heterozygotes) and 25 family B members (10 men and 15 heterozygotes). Clinical assessments, α-galactosidase A (α-GalA) activities, glycosphingolipid substrate levels, and in vitro mutation expression were used to categorize p.D322E as a classic FD mutation and p.I232T as a later-onset FD mutation. In vitro expression revealed that p.D322E and p.I232T had α-GalA activities of 1.4% and 14.9% of the mean wild-type activity, respectively. Family A men had markedly decreased α-GalA activity and childhood-onset classic manifestations, except for angiokeratoma and cornea verticillata. Family B men had residual α-GalA activity and developed FD manifestations in adulthood. Despite these differences, all family A and family B men >30 years of age had left ventricular hypertrophy, which was mainly asymmetrical, and had similar late gadolinium enhancement patterns. Ischemic stroke and severe white matter lesions were more frequent among family A men, but neither family A nor family B men had overt renal disease. Family A and family B heterozygotes had less severe or no clinical manifestations. Men with classic or later-onset FD caused by GLA missense mutations developed prominent and similar cardiovascular disease at similar ages, despite markedly different α-GalA activities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Long-term pruritus as the initial and sole clinical manifestation of occult Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Shapour H; Khojasteh, Habib Noorani; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Monabati, Ahmad; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar

    2004-06-01

    Pruritus or itch is a frequent symptom of patients with Hodgkin's disease. It often occurs during the clinical course of the disease and rarely may precede the diagnosis of underlying disease. In this report, we present a 16-year-old patient who had history of generalized pruritus without any skin rash for 4 years before the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease. Within that period, she had received symptom-oriented medications, with no significant effect. After the first cycle of chemotherapy, her pruritus resolved completely. This case suggests that long-term generalized pruritus may be indicative of a significant underlying problem like Hodgkin's disease.

  11. Focus on Chronic Disease through Different Lenses of Expertise : Towards Implementation of Patient-Focused Decision Support Preventing Disability: The Example of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Örjan

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease. Treatment strategies emphasize early multi-professional interventions to reduce disease activity and to prevent disability, but there is a lack of knowledge on how optimal treatment can be provided to each individual patient. Aim: To elucidate how clinical manifestations of early RA are associated to disease and disability outcomes, to strive for greater potential to establish prognosis in early RA, and to facilitate i...

  12. Bitot’s Spots following Bariatric Surgery: An Ocular Manifestation of a Systemic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Crum

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: To present a case of ocular complications from vitamin A deficiency following bariatric surgery. Case Report: A 41-year-old woman presented with symptoms of dryness and diminished night vision. Examination revealed corneal punctate staining, keratinization of the conjunctiva, and multiple mid-peripheral white lesions at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium. Given the patient’s history of bariatric surgery, anemia, and vitamin D deficiency, further investigation into micronutrient levels was performed and indicated a severe vitamin A deficiency. Oral vitamin A supplementation resulted in the complete resolution of her symptoms within two months. Conclusions: Nutritional deficiencies following bariatric surgery are common and can be disruptive to normal systemic health and visual function. Given that the number of patients pursuing bariatric surgery for weight loss management has increased over the past 50 years, eye care professionals should be aware of the ophthalmic manifestations associated with micronutrient deficiency.

  13. Unilateral pitting edema of the leg as a manifestation of Graves’ disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volke Vallo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Graves’ hyperthyroidism has a number of well-recognized but relatively rare extrathyroid manifestations such as thyroid acropachy, pretibial myxedema, and congestive heart failure. Case presentation A 38-year-old Caucasian woman presented to the out-patient clinic with symptoms of hyperthyroidism lasting for approximately five months. Remarkably, she had developed pitting edema of her left leg four months before. She had gone through a conventional assessment, but the reason for the edema was not revealed. At presentation to the endocrinology clinic, the skin of both legs was of normal color and pitting edema on her left leg was of a diffuse nature and spread from her toes to two thirds of her leg. The skin surface of her left leg was smooth and had no elevations or discoloration, whereas her right leg appeared normal. Based on signs and symptoms of thyrotoxicosis and suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone level (less than 0.001mIU/L, local reference of 0.4 to 4, treatment of 10mg of thiamazole three times a day was started. Additional blood tests revealed marked Graves’ hyperthyroidism with elevated free T4 and anti-thyroid receptor antibodies. Within a month, the free T4 level was normalized and the edema was completely cleared and never reappeared during the treatment course of 12 months. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of unilateral treatment-responsive leg edema as a manifestation of Graves’ hyperthyroidism. However, the pathophysiological mechanism underlying this case of edema remains unclear.

  14. Spectrum of lymphoid hyperplasia: colonic manifestations of sarcoidosis, infectious mononucleosis, and Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ell, S.R.; Frank, P.H.

    1981-10-15

    The radiographic pattern of nodular lymphoid hyperplasia, perhaps better called the lymphoid follicular pattern, has variously been described as an indication of disease and as a normal variant in the adult, with current opinion favoring the latter. We report 3 cases wherein this pattern resulted from definite pathologic processes: sarcoidosis, infectious mononucleosis, and Crohn's disease. Although usually of no pathological significance, the benign follicular pattern may reflect a variety of diseases.

  15. Spectrum of lymphoid hyperplasia: Colonic manifestations of sarcoidosis, infectious mononucleosis, and Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ell, S.R.; Frank, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic pattern of nodular lmyphoid hyperplasia, perhaps better called the lymphoid follicular pattern, has variously been described as an indication of disease and as a normal variant in the adult, with current opinion favoring the latter. We report 3 cases wherein this pattern resulted from definite pathologic processes: sarcoidosis, infectious mononucleosis, and Crohn's disease. Although usually of no pathological significance, the benign follicular pattern may reflect a variety of diseases. (orig.)

  16. Early Disseminated Lyme Disease with Carditis Complicated by Posttreatment Lyme Disease Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Cheryl; Harrison, Andrew; Aucott, John

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. When untreated, infection may spread to the heart, nervous system, and joints. Cardiac involvement usually manifests as abnormalities of the conduction system and bradycardia. Treatment of Lyme disease is generally effective, with a subset of patients experiencing persistent, sometimes long-term symptoms called posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

  17. Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (Albers-Schönberg disease): clinical and radiological manifestations in 42 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénichou, O D; Laredo, J D; de Vernejoul, M C

    2000-01-01

    Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO II, Albers-Schonberg disease) is a genetic condition characterized by generalized osteosclerosis predominating in some skeletal sites such as the spine and pelvis. ADO II is rare, and most available clinical descriptions are based on small numbers of patients. We report the clinical and radiological manifestations in 42 ADO II patients. To our knowledge, this is the largest series reported so far. Our inclusion criterion was presence on radiographs of the spine of vertebral endplate thickening, producing the classic sandwich vertebra appearance. We found various patterns of sandwich vertebra, of which we provide a description to assist physicians in diagnosing ADO II. The classic bone-within-bone appearance was present in most but not all skeletal sites. The radiological penetrance of the disease was high (90%) and increased after 20 years of age. As many as 81% of our patients experienced clinical manifestations. Fractures were common (78% of patients) and healed slowly. Hip osteoarthritis developed in 27% of patients and required arthroplasty in 9 of the 16 affected hips. Nonmandibular osteomyelitis occurred in 4 cases (11%). Twenty-four percent of patients had thoracic or lumbar scoliosis. Orthopedic surgery was performed in 52.8% of patients, of whom half had at least three surgical procedures for internal fracture fixation, arthroplasty, limb deformity correction, or treatment of surgical complications. There was a high rate of surgical complications including nonunion, infection, prosthesis loosening, and intraoperative fractures. Nearly two-thirds of patients (64%) had stomatologic manifestations, including mandibular osteomyelitis in 4 patients (11%). Cranial nerve involvement responsible for hearing loss, bilateral optic atrophy, and/or facial palsy was present in 14 patients but was clearly attributable to ADO II in only 6 cases (16%). This large series sheds new light on several aspects of ADO II, most

  18. The association between uric acid levels and different clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Trine R; Gerke, Oke; Diederichsen, Axel C P

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Uric acid (UA) has been associated with the presence and severity of coronary artery disease. To further assess the role of UA role in coronary artery disease, we investigated UA levels in both healthy asymptomatic middle-aged individuals and in different subgroups of hospitalized patients...

  19. Extraintestinal manifestations in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis: results from a prospective, population-based European inception cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isene, Rune; Bernklev, Tomm; Høie, Ole; Munkholm, Pia; Tsianos, Epameonondas; Stockbrügger, Reinhold; Odes, Selwyn; Palm, Øyvind; Småstuen, Milada; Moum, Bjørn

    2015-03-01

    In chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (Crohn's disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC]), symptoms from outside the gastrointestinal tract are frequently seen, and the joints, skin, eyes, and hepatobiliary area are the most usually affected sites (called extraintestinal manifestations [EIM]). The reported prevalence varies, explained by difference in study design and populations under investigation. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of EIM in a population-based inception cohort in Europe and Israel. IBD patients were incepted into a cohort that was prospectively followed from 1991 to 2004. A total of 1145 patients were followed for 10 years. The cumulative prevalence of first EIM was 16.9% (193/1145 patients) over a median follow-up time of 10.1 years. Patients with CD were more likely than UC patients to have immune-mediated (arthritis, eye, skin, and liver) manifestations: 20.1% versus 10.4% (p colitis compared to proctitis in UC increased the risk of EIM. In a European inception cohort, EIMs in IBD were consistent with that seen in comparable studies. Patients with CD are twice as likely as UC patients to experience EIM, and more extensive distribution of inflammation in UC increases the risk of EIM.

  20. Relationship between disease characteristics and orofacial manifestations in systemic sclerosis: Canadian Systemic Sclerosis Oral Health Study III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Tatibouet, Solène; Steele, Russell; Lo, Ernest; Gravel, Sabrina; Gyger, Geneviève; El Sayegh, Tarek; Pope, Janet; Fontaine, Audrey; Masetto, Ariel; Matthews, Debora; Sutton, Evelyn; Thie, Norman; Jones, Niall; Copete, Maria; Kolbinson, Dean; Markland, Janet; Nogueira, Getulio; Robinson, David; Fritzler, Marvin; Gornitsky, Mervyn

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) is associated with decreased saliva production and interincisal distance, more missing teeth, and periodontal disease. We undertook this study to determine the clinical correlates of SSc with these oral abnormalities. Subjects were recruited from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group cohort. Detailed dental and clinical examinations were performed according to standardized protocols. Associations between dental abnormalities and selected clinical and serologic manifestations of SSc were examined. One hundred sixty-three SSc subjects were included: 90% women, mean ± SD age 56 ± 11 years, mean ± SD disease duration 14 ± 8 years, 72% with limited cutaneous disease, and 28% with diffuse cutaneous disease. Decreased saliva production was associated with Sjögren's syndrome-related autoantibodies (β = -43.32; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] -80.89, -5.75), but not with disease severity (β = -2.51; 95% CI -8.75, 3.73). Decreased interincisal distance was related to disease severity (β = -1.02; 95% CI -1.63, -0.42) and the modified Rodnan skin thickness score (β = -0.38; 95% CI -0.53, -0.23). The number of missing teeth was associated with decreased saliva production (relative risk [RR] 0.97; 95% CI 0.94, 0.99), worse hand function (RR 1.52; 95% CI 1.13, 2.02), and the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD; RR 1.68 [95% CI 1.14, 2.46]). No clinical or serologic variables were correlated with periodontal disease. In SSc, diminished interincisal distance is related to overall disease severity. Decreased saliva production is related to concomitant Sjögren's syndrome antibodies. Tooth loss is associated with poor upper extremity function, GERD, and decreased saliva. The etiology of excess periodontal disease is likely multifactorial and remains unclear. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes: Neuropsychology and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-11

    Alzheimer Disease, Early Onset; Alzheimer Disease; Alzheimer Disease, Late Onset; Dementia, Alzheimer Type; Logopenic Progressive Aphasia; Primary Progressive Aphasia; Visuospatial/Perceptual Abilities; Posterior Cortical Atrophy; Executive Dysfunction; Corticobasal Degeneration; Ideomotor Apraxia

  2. Normal villous architecture with increased intraepithelial lymphocytes: a duodenal manifestation of Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Emily R; Shmidt, Eugenia; Oxentenko, Amy S; Enders, Felicity T; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    To assess a possible association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the histologic finding in duodenal biopsy specimens of increased intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) with normal villous architecture. We identified all patients with duodenal biopsy specimens obtained between 2000 and 2010 showing increased IELs and normal architecture. Among the 74 such patients who also had IBD, we characterized the clinical features of IBD and reviewed all available upper gastrointestinal biopsy specimens. Fifty-eight patients had Crohn disease, 13 had ulcerative colitis, and three had IBD, type unclassified. No duodenal sample with increased IELs had other histologic features of IBD. Among gastric biopsy specimens from 34 patients with Crohn disease, nearly half (16) had focal gastritis. We propose that Crohn disease be included in the differential diagnosis for increased IELs with normal villous architecture in duodenal biopsy specimens, particularly when gastric biopsy specimens show focal gastritis. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  3. The case of Cushings disease imaging by SPECT examination without manifestation of adenoma in MRI examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierach, M.; Pufal, J.; Pilecki, S.; Junik, R.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the possibility of imaging the pathological accumulation of 99mT c-MIBI in the pituitary gland in patients with Cushings disease when MRI examination does not show microadenomas. Cushings disease was diagnosed in a 27 year old male on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. The blood cortisol level of the patient was elevated (the average level was 47 microgram/dl) and it showed no changeability of day and night rhythm. In the patient with Cushing's disease, during the SPECT examination, an increased accumulation of 99mT c-MIBI in the pituitary gland was noticed. MRI scanning was negative. Single photon emission computed tomography using 99mT c-MIBI is a useful and sensitive means of pituitary gland microadenoma detection in patients with Cushings disease when microadenoma is not detected during MRI scanning and when the results of dexamethasone suppression test is positive. (author)

  4. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes in the lumbar spine: a manifestation of facet degenerative joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.L.; Kaplan, P.A.; Dussault, R.G.; Anderson, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Signal intensity changes in lumbar pedicles, similar to those described in vertebral body endplates adjacent to degenerated discs, have been described as an ancillary sign of spondylolysis on MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pedicle marrow signal intensity changes also occur in association with facet degenerative joint disease.Design. Eighty-nine lumbar spine MRI examinations without spondylolysis were reviewed for marrow signal intensity changes in pedicles and vertebral bodies as well as for facet degenerative joint disease.Results. Five percent (46/890) of lumbar pedicles in 23 patients had marrow signal intensity changes. Ninety-one percent (42/46) of the abnormal pedicles had adjacent degenerative joint disease of the facets, while only 21% (189/890) of normal pedicles had adjacent facet degenerative joint disease (p<0.001). Eighty-nine percent (41/46) of the pedicles with marrow signal intensity changes had adjacent degenerative disc disease.Conclusions. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are not a specific sign of spondylolysis; they are commonly seen with adjacent facet degenerative joint disease in the absence of spondylolysis. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are probably a response to abnormal stresses related to abnormal motion or loading caused by the degenerative changes in the spinal segment. (orig.)

  5. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes in the lumbar spine: a manifestation of facet degenerative joint disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, J.L.; Kaplan, P.A.; Dussault, R.G.; Anderson, M.W. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. Signal intensity changes in lumbar pedicles, similar to those described in vertebral body endplates adjacent to degenerated discs, have been described as an ancillary sign of spondylolysis on MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pedicle marrow signal intensity changes also occur in association with facet degenerative joint disease.Design. Eighty-nine lumbar spine MRI examinations without spondylolysis were reviewed for marrow signal intensity changes in pedicles and vertebral bodies as well as for facet degenerative joint disease.Results. Five percent (46/890) of lumbar pedicles in 23 patients had marrow signal intensity changes. Ninety-one percent (42/46) of the abnormal pedicles had adjacent degenerative joint disease of the facets, while only 21% (189/890) of normal pedicles had adjacent facet degenerative joint disease (p<0.001). Eighty-nine percent (41/46) of the pedicles with marrow signal intensity changes had adjacent degenerative disc disease.Conclusions. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are not a specific sign of spondylolysis; they are commonly seen with adjacent facet degenerative joint disease in the absence of spondylolysis. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are probably a response to abnormal stresses related to abnormal motion or loading caused by the degenerative changes in the spinal segment. (orig.)

  6. Diagnostic challenges of early Lyme disease: Lessons from a community case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzwalder Alison

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne infection in North America, is increasingly reported. When the characteristic rash, erythema migrans, is not recognized and treated, delayed manifestations of disseminated infection may occur. The accuracy of diagnosis and treatment of early Lyme disease in the community is unknown. Methods A retrospective, consecutive case series of 165 patients presenting for possible early Lyme disease between August 1, 2002 and August 1, 2007 to a community-based Lyme referral practice in Maryland. All patients had acute symptoms of less than or equal to 12 weeks duration. Patients were categorized according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria and data were collected on presenting history, physical findings, laboratory serology, prior diagnoses and prior treatments. Results The majority (61% of patients in this case series were diagnosed with early Lyme disease. Of those diagnosed with early Lyme disease, 13% did not present with erythema migrans; of those not presenting with a rash, 54% had been previously misdiagnosed. Among those with a rash, the diagnosis of erythema migrans was initially missed in 23% of patients whose rash was subsequently confirmed. Of all patients previously misdiagnosed, 41% had received initial antibiotics likely to be ineffective against Lyme disease. Conclusion For community physicians practicing in high-risk geographic areas, the diagnosis of Lyme disease remains a challenge. Failure to recognize erythema migrans or alternatively, viral-like presentations without a rash, can lead to missed or delayed diagnosis of Lyme disease, ineffective antibiotic treatment, and the potential for late manifestations.

  7. Periodic Paralysis and Encephalopathy as Initial Manifestations of Graves' Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsironis, Theocharis; Tychalas, Athanasios; Kiourtidis, Dimitrios; Kountouras, Jannis; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Rudolf, Jobst; Deretzi, Georgia

    2017-07-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is an uncommon complication of Graves' disease, characterized by the triad of acute hypokalemia without total body potassium deficit, episodic muscle paralysis, and thyrotoxicosis. Graves' encephalopathy is an extremely rare form of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD), characterized by neuropsychiatric symptoms, increased antithyroid antibodies and cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, nonspecific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and cortico-responsiveness. Coexistence of both these complications in the same patient has not been reported before. We herein present a 48-year-old white male patient with TPP and encephalopathy as initial presentations of Graves' disease. Flaccid tetraparesis was reversed a few hours after potassium level correction and the patient did not suffer any relapse with the successful pharmaceutical management of the thyroid function. One month later, the patient presented with dizziness and behavioral symptoms, such as inappropriate laughter and anger. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed meningeal enhancement and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a mild protein increase, with a blood-brain barrier disruption. With the suspicion of EAATD, the patient was treated with high doses of corticosteroids and improved dramatically. To our knowledge this is the first reported coexistence of potentially treatable TPP and EAATD as initial neurological manifestations of Graves' disease, thereby underscoring the necessity of suspicion of possible underlying Graves' disease in patients with acute paralysis and encephalopathy of unclear origin.

  8. Chloroquine analogues in drug discovery: new directions of uses, mechanisms of actions and toxic manifestations from malaria to multifarious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bari, Md Abdul Alim

    2015-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs (e.g. chloroquine and its close structural analogues) were developed primarily to treat malaria; however, they are beneficial for many dermatological, immunological, rheumatological and severe infectious diseases, for which they are used mostly today. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, two of the most fascinating drugs developed in the last 50 years, are increasingly recognized for their effectiveness in myriad non-malarial diseases. In advanced research, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have been shown to have various immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive effects, and currently have established roles in the management of rheumatic diseases, lupus erythematosus (different forms) and skin diseases, and in the treatment of different forms of cancer. Recently, chloroquine analogues have also been found to have metabolic, cardiovascular, antithrombotic and antineoplastic effects. This review is concerned with the lysosomotropic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanisms of chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, quinacrine and related analogues, and the current evidence for both their beneficial effects and potential adverse manifestations in various diseases. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Comparison between the radiological manifestations of thoracic involvement in collagen vascular diseases and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, G.; Rashkov, R.; Georgiev, O.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare the presentation and distribution of lung abnormalities seen in Collagen Vascular Diseases (CVD) with those specifics for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). The HRCT scans of 92 patients fulfilling the ARA criteria's for the diagnosis of four different CVD were reviewed and compared with those of 18 patients with IPF. The presentations of three main patterns of lung disease were assessed into the both groups. In order to find out the trend distribution in each disease, the grade and severity of presentation for the main abnormalities were assessed, using a scoring system.The incidence of reticular lung abnormalities for the group of IPF is 100 % versus 57.3 % for the CVD (p<0.0009). At the same time CVD, except for PSS, had a low incidence of reticular diseases (37 %). The incidence of alveolar abnormalities in CVD (57.3 %) were similar as these in IPF (66.6 %) (p=NS). The severity of the disease was greatest in IPF and PSS without significant difference between them. Nevertheless of uniform character of the abnormalities in the rest of CVD, they were presented with lesser degree and severity. The main abnormalities, seen in pulmonary parenchyma in patients with IPF and CVD were similar but with different grade, severity and distribution. (authors)

  10. The manifestation of 18F-FDG imaging of coincidence SPECT in benign pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jisheng; Liu Jinjun; Wu Jiyong; Pan Huizhong; Wang Huoqiang; Shen Yi; Shi Degang

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the uptake of the 18 F-FDG in the benign pulmonary diseases with dual head SPECT coincidence detection system. Methods: Scanning were performed with dual head SPECT coincidence detection system for patients with pulmonary diseases,the uptake and the imaging characteristic of the diseases were analysed. Results: 1) In 28 tuberculosis (TB) patients, 19 cases with a negative imaging (68%, 19/28), whereas 9 cases with a positive result (32%, 9/28). The T/N value of the TB is 1.7 +- 1.2, but the T/N of the lung cancer is 4.1 +- 2.4, significantly different from them. In the skin PPD test, 9 cases with positive scans showed a 16.2 (12 - 22) mm diameter red spot, but 7 cases of negative scans with a 8.6 (0 - 15) mm diameter, both also have a significant difference. 2) Out of the 8 patients suffered from sarcoidosis, among them 5 active stage with positive scans, whereas another 3 remission cases with negative results. 3) In 18 inflammation cases, positive imagings were showed in 6 patients with cryptococcosis, mycoplasma pneumonia, mycosis, organized pneumonia, lung abscess and bacteria pneumonia. Conclusions: In some benign pulmonary diseases, 18 F-FDG imaging can be positive also. Analysing the characteristic of the imaging could rise specificity in lung cancer and also give some new clues to treatment of these benign pulmonary diseases

  11. Periodontal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: emerging epidemiologic and biologic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agossa, K; Dendooven, A; Dubuquoy, L; Gower-Rousseau, C; Delcourt-Debruyne, E; Capron, M

    2017-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and periodontitis are both described as a disproportionate mucosal inflammatory response to a microbial environment in susceptible patients. Moreover, these two conditions share major environmental and lifestyle-related risk factors. Despite this intriguing pathogenic parallel, large-scale studies and basic research have only recently considered periodontal outcomes as relevant data. There are mounting and consistent arguments, from recent epidemiologic studies and animal models, that these two conditions might be related. This article is a comprehensive and critical up-to-date review of the current evidence and future prospects in understanding the biologic and epidemiologic relationships between periodontal status and inflammatory bowel disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. An unusual case of Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman Disease manifesting as a bilateral Epibulbar mass.

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Swati Ravani; Dr. Jaideep Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report an unusual presentation of a 24-year-old man with bilateral epibulbar mass, whose presentation was confirmed histopathologically as Rosai Dorfman disease. Method: We studied a retrospective and interventional case report. Results: A 24-year-old man presented with a mass over both eyes, gradually and, progressively increasing over one year. Visual acuity and intraocular pressures were normal in both eyes. Examination revealed bilateral non tender mobile soft in consistency ...

  13. The central nervous system manifestation and CT findings of Fabry's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyonaga, Kazutaka; Nishihira, Takeo

    1983-01-01

    A case of Fabry's disease with central nervous system dysfunction is reported. This 27-year-old man had recurrent episodes of pains in the extremities when he was a child. Spontaneous clinical remission occured around puberty. He had been well until age 22 when he experienced transient weakness of the left arm. The following year he developed transient blindness of the right eye. Then, he developed weakness in the extremities, dysphagia, dysarthria, and was brought to the hospital in unconscious state. Several members of his family are affected with the same disease presenting leg pains, kidney disease and angiokeratoma. Physical examination disclosed an optic atrophy, pseudobulbar palsy with spastic weakness in the all extremities and multiple angiokeratoma in the flank, buttocks and thighs. Abnormal laboratory findings included leukocytosis, increased ESR and strongly positive CRP. Biopsy of the skin disclosed dilated capilaries with numerous vacuoles in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. Thin-layer chromatography of the urine sediment showed a marked increase in ceramide trihexoside. Leukocyte alphagalactosidase level was abnormally low. CT scan showed diffuse cerebral atrophy and multiple low density areas in the thalamus, ventral pons and centrum semiovale. The CT findings and possible mechanism of the response to predonisolone were also discussed. (author)

  14. Thoracic Paravertebral Mass as an Infrequent Manifestation of IgG4-Related Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Matzumura Kuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Case. A 50-year-old African American male presented with abdominal pain and significant weight loss. On physical examination, he had parotid and submandibular gland enlargement associated with right eye proptosis. Computed tomography showed a thoracic paravertebral soft tissue mass, enlarged lymph nodes, and ascending aortic aneurysm. Laboratory results were remarkable for elevated total IgG and IgG4 subclass. The submandibular gland pathology revealed chronic sclerosing sialadenitis, with a large subset of inflammatory cells positively staining for IgG4. The histology of the paravertebral mass demonstrated fibrosclerosis with increased lymphocytic infiltrate, associated with increased IgG4 plasma cells. He was diagnosed with immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD. Steroid therapy initially yielded improvement; however, after steroids were stopped, there was disease recurrence. Prednisone was restarted, and the plan was to start him on rituximab. Interestingly, the patient’s brother also had IgG4-RD. Conclusion. IgG4-RD can present as a paravertebral mass which is usually responsive to steroids; however, recurrent and resistant disease can be seen for which steroid-sparing agents such as rituximab should be considered. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of IgG4-RD in two family members presenting as a paravertebral mass, highlighting an exciting area for more research in the future.

  15. [Clinical and radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis manifested as interstitial lung diseases.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ju-Hong; Feng, Rui-E; Tian, Xin-Lun; Xu, Wen-Bing; Xu, Zuo-Jun; Liu, Hong-Rui; Zhu, Yuan-Jue

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the clinical and radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as interstitial lung diseases (ILD). We analyzed the data of cases suspected of diffuse parenchyma lung diseases at this hospital between October 2003 and October 2007. The diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis was based on epithelioid granuloma or positive acid-fast bacilli in lung biopsy and changes on serial radiographs obtained during treatment. The data of a series of 230 consecutive patients with suspected ILD were retrospectively analyzed. The diagnosis was confirmed by lung biopsy. Twelve patients were confirmed to have pulmonary tuberculosis. There were 5 males and 7 females with a mean age of 38 +/- 11 years (range, 17 - 68). The median course of disease in these patients was 3 months (range, 0.5 - 18 months). Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presented with fever (11/12), cough (9/12), weight loss (7/12), dyspnea (7/12), lymphadenopathy (4/12), and splenohepatomegaly (2/12). On chest CT scan, ground-glass attenuation was identified in 4, bilateral patchy infiltration in 5, tree-in-bud appearance 1, and centrilobular lesions in 2 of the 12 patients. During the follow-up period (median, 9 month, range from 3 to 12 month), 11 patients improved, but 1 died of diabetic ketoacidosis. The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis should be considered in suspected ILD patients presenting with fever, splenohepatomegaly and lymphadenopathy.

  16. Plasma calprotectin and its association with cardiovascular disease manifestations, obesity and the metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lise; Nybo, M.; Poulsen, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plasma calprotectin is a potential biomarker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), insulin resistance (IR), and obesity. We examined the relationship between plasma calprotectin concentrations, CVD manifestations and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2......DM) in order to evaluate plasma calprotectin as a risk assessor of CVD in diabetic patients without known CVD. Methods: An automated immunoassay for determination of plasma calprotectin was developed based on a fecal Calprotectin ELIA, and a reference range was established from 120 healthy adults...... associated with obesity, MetS status, autonomic neuropathy, PAD, and MI. However, plasma calprotectin was not an independent predictor of CVD, MI, autonomic neuropathy or PAD....

