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Sample records for earliest systemic antiviral

  1. Elevation of intact and proteolytic fragments of acute phase proteins constitutes the earliest systemic antiviral response in HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger B Kramer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The earliest immune responses activated in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (AHI exert a critical influence on subsequent virus spread or containment. During this time frame, components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and DCs, NK cells, beta-defensins, complement and other anti-microbial factors, which have all been implicated in modulating HIV infection, may play particularly important roles. A proteomics-based screen was performed on a cohort from whom samples were available at time points prior to the earliest positive HIV detection. The ability of selected factors found to be elevated in the plasma during AHI to inhibit HIV-1 replication was analyzed using in vitro PBMC and DC infection models. Analysis of unique plasma donor panels spanning the eclipse and viral expansion phases revealed very early alterations in plasma proteins in AHI. Induction of acute phase protein serum amyloid A (A-SAA occurred as early as 5-7 days prior to the first detection of plasma viral RNA, considerably prior to any elevation in systemic cytokine levels. Furthermore, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT, termed virus inhibitory peptide (VIRIP, was observed in plasma coincident with viremia. Both A-SAA and VIRIP have anti-viral activity in vitro and quantitation of their plasma levels indicated that circulating concentrations are likely to be within the range of their inhibitory activity. Our results provide evidence for a first wave of host anti-viral defense occurring in the eclipse phase of AHI prior to systemic activation of other immune responses. Insights gained into the mechanism of action of acute-phase reactants and other innate molecules against HIV and how they are induced could be exploited for the future development of more efficient prophylactic vaccine strategies.

  2. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

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    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  3. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  4. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  5. Acute infection with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles catalyzes a systemic antiviral state and protects from lethal virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Jennifer L; Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Webb, Drue L; Johnston, Robert E

    2009-12-01

    The host innate immune response provides a critical first line of defense against invading pathogens, inducing an antiviral state to impede the spread of infection. While numerous studies have documented antiviral responses within actively infected tissues, few have described the earliest innate response induced systemically by infection. Here, utilizing Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particles (VRP) to limit infection to the initially infected cells in vivo, a rapid activation of the antiviral response was demonstrated not only within the murine draining lymph node, where replication was confined, but also within distal tissues. In the liver and brain, expression of interferon-stimulated genes was detected by 1 to 3 h following VRP footpad inoculation, reaching peak expression of >100-fold over that in mock-infected animals. Moreover, mice receiving a VRP footpad inoculation 6, 12, or 24 h prior to an otherwise lethal VEE footpad challenge were completely protected from death, including a drastic reduction in challenge virus titers. VRP pretreatment also provided protection from intranasal VEE challenge and extended the average survival time following intracranial challenge. Signaling through the interferon receptor was necessary for antiviral gene induction and protection from VEE challenge. However, VRP pretreatment failed to protect mice from a heterologous, lethal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus, yet conferred protection following challenge with influenza virus. Collectively, these results document a rapid modulation of the host innate response within hours of infection, capable of rapidly alerting the entire animal to pathogen invasion and leading to protection from viral disease.

  6. Defense and counterdefense in the RNAi-based antiviral immune system in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mierlo, Joël T; van Cleef, Koen W R; van Rij, Ronald P

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an important pathway to combat virus infections in insects and plants. Hallmarks of antiviral RNAi in these organisms are: (1) an increase in virus replication after inactivation of major actors in the RNAi pathway, (2) production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (v-siRNAs), and (3) suppression of RNAi by dedicated viral proteins. In this chapter, we will review the mechanism of RNAi in insects, its function as an antiviral immune system, viral small RNA profiles, and viral counterdefense strategies. We will also consider alternative, inducible antiviral immune responses.

  7. Earliest effects of sudden occlusions on pressure profiles in selected locations of the human systemic arterial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, Marcin; Gadda, Giacomo; Taibi, Angelo; Gałązka, Mirosław; Zieliński, Piotr

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a numerical simulation method for predicting the time dependence (wave form) of pressure at any location in the systemic arterial system in humans. The method uses the matlab-Simulink environment. The input data include explicitly the geometry of the arterial tree, treated up to an arbitrary bifurcation level, and the elastic properties of arteries as well as rheological parameters of blood. Thus, the impact of anatomic details of an individual subject can be studied. The method is applied here to reveal the earliest stages of mechanical reaction of the pressure profiles to sudden local blockages (thromboses or embolisms) of selected arteries. The results obtained with a purely passive model provide reference data indispensable for studies of longer-term effects due to neural and humoral mechanisms. The reliability of the results has been checked by comparison of two available sets of anatomic, elastic, and rheological data involving (i) 55 and (ii) 138 arterial segments. The remaining arteries have been replaced with the appropriate resistive elements. Both models are efficient in predicting an overall shift of pressure, whereas the accuracy of the 55-segment model in reproducing the detailed wave forms and stabilization times turns out dependent on the location of the blockage and the observation point.

  8. RNAi and antiviral defense in Drosophila: setting up a systemic immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlikow, Margot; Goic, Bertsy; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) controls gene expression in eukaryotic cells and thus, cellular homeostasis. In addition, in plants, nematodes and arthropods it is a central antiviral effector mechanism. Antiviral RNAi has been well described as a cell autonomous response, which is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules. This dsRNA is the precursor for the silencing of viral RNA in a sequence-specific manner. In plants, systemic antiviral immunity has been demonstrated, however much less is known in animals. Recently, some evidence for a systemic antiviral response in arthropods has come to light. Cell autonomous RNAi may not be sufficient to reach an efficient antiviral response, and the organism might rely on the spread and uptake of an RNAi signal of unknown origin. In this review, we offer a perspective on how RNAi-mediated antiviral immunity could confer systemic protection in insects and we propose directions for future research to understand the mechanism of RNAi-immune signal sorting, spreading and amplification.

  9. A systemic resistance inducing antiviral protein with N-glycosidase activity from Bougainvillea xbuttiana leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, S; Balasubrahmanyam, A; Sadhna, P; Kapoor, H; Lodha, M L

    2001-06-01

    An antiviral protein from Bougainvillea xbuttiana leaves induced systemic resistance in host plants N. glutinosa and Cyamopsis tetragonoloba against TMV and SRV, respectively which was reversed by actinomycin D, when applied immediately or shortly after antiviral protein treatment. When the inhibitor was applied to the host plant leaves post inoculation, it was effective if applied upto 4 h after virus infection. It also delayed the expression of symptoms in systemic hosts of TMV. The inhibitor showed characteristic N-glycosidase activity on 25S rRNA of tobacco ribosomes, suggesting that it could also be interfering with virus multiplication through ribosome-inactivation process.

  10. Earliest life on earth

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Suzanne D

    2010-01-01

    This volume integrates the latest findings on earliest life forms, identified and characterized in some of the oldest rocks on Earth. It places emphasis on the integration of analytical methods with observational techniques and experimental simulations.

  11. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoguang [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Department of Medical Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Qian, Hua [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Miyamoto, Fusako [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Naito, Takeshi [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kawaji, Kumi [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kajiwara, Kazumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); JST Innovation Plaza Kyoto, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8245 (Japan); Hattori, Toshio [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Matsuoka, Masao [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Watanabe, Kentaro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1{sub IIIB} and HIV-1{sub BaL} as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} and anti-HIV-1{sub BaL} activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, 'phenotypic drug evaluation', may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  12. Systems-Biology Approaches to Discover Anti-Viral Effectors of the Human Innate Immune Response

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    Andreas F.R. Sommer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Virus infections elicit an immediate innate response involving antiviral factors. The activities of some of these factors are, in turn, blocked by viral countermeasures. The ensuing battle between the host and the viruses is crucial for determining whether the virus establishes a foothold and/or induces adaptive immune responses. A comprehensive systems-level understanding of the repertoire of anti-viral effectors in the context of these immediate virus-host responses would provide significant advantages in devising novel strategies to interfere with the initial establishment of infections. Recent efforts to identify cellular factors in a comprehensive and unbiased manner, using genome-wide siRNA screens and other systems biology “omics” methodologies, have revealed several potential anti-viral effectors for viruses like Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, Hepatitis C virus (HCV, West Nile virus (WNV, and influenza virus. This review describes the discovery of novel viral restriction factors and discusses how the integration of different methods in systems biology can be used to more comprehensively identify the intimate interactions of viruses and the cellular innate resistance.

  13. "APONEUROTIC SYSTEM" IN MEDICAL CLASSIC THE YELLOW EMPEROR'S CANON OF INTERNAL MEDICINE IS THE EARLIEST DESCRIPTION ON NERVOUS SYSTEM IN HUMAN HISTORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zeng; MA Wen; SONG Yong-xia

    2005-01-01

    The description of "Jingjin" (经筋aponeurotic system or muscles or tendinomuscular structures of the 12 regular meridians) in Chapter Jingjin of book Huangdi Neijing (the Yellow Emperor's Canon of Internal Medicine) is the earliest record on nervous system. The Jingjin and channels are interdependent, and together they form the major parts of the channel-collateral system in the theory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The integration of their own functions contributes to the "Qiji" (气机 functional activities) of the channel-collateral system. The Jingjin distributes in the human body regularly like channels, with starting and ending points (which goes up and down), main streams and branches, converging and connecting spots, and specific manifestations for a certain disease. Observation by modern anatomy shows that blood vessels, nerves, and lymphatic vessels accompany closely with each other to run in the human body and work together to maintain human's life activities.

  14. Amphipathic DNA polymers exhibit antiviral activity against systemic Murine Cytomegalovirus infection

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    Juteau Jean-Marc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorothioated oligonucleotides (PS-ONs have a sequence-independent, broad spectrum antiviral activity as amphipathic polymers (APs and exhibit potent in vitro antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of herpesviruses: HSV-1, HSV-2, HCMV, VZV, EBV, and HHV-6A/B, and in vivo activity in a murine microbiocide model of genital HSV-2 infection. The activity of these agents against animal cytomegalovirus (CMV infections in vitro and in vivo was therefore investigated. Results In vitro, a 40 mer degenerate AP (REP 9 inhibited both murine CMV (MCMV and guinea pig CMV (GPCMV with an IC50 of 0.045 μM and 0.16 μM, respectively, and a 40 mer poly C AP (REP 9C inhibited MCMV with an IC50 of 0.05 μM. Addition of REP 9 to plaque assays during the first two hours of infection inhibited 78% of plaque formation whereas addition of REP 9 after 10 hours of infection did not significantly reduce the number of plaques, indicating that REP 9 antiviral activity against MCMV occurs at early times after infection. In a murine model of CMV infection, systemic treatment for 5 days significantly reduced virus replication in the spleens and livers of infected mice compared to saline-treated control mice. REP 9 and REP 9C were administered intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days at 10 mg/kg, starting 2 days prior to MCMV infection. Splenomegaly was observed in infected mice treated with REP 9 but not in control mice or in REP 9 treated, uninfected mice, consistent with mild CpG-like activity. When REP 9C (which lacks CpG motifs was compared to REP 9, it exhibited comparable antiviral activity as REP 9 but was not associated with splenomegaly. This suggests that the direct antiviral activity of APs is the predominant therapeutic mechanism in vivo. Moreover, REP 9C, which is acid stable, was effective when administered orally in combination with known permeation enhancers. Conclusion These studies indicate that APs exhibit potent, well tolerated

  15. A processed noncoding RNA regulates an altruistic bacterial antiviral system.

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    Blower, Tim R; Pei, Xue Y; Short, Francesca L; Fineran, Peter C; Humphreys, David P; Luisi, Ben F; Salmond, George P C

    2011-02-01

    The ≥ 10³⁰ bacteriophages on Earth relentlessly drive adaptive coevolution, forcing the generation of protective mechanisms in their bacterial hosts. One such bacterial phage-resistance system, ToxIN, consists of a protein toxin (ToxN) that is inhibited in vivo by a specific RNA antitoxin (ToxI); however, the mechanisms for this toxicity and inhibition have not been defined. Here we present the crystal structure of the ToxN-ToxI complex from Pectobacterium atrosepticum, determined to 2.75-Å resolution. ToxI is a 36-nucleotide noncoding RNA pseudoknot, and three ToxI monomers bind to three ToxN monomers to generate a trimeric ToxN-ToxI complex. Assembly of this complex is mediated entirely through extensive RNA-protein interactions. Furthermore, a 2'-3' cyclic phosphate at the 3' end of ToxI, and catalytic residues, identify ToxN as an endoRNase that processes ToxI from a repetitive precursor but is regulated by its own catalytic product.

  16. The earliest matches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naama Goren-Inbar

    Full Text Available Cylindrical objects made usually of fired clay but sometimes of stone were found at the Yarmukian Pottery Neolithic sites of Sha'ar HaGolan and Munhata (first half of the 8(th millennium BP in the Jordan Valley. Similar objects have been reported from other Near Eastern Pottery Neolithic sites. Most scholars have interpreted them as cultic objects in the shape of phalli, while others have referred to them in more general terms as "clay pestles," "clay rods," and "cylindrical clay objects." Re-examination of these artifacts leads us to present a new interpretation of their function and to suggest a reconstruction of their technology and mode of use. We suggest that these objects were components of fire drills and consider them the earliest evidence of a complex technology of fire ignition, which incorporates the cylindrical objects in the role of matches.

  17. The earliest matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren-Inbar, Naama; Freikman, Michael; Garfinkel, Yosef; Goring-Morris, A Nigel; Goring-Morris, Nigel A; Grosman, Leore

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical objects made usually of fired clay but sometimes of stone were found at the Yarmukian Pottery Neolithic sites of Sha'ar HaGolan and Munhata (first half of the 8(th) millennium BP) in the Jordan Valley. Similar objects have been reported from other Near Eastern Pottery Neolithic sites. Most scholars have interpreted them as cultic objects in the shape of phalli, while others have referred to them in more general terms as "clay pestles," "clay rods," and "cylindrical clay objects." Re-examination of these artifacts leads us to present a new interpretation of their function and to suggest a reconstruction of their technology and mode of use. We suggest that these objects were components of fire drills and consider them the earliest evidence of a complex technology of fire ignition, which incorporates the cylindrical objects in the role of matches.

  18. Intelligent MONitoring System for antiviral pharmacotherapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C (SiMON-VC

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    Luis Margusino-Framiñán

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two out of six strategic axes of pharmaceutical care in our hospital are quality and safety of care, and the incorporation of information technologies. Based on this, an information system was developed in the outpatient setting for pharmaceutical care of patients with chronic hepatitis C, SiMON-VC, which would improve the quality and safety of their pharmacotherapy. The objective of this paper is to describe requirements, structure and features of Si- MON-VC. Requirements demanded were that the information system would enter automatically all critical data from electronic clinical records at each of the visits to the Outpatient Pharmacy Unit, allowing the generation of events and alerts, documenting the pharmaceutical care provided, and allowing the use of data for research purposes. In order to meet these requirements, 5 sections were structured for each patient in SiMON-VC: Main Record, Events, Notes, Monitoring Graphs and Tables, and Follow-up. Each section presents a number of tabs with those coded data needed to monitor patients in the outpatient unit. The system automatically generates alerts for assisted prescription validation, efficacy and safety of using antivirals for the treatment of this disease. It features a completely versatile Indicator Control Panel, where temporary monitoring standards and alerts can be set. It allows the generation of reports, and their export to the electronic clinical record. It also allows data to be exported to the usual operating systems, through Big Data and Business Intelligence. Summing up, we can state that SiMON-VC improves the quality of pharmaceutical care provided in the outpatient pharmacy unit to patients with chronic hepatitis C, increasing the safety of antiviral therapy.

  19. Intelligent MONitoring System for antiviral pharmacotherapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C (SiMON-VC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margusino-Framiñán, Luis; Cid-Silva, Purificación; Mena-de-Cea, Álvaro; Sanclaudio-Luhía, Ana Isabel; Castro-Castro, José Antonio; Vázquez-González, Guillermo; Martín-Herranz, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Two out of six strategic axes of pharmaceutical care in our hospital are quality and safety of care, and the incorporation of information technologies. Based on this, an information system was developed in the outpatient setting for pharmaceutical care of patients with chronic hepatitis C, SiMON-VC, which would improve the quality and safety of their pharmacotherapy. The objective of this paper is to describe requirements, structure and features of Si- MON-VC. Requirements demanded were that the information system would enter automatically all critical data from electronic clinical records at each of the visits to the Outpatient Pharmacy Unit, allowing the generation of events and alerts, documenting the pharmaceutical care provided, and allowing the use of data for research purposes. In order to meet these requirements, 5 sections were structured for each patient in SiMON-VC: Main Record, Events, Notes, Monitoring Graphs and Tables, and Follow-up. Each section presents a number of tabs with those coded data needed to monitor patients in the outpatient unit. The system automatically generates alerts for assisted prescription validation, efficacy and safety of using antivirals for the treatment of this disease. It features a completely versatile Indicator Control Panel, where temporary monitoring standards and alerts can be set. It allows the generation of reports, and their export to the electronic clinical record. It also allows data to be exported to the usual operating systems, through Big Data and Business Intelligence. Summing up, we can state that SiMON-VC improves the quality of pharmaceutical care provided in the outpatient pharmacy unit to patients with chronic hepatitis C, increasing the safety of antiviral therapy. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Nano and microparticulate chitosan-based systems for antiviral topical delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, L; Harris, R; Cordoba-Diaz, M; Elorza, M; Elorza, B; Lenoir, J; Adriaens, E; Remon, J P; Heras, A; Cordoba-Diaz, D

    2013-01-23

    Acyclovir (ACV) is one of the drugs of choice for the treatment of epidermal, ocular or systemic herpetic infections. Nevertheless, its trans-mucosal limited absorption and the scarce contact time of the formulation with the mucosal surface - especially in the ocular mucosa - constitute a big limitation of the antiviral efficiency. The most effective way to solve these problems is to increase the quantity and the residence time of the drug over the ocular surface. In order to cope with all these requirements, micro-particles (MPs) and nano-particles (NPs) containing ACV have been developed using cross-linked chitosan with tripolyphosphate (TPP) due to the biocompatibility, bio-adhesion ability and the potential power as penetration enhancer of this polymer. Particles were characterized by Fourier-transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, SEM, Zeta potential and particle size. Encapsulation efficiency and release profiles in flow through diffusion cells were also determined. Besides the Slug Mucosal Irritation (SMI) assay has been applied as an alternative to the Draize test to predict the mucosal irritation of the selected formulation. FTIR and X-ray results suggested an electrostatic interaction ACV-Chitosan that made ACV be molecularly dispersed within the polymer matrix. Encapsulation efficiency was 75% for MP and 16% for NP. Release profiles in flow through diffusion cells were also determined. From the diffusion profiles, it was found that the amounts of ACV effectively diffused in 24h were 30, 430 and 80 μg for the ACV solution, MP and NP respectively. SMI results showed that chitosan-based particles induced moderate irritation and mild tissue damage, what supposes that ACV-MP constitute a promising alternative for further development of an antiviral formulation.

  1. Antiviral Type I and Type III Interferon Responses in the Central Nervous System

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    Thomas Michiels

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  2. Antiviral Type I and Type III Interferon Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Kreit, Marguerite; Hermant, Pascale; Lardinois, Cécile; Michiels, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i) preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii) the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii) the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv) the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway. PMID:23503326

  3. Squalamine as a broad-spectrum systemic antiviral agent with therapeutic potential

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Antiviral compounds that increase the resistance of host tissues represent an attractive class of therapeutic. Here, we show that squalamine, a compound previously isolated from the tissues of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) and the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral activity against human pathogens, which were studied in vitro as well as in vivo. Both RNA- and DNA-enveloped viruses are shown to be susceptible. The proposed mechanism involves the capacit...

  4. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feixiong; Murray, James L; Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Zhao, Zhongming; Rubin, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  5. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiong Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase. Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola. In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  6. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics. PMID:27632082

  7. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Da eZhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents.