  17. Ocular Manifestations of Ebola Virus Disease: An Ophthalmologist's Guide to Prevent Infection and Panic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingolo, Enzo Maria; Messano, Giuseppe Alessio; Fragiotta, Serena; Petti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD—formerly known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever) is a severe hemorrhagic fever caused by lipid-enveloped, nonsegmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the genus Ebolavirus. Case fatality rates may reach up to 76% of infected individuals, making this infection a deadly health problem in the sub-Saharan population. At the moment, there are still no indications on ophthalmological clinical signs and security suggestions for healthcare professionals (doctors and nurses or cooperative persons). This paper provides a short but complete guide to reduce infection risks. PMID:26557674

  18. Changes in cognitive control in pre-manifest Huntington's disease examined using pre-saccadic EEG potentials - a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Vanessa; Bestgen, Anne-Kathrin; Saft, Carsten; Beste, Christian

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that Huntington's disease (HD) affects saccadic processing. However, saccadic dysfunctions in HD may be seen as a result of dysfunctional processes occurring at the oculomotor level prior to the execution of saccades, i.e., at a pre-saccadic level. Virtually nothing is known about possible changes in pre-saccadic processes in HD. This study examines pre-saccadic processing in pre-manifest HD gene mutation carriers (pre-HDs) by using clinically available EEG measures. Error rates, pre-saccadic EEG potentials and saccade onset EEG potentials were measured in 14 pre-HDs and case-matched controls performing prosaccades and antisaccades in a longitudinal study over a 15-month period. The results show that pre-saccadic potentials were changed in pre-HDs, relative to controls and also revealed changes across the 15-month longitudinal period. In particular, pre-saccadic ERP in pre-HDs were characterized by lower amplitudes and longer latencies, which revealed longitudinal changes. These changes were observed for anti-saccades, but not for pro-saccades. Overt saccadic trajectories (potentials) were not different to those in controls, showing that pre-saccadic processes are sensitive to subtle changes in fronto-striatal networks in pre-HDs. Deficits in pre-saccadic processes prior the execution of an erroneous anti-saccade can be seen as an effect of dysfunctional cognitive control in HD. This may underlie saccadic abnormalities and hence a major phenotype of HD. Pre-saccadic EEG potentials preceding erroneous anti-saccades are sensitive to pre-manifest disease progression in HD.

  19. Autopsy-confirmed hippocampal-sparing Alzheimer's disease with delusional jealousy as initial manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Iritani, Shuji; Hattori, Miho; Sekiguchi, Hirotaka; Matsunaga, Shinji; Habuchi, Chikako; Torii, Youta; Umeda, Kentaro; Ozaki, Norio; Yoshida, Mari; Fujita, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is clinically characterized by gradual onset over years with worsening of cognition. The initial and most prominent cognitive deficit is commonly memory dysfunction. However, a subset of AD cases has less hippocampal atrophy than would be expected relative to the predominance of cortical atrophy. These hippocampal-sparing cases have distinctive clinical features, including the presence of focal cortical clinical syndromes. Given that previous studies have indicated that severe hippocampal atrophy corresponds to prominent loss of episodic memory, it is likely that memory impairment is initially absent in hippocampal-sparing AD cases. Here, we report on a patient with an 8-year history of delusional jealousy with insidious onset who was clinically diagnosed as possible AD and pathologically confirmed to have AD with relatively preserved neurons in the hippocampus. This patient had delusional jealousy with a long pre-dementia stage, which initially was characterized by lack of memory impairment. Head magnetic resonance imaging findings showed preserved hippocampal volume with bilateral enlarged ventricles and mild-to-moderate cortical atrophy. Head single-photon emission computed tomography revealed severely decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the right temporal lobe. The resolution of the delusion was attributed to pharmacotherapy by an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, suggesting that the occurrence of delusional jealousy was due to the disease process of AD. Although the neural basis of delusional jealousy remains unclear, this hippocampal-sparing AD case may be classified as an atypical presentation of AD. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  20. Nailfold capillaroscopic changes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: correlations with disease activity, skin manifestation and nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenavandeh, S; Habibi, S

    2017-08-01

    Introduction The clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the consequence of endothelial cell damage leading to serious multiple organ dysfunction. The aim of this study was to assess the association between nailfold capillaroscopic changes and disease activity, skin and renal involvement in patients with SLE. Methods Demographic variables, clinical manifestations and laboratory data of 108 patients with SLE were investigated. Nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) was performed in all patients. Result Morphological changes in NFC were observed in 102 out of 108 (94.4%) SLE patients. Minor changes were found in 33 (30.6%) and major changes in 69 (63.9%) cases. The disease activity was significantly higher in the patients with major changes ( p  0.05), except for the elongated capillary loops, which were seen more often in patients with renal involvement than in patients without it ( p < 0.03). Conclusion The results of the study showed that capillary changes (abnormal capillaroscopy) were very common in patients with SLE, although there were no specific patterns like the ones in scleroderma patients, and some changes may be associated with disease activity, especially in patients with active skin involvement.

  1. Intracranial menigioma manifested after delivery in a patient with Hodgkin's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagulić Mirjana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intracranial meningioma is rarely reported in the patients treated for Hodgkin’s disease (HD, known to mainly occur in the area of radiation therapy. Case report. A 26-year-old woman with HD, and intracranial meningioma following the delivery, was presented. As we knew, a similar case had not been reported in the literature before. Three years prior the surgery for intracranial tumor, the patient had been started to be treated for HD of neoplasm stage I (NS I type, by the use of the standard (bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone BEA-COPP protocol. The remission of HD, achieved after 7 cycles, persisted over a 27-month-period up to the delivery. Within this period, the patient was without neurologic disorder, but with the obvious psychotic behavior, for which the patient was treated with haloperidol. Two days following the normal delivery, during the acute disorder of the consciousness, intracranial tumor was found. A complete bilateral meningioma (11.7 × 8.3 × 8.1 cm of the frontal parietal zone was removed. Conclusion. there were no reliable signs of the use of an intensive hemotherapy in the reported case (alkylating cytostatics and topoisomerases inhibitors which might have caused the proliferation of a benign solid tumor. The pregnancy was supposed to be the possible second risk factor for causing the growth of a meningioma. On the basis of the significant psychic disorders before the pregnancy, as well as upon the size of the operated on tumor, we concluded that the occurrence of intracranial meningioma could be regarded the parallel neoplastic disease or the second primary tumor.

  2. Man made disease: clinical manifestations of low phenylalanine levels in an inadequately treated phenylketonuria patient and mouse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pode-Shakked, Ben; Shemer-Meiri, Lilach; Harmelin, Alon; Stettner, Noa; Brenner, Ori; Abraham, Smadar; Schwartz, Gerard; Anikster, Yair

    2013-01-01

    Phenylalanine (Phe) deficiency and its clinical manifestations have been previously described mostly as sporadic case reports dating back to the 1960's and 1970's. In these reports, low plasma Phe levels were associated with listlessness, eczematous eruptions and failure to gain weight, most often in infants in their first year of life. Herein we describe a 9 month old female patient with known phenylketonuria, who presented with an unusual constellation of symptoms, including severe erythema and desquamation, alopecia, keratomalacia, corneal perforation, failure to thrive and prolonged diarrhea. The diagnostic possibilities of acrodermatitis enteropathica and vitamin deficiencies were ruled out, and further investigation into her medical history led to the conclusion that during the weeks preceding the hospitalization, the patient's diet consisted of the phenylalanine-free medical formula alone, without the addition of a standard infant formula or food as recommended. Subsequently, dietary control of the blood phenylalanine levels brought swift and marked resolution of the dermatological lesions, with renewal of hair growth. Following this experience, and due to the relative paucity of data regarding the clinical manifestations of low serum phenylalanine levels in humans and their putative pathogenetic mechanisms, we sought to further investigate the effects of a phenylalanine-free diet in a mouse study. For this purpose, twenty mice were randomly allocated to receive either a phenylalanine-deficient diet (n=10) or a normal diet (n=10). Weight was measured weekly, and laboratory tests were obtained including complete blood count, electrolyte studies, and phenylalanine and tyrosine levels. Finally, necropsies and histopathological examinations of different tissues were performed in selected mice, either early after diet initiation, late after diet initiation or following re-introduction of normal diets. The study was then repeated in additional two groups of mice

  3. Renal sonographic findings of type I glycogen storage disease in infancy and early childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei [Mackay Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan); Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Lee, Hung-Chang [Mackay Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan); Taipei Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2005-08-01

    Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD-I) is an inherited disorder affecting glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The characteristic manifestations are hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlacticacidemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Renal disease is regarded as a long-term complication and is reported mainly in older patients. We report the renal manifestations and renal ultrasonographic findings of GSD-I in infancy and early childhood in order to assess the role of renal sonography in the diagnosis of GSD-I. We retrospectively reviewed our hospital's database for patients with GSD-I from January 1993 to September 2004. The records of five patients were reviewed for this study. These five patients were diagnosed when they were younger than 3 years old. Data extracted from the charts included the initial extrarenal and renal manifestations, laboratory data, and imaging studies. We analyzed the indications for, and results of, renal sonography. In addition to the clinical presentations and laboratory abnormalities, all five children had nephromegaly and increased echogenicity on ultrasonography on their first visit, although only a minor degree of tubular dysfunction was noted clinically. Three of these five patients had nephrocalcinosis or renal stones or both. Hyperechoic large kidneys, nephrocalcinosis, and renal stones are common in GSD-I. They can be present in early infancy. Abnormalities on renal sonography might suggest GSD-I in a patient with suspected inborn errors of metabolism. (orig.)

  4. [Diastolic dysfunction in the elderly subjects. Disease or a physiological manifestation of ageing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meluzín, J; Podroužková, H; Gregorová, Z; Panovský, R

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this summary paper is to discuss the current knowledge of the impact of age on diastolic function of the left ventricle. Data from the literature: Reports published till this time have convincingly demonstrated a significant relationship of age to diastolic function of the left ventricle. Ageing is a physiological process accompanied by structural changes in both myocardium and arterial bed resulting in worsening of parameters characterizing the left ventricular diastolic function. This "physiological" diastolic dysfunction in the elderly subjects can be explained by the deterioration of passive left ventricular filling properties and by worsening of left ventricular relaxation. The detailed analysis of published reports shows problems in distiguishing this "physiological" diastolic dysfunction resulting from physiological tissue ageing from "pathological" diastolic dysfunction reflecting a disease of cardiovascular system. To interprete correctly values of parameters quantifying diastolic function of the left ventricle, one should take into account the age of subjects under the examination. Further studies are necessary to distinguish exactly "physiological" deterioration of diastolic function associated with ageing from really "pathological" diastolic dysfunction in the elderly subjects.

  5. Parkinson's disease therapy: treatment of early and late disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Purpose To summarize the current strategies for the treatment of early and late Parkinson's disease (PD). Data sources The presented guidelines are based on the review of the literature as well as the author's extensive experience with the treatment of 7000 patients with PD over the past 25 years. Results An analysis of reported data as well as personal experience suggest that while young patients seem to have a slower progression of the disease, they are at a higher risk for developing levodopa induced complications, such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. It is, therefore, prudent practice to delay levodopa therapy, particularly in younger patients, until the PD symptoms become troublesome and interfere with social or occupational functioning. Other strategies, such as the use of deprenyl, amantadine, trihexyphenidyl and dopamine agonists, should be employed before instituting levodopa therapy. Entacopone and dopamine agonists are useful in smoothing out levodopa related motor fluctuations. Surgical interventions, such as pallidotomy and pallidal or subthalamic deep brain stimulation, are effective therapeutic strategies, but should be reserved only for patients in whom optimal medical therapy fails to provide satisfactory control of symptoms. Conclusion The medical and surgical treatment of patients with PD must be individualized and tailored to the needs of the individual patient.

  6. Migraine- and dystonia-related disease-mutations of Na+/K+-ATPases: Relevance of behavioral studies in mice to disease symptoms and neurological manifestations in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Doganli, Canan; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The two autosomal dominantly inherited neurological diseases: familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2) and familial rapid-onset of dystonia-parkinsonism (Familial RDP) are caused by in vivo mutations of specific alpha subunits of the sodium–potassium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase). Intriguingly, patients...... with classical FHM2 and RDP symptoms additionally suffer from other manifestations, such as epilepsy/seizures and developmental disabilities. Recent studies of FHM2 and RDP mouse models provide valuable tools for dissecting the vital roles of the Na+/K+-ATPases, and we discuss their relevance to the complex...

  7. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2 manifests with fibrosing lung disease early in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengst, M. (Meike); Naehrlich, L. (Lutz); P. Mahavadi (Poornima); Grosse-Onnebrink, J. (Joerg); Terheggen-Lagro, S. (Suzanne); Skanke, L.Hø. (Lars Høsøien); Schuch, L.A. (Luise A.); Brasch, F. (Frank); A. Guenther (Andreas); S. Reu (Simone); Ley-Zaporozhan, J. (Julia); Griese, M. (Matthias)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS), a hereditary multisystem disorder with oculocutaneous albinism, may be caused by mutations in one of at least 10 separate genes. The HPS-2 subtype is distinguished by the presence of neutropenia and knowledge of its pulmonary phenotype in

  8. Unusual clinical manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has protean clinical manifestations. The classical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Unusual clinical manifestations may result from involvement of pulmonary, cardiovascular, neural, gastrointestinal, ocular and other systems. Immunological phenomena secondary to antigenic mimicry may also be an important component of many clinical features and may be responsible for reactive arthritis. Leptospirosis in early pregnancy may lead to fetal loss. There are a few reports of leptospirosis in HIV- infected individuals but no generalisation can be made due to paucity of data. It is important to bear in mind that leptospiral illness may be a significant component in cases of dual infections or in simultaneous infections with more than two pathogens.

  9. Morbidity in early Parkinson's disease and prior to diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rune; Kjellberg, Jakob; Ibsen, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonmotor symptoms are probably present prior to, early on, and following, a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Nonmotor symptoms may hold important information about the progression of Parkinson's disease. OBJECTIVE: To evaluated the total early and prediagnostic morbidities in the 3......, poisoning and certain other external causes, and other factors influencing health status and contact with health services. It was negatively associated with neoplasm, cardiovascular, and respiratory diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease present significant differences...

  10. Paget's disease of jaw bones as primary manifestation: A case report of a proper diagnosis made by general dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolongo, Martin G; Cabras, Marco; Bava, Luca; Arduino, Paolo G; Carbone, Mario

    2018-06-01

    To present a case of early diagnosis mandibular Paget's disease of bone (PDB), recognised by a general dentist. PDB is responsible of rapid bone resorption and disorganised bone formation. The patient was a 72-year-old female patient complaining of dental malposition and blatant prognathism. Clinicians should consider PDB in differential diagnosis for an elderly patient undergoing unexplained alteration in face profile and occlusion. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Manifestações cutâneas na doença renal terminal Cutaneous manifestations in end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Lupi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A prevalência da doença renal crônica aumentou nos últimos anos. Os efeitos dessa doença são complexos e podem levar à disfunção de múltiplos órgãos, entre eles, a pele. A maioria dos pacientes apresenta pelo menos uma alteração dermatológica. Algumas vezes, esses sintomas podem ser o primeiro sinal evidente de doença renal. Este artigo aborda as manifestações cutâneas relacionadas a disfunção renal grave ou doença renal terminal, divididas em não específicas e específicas, revisando quadro clínico, etiopatogenia e opções terapêuticas dessas dermatoses. Seu reconhecimento e trata mento precoces diminuem a morbidade, melhorando a qualidade de vida desses doentes.The prevalence of chronic kidney disease has increased over the last years. The effects of this disease are complex and may lead to dysfunction of multiple organs, including the skin, with most patients presenting with at least one dermatologic alteration. Sometimes these symptoms can be the first clear sign of kidney disease. This article discusses the skin manifestations related to severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease (ESRD, which are divided into nonspecific and specific, and reviews the clinical features, etiopathogenesis and therapeutic options for these dermatoses. Early recognition and treatment reduce morbidity and improve these patients' quality of life.

  12. Hypofibrinolytic State in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Aggravated by the Metabolic Syndrome before Clinical Manifestations of Atherothrombotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Aburto-Mejía

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metabolic and genetic factors induce plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 overexpression; higher PAI-1 levels decrease fibrinolysis and promote atherothrombosis. Aim. To assess PAI-1 antigen levels among subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM plus Metabolic Syndrome (MetS before clinical manifestations of atherothrombosis and the contribution of metabolic factors and 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene on the variability of PAI-1. Methods. We conducted an observational, cross-sectional assay in a hospital in Mexico City from May 2010 to September 2011. MetS was defined by the International Diabetes Federation criteria. PAI-1 levels and 4G/5G polymorphism were determined by ELISA and PCR-RFLP analysis. Results. We enrolled 215 subjects with T2DM plus MetS and 307 controls. Subjects with T2DM plus MetS had higher PAI-1 levels than the reference group (58.4 ± 21 versus 49.9 ± 16 ng/mL, p=0.026. A model with components of MetS explained only 12% of variability on PAI-1 levels (R2 = 0.12; p=0.001, with β=0.18 (p=0.03 for hypertension, β=-0.16 (p=0.05 for NL HDL-c, and β=0.15 (p=0.05 for NL triglycerides. Conclusion. Subjects with T2DM plus MetS have elevated PAI-1 levels before clinical manifestations of atherothrombotic disease. Metabolic factors have a more important contribution than 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1 plasma variability.

  13. Hypofibrinolytic State in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Aggravated by the Metabolic Syndrome before Clinical Manifestations of Atherothrombotic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburto-Mejía, Elsa; Santiago-Germán, David; Martínez-Marino, Manuel; María Eugenia Galván-Plata; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; López-Alarcón, Mardia; Hernández-Juárez, Jesús; Alvarado-Moreno, Antonio; Leaños-Miranda, Alfredo; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Isordia-Salas, Irma

    2017-01-01

    Background . Metabolic and genetic factors induce plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) overexpression; higher PAI-1 levels decrease fibrinolysis and promote atherothrombosis. Aim . To assess PAI-1 antigen levels among subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) plus Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) before clinical manifestations of atherothrombosis and the contribution of metabolic factors and 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene on the variability of PAI-1. Methods . We conducted an observational, cross-sectional assay in a hospital in Mexico City from May 2010 to September 2011. MetS was defined by the International Diabetes Federation criteria. PAI-1 levels and 4G/5G polymorphism were determined by ELISA and PCR-RFLP analysis. Results . We enrolled 215 subjects with T2DM plus MetS and 307 controls. Subjects with T2DM plus MetS had higher PAI-1 levels than the reference group (58.4 ± 21 versus 49.9 ± 16 ng/mL, p = 0.026). A model with components of MetS explained only 12% of variability on PAI-1 levels ( R 2 = 0.12; p = 0.001), with β = 0.18 ( p = 0.03) for hypertension, β = -0.16 ( p = 0.05) for NL HDL-c, and β = 0.15 ( p = 0.05) for NL triglycerides. Conclusion . Subjects with T2DM plus MetS have elevated PAI-1 levels before clinical manifestations of atherothrombotic disease. Metabolic factors have a more important contribution than 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1 plasma variability.

  14. Hypofibrinolytic State in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Aggravated by the Metabolic Syndrome before Clinical Manifestations of Atherothrombotic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburto-Mejía, Elsa; Santiago-Germán, David; Martínez-Marino, Manuel; María Eugenia Galván-Plata; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Hernández-Juárez, Jesús; Alvarado-Moreno, Antonio; Leaños-Miranda, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Background. Metabolic and genetic factors induce plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) overexpression; higher PAI-1 levels decrease fibrinolysis and promote atherothrombosis. Aim. To assess PAI-1 antigen levels among subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) plus Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) before clinical manifestations of atherothrombosis and the contribution of metabolic factors and 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene on the variability of PAI-1. Methods. We conducted an observational, cross-sectional assay in a hospital in Mexico City from May 2010 to September 2011. MetS was defined by the International Diabetes Federation criteria. PAI-1 levels and 4G/5G polymorphism were determined by ELISA and PCR-RFLP analysis. Results. We enrolled 215 subjects with T2DM plus MetS and 307 controls. Subjects with T2DM plus MetS had higher PAI-1 levels than the reference group (58.4 ± 21 versus 49.9 ± 16 ng/mL, p = 0.026). A model with components of MetS explained only 12% of variability on PAI-1 levels (R2 = 0.12; p = 0.001), with β = 0.18 (p = 0.03) for hypertension, β = −0.16 (p = 0.05) for NL HDL-c, and β = 0.15 (p = 0.05) for NL triglycerides. Conclusion. Subjects with T2DM plus MetS have elevated PAI-1 levels before clinical manifestations of atherothrombotic disease. Metabolic factors have a more important contribution than 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1 plasma variability. PMID:28271069

  15. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-04-28

    Abstract Background The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. Methods We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. Results Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. Conclusions GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  16. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  17. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Byung I

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is characterized by neurological/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves' disease (GD have been also reported. Methods We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. Results Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. Conclusions GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  18. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  19. Significant CD4, CD8, and CD19 lymphopenia in peripheral blood of sarcoidosis patients correlates with severe disease manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweiss, Nadera J; Salloum, Rafah; Gandhi, Seema; Ghandi, Seema; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Sawaqed, Ray; Badaracco, Maria; Pursell, Kenneth; Pitrak, David; Baughman, Robert P; Moller, David R; Garcia, Joe G N; Niewold, Timothy B

    2010-02-05

    Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood chronic inflammatory condition. Infiltration of affected organs by lymphocytes is characteristic of sarcoidosis, however previous reports suggest that circulating lymphocyte counts are low in some patients with the disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood in a cohort of sarcoidosis patients to determine the prevalence, severity, and clinical features associated with lymphopenia in major lymphocyte subsets. Lymphocyte subsets in 28 sarcoid patients were analyzed using flow cytometry to determine the percentage of CD4, CD8, and CD19 positive cells. Greater than 50% of patients had abnormally low CD4, CD8, or CD19 counts (p<4x10(-10)). Lymphopenia was profound in some cases, and five of the patients had absolute CD4 counts below 200. CD4, CD8, and CD19 lymphocyte subset counts were significantly correlated (Spearman's rho 0.57, p = 0.0017), and 10 patients had low counts in all three subsets. Patients with severe organ system involvement including neurologic, cardiac, ocular, and advanced pulmonary disease had lower lymphocyte subset counts as a group than those patients with less severe manifestations (CD4 p = 0.0043, CD8 p = 0.026, CD19 p = 0.033). No significant relationships were observed between various medical therapies and lymphocyte counts, and lymphopenia was present in patients who were not receiving any medical therapy. Significant lymphopenia involving CD4, CD8, and CD19 positive cells was common in sarcoidosis patients and correlated with disease severity. Our findings suggest that lymphopenia relates more to disease pathology than medical treatment.

  20. Blood to skin recirculation of CD4+ memory T cells associates with cutaneous and systemic manifestations of psoriatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, Marco; Galasso, Marco; Cozzi, Chiara; Sgambelluri, Francesco; Altomare, Andrea; Cigni, Clara; Frigerio, Elena; Drago, Lorenzo; Volinia, Stefano; Granucci, Francesca; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2017-07-01

    Blood to skin recirculation could play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. To investigate this possibility we dissected the phenotype of circulating T cells in psoriasis patients, calculated the correlation the clinical parameters of the disease and performed a parallel bioinformatics analysis of gene expression data in psoriatic skin. We found that circulating CCR6 + CD4 + T EM and T EFF cells significantly correlated with systemic inflammation. Conversely, the percentage of CXCR3 + CD4 + T EM cells negatively correlated with the severity of the cutaneous disease. Importantly CLA + CD4 + T CM cells expressing CCR6 + or CCR4 + CXCR3 + negatively correlated with psoriasis severity suggesting recruitment to the skin compartment. This assumption was reinforced by gene expression data showing marked increase of CCR7 and CLA-encoding gene SELPLG expression in psoriatic skin and strong association of their expression. The data enlightens a role for CD4 + T cells trafficking between blood and skin in cutaneous and systemic manifestations of psoriasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Associations of cardiovascular risk factors, carotid intima-media thickness and manifest atherosclerotic vascular disease with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liira Helena

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of atherosclerosis in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS has not previously been addressed in population studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of cardiovascular risk factors, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT, and clinical atherosclerotic diseases with CTS. Methods In this cross sectional study, the target population consisted of subjects aged 30 or over who had participated in the national Finnish Health Survey in 2000-2001. Of the 7977 eligible subjects, 6254 (78.4% were included in our study. Carotid IMT was measured in a sub-sample of subjects aged 45 to 74 (N = 1353. Results Obesity (adjusted odds ratio (OR 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.1-5.4, high LDL cholesterol (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.6-9.1 for >190 vs. 200 vs. Conclusions Our findings suggest an association between CTS and cardiovascular risk factors in young people, and carotid IMT and clinical atherosclerotic vascular disease in older people. CTS may either be a manifestation of atherosclerosis, or both conditions may share similar risk factors.

  2. Partial Body Weight-Supported Treadmill Training in Patients With Parkinson Disease: Impact on Gait and Clinical Manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Mohan; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Gupta, Anupam

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of conventional gait training (CGT) and partial weight-supported treadmill training (PWSTT) on gait and clinical manifestation. Prospective experimental research design. Hospital. Patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) (N=60; mean age, 58.15±8.7y) on stable dosage of dopaminomimetic drugs were randomly assigned into the 3 following groups (20 patients in each group): (1) nonexercising PD group, (2) CGT group, and (3) PWSTT group. The interventions included in the study were CGT and PWSTT. The sessions of the CGT and PWSTT groups were given in patient's self-reported best on status after regular medications. The interventions were given for 30min/d, 4d/wk, for 4 weeks (16 sessions). Clinical severity was measured by the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and its subscores. Gait was measured by 2 minutes of treadmill walking and the 10-m walk test. Outcome measures were evaluated in their best on status at baseline and after the second and fourth weeks. Four weeks of CGT and PWSTT gait training showed significant improvements of UPDRS scores, its subscores, and gait performance measures. Moreover, the effects of PWSTT were significantly better than CGT on most measures. PWSTT is a promising intervention tool to improve the clinical and gait outcome measures in patients with PD. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrocardiographic manifestations of inherited heart diseases – a sports cardiologist’s point ofview. Part 2. Ion channel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Krenc

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with an increased risk of sudden death for individuals with an undiagnosed cardiovascular disease. Medical evaluations, including a resting electrocardiogram, conducted before and during physical training, enable the identification of still asymptomatic athletes with life-threatening heart diseases and help to protect them from sudden cardiac death. The incidence of sudden cardiac death is estimated at two cases for each 100,000 young athletes per year and it is 2–4 times higher when compared with non-athletes. The most common causes of sudden cardiac death in athletes younger than 35 are cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Three to four per cent of young athletes who die suddenly have no evidence of a structural heart disease, and the cause of their cardiac arrest is primarily electrical heart diseases, such as inherited cardiac ion channel defects (channelopathies, including long and short QT syndromes, Brugada syndrome, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia The clinical courses of all these channelopathies are highly varied. They can be asymptomatic. In certain cases, episodic syncope or aborted cardiac arrest can occur. Sudden cardiac death, especially during physical exercise, can be the first sign. The aim of this article was to provide some information helpful in the recognition of electrocardiographic changes in genetic ion channel diseases, especially in the context of the prevention of sudden cardiac events in young athletes.

  4. Pulmonary granulomatous diseases and pulmonary manifestations of systemic granulomatous disease. Including tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteriosis; Pulmonale granulomatoese Erkrankungen und pulmonale Manifestationen systemischer Granulomatosen. Inklusive Tuberkulose und nichttuberkuloese Mykobakteriosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piel, S. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer interstitielle und seltene Lungenerkrankungen, Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Kreuter, M.; Herth, F. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer interstitielle und seltene Lungenerkrankungen, Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, C.P. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie mit Nuklearmedizin, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Granulomas as signs of specific inflammation of the lungs are found in various diseases with pulmonary manifestations and represent an important imaging finding. The standard imaging modality for the work-up of granulomatous diseases of the lungs is most often thin-slice computed tomography (CT). There are a few instances, e. g. tuberculosis, sarcoidosis and silicosis, where a chest radiograph still plays an important role. Further radiological modalities are usually not needed in the routine work-up of granulomatous diseases of the chest. In special cases magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scans play an important role, e. g. detecting cardiac sarcoidosis by cardiac MRI or choline C-11 PET-CT in diagnosing lung carcinoma in scar tissue after tuberculosis. The accuracy of thin-slice CT is very high for granulomatous diseases. In cases of chronic disease and fibrotic interstitial lung disease it is important to perform thin-slice CT in order to diagnose a specific disease pattern. Thin-slice CT is also highly sensitive in detecting disease complications and comorbidities, such as malignancies. Given these indications thin-slice CT is generally accepted in the routine daily practice. A thin-slice CT and an interdisciplinary discussion are recommended in many cases with a suspected diagnosis of pulmonary granulomatous disease due to clinical or radiographic findings. (orig.) [German] Granulome als Zeichen der spezifischen Entzuendung im Lungengewebe treten bei zahlreichen Erkrankungen mit pulmonaler Manifestation auf und stellen einen wichtigen Befund in der Bildgebung dar. Das radiologische Standardverfahren bei pulmonalen Granulomatosen ist meistens die Duennschichtcomputertomographie, in wenigen Faellen, wie z. B. bei Tuberkulose, Sarkoidose und Silikose, spielt die Roentgenthoraxuebersicht immer noch eine wichtige Rolle. Bei der Standardabklaerung der meisten Granulomatosen ist die Hinzunahme weiterer Verfahren nicht

  5. Desmin common mutation is associated with multi-systemic disease manifestations and depletion of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eMcCormick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Desmin (DES is a major muscle scaffolding protein that also functions to anchor mitochondria. Pathogenic DES mutations, however, have not previously been recognized as a cause of multi-systemic mitochondrial disease. Here, we describe a 45-year-old man who presented to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Mitochondrial-Genetics Diagnostic Clinic for evaluation of progressive cardiac, neuromuscular, gastrointestinal, and mood disorders. Muscle biopsy at age 45 was remarkable for cytoplasmic bodies, as well as ragged red fibers and SDH positive/COX negative fibers that were suggestive of a mitochondrial myopathy. Muscle also showed significant reductions in mitochondrial content (16% of control mean for citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA (35% of control mean. His family history was significant for cardiac conduction defects and myopathy in multiple maternal relatives. Multiple single gene and panel-based sequencing studies were unrevealing. Whole exome sequencing identified a known pathogenic p.S13F mutation in DES that had previously been associated with desmin-related myopathy. Desmin-related myopathy is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by right ventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and arrhythmias. However, neuropathy, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and depletion of both mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA have not previously been widely recognized in this disorder. Recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in desmin-related myopathy clarifies the basis for the multi-systemic manifestations, as are typical of primary mitochondrial disorders. Understanding the mitochondrial pathophysiology of desmin-related myopathy highlights the possibility of new therapies for the otherwise untreatable and often fatal class of disease. We postulate that drug treatments aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis or reducing oxidative stress may be effective therapies to ameliorate the effects of desmin

  6. Leukemic Oral Manifestations and their Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisconi, Carolina Favaro; Caldas, Rogerio Jardim; Oliveira Martins, Lazara Joyce; Fischer Rubira, Cassia Maria; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common neoplastic disease of the white blood cells which is important as a pediatric malignancy. Oral manifestations occur frequently in leukemic patients and may present as initial evidence of the disease or its relapse. The symptoms include gingival enlargement and bleeding, oral ulceration, petechia, mucosal pallor, noma, trismus and oral infections. Oral lesions arise in both acute and chronic forms of all types of leukemia. These oral manifestations either may be the result of direct infiltration of leukemic cells (primary) or secondary to underlying thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, or impaired granulocyte function. Despite the fact that leukemia has long been known to be associated with oral lesions, the available literature on this topic consists mostly of case reports, without data summarizing the main oral changes for each type of leukemia. Therefore, the present review aimed at describing oral manifestations of all leukemia types and their dental management. This might be useful in early diagnosis, improving patient outcomes.

  7. Inter-arm systolic blood pressure differences, relations with future vascular events and mortality in patients with and without manifest vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Guido; Spiering, Wilko; de Jong, Pim A; Kappelle, L Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Cramer, Maarten J; Visseren, Frank L J; Aboyans, Victor; Westerink, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference (SBPD) is an easily obtained patient characteristic which relates to vascular disease. We aimed to identify determinants of large inter-arm SBPD and to investigate the relation between inter-arm SBPD and vascular events in patients with and without manifest vascular disease. In a cohort of 7344 patients with manifest vascular disease or vascular risk factors alone enrolled in the Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease (SMART) study, single bilateral non-simultaneous blood pressure measurements were performed. Logistic and Cox regression was used to identify determinants of large inter-arm SBPD (≥15mmHg) and to investigate the relation between inter-arm SBPD and vascular events (composite of non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, and vascular mortality) and all-cause mortality. In all patients the median inter-arm SBPD was 7mmHg (IQR 3-11) and 1182 (16%) patients had inter-arm SBPD ≥15mmHg. Higher age, higher systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, peripheral artery disease, carotid artery stenosis, higher carotid intima-media thickness, and lower ankle-brachial indices were related to large inter-arm SBPD (≥15mmHg). Each 5mmHg increase in inter-arm SBPD was related to a 12% higher risk of vascular events in patients without manifest vascular disease (HR 1.12; 95% CI 1.00-1.27), whereas no relation was apparent in patients with manifest vascular disease (HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.93-1.04, interaction p-value 0.036). Inter-arm SBPD was not related to all-cause mortality (HR 1.05; 95% CI 0.93-1.19). Inter-arm SBPD relates to a higher risk of vascular events in patients without manifest vascular disease, whereas this relation is not apparent in patients with manifest vascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Early-Onset Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Mimicking Immune-Mediated Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wietse A. Wiels

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesThe objective of this study is to explore the clinical, radiological, and pathological manifestations of a rare subtype of prion disease and their implication for differential diagnosis in case of an early onset neuropsychiatric deterioration.MethodsWe discuss a patients’ clinical history, as well as the string of investigations and symptomatological evolution that finally led to a pathological diagnosis.ResultsOur patient had the extremely rare VV1 type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. We explain the differential diagnosis of progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus and its implications for treatment.ConclusionsCJD, especially the VV1 subtype, can present at an early age with an insidious psychiatric onset. Classical findings of prion disease—14-3-3 protein, PSWC on electroencephalography, and magnetic resonance imaging patterns—are not always present. The presence of neural autoantibodies does not always implicate pathogenicity in the presence of other neurological/neurodegenerative conditions.

  9. MITRAL ANNULAR CALCIFICATION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS: RELATIONSHIP WITH CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND RISK FACTORS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES CAUSED BY ATHEROSCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Urvacheva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to study the association of the mitral annular calcification (MAC with traditional risk factors and clinical manifestations of atherosclerosisin patients aged over 65 years without diabetes.Materials and methods. The prospective study included 100 patients over 65 years with MAC consistently identified among 910 ambulatory patients after transthoracic Doppler echocardiography in relation to the symptoms of cardiovascular disease. The comparison group consisted of 65 consecutively examined patients aged over 65 with no MAC.Results. When comparing risk factors in patients with and without MAC, MAC statistically significant differences was found with age (72,4 ± 5,4 and 70,2 ± 4,3 years, respectively; p = 0,006, the incidence of hypertension of moderate and severe degree (99 % and 90.8 % of patients, p = 0.012, levels of total cholesterol – TC (6,91 ± 0,92 and 6,2 ± 0,90 mmol / l, p = 0.0008 and lipoproteinlow density (3,57 ± 0,95 and 2,96 ± 0,96 mmol / l, p = 0.004 in subgroups of patients aged 65 to 70 years. In multivariate analysis remained statistically significant association of MAC only with age (p = 0,025, β = 0,173 and total cholesterol levels (p = 0,040; β = 0,160. Averages of the coefficient of atherogenicity of blood lipids, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, C-reactive protein, body mass index, waist circumference, the frequency of smoking, and risk assessment on a scale of SCORE in groups of patients with and without MAC did not differ significantly. In patients with MAC was higher incidence of myocardial infarction (p = 0.024 and more often than in patients without MAC, diagnosed coronary heart disease (p = 0.029. In the multivariate analysis adjusted for age and total cholesterol level is set significantly associated with the presence and extent of MAC with symptomatic atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (p < 0,00001; β = 0,410.Conclusion. In patients with MAC older than 65 years without diabetes

  10. [Treatment of early stage Hodgkin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Carde, P.; Mauch, P.

    1993-01-01

    indicate that we still do not definitively know whether or not the early addition of prophylactic chemotherapy improves survival. Arguments in favour of early chemotherapy are: that laparotomy may be avoided, that radiation fields and doses may perhaps be reduced, and that the stress of experiencing...... a relapse is avoided in many patients. The major argument against early chemotherapy is: that by careful staging and selection of patients and by careful radiotherapy techniques the number of patients exposed to potentially toxic chemotherapy may be kept at a minimum. Recently, trials have been carried out...

  11. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and changes in cerebral blood flow: the Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Pieternella H; Muller, Majon; Vincken, Koen L; Westerink, Jan; Mali, Willem P T M; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Geerlings, Mirjam I

    2015-03-01

    Hemoglobin and hematocrit are important determinants of blood viscosity and arterial oxygen content and may therefore influence cerebral blood flow (CBF). We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations of hemoglobin and hematocrit with CBF in 569 patients with manifest arterial disease (mean age 57 ± 10 years) with available data on magnetic resonance angiography to measure parenchymal CBF. Mean (SD) parenchymal CBF at baseline was 52.3 (9.8) mL/min/100 mL and decreased with 1.5 (11.0) mL/min/100 mL after on average 3.9 years of follow-up. Linear regression analyses showed that greater hemoglobin and hematocrit values were associated with lower baseline parenchymal CBF and more decline in parenchymal CBF over time, independent of cardiovascular risk factors, use of antiplatelet drugs, anticoagulants, or diuretics, and brain measures: adjusted mean differences (95% confidence interval [CI]) in decline in parenchymal CBF between patients in the lower and upper quartiles of hemoglobin and hematocrit were -2.48 (95% CI -3.70 to -1.25) and -3.69 (95% CI -5.45 to -1.94) mL/min/100 mL. Higher hemoglobin and hematocrit were associated with lower baseline parenchymal CBF and a greater decline in parenchymal CBF over time, possibly as a result of physiological compensating mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Early Manifestations of Children's Theory of Mind: The Roles of Maternal Mind-Mindedness and Infant Security of Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjo, Jessica; Bernier, Annie; Meins, Elizabeth; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated two aspects of mother-child relationships--mothers' mind-mindedness and infant attachment security--in relation to two early aspects of children's theory of mind development (ToM). Sixty-one mother-child dyads (36 girls) participated in testing phases at 12 (T1), 15 (T2), and 26 months of age (T3), allowing for assessment…

  13. Microbiological, immunological and genetic factors in family members with periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic disease, associated with hematological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Mitsugi; Awane, Saori; Suzuki, Junji; Hino, Takamune; Takemoto, Toshinobu; Kurihara, Hidemi; Miura, Kazuo

    2002-08-01

    The microflora, immunological profiles of host defence functions, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) findings are reported for a mother, son and daughter who were diagnosed as having 'periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases, associated with hematological disorders'. Examinations were made of the bacterial flora from the periodontal pocket, neutrophil chemotaxis, neutrophil phagocytosis, and the genotypes (DQB1) and serotypes (DR locus) of HLA class II antigens. Phenotypic analyses of the peripheral lymphocytes were also conducted. The subgingival microflora from the mother was dominated by Gram-negative rods, especially Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia/Prevotella nigrescens and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Subgingival microflora samples from the son and daughter were dominated by Gram-positive cocci and Gram-positive rods. Through the use of polymerase chain reaction, Campylobacter rectus and Capnocytophaga gingivalis were detected in all subjects, whereas Porphyromonas gingivalis, P. intermedia, and Treponema denticola were not detected in any subjects. All three subjects showed a remarkable level of depressed neutrophil chemotaxis to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, although their phagocyte function levels were normal, in comparison to healthy control subjects. Each subject had the same genotype, HLA-DQB1*0601, while the mother had HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR8, and the son and daughter had HLA-DR2 only. In summary, the members of this family showed a similar predisposition to periodontitis with regard to certain host defence functions. It is suggested that the depressed neutrophil chemotaxis that was identified here could be a significant risk factor for periodontitis in this family.

  14. Faster and stronger manifestation of mitochondrial diseases in skeletal muscle than in heart related to cytosolic inorganic phosphate (Pi) accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    A model of the cell bioenergetic system was used to compare the effect of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies in a broad range of moderate ATP demand in skeletal muscle and heart. Computer simulations revealed that kinetic properties of the system are similar in both cases despite the much higher mitochondria content and "basic" OXPHOS activity in heart than in skeletal muscle, because of a much higher each-step activation (ESA) of OXPHOS in skeletal muscle than in heart. Large OXPHOS deficiencies lead in both tissues to a significant decrease in oxygen consumption (V̇o2) and phosphocreatine (PCr) and increase in cytosolic ADP, Pi, and H(+) The main difference between skeletal muscle and heart is a much higher cytosolic Pi concentration in healthy tissue and much higher cytosolic Pi accumulation (level) at low OXPHOS activities in the former, caused by a higher PCr level in healthy tissue (and higher total phosphate pool) and smaller Pi redistribution between cytosol and mitochondria at OXPHOS deficiency. This difference does not depend on ATP demand in a broad range. A much greater Pi increase and PCr decrease during rest-to-moderate work transition in skeletal muscle at OXPHOS deficiencies than at normal OXPHOS activity significantly slows down the V̇o2 on-kinetics. Because high cytosolic Pi concentrations cause fatigue in skeletal muscle and can compromise force generation in skeletal muscle and heart, this system property can contribute to the faster and stronger manifestation of mitochondrial diseases in skeletal muscle than in heart. Shortly, skeletal muscle with large OXPHOS deficiencies becomes fatigued already during low/moderate exercise. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Motor subtype changes in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisinger, Robert S; Hess, Christopher W; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Almeida, Leonardo; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S; Gunduz, Aysegul

    2017-10-01

    Distinct motor subtypes of Parkinson's disease (PD) have been described through both clinical observation and through data-driven approaches. However, the extent to which motor subtypes change during disease progression remains unknown. Our objective was to determine motor subtypes of PD using an unsupervised clustering methodology and evaluate subtype changes with disease duration. The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative database of 423 newly diagnosed PD patients was utilized to retrospectively identify unique motor subtypes through a data-driven, hierarchical correlational clustering approach. For each patient, we assigned a subtype to each motor assessment at each follow-up visit (time points) and by using published criteria. We examined changes in PD subtype with disease duration using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Five distinct motor subtypes were identified based on the motor assessment items and these included: Tremor Dominant (TD), Axial Dominant, Appendicular Dominant, Rigidity Dominant, and Postural and Instability Gait Disorder Dominant. About half of the patients had consistent subtypes at all time points. Most patients met criteria for TD subtype soon after diagnosis. For patients with inconsistent subtypes, there was an overall trend to shift away from a TD phenotype with disease duration, as shown by chi-squared test, p motor subtypes in PD can shift with increasing disease duration. Shifting subtypes is a factor that should be accounted for in clinical practice or in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality of life, fatigue and mental health in patients with the m.3243A > G mutation and its correlates with genetic characteristics and disease manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaak, Christianne; de Laat, Paul; Koene, Saskia; Tibosch, Marijke; Rodenburg, Richard; de Groot, Imelda; Knoop, Hans; Janssen, Mirian; Smeitink, Jan

    2016-03-18

    Mitochondrial disorders belong to the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases with the m.3243A > G mutation reflecting being one of the most common mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Previous studies showed little relationship between mitochondrial genetics and disease manifestation. Relationship between genotype and disease manifestation with patient reported quality of life and other patient reported outcomes is still unexplored. Seventy-two out of the 122 invited adult patients with m.3243A > G mutation completed online standardized questionnaires on quality of life, functional impairment, fatigue and mental health as assessed by the RAND-SF36, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS). Data were related to clinical manifestation reflected by the Newcastle Mitochondrial Disease Adult Scale (NMDAS) score and heteroplasmy levels of the mutation in urine epithelial cells. Patients reported impaired quality of life. Sixty percent showed severe levels of fatigue, and 37% showed clinical relevant mental health problems, which was significantly more than healthy norms. These patient reported health outcomes showed negligible relationship with levels of heteroplasmy (r = mental health problems, are only partly reflected by clinical assessments. In order to support patients more effectively, integration of patient reported outcomes, alongside symptoms of their disease, in clinical practice is warranted.

  17. The gastrointestinal manifestation of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome: from a single adenoma to polyposis-like phenotype and early onset cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Z; Kariv, R; Barnes-Kedar, I; Goldberg, Y; Half, E; Morgentern, S; Eli, B; Baris, H N; Vilkin, A; Belfer, R G; Niv, Y; Elhasid, R; Dvir, R; Abu-Freha, N; Cohen, S

    2015-11-01

    Data on the clinical presentation of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome (CMMRD) is accumulating. However, as the extraintestinal manifestations are often fatal and occur at early age, data on the systematic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is scarce. Here we describe 11 subjects with verified biallelic carriage and who underwent colonoscopy, upper endoscopy and small bowel evaluation. Five subjects were symptomatic and in six subjects the findings were screen detected. Two subjects had colorectal cancer and few adenomatous polyps (19, 20 years), three subjects had polyposis-like phenotype (13, 14, 16 years), four subjects had few adenomatous polyps (8, 12-14 years) and two subjects had no polyps (both at age 6). Of the three subjects in the polyposis-like group, two subjects had already developed high-grade dysplasia or cancer and one subject had atypical juvenile polyps suggesting juvenile polyposis. Three out of the five subjects that underwent repeated exams had significant findings during short interval. The gastrointestinal manifestations of CMMRD are highly dependent upon age of examination and highly variable. The polyps may also resemble juvenile polyposis. Intensive surveillance according to current guidelines is mandatory. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Spectrum of ocular manifestations in CLN2-associated batten (Jansky-Bielschowsky disease correlate with advancing age and deteriorating neurological function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Orlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL, one form of Batten's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from a CLN2 gene mutation. The spectrum of ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL and the relationship with neurological function has not been previously described. METHODS: Patients underwent ophthalmic evaluations, including anterior segment and dilated exams, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Patients were also assessed with the LINCL Neurological Severity Scale. Ophthalmic findings were categorized into one of five severity scores, and the association of the extent of ocular disease with neurological function was assessed. RESULTS: Fifty eyes of 25 patients were included. The mean age at the time of exam was 4.9 years (range 2.5 to 8.1. The mean ophthalmic severity score was 2.6 (range 1 to 5. The mean neurological severity score was 6.1 (range 2 to 11. Significantly more severe ophthalmic manifestations were observed among older patients (p<0.005 and patients with more severe neurological findings (p<0.03. A direct correlation was found between the Ophthalmic Severity Scale and the Weill Cornell Neurological Scale (p<0.002. A direct association was also found between age and the ophthalmic manifestations (p<0.0002, with older children having more severe ophthalmic manifestations. CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL correlate closely with the degree of neurological function and the age of the patient. The newly established LINCL Ophthalmic Scale may serve as an objective marker of LINCL severity and disease progression, and may be valuable in the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies for LINCL, including gene therapy.

  19. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  20. Immune-mediated diseases and microbial exposure in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Bønnelykke, K; Stokholm, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The non-communicable disease pandemic includes immune-mediated diseases such as asthma and allergy, which are likely originating in early life where the immature immune system is prone to alterations caused by the exposome. The timing of exposure seems critical for the developing immune system...

  1. Molecular characterization of early blight disease resistant and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potato early blight disease caused by Alternaria solani is one of the major factors limiting potato production worldwide. Developing highly resistant cultivars is the most effective way to control the disease. In this study, 20 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and 6 simple sequence repeats (SSR) primers were ...

  2. Ophthalmic examination in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder causing irreversible deterioration in memory and loss of self-care ability, which is seriously affecting the quality of life. There is no cure for Alzheimer's disease. Medication only can control the progression of the disease. Early diagnosis and control of disease progress is of great significance in improving the quality of life of the patients and reducing the burden of family and society. Ophthalmic examination is seen as a window which can “see” brain directly, and some changes in the eye can reflect the changes of the brain most directly. This paper reviews the ophthalmic examination of Alzheimer's disease, including optical coherence tomography(OCT, visual field, contrast sensitivity and eye movements, et al. We hope to provide a new idea for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. The Intestinal Microbiome in Early Life: Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claire eArrieta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human microbial colonization begins at birth and continues to develop and modulate in species abundance for about three years, until the microbiota becomes adult-like. During the same time period, children experience significant developmental changes that influence their current health status as well as their immune system. An ever-expanding number of articles associate several diseases with early life imbalances of the gut microbiota, also referred to as gut microbial dysbiosis. Whether early life dysbiosis precedes and plays a role in disease pathogenesis, or simply originates from the disease process itself is a question that is beginning to be answered in a few diseases, including IBD, obesity and asthma. This review describes the gut microbiome structure and function during the formative first years of life, as well as the environmental factors that determine its composition. It also aims to discuss the recent advances in understanding the role of the early life gut microbiota in the development of immune-mediated, metabolic, and neurological diseases. A greater understanding of how the early life gut microbiota impacts our immune development could potentially lead to novel microbial-derived therapies that target disease prevention at an early age.

  4. Early Developmental Conditioning of Later Health and Disease: Physiology or Pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M. A.; Gluckman, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive experimental animal studies and epidemiological observations have shown that environmental influences during early development affect the risk of later pathophysiological processes associated with chronic, especially noncommunicable, disease (NCD). This field is recognized as the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD). We discuss the extent to which DOHaD represents the result of the physiological processes of developmental plasticity, which may have potential adverse consequences in terms of NCD risk later, or whether it is the manifestation of pathophysiological processes acting in early life but only becoming apparent as disease later. We argue that the evidence suggests the former, through the operation of conditioning processes induced across the normal range of developmental environments, and we summarize current knowledge of the physiological processes involved. The adaptive pathway to later risk accords with current concepts in evolutionary developmental biology, especially those concerning parental effects. Outside the normal range, effects on development can result in nonadaptive processes, and we review their underlying mechanisms and consequences. New concepts concerning the underlying epigenetic and other mechanisms involved in both disruptive and nondisruptive pathways to disease are reviewed, including the evidence for transgenerational passage of risk from both maternal and paternal lines. These concepts have wider implications for understanding the causes and possible prevention of NCDs such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, for broader social policy and for the increasing attention paid in public health to the lifecourse approach to NCD prevention. PMID:25287859

  5. Clinical Manifestations of Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Lytic Activation: Multicentric Castleman Disease (KSHV-MCD) and the KSHV Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotto, Mark N; Uldrick, Thomas S; Hu, Duosha; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of Kaposi sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), it was appreciated that this virus was associated with most cases of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) arising in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. It has subsequently been recognized that KSHV-MCD is a distinct entity from other forms of MCD. Like MCD that is unrelated to KSHV, the clinical presentation of KSHV-MCD is dominated by systemic inflammatory symptoms including fevers, cachexia, and laboratory abnormalities including cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hyponatremia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Pathologically KSHV-MCD is characterized by polyclonal, IgM-lambda restricted plasmacytoid cells in the intrafollicular areas of affected lymph nodes. A portion of these cells are infected with KSHV and a sizable subset of these cells express KSHV lytic genes including a viral homolog of interleukin-6 (vIL-6). Patients with KSHV-MCD generally have elevated KSHV viral loads in their peripheral blood. Production of vIL-6 and induction of human (h) IL-6 both contribute to symptoms, perhaps in combination with overproduction of IL-10 and other cytokines. Until recently, the prognosis of patients with KSHV-MCD was poor. Recent therapeutic advances targeting KSHV-infected B cells with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and utilizing KSHV enzymes to target KSHV-infected cells have substantially improved patient outcomes. Recently another KSHV-associated condition, the KSHV inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS) has been described. Its clinical manifestations resemble those of KSHV-MCD but lymphadenopathy is not prominent and the pathologic nodal changes of KSHV-MCD are absent. Patients with KICS exhibit elevated KSHV viral loads and elevation of vIL-6, homolog of human interleukin-6 and IL-10 comparable to those seen in KSHV-MCD; the cellular origin of these is a matter of investigation. KICS may contribute to the inflammatory symptoms seen in some patients with

  6. Clinical Manifestations of Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Lytic Activation: Multicentric Castleman Disease (KSHV–MCD) and the KSHV Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotto, Mark N.; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Hu, Duosha; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of Kaposi sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), it was appreciated that this virus was associated with most cases of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) arising in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. It has subsequently been recognized that KSHV–MCD is a distinct entity from other forms of MCD. Like MCD that is unrelated to KSHV, the clinical presentation of KSHV–MCD is dominated by systemic inflammatory symptoms including fevers, cachexia, and laboratory abnormalities including cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hyponatremia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Pathologically KSHV–MCD is characterized by polyclonal, IgM-lambda restricted plasmacytoid cells in the intrafollicular areas of affected lymph nodes. A portion of these cells are infected with KSHV and a sizable subset of these cells express KSHV lytic genes including a viral homolog of interleukin-6 (vIL-6). Patients with KSHV–MCD generally have elevated KSHV viral loads in their peripheral blood. Production of vIL-6 and induction of human (h) IL-6 both contribute to symptoms, perhaps in combination with overproduction of IL-10 and other cytokines. Until recently, the prognosis of patients with KSHV–MCD was poor. Recent therapeutic advances targeting KSHV-infected B cells with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and utilizing KSHV enzymes to target KSHV-infected cells have substantially improved patient outcomes. Recently another KSHV-associated condition, the KSHV inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS) has been described. Its clinical manifestations resemble those of KSHV–MCD but lymphadenopathy is not prominent and the pathologic nodal changes of KSHV–MCD are absent. Patients with KICS exhibit elevated KSHV viral loads and elevation of vIL-6, homolog of human interleukin-6 and IL-10 comparable to those seen in KSHV–MCD; the cellular origin of these is a matter of investigation. KICS may contribute to the inflammatory symptoms seen in some

  7. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Clinical significance and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, K.; Teipel, S.J.; Hampel, H.

    2000-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease describes the recognition and diagnosis in patients with very mild dementia. Internationally accepted diagnostic criteria support the diagnosis based on clinical evaluation. Recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging as well as studies on specific proteins in the cerebro-spinal fluid that are related to distinct pathophysiological disease processes are most promising approaches to defining biological markers of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.) [de

  8. Pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Gulati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has a spectrum of presentation which ranges from mild disease to a severe form comprising of jaundice and renal failure. Involvement of the lung can vary from subtle clinical features to deadly pulmonary hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Of late, it has been identified that leptospirosis can present atypically with predominant pulmonary manifestations. This can delay diagnosis making and hence optimum treatment. The purpose of this review is to bring together all the reported pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis and the recent trends in the management.

  9. Clinical manifestation and aetiology of a genital associated disease in Olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis) at Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Knauf, Sascha

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate a genitally associated disease and to describe its clinical manifestation and aetiology in baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in the United Republic of Tanzania. Lake Manyara National Park is located in the northern part of the country, 160 km northwest of the Mt. Kilimanjaro. It is among the smallest protected areas, but belongs to the extended ecosystem of the Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara and Tarangire National Park. The...

  10. A multicentre study of 513 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. I. Disease manifestations and analyses of clinical subsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S; Petersen, J; Ullman, S

    1998-01-01

    duration of follow-up was 8.2 years from diagnosis and 12.8 years from first symptom. This paper describes the most common clinical and laboratory manifestations and their relationship to sex and age at the time of onset and diagnosis. Cluster analysis revealed three clinically defined clusters at the time...

  11. Homocysteine, progression of ventricular enlargement, and cognitive decline: the Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochemsen, Hadassa M.; Kloppenborg, Raoul P.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Kampman, Ellen; Mali, Willem P. T. M.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Doevendans, P. A.; van der Graaf, Y.; Grobbee, D. E.; Rutten, G. E. H. M.; Kappelle, L. J.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F. L.; Visseren, F. L. J.

    2013-01-01

    Homocysteine may be a modifiable risk factor for cognitive decline and brain atrophy, particularly in older persons. We examined whether homocysteine increased the risk for cognitive decline and brain atrophy, and evaluated the modifying effect of age. Within the Second Manifestations of ARTerial

  12. [Cognitive rehabilitation in early stage Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, E; Thöne-Otto, A; Bürger, K; Schröder, S G; Hoffmann, W; Schneider, W; Teipel, S

    2016-07-01

    Dementia impairs the coping with routine daily tasks and social relationships due to an increasing degeneration of cognitive abilities. An appropriate treatment must adequately consider the effects of declined cognitive abilities on patients and their environment. Therefore, in recent times, integrative procedures for cognitive rehabilitation (CR) have become increasingly important for the therapy of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mild dementia (MD). CR approaches provide compensatory possibilities for clearly defined routine challenges and the individual needs of those affected. This overview article in the form of a selective review elaborates factors for the effectiveness of CR on the basis of the currently available literature: 1) individuality - consideration of personal needs and targets, 2) compensation - mediation of skills and strategies to compensate for cognitive impairments, 3) interaction - inclusion of relatives and environmental conditions and 4) integration - integration of various therapeutic disciplines and methods. On the basis of this assessment with regards to the content, a critical analysis of the methods of short and long-term therapeutic effects on MCD and MD was carried out. Although the resulting factors were of high long-term relevance for the improvement of depression and quality of life, effects on cognition were more pronounced for MCI than for MD, which emphasizes the importance of beginning therapy as early as possible. The results show that future studies on effectiveness must employ endpoints relevant for routine daily life, and that the possibility of an implementation of therapeutic concepts in a healthcare system should be considered as an essential criterion.

  13. Metabolic bone disease as a presenting manifestation of primary Sjögren′s syndrome: Three cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Khandelwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary Sjögren′s syndrome (pSS is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands with varying degrees of systemic involvement. Chronic inflammation compromises the glands′ function that leads to dry symptoms in the mouth/eyes. Renal involvement is a well recognized extraglandular manifestation of pSS. Metabolic bone disease (MBD, however, rarely occurs as the primary manifestation of a renal tubule disorder due to pSS. To the best of our knowledge there are only 6 reported cases of metabolic bone disease as the primary manifestation of pSS to date. Four of these had distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA, and 2 had a combined picture of distal and proximal tubular dysfunction. We herein present our experience of 3 cases who presented to us with a clinical picture suggestive of MBD. While investigating these patients, we found evidence of RTA, which was found to be secondary to pSS.