  8. Squalamine as a broad-spectrum systemic antiviral agent with therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasloff, Michael; Adams, A Paige; Beckerman, Bernard; Campbell, Ann; Han, Ziying; Luijten, Erik; Meza, Isaura; Julander, Justin; Mishra, Abhijit; Qu, Wei; Taylor, John M; Weaver, Scott C; Wong, Gerard C L

    2011-09-20

    Antiviral compounds that increase the resistance of host tissues represent an attractive class of therapeutic. Here, we show that squalamine, a compound previously isolated from the tissues of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) and the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral activity against human pathogens, which were studied in vitro as well as in vivo. Both RNA- and DNA-enveloped viruses are shown to be susceptible. The proposed mechanism involves the capacity of squalamine, a cationic amphipathic sterol, to neutralize the negative electrostatic surface charge of intracellular membranes in a way that renders the cell less effective in supporting viral replication. Because squalamine can be readily synthesized and has a known safety profile in man, we believe its potential as a broad-spectrum human antiviral agent should be explored.

  9. The earliest seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, W.H.; Rothwell, G.W.; Scheckler, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Lagenostomalean-type seeds in bifurcating cupule systems have been discovered in the late Devonian Hampshire Formation of Randolph County, West Virginia, USA (Fig. 1). The associated megaflora, plants from coal balls, and vertebrate and invertebrate faunas demonstrate that the material is Famennian; the microflora indicates a more specific Fa2c age. Consequently, these seeds predate Archaeosperma arnoldii1 from the Fa2d of northeastern Pennsylvania, the oldest previously reported seed. By applying precision fracture, transfer, de??gagement, and thin-section techniques to selected cupules from the more than 100 specimens on hand, we have determined the three-dimensional morphology and histology of the seeds (Fig. 2a-h, k) and cupule systems. A comparison with known late Devonian to early Carboniferous seeds reveals that ours are more primitively organized than all except Genomosperma2,3. ?? 1981 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-10-13

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5'-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism.

  11. Manipulating age in earliest memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Ineke; Schweig, Theresa; Huntjens, Rafaële J.C.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the malleability of the estimated age in undergraduates’ earliest memories. In study 1, vignettes containing examples about age 2 rendered earlier ages than examples referring to age 6. Study 2 showed that eliciting self-relevant or public event knowledge from participants’ preschool

  12. Gene Expression Profiles from Disease Discordant Twins Suggest Shared Antiviral Pathways and Viral Exposures among Multiple Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lu; O'Hanlon, Terrance P; Lai, Zhennan; Fannin, Rick; Weller, Melodie L; Rider, Lisa G; Chiorini, John A; Miller, Frederick W

    2015-01-01

    Viral agents are of interest as possible autoimmune triggers due to prior reported associations and widely studied molecular mechanisms of antiviral immune responses in autoimmunity. Here we examined new viral candidates for the initiation and/or promotion of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID), as well as possible related signaling pathways shared in the pathogenesis of those disorders. RNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 33 twins discordant for SAID and 33 matched, unrelated healthy controls was analyzed using a custom viral-human gene microarray. Paired comparisons were made among three study groups-probands with SAID, their unaffected twins, and matched, unrelated healthy controls-using statistical and molecular pathway analyses. Probands and unaffected twins differed significantly in the expression of 537 human genes, and 107 of those were associated with viral infections. These 537 differentially expressed human genes participate in overlapping networks of several canonical, biologic pathways relating to antiviral responses and inflammation. Moreover, certain viral genes were expressed at higher levels in probands compared to either unaffected twins or unrelated, healthy controls. Interestingly, viral gene expression levels in unaffected twins appeared intermediate between those of probands and the matched, unrelated healthy controls. Of the viruses with overexpressed viral genes, herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) was the only human viral pathogen identified using four distinct oligonucleotide probes corresponding to three HSV-2 genes associated with different stages of viral infection. Although the effects from immunosuppressive therapy on viral gene expression remain unclear, this exploratory study suggests a new approach to evaluate shared viral agents and antiviral immune responses that may be involved in the development of SAID.

  13. The innate antiviral immune system of the cat: molecular tools for the measurement of its state of activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-Tissot, Céline; Rüegger, Vera L; Cattori, Valentino; Meli, Marina L; Riond, Barbara; Gomes-Keller, Maria Alice; Vögtlin, Andrea; Wittig, Burghardt; Juhls, Christiane; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2011-10-15

    The innate immune system plays a central role in host defence against viruses. While many studies portray mechanisms in early antiviral immune responses of humans and mice, much remains to be discovered about these mechanisms in the cat. With the objective of shedding light on early host-virus interactions in felids, we have developed 12 real-time TaqMan(®) qPCR systems for feline genes relevant to innate responses to viral infection, including those encoding for various IFNα and IFNω subtypes, IFNβ, intracellular antiviral factor Mx, NK cell stimulator IL-15 and effectors perforin and granzyme B, as well as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3 and 8. Using these newly developed assays and others previously described, we measured the relative expression of selected markers at early time points after viral infection in vitro and in vivo. Feline embryonic fibroblasts (FEA) inoculated with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) indicated peak levels of IFNα, IFNβ and Mx expression already 6h after infection. In contrast, Crandell-Rees feline kidney (CrFK) cells inoculated with feline herpes virus (FHV) responded to infection with high levels of IFNα and IFNβ only after 24h, and no induction of Mx could be detected. In feline PBMCs challenged in vitro with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), maximal expression levels of IFNα, β and ω subtype genes as well as IL-15 and TLRs 3, 7 and 8 were measured between 12 and 24h after infection, whereas expression levels of proinflammatory cytokine gene IL-6 were consistently downregulated until 48h post inoculation. A marginal upregulation of granzyme B was also observed within 3h after infection. In an in vivo experiment, cats challenged with FIV exhibited a 2.4-fold increase in IFNα expression in blood 1 week post infection. We furthermore demonstrate the possibility of stimulating feline immune cells in vitro with various immune response modifiers (IRMs) already known for their immunostimulatory properties in mice and humans, namely

  14. Characterization of human antiviral adaptive immune responses during hepatotropic virus infection in HLA-transgenic human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billerbeck, Eva; Horwitz, Joshua A; Labitt, Rachael N; Donovan, Bridget M; Vega, Kevin; Budell, William C; Koo, Gloria C; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Humanized mice have emerged as a promising model to study human immunity in vivo. Although they are susceptible to many pathogens exhibiting an almost exclusive human tropism, human immune responses to infection remain functionally impaired. It has recently been demonstrated that the expression of HLA molecules improves human immunity to lymphotropic virus infections in humanized mice. However, little is known about the extent of functional human immune responses in nonlymphoid tissues, such as in the liver, and the role of HLA expression in this context. Therefore, we analyzed human antiviral immunity in humanized mice during a hepatotropic adenovirus infection. We compared immune responses of conventional humanized NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient (NSG) mice to those of a novel NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient strain transgenic for both HLA-A*0201 and a chimeric HLA-DR*0101 molecule. Using a firefly luciferase-expressing adenovirus and in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we demonstrate a human T cell-dependent partial clearance of adenovirus-infected cells from the liver of HLA-transgenic humanized mice. This correlated with liver infiltration and activation of T cells, as well as the detection of Ag-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. When infected with a hepatitis C virus NS3-expressing adenovirus, HLA-transgenic humanized mice mounted an HLA-A*0201-restricted hepatitis C virus NS3-specific CD8(+) T cell response. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the generation of partial functional antiviral immune responses against a hepatotropic pathogen in humanized HLA-transgenic mice. The adenovirus reporter system used in our study may serve as simple in vivo method to evaluate future strategies for improving human intrahepatic immune responses in humanized mice.

  15. Earliest known crown-group salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ke-Qin; Shubin, Neil H

    2003-03-27

    Salamanders are a model system for studying the rates and patterns of the evolution of new anatomical structures. Recent discoveries of abundant Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous salamanders are helping to address these issues. Here we report the discovery of well-preserved Middle Jurassic salamanders from China, which constitutes the earliest known record of crown-group urodeles (living salamanders and their closest relatives). The new specimens are from the volcanic deposits of the Jiulongshan Formation (Bathonian), Inner Mongolia, China, and represent basal members of the Cryptobranchidae, a family that includes the endangered Asian giant salamander (Andrias) and the North American hellbender (Cryptobranchus). These fossils document a Mesozoic record of the Cryptobranchidae, predating the previous record of the group by some 100 million years. This discovery provides evidence to support the hypothesis that the divergence of the Cryptobranchidae from the Hynobiidae had taken place in Asia before the Middle Jurassic period.

  16. HIV-1, interferon and the interferon regulatory factor system: an interplay between induction, antiviral responses and viral evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Giulia; Remoli, Anna Lisa; Sgarbanti, Marco; Perrotti, Edvige; Fragale, Alessandra; Battistini, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Thirty years after the first isolation of the etiological agent of AIDS, the virus HIV-1 is still a major threat worldwide with millions of individuals currently infected. Although current combination therapies allow viral replication to be controlled, HIV-1 is not eradicated and persists in drug- and immune system-insensitive reservoirs and a cure is still lacking. Pathogens such as HIV-1 that cause chronic infections are able to adapt to the host in a manner that ensures long term residence and survival, via the evolution of numerous mechanisms that evade various aspects of the innate and adaptive immune response. One such mechanism is targeted to members of the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF) family of proteins. These transcription factors regulate a variety of biological processes including interferon induction, immune cell activation and downstream pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). HIV-1 renders IRFs harmless and hijacks them to its own advantage in order to facilitate its replication and evasion of immune responses. Type I interferon (IFN), the canonical antiviral innate response, can be induced in both acute and chronic HIV-1 infection in vivo, but in the majority of individuals this initial response is not protective and can contribute to disease progression. Type I IFN expression is largely inhibited in T cells and macrophages in order to successfully establish productive infection, whereas sustained IFN production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells is considered an important source of chronic immune activation, a hallmark to AIDS progression.

  17. A novel system for the launch of alphavirus RNA synthesis reveals a role for the Imd pathway in arthropod antiviral response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthi Avadhanula

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are RNA viruses transmitted between vertebrate hosts by arthropod vectors, primarily mosquitoes. How arthropods counteract alphaviruses or viruses per se is not very well understood. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying innate immunity against bacterial and fungal infections. In this study we report the use of a novel system to analyze replication of Sindbis virus (type species of the alphavirus genus RNA following expression of a Sindbis virus replicon RNA from the fly genome. We demonstrate deficits in the immune deficiency (Imd pathway enhance viral replication while mutations in the Toll pathway fail to affect replication. Similar results were observed with intrathoracic injections of whole virus and confirmed in cultured mosquito cells. These findings show that the Imd pathway mediates an antiviral response to Sindbis virus replication. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of an antiviral role for the Imd pathway in insects.

  18. La respuesta inmune antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainel Sánchez de la Rosa

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Se expone que los virus son parásitos intracelulares obligados, puesto que no tienen metabolismo propio; esto obliga al sistema inmune a poner en marcha sus mecanismos más especializados para reconocer y eliminar, tanto a los virus libres, como a las células infectadas. Se señala que las células presentadoras de antígenos, los linfocitos B y los T unidos al complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad, forman parte de la organización de la respuesta inmune antiviral; la inducción de esta respuesta con proteínas, péptidos y ADN desnudo, son alternativas actuales tanto en la prevención como en el tratamiento de las infecciones viralesIt is explained that viruses are compulsory intracellular parasites, since they don't have their own metabolism, which makes the immune system to start its mest specialized mechanisms to recognize and eliminate the free viruses and the infected cells. It is stated that the cells presenting antigens, and the B and T lymphocytes together with the major histocompatibility complex, are part of the organization of the immune antiviral response. The induction of this response with proteins, peptides and naked DNA are the present alternatives for the prevention and treatment of viral infections

  19. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  20. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  1. Interferon-induced antiviral Mx1 GTPase is associated with components of the SUMO-1 system and promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, O G; Ullrich, E; Kochs, G; Haller, O

    2001-12-10

    Mx proteins are interferon-induced large GTPases, some of which have antiviral activity against a variety of viruses. The murine Mx1 protein accumulates in the nucleus of interferon-treated cells and is active against members of the Orthomyxoviridae family, such as the influenza viruses and Thogoto virus. The mechanism by which Mx1 exerts its antiviral action is still unclear, but an involvement of undefined nuclear factors has been postulated. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified cellular proteins that interact with Mx1 protein. The Mx1 interactors were mainly nuclear proteins. They included Sp100, Daxx, and Bloom's syndrome protein (BLM), all of which are known to localize to specific subnuclear domains called promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs). In addition, components of the SUMO-1 protein modification system were identified as Mx1-interacting proteins, namely the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO-1 and SAE2, which represents subunit 2 of the SUMO-1 activating enzyme. Analysis of the subcellular localization of Mx1 and some of these interacting proteins by confocal microscopy revealed a close spatial association of Mx1 with PML NBs. This suggests a role of PML NBs and SUMO-1 in the antiviral action of Mx1 and may allow us to discover novel functions of this large GTPase.

  2. Systemic RNA delivery to dendritic cells exploits antiviral defence for cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Lena M.; Diken, Mustafa; Haas, Heinrich; Kreiter, Sebastian; Loquai, Carmen; Reuter, Kerstin C.; Meng, Martin; Fritz, Daniel; Vascotto, Fulvia; Hefesha, Hossam; Grunwitz, Christian; Vormehr, Mathias; Hüsemann, Yves; Selmi, Abderraouf; Kuhn, Andreas N.; Buck, Janina; Derhovanessian, Evelyna; Rae, Richard; Attig, Sebastian; Diekmann, Jan; Jabulowsky, Robert A.; Heesch, Sandra; Hassel, Jessica; Langguth, Peter; Grabbe, Stephan; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-06-01

    Lymphoid organs, in which antigen presenting cells (APCs) are in close proximity to T cells, are the ideal microenvironment for efficient priming and amplification of T-cell responses. However, the systemic delivery of vaccine antigens into dendritic cells (DCs) is hampered by various technical challenges. Here we show that DCs can be targeted precisely and effectively in vivo using intravenously administered RNA-lipoplexes (RNA-LPX) based on well-known lipid carriers by optimally adjusting net charge, without the need for functionalization of particles with molecular ligands. The LPX protects RNA from extracellular ribonucleases and mediates its efficient uptake and expression of the encoded antigen by DC populations and macrophages in various lymphoid compartments. RNA-LPX triggers interferon-α (IFNα) release by plasmacytoid DCs and macrophages. Consequently, DC maturation in situ and inflammatory immune mechanisms reminiscent of those in the early systemic phase of viral infection are activated. We show that RNA-LPX encoding viral or mutant neo-antigens or endogenous self-antigens induce strong effector and memory T-cell responses, and mediate potent IFNα-dependent rejection of progressive tumours. A phase I dose-escalation trial testing RNA-LPX that encode shared tumour antigens is ongoing. In the first three melanoma patients treated at a low-dose level, IFNα and strong antigen-specific T-cell responses were induced, supporting the identified mode of action and potency. As any polypeptide-based antigen can be encoded as RNA, RNA-LPX represent a universally applicable vaccine class for systemic DC targeting and synchronized induction of both highly potent adaptive as well as type-I-IFN-mediated innate immune mechanisms for cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Stygiolobus rod-shaped virus and the interplay of crenarchaeal rudiviruses with the CRISPR antiviral system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Shah, Shiraz Ali; Bize, Ariane

    2008-01-01

    helicase and nuclease implicated in DNA replication. Analysis of matches between known crenarchaeal chromosomal CRISPR spacer sequences, implicated in a viral defense system, and rudiviral genomes revealed that about 10% of the 3,042 unique acidothermophile spacers yield significant matches to rudiviral...... genomes, with a bias to highly conserved protein genes, consistent with the widespread presence of rudiviruses in hot acidophilic environments. We propose that the 12-bp indels which are commonly found in conserved rudiviral protein genes may be generated as a reaction to the presence of the host CRISPR...

  4. Antiviral Information Management System (AIMS): a prototype for operational innovation in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Pravin R; Neal, Lauren; Florian, Jeff; Chen, Ying; Naeger, Lisa; Robertson, Sarah; Soon, Guoxing; Birnkrant, Debra

    2010-09-01

    This article presents a prototype for an operational innovation in knowledge management (KM). These operational innovations are geared toward managing knowledge efficiently and accessing all available information by embracing advances in bioinformatics and allied fields. The specific components of the proposed KM system are (1) a database to archive hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment data in a structured format and retrieve information in a query-capable manner and (2) an automated analysis tool to inform trial design elements for HCV drug development. The proposed framework is intended to benefit drug development by increasing efficiency of dose selection and improving the consistency of advice from US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is also hoped that the framework will encourage collaboration among FDA, industry, and academic scientists to guide the HCV drug development process using model-based quantitative analysis techniques.

  5. The Earliest Ion Channels in Protocellular Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijajlovic, Milan; Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Wei, Chenyu

    2010-01-01

    Cellular membranes with their hydrophobic interior are virtually impermeable to ions. Bulk of ion transport through them is enabled through ion channels. Ion channels of contemporary cells are complex protein molecules which span the membrane creating a cylindrical pore filled with water. Protocells, which are widely regarded as precursors to modern cells, had similarly impermeable membranes, but the set of proteins in their disposal was much simpler and more limited. We have been, therefore, exploring an idea that the first ion channels in protocellular membranes were formed by much smaller peptide molecules that could spontaneously selfassemble into short-lived cylindrical bundles in a membrane. Earlier studies have shown that a group of peptides known as peptaibols is capable of forming ion channels in lipid bilayers when they are exposed to an electric field. Peptaibols are small, non-genetically encoded peptides produced by some fungi as a part of their system of defense against bacteria. They are usually only 14-20 residues long, which is just enough to span the membrane. Their sequence is characterized by the presence of non-standard amino acids which, interestingly, are also expected to have existed on the early earth. In particular, the presence of 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) gives peptaibols strong helix forming propensities. Association of the helices inside membranes leads to the formation of cylindrical bundles, typically containing 4 to 10 monomers. Although peptaibols are excellent candidates for models of the earliest ion channels their structures, which are stabilized only by van der Waals forces and occasional hydrogen bonds between neighboring helices, are not very stable. Although it might properly reflect protobiological reality, it is also a major obstacle in studying channel behavior. For this reason we focused on two members of the peptaibol family, trichotoxin and antiamoebin, which are characterized by a single conductance level. This

  6. Age and origin of earliest adakitic-like magmatism in Panama: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whattam, Scott A.; Montes, Camilo; McFadden, Rory R.; Cardona, Agustin; Ramirez, Diego; Valencia, Victor

    2012-06-01

    40-20 Ma marks a fundamental interval in the evolution of the 70-0 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc system. During this period, there is no evidence of Panamanian magmatic arc activity to the east of the Panama Canal Basin while to the west and in localized regions to the east of the Panama Canal Basin a phase of intrusive-only activity is recorded. Fundamentally, geochemical and geochronological evidence presented herein indicate that this intrusive activity was predominantly 'adakitic-like' and becomes younger from west to east along an approximately W-E striking lineament. Granodiorites of the Petaquilla batholith, western Panama yield LAM-ICP-MS 206Pb/238U zircon ages of 29.0 + 0.7, - 0.6 Ma, 28.5 + 0.7, - 0.5 Ma, 28.3 + 0.5, - 0.4 Ma and 26.2 + 0.5, - 0.9 Ma. To the east of the Panama Canal Basin zircons from a hypabyssal diorite of the mainly intermediate Majé subvolcanic suite, cedes a mean 206Pb/238U age of 18.9 + 0.4 Ma. Relative to other 70-5 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc lavas and intrusives, Majé and Petaquilla intrusives yield adakitic-like major and trace element abundances (e.g., > 15 wt.% Al2O3, generally > 3.5 wt.% Na2O, > 400 ppm Sr, 120) and strongly fractionated HREE patterns. These 30-26 Ma (Petaquilla) and 19 Ma (Majé) suites are also compositionally similar to a subvolcanic suite of rare, circa 25 Ma adakitic-like, andesitic intrusives which occur within the Panama Canal Basin midway between Petaquilla and Majé and at the same approximate latitude as Petaquilla and Majé. Collectively, the geochemical and geochronological data for the adakitic-like intrusives arc consistent with formation via partial melting of lowermost, mafic crust above a sub-horizontal slab tear that propagated from the west (Petaquilla) to the east (Majé) between 30 and 19 Ma. Our new tectonic model postulates that collision between the Panamanian magmatic arc system and an 'indentor' (e.g., a tract of thickened buoyant, oceanic crust or plateau) occurred at about 40 Ma, a

  7. A thermodynamic and mechanical model for the earliest Solar System: Formation via 3-d collapse of dust in the pre-Solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, R. E.; Hofmeister, A.