  14. Sclerodermatomyositis, ocular manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza-Seres, M; Serna-Ojeda, J C; Flores-Suárez, L F

    2017-07-01

    Sclerodermatomyositis is an overlap syndrome of myositis and scleroderma, with dermatological, muscular and joint involvement, but may also present with ocular manifestations. A 57 year-old woman presented with ophthalmological manifestations, including scleral thinning 360°, and the presence of cells in the anterior and posterior chamber. Oriented physical examination and laboratory studies led to the diagnosis, with the need for systemic treatment. Sclerodermatomyositis is a rare disease. Its diagnosis needs thorough clinical and laboratory studies, and its management should be multidisciplinary when inflammatory ocular manifestations may be present. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of TNF-α antagonist and other immunomodulators in the treatment of patients with ophthalmologic manifestations of Behcet's disease and HLA B51 positive vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatanović Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Behcet's disease is genetically conditioned, immune-mediated multisystem occlusive vasculitis of small blood vessels, espesially venules, of unknown etiology. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical features, disease activity and therapy of the patients with ophthalmologic manifestation of Behcet's disease. Methods. In this study symptoms and signs of the disease were analyzed both prospectively and retrospectively during the active manifestation of the disease. The diagnosis was reached according to the International Criteria for Behcet's Disease (2006. The treatment effects were evaluated based on the presence of the best corrected visual acuity and the inflammation of the vitreous humour before and after the application of our therapeutic method. The applied therapeutic modality consisted of the primary application of corticosteroid therapy in the active stage of the disease complemented with the choice of drugs from the immunosuppressive group. In this study there drugs were cyclosporine or methotrexate. A treatment refractory patients with poor vision prognosis were treated with a third drug, the biological preparation infliximab, a tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α antagonist. Results. The mean age of 11 patients with ophthalmologic manifestation of Behcet's disease was 50.6 years. HLA B-5(51 was positive in 81% of the patients while 36% of the patients had positive pathergy test. Changes in affected eyes included vitritis (100%, posterior uveitis (45%, panuveitis (54%, retinal vasculitis (54%, cystoid macular edema (54%, and cystoid degeneration (18%. Increased intraocular pressure was observed in 27% of the patients. There was no statistically significant variation in disease activity parameters in any of the patients (p > 0.05. A statistically significant improvement in visual acuity (p < 0.05 and a high statistically significant decrease of inflammation of the worst affected eyes (p = 0.001 were detected

  16. Report of two patients with Paget′s disease - one with typical clinical and radiological manifestations including cardiac involvement and the other subclinical but with radiological changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sivapatha Sundharam

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteitis deformans or Paget′s disease of bone, fondly referred to as the ′collage of matrix madness′, is a unique skeletal disease characterized by furious osteoclastic bone resorption followed by a period of hectic bone formation, resulting in again in the bone mass wherein the newly formed bone is disordered and architecturally unsound. A disease of obscure etiology, it usually manifests as progressive enlargement of one or multiple bones of the skeleton. Herewith we present a typical example of a polyostotic form of Paget′s disease with classical clinical features and radiologic changes in one patient and a subclinical form of Paget′s disease with marked radiological changes in the other patient.

  17. Rheumatic manifestations at presentation of Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma. A national survey of one hundred forty-six patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudin, P.; Rozand, Y.; Fauconnier, J.; Phelip, X.

    1995-01-01

    The authors report the findings of a national survey conducted at the request for the French Society for Rheumatology to list the rheumatic manifestations that can be inaugural in Hodgkin's disease on non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma. This was an exploratory, retrospective, descriptive study of 146 patients from 22 rheumatology departments. A number of clinical features (young male, nocturnal sweats, generalized pruritus, protracted fever, central or peripheral lymphadenopathy) and laboratory test abnormalities (evidence of severe inflammation) considerably increased the likelihood of Hodgkin's disease rather than malignant lymphoma. The diagnosis of bony involvement requires multidisciplinary studies of tumor specimens. (authors). 4 figs., 7 tabs., 71 refs

  18. Research progress in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-sha SUN

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a kind of central nervous system degenerative disease with higher incidence, which has been paid increasing attention. The pathogenesis is not yet clear though it has been studied a lot. The existing theories focused on amyloid β-protein (Aβ deposit, hyperphosphorylation of tau and cholinergic neuronal loss. There is mainly symptomatic treatment which cannot reverse disease course. So early diagnosis is particularly important for prevention and treatment of AD. The article will review recent advances in the studies of early diagnosis of AD. It may help accurately diagnose the process from mild cognitive impairment (MCI to early AD and give advice on prevention and treatment. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2018.03.011

  19. [A case of Neuro-Behçet's disease with early onset of bipolar mood disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yuko; Hatanaka, Yuki; Ikebuchi, Emi; Shimizu, Teruo; Nanko, Shinichiro; Utsumii, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of Neuro-Behçet's disease with early onset of bipolar mood disorder. A 53-year-old man with neuropathy including dysphasia and dyslalia developed bipolar mood disorder with anxiety, agitation, depressive mood, talkativeness, hyperkinesias, and appetite rise, and soon exhibited severe personality deterioration. Oral aphthae, cell proliferation and elevated IL-6 levels in spinal fluid, and the patient's clinical downhill course with remission and relapse in spite of good reaction to steroid preparation indicated the possibility of Neuro-Behçet's disease. Brain MRI showed clear swelling of the brain stem area, especially in the pons, in the active phase with low signal in T1-weighted images contrasting with clear high signal in T2-weighted images and FLAIR. At the time of remission, atrophy of the brain stem was shown. These findings were consistent with the view reported in recent years concerning the brain image of Neuro-Behçet's disease, which seemed to be useful for the differential diagnosis. This case manifested two outstanding clinical features. First, it showed bipolar mood swing or mixed state distinguishable from disinhibition or euphoria in deteriorated personality, which is common in this condition. A clear bipolar mood disorder has not been described until now in Neuro-Behçet's disease. Second, subclinical dysthymia or hypomanic phase occurred before clear onset of the disease. In Neuro-Behçet's disease, it is currently considered that psychiatric symptoms may appear in the early stage, but there is controversy as to whether they can precede the other symptoms. Our case indicated very early onset of psychiatric symptoms in this condition.

  20. Biomarkers in the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Sheng-di

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. It has become clear that PD can have a preclinical phase, a period during which neurodegeneration has already begun years before the onset of typical motor symptoms. Consequently, if the early neurodegeneration in PD can be timely diagnosed, it will significantly slow down the progression of the disease and improve the quality of life. To date, there is no fully reliable and validated biomarker for the early diagnosis of PD, but some promising biomarker candidates exist.

  1. Cardiovascular manifestations of Alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Stephen J; Fisher, Michael; Gallagher, James A; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R

    2011-12-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of alkaptonuria relate to deposition of ochronotic pigment within heart valves, endocardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. We assessed 16 individuals with alkaptonuria for cardiovascular disease, including full electrocardiographic and echocardiographic assessment. The self reported prevalence of valvular heart disease and coronary artery disease was low. There was a significant burden of previously undiagnosed aortic valve disease, reaching a prevalence of over 40% by the fifth decade of life. The aortic valve disease was found to increase in both prevalence and severity with advancing age. In contrast to previous reports, we did not find a significant burden of mitral valve disease or coronary artery disease. These findings are important for the clinical follow-up of patients with alkaptonuria and suggest a role for echocardiographic surveillance of patients above 40 years old.

  2. Organising pneumonia as the first manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Chisho; Satoh, Noriyuki; Narita, Masashi; Kikuchi, Akio; Inoue, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Organising pneumonia (OP) is an inflammatory lung disease with distinctive clinicopathological features. OP can be evident during the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with increased disease activity. The authors report an OP associated with RA case in which pulmonary symptoms preceded the onset of joint symptoms. An OP patient with elevated serum anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody is likely to manifest RA in the near future, reflecting its high disease activity. Thus, an early rheumatologic consultation should be taken into consideration to make an early decision to initiate disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs therapy. PMID:22699479

  3. Characterization of early host responses in adults with dengue disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Ling

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While dengue-elicited early and transient host responses preceding defervescence could shape the disease outcome and reveal mechanisms of the disease pathogenesis, assessment of these responses are difficult as patients rarely seek healthcare during the first days of benign fever and thus data are lacking. Methods In this study, focusing on early recruitment, we performed whole-blood transcriptional profiling on denguevirus PCR positive patients sampled within 72 h of self-reported fever presentation (average 43 h, SD 18.6 h and compared the signatures with autologous samples drawn at defervescence and convalescence and to control patients with fever of other etiology. Results In the early dengue fever phase, a strong activation of the innate immune response related genes were seen that was absent at defervescence (4-7 days after fever debut, while at this second sampling genes related to biosynthesis and metabolism dominated. Transcripts relating to the adaptive immune response were over-expressed in the second sampling point with sustained activation at the third sampling. On an individual gene level, significant enrichment of transcripts early in dengue disease were chemokines CCL2 (MCP-1, CCL8 (MCP-2, CXCL10 (IP-10 and CCL3 (MIP-1α, antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 1 (DEFB1, desmosome/intermediate junction component plakoglobin (JUP and a microRNA which may negatively regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in dengue infected peripheral blood cells, mIR-147 (NMES1. Conclusions These data show that the early response in patients mimics those previously described in vitro, where early assessment of transcriptional responses has been easily obtained. Several of the early transcripts identified may be affected by or mediate the pathogenesis and deserve further assessment at this timepoint in correlation to severe disease.

  4. Early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, assessment, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Drummond, M Bradley

    2015-05-02

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide. COPD, however, is a heterogeneous collection of diseases with differing causes, pathogenic mechanisms, and physiological effects. Therefore a comprehensive approach to COPD prevention will need to address the complexity of COPD. Advances in the understanding of the natural history of COPD and the development of strategies to assess COPD in its early stages make prevention a reasonable, if ambitious, goal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomarker for early renal microvascular and diabetic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrakul, Narisa; Futrakul, Prasit

    2017-11-01

    Recognition of early stage of diabetic kidney disease, under common practice using biomarkers, namely microalbuminuria, serum creatinine level above 1 mg/dL and accepted definition of diabetic kidney disease associated with creatinine clearance value below 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , is unlikely. This would lead to delay treatment associated with therapeutic resistance to vasodilator due to a defective vascular homoeostasis. Other alternative biomarkers related to the state of microalbuminuria is not sensitive to screen for early diabetic kidney disease (stages I, II). In this regard, a better diagnostic markers to serve for this purpose are creatinine clearance, fractional excretion of magnesium (FE Mg), cystatin C. Recently, renal microvascular disease and renal ischemia have been demonstrated to correlate indirectly with the development of diabetic kidney disease and its function. Among these are angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, namely VEGF, VEGF receptors, angiopoietins and endostatin. With respect to therapeutic prevention, implementation of treatment at early stage of diabetic and nondiabetic kidney disease is able to restore renal perfusion and function.

  6. Effects of a long-term disturbance on arthropods and vegetation in subalpine wetlands: manifestations of pack stock grazing in early versus mid-season.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey G Holmquist

    Full Text Available Conclusions regarding disturbance effects in high elevation or high latitude ecosystems based solely on infrequent, long-term sampling may be misleading, because the long winters may erase severe, short-term impacts at the height of the abbreviated growing season. We separated a long-term effects of pack stock grazing, manifested in early season prior to stock arrival, from b additional pack stock grazing effects that might become apparent during annual stock grazing, by use of paired grazed and control wet meadows that we sampled at the beginning and end of subalpine growing seasons. Control meadows had been closed to grazing for at least two decades, and meadow pairs were distributed across Sequoia National Park, California, USA. The study was thus effectively a landscape-scale, long-term manipulation of wetland grazing. We sampled arthropods at these remote sites and collected data on associated vegetation structure. Litter cover and depth, percent bare ground, and soil strength had negative responses to grazing. In contrast, fauna showed little response to grazing, and there were overall negative effects for only three arthropod families. Mid-season and long-term results were generally congruent, and the only indications of lower faunal diversity on mid-season grazed wetlands were trends of lower abundance across morphospecies and lower diversity for canopy fauna across assemblage metrics. Treatment x Season interactions almost absent. Thus impacts on vegetation structure only minimally cascaded into the arthropod assemblage and were not greatly intensified during the annual growing season. Differences between years, which were likely a response to divergent snowfall patterns, were more important than differences between early and mid-season. Reliance on either vegetation or faunal metrics exclusively would have yielded different conclusions; using both flora and fauna served to provide a more integrative view of ecosystem response.

  7. Effects of a long-term disturbance on arthropods and vegetation in subalpine wetlands: manifestations of pack stock grazing in early versus mid-season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Haultain, Sylvia A

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions regarding disturbance effects in high elevation or high latitude ecosystems based solely on infrequent, long-term sampling may be misleading, because the long winters may erase severe, short-term impacts at the height of the abbreviated growing season. We separated a) long-term effects of pack stock grazing, manifested in early season prior to stock arrival, from b) additional pack stock grazing effects that might become apparent during annual stock grazing, by use of paired grazed and control wet meadows that we sampled at the beginning and end of subalpine growing seasons. Control meadows had been closed to grazing for at least two decades, and meadow pairs were distributed across Sequoia National Park, California, USA. The study was thus effectively a landscape-scale, long-term manipulation of wetland grazing. We sampled arthropods at these remote sites and collected data on associated vegetation structure. Litter cover and depth, percent bare ground, and soil strength had negative responses to grazing. In contrast, fauna showed little response to grazing, and there were overall negative effects for only three arthropod families. Mid-season and long-term results were generally congruent, and the only indications of lower faunal diversity on mid-season grazed wetlands were trends of lower abundance across morphospecies and lower diversity for canopy fauna across assemblage metrics. Treatment x Season interactions almost absent. Thus impacts on vegetation structure only minimally cascaded into the arthropod assemblage and were not greatly intensified during the annual growing season. Differences between years, which were likely a response to divergent snowfall patterns, were more important than differences between early and mid-season. Reliance on either vegetation or faunal metrics exclusively would have yielded different conclusions; using both flora and fauna served to provide a more integrative view of ecosystem response.

  8. Early-onset Coronary Artery Disease: Clinical and Hereditary Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh

    2017-01-01

    ), and to characterize and quantify subclinical atherosclerosis in their relatives. Furthermore, the aim was to explore the impact of common genetic risk variants on the age of onset, familial clustering and disease severity. In study I, 143 patients with early-onset CAD were recruited from the Western Denmark Heart...

  9. Working memory in early Alzheimer's disease: a neuropsychological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, J D; Howard, R J

    2010-02-01

    Reports of the extent of working memory (WM) impairment in early Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been inconsistent. Using the model of WM proposed by Baddeley, neuropsychological evidence for the impairment of WM in early AD is evaluated. Literature searches were performed using Medline, PsycINFO and Embase databases. Individual papers were then examined for additional references not revealed by computerised searches. Phonological loop function is intact at the preclinical and early stages of AD, becoming more impaired as the disease progresses. In mild AD, there is impairment on tasks assessing visuospatial sketchpad (VSS) function; however, these tasks also require executive processing by the central executive system (CES). There is evidence that the CES is impaired in mild AD and may be affected in the earlier preclinical stage of the disease. Episodic buffer function may be impaired but further research is required. Future research into central executive functioning at the earliest stages of the disease, combined with further longitudinal studies, needs to be carried out. Tasks to assess the proposed functions of the episodic buffer and specific tests of the VSS suitable for AD subjects need to be developed and validated. Learning more about these processes and how they are affected in AD is important in understanding and managing the cognitive deficits seen in the early stages of AD.

  10. Cost Analysis of Early Psychosocial Intervention in Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, R.; Sørensen, J.; Waldorff, F.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the impact of early psychosocial intervention aimed at patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their caregivers on resource use and costs from a societal perspective. METHODS: Dyads of patients and their primary caregiver were randomised to intervention (n = 163...

  11. Early-onset stargardt disease: phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertus, S.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Bax, N.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the phenotype and genotype of patients with early-onset Stargardt disease. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-one Stargardt patients with age at onset

  12. [Drug treatment of early-stage (de novo and "honeymoon") Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, P; Defebvre, L

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we discuss the management of motor symptoms during the early phases of Parkinson's disease, excluding that of any other clinical manifestation. We relied primarily upon recently published data and do not describe older publications relating to anticholinergic drugs or amantadine. The initial pharmacological treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is symptomatic and remains based upon dopaminergic drugs. However, the development of new drugs has broadened the range of strategic options and improved overall patient management. Announcing the diagnosis is a critical moment, as pointed out by patients' associations. Patients should be advised to maintain personal, professional, social and physical activities as long as possible. The potential benefit of early pharmacological treatment should be explained, focusing on the possible disease-modifying effect of drugs such as rasagiline. According to current guidelines, L-Dopa is preferred in patients above 65years of age, while those below 65 should be treated with dopamine agonists. Like monoamine oxidase inhibitors B (MAOI-B), synthetic dopamine agonists exhibit several advantages: easy-to-use treatment with a once-daily administration, delayed L-Dopa initiation, significant efficacy on motor symptoms (although lower than that of L-Dopa). MOAI can be prescribed in association with L-Dopa or dopamine agonists. Rasagiline also delays L-Dopa initiation, and consequently motor complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Risk of early surgery for Crohn's disease: implications for early treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Bruce E; Arsenault, Joanne E; Rosen, Michael J; Alsahli, Mazen; Bailen, Laurence; Banks, Peter; Bensen, Steven; Bousvaros, Athos; Cave, David; Cooley, Jeffrey S; Cooper, Herbert L; Edwards, Susan T; Farrell, Richard J; Griffin, Michael J; Hay, David W; John, Alex; Lidofsky, Sheldon; Olans, Lori B; Peppercorn, Mark A; Rothstein, Richard I; Roy, Michael A; Saletta, Michael J; Shah, Samir A; Warner, Andrew S; Wolf, Jacqueline L; Vecchio, James; Winter, Harland S; Zawacki, John K

    2003-12-01

    In this study we aimed to define the rate of early surgery for Crohn's disease and to identify risk factors associated with early surgery as a basis for subsequent studies of early intervention in Crohn's disease. We assembled a retrospective cohort of patients with Crohn's disease diagnosed between 1991 and 1997 and followed for at least 3 yr, who were identified in 16 community and referral-based practices in New England. Chart review was performed for each patient. Details of baseline demographic and disease features were recorded. Surgical history including date of surgery, indication, and procedure were also noted. Risk factors for early surgery (defined as major surgery for Crohn's disease within 3 yr of diagnosis, exclusive of major surgery at time of diagnosis) were identified by univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors. Of 345 eligible patients, 69 (20.1%) required surgery within 3 yr of diagnosis, excluding the 14 patients (4.1%) who had major surgery at the time of diagnosis. Overall, the interval between diagnosis and surgery was short; one half of all patients who required surgery underwent operation within 6 months of diagnosis. Risk factors identified by univariate analysis as significantly associated with early surgery included the following: smoking; disease of small bowel without colonic involvement; nausea and vomiting or abdominal pain on presentation; neutrophil count; and steroid use in the first 6 months. Disease localized to the colon only, blood in the stool, use of 5-aminosalicylate, and lymphocyte count were inversely associated with risk of early surgery. Logistic regression confirmed independent associations with smoking as a positive risk factor and involvement of colon without small bowel as a negative risk factor for early surgery. The rate of surgery is high in the first 3 yr after diagnosis of Crohn's disease, particularly in the first 6 months. These results suggest that

  14. Digitized Spiral Drawing: A Possible Biomarker for Early Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Luciano, Marta; Wang, Cuiling; Ortega, Roberto A; Yu, Qiping; Boschung, Sarah; Soto-Valencia, Jeannie; Bressman, Susan B; Lipton, Richard B; Pullman, Seth; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Pre-clinical markers of Parkinson's Disease (PD) are needed, and to be relevant in pre-clinical disease, they should be quantifiably abnormal in early disease as well. Handwriting is impaired early in PD and can be evaluated using computerized analysis of drawn spirals, capturing kinematic, dynamic, and spatial abnormalities and calculating indices that quantify motor performance and disability. Digitized spiral drawing correlates with motor scores and may be more sensitive in detecting early changes than subjective ratings. However, whether changes in spiral drawing are abnormal compared with controls and whether changes are detected in early PD are unknown. 138 PD subjects (50 with early PD) and 150 controls drew spirals on a digitizing tablet, generating x, y, z (pressure) data-coordinates and time. Derived indices corresponded to overall spiral execution (severity), shape and kinematic irregularity (second order smoothness, first order zero-crossing), tightness, mean speed and variability of spiral width. Linear mixed effect adjusted models comparing these indices and cross-validation were performed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was applied to examine discriminative validity of combined indices. All indices were significantly different between PD cases and controls, except for zero-crossing. A model using all indices had high discriminative validity (sensitivity = 0.86, specificity = 0.81). Discriminative validity was maintained in patients with early PD. Spiral analysis accurately discriminates subjects with PD and early PD from controls supporting a role as a promising quantitative biomarker. Further assessment is needed to determine whether spiral changes are PD specific compared with other disorders and if present in pre-clinical PD.

  15. Pulmonary manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease in a 7-year-old immunodeficient boy with Epstein-Barr virus infection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra; Wojsyk-Banaszak, Irena; Jonczyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Breborowicz, Anna

    2016-06-08

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a multiorgan fibroinflammatory condition with lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates containing abundant IgG4-positive plasma cells. The immunopathogenesis of the disease and the potential role of triggering autoantigens or infectious factors have not been clearly defined. Immunoglobulin G4-related lung disease is a new and emerging condition in pediatric patients and to date, there have been only two reports regarding pulmonary manifestation of IgG4-RD in children recently published. This is the first report of IgG4-related lung disease in an immunodeficient child with Epstein-Barr virus infection. We report on the case of a 7-year old atopic boy who was hospitalized with an initial clinical and radiological diagnosis of pneumonia, positive Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA in the blood and defective adaptive immunity. The lung CT showed a consolidated mass lesion adjacent to the posterior wall of the chest and the diaphragm. The child underwent surgical resection of the tumor, and the histologic examination of the lung specimens revealed lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates with fibrosis and vasculitis correlating with IgG4-related lung disease. Subsequent monitoring of the patient with lung CT, pulmonary function tests and IgG4 levels did not show signs of active disease. The diagnosis of IgG4-related lung disease in children is challenging because of its rarity, nonspecific symptomatology and heterogeneous morphological manifestations. Further studies are required in children with pulmonary presentation of IgG4-RD to better understand pathogenesis of this condition, possible immunological or infectious triggering factors, and finally, to determine pediatric patient-targeted therapeutic interventions.

  16. Application of Metabonomics in Early Diagnosis of Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao LIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of life sciences, people have changed their focus from local research to systematic biology, thus contributing to the development of a series of “omics”, including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabonomics, etc. Metabonomics is a presently developed new branch of science that can provide qualitative and quantitative analysis on all metabolites with low-molecular quality in the body, tissues or cells of an organism. It recognizes the changes and rules of the biological endogenous substance under the impact of internal and external factors by generally and quantitatively detecting multiple small molecular compounds in biological samples, in hope of finding out the metabolic marker clusters in the early stage of diseases so as to provide new pathways for the early diagnosis of the diseases and the realization of individualized drug administration. Additionally, metabonomics research on clinical diseases has become a hot topic and made great achievement in the developmental condition, diagnostic methods, pathogenic mechanism and pharmaceutical efficacy evaluation of diseases. This study mainly reviewed the application and advances of metabonomics in the early diagnosis of malignant tumors, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, hoping to provide references and prompts for metabonomics-associated researches.

  17. C1q nephropathy and isolated CD59 deficiency manifesting as necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis: A rare association of two diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C1q nephropathy is a recently described clinico-pathologic entity with a variable clinical presentation and pathology. Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN has been reported in only two patients in the available literature. CD59 deficiency, along with lack of CD55, is responsible for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH. Few cases of isolated CD59 deficiency have been described with PNH-like features. A middle-aged adult male presented with rapidly progressive renal failure. Serological investigations were negative. A renal biopsy revealed necrotizing crescentic GN with rupture of Bowman′s capsule. Immunofluorescence on the frozen sections showed dominant mesangial deposits of C1q along with IgM. Hematological work-up of the patient revealed isolated CD59 deficiency. Hence, a final diagnosis of C1q nephropathy and CD59 deficiency manifesting as crescentic GN and hemolytic anemia was made. The co-existence of two rare disorders, C1q nephropathy and CD59 deficiency, in a patient with necrotizing crescentic GN is described for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The pathogenetic link of these two entities with the clinical manifestation requires further study.

  18. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  19. Two Thai families with Norrie disease (ND): association of two novel missense mutations with severe ND phenotype, seizures, and a manifesting carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, K; Limprasert, P; Ratanasukon, M; Tengtrisorn, S; Yingchareonpukdee, J; Vasiknanonte, P; Kitaoka, T; Ghadami, M; Niikawa, N; Kishino, T

    2001-04-15

    We describe two Thai families with Norrie disease (ND) in three generations, including 10 affected males and one manifesting female. All affected males in each family had severely defective eye development with complete loss of vision. In addition, three male patients (one from family 1 and two from family 2) suffered from epilepsy, and one female carrier from one family manifested blindness with phthisis bulbi in her right eye. Mutation analysis of the ND gene (NDP) revealed two different novel missense mutations (L16P and S75P) that co-segregated with ND in each family, suggesting that the newly appearing proline at codon 16 or codon 75 alters the conformation of the ND protein and contributes to the severe phenotype of ND in each family. Other studies suggest that epileptic seizures or growth retardation that is associated with ND is the consequence of loss of contiguous genes, because most such patients had deletions extending beyond the Norrie locus. Our finding that the three affected males in the two families with the missense mutations had epilepsy does not support a contiguous gene effect, but favors the pleiotropism of NDP, at least as far as the epileptic manifestation is concerned. The unilateral blindness in the female carrier may have been due to non-random X-inactivation. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Assessing Impairment of Executive Function and Psychomotor Speed in Premanifest and Manifest Huntington's Disease Gene-expansion Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unmack Larsen, Ida; Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Gade, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) and psychomotor speed (PMS) has been widely studied in Huntington's disease (HD). Most studies have focused on finding markers of disease progression by comparing group means at different disease stages. Our aim was to investigate performances on nine measures of EF and PMS...

  1. Early-onset Hirayama disease in a female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Baumann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hirayama disease is a rare myelopathy, occurring predominantly in males with onset in the teens. Methods and results: Here, we report a young female patient who developed the first signs of Hirayama disease at 10.5 years of age. Prior to onset, she had experienced a growth spurt and grew about 8 cm. The disease progressed over 3 years and the typical clinical, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging signs of Hirayama disease were found. After this period and achievement of her final height, no further progression was noticed. Conclusions: This case highlights that pediatric neurologists should be aware of Hirayama disease, which can also occur in girls in early adolescence.

  2. CD30-Positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disease of the Oral Mucosa in Children: A Manifestation of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated T-Lymphoproliferative Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mineui; Ko, Young Hyeh

    2015-11-01

    Eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa (EUOM) is a very rare, benign, self-limiting ulcerative lesion of the oral cavity of unknown pathogenesis, and belongs to the same spectrum of CD30(+) T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) of the oral mucosa. The etiology and pathogenesis of the disease are unknown. We report two cases in children who were initially diagnosed with EUOM and CD30(+) T-cell LPD, respectively. However, retrospective analysis revealed that a majority of infiltrated atypical T cells were positive for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The present cases suggest that the pathogenesis and etiology of EUOM or CD30(+) T-cell LPD occurring in children are different from those in adults. EUOM or CD30(+) T-cell LPD in children is a manifestation of EBV-positive T-cell LPD, and should therefore be distinguished from the disease in adults.

  3. Orofacial granulomatosis in children can be the initial manifestation of systemic disease: a presentation of two cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Anne Birgitte; Deleuran, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis is a chronic granulomatous condition characterized by relapsing and remitting lip swelling and oral involvement that may include deep ulcers, tags and cobblestone formation. It occurs as an independent entity but also in conjunction with systemic diseases...... such as tuberculosis, sarcoidosis and Crohn's disease. The clinical presentation is not indicative of concomitant systemic disease. To highlight the importance of thorough examination to rule out systemic disease, we present two childhood cases of orofacial granulomatosis, one of which was associated to Crohn......'s disease....

  4. Chlorophyll as a biomarker for early disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Atta, Babar; Saleem, M.; Ali, Hina; Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Imran; Ahmed, M.

    2018-06-01

    The current study was designed to identify the stage for the diagnosis of disease before visible symptoms appeared. Fluorescence spectroscopy has been employed to identify disease signatures for its early diagnosis in rice plant leaves. Bacterial leaf blight (BLB) diseased and healthy leaf samples were collected from the rice fields in September, 2017 which were then used to record spectra using an excitation wavelength at 410 nm. The spectral range of emission was set from 420 to 800 nm which covers the blue–green and the chlorophyll bands. It was found that diseased leaves have a narrower ‘chlorophyll a’ band than healthy ones, and furthermore, that the emission band at 730 nm was either declined or depleted in the sample with high infection symptoms. In contrast, the blue–green region was observed to increase due to the emergence of disease. As the band intensity of chlorophyll decreases during infection, this decrease in chlorophyll content and increase in the blue–green spectral region could provide a new approach for predicting BLB at an early stage. The important finding was that the chlorophyll degradation and rise in the blue–green region take place in leaves with BLB or during BLB infection. Principal component analysis has been applied to spectral data which successfully separated diseased samples from healthy ones even with very small spectral variations.

  5. The absence of later wave components in auditory brainstem responses as an initial manifestation of type 2 Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yusuke; Goto, Masahiro; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro; Kaneko, Takashi; Miyama, Sahoko

    2014-12-01

    Type 2 Gaucher disease is the most severe neuronopathic form of Gaucher disease and is characterized by severe neurodegeneration with brainstem involvement and organ failure. Prediction or diagnosis of type 2 Gaucher disease before the development of neurological complications is difficult. A 5-month-old female infant presented with deafness without other neurological abnormalities. Auditory brainstem response analysis revealed the absence of later wave components. Two months later, muscular rigidity became evident, followed by the development of opisthotonus and strabismus. Rapid progression of splenomegaly led to the diagnosis of type 2 Gaucher disease. Abnormal auditory brainstem response findings may already exist before the development of severe brainstem abnormalities such as muscular rigidity and opisthotonus in type 2 Gaucher disease. When patients present with deafness and absent later wave components on auditory brainstem response, type 2 Gaucher disease should be included in the differential diagnosis even in the absence of other neurological abnormalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dealing with Coronary Artery Disease in Early Encountering: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mojalli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is rising in industrial and developing countries. Coronary Artery Disease (CAD is the most common cardiovascular disease. Thus, understanding the signs and risk factors of CAD from the patients’ perspective and their ways of dealing with this disease is of vital importance. Objectives: This qualitative study aimed to explore the Iranian patients’ viewpoints about CAD and how they dealt with it in their first encounter. Patients and Methods: This study was a qualitative content analysis conducted on 18 patients with CAD. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Initially, purposeful sampling was performed followed by maximum variety. Sampling continued until data saturation. Then, all the interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. After all, the data were analyzed by constant comparative analysis using MAXQUDA2010 software. Results: The themes manifested in this study included “invasion of disease” with subthemes of “warning signs” and “risk factors” and “confrontation strategies” with subthemes of “seeking for information”, “follow-up”, and “control measures”. Conclusions:: The results of this study described the patients’ perceptions of CAD and how they dealt with this disorder in early encountering. Based on the results, physicians and nurses should focus on empowerment of patients by facilitating this process as well as by educating them with regards to dealing with CAD.

  7. R wave amplitude: a new determinant of failure of patients with coronary heart disease to manifest ST segment depression during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakki, A.H.; Iskandrian, A.S.; Kutalek, S.; Hare, T.W.; Sokoloff, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease may not manifest ST segment depression during exercise. Inadequate stress, mild coronary artery disease and severe left ventricular dysfunction have been postulated as mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of exercise R wave amplitude on ST segment depression in 81 patients with coronary artery disease (50% or greater diameter narrowing of one or more vessels). All patients underwent symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing and 71 patients (88%) had concomitant thallium-201 imaging. In 26 patients, the exercise R wave amplitude in electrocardiographic lead V5 was less than 11 mm (Group I), and in 55 patients it was 11 mm or greater (Group II). The two groups were similar with regard to age, sex, propranolol administration and left ventricular function. There was a significant difference in the incidence of positive exercise electrocardiograms in the two groups (2 patients [8%] in Group I and 27 patients [49%] in Group II; p . 0.002), despite similar exercise heart rate and extent of coronary artery disease. Myocardial ischemia, manifested by exercise-induced angina or exercise-induced thallium-201 perfusion defects, was similar in both groups. Thallium-201 imaging showed perfusion defects in 73% of patients in Group I and in 76% of patients in Group II (p . not significant). Thus, R wave amplitude is a new determinant of failure to develop ST depression during exercise. A low R wave amplitude (less than 11 mm) is rarely associated with ST depression, even in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease. Exercise thallium-201 imaging is a valuable diagnostic tool in patients with low R wave amplitude

  8. Transformation in pretreatment manifestations of Gaucher disease type 1 during two decades of alglucerase/imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy in the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pramod K; Batista, Julie L; Andersson, Hans C; Balwani, Manisha; Burrow, Thomas Andrew; Charrow, Joel; Kaplan, Paige; Khan, Aneal; Kishnani, Priya S; Kolodny, Edwin H; Rosenbloom, Barry; Scott, C Ronald; Weinreb, Neal

    2017-09-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the prevalence of severe clinical manifestations in Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) patients at the time of treatment initiation has changed since alglucerase/imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) was approved in the United States (US) in 1991. US alglucerase/imiglucerase-treated GD1 patients from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group Gaucher Registry clinicaltrials.gov NCT00358943 were stratified by age at ERT initiation (<18, 18 to <50, ≥50 years), era of ERT initiation (1991-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, 2006-2009), and splenectomy status pre-ERT. Prevalence of splenectomy decreased dramatically across the eras among all age groups. Bone manifestations were more prevalent in splenectomized patients than non-splenectomized patients in all age groups. Prevalence of bone manifestations differed across eras in certain age groups: non-splenectomized patients had a lower prevalence of ischemic bone events (pediatric patients) and bone crisis (pediatric patients and adults 18 to <50 years) in later eras; splenectomized adult (18 to <50 years) patients had a lower prevalence of ischemic bone events and bone crisis in later eras. Over two decades after the introduction of ERT, the prevalence of splenectomy and associated skeletal complications has declined dramatically. Concomitantly, the interval between diagnosis and initiation of ERT has decreased, most strikingly in pediatric patients who have the most severe disease. Together, these findings suggest that since the introduction of alglucerase/imiglucerase ERT, optimal standard of care has become established in the US to prevent destructive complications of GD1. © 2017 The Authors American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. p.H1069Q mutation in ATP7B and biochemical parameters of copper metabolism and clinical manifestation of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromadzka, Graznya; Schmidt, Harmut H J; Genschel, Janine; Bochow, Bettina; Rodo, M; Tarnacka, Beatek; Litwin, Thomas; Chabik, Grzegorz; Członkowska, Anna

    2006-02-01

    We compared the effect of the p.H1069Q mutation and other non-p.H1069Q mutations in ATP7B on the phenotypic expression of Wilson's disease (WD), and assessed whether the clinical phenotype of WD in compound heterozygotes depends on the type of mutation coexisting with the p.H1069Q. One hundred forty-two patients with clinically, biochemically, and genetically diagnosed WD were studied. The mutational analysis of ATP7B was performed by direct sequencing. A total number of 26 mutations in ATP7B were identified. The p.His1069Gln was the most common mutation (allelic frequency: 72%). Seventy-three patients were homozygous for this mutation. Of compound heterozygotes, 37 had frameshift/nonsense mutation, and 20 had other missense mutation on one of their ATP7B alleles. Twelve patients had two non-p.H1069Q mutations. Patients homozygous for the p.H1069Q mutation had the less severe disturbances of copper metabolism and the latest presentation of first WD symptoms. The most severely disturbed copper metabolism and the earliest age at initial disease manifestation was noticed in non-p.H1069Q patients. In compound heterozygotes, the type of mutation coexisting with the p.H1069Q to a small extent influenced WD phenotype. The phenotype of WD varied considerably among patients with the same genotype. The p.H1069Q mutation is associated with late WD manifestation and with a mild disruption of copper metabolism. In compound heterozygotes, the phenotype of WD to a small extent depends on the type of mutation coexisting with the p.H1069Q. Besides genotype, additional modifying factors seem to determine WD manifestations. Copyright (c) 2005 Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Pulmonary hypertension not a major feature of early mixed connective tissue disease: A prospective clinicoserological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD has features common to lupus, scleroderma and myositis with high levels of antibodies to U1 ribonucleoprotein (U1 RNP. Identification of a high incidence of pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH has changed its prospect. We report the largest series from India. Settings and Design: Rheumatology unit of a tertiary care centre in India; prospective. Materials and Methods: Patients seen between January 2002 and June 2004, satisfying the Kasukawa criteria were enrolled. All patients had a complete laboratory work-up including pulmonary function test, 2-D echocardiography, and Schirmer′s test, antinuclear antibodies (ANA and antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens. HRCT of chest was done where indicated. All patients were given standard treatment and followed up regularly. Results: Out of 1500 patients, thirteen (one male were diagnosed to have MCTD. The median follow-up period was 18 months [Interquartile range (IQR 12-22]. The median age of onset of symptoms was 36 years (IQR 22-39 and the median duration of disease was three years (IQR 1.75-4. The most common manifestation was polyarthritis followed by puffy fingers. Sjogren′s syndrome, dysphagia and interstitial lung disease, was present in four, three and two patients respectively. Two patients each had myositis and migraine. None had PAH, serositis or renal involvement. Arthritis, puffy fingers and RaynaudÆs phenomenon were the most common manifestations at onset. All patients were positive for ANA and anti U1 RNP. Two patients each had antibodies to Sm and SSA. Response to treatment also was noted. Conclusion: Pulmonary artery hypertension is not common in early MCTD.

  11. Immunologic manifestations of autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deretic, Vojo; Kimura, Tomonori; Timmins, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The broad immunologic roles of autophagy span innate and adaptive immunity and are often manifested in inflammatory diseases. The immune effects of autophagy partially overlap with its roles in metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control but typically expand further afield to encompass unique...... immunologic adaptations. One of the best-appreciated manifestations of autophagy is protection against microbial invasion, but this is by no means limited to direct elimination of intracellular pathogens and includes a stratified array of nearly all principal immunologic processes. This Review summarizes...... the broad immunologic roles of autophagy. Furthermore, it uses the autophagic control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a paradigm to illustrate the breadth and complexity of the immune effects of autophagy....

  12. Extraintestinal manifestations were common in children with coeliac disease and were more prevalent in patients with more severe clinical and histological presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurminen, Samuli; Kivelä, Laura; Huhtala, Heini; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2018-03-22

    This study investigated the prevalence of extraintestinal manifestations (EIM) in paediatric coeliac disease and their associations with other disease features. Researchers at the University of Tampere, Finland, compared EIM in 511 children diagnosed with coeliac disease from 2003 to 2014 and 180 diagnosed with functional gastrointestinal disorders from 2007 to 2013. Disease severity and dietary responses were also compared between coeliac children diagnosed by screening (n = 146) or because of EIM (n = 116) or gastrointestinal symptoms (n = 249). Coeliac patients had more EIM (62%) than those with functional disorders (33%). The most common EIM in coeliac children were poor growth (27%) and anaemia (18%). Children with coeliac disease often showed fatigue (8%) and symptoms affecting the skin (15%), nervous system (9%) and joints (6%). Coeliac patients with EIM as their main clinical presentation had more severe symptoms and histological damage at diagnosis than those with gastrointestinal presentation and screen-detected cases. The subgroups did not differ with regard to other clinical and laboratory parameters and dietary adherence. Concomitant EIM were also common in children diagnosed because of gastrointestinal presentation (60%) and by screening (37%). EIM were common in coeliac disease and associated with more severe clinical and histological presentation. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The impact of rheumatic diseases on early retirement

    OpenAIRE

    Laires, Pedro Almeida, 1979-

    2017-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (Epidemiologia), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2017 BACKGROUND: Rheumatic Diseases (RD) are characterized by pain and reduction in the range of motion and function in one or more areas of the musculoskeletal system. RD are prominent causes of morbidity and disability throughout the world, giving rise to enormous healthcare expenditures. RD may also lead to early retirement, generating indirect costs to society, namely t...

  14. Limbic grey matter changes in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingfeng; Xing, Yue; Schwarz, Stefan T; Auer, Dorothee P

    2017-05-02

    The purpose of this study was to investigate local and network-related changes of limbic grey matter in early Parkinson's disease (PD) and their inter-relation with non-motor symptom severity. We applied voxel-based morphometric methods in 538 T1 MRI images retrieved from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative website. Grey matter densities and cross-sectional estimates of age-related grey matter change were compared between subjects with early PD (n = 366) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 172) within a regression model, and associations of grey matter density with symptoms were investigated. Structural brain networks were obtained using covariance analysis seeded in regions showing grey matter abnormalities in PD subject group. Patients displayed focally reduced grey matter density in the right amygdala, which was present from the earliest stages of the disease without further advance in mild-moderate disease stages. Right amygdala grey matter density showed negative correlation with autonomic dysfunction and positive with cognitive performance in patients, but no significant interrelations were found with anxiety scores. Patients with PD also demonstrated right amygdala structural disconnection with less structural connectivity of the right amygdala with the cerebellum and thalamus but increased covariance with bilateral temporal cortices compared with controls. Age-related grey matter change was also increased in PD preferentially in the limbic system. In conclusion, detailed brain morphometry in a large group of early PD highlights predominant limbic grey matter deficits with stronger age associations compared with controls and associated altered structural connectivity pattern. This provides in vivo evidence for early limbic grey matter pathology and structural network changes that may reflect extranigral disease spread in PD. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The

  15. Degenerative alterations of the cementum-periodontal ligament complex and early tooth loss in a young patient with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruţiu, S A; Buiga, Petronela; Roman, Alexandra; Danciu, Theodora; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Mihu, D

    2012-01-01

    Premature exfoliation of primary or permanent teeth in children or adolescents is extremely rare and it can be a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease. This study aims to present the histological aspects associated with early tooth loss in a case of periodontal disease developed without local inflammation and with minimal periodontal pockets and attachment loss. The maxillary left second premolar was extracted together with a gingival collar attached to the root surface. The histological analysis recorded the resorption of the cementum in multiple areas of the entire root surface with the connective tissue of the desmodontium invading the lacunae defects. The connective tissue rich in cells occupied the periodontal ligamentar space and the resorptive areas. No inflammation was obvious in the periodontal ligament connective tissue. This report may warn clinicians about the possibility of the association of cemental abnormalities with early tooth loss.

  16. Manifestações extra-esofágicas da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico Extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    Richard Ricachenevski Gurski

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A doença do refluxo gastroesofágico freqüentemente se apresenta com pirose e regurgitação, os chamados sintomas típicos. Porém, um subgrupo de pacientes apresenta um conjunto de sinais e sintomas que não estão relacionados diretamente ao dano esofágico. A esse conjunto dá-se o nome de manifestações extra-esofágicas da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico. Compreendem, principalmente, broncoespasmo, tosse crônica e alterações inflamatórias na laringe (chamados manifestações atípicas. Apesar de essas manifestações formarem um grupo heterogêneo, algumas considerações gerais englobam todos os subgrupos: embora a associação entre a doença do refluxo gastroesofágico e as manifestações extra-esofágicas esteja bem estabelecida, uma relação entre causa e efeito definitiva ainda não está elucidada; em relação à patogênese das manifestações extra-esofágicas, os principais mecanismos propostos são a injúria direta do tecido extra-esofágico pelo conteúdo ácido gástrico refluído e o reflexo esôfago-brônquico mediado pelo nervo vago; a doença do refluxo gastroesofágico pode não ser incluída no diagnóstico diferencial do grupo de pacientes que apresenta somente os sintomas atípicos. Este artigo revisa as manifestações extra-esofágicas da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico encontradas na literatura, discutindo a epidemiologia, patogênese, diagnóstico e tratamento, com foco nas apresentações mais estudadas e estabelecidas.Gastroesophageal reflux disease often presents as heartburn and acid reflux, the so-called "typical" symptoms. However, a subgroup of patients presents a collection of signs and symptoms that are not directly related to esophageal damage. These are known collectively as the extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Principal among such manifestations are bronchospasm, chronic cough and laryngitis, which are classified as atypical symptoms. These

  17. Early pathology in sleep studies of patients with familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givaty, Gili; Maggio, Nicola; Cohen, Oren S; Blatt, Ilan; Chapman, Joab

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to assess sleep function in patients with recent-onset familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). The largest cluster of fCJD patients is found in Jews of Libyan origin, linked to the prion protein gene (PRNP) E200K mutation. The high index of suspicion in these patients often leads to early diagnosis, with complaints of insomnia being a very common presenting symptom of the disease. The study included 10 fCJD patients diagnosed by clinical manifestations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain, elevated tau protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and positive PRNP E200K mutation. Standard polysomnography was performed after a brief interview confirming the presence of sleep disturbances. All patients showed a pathological sleep pattern according to all scoring evaluation settings. The sleep stages were characterized by (i) disappearance of sleep spindles; (ii) outbursts of periodic sharp waves and shallowing of sleep consisting in increased Stage 2 and wake periods during the night, as well as decrease of slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Recordings of respiratory functions reported irregular breathing with central and obstructive apnea and hypopnea. The typical hypotonia occurring during the night and atonia during REM sleep were replaced by hyperactive sleep consisting of multiple jerks, movements and parasomnia (mainly talking) throughout the night. In conclusion, we report unique pathological sleep patterns in early fCJD associated with the E200K mutation. Specific respiratory disturbances and lack of atonia could possibly serve as new, early diagnostic tools in the disease. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  18. Dental erosion, an extraesophageal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease: the experience of a center for digestive physiology in Southeastern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Roesch-Ramos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental erosion (DE is the loss of the hard tissues of the tooth produced by the action of gastric juice, pepsin and acid on the dental enamel, its frequency ranges from 5to 53.41%. In Mexico there are no reports on the frequency and possible association. Objective: To establish the prevalence of dental erosion and its relationship to GERD. Patients and methods: Prospective, observational, descriptive and comparative study was conducted in 60patients diagnosed with GERD and 60healthy patients at the Institute of Medical and Biological Research of the Universidad Veracruzana in Veracruz city. Anthropometric characteristics, dietary habits, oral hygiene, alcohol consumption, smoking, ED index and Index of decayed/missing dental pieces/sealed and correlation between severity of ED and GERD were analyzed. Results: 78.67% of patients with GERD had ED, 23.33% corresponded to grade 0, 41.67% to N1, N2and 23.33% to 11.67% to N3. Predominance of females (2.3:1. The mean age was 50.92± 13.52years. The severity of dental erosion was significantly related to the severity of reflux, halitosis, CPO index and poor eating habits. There was no statistically significant difference in the other variables analyzed. Conclusions: Dental erosion has a high frequency in patients with GERD and reflux characteristics are directly related to their severity and therefore should be considered as a manifestation of GERD extraesophageal.

  19. Dental erosion, an extraesophageal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The experience of a center for digestive physiology in Southeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch-Ramos, Laura; Roesch-Dietlen, Federico; Remes-Troche, José María; Romero-Sierra, Graciela; Mata-Tovar, Carlos de Jesús; Azamar-Jácome, Amyra Ali; Barranca-Enríquez, Antonia

    2014-02-01

    Dental erosion (DE) is the loss of the hard tissues of the tooth produced by the action of gastric juice, pepsin and acid on the dental enamel, its frequency ranges from 5 to 53.41 %. In Mexico there are no reports on the frequency and possible association. To establish the prevalence of dental erosion and its relationship to GERD. Prospective, observational, descriptive and comparative study was conducted in 60 patients diagnosed with GERD and 60 healthy patients at the Institute of Medical and Biological Research of the Universidad Veracruzana in Veracruz city. Anthropometric characteristics, dietary habits, oral hygiene, alcohol consumption, smoking, ED index and Index of decayed/missing dental pieces/sealed and correlation between severity of ED and GERD were analyzed. 78.67 % of patients with GERD had ED, 23.33 % corresponded to grade 0, 41.67 % to N1, N2 and 23.33 % to 11.67 % to N3. Predominance of females (2,3:1). The mean age was 50.92 +/- 13.52 years. The severity of dental erosion was significantly related to the severity of reflux, halitosis, CPO index and poor eating habits. There was no statistically significant difference in the other variables analyzed. Dental erosion has a high frequency in patients with GERD and reflux characteristics are directly related to their severity and therefore should be considered as a manifestation of GERD extraesophageal.

  20. The airway microbiota in early cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayman, Katherine B; Armstrong, David S; Grimwood, Keith; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2017-11-01

    Infection plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Over the past two decades, the application of molecular and extended culture-based techniques to microbial analysis has changed our understanding of the lungs in both health and disease. CF lung disease is a polymicrobial disorder, with obligate and facultative anaerobes recovered alongside traditional pathogens in varying proportions, with some differences observed to correlate with disease stage. While healthy lungs are not sterile, differences between the lower airway microbiota of individuals with CF and disease-controls are already apparent in childhood. Understanding the evolution of the CF airway microbiota, and its relationship with clinical treatments and outcome at each disease stage, will improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and potentially inform clinical management. This review summarizes current knowledge of the early development of the respiratory microbiota in healthy children and then discusses what is known about the airway microbiota in individuals with CF, including how it evolves over time and where future research priorities lie. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Children: A Guide to Early Diagnosis for the General Pediatrician

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    Hanna Alobaidy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick disease (NP-C is a lysosomal storage disease in which impaired intracellular lipid transport leads to accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in various neurovisceral tissues. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations in the NPC1 or NPC2 genes. The clinical spectrum is grouped by the age of onset and onset of neurological manifestation: pre/perinatal; early infantile; late infantile; and juvenile periods. The NP-C Suspicion Index (SI screening tool was developed to identify suspected patients with this disease. It is especially good at recognizing the disease in patients older than four years of age. Biochemical tests involving genetic markers and Filipin staining of skin fibroblast are being employed to assist diagnosis. Therapy is mostly supportive and since 2009, the first specific therapy approved for use was Miglustat (Zavesca aimed at stabilizing the rate of progression of neurological manifestation. The prognosis correlates with age at onset of neurological signs; patients with early onset form progress faster. The NP-C disease has heterogeneous neurovisceral manifestations. A SI is a screening tool that helps in diagnostic process. Filipin staining test is a specific biomarker diagnostic test. Miglustat is the first disease-specific therapy.

  2. Opportunity cost for early treatment of Chagas disease in Mexico.

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    Janine M Ramsey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life.

  3. Opportunity cost for early treatment of Chagas disease in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Janine M; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Sanchez-González, Gilberto; Peña-Nieves, Adriana; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life.

  4. Effect of Goiter Dispersion Formula on Serum Cytokines in Hyperthyroidism Patients with Neurologic Manifestations of Graves' Disease: A Randomized Trial on 80 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wen-Hong; Wang, Ying; Yang, Rui; Hu, Hai-Bing

    2018-05-01

    This study is aimed to explore the combined use of goiter dispersion formula and antithyroid drugs in the treatment of patients with neurologic manifestations of Graves' disease by examining its modulating effects on patients' cytokines. A total of 80 patients with Graves' disease were randomly divided into treatment and control groups. Patients of the treatment group received goiter dispersion formula and antithyroid drugs (methimazole or propylthiouracil), whereas those of the control group received antithyroid drug alone. FT3, FT4, and TSH contents were detected by chemiluminescence immunoassay at pre- and post-treatment; interleukin (IL)-2, IL-8, and IL-17 serum levels before and after the treatment were detected by radioimmunoassay; thyroid B-mode ultrasound and liver and renal function tests were performed in all patients of both groups. An additional cohort of 40 healthy subjects was recruited for baseline measurement. All the enrolled patients completed the trial. The effective treatment rate was higher in the treatment group than in the control group, of which the difference was statistically significant (treatment group, 95%; control group, 75%, p Graves' disease comparing with those in healthy subjects (p Graves' disease by modulating IL-2, IL-8, and IL-17. The data supported the rationale for the use of goiter dispersion formula in Graves' disease treatment.

  5. Recent advances in knowledge regarding the head and neck manifestations of IgG4-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder, characterized by elevated serum IgG4 levels as well as abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes and fibrosis in various organs, including the head and neck region. In particular, the salivary glands, orbit, and thyroid are common sites of disease involvement. IgG4-RD is diagnosed based on various clinical, serological, and histopathological findings, none of which are pathognomonic. Hence, various differential diagnoses, which exhibit elevated serum IgG4 levels and infiltration of IgG4-postive cells into tissues, need to be excluded, especially malignant diseases and mimicking disorders. Systemic corticosteroids are generally effective in inducing IgG4-RD remission; however, recurrent or refractory cases are common. In addition, although the pathogenic mechanisms of IgG4-RD remain unclear, an antigen-driven inflammatory condition is believed to be involved. Recent studies have indicated the important pathogenic role of B cell/T cell collaboration and innate immunity in this disease. Nevertheless, additional research and discussions are needed to resolve many remaining questions. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent insights on the history, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of IgG4-RD in the head and neck region. Furthermore, we have also addressed the pathogenesis of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Polygenic Risk Score for Alzheimer's Disease: Implications for Memory Performance and Hippocampal Volumes in Early Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrud, Luiza K; Santoro, Marcos L; Pine, Daniel S; Talarico, Fernanda; Gadelha, Ary; Manfro, Gisele G; Pan, Pedro M; Jackowski, Andrea; Picon, Felipe; Brietzke, Elisa; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Miguel, Eurípedes C; Rohde, Luis A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pausova, Zdenka; Belangero, Sintia; Paus, Tomas; Salum, Giovanni A

    2018-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a heritable neurodegenerative disorder in which early-life precursors may manifest in cognition and brain structure. The authors evaluate this possibility by examining, in youths, associations among polygenic risk score for Alzheimer's disease, cognitive abilities, and hippocampal volume. Participants were children 6-14 years of age in two Brazilian cities, constituting the discovery (N=364) and replication samples (N=352). As an additional replication, data from a Canadian sample (N=1,029), with distinct tasks, MRI protocol, and genetic risk, were included. Cognitive tests quantified memory and executive function. Reading and writing abilities were assessed by standardized tests. Hippocampal volumes were derived from the Multiple Automatically Generated Templates (MAGeT) multi-atlas segmentation brain algorithm. Genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease was quantified using summary statistics from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project. Analyses showed that for the Brazilian discovery sample, each one-unit increase in z-score for Alzheimer's polygenic risk score significantly predicted a 0.185 decrement in z-score for immediate recall and a 0.282 decrement for delayed recall. Findings were similar for the Brazilian replication sample (immediate and delayed recall, β=-0.259 and β=-0.232, both significant). Quantile regressions showed lower hippocampal volumes bilaterally for individuals with high polygenic risk scores. Associations fell short of significance for the Canadian sample. Genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease may affect early-life cognition and hippocampal volumes, as shown in two independent samples. These data support previous evidence that some forms of late-life dementia may represent developmental conditions with roots in childhood. This result may vary depending on a sample's genetic risk and may be specific to some types of memory tasks.

  7. Early Detection System of Vascular Disease and Its Application Prospect

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    Huan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Markers of imaging, structure, and function reflecting vascular damage, integrating a long time accumulation effect of traditional and unrecognized cardiovascular risk factors, can be regarded as surrogate endpoints of target organ damage before the occurrence of clinical events. Prevention of cardiovascular disease requires risk stratification and treatment of traditional risk factors, such as smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes. However, traditional risk stratification is not sufficient to provide accurate assessment of future cardiovascular events. Therefore, vascular injury related parameters obtained by ultrasound or other noninvasive devices, as a surrogate parameter of subclinical cardiovascular disease, can improve cardiovascular risk assessment and optimize the preventive treatment strategy. Thus, we will summarize the research progress and clinical application of early assessment technology of vascular diseases in the present review.

  8. Congenital heart disease in the newborn requiring early intervention

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    Sin Weon Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although antenatal diagnostic technique has considerably improved, precise detection and proper management of the neonate with congenital heart disease (CHD is always a great concern to pediatricians. Congenital cardiac malformations vary from benign to serious conditions such as complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA, critical pulmonary and aortic valvular stenosis/atresia, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS, obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR, which the baby needs immediate diagnosis and management for survival. Unfortunately, these life threatening heart diseases may not have obvious evidence early after birth, most of the clinical and physical findings are nonspecific and vague, which makes the diagnosis difficult. High index of suspicion and astute acumen are essential to decision making. When patent ductus arteriosus (PDA is opened widely, many serious malformations may not be noticed easily in the early life, but would progress as severe acidosis/shock/cyanosis or even death as PDA constricts after few hours to days. Ductus dependent congenital cardiac lesions can be divided into the ductus dependent systemic or pulmonary disease, but physiologically quite different from each other and treatment strategy has to be tailored to the clinical status and cardiac malformations. Inevitably early presentation is often regarded as a medical emergency. Differential diagnosis with inborn error metabolic disorders, neonatal sepsis, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN and other pulmonary conditions are necessary. Urgent identification of the newborn at such high risk requires timely referral to a pediatric cardiologist, and timely intervention is the key in reducing mortality and morbidity. This following review deals with the clinical presentations, investigative modalities and approach to management of congenital cardiac malformations presenting in the early life.

  9. The effect of vitamin D on clinical manifestations and activity of Behçet’s disease

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    Nurşad Aslan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Immune mechanisms have been implemented to have a role in the pathogenesis of Behçet’s disease (BD and vitamin D has been shown to have a regulatory role in the immune system function. Aim: To evaluate the vitamin D levels of BD patients and its relationship between clinical findings and disease activity of BD. Material and methods: Sixty-eight patients with BD and 70 age- and sex-matched controls were examined retrospectively. Demographic features, vitamin D levels for both groups and clinical findings, disease activity, drug usage for BD patients were examined from their medical reports. Disease activity was calculated for each patient according to Krause’s BD activity assessment. Results: Mean vitamin D levels of patients and controls were 15.35 ±7.18 ng/ml and 18.44 ±5.79 ng/ml, respectively. Vitamin D levels were significantly lower in BD patients than in controls (p = 0.006. Mean vitamin D levels of active and inactive BD cases were 15.68 ±7.31 ng/ml and 15.08 ±7.17 ng/ml, respectively (p = 0.73. Disease activity of patients using and not using vitamin D was similar (p = 0.51. Conclusions : Significantly lower levels of vitamin D were observed in BD patients. Our results indicate that there is no correlation between BD activity and a vitamin D level. Together with these, vitamin D replacement treatment was found to have no effect on disease activity.