    2012-12-01

    The fundamental and shared rotational characteristics of the Solar System (nearly circular, co-planar orbits and mostly upright axial spins of the planets) record conditions of origin, yet are not explained by prevailing 2-dimensional disk models. Current planetary spin and orbital rotational energies (R.E.) each nearly equal and linearly depend on gravitational self-potential of formation (Ug), revealing mechanical energy conservation. We derive ΔUg ˜= ΔR.E. and stability criteria from thermodynamic principles, and parlay these relationships into a detailed model of simultaneous accretion of the protoSun and planets from the dust-bearing pre-solar nebula (PSN). Gravitational heating is insignificant because Ug is negative, the 2nd law of thermodynamics must be fulfilled, and ideal gas conditions pertain until the objects were nearly fully formed. Combined conservation of angular momentum and mechanical energy during 3-dimensional collapse of spheroidal dust shells in a contracting nebula provides ΔR.E. ˜= R.E. for the central body, whereas for formation of orbiting bodies, ΔR.E.depends on the contraction of orbits during collapse. Orbital data for the inner planets follow 0.04xR.E.f ˜= -Ug which confirms conservation of angular momentum. Measured spins of the youngest stars confirm that R.E.˜= -Ug. Heat production occurs after nearly final sizes are reached via mechanisms such as shear during differential rotation and radioactivity. We focus on the dilute stage, showing that the PSN was compositionally graded due to light molecules diffusing preferentially, providing the observed planetary chemistry, and set limits on PSN mass, density, and temperature. From measured planetary masses and orbital characteristics, accounting for dissipation of spin, we deduce mechanisms and the sequence of converting a 3-d dusty cloud to the present 2-d Solar System, and infer the evolution of dust and gas densities. Duration of events is obtained from the time

  8. Modeling Viral Infectious Diseases and Development of Antiviral Therapies Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Trevisan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent biotechnology breakthrough of cell reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which has revolutionized the approaches to study the mechanisms of human diseases and to test new drugs, can be exploited to generate patient-specific models for the investigation of host–pathogen interactions and to develop new antimicrobial and antiviral therapies. Applications of iPSC technology to the study of viral infections in humans have included in vitro modeling of viral infections of neural, liver, and cardiac cells; modeling of human genetic susceptibility to severe viral infectious diseases, such as encephalitis and severe influenza; genetic engineering and genome editing of patient-specific iPSC-derived cells to confer antiviral resistance.

  9. Stable isotope-based Plio-Pleistocene ecosystem reconstruction of some of the earliest hominid fossil sites in the East African Rift System (Chiwondo Beds, N Malawi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdecke, Tina; Thiemeyer, Heinrich; Schrenk, Friedemann; Mulch, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The isotope geochemistry of pedogenic carbonate and fossil herbivore enamel is a powerful tool to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions in particular when climate change plays a key role in the evolution of ecosystems. Here, we present the first Plio-Pleistocene long-term carbon (δ13C), oxygen (δ18O) and clumped isotope (Δ47) records from pedogenic carbonate and herbivore teeth in the Malawi Rift. These data represent an important southern hemisphere record in the East African Rift System (EARS), a key region for reconstructing vegetation patterns in today's Zambezian Savanna and correlation with data on the evolution and migration of early hominids across the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone. As our study site is situated between the well-known hominid-bearing sites of eastern and southern Africa in the Somali-Masai Endemic Zone and Highveld Grassland it fills an important geographical gap for early hominid research. 5.0 to 0.6 Ma fluviatile and lacustrine deposits of the Chiwondo Beds (NE shore of Lake Malawi) comprise abundant pedogenic carbonate and remains of a diverse fauna dominated by large terrestrial mammals. These sediments are also home to two hominid fossil remains, a mandible of Homo rudolfensis and a maxillary fragment of Paranthropus boisei, both dated around 2.4 Ma. The Chiwondo Beds therefore document early co-existence of these two species. We evaluate δ13C data from fossil enamel of different suid, bovid, and equid species and contrast these with δ13C and δ18O values of pedogenic carbonate. We complement the latter with clumped isotope soil temperature data. Results of almost 800 pedogenic carbonate samples from over 20 sections consistently average δ13C = -8.5 ‰ over the past 5 Ma with no significant short-term δ13C excursions or long-term trends. The data from molar tooth enamel of nine individual suids of the genera Metridiochoerus, Notochoerus and Nyanzachoerus support these findings with average δ13C = -10.0 ‰. The absence

  10. Systemic corticosteroids and early administration of antiviral agents for pneumonia with acute wheezing due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Kudo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pneumonia patients with wheezing due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 were frequently treated with systemic corticosteroids in Japan although systemic corticosteroid for critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza A(H1N1pdm09 has been controversial. Applicability of systemic corticosteroid treatment needs to be evaluated. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrospectively reviewed 89 subjects who were diagnosed with influenza A(H1N1pdm09 and admitted to a national hospital, Tokyo during the pandemic period. The median age of subjects (45 males was 8 years (range, 0-71. All subjects were treated with antiviral agents and the median time from symptom onset to initiation of antiviral agents was 2 days (range, 0-7. Subjects were classified into four groups: upper respiratory tract infection, wheezing illness, pneumonia with wheezing, and pneumonia without wheezing. The characteristics of each group was evaluated. A history of asthma was found more frequently in the wheezing illness (55.6% and pneumonia with wheezing (43.3% groups than in the other two groups (p = 0.017. Corticosteroid treatment was assessed among subjects with pneumonia. Oxygen saturation was lower in subjects receiving corticosteroids (steroid group than in subjects not receiving corticosteroids (no-steroid group (p<0.001. The steroid group required greater oxygen supply than the no-steroid group (p<0.001. No significant difference was found by the Kaplan-Meier method between the steroid and the no-steroid groups in hours to fever alleviation from the initiation of antiviral agents and hospitalization days. In logistic regression analysis, wheezing, pneumonia and oxygen saturation were independent factors associated with using systemic corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: Patients with wheezing and a history of asthma were frequently found in the study subjects. Systemic corticosteroids together with early administration of antiviral agents to pneumonia with wheezing and

  11. Antiviral potential of lactic acid bacteria and their bacteriocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kassaa, I; Hober, D; Hamze, M; Chihib, N E; Drider, D

    2014-12-01

    Emerging resistance to antiviral agents is a growing public health concern worldwide as it was reported for respiratory, sexually transmitted and enteric viruses. Therefore, there is a growing demand for new, unconventional antiviral agents which may serve as an alternative to the currently used drugs. Meanwhile, published literature continues shedding the light on the potency of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their bacteriocins as antiviral agents. Health-promoting LAB probiotics may exert their antiviral activity by (1) direct probiotic-virus interaction; (2) production of antiviral inhibitory metabolites; and/or (3) via stimulation of the immune system. The aim of this review was to highlight the antiviral activity of LAB and substances they produce with antiviral activity.

  12. Earliest Holozoan Expansion of Phosphotyrosine Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Hiroshi; Torruella, Guifré; Burger, Gertraud; Brown, Matthew W.; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2015-01-01

    Phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signaling is involved in development and maintenance of metazoans’ multicellular body through cell-to-cell communication. Tyrosine kinases (TKs), tyrosine phosphatases, and other proteins relaying the signal compose the cascade. Domain architectures of the pTyr signaling proteins are diverse in metazoans, reflecting their complex intercellular communication. Previous studies had shown that the metazoan-type TKs, as well as other pTyr signaling proteins, were already diversified in the common ancestor of metazoans, choanoflagellates, and filastereans (which are together included in the clade Holozoa) whereas they are absent in fungi and other nonholozoan lineages. However, the earliest-branching holozoans Ichthyosporea and Corallochytrea, as well as the two fungi-related amoebae Fonticula and Nuclearia, have not been studied. Here, we analyze the complete genome sequences of two ichthyosporeans and Fonticula, and RNAseq data of three additional ichthyosporeans, one corallochytrean, and Nuclearia. Both the ichthyosporean and corallochytrean genomes encode a large variety of receptor TKs (RTKs) and cytoplasmic TKs (CTKs), as well as other pTyr signaling components showing highly complex domain architectures. However, Nuclearia and Fonticula have no TK, and show much less diversity in other pTyr signaling components. The CTK repertoires of both Ichthyosporea and Corallochytrea are similar to those of Metazoa, Choanoflagellida, and Filasterea, but the RTK sets are totally different from each other. The complex pTyr signaling equipped with positive/negative feedback mechanism likely emerged already at an early stage of holozoan evolution, yet keeping a high evolutionary plasticity in extracellular signal reception until the co-option of the system for cell-to-cell communication in metazoans. PMID:24307687

  13. Pox Pottery: Earliest Identified Mexican Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, C F

    1965-07-09

    The earliest known ceramics from Mexico, termed "Pox Pottery," may mark the transition from a nomadic to a settled way of life. The presence of "Pox Pottery" in both coastal Guerrero and the Tehuacan Valley might provide evidence as to the type of environment in which this change first occurred.

  14. Antiviral drug valacyclovir treatment combined with a clean feeding system enhances the suppression of salivary gland hypertrophy in laboratory colonies of Glossina pallidipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Hytrosaviridae cause salivary gland hypertrophy (SGH) syndrome in some infected tsetse flies (Diptera: Glossinidae). Infected male and female G. pallidipes with SGH have a reduced fecundity and fertility. Due to the deleterious impact of the virus on G. pallidipes colonies, adding the antiviral drug valacyclovir to the blood diet and changing the feeding regime to a clean feeding system (each fly receives for each feeding a fresh clean blood meal) have been investigated to develop virus management strategies. Although both approaches used alone successfully reduced the virus load and the SGH prevalence in small experimental groups, considerable time was needed to obtain the desired SGH reduction and both systems were only demonstrated with colonies that had a low initial virus prevalence (SGH ≤ 10%). As problems with SGH are often only recognized once the incidence is already high, it was necessary to demonstrate that this combination would also work for high prevalence colonies. Findings Combining both methods at colony level successfully suppressed the SGH in G. pallidipes colonies that had a high initial virus prevalence (average SGH of 24%). Six months after starting the combined treatment SGH symptoms were eliminated from the treated colony, in contrast to 28 months required to obtain the same results using clean feeding alone and 21 months using antiviral drug alone. Conclusions Combining valacyclovir treatment with the clean feeding system provides faster control of SGH in tsetse than either method alone and is effective even when the initial SGH prevalence is high. PMID:24886248

  15. TRIM68 negatively regulates IFN-β production by degrading TRK fused gene, a novel driver of IFN-β downstream of anti-viral detection systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Wynne

    Full Text Available In recent years members of the tripartite motif-containing (TRIM family of E3 ubiquitin ligases have been shown to both positively and negatively regulate viral defence and as such are emerging as compelling targets for modulating the anti-viral immune response. In this study we identify TRIM68, a close homologue of TRIM21, as a novel regulator of Toll-like receptor (TLR- and RIG-I-like receptor (RLR-driven type I IFN production. Proteomic analysis of TRIM68-containing complexes identified TRK-fused gene (TFG as a potential TRIM68 target. Overexpression of TRIM68 and TFG confirmed their ability to associate, with TLR3 stimulation appearing to enhance the interaction. TFG is a known activator of NF-κB via its ability to interact with inhibitor of NF-κB kinase subunit gamma (IKK-γ and TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK. Our data identifies a novel role for TFG as a positive regulator of type I IFN production and suggests that TRIM68 targets TFG for lysosomal degradation, thus turning off TFG-mediated IFN-β production. Knockdown of TRIM68 in primary human monocytes resulted in enhanced levels of type I IFN and TFG following poly(I:C treatment. Thus TRIM68 targets TFG, a novel regulator of IFN production, and in doing so turns off and limits type I IFN production in response to anti-viral detection systems.

  16. Efficient Suppression of Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Combination Treatment with miR-122 Antagonism and Direct-acting Antivirals in Cell Culture Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fanwei Liu; Tetsuro Shimakami; Kazuhisa Murai; Takayoshi Shirasaki; Masaya Funaki; Masao Honda; Seishi Murakami; Minkyung Yi; Hong Tang; Shuichi Kaneko

    2016-01-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) show effective antiviral activity with few side effects. However, the selection of DAA-resistance mutants is a growing problem that needs to be resolved. In contrast, miR-122 antagonism shows extensive antiviral effects among all HCV genotypes and a high barrier to drug resistance. In the present study, we evaluated three DAAs (simeprevir, daclatasvir, and sofosbuvir) in combination with anti-miR-122 treatment against HCV genotyp...

  17. Electroreception in lampreys: evidence that the earliest vertebrates were electroreceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodznick, D; Northcutt, R G

    1981-04-24

    Evoked potential and unit responses from the lamprey brain to weak electric fields demonstrate that lampreys have an electrosensory system as sensitive as those of other electroreceptive fishes. Electrosensory responses were recorded in the dorsal medulla, the midbrain torus semicircularis, and the optic tectum. Similarities in the structure of the anterior lateral line nerves and medullary organization between lampreys and several primitive jawed fishes indicate that the electroreceptive systems are homologous in these taxa. Thus electroreception was probably present in the earliest vertebrates ancestral to both agnathans and gnathostomes.

  18. Ophthalmic antiviral chemotherapy : An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athmanathan Sreedharan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drug development has been slow due to many factors. One such factor is the difficulty to block the viral replication in the cell without adversely affecting the host cell metabolic activity. Most of the antiviral compounds are analogs of purines and pyramidines. Currently available antiviral drugs mainly inhibit viral nucleic acid synthesis, hence act only on actively replicating viruses. This article presents an overview of some of the commonly used antiviral agents in clinical ophthalmology.

  19. Antiviral Drugs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used for seasonal flu.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  20. A population approach to disease management: hepatitis C direct-acting antiviral use in a large health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belperio, Pamela S; Backus, Lisa I; Ross, David; Neuhauser, Melinda M; Mole, Larry A

    2014-06-01

    The introduction of the first direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV), telaprevir and boceprevir, marked a unique event in which 2 disease-changing therapies received FDA approval at the same time. Comparative safety and effectiveness data in real-world populations upon which to make formulary decisions did not exist. To describe the implementation, measurement, and outcomes of an enduring population-based approach of surveillance of medication management for HCV. The foundation of the population approach to HCV medication management used by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) relied upon a basic framework of (a) providing data for effective regional and local management, (b) education and training, (c) real-time oversight and feedback from a higher organization level, and (d) prompt outcome sharing. These population-based processes spanned across the continuum of the direct-acting antiviral oversight process. We used the VA's HCV Clinical Case Registry-which includes pharmacy, laboratory, and diagnosis information for all HCV-infected veterans from all VA facilities-to assess DAA treatment eligibility, DAA uptake and timing, appropriate use of DAAs including HCV RNA monitoring and medication possession ratios (MPR), nonconcordance with guidance for adjunct erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) use, hematologic adverse effects, discontinuation rates, and early and sustained virologic responses. Training impact was assessed via survey and change in pharmacist scope of practice. One year after FDA approval, DAAs had been prescribed at 120 of 130 VA facilities. Over 680 VA providers participated in live educational training programs including 380 pharmacists, and pharmacists with a scope of practice for HCV increased from 59 to 110 pharmacists (86%). HCV RNA futility testing improved such that only 1%-3% of veterans did not have appropriate testing compared with 15%-17% 6

  1. Development of a novel Dengue-1 virus replicon system expressing secretory Gaussia luciferase for analysis of viral replication and discovery of antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Replicon systems have been used for high-throughput screening of anti-dengue virus (anti-DENV) inhibitors and for understanding mechanisms of viral replication. In the present study, we constructed novel DENV-1 replicons encoding Gaussia luciferase that was secreted into the culture medium. Two types of constructs were generated: RNA-based and DNA-based. Each type was translated in an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent or IRES-independent manner. Among these constructs, the DNA-based replicon employing IRES-dependent translation (DGL2) produced the highest titer. Luciferase levels in the culture medium revealed that the DGL2 replicon was inhibited by ribavirin (a well-known DENV inhibitor) at levels similar to those measured for drug inhibition of multi-round DENV-1 infection. These results indicate that the DNA-based IRES-driven DENV-1 replicon may facilitate studies on viral replication and antiviral compound discovery.

  2. Development of an in vitro system to measure the sensitivity to the antiviral Mx protein of fish viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Katherine; Hall, Malcolm; Urquhart, Katy; Gahlawat, Suresh; Collet, Bertrand

    2012-06-01

    Mx is a structural protein, induced by type I interferon (IFN), with direct antiviral properties. In fish the inherent contribution of Mx protein to viral protection is unknown. The transgenic Chinook salmon embryonic (CHSE)-TOF cell line was genetically modified to express the rainbow trout Mx (rbtMx1) protein under the control of the tetracycline derivative, doxycycline (DOX). Two clones CHSE-TOF-MX8 and CHSE-TOF-MX10 were isolated and characterised by qPCR. The level of resistance to Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus (IPNV), Salmon Alphavirus (SAV), Infectious Haematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV) and Epizootic Haematopoietic Necrosis Virus (EHNV) of the CHSE-TOF, CHSE-TOF-MX8 and CHSE-TOF-MX10 cell lines cultivated with and without DOX was measured. A novel method was established to measure accurately the level of sensitivity of any given viral isolate to Mx protein. IPNV and SAV viruses were highly sensitive to the presence of rbtMx1 in the cells whereas IHNV and EHNV showed partial resistance suggesting contrasting viral evasion strategies between these categories of viruses.

  3. EARLIEST TRIASSIC CONODONTS FROM CHITRAL, NORTHERNMOST PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA CRISTINA PERRI

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Extensive tracts of very shallow water carbonates in the valleys of the Yarkhun and Mastuj rivers of Chitral (northernmost Pakistan previously though to be Permian (or Cretaceous are shown by conodonts from two horizons in sequences 110 km apart—near Torman Gol (Mastuj valley and near Sakirmul (upper Yarkhun valley—to include earliest Triassic (Scythian—Induan horizons. Both faunas have Isarcicella staeschei Dai & Zhang, Is. lobata Perri, Is. turgida (Kozur et al. and Hindeodus parvus (Kozur & Pjatakova, whereas Is. Isarcica (Huckriede has been recognised only in the Torman Gol occurrence. The presence, respectively, of Is. staeschei in the Sakirmul and Is. isarcica in the Torman Gol occurrences, allows discrimination of the staeschei and isarcica zones respectively the third and the fourth conodont biozones of the Early Triassic conodont biozonation of Perri (in Perri & Farabegoli 2003. Such faunas, consisting mainly of isarcicellids and hindeodids but lacking gondolellids, are characteristic of restricted sea environments across the Permian–Triassic boundary and in the earliest Triassic in other Tethyan areas. The conodont faunas from these two occurrences are remarkably similar, nearly contemporaneous, and indicate shallow water biofacies. They are inferred to equate with the Ailak Dolomite, a sequence of Late Permian–?Late Triassic dolostones discriminated farther up the Yarkhun valley and extending eastwards into the upper Hunza region of northernmost Pakistan. The Zait Limestone and Sakirmul carbonate sequence are consistent with extension of the previously inferred Triassic carbonate platform at least 110 km farther to the SW than previously supposed.