  10. Cross sectional PET study of cerebral adenosine A{sub 1} receptors in premanifest and manifest Huntington's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusch, Andreas; Elmenhorst, David [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-2), Juelich (Germany); Saft, Carsten; Kraus, Peter H.; Gold, Ralf [St. Josef Hospital, Ruhr University Bochum, Department of Neurology, Huntington Centre NRW, Bochum (Germany); Hartung, Hans-Peter [Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bauer, Andreas [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-2), Juelich (Germany); Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To study cerebral adenosine receptors (AR) in premanifest and manifest stages of Huntington's disease (HD). We quantified the cerebral binding potential (BP{sub ND}) of the A{sub 1}AR in carriers of the HD CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion using the radioligand [{sup 18} F]CPFPX and PET. Four groups were investigated: (i) premanifest individuals far (preHD-A; n = 7) or (ii) near (preHD-B; n = 6) to the predicted symptom onset, (iii) manifest HD patients (n = 8), and (iv) controls (n = 36). Cerebral A{sub 1}AR values of preHD-A subjects were generally higher than those of controls (by up to 31 %, p <.01, in the thalamus on average). Across stages a successive reduction of A{sub 1}AR BP{sub ND} was observed to the levels of controls in preHD-B and undercutting controls in manifest HD by down to 25 %, p <.01, in the caudatus and amygdala. There was a strong correlation between A{sub 1}AR BP{sub ND} and years to onset. Before onset of HD, the assumed annual rates of change of A{sub 1}AR density were -1.2 % in the caudatus, -1.7 % in the thalamus and -3.4 % in the amygdala, while the corresponding volume losses amounted to 0.6 %, 0.1 % and 0.2 %, respectively. Adenosine receptors switch from supra to subnormal levels during phenoconversion of HD. This differential regulation may play a role in the pathophysiology of altered energy metabolism. (orig.)

  11. [Pulmonary Manifestations of Vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vietinghoff, S

    2016-11-01

    The variable symptoms and signs of pulmonary vasculitis are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Vasculitis should be considered in rapidly progressing, severe and unusual manifestations of pulmonary disease. Clinical examination of other organ systems typically affected by vasculitis such as skin and kidney and autoantibody measurements are complementary approaches to manage this situation. Pulmonary involvement is common in small vessel vasculitis including anti-GBM disease (Goodpasture syndrome) and the ANCA-associated vasculitides. Life threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and irreversible damage of other organs, frequently the kidney, are important complications necessitating rapid diagnosis of these conditions.Vasculitides are rare diseases of multiple organs and therapies including biologics are evolving rapidly, requiring cooperation of specialities and with specialized centres to achieve best patient care. All involved physicians should be aware of typical complications of immunosuppressive therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Mastoiditis and facial paralysis as initial manifestations of temporal bone systemic diseases - the significance of the histopathological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniu, Alma Aurelia; Harabagiu, Oana; Damian, Laura Otilia; Ştefănescu, Eugen HoraŢiu; FănuŢă, Bogdan Marius; Cătană, Andreea; Mogoantă, Carmen Aurelia

    2016-01-01

    Several systemic diseases, including granulomatous and infectious processes, tumors, bone disorders, collagen-vascular and other autoimmune diseases may involve the middle ear and temporal bone. These diseases are difficult to diagnose when symptoms mimic acute otomastoiditis. The present report describes our experience with three such cases initially misdiagnosed. Their predominating symptoms were otological with mastoiditis, hearing loss, and subsequently facial nerve palsy. The cases were considered an emergency and the patients underwent tympanomastoidectomy, under the suspicion of otitis media with cholesteatoma, in order to remove a possible abscess and to decompress the facial nerve. The common features were the presence of severe granulation tissue filling the mastoid cavity and middle ear during surgery, without cholesteatoma. The definitive diagnoses was made by means of biopsy of the granulation tissue from the middle ear, revealing granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis) in one case, middle ear tuberculosis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma respectively. After specific associated therapy facial nerve functions improved, and atypical inflammatory states of the ear resolved. As a group, systemic diseases of the middle ear and temporal bone are uncommon, but aggressive lesions. After analyzing these cases and reviewing the literature, we would like to stress upon the importance of microscopic examination of the affected tissue, required for an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

  13. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Pedersen, Simon Glerup; Gesslein, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments...

  14. Manifestation of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Different Dietary Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera HI Fengler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, which are usually associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, are considerable health and economic issues due to the rapid increase of their prevalence in Western society. Histologically, the diseases are characterised by steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and if further progressed, fibrosis. Dietary-induced mouse models are widely used in investigations of the development and progression of NAFLD and NASH; these models attempt to mimic the histological and metabolic features of the human diseases. However, the majority of dietary mouse models fail to reflect the whole pathophysiological spectrum of NAFLD and NASH. Some models exhibit histological features similar to those seen in humans while lacking the metabolic context, while others resemble the metabolic conditions leading to NAFLD in humans but fail to mimic the whole histological spectrum, including progression from steatosis to liver fibrosis, and thus fail to mimic NASH. This review summarises the advantages and disadvantages of the different dietary-induced mouse models of NAFLD and NASH, with a focus on the genetic background of several commonly used wild-type mouse strains as well as gender and age, which influence the development and progression of these liver diseases.

  15. Genetic Analysis of PARK2 and PINK1 Genes in Brazilian Patients with Early-Onset Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Cristina Vasconcelos Moura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder in the world, affecting 1-2% of individuals over the age of 65. The etiology of Parkinson's disease is complex, with the involvement of gene-environment interactions. Although it is considered a disease of late manifestation, early-onset forms of parkinsonism contribute to 5–10% of all cases. In the present study, we screened mutations in coding regions of PARK2 and PINK1 genes in 136 unrelated Brazilian patients with early-onset Parkinson's disease through automatic sequencing. We identified six missense variants in PARK2 gene: one known pathogenic mutation, two variants of uncertain role, and three nonpathogenic changes. No pathogenic mutation was identified in PINK1 gene, only benign polymorphisms. All putative pathogenic variants found in this study were in heterozygous state. Our data show that PARK2 point mutations are more common in Brazilian early-onset Parkinson's disease patients (2.9% than PINK1 missense variants (0%, corroborating other studies worldwide.

  16. Atypical Manifestations of Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, E. A.; Lauener, R. W.; McIntosh, H. W.

    1964-01-01

    Patients with hyperthyroidism usually present with symptoms of hypermetabolism with or without goitre and/or eye signs. Occasionally, however, the chief complaints are not immediately suggestive of hyperthyroidism. Patients with hyperthyroidism are described who presented with such atypical manifestations as periodic muscular paralysis, myasthenia, myopathy, encephalopathy, psychosis, angina pectoris, atrial fibrillation, heart failure without underlying heart disease, skeletal demineralization, pretibial myxedema, unilateral eye signs, and pitting edema of the ankles. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:14178405

  17. Hodgkin's disease part 1: pathology, staging, and management of early stage disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauch, Peter; Yahalom, Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 25 years there have been dramatic improvements in our understanding of the epidemiology, biology, natural history, and treatment of Hodgkins disease. Hodgkin's disease is one of the few cancers where both chemotherapy and radiation therapy have provided dramatic improvements in cure of this once uniformly fatal disease. Part 1 of the refresher course on Hodgkin's disease will include a review of: 1) New Findings in epidemiology, immunohistochemistry and molecular biology of the Reed-Sternberg cell including association with Epstein-Barr virus; 2) Review of pathology including discussions of NS 1 vs NS2, and nodular LP subclassifications; 3) Recommendations for staging including the role of staging laparotomy in Hodgkin's disease; 4) Standard techniques for commonly used radiation therapy fields for Hodgkin's disease and 5) Treatment of early stage Hodgkin's disease including an overview on recent and current clinical trials

  18. Early chronic kidney disease: diagnosis, management and models of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Olivier J.; O'Donoghue, Donal J.; Ritchie, James; Kanavos, Panos G.; Narva, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a prevalent condition in many countries, and it is estimated that over $1 trillion is spent globally on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) care. There is a clear clinical and economic rationale for designing timely and appropriate health system responses to limit progression from CKD to ESRD. This article reviews the gaps in our knowledge about which early CKD interventions are appropriate, the optimal time to intervene, and what model of care to adopt. The available diagnostic tests exhibit key limitations. Clinical care may improve if early-stage (1–3) CKD with risk for progression towards ESRD is differentiated from early CKD that is unlikely to advance. It is possible that CKD should be re-conceptualized as a part of primary care. Additional research is needed to better understand the risk factors for CKD progression. Systems modelling can be used to evaluate the impact of different care models on CKD outcomes and costs. The US Indian Health Service experience has demonstrated that an integrated, system-wide approach, even in an underfunded system, can produce significant benefits. PMID:26055354

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging markers for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Marino; Rosella Ciurleo; Giuseppe Di Lorenzo; Marina Barresi; Simona De Salvo; Sabrina Giacoppo; Alessia Bramanti; Pietro Lanzafame; Placido Bramanti

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective and progressive degeneration, as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. In PD, approximately 60-70% of nigrostriatal neurons are degenerated and 80% of content of the striatal dopamine is reduced before the diagnosis can be established according to widely accepted clinical diagnostic criteria. This condition describes a stage of disease called "prodromal", where non-motor symptoms, such as olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behaviour disorder, depression, precede motor sign of PD. Detection of prodromal phase of PD is becoming an important goal for determining the prognosis and choosing a suitable treatment strategy. In this review, we present some non-invasive instrumental approaches that could be useful to identify patients in the prodromal phase of PD or in an early clinical phase, when the first motor symptoms begin to be apparent. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and advanced MRI techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging, diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI, are useful to differentiate early PD with initial motor symptoms from atypical parkinsonian disorders, thus, making easier early diagnosis. Functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging techniques can show abnormalities in the olfactory system in prodromal PD.

  20. Interventions aiming to reduce early retirement due to rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Almeida Laires

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aging of the population and early retirement translates into productivity losses to society. Persistence of working life is crucial to counteract this sustainability issue faced by western countries. Musculoskeletal and rheumatic diseases (RD may cause work disability and early exit from work, including early retirement. The objective of this article is to review the current knowledge about interventions aiming to reduce early retirement due to RD. Methods: We searched PubMed and The Cochrane Library for studies either in English or Portuguese between January 2000 and June 2016 that evaluated the impact of interventions targeting early retirement in RD patients still at work. We also searched for grey literature from Portuguese institutional repositories. Results: We identified several published studies testing pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic vocational rehabilitation interventions. None was specifically identified for Portugal. The general low quality of the literature and its inconsistency makes it unfeasible to draw definitive conclusions. However, some broad recommendations might be outlined. An effective intervention must: 1 act upon different levels (e.g. RD patient, workplace, involving several stakeholders (e.g. rheumatologists, occupational physicians, employers; 2 prioritize the right patients (e.g. more disabling RD; and 3 consider the patients’ role, for instance by including an element of patient education and support. Despite the lack of good quality evidence on this field, there seems to be a growing interest in the international scientific community with several ongoing studies promoting such interventions. This promising data will be very useful to set up effective policies. Conclusions: This article summarizes the current knowledge about the impact of interventions to avoid or mitigate early retirement in RD patients. It highlights the demand for further research and it also contributes to aware decision

  1. Physical Activity and Characteristics of the Carotid Artery Wall in High-Risk Patients-The SMART (Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, H Myrthe; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Visseren, Frank L J; Van den Berg-Vos, Renske M; Bots, Michiel L; de Borst, Gert Jan; Cramer, Maarten J; Kappelle, L Jaap; Geerlings, Mirjam I

    2017-07-23

    Physical activity reduces the risk of vascular disease. This benefit is not entirely explained through an effect on vascular risk factors. We examined the relationship of physical activity and characteristics of the carotid artery wall in patients with vascular disease or risk factors. Cross-sectional analyses were performed in 9578 patients from the SMART (Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease) study, a prospective cohort study among patients with vascular disease or risk factors. Physical activity was assessed using questionnaires. Carotid intima-media thickness and carotid artery stenosis of both common carotid arteries was measured. In a subset of 3165 participants carotid diastolic diameter and distension were assessed. Carotid stiffness was expressed as the distensibility coefficient and Young's elastic modulus. Regression analyses adjusted for vascular risk factors showed that physical activity was inversely associated with diastolic diameter (fifth versus first quintile B=-0.13 mm; 95% CI, -0.21 to -0.05) and decreased risk of carotid artery stenosis (relative risk, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.48-0.69). A light level of physical activity was associated with less carotid stiffness (second versus first quintile; Young's elastic modulus B=-0.11 kPa -1 ×10 -3 ; 95% CI, -0.16 to -0.06; distensibility coefficient B=0.93 kPa×10 3 ; 95% CI, 0.34-1.51), but there was no additional benefit with increasing levels of physical activity. In patients with vascular disease, physical activity was inversely associated with common carotid intima-media thickness, but not in patients with vascular risk factors. In patients with vascular disease or risk factors, increased physical activity was associated with smaller carotid diastolic diameter, decreased risk of carotid artery stenosis, and less carotid stiffness, but it only showed benefits on carotid intima-media thickness in patients with vascular disease. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  2. Anatomical correlates of cognitive functions in early Parkinson's disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Biundo

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits may occur early in Parkinson's disease (PD but the extent of cortical involvement associated with cognitive dysfunction needs additional investigations. The aim of our study is to identify the anatomical pattern of cortical thickness alterations in patients with early stage PD and its relationship with cognitive disability.We recruited 29 PD patients and 21 healthy controls. All PD patients performed an extensive neuropsychological examination and 14 were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI. Surface-based cortical thickness analysis was applied to investigate the topographical distribution of cortical and subcortical alterations in early PD compared with controls and to assess the relationship between cognition and regional cortical changes in PD-MCI.Overall PD patients showed focal cortical (occipital-parietal areas, orbito-frontal and olfactory areas and subcortical thinning when compared with controls. PD-MCI showed a wide spectrum of cognitive deficits and related significant regional thickening in the right parietal-frontal as well as in the left temporal-occipital areas.Our results confirm the presence of changes in grey matter thickness at relatively early PD stage and support previous studies showing thinning and atrophy in the neocortex and subcortical regions. Relative cortical thickening in PD-MCI may instead express compensatory neuroplasticity. Brain reserve mechanisms might first modulate cognitive decline during the initial stages of PD.

  3. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease manifesting as bilateral tonsillar hypertrophy on MRI images: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mee Hyun; Woo, Ji Young; Lee, Yul; Yoon, Dae Young; Hong, Hye Sook; Hong, Min Eui [Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease (IgG4-SD) is currently recognized as a distinct systemic disease involving various organs. We reported the imaging findings of a case of pathologically confirmed IgG4-SD involving bilateral palatine tonsils. CT and MRI showed diffuse enlargement of both palatine tonsils with homogeneous contrast enhancement. Focal contour bulging was noted in the right palatine tonsil. Lesions appeared as isointense on T1-weighted and slightly hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI images, as compared with muscle. The T2-weighted MRI image showed a striated pattern in both tonsils. Despite its rare occurrence, IgG4-SD should be included in the differential diagnoses of patients with symptomatic bilateral tonsillar hypertrophy that is non-responsive to medication.

  4. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease manifesting as bilateral tonsillar hypertrophy on MRI images: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mee Hyun; Woo, Ji Young; Lee, Yul; Yoon, Dae Young; Hong, Hye Sook; Hong, Min Eui

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease (IgG4-SD) is currently recognized as a distinct systemic disease involving various organs. We reported the imaging findings of a case of pathologically confirmed IgG4-SD involving bilateral palatine tonsils. CT and MRI showed diffuse enlargement of both palatine tonsils with homogeneous contrast enhancement. Focal contour bulging was noted in the right palatine tonsil. Lesions appeared as isointense on T1-weighted and slightly hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI images, as compared with muscle. The T2-weighted MRI image showed a striated pattern in both tonsils. Despite its rare occurrence, IgG4-SD should be included in the differential diagnoses of patients with symptomatic bilateral tonsillar hypertrophy that is non-responsive to medication

  5. Graves' Disease as a Manifestation of Immune Reconstitution in HIV-Infected Individuals after Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Rasul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in certain HIV-1-infected individuals has been described as an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS. This phenomenon should be suspected in individuals who present with clinical deterioration and a presentation suggestive of hyperthyroidism despite good virological and immunological response to HAART. Signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism may be discrete or overt and typically develop 8–33 months after initiating therapy. One to two percent of HIV-infected patients can present with overt thyroid disease. Relatively few cases of Graves' IRIS have been reported in the literature to date. We describe four cases of Graves' IRIS in HIV-infected patients who were started on HAART therapy.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: inclusion body myopathy with early-onset Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions IBMPFD Inclusion body myopathy with early-onset Paget disease and ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Inclusion body myopathy with early-onset Paget disease and ...

  7. Long-Term Outcomes in Puerto Ricans with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Receiving Early Treatment with Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs using the American College of Rheumatology Definition of Early RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Rosario, Noemí; Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M; Díaz-Correa, Leyda M; Pérez-Ríos, Naydi; Rodríguez, Noelia; Ríos, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Early treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) results in better long-term outcomes. However, the optimal therapeutic window has not been clearly established. To determine the clinical outcome of Puerto Ricans with RA receiving early treatment with conventional and/or biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) based on the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) definition of early RA. A cross-sectional study was performed in a cohort of Puerto Ricans with RA. Demographic features, clinical manifestations, disease activity, functional status, and pharmacotherapy were determined. Early treatment was defined as the initiation of DMARDs (conventional and/or biologic) in less than 6 months from the onset of symptoms attributable to RA. Patients who received early (disease duration was 14.9 years and 337 (87.0%) patients were women. One hundred and twenty one (31.3%) patients received early treatment. In the multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex, early treatment was associated with better functional status, lower probability of joint deformities, intra-articular injections and joint replacement surgeries, and lower scores in the physician's assessments of global health, functional impairment and physical damage of patients. Using the ACR definition of early RA, this group of patients treated with DMARDs within 6 months of disease had better long-term outcomes with less physical damage and functional impairment.

  8. The management of patients with early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascol, O; Payoux, P; Ferreira, J; Brefel-Courbon, C

    2002-10-01

    A major problem in the management of early Parkinson's disease is to choose the first medication to prescribe. This decision should rely on the level of available clinical evidence, largely based, at least for efficacy, on the results of randomised clinical trials. Safety and costs are also crucial to consider. Other factors like for example pathophysiological concepts, individual experience, marketing pressure, socio-economical environment, patients needs and expectations have, however, also their own influence. Levodopa is efficacious and cheap, but induces long-term motor complications. The early use of dopamine agonists is more and more frequently promoted, because large prospective L-dopa-controlled trials demonstrated that this strategy reduces the risk of such long-term complications. Integrating individual clinical expertise to the best available external clinical evidence (evidence-based medicine) is the best strategy in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Early detection of Alzheimer disease: methods, markers, and misgivings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R C; Clarke, V C; Thompson, N J; Woodard, J L; Letz, R

    1997-01-01

    There is at present no reliable predictive test for most forms of Alzheimer disease (AD). Although some information about future risk for disease is available in theory through ApoE genotyping, it is of limited accuracy and utility. Once neuroprotective treatments are available for AD, reliable early detection will become a key component of the treatment strategy. We recently conducted a pilot survey eliciting attitudes and beliefs toward an unspecified and hypothetical predictive test for AD. The survey was completed by a convenience sample of 176 individuals, aged 22-77, which was 75% female, 30% African-American, and of which 33% had a family member with AD. The survey revealed that 69% of this sample would elect to obtain predictive testing for AD if the test were 100% accurate. Individuals were more likely to desire predictive testing if they had an a priori belief that they would develop AD (p = 0.0001), had a lower educational level (p = 0.003), were worried that they would develop AD (p = 0.02), had a self-defined history of depression (p = 0.04), and had a family member with AD (p = 0.04). However, the desire for predictive testing was not significantly associated with age, gender, ethnicity, or income. The desire to obtain predictive testing for AD decreased as the assumed accuracy of the hypothetical test decreased. A better short-term strategy for early detection of AD may be computer-based neuropsychological screening of at-risk (older aged) individuals to identify very early cognitive impairment. Individuals identified in this manner could be referred for diagnostic evaluation and early cases of AD could be identified and treated. A new self-administered, touch-screen, computer-based, neuropsychological screening instrument called Neurobehavioral Evaluation System-3 is described, which may facilitate this type of screening.

  10. Broad phenotypic spectrum in familial adenomatous polyposis; from early onset and severe phenotypes to late onset of attenuated polyposis with the first manifestation at age 72

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Ericsson, Mats

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is typically characterized by multiple colonic polyps and frequent extracolonic features. Whereas the number of colonic polyps has been linked to the APC gene mutation, possible genotype-phenotype correlations largely remain to be defined...... cancer at age 72 as the first manifestation of attenuated FAP. Conclusion With an increasing number of FAP families diagnosed, a broad and variable tumor spectrum and a high frequency of extracolonic manifestations are gradually recognized. We report novel APC mutations and present two FAP cases...

  11. Facial manifestations of Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission: Two atypical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benjamin Y; Kojima, Lisa; Huang, Mary S; Friedmann, Alison M; Ferry, Judith A; Weinstein, Howard J

    2016-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) rarely occurs in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), who have not received hematopoietic transplantation. We describe EBV-LPD manifesting as facial lesions in two children with ALL in remission. One patient was a 16-year-old male with T-cell ALL with an EBV-positive angiocentric polymorphous lip lesion presenting as right-sided facial swelling. The other patient was a 12-year-old male with B-cell ALL with an EBV-positive polymorphous lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate presenting as bilateral dacryoadenitis. Neither patient had known primary immunodeficiencies. Both cases improved with immunosuppressant de-escalation. These cases suggest that immunosuppression induced by maintenance chemotherapy is sufficient to promote EBV-LPD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Oral Manifestations of Tropical Infectious Diseases of Central and South America. Part II. Bacterial and Mycotic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-24

    resemble pulmonary tuberculosis , in which 8% of the patients develop ora l or pha ryngea l lesions. In patients with disseminated paracocc idioido...ions , par t icularl y Mexico , Panama , and northern South America .1 The disease occurs most fre- quentl y before the age of ten years and is rare...30-50 years of age.7’’8 Infect i on most comon l y occurs through inhalation of spores resulting in a pulmonary infection which may or may not become

  13. Early detection of Freiberg's disease by radionuclide bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jingjing

    1993-01-01

    56 hallux valgus deformities of 28 patients were studied with radionuclide bone imaging (RNBI). Among them, 24 feet(42.85%) revealed increased uptake of radioactivity in second or third metatarsal. The ratio of radioactivity in lesion and contralateral normal site (D/N) was increased, the difference between the patient and normal groups was significant (P<0.01). The histologic study showed that there have been degenerative changes and bone cell necrosis in increased uptake area. It was concluded that RNBI was more sensitive than X ray and can be used for the early diagnosis of Freiberg's Disease

  14. Interdependence of physical inactivity, loss of muscle mass and low dietary intake: Extrapulmonary manifestations in older chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kazuya; Sato, Susumu; Muro, Shigeo; Yamada, Minoru; Hasegawa, Koichi; Kiyokawa, Hirofumi; Mishima, Michiaki; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2018-01-01

    Extrapulmonary manifestations, such as reductions in skeletal muscle and physical inactivity, are important clinical features of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and might depend on the severity of COPD. As it is still unclear whether the relationship between muscle loss and physical inactivity is dominated by a disease-specific relationship or caused by patient factors, including physiological aging, we aimed to investigate the pulmonary or extrapulmonary factors associated with physical inactivity among older COPD patients. A total of 38 older male COPD patients (aged ≥65 years) were enrolled, and were evaluated cross-sectionally. Skeletal muscle mass was measured using bioelectrical impedance, and physical activity and energy intake were recorded for 2 weeks using a pedometer and diary. Daily step counts were successfully evaluated in 28 participants (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s [%predicted; %FEV 1 ]; 49.5%), and ranged widely. The mean step counts was 5166 steps/day, and found to have a significant relationship with dyspnea (r = -0.46), diffusing capacity (r = 0.47), %FEV1 (r = 0.44), skeletal muscle index (r = 0.59) and total dietary intake (r = 0.47), but not with age (P = 0.14). A stepwise multivariate analysis showed that the skeletal muscle index (β = 0.50) and total dietary intake (β = 0.35) were significant determinants of the daily step count (R 2 = 0.46, p physical activity, skeletal muscle mass and dietary intake are more closely correlated with physical activity in COPD patients. Because physical inactivity might be the strongest predictor of prognosis, the present results suggest that a comprehensive treatment strategy must be considered for older COPD patients to improve their extrapulmonary manifestations and pulmonary dysfunction. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 88-94. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. High-resolution respirometry of fine-needle muscle biopsies in pre-manifest Huntington's disease expansion mutation carriers shows normal mitochondrial respiratory function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Buck

    Full Text Available Alterations in mitochondrial respiration are an important hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD, one of the most common monogenetic causes of neurodegeneration. The ubiquitous expression of the disease causing mutant huntingtin gene raises the prospect that mitochondrial respiratory deficits can be detected in skeletal muscle. While this tissue is readily accessible in humans, transgenic animal models offer the opportunity to cross-validate findings and allow for comparisons across organs, including the brain. The integrated respiratory chain function of the human vastus lateralis muscle was measured by high-resolution respirometry (HRR in freshly taken fine-needle biopsies from seven pre-manifest HD expansion mutation carriers and nine controls. The respiratory parameters were unaffected. For comparison skeletal muscle isolated from HD knock-in mice (HdhQ111 as well as a broader spectrum of tissues including cortex, liver and heart muscle were examined by HRR. Significant changes of mitochondrial respiration in the HdhQ knock-in mouse model were restricted to the liver and the cortex. Mitochondrial mass as quantified by mitochondrial DNA copy number and citrate synthase activity was stable in murine HD-model tissue compared to control. mRNA levels of key enzymes were determined to characterize mitochondrial metabolic pathways in HdhQ mice. We demonstrated the feasibility to perform high-resolution respirometry measurements from small human HD muscle biopsies. Furthermore, we conclude that alterations in respiratory parameters of pre-manifest human muscle biopsies are rather limited and mirrored by a similar absence of marked alterations in HdhQ skeletal muscle. In contrast, the HdhQ111 murine cortex and liver did show respiratory alterations highlighting the tissue specific nature of mutant huntingtin effects on respiration.

  16. Early Detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Seiichi; Hanagama, Masakazu; Yanai, Masaru

    2017-12-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an early detection program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a primary care setting in Japan. Methods Participants of ≥40 years of age who regularly visited a general practitioner's clinic due to chronic disease were asked to complete a COPD screening questionnaire (COPD Population Screener; COPD-PS) and undergo simplified spirometry using a handheld spirometric device. Patients who showed possible COPD were referred to a respiratory specialist and underwent a detailed examination that included spirometry and chest radiography. Results A total of 111 patients with possible COPD were referred for close examination. Among these patients, 27 patients were newly diagnosed with COPD. The patients with COPD were older, had lower BMI values, and had a longer smoking history in comparison to non-COPD patients. COPD patients also had more comorbid conditions. A diagnosis of COPD was significantly associated with a high COPD-PS score (pearly detection of undiagnosed COPD in primary care.

  17. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows investigations

  18. Manifestações esqueléticas da doença de gaucher Skeletal manifestations in Gaucher's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius França de Mendonça

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Gaucher é manifestação genética causada pela deficiência da enzima glicocerebrosidase, resultando no acúmulo secundário de glicocerebrosídeos nos órgãos do sistema reticuloendotelial. Apresenta-se sob três formas clínicas distintas, podendo ser rapidamente fatal ou crônica com poucos sintomas. O presente trabalho tem o objetivo de analisar os achados da radiografia simples do esqueleto em 32 pacientes comprovadamente portadores da doença, de ambos os sexos e em diferentes faixas etárias. Foram observadas as seguintes alterações: osteopenia difusa em todos os casos, deformidade em "frasco de Erlenmeyer" em 93,7%, alterações articulares em 40,6%, necrose da cabeça do fêmur e lesões líticas em 28,1%, respectivamente, fratura patológica em 9,3% e necrose da cabeça do úmero em 6,2% dos casos. Estes resultados encontram-se de acordo com as descrições da literatura, demonstrando a importância da radiologia convencional como método complementar no diagnóstico desta enfermidade.Gaucher's disease has a genetic background and is characterized by the deficiency of enzyme glucocerebrosidase, resulting in secondary accumulation of glucocerebrosides in the reticuloendothelial organs. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the x-ray findings in the skeleton of a group of 32 male and female patients of different ages, with biochemical diagnosis of Gaucher's disease. The following bone lesions were observed: diffuse osteopenia (100% of the patients, "Erlenmeyer flask" deformities (93.7% of the patients, abnormalities of the joints (40.6% of the patients, necrosis of the femoral head (28.1% of the patients, lytic lesions (28.1% of the patients, pathological fractures (9.3% of the patients and necrosis of the humeral head (6.2% of the patients. These results are concordant with the literature, and demonstrate the importance of conventional x-ray as a complementary method in the diagnosis of Gaucher's disease.

  19. Vitamin D status in rheumatoid arthritis patients: relation to clinical manifestations, disease activity, quality of life and fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheita, Tamer A; Sayed, Safaa; Gheita, Heba A; Kenawy, Sanaa A

    2016-03-01

    To assess vitamin D levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to find their relation to clinical parameters, fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), quality of life (QoL) and disease activity. The study included 63 RA patients and 62 controls. Clinical examination and laboratory investigations were performed. For patients, the Disease Activity Score (DAS-28), QoL index, Health Assessment Questionnaire II (HAQ II) and Modified Larsen score were calculated. 25-OH-vitamin D was measured in patients and controls. The patients' mean age was 41.59 ± 9.69 years and disease duration 5.89 ± 3.67 years. The level of vitamin D in RA patients was significantly lower (23.11 ± 12.71 ng/mL) than that in the controls (32.59 ± 13.06 ng/mL) (P = 0.005) being deficient in 50.8%, insufficient in 23.8% and normal in 25.4%. The RA patients with FMS (n = 33) had significantly lower levels of vitamin D (19.08 ± 10.59 ng/mL) than those without (27.55 ± 13.51 ng/mL) (P = 0.008). The difference was significant on comparing those receiving hydroxychloroquine (17.39 ± 7.84 ng/mL) to those not (31.85 ± 13.85 ng/mL) (P < 0.001). Vitamin D significantly correlated with QoL index (r = 0.58, P < 0.001) and negatively with HAQ II (r = -0.36, P = 0.004) and BMI (r = -0.39, P = 0.001). Special attention is required regarding vitamin D levels in RA patients with FMS and decreased QoL. Vitamin D should be corrected and supplementation considered among the RA management armamentarium. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Broad phenotypic spectrum in familial adenomatous polyposis; from early onset and severe phenotypes to late onset of attenuated polyposis with the first manifestation at age 72

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    Johannsson Oskar

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is typically characterized by multiple colonic polyps and frequent extracolonic features. Whereas the number of colonic polyps has been linked to the APC gene mutation, possible genotype-phenotype correlations largely remain to be defined for the extracolonic manifestations. Methods Full genomic sequencing combined with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was used to identify APC gene mutations, which were correlated to the clinical presentations. Results 10 novel APC gene mutations were identified in 11 families. A broad spectrum of extracolonic manifestations was identified in most of these individuals. Two sisters with an insertion in codon 528 (c.1582_1583insGC both showed severe phenotypes with classical polyposis, upper gastrointestinal polyps and thyroid cancer. A woman with a 3'APC mutation (c.5030_5031insAA developed colon cancer at age 72 as the first manifestation of attenuated FAP. Conclusion With an increasing number of FAP families diagnosed, a broad and variable tumor spectrum and a high frequency of extracolonic manifestations are gradually recognized. We report novel APC mutations and present two FAP cases that suggest familial aggregation of thyroid cancer and demonstrate the need to consider attenuated FAP also among elderly patients with colon cancer.

  1. Transient ischemic attack and minor stroke are the most common manifestations of acute cerebrovascular disease: a prospective, population-based study--the Aarhus TIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Weitzel-Mudersbach, Paul; Andersen, Grethe; Hundborg, Heidi H; Johnsen, Søren P

    2013-01-01

    Severity of acute vascular illness may have changed in the last decades due to improvements in primary and secondary prevention. Population-based data on the severity of acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease are sparse. We aimed to examine incidence, characteristics and severity of acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease in a well-defined population. All patients admitted with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or acute ischemic stroke from March 1, 2007, to February 29, 2008, with residence in the Aarhus area, were included. Incidence rates and characteristics of TIA and ischemic stroke were compared. TIA accounted for 30%, TIA and minor stroke combined for 65% of all acute ischemic cerebrovascular events. Age-adjusted incidence rates of TIA and ischemic stroke were 72.2/100,000 and 129.5/100,000 person-years, respectively. TIA patients were younger than stroke patients (66.3 vs. 72.7 years; p TIA and stroke patients share many characteristics; however, TIA patients are younger and have fewer manifestations of atherosclerotic diseases, indicating a high potential for secondary prevention. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis as initial manifestation of Graves' disease in a 16-year-old Korean adolescent

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    Se Yong Jung

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP is a rare complication of hyperthyroidism, with recurrent muscle paralysis and hypokalemia that are caused by an intracellular shift of potassium. TPP is relatively common in Asian males, but is extremely rare in children and adolescents, even for those of Asian descent. We describe a 16-year-old Korean adolescent presenting with a two-week history of episodic leg weakness in the morning. He showed sinus tachycardia, lower leg weakness, and hypokalemia. Thyroid function test showed hyperthyroidism, and thyroid ultrasonography revealed a diffuse enlarged thyroid with increased vascularity, consistent with Graves' disease. He was treated with β-adrenergic blocker and antithyroid drugs. He has been symptom free for one year, as his hyperthyroidism has been controlled well with antithyroid drugs. TPP should be considered in children and adolescents with acute paralysis of the lower extremities and hypokalemia.

  3. Manifestations and management of veno-occlusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome in the era of contemporary therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Priti; Wallis, Whitney; Kebriaei, Partow

    2017-02-01

    The concept of veno-occlusive disease (VOD), along with our understanding of it, has historically been and remains an evolving phenomenon. This review presents a broad view of VOD, also known as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), including (1) traditional hematopoietic stem cell transplant-associated VOD/SOS, (2) late-onset VOD/SOS, (3) pulmonary VOD, and (4) VOD/SOS associated with chemotherapy only. Several VOD/SOS management modalities exist that include modes for both prophylaxis and treatment. An extensive review of the literature on monoclonal antibodies, both approved and pending approval by the US Food and Drug Administration, reveals that only a few have been associated with an increased risk for VOD/SOS. In fact, bevacizumab appears to have a protective effect against the development of VOD/SOS. As the landscape of cancer treatment changes, careful attention needs to be focused on how new therapies affect the incidence of VOD/SOS.

  4. Early etiology of Alzheimer's disease: tipping the balance toward autophagy or endosomal dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, Aleksandar; Annaert, Wim

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. This brain neuropathology is characterized by a progressive synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss, which lead to decline in memory and other cognitive functions. Histopathologically, AD manifests via synaptic abnormalities, neuronal degeneration as well as the deposition of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. While the exact pathogenic contribution of these two AD hallmarks and their abundant constituents [aggregation-prone amyloid β (Aβ) peptide species and hyperphosphorylated tau protein, respectively] remain debated, a growing body of evidence suggests that their development may be paralleled or even preceded by the alterations/dysfunctions in the endolysosomal and the autophagic system. In AD-affected neurons, abnormalities in these cellular pathways are readily observed already at early stages of disease development, and even though many studies agree that defective lysosomal degradation may relate to or even underlie some of these deficits, specific upstream molecular defects are still deliberated. In this review we summarize various pathogenic events that may lead to these cellular abnormalities, in light of our current understanding of molecular mechanisms that govern AD progression. In addition, we also highlight the increasing evidence supporting mutual functional dependence of the endolysosomal trafficking and autophagy, in particular focusing on those molecules and processes which may be of significance to AD.

  5. [Early detection of occupational skin diseases in sewer workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, V; Lauffer, F; Fincan, Y; Biedermann, T; Zink, A

    2018-04-25

    Skin diseases affect 30-70% of the world population, and globally, skin cancer rates are continuously increasing. In this respect, prevention programs and early detection of skin diseases are of particular importance. To screen sewer workers for skin diseases with regard to their work-related risk. Employees of the municipal utilities in Munich (Münchner Stadtentwässerung) underwent a whole-body examination of the skin, conducted by two dermatologists. In addition, all employees completed a paper-based questionnaire on risk behavior and preventive measures. We examined 81 employees (79 men, 2 women, mean age 45.7 ± 9.5 years). Skin lesions in need of treatment were found in 30.9% (n = 25): the most frequent diagnosis was mycosis pedis (16.1%). In addition, one employee was diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma and two with actinic keratoses. According to the questionnaire, 43.5% of the employees had undergone a physician-led skin cancer screening in the past, whereas sun-protection practices were rarely applied. According to our findings, employee skin cancer screening seems to be beneficial for the detection of work-related skin diseases and is associated with a high participation rate. Furthermore, the study suggests that sewer workers have a high rate of mycosis pedis, possibly a work-related effect.

  6. Early growth and chronic disease: a public health overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Catherine

    2005-07-01

    Infant and childhood growth result from and reflect a range of influences in pre- and postnatal life. These include nutrition, burden of infection and the psycho-social environment. Nutrition in young children is dependent on individual level factors such as fetal experience, infant feeding and weaning practices, and on societal factors such as education of women and economic conditions. The relationship of early postnatal growth to adult disease may be indicative or causal, and may reveal both biological and sociological processes. Although non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and obesity are risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, the relationships of these three conditions to infant growth differ. Poor infant growth has been associated with higher levels of NIDDM and ischaemic heart disease, but lower levels of adult obesity. Most research has been of populations living in developed countries at different stages of nutritional transition. However, differences in context are not simply limited to the stage of the nutritional transition. They also need to consider the nature of that transition and its social correlates, which may result in the clustering of aetiological influences such as increased body mass and poverty. The size of effect of the relationship of infant growth to adult disease is important not only to determine its relative aetiological importance but also for its potential for public health policy. Such policy also needs to consider the relationships of infant growth to a range of outcomes, both health and human capital, which are not the subject of this workshop.

  7. Radiological manifestations of melioidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, K.S.; Chong, V.H.

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis is a serious infection that is associated with high mortality. It is due to a Gram-negative bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei which is an environmental saprophyte found in wet soils. Melioidosis is endemic to northern Australia and the Southeast Asia. However, there is now increasing number of reports of imported cases to regions where this infection has not been previously encountered. Almost any organ can be affected. Like many other conditions, radiological imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic workup of melioidosis. Awareness of the various radiological manifestations can help direct appropriate investigations to achieve early diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate treatment. Generally, there are no known characteristic features on imaging that can specifically differentiate melioidosis from other infections. However, the 'honeycomb' appearance has been described to be characteristic for large melioidosis liver abscesses. Simultaneous involvement of various organs is also characteristics. To date, there are few data available on the radiological manifestations of melioidosis. The present pictorial essay describes melioidosis affecting the various organs.

  8. Multidisciplinary strategies in the management of early chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Hernández-Herrera, Aurora; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide epidemic especially in developing countries, with clear deficiencies in identification and treatment. Better care of CKD requires more than only economic resources, utilization of health research in policy-making and health systems changes that produce better outcomes. A multidisciplinary approach may facilitate and improve management of patients from early CKD in the primary health-care setting. This approach is a strategy for improving comprehensive care, initiating and maintaining healthy behaviors, promoting teamwork, eliminating barriers to achieve goals and improving the processes of care. A multidisciplinary intervention may include educational processes guided by health professional, use of self-help groups and the development of a CKD management plan. The complex and fragmented care management of patients with CKD, associated with poor outcome, enhances the importance of implementing a multidisciplinary approach in the management of this disease from the early stages. Multidisciplinary strategies should focus on the needs of patients (to increase their empowerment) and should be adapted to the resources and health systems prevailing in each country; its systematic implementation can help to improve patient care and slow the progression of CKD. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Branched chain amino acid profile in early chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional status in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients is a predictor of prognosis during the first period of dialysis. Serum albumin is the most commonly used nutritional marker. Another index is plasma amino acid profile. Of these, the plasma levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAA, especially valine and leucine, correlate well with nutritional status. Plasma BCAAs were evaluated along with albumin and C-reactive protein in 15 patients of early stages of CKD and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. A significant decrease in plasma valine, leucine and albumin levels was observed in CKD patients when compared with the controls (P <0.05. No significant difference in C-reactive protein (CRP levels was observed between the two groups. Malnutrition seen in our CKD patients in the form of hypoalbuminemia and decreased concentrations of BCAA points to the need to evaluate the nutritional status in the early stages itself. Simple measures in the form of amino acid supplementation should be instituted early to decrease the morbidity and mortality before start of dialysis in these patients.

  10. Olfactory Dysfunction as an Early Biomarker in Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michelle E.Fullard; James F.Morley; John E.Duda

    2017-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and often predates the diagnosis by years,reflecting early deposition of Lewy pathology,the histologic hallmark of PD,in the olfactory bulb.Clinical tests are available that allow for the rapid characterization of olfactory dysfunction,including tests of odor identification,discrimination,detection,and recognition thresholds,memory,and tests assessing the build-up of odor intensity across increasing suprathreshold stimulus concentrations.The high prevalence of olfactory impairment,along with the ease and low cost of assessment,has fostered great interest in olfaction as a potential biomarker for PD.Hyposmia may help differentiate PD from other causes of parkinsonism,and may also aid in the identification of "pre-motor" PD due to the early pathologic involvement of olfactory pathways.Olfactory function is also correlated with other non-motor features of PD and may serve as a predictor of cognitive decline.In this article,we summarize the existing literature on olfaction in PD,focusing on the potential for olfaction as a biomarker for early or differential diagnosis and prognosis.

  11. Changes in spontaneous brain activity in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Zhang, Min-Ming; Zheng, Xu-Ning; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-09

    Resting state brain activity can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of the present study was (a) to investigate abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in early PD patients using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) with a regional homogeneity (ReHo) method and (b) to demonstrate the potential of using changes in abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity for monitoring the progression of PD during its early stages. Seventeen early PD patients were assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hoehn and Yahr disability scale and the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) were compared with seventeen gender- and age-matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent MRI scans using a 1.5T General Electric Signa Excite II scanner. The MRI scan protocol included whole-brain volumetric imaging using a 3D inversion recovery prepared (IR-Prep) fast spoiled gradient-echo pulse sequence and 2D multi-slice (22 axial slices covering the whole brain) resting-state fMRI using an echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence. Images were analyzed in SPM5 together with a ReHo algorithm using the in-house software program REST. A corrected threshold of pbrain regions, including the left cerebellum, left parietal lobe, right middle temporal lobe, right sub-thalamic nucleus areas, right superior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus (MFG), right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), right precuneus lobe, left MFG and left IPL. Additionally, significantly reduced ReHo was also observed in the early PD patients in the following brain regions: the left putamen, left inferior frontal gyrus, right hippocampus, right anterior cingulum, and bilateral lingual gyrus. Moreover, in PD patients, ReHo in the left putamen was negatively correlated with the UPDRS scores (r=-0.69). These results indicate that the abnormal resting state spontaneous brain activity associated with patients with early PD can be revealed by Reho analysis. Copyright

  12. Changes in insomnia subtypes in early Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholfsen, Lena K; Larsen, Jan P; Schulz, Jörn; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Gjerstad, Michaela D

    2017-01-24

    To examine the development of factors associated with insomnia in a cohort of originally drug-naive patients with incident Parkinson disease (PD) during the first 5 years after diagnosis. One hundred eighty-two drug-naive patients with PD derived from a population-based incident cohort and 202 control participants were assessed for insomnia before treatment initiation and were repeatedly examined after 1, 3, and 5 years. Insomnia was diagnosed according to the Stavanger Sleepiness Questionnaire. The Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale was used to differentiate sleep initiation problems from problems of sleep maintenance. Generalized estimating equation models were applied for statistical measures. The prevalence of insomnia in general was not higher in patients with PD compared to controls at the 5-year follow-up. There were changes in the prevalence of the different insomnia subtypes over the 5-year follow-up. The prevalence of solitary problems in sleep maintenance increased from 31% (n = 18) in the drug-naive patients at baseline to 49% (n = 29) after 1 year and were associated with the use of dopamine agonists and higher Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores. The prevalence of solitary sleep initiation problems decreased continuously from 21% (n = 12) at baseline to 7.4% (n = 4) after 5 years; these were associated with less daytime sleepiness. The prevalence rates of the different insomnia subtypes changed notably in patients with early PD. The frequency of sleep maintenance problems increased, and these problems were associated with dopamine agonist use and depressive symptoms, while the total number of patients with insomnia remained stable. Our findings reflect the need for early individual assessments of insomnia subtypes and raise the possibility of intervention to reduce these symptoms in patients with early PD. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Manifestações sistêmicas na doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica Systemic manifestations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Zuniga Dourado

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica é progressiva e está relacionada a uma resposta inflamatória anormal dos pulmões à inalação de partículas e/ou gases tóxicos, sobretudo a fumaça de cigarro. Embora acometa primariamente os pulmões, diversas manifestações extrapulmonares relacionadas a esta enfermidade têm sido descritas. O aumento do número de células inflamatórias, que resulta em produção anormal de citocinas pró-inflamatórias, e o desequilíbrio entre a formação de radicais livres e a capacidade antioxidante, resultando em sobrecarga oxidativa, provavelmente são mecanismos envolvidos na inflamação local e sistêmica. Além disso, a diminuição do condicionamento físico secundária às limitações ventilatórias pode estar envolvida no desenvolvimento de alterações musculares. A doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica apresenta diversas manifestações sistêmicas que incluem a depleção nutricional, a disfunção dos músculos esqueléticos, que contribui para a intolerância ao exercício, e as manifestações relacionadas a co-morbidades comumente observadas nestes pacientes. Essas manifestações têm sido relacionadas à sobrevida e ao estado geral de saúde dos pacientes. Nesse sentido, esta revisão tem como objetivo discutir os achados da literatura relacionados às manifestações sistêmicas da doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica, ressaltando o papel da inflação sistêmica, e algumas perspectivas de tratamento.Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is progressive and is characterized by abnormal inflammation of the lungs in response to inhalation of noxious particles or toxic gases, especially cigarette smoke. Although this infirmity primarily affects the lungs, diverse extrapulmonary manifestations have been described. The likely mechanisms involved in the local and systemic inflammation seen in this disease include an increase in the number of inflammatory cells (resulting in abnormal production

  14. The impact of non-motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease on partners: understanding and application of chronic sorrow theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Christine J

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) can cause many emotions, including grief and a sense of isolation for both the person with PD (referred to as Parkinsonian) and their partner. Such ongoing grief and emotional turmoil can be termed chronic sorrow. The aim of this research is to present accounts of partners' perspectives, analysed in the context of chronic sorrow theory, to offer health professionals an insight into the impact of non-motor PD symptoms on partners. A group of partners of Parkinsonians provided the data through individual stories. These stories were subjected to thematic analysis, using a seven-step process leading to the establishment of themes. Caregiver burden and chronic sorrow is not related to providing physical care, but the emotional care of attempting to minimise the effect of PD, coping with disturbance to sleep, and helping the Parkinsonian to maintain as much independence as possible. Contributors to this article found chronic sorrow theory provided a framework for understanding their emotions. Sharing their experiences with others provided an opportunity to be heard, and enabled them to make sense of individual situations. Chronic sorrow theory provides a useful framework for both partners of Parkinsonians in understanding their emotional responses, and for health professionals in considering the challenges partners face in coping with living with a person with PD.

  15. Diagnosing antiphospholipid syndrome: 'extra-criteria' manifestations and technical advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, Savino; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Roccatello, Dario; Khamashta, Munther

    2017-09-01

    First described in the early 1980s, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a unique form of acquired autoimmune thrombophilia in which patients present with clinical features of recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity and persistently test positive for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). At least one clinical (vascular thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity) and one lab-based (positive test result for lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and/or anti-β2-glycoprotein 1 antibodies) criterion have to be met for a patient to be classified as having APS. However, the clinical spectrum of APS encompasses additional manifestations that can affect many organs and cannot be explained exclusively by patients being in a prothrombotic state; clinical manifestations not listed in the classification criteria (known as extra-criteria manifestations) include neurologic manifestations (chorea, myelitis and migraine), haematologic manifestations (thrombocytopenia and haemolytic anaemia), livedo reticularis, nephropathy and valvular heart disease. Increasingly, research interest has focused on the development of novel assays that might be more specific for APS than the current aPL tests. This Review focuses on the current classification criteria for APS, presenting the role of extra-criteria manifestations and lab-based tests. Diagnostic approaches to difficult cases, including so-called seronegative APS, are also discussed.

  16. Speaking in Alzheimer’s disease, is that an early sign? Importance of changes in language abilities in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta eSzatloczki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Alzheimer’s disease (AD influences the temporal characteristics of spontaneous speech. These phonetical changes are present even in mild AD. Based on this, the question arises whether an examination based on language analysis could help the early diagnosis of AD and if so, which language and speech characteristics can identify AD in its early stage. The purpose of this article is to summarize the relation between prodromal and manifest AD and language functions and language domains. Based on our research we are inclined to claim that AD can be more sensitively detected with the help of a linguistic analysis than with other cognitive examinations. The temporal characteristics of spontaneous speech such as speech tempo, number of pauses in speech and their length are sensitive detectors of the early stage of the disease, which enables an early simple linguistic screening for AD. However, knowledge about the unique features of the language problems associated with different dementia variants still has to be improved and refined.

  17. Early energy deficit in Huntington disease: identification of a plasma biomarker traceable during disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Mochel

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, with no effective treatment. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying HD has not been elucidated, but weight loss, associated with chorea and cognitive decline, is a characteristic feature of the disease that is accessible to investigation. We, therefore, performed a multiparametric study exploring body weight and the mechanisms of its loss in 32 presymptomatic carriers and HD patients in the early stages of the disease, compared to 21 controls. We combined this study with a multivariate statistical analysis of plasma components quantified by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1H NMR spectroscopy. We report evidence of an early hypermetabolic state in HD. Weight loss was observed in the HD group even in presymptomatic carriers, although their caloric intake was higher than that of controls. Inflammatory processes and primary hormonal dysfunction were excluded. (1H NMR spectroscopy on plasma did, however, distinguish HD patients at different stages of the disease and presymptomatic carriers from controls. This distinction was attributable to low levels of the branched chain amino acids (BCAA, valine, leucine and isoleucine. BCAA levels were correlated with weight loss and, importantly, with disease progression and abnormal triplet repeat expansion size in the HD1 gene. Levels of IGF1, which is regulated by BCAA, were also significantly lower in the HD group. Therefore, early weight loss in HD is associated with a systemic metabolic defect, and BCAA levels may be used as a biomarker, indicative of disease onset and early progression. The decreased plasma levels of BCAA may correspond to a critical need for Krebs cycle energy substrates in the brain that increased metabolism in the periphery is trying to provide.

  18. Molecular crosstalk between a chemical and a biological stressor and consequences on disease manifestation in rainbow trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burki, Richard; Krasnov, Aleksei; Bettge, Kathrin; Rexroad, Caird E.; Afanasyev, Sergey; Antikainen, Miia; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; Wahli, Thomas; Segner, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the molecular and organism reaction of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, to the combined impact of two environmental stressors. The two stressors were the myxozoan parasite, Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae, which is the etiological agent of proliferative kidney disease (PKD) and a natural stressor to salmonid populations, and 17β-estradiol (E2) as prototype of estrogen-active chemical stressors in the aquatic environment. Both stressors, the parasite and estrogenic contaminants, co-exist in Swiss rivers and are discussed as factors contributing to the decline of Swiss brown trout populations over the last decades. Using a microarray approach contrasting parasite-infected and non-infected rainbow trout at low or high estrogen levels, it was observed that molecular response patterns under joint exposure differed from those to the single stressors. More specifically, three major response patterns were present: (i) expression responses of gene transcripts to one stressor are weakened by the presence of the second stressor; (ii) expression responses of gene transcripts to one stressor are enhanced by the presence of the second stressor; (iii) expression responses of gene transcripts at joint treatment are dominated by one of the two stressors. Organism-level responses to concurrent E2 and parasite treatment – assessed through measuring parasite loads in the fish host and cumulative mortalities of trout – were dominated by the pathogen, with no modulating influence of E2. The findings reveal function- and level-specific responses of rainbow trout to stressor combinations, which are only partly predictable from the response to the single stressors.

  19. Molecular crosstalk between a chemical and a biological stressor and consequences on disease manifestation in rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burki, Richard [Centre for Fish and Wildlife Health, University of Bern, Laenggassstrasse 122, CH-3001 Bern (Switzerland); Krasnov, Aleksei [NOFIMA Marin, Postboks. 5010, 1432As (Norway); Bettge, Kathrin [Centre for Fish and Wildlife Health, University of Bern, Laenggassstrasse 122, CH-3001 Bern (Switzerland); Rexroad, Caird E. [National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture, USDA-ARS, 11876 Leetown Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430 (United States); Afanasyev, Sergey [Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry, M. Toreza av. 44, Peterburg 194223 (Russian Federation); Antikainen, Miia [Institute of Applied Biotechnology, University of Kuopio (Finland); Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia [Man-Society-Environment, University of Basel, Vesalgasse 1, CH-4051 Basel (Switzerland); Wahli, Thomas [Centre for Fish and Wildlife Health, University of Bern, Laenggassstrasse 122, CH-3001 Bern (Switzerland); Segner, Helmut, E-mail: helmut.segner@vetsuisse.unibe.ch [Centre for Fish and Wildlife Health, University of Bern, Laenggassstrasse 122, CH-3001 Bern (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the molecular and organism reaction of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, to the combined impact of two environmental stressors. The two stressors were the myxozoan parasite, Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae, which is the etiological agent of proliferative kidney disease (PKD) and a natural stressor to salmonid populations, and 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) as prototype of estrogen-active chemical stressors in the aquatic environment. Both stressors, the parasite and estrogenic contaminants, co-exist in Swiss rivers and are discussed as factors contributing to the decline of Swiss brown trout populations over the last decades. Using a microarray approach contrasting parasite-infected and non-infected rainbow trout at low or high estrogen levels, it was observed that molecular response patterns under joint exposure differed from those to the single stressors. More specifically, three major response patterns were present: (i) expression responses of gene transcripts to one stressor are weakened by the presence of the second stressor; (ii) expression responses of gene transcripts to one stressor are enhanced by the presence of the second stressor; (iii) expression responses of gene transcripts at joint treatment are dominated by one of the two stressors. Organism-level responses to concurrent E2 and parasite treatment - assessed through measuring parasite loads in the fish host and cumulative mortalities of trout - were dominated by the pathogen, with no modulating influence of E2. The findings reveal function- and level-specific responses of rainbow trout to stressor combinations, which are only partly predictable from the response to the single stressors.

  20. Dissociation between implicit and explicit manifestations of awareness in early stage dementia: evidence from the emotional Stroop effect for dementia-related words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyr, Anthony; Clare, Linda; Nelis, Sharon M; Roberts, Judith L; Robinson, Julia U; Roth, Ilona; Markova, Ivana S; Woods, Robert T; Whitaker, Christopher J; Morris, Robin G

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether people with dementia (PwD), and carers of PwD, show a processing bias to dementia-related words in an emotional Stroop task, and if so, whether the presence of such a bias is related to level of explicit awareness of the condition. Seventy-nine people with early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular or mixed dementia, and their carers, completed an emotional Stroop task. Time taken to colour-name dementia-related and neutral words was compared within and between groups. Additionally, as a comparison, ratings of the awareness of the condition shown by PwD were made on the basis of a detailed interview with each PwD and his/her carer. PwD and carers showed the same level of increase in response times to salient compared to neutral words. In the PwD this effect was unrelated to the degree of awareness that they demonstrated regarding the condition. The emotional Stroop effect in response to dementia-related words in PwD indicates that preserved implicit awareness of the condition can be elicited even where there is reduced explicit awareness. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Features associated with the development of non-motor manifestations in Parkinson's disease Factores asociados con el desarrollo de complicaciones no motoras en la enfermedad de Parkinson

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    Carlos Juri

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder, predominantly characterized by the presence of motor symptoms. However, the non motor manifestations (NMM are a frequent complaint in the PD patients. There is a lack of information about the risk factors associated with the NMM in these patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of the more common NMM in a population of PD patients and to determine the features associated with its development. We studied 124 ambulatory PD patients. NMM were defined by the presence of neuropsychiatric manifestations, cognitive disorder, autonomic dysfunction or sleep related problems. In a multivariate analysis we found that the years of evolution of the PD and the presence of cognitive dysfunction are the risk factors for the neuropsychiatric and autonomic manifestations, whereas axial impairment is a risk factor for cognitive disorders and dyskinesias is for sleep related problems. In conclusion, this study shows that the features related to the PD progression appear as the main risk factors associated with NMM.La enfermedad de Parkinson (EP es un trastorno neurodegenerativo, caracterizado predominan-temente por la presencia de síntomas motores. No obstante, la presencia de manifestaciones no motoras (MNN son frecuentes en los pacientes con EP. Existe escasa información sobre los factores de riesgo asociados con la aparición de MNN en dichos pacientes. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la prevalencia de las MNN más comunes en una población de pacientes portadores de EP y determinar los factores de riesgo asociados con su aparición. Estudiamos 124 pacientes portadores de EP atendidos en forma ambulatoria. La presencia de MNN fue definida por la aparición de manifestaciones neuropsiquiátricas, trastorno cognitivo, disfunción autonómica o alteraciones del sueño. En el análisis multivariado encontramos que los años de evolución de la EP y la presencia de disfunci

  2. Neglected Tropical Diseases: Treatment of Dermatological Manifestation of Filariasis with Combination Regimen of Albendazole, Ivermectin, and Loratadine: A Case Report from a Suburban Community in Nigeria

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    Osede Ignis Iribhogbe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Threadlike filarial nematodes have been identified as the causative agent of filariasis. Cutaneous filariasis is caused primarily by Loa loa, Onchocerca volvulus, and Mansonella streptocerca. These parasites occupy the subcutaneous layer of the skin. However, other filarial parasites are usually associated with varying degrees of dermatological manifestations. In the present discourse, two cases of cutaneous filariasis were diagnosed in two female patients (21 and 40 years old, respectively in Remitch Clinic and Maternity located in a nonriverine community in Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria. In this report, patients with body mass index (BMI of 18.97 and 23.45 kg/m2, respectively, presented on two different occasions at least 6 months apart with hyperpigmented skin lesions in the upper and lower limbs, respectively. There was associated intense pruritus with no evidence of lymphadenopathy and lymphoedema. Following laboratory confirmation of filariasis, the patients were placed on a single oral dose combination of albendazole (400 mg + ivermectin (200 mcg/kg, while oral doses of loratadine 10 mg were administered daily for 5 days. Patients were carefully followed up for 6 weeks during which recession of the lesion and untoward reactions were monitored. It was observed that within 6 weeks of treatment, there was a dramatic recession of skin lesion. Adverse effect reported from use of the combination was mild. This case report revealed that cutaneous filariasis is not an uncommon presentation of filariasis infestation in Nigeria. The report also validates the safety and efficacy of the combination in the management of cutaneous manifestation of the disease.