  4. The earliest published electrocardiogram showing ventricular preexcitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Knorre, Georg H

    2005-03-01

    When in 1930, Wolff, Parkinson, and White published what is today known as the WPW, or preexcitation syndrome, they, and subsequently others, found few comparable cases in the preceding literature. Among these the report of Cohn and Fraser, published in 1913, was the earliest. However, another even earlier documentation in a 1909 article by Hoffmann escaped notice till now. The ECG of a patient with paroxysmal tachycardia reveals a short PR interval and a delta-wave-induced widening of the QRS complex, even though the reproduced tachycardia was not preexcitation related. The interpretation of this poorly reproduced ECG can be confirmed by another and more detailed description of the patient in an electrocardiography textbook published in 1914 by the same author. Thus, the earliest publication of an ECG showing ventricular preexcitation now can be dated back to 1909. Moreover, the Hoffmann monograph contains two additional examples of the WPW syndrome not noticed until now. All three cases published by Hoffmann had their first ECG recordings in 1912 or earlier.

  5. Induction and suppression of the innate antiviral responses by picornaviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Q.

    2014-01-01

    On the front line of innate antiviral immune reactions is the type I interferon (IFN-α/β) system. IFN-α/β are small signaling molecules that can be produced by virtually all nucleated cells in our body upon virus infections, and induce a so-called “antiviral state” in neighboring cells by activating

  6. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...... the examples of polymer therapeutics being applied as an antiviral treatment are few and far in-between. This work aims to explore antiviral therapeutics, specifically in context of hepatitis virus C (HCV) and HIV. The current treatment of hepatitis C consists of a combination of drugs, of which ribavirin....... Curiously, the therapeutic window of ribavirin was vastly improved in several of these polymers suggesting altered pharmacodynamics. The applicability of liver-targeting sugar moieties is likewise tested in a similarly methodical approach. The same technique of synthesis was applied with zidovudine to make...

  7. Imaging the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, William; Small, Scott A

    2006-12-01

    Historical progress in medicine can be charted along the lines of technical innovations that have visualized the invisible. One hundred years ago, Alois Alzheimer exploited newly developed histological stains to visualize his eponymonous disease in dead tissue under the microscope. Now, as we are entering the second century of Alzheimer's disease research, technical innovation has endowed us with a range of in vivo imaging techniques that promise to visualize Alzheimer' disease in living people. The earliest stage of Alzheimer's disease is characterized by cell-sickness, not cell-death, and can occur before the deposition of amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. In principle, 'functional' imaging techniques might be able to detect this early stage of the disease, a stage that was invisible to Alzheimer himself. Here, we will first define the neurobiological meaning of 'function' and then review the different approaches that measure brain dysfunction in Alzheimer' disease.

  8. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-03-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth's surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635-542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5-4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth.

  9. Sustained Inhibition of HBV Replication In Vivo after Systemic Injection of AAVs Encoding Artificial Antiviral Primary MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohube Betty Maepa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV remains a problem of global significance and improving available treatment is important to prevent life-threatening complications arising in persistently infected individuals. HBV is susceptible to silencing by exogenous artificial intermediates of the RNA interference (RNAi pathway. However, toxicity of Pol III cassettes and short duration of silencing by effectors of the RNAi pathway may limit anti-HBV therapeutic utility. To advance RNAi-based HBV gene silencing, mono- and trimeric artificial primary microRNAs (pri-miRs derived from pri-miR-31 were placed under control of the liver-specific modified murine transthyretin promoter. The sequences, which target the X sequence of HBV, were incorporated into recombinant hepatotropic self-complementary adeno-associated viruses (scAAVs. Systemic intravenous injection of the vectors into HBV transgenic mice at a dose of 1 × 1011 per animal effected significant suppression of markers of HBV replication for at least 32 weeks. The pri-miRs were processed according to the intended design, and intrahepatic antiviral guide sequences were detectable for 40 weeks after the injection. There was no evidence of toxicity, and innate immunostimulation was not detectable following the injections. This efficacy is an improvement on previously reported RNAi-based inhibition of HBV replication and is important to clinical translation of the technology.

  10. Ultrasonic hearing and echolocation in the earliest toothed whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Travis; Fitzgerald, Erich M G; Evans, Alistair R

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of biosonar (production of high-frequency sound and reception of its echo) was a key innovation of toothed whales and dolphins (Odontoceti) that facilitated phylogenetic diversification and rise to ecological predominance. Yet exactly when high-frequency hearing first evolved in odontocete history remains a fundamental question in cetacean biology. Here, we show that archaic odontocetes had a cochlea specialized for sensing high-frequency sound, as exemplified by an Oligocene xenorophid, one of the earliest diverging stem groups. This specialization is not as extreme as that seen in the crown clade. Paired with anatomical correlates for high-frequency signal production in Xenorophidae, this is strong evidence that the most archaic toothed whales possessed a functional biosonar system, and that this signature adaptation of odontocetes was acquired at or soon after their origin.

  11. Geno2pheno[HCV] - A Web-based Interpretation System to Support Hepatitis C Treatment Decisions in the Era of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhav Kalaghatgi

    Full Text Available The face of hepatitis C virus (HCV therapy is changing dramatically. Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs specifically targeting HCV proteins have been developed and entered clinical practice in 2011. However, despite high sustained viral response (SVR rates of more than 90%, a fraction of patients do not eliminate the virus and in these cases treatment failure has been associated with the selection of drug resistance mutations (RAMs. RAMs may be prevalent prior to the start of treatment, or can be selected under therapy, and furthermore they can persist after cessation of treatment. Additionally, certain DAAs have been approved only for distinct HCV genotypes and may even have subtype specificity. Thus, sequence analysis before start of therapy is instrumental for managing DAA-based treatment strategies. We have created the interpretation system geno2pheno[HCV] (g2p[HCV] to analyse HCV sequence data with respect to viral subtype and to predict drug resistance. Extensive reviewing and weighting of literature related to HCV drug resistance was performed to create a comprehensive list of drug resistance rules for inhibitors of the HCV protease in non-structural protein 3 (NS3-protease: Boceprevir, Paritaprevir, Simeprevir, Asunaprevir, Grazoprevir and Telaprevir, the NS5A replicase factor (Daclatasvir, Ledipasvir, Elbasvir and Ombitasvir, and the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Dasabuvir and Sofosbuvir. Upon submission of up to eight sequences, g2p[HCV] aligns the input sequences, identifies the genomic region(s, predicts the HCV geno- and subtypes, and generates for each DAA a drug resistance prediction report. g2p[HCV] offers easy-to-use and fast subtype and resistance analysis of HCV sequences, is continuously updated and freely accessible under http://hcv.geno2pheno.org/index.php. The system was partially validated with respect to the NS3-protease inhibitors Boceprevir, Telaprevir and Simeprevir by using data generated with recombinant

  12. Geno2pheno[HCV] – A Web-based Interpretation System to Support Hepatitis C Treatment Decisions in the Era of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaghatgi, Prabhav; Sikorski, Anna Maria; Knops, Elena; Rupp, Daniel; Sierra, Saleta; Heger, Eva; Neumann-Fraune, Maria; Beggel, Bastian; Walker, Andreas; Timm, Jörg; Walter, Hauke; Obermeier, Martin; Kaiser, Rolf; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The face of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy is changing dramatically. Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) specifically targeting HCV proteins have been developed and entered clinical practice in 2011. However, despite high sustained viral response (SVR) rates of more than 90%, a fraction of patients do not eliminate the virus and in these cases treatment failure has been associated with the selection of drug resistance mutations (RAMs). RAMs may be prevalent prior to the start of treatment, or can be selected under therapy, and furthermore they can persist after cessation of treatment. Additionally, certain DAAs have been approved only for distinct HCV genotypes and may even have subtype specificity. Thus, sequence analysis before start of therapy is instrumental for managing DAA-based treatment strategies. We have created the interpretation system geno2pheno[HCV] (g2p[HCV]) to analyse HCV sequence data with respect to viral subtype and to predict drug resistance. Extensive reviewing and weighting of literature related to HCV drug resistance was performed to create a comprehensive list of drug resistance rules for inhibitors of the HCV protease in non-structural protein 3 (NS3-protease: Boceprevir, Paritaprevir, Simeprevir, Asunaprevir, Grazoprevir and Telaprevir), the NS5A replicase factor (Daclatasvir, Ledipasvir, Elbasvir and Ombitasvir), and the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Dasabuvir and Sofosbuvir). Upon submission of up to eight sequences, g2p[HCV] aligns the input sequences, identifies the genomic region(s), predicts the HCV geno- and subtypes, and generates for each DAA a drug resistance prediction report. g2p[HCV] offers easy-to-use and fast subtype and resistance analysis of HCV sequences, is continuously updated and freely accessible under http://hcv.geno2pheno.org/index.php. The system was partially validated with respect to the NS3-protease inhibitors Boceprevir, Telaprevir and Simeprevir by using data generated with recombinant, phenotypic

  13. Type I interferon production during herpes simplex virus infection is controlled by cell-type-specific viral recognition through Toll-like receptor 9, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein pathway, and novel recognition systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Brandtoft; Sørensen, Louise Nørgaard; Malmgaard, Lene

    2007-01-01

    and fibroblasts, where the virus was able to replicate, HSV-induced IFN-alpha/beta production was dependent on both viral entry and replication, and ablated in cells unable to signal through the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein pathway. Thus, during an HSV infection in vivo, multiple mechanisms......Recognition of viruses by germ line-encoded pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system is essential for rapid production of type I interferon (IFN) and early antiviral defense. We investigated the mechanisms of viral recognition governing production of type I IFN during herpes....... In conventional DCs, the IFN response occurred independently of viral replication but was dependent on viral entry. Moreover, using a HSV-1 UL15 mutant, which fails to package viral DNA into the virion, we found that entry-dependent IFN induction also required the presence of viral genomic DNA. In macrophages...

  14. Fixational eye movements in the earliest stage of metazoan evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bielecki

    Full Text Available All known photoreceptor cells adapt to constant light stimuli, fading the retinal image when exposed to an immobile visual scene. Counter strategies are therefore necessary to prevent blindness, and in mammals this is accomplished by fixational eye movements. Cubomedusae occupy a key position for understanding the evolution of complex visual systems and their eyes are assumedly subject to the same adaptive problems as the vertebrate eye, but lack motor control of their visual system. The morphology of the visual system of cubomedusae ensures a constant orientation of the eyes and a clear division of the visual field, but thereby also a constant retinal image when exposed to stationary visual scenes. Here we show that bell contractions used for swimming in the medusae refresh the retinal image in the upper lens eye of Tripedalia cystophora. This strongly suggests that strategies comparable to fixational eye movements have evolved at the earliest metazoan stage to compensate for the intrinsic property of the photoreceptors. Since the timing and amplitude of the rhopalial movements concur with the spatial and temporal resolution of the eye it circumvents the need for post processing in the central nervous system to remove image blur.

  15. Antiviral Drug Research Proposal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Injaian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of antiviral drugs provides an excellent example of how basic and clinical research must be used together in order to achieve the final goal of treating disease. A Research Oriented Learning Activity was designed to help students to better understand how basic and clinical research can be combined toward a common goal. Through this project students gained a better understanding of the process of scientific research and increased their information literacy in the field of virology. The students worked as teams to research the many aspects involved in the antiviral drug design process, with each student becoming an "expert" in one aspect of the project. The Antiviral Drug Research Proposal (ADRP culminated with students presenting their proposals to their peers and local virologists in a poster session. Assessment data showed increased student awareness and knowledge of the research process and the steps involved in the development of antiviral drugs as a result of this activity.

  16. Emerging antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2008-09-01

    Foremost among the newly described antiviral agents that may be developed into drugs are, for the treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, cPrPMEDAP; for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, BAY 57-1293; for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections, FV-100 (prodrug of Cf 1743); for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, maribavir; for the treatment of poxvirus infections, ST-246; for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) (which in the meantime has already been approved in the EU); for the treatment of various DNA virus infections, the hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) and octadecyloxyethyl (ODE) prodrugs of cidofovir; for the treatment of orthomyxovirus infections (i.e., influenza), peramivir; for the treatment of hepacivirus infections (i.e., hepatitis C), the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, the nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NRRIs) PSI-6130 and R1479, and various non-nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NNRRIs); for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, integrase inhibitors (INIs) such as elvitegravir, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as apricitabine, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) such as rilpivirine and dapivirine; and for the treatment of both HCV and HIV infections, cyclosporin A derivatives such as the non-immunosuppressive Debio-025.

  17. Diagnosis and antiviral intervention strategies for mitigating an influenza epidemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many countries have amassed antiviral stockpiles for pandemic preparedness. Despite extensive trial data and modelling studies, it remains unclear how to make optimal use of antiviral stockpiles within the constraints of healthcare infrastructure. Modelling studies informed recommendations for liberal antiviral distribution in the pandemic phase, primarily to prevent infection, but failed to account for logistical constraints clearly evident during the 2009 H1N1 outbreaks. Here we identify optimal delivery strategies for antiviral interventions accounting for logistical constraints, and so determine how to improve a strategy's impact. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We extend an existing SEIR model to incorporate finite diagnostic and antiviral distribution capacities. We evaluate the impact of using different diagnostic strategies to decide to whom antivirals are delivered. We then determine what additional capacity is required to achieve optimal impact. We identify the importance of sensitive and specific case ascertainment in the early phase of a pandemic response, when the proportion of false-positive presentations may be high. Once a substantial percentage of ILI presentations are caused by the pandemic strain, identification of cases for treatment on syndromic grounds alone results in a greater potential impact than a laboratory-dependent strategy. Our findings reinforce the need for a decentralised system capable of providing timely prophylaxis. CONCLUSIONS: We address specific real-world issues that must be considered in order to improve pandemic preparedness policy in a practical and methodologically sound way. Provision of antivirals on the scale proposed for an effective response is infeasible using traditional public health outbreak management and contact tracing approaches. The results indicate to change the transmission dynamics of an influenza epidemic with an antiviral intervention, a decentralised system is required for

  18. The Evolution of the Earliest Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J. William

    1978-01-01

    Describes the unicellular microorganisms of three billion years ago. Explains how these primitive cells gave rise to biochemical systems and the present oxygen-rich atmosphere. Numerous diagrams, charts, and illustrations. (MA)

  19. Diet and the evolution of the earliest human ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaford, M F; Ungar, P S

    2000-12-05

    Over the past decade, discussions of the evolution of the earliest human ancestors have focused on the locomotion of the australopithecines. Recent discoveries in a broad range of disciplines have raised important questions about the influence of ecological factors in early human evolution. Here we trace the cranial and dental traits of the early australopithecines through time, to show that between 4.4 million and 2.3 million years ago, the dietary capabilities of the earliest hominids changed dramatically, leaving them well suited for life in a variety of habitats and able to cope with significant changes in resource availability associated with long-term and short-term climatic fluctuations.

  20. ANTI-VIRAL ACTIVITY OF GLYCIRRHETINIC AND GLYCIRRHIZIC ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zarubaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a highly contagious human disease. In the course of use of antiviral drugs drug-resistant strains of the virus are formed, resulting in reduced efficiency of the chemotherapy. The review describes the biological activity of glycirrhetinic (GLA and glycirrhizic (GA acids in terms of their use as a therapeutic agent for viral infections. So, these compounds are against a broad spectrum of viruses, including herpes, corona-, alphaand flaviviruses, human immunodeficiency virus, vaccinia virus, poliovirus type I, vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus. These data indicate that anti-viral effect of these compounds is due to several types of activity — direct antiviral effects, effects on cellular proand anti-viral and immunomodulating pathways, in particular by activation of innate immunity system. GA interferes with early steps of the viral reproductive cycle such as virus binding to its receptor, the absorption of the virus by endocytosis or virus decapsidation in the cytoplasm. This is due to the effect of GA-induced reduction of membrane fluidity. Thus, one mechanism for the antiviral activity of GA is that GA molecule increases the rigidity of cellular and viral membranes after incorporation in there. This results in increasing of energy threshold required for the formation of negative curvature at the fusion zones, as well as difficult lateral migration of the virus-receptor complexes. In addition, glycyrrhizin prevents interaction of viral nucleoprotein with cellular protein HMGB1, which is necessary for the viral life cycle. Glycyrrhizin also inhibits the induction of oxidative stress during influenza infection, exhibiting antioxidant properties, which leads to a reduction of virus-induced production of cytokines/chemokines, without affecting the replication of the virus. A wide spectrum of biological activity and effect on various aspects of the viral pathogenesis substantiate the effect of GA and GLA as a component

  1. Commensal bacteria calibrate the activation threshold of innate antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Michael C; Osborne, Lisa C; Monticelli, Laurel A; Doering, Travis A; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Paley, Michael A; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E John; Artis, David

    2012-07-27

    Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Influenza Round Table: Antiviral Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-11-04

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used.  Created: 11/4/2009 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 11/4/2009.

  3. Interchromosomal huddle kickstarts antiviral defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Fraser, Peter

    2008-07-11

    Long-distance chromosomal interactions are emerging as a potential mechanism of gene expression control. In this issue, Apostolou and Thanos (2008) describe how viral infection elicits interchromosomal associations between the interferon-beta (IFN-beta) gene enhancer and DNA binding sites of the transcription factor NF-kappaB, resulting in the initiation of transcription and an antiviral response.

  4. The future of antiviral immunotoxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, K.; Høy Jakobsen, Mette; Kledal, Thomas N;

    2016-01-01

    There is a constant need for new therapeutic interventions in a wide range of infectious diseases. Over the past few years, the immunotoxins have entered the stage as promising antiviral treatments. Immunotoxins have been extensively explored in cancer treatment and have achieved FDA approval...

  5. Earliest Recollections and Birth Order: Two Adlerian Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Les

    1992-01-01

    Presents two exercises designed to demonstrate the influence of two Adlerian principles on personality. Includes exercises dealing with birth order and earliest recollection. Concludes that the exercises actively demonstrate major concepts for counseling courses in Adlerian psychotherapy. Reports that students rated both exercises highly, with…

  6. A quantitative infection assay for human type I, II, and III interferon antiviral activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon virus infection, cells secrete a diverse group of antiviral molecules that signal proximal cells to enter into an antiviral state, slowing or preventing viral spread. These paracrine signaling molecules can work synergistically, so measurement of any one antiviral molecule does not reflect the total antiviral activity of the system. Results We have developed an antiviral assay based on replication inhibition of an engineered fluorescent vesicular stomatitis virus reporter strain on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Our assay provides a quantitative functional readout of human type I, II, and III interferon activities, and it provides better sensitivity, intra-, and inter-assay reproducibility than the traditional crystal violet based assay. Further, it eliminates cell fixation, rinsing, and staining steps, and is inexpensive to implement. Conclusions A dsRed2-strain of vesicular stomatitis virus that is sensitive to type I, II, and III interferons was used to develop a convenient and sensitive assay for interferon antiviral activity. We demonstrate use of the assay to quantify the kinetics of paracrine antiviral signaling from human prostate cancer (PC3) cells in response to viral infection. The assay is applicable to high-throughput screening for anti-viral compounds as well as basic studies of cellular antiviral signaling. PMID:23829314

  7. Your Earliest Memory May Be Earlier than You Think: Prospective Studies of Children's Dating of Earliest Childhood Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Peterson, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Theories of childhood amnesia and autobiographical memory development have been based on the assumption that the age estimates of earliest childhood memories are generally accurate, with an average age of 3.5 years among adults. It is also commonly believed that early memories will by default become inaccessible later on and this eventually…

  8. Antiviral activity of human lactoferrin : Inhibition of alphavirus interaction with heparan sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, Barry-Lee; Aneke, Onwuchekwa J.C.; Smit, Jolanda; Kimata, Koji; Bittman, Robert; Meijer, Dirk K.F.; Wilschut, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Human lactoferrin is a component of the non-specific immune system with distinct antiviral properties. We used alphaviruses, adapted to interaction with heparan sulfate (HS), as a tool to investigate the mechanism of lactoferrin's antiviral activity. Lactoferrin inhibited infection of BHK-21 cells b

  9. Mechanisms of virus resistance and antiviral activity of snake venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JVR Rivero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses depend on cell metabolism for their own propagation. The need to foster an intimate relationship with the host has resulted in the development of various strategies designed to help virus escape from the defense mechanisms present in the host. Over millions of years, the unremitting battle between pathogens and their hosts has led to changes in evolution of the immune system. Snake venoms are biological resources that have antiviral activity, hence substances of significant pharmacological value. The biodiversity in Brazil with respect to snakes is one of the richest on the planet; nevertheless, studies on the antiviral activity of venom from Brazilian snakes are scarce. The antiviral properties of snake venom appear as new promising therapeutic alternative against the defense mechanisms developed by viruses. In the current study, scientific papers published in recent years on the antiviral activity of venom from various species of snakes were reviewed. The objective of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of resistance developed by viruses and the components of snake venoms that present antiviral activity, particularly, enzymes, amino acids, peptides and proteins.

  10. Cherry Valley ducks mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS mediated signaling pathway and antiviral activity research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I like receptors (RLRs-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly up-regulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus. Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8 in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What’s more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (duck Tembusu virus, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks.

  11. Antiviral defense in shrimp: from innate immunity to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Huang, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiaobo; He, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-01

    The culture of penaeid shrimp is rapidly developing as a major business endeavor worldwide. However, viral diseases have caused huge economic loss in penaeid shrimp culture industries. Knowledge of shrimp innate immunity and antiviral responses has made important progress in recent years, allowing the design of better strategies for the prevention and control of shrimp diseases. In this study, we have updated information on shrimp antiviral immunity and interactions between shrimp hosts and viral pathogens. Current knowledge and recent progress in immune signaling pathways (e.g., Toll/IMD-NF-κB and JAK-STAT signaling pathways), RNAi, phagocytosis, and apoptosis in shrimp antiviral immunity are discussed. The mechanism of viral infection in shrimp hosts and the interactions between viruses and shrimp innate immune systems are also analyzed.

  12. Recent advances in antiviral therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinchington, D

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1980s many institutions in Britain were seriously considering whether there was a need for specialist departments of virology. The arrival of HIV changed that perception and since then virology and antiviral chemotherapy have become two very active areas of bio-medical research. Cloning and sequencing have provided tools to identify viral enzymes and have brought the day of the "designer drug" nearer to reality. At the other end of the spectrum of drug discovery, huge numbers of ...

  13. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K;

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are exposed to environmental substances and represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms. The innate immune system is responsible for early defense against infections and it is believed that the interferons (IFNs) constitute the first line of defense against viruses. Here...... we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity...

  14. [Renal toxicity of antiviral drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca', Giovanni M; Balestra, Emilio; Tavio, Marcello; Morroni, Manrico; Manarini, Gloria; Brigante, Fabiana

    2012-01-01

    Highly effective and powerful antiviral drugs have been introduced into clinical practice in recent years which are associated with an increased incidence of nephrotoxicity. The need of combining several drugs, the fragility of the patients treated, and the high susceptibility of the kidney are all factors contributing to renal injury. Many pathogenetic mechanisms are involved in the nephrotoxicity of antiviral drugs, including drug interaction with transport proteins in the tubular cell; direct cytotoxicity due to a high intracellular drug concentration; mitochondrial injury; and intrarenal obstruction or stone formation due to the low solubility of drugs at a normal urinary pH. As a result, various clinical pictures may be observed in patients treated with antiviral drugs, ranging from tubular dysfunction (Fanconi syndrome, renal tubular acidosis, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus) to acute renal failure (induced by tubular necrosis or crystal nephropathy) and kidney stones. Careful attention should be paid to prevent renal toxicity by evaluating the glomerular filtration rate before therapy and adjusting the drug dosage accordingly, avoiding the combination with other nephrotoxic drugs, and monitoring renal parameters on a regular basis while treating patients.

  15. Antiviral activity of hemocyanins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Dolashka,

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hemocyanins are giant biological macromolecules acting as oxygen-transporting glycoproteins. Most of them are respiratory proteins of arthropods and mollusks, but besides they also exhibit protecting effects against bacterial, fungal and viral invasions. As discovered by 2-DGE proteomics analyses, several proteins including hemocyanins of hemocytes from virus-infected arthropods increased upon infection, confirming hemocyanin’s role as part of the organism’s defence system. Based on the structural analyses of molluscan Hcs it is suggested that the carbohydrate chains of the glycoproteins seem to interact with surface-exposed amino acid or carbohydrate residues of the viruses through van der Waals interactions.

  16. Diet and the evolution of the earliest human ancestors

    OpenAIRE

    Mark F. Teaford; Peter S Ungar

    2000-01-01

    Over the past decade, discussions of the evolution of the earliest human ancestors have focused on the locomotion of the australopithecines. Recent discoveries in a broad range of disciplines have raised important questions about the influence of ecological factors in early human evolution. Here we trace the cranial and dental traits of the early australopithecines through time, to show that between 4.4 million and 2.3 million years ago, the dietary capabilities of...

  17. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds.

  18. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds. PMID:28197148

  19. Antiviral Defenses in Plants through Genome Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romay, Gustavo; Bragard, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Plant–virus interactions based-studies have contributed to increase our understanding on plant resistance mechanisms, providing new tools for crop improvement. In the last two decades, RNA interference, a post-transcriptional gene silencing approach, has been used to induce antiviral defenses in plants with the help of genetic engineering technologies. More recently, the new genome editing systems (GES) are revolutionizing the scope of tools available to confer virus resistance in plants. The most explored GES are zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 endonuclease. GES are engineered to target and introduce mutations, which can be deleterious, via double-strand breaks at specific DNA sequences by the error-prone non-homologous recombination end-joining pathway. Although GES have been engineered to target DNA, recent discoveries of GES targeting ssRNA molecules, including virus genomes, pave the way for further studies programming plant defense against RNA viruses. Most of plant virus species have an RNA genome and at least 784 species have positive ssRNA. Here, we provide a summary of the latest progress in plant antiviral defenses mediated by GES. In addition, we also discuss briefly the GES perspectives in light of the rebooted debate on genetic modified organisms (GMOs) and the current regulatory frame for agricultural products involving the use of such engineering technologies. PMID:28167937

  20. Marine Pharmacology in 2012–2013: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and Other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2012 to 2013 was systematically reviewed, consistent with the 1998–2011 reviews of this series. Marine pharmacology research from 2012 to 2013, conducted by scientists from 42 countries in addition to the United States, reported findings on the preclinical pharmacology of 257 marine compounds. The preclinical pharmacology of compounds isolated from marine organisms revealed antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, antiviral and anthelmitic pharmacological activities for 113 marine natural products. In addition, 75 marine compounds were reported to have antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities and affect the immune and nervous system. Finally, 69 marine compounds were shown to display miscellaneous mechanisms of action which could contribute to novel pharmacological classes. Thus, in 2012–2013, the preclinical marine natural product pharmacology pipeline provided novel pharmacology and lead compounds to the clinical marine pharmaceutical pipeline, and contributed significantly to potentially novel therapeutic approaches to several global disease categories. PMID:28850074

  1. Development and characterization of hepatitis C virus genotype 1-7 cell culture systems: role of CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I and effect of antiviral drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Scheel, Troels K H; Jensen, Tanja B

    2009-01-01

    Six major hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and numerous subtypes have been described, and recently a seventh major genotype was discovered. Genotypes show significant molecular and clinical differences, such as differential response to combination therapy with interferon-alpha and ribavirin...... against the putative coreceptors CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, neutralizing antibodies in selected chronic phase HCV sera had differential effects against genotype 1-7 viruses. Conclusion: We completed and characterized a panel of JFH1-based cell culture...... systems of all seven major HCV genotypes and important subtypes and used these viruses in comparative studies of antivirals, HCV receptor interaction, and neutralizing antibodies....

  2. Marine Pharmacology in 2012–2013: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and Other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro M. S. Mayer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2012 to 2013 was systematically reviewed, consistent with the 1998–2011 reviews of this series. Marine pharmacology research from 2012 to 2013, conducted by scientists from 42 countries in addition to the United States, reported findings on the preclinical pharmacology of 257 marine compounds. The preclinical pharmacology of compounds isolated from marine organisms revealed antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, antiviral and anthelmitic pharmacological activities for 113 marine natural products. In addition, 75 marine compounds were reported to have antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities and affect the immune and nervous system. Finally, 69 marine compounds were shown to display miscellaneous mechanisms of action which could contribute to novel pharmacological classes. Thus, in 2012–2013, the preclinical marine natural product pharmacology pipeline provided novel pharmacology and lead compounds to the clinical marine pharmaceutical pipeline, and contributed significantly to potentially novel therapeutic approaches to several global disease categories.

  3. Antiviral effects of grape seed extract against feline calicivirus, murine norovirus, and hepatitis A virus in model food systems and under gastric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Snehal S; Su, Xiaowei; D'Souza, Doris H

    2015-12-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE) has antiviral activities against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and human norovirus surrogates (feline calicivirus (FCV-F9) and murine norovirus (MNV-1)). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) time and dose-dependence of GSE against FCV-F9, MNV-1, and HAV at room temperature (RT) and 37 °C over 24 h; and (2) GSE effects in model foods (apple juice (AJ) and 2% milk) and simulated gastric conditions at 37 °C. Viruses at ∼5 log PFU/ml were treated with 0.5-8 mg/ml GSE prepared in water, AJ, milk or gastric juices, or water over 24 h at RT or 37 °C. Infectivity of triplicate treatments was evaluated using plaque assays. GSE effects increased with time and concentration. GSE at 1 mg/ml in AJ reduced MNV-1 to undetectable levels after 1 h and by 1 log in milk after 24 h. GSE at 1 and 2 mg/ml in AJ reduced HAV to undetectable levels after 1 h, while 2 and 4 mg/ml GSE in milk caused ∼1 log reduction after 24 h. GSE at 2 mg/ml in intestinal fluid reduced FCV-F9, MNV-1 and HAV to undetectable levels after 6 h. GSE appears to be a suitable natural option for foodborne viral reduction. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The earliest evidence for anatomically modern humans in northwestern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Tom; Compton, Tim; Stringer, Chris; Jacobi, Roger; Shapiro, Beth; Trinkaus, Erik; Chandler, Barry; Gröning, Flora; Collins, Chris; Hillson, Simon; O'Higgins, Paul; FitzGerald, Charles; Fagan, Michael

    2011-11-02

    The earliest anatomically modern humans in Europe are thought to have appeared around 43,000-42,000 calendar years before present (43-42 kyr cal BP), by association with Aurignacian sites and lithic assemblages assumed to have been made by modern humans rather than by Neanderthals. However, the actual physical evidence for modern humans is extremely rare, and direct dates reach no farther back than about 41-39 kyr cal BP, leaving a gap. Here we show, using stratigraphic, chronological and archaeological data, that a fragment of human maxilla from the Kent's Cavern site, UK, dates to the earlier period. The maxilla (KC4), which was excavated in 1927, was initially diagnosed as Upper Palaeolithic modern human. In 1989, it was directly radiocarbon dated by accelerator mass spectrometry to 36.4-34.7 kyr cal BP. Using a Bayesian analysis of new ultrafiltered bone collagen dates in an ordered stratigraphic sequence at the site, we show that this date is a considerable underestimate. Instead, KC4 dates to 44.2-41.5 kyr cal BP. This makes it older than any other equivalently dated modern human specimen and directly contemporary with the latest European Neanderthals, thus making its taxonomic attribution crucial. We also show that in 13 dental traits KC4 possesses modern human rather than Neanderthal characteristics; three other traits show Neanderthal affinities and a further seven are ambiguous. KC4 therefore represents the oldest known anatomically modern human fossil in northwestern Europe, fills a key gap between the earliest dated Aurignacian remains and the earliest human skeletal remains, and demonstrates the wide and rapid dispersal of early modern humans across Europe more than 40 kyr ago. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  5. The Earliest Acupuncture and Moxibustion Manuscript Was Found in Dunhuang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qi; Silke Assmus-Helfen

    2011-01-01

    @@ In 1900, around 50 000 books and manuscripts were discovered in the Mogao Grottoes of Dunhuang in Gansu Province, China.Known today as the "Dunhuang Heritage",this trove had been sealed in a cave for close on 900 years.Among the books, there was a volume entitled "New Compendium of Works on Moxibustion for Emergencies (新集备急灸经)".It is the earliest original manuscript for the collection of acupuncture papers at present and is particularly precious as not having been found recorded in any ancient books.

  6. Broad-spectrum antiviral therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd H Rider

    Full Text Available Currently there are relatively few antiviral therapeutics, and most which do exist are highly pathogen-specific or have other disadvantages. We have developed a new broad-spectrum antiviral approach, dubbed Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA Activated Caspase Oligomerizer (DRACO that selectively induces apoptosis in cells containing viral dsRNA, rapidly killing infected cells without harming uninfected cells. We have created DRACOs and shown that they are nontoxic in 11 mammalian cell types and effective against 15 different viruses, including dengue flavivirus, Amapari and Tacaribe arenaviruses, Guama bunyavirus, and H1N1 influenza. We have also demonstrated that DRACOs can rescue mice challenged with H1N1 influenza. DRACOs have the potential to be effective therapeutics or prophylactics for numerous clinical and priority viruses, due to the broad-spectrum sensitivity of the dsRNA detection domain, the potent activity of the apoptosis induction domain, and the novel direct linkage between the two which viruses have never encountered.

  7. What You Should Know about Flu Antiviral Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters What You Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Language: ... that can be used to treat flu illness. What are antiviral drugs? Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines ( ...

  8. Naphthyridines with Antiviral Activity - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inder P; Kumar, Sanjay; Gupta, Shiv

    2017-01-01

    Naphthyridine scaffold is an important pharmacophore in compounds which have shown various biological activities like antiviral, antimicrobial, anticancer, antiinflammatory and analgesic. This scaffold is also reported to exhibit activity against HIV, HCMV, HSV, HPV and HCV. Antiviral activity displayed by many naphthyridine analogs is in nM range. Only few review articles are available in literature which describe about various biological activities of naphthyridines, but there is no comprehensive compilation particularly for antiviral activities. The objective of this review is to compile the literature on anti-viral activities of naphthyridine analogs. SciFinder, Google Scholar and PubMed database were searched with keyword "naphthyridine" and the references obtained were further sorted using keywords "antihiv", "antiviral" and "virus", separately. References obtained were considered to review the antiviral literature of naphthyridines. Literature search using SciFinder database with different keywords gave several references. Only references of antiviral activities of naphthyridine compounds were reviewed. References to in-silico studies alone or on formulation development or on patents were excluded. This review will be helpful for future researches to design and synthesize naphthyridine analogs with improved antiviral activities. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Bilirubin: an endogenous molecule with antiviral activity in vitro.

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    Rosaria eSantangelo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bilirubin-IX-alpha (BR is the final product of heme metabolism through the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase (HO/BVR system. Previous papers reported on the microbicidal effects of the HO by-products biliverdin-IX-alpha, carbon monoxide and iron, through either direct or indirect mechanisms. In this paper the evidence of a virucidal effect of BR against human herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and the enterovirus EV71 was provided. Bilirubin-IX-alpha, at concentrations 1-10 µM, close to those found in blood and tissues, significantly reduced HSV-1 and EV71 replication in Hep-2 and Vero cell lines, respectively. Bilirubin-IX-alpha inhibited viral infection of Hep-2 and Vero cells when given 2 hours before, concomitantly and 2 hours after viral infection. Furthermore, BR retained its antiviral activity even complexed with a saturating concentration of human serum-albumin. Moreover, 10 µM BR increased the formation of nitric oxide and the phosphorylation of JNK in Vero and Hep-2 cell lines, respectively, thus implying a role of these two pathways in the mechanism of antiviral activity of the bile pigment. In conclusion, these results support the antiviral effect of BR against HSV-1 and enterovirus in vitro, and put the basis for further basic and clinical studies to understand the real role of BR as an endogenous antiviral molecule.

  10. Antiviral effect of mefloquine on feline calicivirus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Phillip; Sheehy, Paul A; Fawcett, Anne; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2015-04-17

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is an important viral pathogen of domestic cats causing clinical signs ranging from mild to severe oral ulceration or upper respiratory tract disease through to a severe fatal systemic disease. Current therapeutic options are limited, with no direct acting antivirals available for treatment. This study screened a panel of 19 compounds for potential antiviral activity against FCV strain F9 and recent field isolates in vitro. Using a resazurin-based cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition assay, mefloquine demonstrated a marked inhibitory effect on FCV induced CPE, albeit with a relatively low selectivity index. Orthogonal assays confirmed inhibition of CPE was associated with a significant reduction in viral replication. Mefloquine exhibited a strong inhibitory effect against a panel of seven recent FCV isolates from Australia, with calculated IC50 values for the field isolates approximately 50% lower than against the reference strain FCV F9. In vitro combination therapy with recombinant feline interferon-ω, a biological response modifier currently registered for the treatment of FCV, demonstrated additive effects with a concurrent reduction in the IC50 of mefloquine. These results are the first report of antiviral effects of mefloquine against a calicivirus and support further in vitro and in vivo evaluation of this compound as an antiviral therapeutic for FCV.

  11. Cattle Management for Dairying in Scandinavia's Earliest Neolithic.

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    Kurt J Gron

    Full Text Available New evidence for cattle husbandry practices during the earliest period of the southern Scandinavian Neolithic indicates multiple birth seasons and dairying from its start. Sequential sampling of tooth enamel carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratio analyses and strontium isotopic provenancing indicate more than one season of birth in locally reared cattle at the earliest Neolithic Funnel Beaker (EN I TRB, 3950-3500 cal. B.C. site of Almhov in Scania, Sweden. The main purpose for which cattle are manipulated to give birth in more than one season is to prolong lactation for the production of milk and dairy-based products. As this is a difficult, intensive, and time-consuming strategy, these data demonstrate complex farming practices by early Neolithic farmers. This result offers strong support for immigration-based explanations of agricultural origins in southern Scandinavia on the grounds that such a specialised skill set cannot represent the piecemeal incorporation of agricultural techniques into an existing hunter-gatherer-fisher economy.

  12. Antiviral activity of ovotransferrin derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansanti, Francesco; Massucci, M Teresa; Giardi, M Federica; Nozza, Fabrizio; Pulsinelli, Emy; Nicolini, Claudio; Botti, Dario; Antonini, Giovanni

    2005-05-27

    Ovotransferrin and lactoferrin are iron-binding proteins with antiviral and antibacterial activities related to natural immunity, showing marked sequence and structural homologies. The antiviral activity of two hen ovotransferrin fragments DQKDEYELL (hOtrf(219-227)) and KDLLFK (hOtrf(269-301) and hOtrf(633-638)) towards Marek's disease virus infection of chicken embryo fibroblasts is reported here. These fragments have sequence homology with two bovine lactoferrin fragments with antiviral activity towards herpes simplex virus, suggesting that these fragments could have a role for the exploitation of the antiviral activity of the intact proteins towards herpes viruses. NMR analysis showed that these peptides, chemically synthetized, did not possess any favourite conformation in solution, indicating that both the aminoacid sequence and the conformation they display in the intact protein are essential for the antiviral activity.

  13. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10-5 kDa, 5-1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10?5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  14. Antiviral Perspectives for Chikungunya Virus

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    Deepti Parashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen that has a major health impact in humans and causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and, in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting for weeks to years. CHIKV reemerged in 2005-2006 in several parts of the Indian Ocean islands and India after a gap of 32 years, causing millions of cases. The re-emergence of CHIKV has also resulted in numerous outbreaks in several countries in the eastern hemisphere, with a threat to further expand in the near future. However, there is no vaccine against CHIKV infection licensed for human use, and therapy for CHIKV infection is still mainly limited to supportive care as antiviral agents are yet in different stages of testing or development. In this review we explore the different perspectives for chikungunya treatment and the effectiveness of these treatment regimens and discuss the scope for future directions.