  3. Manifestações da apraxia de fala na doença de Alzheimer Manifestations of apraxia of speech in Alzheimer's disease

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    Maysa Luchesi Cera

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar as manifestações práxicas de pacientes com doença de Alzheimer em diferentes estágios da doença e verificar as similaridades entre as suas ocorrências. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados noventa pacientes com doença de Alzheimer, 30 em cada fase da doença (leve, moderada e grave, por meio dos instrumentos: Escala de Avaliação Clínica da Demência (CDR, Mini-Exame do Estado Mental (MEEM, Avaliação das Atividades Instrumentais de Vida Diária (Índice Lawton e Protocolo de Avaliação da Apraxia Verbal e Não-verbal. Foram avaliados 66 pacientes do gênero feminino e 24 do masculino, a média da idade foi 80,2±7,2 e da escolaridade foi 4,2±3,5 anos. RESULTADOS: Na fase leve, as proporções de ensaio, repetição e adição foram semelhantes, assim como omissão, substituição e autocorreção. Na fase moderada foram semelhantes: ensaio e repetição, substituição, omissão e adição, e autocorreção. Na fase grave, todas as manifestações se assemelharam, exceto a adição. O erro do tipo adição diferenciou os pacientes em relação às fases da doença. CONCLUSÃO: Os pacientes dos três estágios da doença apresentam diferentes padrões de manifestações práxicas verbais.PURPOSE: To identify praxic speech manifestations in patients diagnosed with different stages of Alzheimer's disease, and to verify similarities among their occurrences. METHODS: Participants were 90 patients with Alzheimer's, 30 in each stage of the disease (mild, moderate and severe, who were assessed using the following instruments: Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, and the Assessment Protocol of Verbal and Orofacial Apraxia. Sixty six female subjects and 24 male subjects were assessed; mean age was 80.2±7.2 years, and mean level of education was 4.2±3.5 years. RESULTS: In the mild stage, the proportions of trial-and-error, repetition and addition were

  4. Early manifestations of the Valparaíso’s imaginary. In the context of a porteña culture of the South Pacific

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    Marco Chandía Araya

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The poetic imaginary that emerges from the porteña culture of the South Pacific is a product of the imagination that responds to a historic scriptural exercise. We review these manifestations from three moments or sensitivities that build an image of the Valparaiso city-port. The journey tale, the modernist gesture and the naturalistic narrative (all of them appear before a major aesthetic-literary product reveal a way of inhabit the city-port that allows to propose the existence of a culture in conflict with Occident.  The passages of these manifestations cannot be read separately from that poetic of the porteño inhabit, but as part of a discourse of the border that declares against the oblivion and in favor of the historic survival of these city-ports

  5. Interleukin-23 in early disease development in rheumatoid arthritis

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    Andersen, Thomas; Hvid, M; Johansen, C

    2015-01-01

    randomized to methotrexate (MTX) plus adalimumab (ADA; n = 75) or MTX plus placebo-ADA (PLA; n = 76). Plasma samples were obtained at baseline and at months 3, 6, and 12 together with values for C-reactive protein (CRP), the 28-joint Disease Activity Score based on CRP (DAS28CRP), scores on the Clinical......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the levels of interleukin (IL)-23 in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) and the effect of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-α treatment on IL-23 levels. METHOD: Treatment-naïve eRA patients from the OPERA cohort were included (n = 151). Patients were...... Disease Activity Index (CDAI) and the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI), visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain/fatigue/physician global and total Sharp/van der Heijde score (TSS). IL-23 was measured at each time point. RESULTS: IL-23 levels decreased significantly in the ADA group from 20.6 pg...

  6. Disease Management of Early Childhood Caries: ECC Collaborative Project.

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    Ng, Man Wai; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Lieberman, Martin; Lee, Jessica Y; Scoville, Richard; Hannon, Cindy; Maramaldi, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, the standard of care for early childhood caries (ECC) has been primarily surgical and restorative treatment with little emphasis on preventing and managing the disease itself. It is now recognized that surgical treatment alone does not address the underlying etiology of the disease. Despite costly surgeries and reparative treatment, the onset and progression of caries are likely to continue. A successful rebalance of risk and protective factors may prevent, slow down, or even arrest dental caries and its progression. An 18-month risk-based chronic disease management (DM) approach to address ECC in preschool children was implemented as a quality improvement (QI) collaborative by seven teams of oral health care providers across the United States. In the aggregate, fewer DM children experienced new cavitation, pain, and referrals to the operating room (OR) for restorative treatment compared to baseline historical controls. The teams found that QI methods facilitated adoption of the DM approach and resulted in improved care to patients and better outcomes overall. Despite these successes, the wide scale adoption and spread of the DM approach may be limited unless health policy and payment reforms are enacted to compensate providers for implementing DM protocols in their practice.

  7. Disease Management of Early Childhood Caries: ECC Collaborative Project

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    Man Wai Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the standard of care for early childhood caries (ECC has been primarily surgical and restorative treatment with little emphasis on preventing and managing the disease itself. It is now recognized that surgical treatment alone does not address the underlying etiology of the disease. Despite costly surgeries and reparative treatment, the onset and progression of caries are likely to continue. A successful rebalance of risk and protective factors may prevent, slow down, or even arrest dental caries and its progression. An 18-month risk-based chronic disease management (DM approach to address ECC in preschool children was implemented as a quality improvement (QI collaborative by seven teams of oral health care providers across the United States. In the aggregate, fewer DM children experienced new cavitation, pain, and referrals to the operating room (OR for restorative treatment compared to baseline historical controls. The teams found that QI methods facilitated adoption of the DM approach and resulted in improved care to patients and better outcomes overall. Despite these successes, the wide scale adoption and spread of the DM approach may be limited unless health policy and payment reforms are enacted to compensate providers for implementing DM protocols in their practice.

  8. Behavioral phenotyping of Parkin-deficient mice: looking for early preclinical features of Parkinson's disease.

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    Daniel Rial

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence showing that the neurodegenerative processes that lead to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD begin many years before the appearance of the characteristic motor symptoms. Neuropsychiatric, sensorial and cognitive deficits are recognized as early non-motor manifestations of PD, and are not attenuated by the current anti-parkinsonian therapy. Although loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene cause early-onset familial PD, Parkin-deficient mice do not display spontaneous degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway or enhanced vulnerability to dopaminergic neurotoxins such as 6-OHDA and MPTP. Here, we employed adult homozygous C57BL/6 mice with parkin gene deletion on exon 3 (parkin-/- to further investigate the relevance of Parkin in the regulation of non-motor features, namely olfactory, emotional, cognitive and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Parkin-/- mice displayed normal performance on behavioral tests evaluating olfaction (olfactory discrimination, anxiety (elevated plus-maze, depressive-like behavior (forced swimming and tail suspension and motor function (rotarod, grasping strength and pole. However, parkin-/- mice displayed a poor performance in the open field habituation, object location and modified Y-maze tasks suggestive of procedural and short-term spatial memory deficits. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP. These findings indicate that the genetic deletion of parkin causes deficiencies in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, resulting in memory deficits with no major olfactory, emotional or motor impairments. Therefore, parkin-/- mice may represent a promising animal model to study the early stages of PD and for testing new therapeutic strategies to restore learning and memory and synaptic plasticity impairments in PD.

  9. Mucocutaneous manifestations of HIV infection

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    Shobhana A

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with various mucocutaneous features, which may be the first pointer towards the existence of HIV infection. This study was done to note the different mucocutaneous lesions present in the HIV population in eastern India. METHODS: Four hundred and ten HIV seropositive patients attending the outpatient and inpatient departments were included in the study. RESULTS: Out of 410 HIV positives, 40% had mucocutaneous involvement at presentation. The mean age of the study population was 29 years and male to female ratio was 2.5:1. The common mucocutaneous morbidities included oral candidiasis (36%, dermatophytosis and gingivitis (13% each, herpes zoster (6%, herpes simplex and scabies (5% each. A striking feature, noted in 36% males, was straightening of hairs. Genital herpes was the commonest genital ulcer disease. Lesions associated with declining immunity included oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia and herpes zoster with median CD4 counts of 98, 62 and 198/ L respectively. CONCLUSION: Early recognition of mucocutaneous manifestations and associated STDs help in better management of HIV/AIDS.

  10. An unusual renal manifestation of chronic HBV infection.

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    Aravindan, Ananthakrishnapuram; Yong, Jim; Killingsworth, Murray; Strasser, Simone; Suranyi, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Hepatitis B viral infection is usually a self-limiting disease in immunocompetent individuals. Chronic infection can be seen in up to 5% of infected patients. Renal manifestations of chronic HBV infection are usually glomerular. We describe here an uncommon presentation of a patient with chronic HBV infection with very high viral load and rapidly progressive renal failure. Renal biopsy showed features of tubulointerstitial nephritis and tubular epithelial inclusion bodies suggestive of HBV infection. Entecavir treatment slowed down the progression of his renal disease. Tubulointerstitial nephritis should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis in patients with HBV infection. Early antiviral treatment may halt the progression of renal disease.

  11. Musculoskeletal manifestations in sickle cell anemia

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    Reddy Ravikanth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by substitution of glutamic acid by valine at the sixth position of the beta globin chain. The sequence of events leads to pain crisis. Ischemia of the tissues resulting from decreased blood flow is believed to occur in pain crisis. Repeated or prolonged sickling causes red cell death in the form of hemolytic anemia. The majority of hospital admissions are due to painful crisis. These patients are at increased risk for both osteomyelitis and infarction of the long bones. Magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to be helpful in the diagnosis of early osteomyelitis and its differentiation from infarction in sickle cell disease patients with acute bone crisis. Others findings include dactylitis, medullary infarcts, diploic space widening, fish mouth vertebrae, and avascular necrosis. We present a case series on the various musculoskeletal manifestations of sickle cell disease.

  12. Subjective cognitive impairment: Towards early identification of Alzheimer disease.

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    Garcia-Ptacek, S; Eriksdotter, M; Jelic, V; Porta-Etessam, J; Kåreholt, I; Manzano Palomo, S

    2016-10-01

    Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease (AD) begins decades before dementia and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) already demonstrate significant lesion loads. Lack of information about the early pathophysiology in AD complicates the search for therapeutic strategies.Subjective cognitive impairment is the description given to subjects who have memory-related complaints without pathological results on neuropsychological tests. There is no consensus regarding this heterogeneous syndrome, but at least some of these patients may represent the earliest stage in AD. We reviewed available literature in order to summarise current knowledge on subjective cognitive impairment. Although they may not present detectable signs of disease, SCI patients as a group score lower on neuropsychological tests than the general population does, and they also have a higher incidence of future cognitive decline. Depression and psychiatric co-morbidity play a role but cannot account for all cognitive complaints. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in these patients reveal a pattern of hippocampal atrophy similar to that of amnestic mild cognitive impairment and functional MRI shows increased activation during cognitive tasks which might indicate compensation for loss of function. Prevalence of an AD-like pattern of beta-amyloid (Aβ42) and tau proteins in cerebrospinal fluid is higher in SCI patients than in the general population. Memory complaints are relevant symptoms and may predict AD. Interpatient variability and methodological differences between clinical studies make it difficult to assign a definition to this syndrome. In the future, having a standard definition and longitudinal studies with sufficient follow-up times and an emphasis on quantifiable variables may clarify aspects of early AD. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Early life nutrition, epigenetics and programming of later life disease.

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    Vickers, Mark H

    2014-06-02

    The global pandemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes is often causally linked to marked changes in diet and lifestyle; namely marked increases in dietary intakes of high energy diets and concomitant reductions in physical activity levels. However, less attention has been paid to the role of developmental plasticity and alterations in phenotypic outcomes resulting from altered environmental conditions during the early life period. Human and experimental animal studies have highlighted the link between alterations in the early life environment and increased risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in later life. This link is conceptualised as the developmental programming hypothesis whereby environmental influences during critical periods of developmental plasticity can elicit lifelong effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. In particular, the nutritional environment in which the fetus or infant develops influences the risk of metabolic disorders in offspring. The late onset of such diseases in response to earlier transient experiences has led to the suggestion that developmental programming may have an epigenetic component, as epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation or histone tail modifications could provide a persistent memory of earlier nutritional states. Moreover, evidence exists, at least from animal models, that such epigenetic programming should be viewed as a transgenerational phenomenon. However, the mechanisms by which early environmental insults can have long-term effects on offspring are relatively unclear. Thus far, these mechanisms include permanent structural changes to the organ caused by suboptimal levels of an important factor during a critical developmental period, changes in gene expression caused by epigenetic modifications (including DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA) and permanent changes in cellular ageing. A better understanding of the epigenetic basis of developmental programming and how these effects may be

  14. Early Life Nutrition, Epigenetics and Programming of Later Life Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H. Vickers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The global pandemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes is often causally linked to marked changes in diet and lifestyle; namely marked increases in dietary intakes of high energy diets and concomitant reductions in physical activity levels. However, less attention has been paid to the role of developmental plasticity and alterations in phenotypic outcomes resulting from altered environmental conditions during the early life period. Human and experimental animal studies have highlighted the link between alterations in the early life environment and increased risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in later life. This link is conceptualised as the developmental programming hypothesis whereby environmental influences during critical periods of developmental plasticity can elicit lifelong effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. In particular, the nutritional environment in which the fetus or infant develops influences the risk of metabolic disorders in offspring. The late onset of such diseases in response to earlier transient experiences has led to the suggestion that developmental programming may have an epigenetic component, as epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation or histone tail modifications could provide a persistent memory of earlier nutritional states. Moreover, evidence exists, at least from animal models, that such epigenetic programming should be viewed as a transgenerational phenomenon. However, the mechanisms by which early environmental insults can have long-term effects on offspring are relatively unclear. Thus far, these mechanisms include permanent structural changes to the organ caused by suboptimal levels of an important factor during a critical developmental period, changes in gene expression caused by epigenetic modifications (including DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA and permanent changes in cellular ageing. A better understanding of the epigenetic basis of developmental programming and how

  15. Early Life Stress, Depression And Parkinson's Disease: A New Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallé, Ernest; Mabandla, Musa V

    2018-03-19

    This review aims to shed light on the relationship that involves exposure to early life stress, depression and Parkinson's disease (PD). A systematic literature search was conducted in Pubmed, MEDLINE, EBSCOHost and Google Scholar and relevant data were submitted to a meta-analysis . Early life stress may contribute to the development of depression and patients with depression are at risk of developing PD later in life. Depression is a common non-motor symptom preceding motor symptoms in PD. Stimulation of regions contiguous to the substantia nigra as well as dopamine (DA) agonists have been shown to be able to attenuate depression. Therefore, since PD causes depletion of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, depression, rather than being just a simple mood disorder, may be part of the pathophysiological process that leads to PD. It is plausible that the mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways that mediate mood, emotion, and/or cognitive function may also play a key role in depression associated with PD. Here, we propose that a medication designed to address a deficiency in serotonin is more likely to influence motor symptoms of PD associated with depression. This review highlights the effects of an antidepressant, Fluvoxamine maleate, in an animal model that combines depressive-like symptoms and Parkinsonism.

  16. CSF N-glycoproteomics for early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmigiano, Angelo; Barone, Rita; Sturiale, Luisa; Sanfilippo, Cristina; Bua, Rosaria Ornella; Romeo, Donata Agata; Messina, Angela; Capuana, Maria Luisa; Maci, Tiziana; Le Pira, Francesco; Zappia, Mario; Garozzo, Domenico

    2016-01-10

    This work aims at exploring the human CSF (Cerebrospinal fluid) N-glycome by MALDI MS techniques, in order to assess specific glycosylation pattern(s) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (n:24) and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n:11), these last as potential AD patients at a pre-dementia stage. For comparison, 21 healthy controls were studied. We identified a group of AD and MCI subjects (about 40-50% of the studied sample) showing significant alteration of CSF N-glycome profiling, consisting of a decrease in the overall sialylation degree and an increase in species bearing bisecting GlcNAc. Noteworthy, all the MCI patients that converted to AD within the clinical follow-up, had an abnormal CSF glycosylation profile. Based on the studied cohort, CSF glycosylation changes may occur before an AD clinical onset. Previous studies specifically focused on the key role of glycosyltransferase GnT-III on AD-pathogenesis, addressing the patho-mechanism to specific sugar modification of BACE-1 glycoprotein with bisecting GlcNAc. Our patients addressed protein N-glycosylation changes at an early phase of the whole biomolecular misregulation on AD, pointing to CSF N-glycome analyses as promising tool to enhance early detection of AD and also suggesting alternative therapeutics target molecules, such as specific glyco-enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Alejandra Guillermina Miranda-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN. Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day, including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2, with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health.

  18. Association of the interferon signature metric with serological disease manifestations but not global activity scores in multiple cohorts of patients with SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, William P; Maciuca, Romeo; Wolslegel, Kristen; Tew, Wei; Abbas, Alexander R; Chaivorapol, Christina; Morimoto, Alyssa; McBride, Jacqueline M; Brunetta, Paul; Richardson, Bruce C; Davis, John C; Behrens, Timothy W; Townsend, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The interferon (IFN) signature (IS) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) includes over 100 genes induced by type I IFN pathway activation. We developed a method to quantify the IS using three genes—the IS metric (ISM)—and characterised the clinical characteristics of patients with SLE with different ISM status from multiple clinical trials. Methods Blood microarray expression data from a training cohort of patients with SLE confirmed the presence of the IS and identified surrogate genes. We assayed these genes in a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay, yielding an ISM from the IS. The association of ISM status with clinical disease characteristics was assessed in patients with extrarenal lupus and lupus nephritis from four clinical trials. Results Three genes, HERC5, EPSTI and CMPK2, correlated well with the IS (p>0.96), and composed the ISM qPCR assay. Using the 95th centile for healthy control data, patients with SLE from different studies were classified into two ISM subsets—ISM-Low and ISM-High—that are longitudinally stable over 36 weeks. Significant associations were identified between ISM-High status and higher titres of anti-dsDNA antibodies, presence of anti extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies, elevated serum B cell activating factor of the tumour necrosis factor family (BAFF) levels, and hypocomplementaemia. However, measures of overall clinical disease activity were similar for ISM-High and ISM-Low groups. Conclusions The ISM is an IS biomarker that divides patients with SLE into two subpopulations—ISM-High and ISM-Low—with differing serological manifestations. The ISM does not distinguish between high and low disease activity, but may have utility in identifying patients more likely to respond to treatment(s) targeting IFN-α. Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT00962832. PMID:25861459

  19. Essential veterinary education in emerging infections, modes of introduction of exotic animals, zoonotic diseases, bioterrorism, implications for human and animal health and disease manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, B B; Marano, N

    2009-08-01

    A fundamental role of the veterinary profession is the protection of human health through wholesome food and control of diseases of animal origin, especially zoonoses. Therefore, training of veterinary students worldwide needs to face the new challenges posed by emerging infections, both from wildlife and domestic animals, as well as risks from bio/agroterrorism. New courses emphasising recognition, response, recovery and prevention must be developed to respond to natural or intentionally induced emerging diseases and zoonoses. Training programmes in applied epidemiology, zoonoses and foreign animal diseases are crucial for the development of a strong workforce to deal with microbial threats. Students should learn the reporting pathways for reportable diseases in their countries or states. Knowledge of the principles of ecology and ecosystems should be acquired during pre-veterinary studies. Elective classes on wildlife diseases, emphasising wildlife zoonotic diseases, should be offered during the veterinary curriculum, as well as a course on risk communication, since veterinarians are frequently in the position of having to convey complex information under adverse circumstances.

  20. Rapid onset of efficacy of rasagiline in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambito Marsala, Sandro; Vitaliani, Roberta; Volpe, Daniele; Capozzoli, Francesca; Baroni, Luciana; Belgrado, Enrico; Borsato, Carlo; Gioulis, Manuela; Marchini, Corrado; Antonini, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    Rasagiline is a monoamine oxidase type-B inhibitor used as monotherapy or in addition to levodopa in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). This naturalistic single-blind study was aimed at evaluating the rapidity of onset effect of rasagiline on motor symptoms in a cohort of early relatively elderly PD patients. 102 outpatients (55 males, median age 71 years) have been selected: 26 were PD therapy-naive and 76 received rasagiline as add-on therapy. The third section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRSIII) and the Hoehn-Yahr (HY) scale were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 4 weeks thereafter. The mean UPDRS III total score (-6.7 at week 1 and -8.9 at week 4) and single items, as well as mean HY score (-0.40 at week 1 and -0.67 at week 4), significantly decreased from baseline (p or ≤71 years. Rasagiline had a rapid therapeutic effect from the first week of therapy, which further improved at 4 weeks. The rapid onset of action and the absence of a dose titration are important issues in the management of the PD patient.

  1. Molecular genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Rita; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2016-06-01

    As the discovery of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) genes, APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2, in families with autosomal dominant early-onset AD (EOAD), gene discovery in familial EOAD came more or less to a standstill. Only 5% of EOAD patients are carrying a pathogenic mutation in one of the AD genes or a apolipoprotein E (APOE) risk allele ε4, most of EOAD patients remain unexplained. Here, we aimed at summarizing the current knowledge of EOAD genetics and its role in ongoing approaches to understand the biology of AD and disease symptomatology as well as developing new therapeutics. Next, we explored the possible molecular mechanisms that might underlie the missing genetic etiology of EOAD and discussed how the use of massive parallel sequencing technologies triggered novel gene discoveries. To conclude, we commented on the relevance of reinvestigating EOAD patients as a means to explore potential new avenues for translational research and therapeutic discoveries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease and Oxidative Stress

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    Marco Antonio Meraz-Ríos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in elderly adults. It is estimated that 10% of the world’s population aged more than 60–65 years could currently be affected by AD, and that in the next 20 years, there could be more than 30 million people affected by this pathology. One of the great challenges in this regard is that AD is not just a scientific problem; it is associated with major psychosocial and ethical dilemmas and has a negative impact on national economies. The neurodegenerative process that occurs in AD involves a specific nervous cell dysfunction, which leads to neuronal death. Mutations in APP, PS1, and PS2 genes are causes for early onset AD. Several animal models have demonstrated that alterations in these proteins are able to induce oxidative damage, which in turn favors the development of AD. This paper provides a review of many, although not all, of the mutations present in patients with familial Alzheimer’s disease and the association between some of these mutations with both oxidative damage and the development of the pathology.

  3. Broad phenotypic spectrum in familial adenomatous polyposis; from early onset and severe phenotypes to late onset of attenuated polyposis with the first manifestation at age 72

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Ericsson, Mats

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is typically characterized by multiple colonic polyps and frequent extracolonic features. Whereas the number of colonic polyps has been linked to the APC gene mutation, possible genotype-phenotype correlations largely remain to be defined...... of extracolonic manifestations was identified in most of these individuals. Two sisters with an insertion in codon 528 (c.1582_1583insGC) both showed severe phenotypes with classical polyposis, upper gastrointestinal polyps and thyroid cancer. A woman with a 3'APC mutation (c.5030_5031insAA) developed colon...

  4. Corneal manifestations in systemic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zarranz-Ventura, J.; Nova, E. De; Moreno-Montañés, J.

    2008-01-01

    Un gran número de enfermedades sistémicas presentan manifestaciones corneales dentro de su espectro de enfermedad. El estudio detallado de todos los cuadros que asocian patología corneal resulta inabarcable, por ello se presentan las enfermedades más prevalentes o características. Este estudio contempla las enfermedades pulmonares y conectivopatías (colagenosis, enfermedades reumatológicas y enfermedades inflamatorias idiopáticas), las enfermedades dermatológicas, cardiovasculares, hematológi...

  5. Ocular manifestations of systemic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Andonegui, J.

    2008-01-01

    Existe un gran número de enfermedades sistémicas que pueden presentar en algún momento de su evolución manifestaciones oculares. Estas alteraciones pueden provocar sintomatología por sí mismas, pueden ayudar a diagnosticar la enfermedad sistémica que las originó o pueden servir para monitorizar el curso evolutivo de la misma. Se destacan las principales características de una serie de enfermedades sistémicas asociadas a patología ocular que serán estudiadas en detalle a lo largo de esta monog...

  6. The role of monogenic disease in children with very early onset inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Baldassano, Robert N

    2017-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic intestinal microbes, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. Patients diagnosed with IBD occurring before the age of 5 are a unique population, known as very early onset (VEO)-IBD and can be phenotypically and genetically distinct from older-onset IBD. We aim to review the clinical presentation of children with VEO-IBD and recent discoveries that point to genomic drivers of disease that may impact our therapeutic decisions. VEO-IBD is increasing in incidence and is associated with more severe disease, aggressive progression and poor response to most conventional therapies. This article will review the advances in sequencing technology that have led to identification of novel gene variants associated with disease and potentially new targeted therapeutic options. Children with VEO-IBD may present with a different phenotype and more severe disease than older children and adults. Identification of the causal gene or pathways, these children may allow for true precision medicine with targeted therapy and improved disease course.

  7. Predictors of driving safety in early Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, J D; Anderson, S W; Uc, E Y; Dastrup, E; Rizzo, M

    2009-02-10

    To measure the association of cognition, visual perception, and motor function with driving safety in Alzheimer disease (AD). Forty drivers with probable early AD (mean Mini-Mental State Examination score 26.5) and 115 elderly drivers without neurologic disease underwent a battery of cognitive, visual, and motor tests, and drove a standardized 35-mile route in urban and rural settings in an instrumented vehicle. A composite cognitive score (COGSTAT) was calculated for each subject based on eight neuropsychological tests. Driving safety errors were noted and classified by a driving expert based on video review. Drivers with AD committed an average of 42.0 safety errors/drive (SD = 12.8), compared to an average of 33.2 (SD = 12.2) for drivers without AD (p < 0.0001); the most common errors were lane violations. Increased age was predictive of errors, with a mean of 2.3 more errors per drive observed for each 5-year age increment. After adjustment for age and gender, COGSTAT was a significant predictor of safety errors in subjects with AD, with a 4.1 increase in safety errors observed for a 1 SD decrease in cognitive function. Significant increases in safety errors were also found in subjects with AD with poorer scores on Benton Visual Retention Test, Complex Figure Test-Copy, Trail Making Subtest-A, and the Functional Reach Test. Drivers with Alzheimer disease (AD) exhibit a range of performance on tests of cognition, vision, and motor skills. Since these tests provide additional predictive value of driving performance beyond diagnosis alone, clinicians may use these tests to help predict whether a patient with AD can safely operate a motor vehicle.

  8. Early experience of endovascular treatment of peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, T.; Yousuf, K.; Karim, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is prevalent affecting up to 16% of the population aged 55 years or older. Endovascular intervention for the treatment of limb ischemia has become the first line therapy but in Pakistan it is in embryonic stage due to dearth of trained persons and dedicated centres. This study was conducted to evaluate procedural success and early outcome of endovascular treatment of peripheral vascular disease. Methods: A prospective single arm multicentre study was conducted at the National Institute of Cardiovascular Disease and National Medical Centre, Karachi, Pakistan from January 2013 to June 2014. A total of 25 patients were enrolled in the study that underwent endovascular treatment. Out of 25 patients 23 (92%) had critical limb ischemia (CLI) as per TASC II classification (A to D) and 2 (8%) had carotid lesion with history of TIA. Patients of acute limb ischemia and stroke were excluded. Ankle brachial index (ABI) was classified as normal (0.9-1.3), mild (0.7-0.9), moderate (0.4-0.69), severe (<0.4). Outcome was taken as immediate success and symptoms, amputation of limb among CLI patients and incidence of stroke in patients with carotid artery lesion at end of six months. Results: Among aortoiliac, femoropopliteal and tibioperoneal lesions, tibioperoneal lesions at six months were found to be more symptomatic 6 (86%) and amputation 4 (57%). Two carotid lesions at follow up were asymptomatic without stroke. Conclusion: Endovascular treatment of peripheral vascular lesions, i.e., aortoiliac, femoropopliteal tibioperoneal and carotid lesions were satisfactory in immediate outcome. Tibioperoneal lesions were more symptomatic and limb amputation at six months. (author)

  9. Alzheimer's disease prevention: from risk factors to early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Minguillón, Carolina; Gramunt, Nina; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2017-09-12

    Due to the progressive aging of the population, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming a healthcare burden of epidemic proportions for which there is currently no cure. Disappointing results from clinical trials performed in mild-moderate AD dementia combined with clear epidemiological evidence on AD risk factors are contributing to the development of primary prevention initiatives. In addition, the characterization of the long asymptomatic stage of AD is allowing the development of intervention studie