  15. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

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    Avi Raveh

    Full Text Available Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable

  16. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C; Dobry, Craig J; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J; Blakely, Pennelope K; Tai, Andrew W; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  17. Antimicrobial peptides as model molecules for the development of novel antiviral agents in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, A; Ortega-Villaizan, M; Chico, V; Brocal, I; Perez, L; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2009-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are one of the components of the non-specific immune system that operate first lines of protection in many animal species including fish. They exert broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, apart from many other potential roles in innate immunity, and represent a promising class of antiviral agents. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of their antiviral action(s) indicate that they have a dual role in antiviral defence, acting not only directly on the virion but also on the host cell. Despite the acute problems of viral diseases and restrictions in using chemicals in aquaculture, few but successful attempts to assess the antiviral activities of fish AMPs have been reported. This review focuses on the antiviral activities and mechanisms of action of some AMPs, and their potential relevance in the aquaculture industry, one of the most important sources of fishery products in the near future. It is a matter of notable concern to understand whether the AMPs can be used as model molecules for designing antiviral drugs that might help to solve the problems with viruses in the fish farming industry worldwide. In addition, because fish rely more heavily on their innate immune defences than mammals, they might constitute a potential rich source of antiviral compounds for fighting against mammalian viral infections.

  18. Plated Cambrian bilaterians reveal the earliest stages of echinoderm evolution.

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    Samuel Zamora

    Full Text Available Echinoderms are unique in being pentaradiate, having diverged from the ancestral bilaterian body plan more radically than any other animal phylum. This transformation arises during ontogeny, as echinoderm larvae are initially bilateral, then pass through an asymmetric phase, before giving rise to the pentaradiate adult. Many fossil echinoderms are radial and a few are asymmetric, but until now none have been described that show the original bilaterian stage in echinoderm evolution. Here we report new fossils from the early middle Cambrian of southern Europe that are the first echinoderms with a fully bilaterian body plan as adults. Morphologically they are intermediate between two of the most basal classes, the Ctenocystoidea and Cincta. This provides a root for all echinoderms and confirms that the earliest members were deposit feeders not suspension feeders.

  19. The earliest fossil evidence for sexual dimorphism in primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishtalka, Leonard; Stucky, Richard K.; Beard, K. C.

    1990-01-01

    Recently obtained material of the early Eocene primate Notharctus venticolus, including two partial skulls from a single stratigraphic horizon, provides the geologically earliest evidence of sexual dimorphism in canine size and shape in primates and the only unequivocal evidence for such dimorphism in strepsirhines. By analogy with living platyrrhines, these data suggest that Notharctus venticolus may have lived in polygynous social groups characterized by a relatively high level of intermale competition for mates and other limited resources. The anatomy of the upper incisors and related evidence imply that Notharctus is not as closely related to extant lemuriform primates as has been recently proposed. The early Eocene evidence for canine sexual dimorphism reported here, and its occurrence in a nonanthropoid, indicates that in the order Primates such a condition is either primitive or evolved independently more than once.

  20. Investigating the earliest epochs of the Milky Way halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkenburg, Else; Starkenburg

    2016-08-01

    Resolved stellar spectroscopy can obtain knowledge about chemical enrichment processes back to the earliest times, when the oldest stars were formed. In this contribution I will review the early (chemical) evolution of the Milky Way halo from an observational perspective. In particular, I will discuss our understanding of the origin of the peculiar abundance patterns in various subclasses of extremely metal-poor stars, taking into account new data from our abundance and radial velocity monitoring programs, and their implications for our understanding of the formation and early evolution of both the Milky Way halo and the satellite dwarf galaxies therein. I conclude by presenting the ``Pristine'' survey, a program on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to study this intriguing epoch much more efficiently.

  1. The earliest translations of Emily Dickinson's poetry in Slovene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Petrič

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article addresses the issue of the earliest  translations of Dickinson's poetry in Slovene. Only 6 of the total number of 19 poems, translated into Slovene by Vatro Grill, were published  in his 1979 memoir Med dvema svetovoma (Between Two Worlds. The other 13 poems included in Grill's manuscripts were never published.  In the first  part  of her article,  the author  briefly  surveys  the translations of Dickinson's poetry into Slovene by Mart  Ogen, Aleš  Debeljak, Ivo Svetina and Miklavž Komelj. In the second part, the focus is on_Grill's translation of two poems by Emily Dickinson whereby the translator's ability to capture the meaning of Dickinson's verse is measured against Mart Ogen's translation of the same poems.

  2. Earliest evidence for commensal processes of cat domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaowu; Hu, Songmei; Wang, Weilin; Wu, Xiaohong; Marshall, Fiona B; Chen, Xianglong; Hou, Liangliang; Wang, Changsui

    2014-01-01

    Domestic cats are one of the most popular pets globally, but the process of their domestication is not well understood. Near Eastern wildcats are thought to have been attracted to food sources in early agricultural settlements, following a commensal pathway to domestication. Early evidence for close human-cat relationships comes from a wildcat interred near a human on Cyprus ca. 9,500 y ago, but the earliest domestic cats are known only from Egyptian art dating to 4,000 y ago. Evidence is lacking from the key period of cat domestication 9,500-4,000 y ago. We report on the presence of cats directly dated between 5560-5280 cal B.P. in the early agricultural village of Quanhucun in Shaanxi, China. These cats were outside the wild range of Near Eastern wildcats and biometrically smaller, but within the size-range of domestic cats. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of human and animal bone collagen revealed substantial consumption of millet-based foods by humans, rodents, and cats. Ceramic storage containers designed to exclude rodents indicated a threat to stored grain in Yangshao villages. Taken together, isotopic and archaeological data demonstrate that cats were advantageous for ancient farmers. Isotopic data also show that one cat ate less meat and consumed more millet-based foods than expected, indicating that it scavenged among or was fed by people. This study offers fresh perspectives on cat domestication, providing the earliest known evidence for commensal relationships between people and cats.

  3. Considerations on Terrestrial Iron Depositing Analogs to Earliest Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Garrison, D. H.; McKay, D. S.

    2007-01-01

    Iron oxide and hydroxide minerals, including hematite, can mineralize and preservemicrofossils and physical biomarkers (Allen at al., 2004). Preserved remnants of phototrophic microorganisms are recognized as biosignatures of past life on Earth (Schopf, 2006). To date, two types of surface iron depositing environments have been studied as analogs to possible habitable environments on earliest Mars: the highly acidified Rio Tinto River (Iberian Belt, Spain) [Gomez Ortis et al., 2007], and the nearneutral iron depositing Chocolate Pots Hot Spring (Yellowstone National Park, US) [Parenteau at al., 2005]. While phototrophs in the Rio Tinto are only represented by eukaryotic algae (Amaral Zettler et all., 2002), Chocolate Pots is mainly populated with cyanobacteria (Pierson et all., 2000; Brown et all., 2007). Which of these environments is the closer analog to a potentially habitable early Mars? Paleobiological data, combined with recent "tree of life" interpretations, suggest that phototrophic eukaryotes evolved not earlier than 2.5 - 2.8 b.y. after Earth s accretion (4.6 b.y.), while cyanobacteria and /or their iron-tolerant predecessors evolved between 1 - 1.5 b.y. after accretion (Brown et al., 2007). Lindsay and Brasier (2002) postulated that microbial life on Mars surface could have lasted no more than 1-1.5 b.y. after Mars accretion (also 4.6 b.y.). Recent multispectral mapping of Mars suggests that near-neutral wet environments prevailed at approximately this time (Bibring, et al., 2006). Thus, near-neutral iron depositing hot springs such as Chocolate Pots Hot Spring seem to be the more likely habitable analogs for earliest Mars.

  4. A-type CpG ODN with higher binding affinity to LvToll1 could probably activate downstream IFN system-like antiviral response in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

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    J Xu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs is a widely used immune adjuvant, which could activate various immune responses including antiviral response through interaction with Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 in mammals. In the present study, four types of CpG ODN (CpG-A, CpG-B CpG-C, and CpG-P were synthesized and injected to the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei in order to evaluate their immune enhancement effect in shrimp. The copy numbers of white spot syndrome virus in the shrimps treated with different types of CpG ODNs were of 3.10×105 (CpG-A, 8.32×105 (CpG-B, 9.84×105 (CpG-C, and 8.12×105 (CpG-P copies ng-1 DNA respectively, which were significantly lower (p < 0.01 than that in PBS group (1.70×106 copies ng-1 DNA. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR assay revealed that the four types of CpG ODN displayed different binding affinity to LvToll1, LvToll2 and LvToll3, and the highest binding affinity was observed between CpG-A and LvToll1. Correspondingly, the mRNA transcripts of LvTolls were up-regulated significantly in CpG-A stimulated shrimps,which was significantly higher than that in CpG-B, CpG-C and CpG-P groups (p < 0.01. The phagocytic rate and ROS level of shrimp hemocytes in CpG-A and CpG-B groups increased significantly compared with that in other groups, which were 1.63-fold, 9.98-fold (p < 0.01 in CpG-A and 1.60-fold, 4.92-fold (p < 0.01 in CpG-B higher than those in PBS group, respectively. Moreover, after CpG-A stimulation, the probable IFN level in shrimp plasma increased to 2.60-fold (p < 0.01 of that in PBS group, and the mRNA expressions of IFN system-like antiviral genes (LvIRF, LvVago4 and LvSTAT were also significantly up-regulated in CpG-A group, displaying a stronger response than that in CpG-B, CpG-C and CpG-P groups. The results indicated that CpG-A could promote the cellular and humoral immunity in shrimp, and induce relatively higher antiviral immune response among the four CpG ODNs. It provided useful information to understand

  5. Marine Pharmacology in 2009–2011: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2009 to 2011 is presented in this review, following the format used in the 1998–2008 reviews of this series. The pharmacology of structurally-characterized compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is discussed in a comprehensive manner. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral pharmacological activities were reported for 102 marine natural products. Additionally, 60 marine compounds were observed to affect the immune and nervous system as well as possess antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 68 marine metabolites were shown to interact with a variety of receptors and molecular targets, and thus will probably contribute to multiple pharmacological classes upon further mechanism of action studies. Marine pharmacology during 2009–2011 remained a global enterprise, with researchers from 35 countries, and the United States, contributing to the preclinical pharmacology of 262 marine compounds which are part of the preclinical pharmaceutical pipeline. Continued pharmacological research with marine natural products will contribute to enhance the marine pharmaceutical clinical pipeline, which in 2013 consisted of 17 marine natural products, analogs or derivatives targeting a limited number of disease categories. PMID:23880931

  6. Origin of Chinese ancient glasses——study on the earliest Chinese ancient glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Fuxi; CHENG Huansheng; LI Qinghui

    2006-01-01

    The earliest Chinese ancient glasses before the West Han Dynasty (200 BC) from different regions are studied. The glass samples were unearthed from Hunan, Hubei, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guizhou, Guangdong and Xinjiang of China. The chemical composition of these glasses samples is analyzed by proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) method and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). It is shown that the glass chemical compositions belong to barium-lead silicate BaO-PbO-SiO2, potash soda lime silicate K2O (Na2O)-CaO-SiO2 (K2O/Na2O>1), soda potash lime silicate Na2O (K2O)-CaO-SiO2 (K2O/Na2O<1) and potash silicate K2O-SiO2 glass systems, respectively. The origins of the earliest Chinese ancient glasses are discussed from the archaeological and historical points of view. These four types of Chinese ancient glasses were all made in Chinese territory using local raw materials. The glass preparation technology was related to the Chinese ancient bronze metallurgy and proto-porcelain glaze technology. The glass technology relationship between the East and the West is analyzed at the same time.

  7. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Timothy C. M.; Chan, Martin C. W.; Nelson Lee

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadin...

  8. Antiviral antibodies target adenovirus to phagolysosomes and amplify the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiss, Anne K; Vilaysane, Akosua; Cotter, Matthew J; Clark, Sharon A; Meijndert, H Christopher; Colarusso, Pina; Yates, Robin M; Petrilli, Virginie; Tschopp, Jurg; Muruve, Daniel A

    2009-06-01

    Adenovirus is a nonenveloped dsDNA virus that activates intracellular innate immune pathways. In vivo, adenovirus-immunized mice displayed an enhanced innate immune response and diminished virus-mediated gene delivery following challenge with the adenovirus vector AdLacZ suggesting that antiviral Abs modulate viral interactions with innate immune cells. Under naive serum conditions in vitro, adenovirus binding and internalization in macrophages and the subsequent activation of innate immune mechanisms were inefficient. In contrast to the neutralizing effect observed in nonhematopoietic cells, adenovirus infection in the presence of antiviral Abs significantly increased FcR-dependent viral internalization in macrophages. In direct correlation with the increased viral internalization, antiviral Abs amplified the innate immune response to adenovirus as determined by the expression of NF-kappaB-dependent genes, type I IFNs, and caspase-dependent IL-1beta maturation. Immune serum amplified TLR9-independent type I IFN expression and enhanced NLRP3-dependent IL-1beta maturation in response to adenovirus, confirming that antiviral Abs specifically amplify intracellular innate pathways. In the presence of Abs, confocal microscopy demonstrated increased targeting of adenovirus to LAMP1-positive phagolysosomes in macrophages but not epithelial cells. These data show that antiviral Abs subvert natural viral tropism and target the adenovirus to phagolysosomes and the intracellular innate immune system in macrophages. Furthermore, these results illustrate a cross-talk where the adaptive immune system positively regulates the innate immune system and the antiviral state.

  9. Silver Nanoparticles as Potential Antiviral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Galdiero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus infections pose significant global health challenges, especially in view of the fact that the emergence of resistant viral strains and the adverse side effects associated with prolonged use continue to slow down the application of effective antiviral therapies. This makes imperative the need for the development of safe and potent alternatives to conventional antiviral drugs. In the present scenario, nanoscale materials have emerged as novel antiviral agents for the possibilities offered by their unique chemical and physical properties. Silver nanoparticles have mainly been studied for their antimicrobial potential against bacteria, but have also proven to be active against several types of viruses including human imunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, herpes simplex virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and monkey pox virus. The use of metal nanoparticles provides an interesting opportunity for novel antiviral therapies. Since metals may attack a broad range of targets in the virus there is a lower possibility to develop resistance as compared to conventional antivirals. The present review focuses on the development of methods for the production of silver nanoparticles and on their use as antiviral therapeutics against pathogenic viruses.

  10. Insects antiviral and anticancer peptides: new leads for the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocinska, Malgorzata; Marciniak, Pawel; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Insect produce wide range of protein and peptides as a first fast defense line against pathogen infection. These agents act in different ways including insect immune system activation or by direct impact on the target tumor cells or viruses. It has been shown that some of the insect peptides suppress viral gene and protein expression, rybosilate DNA, whereas others cause membrane lysis, induce apoptosis or arrest cell cycle. Several of the purified and characterized peptides of insect origin are very promising in treating of serious human diseases like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpex simplex virus (HSV) or leukaemia. However, some obstacles need to be overcome. Cytotoxic activity of peptides, susceptibility to proteases or high cost of production remain still unsolved problems. Reports on the peptides antiviral and antitumour mechanisms are scanty. Thus, in this review we present characteristic, mode of action and potential medical applications of insects origin peptides with the antiviral and antitumour activity.

  11. Modelling viral infections using zebrafish: Innate immune response and antiviral research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Mónica; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2017-03-01

    Zebrafish possess a highly developed immune system that is remarkably similar to the human one. Therefore, it is expected that the majority of the signalling pathways and molecules involved in the immune response of mammals exist and behave similarly in fish. The innate antiviral response depends on the recognition of viral components by host cells. Pattern recognition receptors initiate antimicrobial defence mechanisms via several well-conserved signalling pathways. In this paper, we review current knowledge of the antiviral innate immune response in zebrafish by considering the main molecules that have been characterized and the infection models used for the in vivo study of the antiviral innate immune response. We next summarize published studies in which larval and adult zebrafish were used to study viral diseases of fish, then provide a similar review of studies of human viral diseases in zebrafish and experience with antiviral drug screening in this model organism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Aurorae: The earliest datable observation of the aurora borealis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, F. Richard; Willis, David M.; Hallinan, Thomas J.

    2004-12-01

    The Late Babylonian astronomical texts, discovered at the site of Babylon (32.5°N, 44.4°E) more than a century ago, contain what is probably the earliest reliable account of the aurora borealis. A clay tablet recording numerous celestial observations made by the official astronomers during the 37th year of King Nebuchadnezzar II (568/567 BC) describes an unusual ``red glow'' in the sky at night; the exact date of this observation corresponds to the night of 12/13 March in 567 BC. The most likely interpretation of the phenomenon is an auroral display. This event occurred several centuries before the first clearly identifiable observation of the aurora from elsewhere in the world, namely China in 193 BC. The Babylonian auroral observation is remarkable in the sense that it is one of a series of carefully recorded astronomical observations, for each of which the year, month and day are known precisely. This observation occurred at a time when the geomagnetic (dipole) latitude of Babylon was about 41°N compared with the present value of 27.5°N, suggesting a higher auroral incidence at Babylon in 567 BC than at present.

  13. Earliest evidence of pollution by heavy metals in archaeological sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Guadalupe; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J.; García-Alix, Antonio; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca; Mattielli, Nadine; Finlayson, Clive; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Sánchez, Miguel Cortés; de Castro, Jose María Bermúdez; Blasco, Ruth; Rosell, Jordi; Carrión, José; Rodríguez-Vidal, Joaquín; Finlayson, Geraldine

    2015-09-01

    Homo species were exposed to a new biogeochemical environment when they began to occupy caves. Here we report the first evidence of palaeopollution through geochemical analyses of heavy metals in four renowned archaeological caves of the Iberian Peninsula spanning the last million years of human evolution. Heavy metal contents reached high values due to natural (guano deposition) and anthropogenic factors (e.g. combustion) in restricted cave environments. The earliest anthropogenic pollution evidence is related to Neanderthal hearths from Gorham's Cave (Gibraltar), being one of the first milestones in the so-called “Anthropocene”. According to its heavy metal concentration, these sediments meet the present-day standards of “contaminated soil”. Together with the former, the Gibraltar Vanguard Cave, shows Zn and Cu pollution ubiquitous across highly anthropic levels pointing to these elements as potential proxies for human activities. Pb concentrations in Magdalenian and Bronze age levels at El Pirulejo site can be similarly interpreted. Despite these high pollution levels, the contaminated soils might not have posed a major threat to Homo populations. Altogether, the data presented here indicate a long-term exposure of Homo to these elements, via fires, fumes and their ashes, which could have played certain role in environmental-pollution tolerance, a hitherto neglected influence.

  14. Potential Biomarkers of the Earliest Clinical Stages of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alieva, Anelya Kh; Filatova, Elena V; Karabanov, Aleksey V; Illarioshkin, Sergey N; Slominsky, Petr A; Shadrina, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a widespread neurodegenerative disorder. Despite the intensive studies of this pathology, in general, the picture of the etiopathogenesis has still not been clarified fully. To understand better the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of PD, we analyzed the expression of 10 genes in the peripheral blood of treated and untreated patients with PD. 35 untreated patients with PD and 12 treated patients with Parkinson's disease (Hoehn and Yahr scores 1-2) were studied. An analysis of the mRNA levels of ATP13A2, PARK2, PARK7, PINK1, LRRK2, SNCA, ALDH1A1, PDHB, PPARGC1A, and ZNF746 genes in the peripheral blood of patients was carried out using reverse transcription followed by real-time PCR. A statistically significant and specific increase by more than 1.5-fold in the expression of the ATP13A2, PARK7, and ZNF746 genes was observed in patients with PD. Based on these results, it can be suggested that the upregulation of the mRNA levels of ATP13A2, PARK7, and ZNF746 in untreated patients in the earliest clinical stages can also be observed in the preclinical stages of PD, and that these genes can be considered as potential biomarkers of the preclinical stage of PD.

  15. The Formation and Growth of the Earliest Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, James; Comastri, Andrea; Topical Panel 2. 1

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how supermassive black holes (BHs) form and grow in the very early (z>6) Universe, when the first stars and galaxies were forming, is one of the major science aims of the Athena mission. The physical processes responsible for the initial formation of these BHs and their early growth via accretion - when they are seen as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) - remain unclear. Large-scale optical/near-infrared imaging surveys have identified a few tens of luminous AGNs at z>6, powered by extremely massive BHs, and place vital constraints on the range of possible formation and growth mechanisms. To make further progress, however, we must identify lower luminosity and obscured AGNs at z>6, which represent the bulk of early BH growth. I will discuss recent measurements that trace the evolution of AGN population out to the highest possible redshifts (z~5-6) using the latest X-ray surveys with Chandra and XMM-Newton. However, Athena will provide the superb sensitivity over a wide field-of-view that is required to identify the earliest (z>6) growing BHs, trace their evolution within the early galaxy population, and determine the physical mechanisms that drive their formation and growth. Achieving these aims represents a major challenge that will push the capabilities of both Athena and supporting ground- and space-based observatories. I will present the prospects for a large Athena survey programme and discuss both the technical and scientific challenges that must be addressed in preparation for the Athena mission.

  16. History of the Earliest Russian Old Testament Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Ju. Anders

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a previously unstudied manuscript, “Opyt perevoda vetkhozavetnykh knig [. . .] Mikhailom Fotinskim” (1806. In this article, we analyze the history of this manuscript, the circumstances surrounding the translation, and its purpose; some personal facts about the translator are also reviewed. This source represents the earliest Russian translation of the Old Testament, antedating by more than fifteen years the Russian Bible Society translations. Rev. Mikhail Fotinsky’s translation of five Old Testament books (only two ones in the Genesis was sent to the Moscow Religious Censorship Committee (Moskovskaia Dukhovnaia tsenzura in 1806, and the next year, Fotinsky asked the Censorship Committee to allow him to make a translation of the entire Old Testament. However, the censors left the manuscript in their repository, and there was no further development on this project. Contemporaries ignored this translation for several reasons. The first reason might be related to language: Fotinsky’s translation includes many Ukrainian elements. The second reason relates to its literary quality (or lack thereof, as the translation was interlinear and thus not stylistically developed. The manuscript contains many commentaries by Fotinsky, who concentrated on the Hebrew original and Judaic exegesis, trying to show different interpretations that may have occurred as a result of the polysemy of the original text.

  17. The antiviral response to gamma interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Pereira, Ana P; Williams, Timothy M; Strobl, Birgit; Watling, Diane; Briscoe, James; Kerr, Ian M

    2002-09-01

    A role for alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) in the IFN-gamma antiviral response has long been suggested. Accordingly, possible roles for autocrine or double-stranded-RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-alpha/beta in the IFN-gamma response were investigated. Use was made of wild-type and a variety of mutant human fibrosarcoma cell lines, including mutant U5A cells, which lack a functional IFN-alpha/beta receptor and hence an IFN-alpha/beta response. IFN-gamma did not induce detectable levels of IFN-alpha/beta in any of the cell lines, nor was the IFN-gamma response per se dependent on autocrine IFN-alpha/beta. On the other hand, a number of responses to dsRNA [poly(I). poly(C)] and encephalomyocarditis virus were greatly enhanced by IFN-gamma pretreatment (priming) of wild-type cells or of mutant cells lacking an IFN-alpha/beta response; these include the primary induction of dsRNA-inducible mRNAs, including IFN-beta mRNA, and, to a lesser extent, the dsRNA-mediated activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase(s). IFN-gamma priming of mRNA induction by dsRNA is dependent on JAK1 and shows biphasic kinetics, with an initial rapid (<30-min) response being followed by a more substantial effect on overnight incubation. The IFN-gamma-primed dsRNA responses appear to be subject to modulation through the p38, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and ERK1/ERK2 MAP kinase pathways. It can be concluded that despite efficient priming of IFN-beta production, the IFN-alpha/beta pathways play no significant role in the primary IFN-gamma antiviral response in these cell-virus systems. The observed IFN-gamma priming of dsRNA responses, on the other hand, will likely play a significant role in combating virus infection in vivo.

  18. Containing pandemic influenza with antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longini, Ira M; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Nizam, Azhar; Yang, Yang

    2004-04-01

    For the first wave of pandemic influenza or a bioterrorist influenza attack, antiviral agents would be one of the few options to contain the epidemic in the United States until adequate supplies of vaccine were available. The authors use stochastic epidemic simulations to investigate the effectiveness of targeted antiviral prophylaxis to contain influenza. In this strategy, close contacts of suspected index influenza cases take antiviral agents prophylactically. The authors compare targeted antiviral prophylaxis with vaccination strategies. They model an influenza pandemic or bioterrorist attack for an agent similar to influenza A virus (H2N2) that caused the Asian influenza pandemic of 1957-1958. In the absence of intervention, the model predicts an influenza illness attack rate of 33% of the population (95% confidence interval (CI): 30, 37) and an influenza death rate of 0.58 deaths/1,000 persons (95% Cl: 0.4, 0.8). With the use of targeted antiviral prophylaxis, if 80% of the exposed persons maintained prophylaxis for up to 8 weeks, the epidemic would be contained, and the model predicts a reduction to an illness attack rate of 2% (95% Cl: 0.2, 16) and a death rate of 0.04 deaths/1,000 persons (95% CI: 0.0003, 0.25). Such antiviral prophylaxis is nearly as effective as vaccinating 80% of the population. Vaccinating 80% of the children aged less than 19 years is almost as effective as vaccinating 80% of the population. Targeted antiviral prophylaxis has potential as an effective measure for containing influenza until adequate quantities of vaccine are available.

  19. Antiviral Warrior-APOBEC3G

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-xia; MA Yi-cai

    2005-01-01

    This paper is to further understand how APOBEC3G can defend the retroviruses and to find new approaches to AIDs (acquired immure deficiency syndrome).The viral infectivity factor (Vif) induces rapid degradation of APOBEC3G by ubiquitination, which is a proteosome-dependent pathway. Precisely speaking, only in the virus-producing cell Vif expression is necessary; in its absence, infection of a subsequent target cell terminates at a postentry step through the action of the human APOBEC3G antiviral mechanism. Vif protein has two domains: one binds to APOBEC3G and the other regulates the degradation of APOBEC3G by a conserved sequence, SLQ (Y/F) LA motif. Recently, the research on Vif has also revealed APOBEC3G is a novel component of innate immune system. In fact, APOBEC3G not only acts in DNA editing to block the replication of retroviruses such as HIV-1, but also is able to defend a wide spectrum of distantly related retroviruses and interferes with HBV through a different mechanism from HIV.

  20. Ribozymes:an anti-viral agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asad U.Khan; Shahper N.Khan

    2008-01-01

    The discovery that RNA can act as an enzyme led Thomas Cech to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and led immediately to the next wave of attempts to find an effective RNA-based therapy.The tantalizing idea that RNA enzymes called trans-cleaving ribozymes enables them to act as potential antiviral and powerful tool for functional genomic studies.The efficacy of ribozyme function in a complex intracellular environment is depend-ent on the intracellular fate of the RNA that is being targeted.Recently,ribozymes have been used successfully to inhibit gene expression in a variety of biological systems in vitro and in vivo.Ribozyme has also been used successfully to combat many cases of viral infection,as clinical trial.Despite it needs to be investigated and explored as far as its structural and functional aspects are concern.In view of the significance of ribozyme in modern medicine,we reviewed the recent literature on general approach to control viral infection.

  1. ANTIVIRAL POTENTIAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruwali Pushpa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘Antiviral agents’ has been defined in very broad terms as substances other than a virus or virus containing vaccine or specific antibody which can produce either a protective or therapeutic effect to the clear detectable advantage of the virus infected host. The herbal medicine has a long traditional use and the major advantage over other medicines is their wide therapeutic window with rare side effects. There are some disadvantages of synthetic drugs like narrow therapeutic window and more importantly the various adverse side effects which occur quite frequently. Due to these disadvantages and other limitations, there is an increasing trend in the field of research for discovering new and noble drugs based on various herbal formulations. This review attempts to address the importance of developing therapeutic herbal formulations from various medicinal plants using the knowledge based on traditional system of medicines, the Ayurveda. Although natural products have been used by civilization since ancient times, only in recent decades has there been growing research into alternative therapies and the therapeutics use of natural products, especially those derived from plants. Plants synthesize and preserve a variety of biochemical products, many of which are extractable and used for various scientific investigations. Therefore, medicinal plants proved to be a major resort for the treatment of diseases and sicknesses by traditional healers in many societies.

  2. Human influenza is more effective than avian influenza at antiviral suppression in airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Alan Chen-Yu; Barr, Ian; Hansbro, Philip M; Wark, Peter A

    2011-06-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the initial site of infection with influenza viruses. The innate immune responses of airway epithelial cells to infection are important in limiting virus replication and spread. However, relatively little is known about the importance of this innate antiviral response to infection. Avian influenza viruses are a potential source of future pandemics; therefore, it is critical to examine the effectiveness of the host antiviral system to different influenza viruses. We used a human influenza (H3N2) and a low-pathogenic avian influenza (H11N9) to assess and compare the antiviral responses of Calu-3 cells. After infection, H3N2 replicated more effectively than the H11N9 in Calu-3 cells. This was not due to differential expression of sialic acid residues on Calu-3 cells, but was attributed to the interference of host antiviral responses by H3N2. H3N2 induced a delayed antiviral signaling and impaired type I and type III IFN induction compared with the H11N9. The gene encoding for nonstructural (NS) 1 protein was transfected into the bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), and the H3N2 NS1 induced a greater inhibition of antiviral responses compared with the H11N9 NS1. Although the low-pathogenic avian influenza virus was capable of infecting BECs, the human influenza virus replicated more effectively than avian influenza virus in BECs, and this was due to a differential ability of the two NS1 proteins to inhibit antiviral responses. This suggests that the subversion of human antiviral responses may be an important requirement for influenza viruses to adapt to the human host and cause disease.

  3. Earliest example of a giant monitor lizard (Varanus, Varanidae, Squamata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack L Conrad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Varanidae is a clade of tiny (600 mm PCL lizards first appearing in the Cretaceous. True monitor lizards (Varanus are known from diagnostic remains beginning in the early Miocene (Varanus rusingensis, although extremely fragmentary remains have been suggested as indicating earlier Varanus. The paleobiogeographic history of Varanus and timing for origin of its gigantism remain uncertain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new Varanus from the Mytilini Formation (Turolian, Miocene of Samos, Greece is described. The holotype consists of a partial skull roof, right side of a braincase, partial posterior mandible, fragment of clavicle, and parts of six vertebrae. A cladistic analysis including 83 taxa coded for 5733 molecular and 489 morphological characters (71 previously unincluded demonstrates that the new fossil is a nested member of an otherwise exclusively East Asian Varanus clade. The new species is the earliest-known giant (>600 mm PCL terrestrial lizard. Importantly, this species co-existed with a diverse continental mammalian fauna. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The new monitor is larger (longer than 99% of known fossil and living lizards. Varanus includes, by far, the largest limbed squamates today. The only extant non-snake squamates that approach monitors in maximum size are the glass-snake Pseudopus and the worm-lizard Amphisbaena. Mosasauroids were larger, but exclusively marine, and occurred only during the Late Cretaceous. Large, extant, non-Varanus, lizards are limbless and/or largely isolated from mammalian competitors. By contrast, our new Varanus achieved gigantism in a continental environment populated by diverse eutherian mammal competitors.

  4. Earliest land plants created modern levels of atmospheric oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Timothy M.; Dahl, Tais W.; Daines, Stuart J.; Mills, Benjamin J. W.; Ozaki, Kazumi; Saltzman, Matthew R.; Porada, Philipp

    2016-08-01

    The progressive oxygenation of the Earth’s atmosphere was pivotal to the evolution of life, but the puzzle of when and how atmospheric oxygen (O2) first approached modern levels (˜21%) remains unresolved. Redox proxy data indicate the deep oceans were oxygenated during 435-392 Ma, and the appearance of fossil charcoal indicates O2 >15-17% by 420-400 Ma. However, existing models have failed to predict oxygenation at this time. Here we show that the earliest plants, which colonized the land surface from ˜470 Ma onward, were responsible for this mid-Paleozoic oxygenation event, through greatly increasing global organic carbon burial—the net long-term source of O2. We use a trait-based ecophysiological model to predict that cryptogamic vegetation cover could have achieved ˜30% of today’s global terrestrial net primary productivity by ˜445 Ma. Data from modern bryophytes suggests this plentiful early plant material had a much higher molar C:P ratio (˜2,000) than marine biomass (˜100), such that a given weathering flux of phosphorus could support more organic carbon burial. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that early plants selectively increased the flux of phosphorus (relative to alkalinity) weathered from rocks. Combining these effects in a model of long-term biogeochemical cycling, we reproduce a sustained +2‰ increase in the carbonate carbon isotope (δ13C) record by ˜445 Ma, and predict a corresponding rise in O2 to present levels by 420-400 Ma, consistent with geochemical data. This oxygen rise represents a permanent shift in regulatory regime to one where fire-mediated negative feedbacks stabilize high O2 levels.

  5. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhara-Bell Jarred

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These extracts were tested against two mammalian viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, using Vero cells as the cell culture system, and two marine virus counterparts, channel catfish virus (CCV and snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV, in their respective cell cultures (CCO and EPC. Evaluation of these extracts demonstrated that some possess antiviral potential. In sum, extracts 162M(4, 258M(1, 298M(4, 313(2, 331M(2, 367M(1 and 397(1 appear to be effective broad-spectrum antivirals with potential uses as prophylactic agents to prevent infection, as evident by their highly inhibitive effects against both virus types. Extract 313(2 shows the most potential in that it showed significantly high inhibition across all tested viruses. The samples tested in this study were crude extracts; therefore the development of antiviral application of the few potential extracts is dependent on future studies focused on the isolation of the active elements contained in these extracts.

  6. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; Yang, Yongbo; Barlow, Russell; Trapido-Rosenthal, Hank; Lu, Yuanan

    2010-08-07

    Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These extracts were tested against two mammalian viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), using Vero cells as the cell culture system, and two marine virus counterparts, channel catfish virus (CCV) and snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV), in their respective cell cultures (CCO and EPC). Evaluation of these extracts demonstrated that some possess antiviral potential. In sum, extracts 162M(4), 258M(1), 298M(4), 313(2), 331M(2), 367M(1) and 397(1) appear to be effective broad-spectrum antivirals with potential uses as prophylactic agents to prevent infection, as evident by their highly inhibitive effects against both virus types. Extract 313(2) shows the most potential in that it showed significantly high inhibition across all tested viruses. The samples tested in this study were crude extracts; therefore the development of antiviral application of the few potential extracts is dependent on future studies focused on the isolation of the active elements contained in these extracts.

  7. Antiviral activities of heated dolomite powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoike, Koichi; Hirano, Shozo; Yamana, Hideaki; Onda, Tetsuhiko; Maeda, Takayoshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Hayakawa, Motozo

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the heating conditions of dolomite powder on its antiviral activity was studied against the H5N3 avian influenza virus. Calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), obtained by the thermal decomposition of dolomite above 800 degrees C, were shown to have strong antiviral activity, but the effect was lessened when the heating temperature exceeded 1400 degrees C. Simultaneous measurement of the crystallite size suggested that the weakening of the activity was due to the considerable grain growth of the oxides. It was found that the presence of Mg in dolomite contributed to the deterrence of grain growth of the oxides during the heating process. Although both CaO and MgO exhibited strong antiviral activity, CaO had the stronger activity but quickly hydrated in the presence of water. On the other hand, the hydration of MgO took place gradually under the same conditions. Separate measurements using MgO and Mg(OH)2 revealed that MgO had a higher antiviral effect than Mg(OH)2. From the overall experiments, it was suggested that the strong antiviral activity of dolomite was related to the hydration reaction of CaO.

  8. HCV细胞培养系统及其在中草药提取物抗HCV研究中的应用%HCV culture system and its application in antiviral research on Chinese herb extracts in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李京涛; 常占杰; 席奇; 刘亚珠; 宋春荣; 南然; 李日向; 魏海梁; 闫曙光

    2015-01-01

    应用中草药治疗丙型肝炎报道较多,然而这些研究大多采用中药复方制剂进行临床治疗,疗效局限。由于一种中药含有多种活性物质,某些物质之间在体内甚至有相互拮抗的作用,因此,对于治疗结果的作用机理很难阐述清楚。简述了HCV假病毒、复制子和全长细胞培养系统的研究现状,并对应用HCV RNA细胞模型研究中药单体或有效成分进行抗HCV实验研究的相关进展进行了综述,为中药治疗丙型肝炎研究提供新思路。%Many studies have shown that Chinese herb extracts could treat patients who suffer hepatitis C.However,the clinical efficacy is limited due to the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)compounds.Because each drug contains multiple active substances,some of which may even act against each other in vivo,it is hard to clarify the mechanism of treatment.The current research on pseudotyped hepatitis C virus (HCV),replicon,and cell culture system is summarized,and the advances in antiviral research on the monomers or active compo-nents of Chinese herbs in vitro based on HCV RNA models are reviewed,thus providing new ideas for TCM treatment of hepatitis C.

  9. 13 CFR 120.523 - What is the “earliest uncured payment default”?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the âearliest uncured payment defaultâ? 120.523 Section 120.523 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... uncured payment default is the date of the earliest failure by a Borrower to pay a regular installment...

  10. Biotic Response in Aquatic Reptiles (Testudines) during Earliest Eocene Climatic Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, P. A.; Hutchison, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The earliest Eocene is marked by significant events of global warming: the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) at ~55.8 Ma and two short-lived events (ETM2 or Elmo and H2) approximately 2 Ma later. These environmental changes induced strong responses in the continental biota. Noteworthy changes in North American mid-latitude faunas and floras that are temporally correlated with earliest Eocene warming events include: increased diversity; turnover; and significant range changes, comprising both northward shifts in ranges of North American taxa as well as intercontinental dispersal across Holarctica. Evidence for these biotic changes comes directly from the fossil record and indirectly from phylogeographic analyses of molecular phylogenies of extant biota. To date, the stratigraphic record of biotic change has only been examined for the flora and terrestrial mammals. Data on reptiles and for continental aquatic systems are particularly lacking. In order to assess the impact of climate-mediated faunal change in aquatic systems during early Paleogene warming, we have focused on developing a detailed record of fossil turtles (Testudines) from the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, where these records can be directly compared to similarly studied mammalian and floral data and to isotopic studies that provide independent proxies of climate change. Using genus-level occurrence data from more than 450 stratigraphically-constrained localities spanning ~2.5 Ma, we calculated first and last appearances, taxonomic richness, and relative abundance as measured by presence-absence (site occupancy). Among turtles, taxonomic richness increased episodically through the earliest Eocene with two new taxa appearing at the PETM, two immediately following it, and two at Biohorizon B, an interval associated with the younger hyperthermals. These new, immigrant taxa eventually comprised 40% of known generic richness. Phylogenetically, the inferred biogeographic source regions are southern North

  11. A fresh look at an antiviral helicase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonid Gitlin; Marco Colonna

    2007-01-01

    @@ In order to survive,all organlsms must guard against viral infections.Recognition of viruses is accomplished via multiple sensors.Many mammalian proteins can recognize viral products,such as double-stranded RNA(dsRNA),yet feW of them are known to induce interferon,the central antiviral messenger.Since interferon is indispensable for Successful antiviral defense [1],the interferon-inducing sensors have been of particular interest.However,a clear understanding of such sensors has been elusive,and the first well-established sensor family,the toll-like receptors (TLRs),was described relatively recently[2].Antiviral TLRS are positioned in the endosomes,where they report the appearance of viral genetic material(DNA,single-and double-stranded RNA).

  12. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  13. Ichnotaxonomy of the Laetoli trackways: The earliest hominin footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, D. J.; Lockley, Martin G.; Lucas, Spencer G.; Musiba, Charles

    2011-04-01

    At 3.6 Ma, the Laetoli Pliocene hominin trackways are the earliest direct evidence of hominin bipedalism. Three decades since their discovery, not only is the question of their attribution still discussed, but marked differences in interpretation concerning the footprints' qualitative features and the inferred nature of the early hominin foot morphology remain. Here, we establish a novel ichnotaxon, Praehominipes laetoliensis, for these tracks and clarify the distinctions of these footprints from those of later hominins, especially modern humans. We also contrast hominin, human, and ape footprints to establish morphological features of these footprints correlated with a midtarsal break versus a stiff longitudinal arch. Original photos, including stereo photographs, and casts of footprints from the 1978 Laetoli excavation, confirm midtarsal flexibility, and repeatedly indicate an associated midfoot pressure ridge. In contrast, the modern human footprint reflects the derived arched-foot architecture, combined with a stiff-legged striding gait. Fossilized footprints of unshod modern human pedestrians in Hawaii and Nicaragua unambiguously illustrate these contrasts. Some points of comparisons with ape footprints are complicated by a variable hallucal position and the distinct manner of ape facultative bipedalism. In contrast to the comparatively rigid platform of the modern human foot, midtarsal flexibility is present in the chimpanzee foot. In ape locomotion, flexion at the transverse tarsal joint, referred to as the "midtarsal break," uncouples the respective functions of the prehensile forefoot and the propulsive hindfoot during grasp-climbing. At some point after the transition to habitual bipedalism, these grasp-climb adaptations, presumed to be present in the last common ancestor of apes and humans, were initially compromised by the loss of divergence of the hallux. An analogous trajectory is evident along an array of increasingly terrestrial extant ape species

  14. Drosophila as a model for antiviral immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanna; Valanne; Mika; Rmet

    2010-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been successfully used to study numerous biological processes including immune response.Flies are naturally infected with more than twenty RNA viruses making it a valid model organism to study host-pathogen interactions during viral infections.The Drosophila antiviral immunity includes RNA interference,activation of the JAK/STAT and other signaling cascades and other mechanisms such as autophagy and interactions with other microorganisms.Here we review Drosophila as an immunological research model as well as recent advances in the field ofDrosophila antiviral immunity.

  15. ESA on the trail of the earliest stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    extinguished themselves, showering the metals they had created into space. The heavy elements lay dormant until they were collected into the next generation of stars and the first galaxies, sometime later. The theory of population III stars suggests they are long dead in the local Universe. How can their existence then be confirmed? In the most distant realms of space, where what we observe is either very old or even extinguished, some signs of their existence might still be glimpsed. One mission that will help considerably in the search is the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), ESA's collaboration with NASA to replace the Hubble Space Telescope with a six-metre-class telescope. There are many questions for it to answer. "We don't really know what the first generation of stars are like and we don't know where exactly they formed," says Peter Jakobsen, ESA's Study Scientist for the JWST. "One of the biggest questions is whether the first stars formed in clumps or as isolated individuals. If they clumped, we'll be able to see them much more easily and further away than if they didn't." Even if JWST does not see the first stars directly, it will give astronomers an invaluable clue about how far away they are, allowing them to refine their theories. New research suggests that even if the population III stars are extremely far away, JWST would see them exploding as supernovae, at the ends of their individual lives. In addition, some astronomers suspect that some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are created by the death of these earliest stars. Ironically, we may therefore already be seeing the farewell detonation of some population III stars. ESA's new gamma-ray observatory, Integral, is perfectly placed to shed light on these violent events. It will indirectly help provide clues about population III stars. "I suspect that in the next ten years, we'll know the answers to at least some of our questions about what went on in the early Universe," says Jakobsen. This includes learning more

  16. Plant immunity against viruses: antiviral immune receptors in focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calil, Iara P; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2017-03-01

    Among the environmental limitations that affect plant growth, viruses cause major crop losses worldwide and represent serious threats to food security. Significant advances in the field of plant-virus interactions have led to an expansion of potential strategies for genetically engineered resistance in crops during recent years. Nevertheless, the evolution of viral virulence represents a constant challenge in agriculture that has led to a continuing interest in the molecular mechanisms of plant-virus interactions that affect disease or resistance. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of the antiviral immune system in plants and the latest breakthroughs reported in plant defence against viruses. Particular attention is given to the immune receptors and transduction pathways in antiviral innate immunity. Plants counteract viral infection with a sophisticated innate immune system that resembles the non-viral pathogenic system, which is broadly divided into pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity. An additional recently uncovered virus-specific defence mechanism relies on host translation suppression mediated by a transmembrane immune receptor. In all cases, the recognition of the virus by the plant during infection is central for the activation of these innate defences, and, conversely, the detection of host plants enables the virus to activate virulence strategies. Plants also circumvent viral infection through RNA interference mechanisms by utilizing small RNAs, which are often suppressed by co-evolving virus suppressors. Additionally, plants defend themselves against viruses through hormone-mediated defences and activation of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS), which alternatively impairs and facilitates viral infection. Therefore, plant defence and virulence strategies co-evolve and co-exist; hence, disease development is largely dependent on the extent and rate at which these opposing

  17. Bell's Palsy: Treatment with Steroids and Antiviral Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PATIENTS and their FAMILIES BELL’S PALSY: TREATMENT WITH STEROIDS AND ANTIVIRAL DRUGS This information sheet is provided to help you understand the role of steroids and antiviral drugs for treating Bell’s palsy. Neurologists ...

  18. Earliest memories in Israeli kibbutz upbringing: it is parental engagement that makes a difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviezer, Ora; Sher-Censor, Efrat; Stein-Lahad, Tahel

    2017-03-30

    Culture and parenting shape the ability to recall early childhood experiences. This research focused on the unique context of upbringing in the Israeli kibbutz and examined how cultural orientation and experiences of parental engagement in Kibbutz and non-Kibbutz settings shaped adults' earliest memories. Participants were 108 women (study 1) and 75 women and men (study 2) who were raised in traditional kibbutz upbringing or in a non-kibbutz family setting. In addition to reporting their earliest memory and age at earliest memory, participants estimated retrospectively the amount of daily time spent in interaction with parents, caregivers, and other children during the time of earliest memory. Overall, upbringing-related variations in cultural orientation were evident in the content of memories. A prediction of later age at earliest memory due to limited opportunities for parent-child interaction characteristic of traditional kibbutz upbringing was not supported. Rather, in both studies, age at earliest memory was linked to retrospective estimation of parental engagement, after controlling for childhood ecology. Study 2 revealed also a link of age at earliest memory to retrospective estimation of involvement with non-parental caregivers. These findings are congruent with the social-interaction model's claims about the importance of interaction with caregiving adults to autobiographical memory's development.

  19. Tracing Life in the Earliest Terrestrial Rock Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepland, A.; van Zuilen, M.; Arrhenius, G.

    2001-12-01

    The principal method for studying the earliest traces of life in the metamorphosed, oldest (> 3.5 Ga) terrestrial rocks involves determination of isotopic composition of carbon, mainly prevailing as graphite. It is generally believed that this measure can distinguish biogenic graphite from abiogenic varieties. However, the interpretation of life from carbon isotope ratios has to be assessed within the context of specific geologic circumstances requiring (i) reliable protolith interpretation (ii) control of secondary, metasomatic processes, and (iii) understanding of different graphite producing mechanisms and related carbon isotopic systematics. We have carried out a systematic study of abundance, isotopic composition and petrographic associations of graphite in rocks from the ca. 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt (ISB) in southern West Greenland. Our study indicates that most of the graphite in ISB occurs in carbonate-rich metasomatic rocks (metacarbonates) while sedimentary units, including banded iron formations (BIFs) and metacherts, have exceedingly low graphite concentrations. Regardless of isotopic composition of graphite in metacarbonate rocks, their secondary origin disqualifies them from providing evidence for traces of life stemming from 3.8 Ga. Recognition of the secondary origin of Isua metacarbonates thus calls for reevaluation of biologic interpretations by Schidlowski et al. (1979) and Mojzsis et al. (1996) that suggested the occurrence of 3.8 Ga biogenic graphite in these rocks. The origin of minute quantities of reduced carbon, released from sedimentary BIFs and metacherts at combustion steps > 700 C remains to be clarified. Its isotopic composition (d13C from -18 to -25%) may hint at a biogenic origin. However, such isotopically light carbon was also found in Proterozoic mafic dykes cross-cutting the metasedimentary units in the ISB. The occurrence of isotopically light, reduced carbon in biologically irrelevant dykes may indicate secondary graphite

  20. Antiviral drug resistance of herpes simplex virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranska, Ruzena

    2004-01-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) usually have an asymptomatic or benign course. However, severe infections do occur, particularly in HIV/AIDS patients or transplant recipients, and may be life-threatening unless adequate antiviral therapy is given. Since its introduction in the early 1980

  1. Antiviral drug resistance of herpes simplex virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranska, Ruzena

    2004-01-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) usually have an asymptomatic or benign course. However, severe infections do occur, particularly in HIV/AIDS patients or transplant recipients, and may be life-threatening unless adequate antiviral therapy is given. Since its introduction in the early

  2. IFN-gamma: Novel antiviral cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ank, Nina; West, Hans; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2006-01-01

    and adaptive immune responses. Recently, a novel class of cytokines was discovered and named IFN-lambda (alternatively type III IFN or interleukin-28/29 [IL- 28/29]), based on IFN-like antiviral activity and induction of typical IFN-inducible genes. Here, we review the literature on IFN-lambda and discuss...

  3. Antiviral Prophylaxis and H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Richard Pebody, a consultant epidemiologist at the Health Protection Agency in London, UK, discusses the use of antiviral post-exposure prophylaxis and pandemic H1N1.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  4. DMPD: Antiviral innate immunity pathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16474426 Antiviral innate immunity pathways. Seth RB, Sun L, Chen ZJ. Cell Res. 200...6 Feb;16(2):141-7. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Antiviral innate immunity pathways. PubmedID 16474426 ...Title Antiviral innate immunity pathways. Authors Seth RB, Sun L, Chen ZJ. Publication Cell Res. 2006 Feb;16

  5. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  6. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eChatain-Ly

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds - cetytrimethylammonium (CTAB, chitosan, nisin and lysozyme - was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA infecting E.coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7- 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 log(pfu/mL to 1,5 log(pfu/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min. These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds.

  7. TRIM25 Enhances the Antiviral Action of Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein (ZAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Zerlina; Cheung, Pamela; Schneider, William M.; Bozzacco, Leonia; Buehler, Eugen; Takaoka, Akinori; Rice, Charles M.; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; MacDonald, Margaret R.

    2017-01-01

    The host factor and interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) product, zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP), inhibits a number of diverse viruses by usurping and intersecting with multiple cellular pathways. To elucidate its antiviral mechanism, we perform a loss-of-function genome-wide RNAi screen to identify cellular cofactors required for ZAP antiviral activity against the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV). In order to exclude off-target effects, we carry out stringent confirmatory assays to verify the top hits. Important ZAP-liaising partners identified include proteins involved in membrane ion permeability, type I IFN signaling, and post-translational protein modification. The factor contributing most to the antiviral function of ZAP is TRIM25, an E3 ubiquitin and ISG15 ligase. We demonstrate here that TRIM25 interacts with ZAP through the SPRY domain, and TRIM25 mutants lacking the RING or coiled coil domain fail to stimulate ZAP’s antiviral activity, suggesting that both TRIM25 ligase activity and its ability to form oligomers are critical for its cofactor function. TRIM25 increases the modification of both the short and long ZAP isoforms by K48- and K63-linked polyubiquitin, although ubiquitination of ZAP does not directly affect its antiviral activity. However, TRIM25 is critical for ZAP’s ability to inhibit translation of the incoming SINV genome. Taken together, these data uncover TRIM25 as a bona fide ZAP cofactor that leads to increased ZAP modification enhancing its translational inhibition activity. PMID:28060952

  8. CRISPR/Cas9系统在培育抗病毒植物新种质中的应用%Application of CRISPR/Cas9 system in breeding of new antiviral plant germplasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张道微; 张超凡; 董芳; 黄艳岚; 张亚; 周虹

    2016-01-01

    summarized the advantages, main problems and development tendency of CRISPR/cas9 system in breeding of new antiviral plant germplasms.

  9. Dimerization of tetherin is not essential for its antiviral activity against Lassa and Marburg viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshie Sakuma

    Full Text Available Tetherin (also known as BST2, CD317 or HM1.24 has recently been reported to inhibit a wide range of viruses. However, the antiviral mechanism of action of tetherin has not been determined. Both ends of the tetherin molecule are associated with the plasma membrane and it forms a homodimer. Therefore, a model in which progeny virions are retained on the cell surface by dimer formation between tetherin molecules on the viral envelope and plasma membrane has been proposed as the antiviral mechanism of action of this molecule. To investigate this possibility, we examined the correlation between dimerization and antiviral activity of tetherin in Lassa and Marburg virus-like particle production systems using tetherin mutants deficient in dimer formation. However, the tetherin mutant with complete loss of dimerization activity still showed apparent antiviral activity, indicating that dimerization of tetherin is not essential for its antiviral activity. This suggests that tetherin retains progeny virions on the cell surface by a mechanism other than dimerization.

  10. Basal tissue structure in the earliest euconodonts: Testing hypotheses of developmental plasticity in euconodont phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X.-P.; Donoghue, P.C.J.; Repetski, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that conodonts are vertebrates rests solely on evidence of soft tissue anatomy. This has been corroborated by microstructural, topological and developmental evidence of homology between conodont and vertebrate hard tissues. However, these conclusions have been reached on the basis of evidence from highly derived euconodont taxa and the degree to which they are representative of plesiomorphic euconodonts remains an open question. Furthermore, the range of variation in tissue types comprising the euconodont basal body has been used to establish a hypothesis of developmental plasticity early in the phylogeny of the clade, and a model of diminishing potentiality in the evolution of development systems. The microstructural fabrics of the basal tissues of the earliest euconodonts (presumed to be the most plesiomorphic) are examined to test these two hypotheses. It is found that the range of microstructural variation observed hitherto was already apparent among plesiomorphic euconodonts. Thus, established histological data are representative of the most plesiomorphic euconodonts. However, although there is evidence of a range in microstructural fabrics, these are compatible with the dentine tissue system alone, and the degree of variation is compatible with that seen in clades of comparable diversity. ?? The Palaeontological Association.

  11. Earliest Deadline Control of a Group of Heat Pumps with a Single Energy Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Fink

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop and investigate the optimal control of a group of 104 heat pumps and a central Combined Heat and Power unit (CHP. The heat pumps supply space heating and domestic hot water to households. Each house has a buffer for domestic hot water and a floor heating system for space heating. Electricity for the heat pumps is generated by a central CHP unit, which also provides thermal energy to a district heating system. The paper reviews recent smart grid control approaches for central and distributed levels. An online algorithm is described based on the earliest deadline first theory that can be used on the aggregator level to control the CHP and to give signals to the heat pump controllers if they should start or should wait. The central controller requires only a limited amount of privacy-insensitive information from the heat pump controllers about their deadlines, which the heat pump controllers calculate for themselves by model predictions. In this way, a robust heat pump and CHP control is obtained, which is able to minimize energy demand and results in the desired thermal comfort for the households. The simulations demonstrate fast computation times due to minor computational and communication overheads.

  12. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy C. M. Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir, M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine, and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir. In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs. Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed.

  13. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Timothy C M; Chan, Martin C W; Lee, Nelson

    2015-09-14

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir). In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed.

  14. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Kirkegaard, Karla A; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus's inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles-the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations-both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings.

  15. An antiviral furanoquinone from Paulownia tomentosa Steud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, K H; Huh, H; Kim, B K; Lee, C K

    1999-11-01

    A methanol extract of the stem bark of Paulownia tomentosa showed antiviral activity against poliovirus types 1 and 3. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, chloroform and water, and a silicagel column chromatography resulted in the purification of a compound. The compound was identified as methyl-5-hydroxy-dinaphthol[1,2-2',3']furan-7,12-dione-6-carbox yla te on the basis of spectroscopic data. The component caused a significant reduction of viral cytopathic effect when it was subjected to a standard antiviral assay by using HeLa cells. The EC(50) of the compound against poliovirus type 1 strain Brunhilde, and type 3 strain Leon were 0.3 microg/mL and 0.6 microg/mL, respectively.

  16. Antiviral Strategies for Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available While vaccines are the primary public health response to seasonal and pandemic flu, short of a universal vaccine there are inherent limitations to this approach. Antiviral drugs provide valuable alternative options for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Here, we will review drugs and drug candidates against influenza with an emphasis on the recent progress of a host-targeting entry-blocker drug candidate, DAS181, a sialidase fusion protein.

  17. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P. Minneman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV. The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  18. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of I...

  19. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  20. Cycluridine: A novel antiviral effective against flaviviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galabov, Angel S; Mukova, Lucia; Abashev, Yuriy P; Wassilewa, Lilia; Tzvetkov, Petko; Minkov, Vassil; Barinskiy, Igor F; Rice, Charles M; Ouzounov, Sergey; Sidzhakova, Dorotea

    2017-08-01

    This review describes the contemporary state of research for antivirals effective against flaviviruses, especially focusing on inhibitors of the pestivirus causative agent of bovine viral diarrhoea virus. We highlight cycluridine, an originally synthesized Mannich's base [a tetrahydro-2(1H)-pyrimidinones derivative], as a highly effective antiviral possessing a strong inhibitory effect on bovine viral diarrhoea virus replication. Cycluridine was active against replication of a wide variety of bovine viral diarrhoea virus strains in cell cultures. The drug-sensitive period in the bovine viral diarrhoea virus replication cycle included the latent period and the exponential phase; a 90-min delay in the peak of viral RNA synthesis was observed. Cycluridine administered orally manifested a pronounced protective effect in calves with natural mucosal disease/viral diarrhoea and calves experimentally infected with bovine viral diarrhoea virus. Its magnitude of activity and selectivity places cycluridine in the lead among all known substances with anti- bovine viral diarrhoea virus activity. Additionally, cycluridine applied subcutaneously showed anti-tick-born encephalitis virus activity, manifesting a marked protective effect in mice infected with tick-born encephalitis virus. Cycluridine could be a prospective antiviral in veterinary and medical practice for the treatment of bovine viral diarrhoea virus and other flavivirus infections.

  1. Antiviral biflavonoids from Radix Wikstroemiae (Liaogewanggen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Wencai

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radix Wikstroemiae is a common Chinese herbal medicine. The ethyl acetate fraction of the ethanolic extract of W. indica possesses potent in vitro antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. This study aims to identify the antiviral components of the active fraction. Methods The active fraction of the Radix Wikstroemiae extract was isolated with chromatographic methods such as silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC columns. The structures of the isolated compounds were determined based on spectroscopic analyses. The in vitro antiviral activity of the compounds against RSV was tested with the cytopathic effect (CPE reduction assay and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT method. Results Four biflavonoids, namely neochamaejasmin B, genkwanol B, genkwanol C and stelleranol, were isolated and characterized. Genkwanol B, genkwanol C and stelleranol, which are stereo isomers of spirobiflavonoids, showed potent anti-RSV activity whereas neochamaejasmin B did not. Conclusion Neochamaejasmin B, genkwanol B, genkwanol C and stelleranol were isolated from Radix Wikstroemiae and the complete absolute configurations of five chiral carbons in stelleranol were substantiated for the first time. Furthermore, the anti-RSV activity of genkwanol B, genkwanol C and stelleranol was reported for the first time.

  2. CRM1 Inhibitors for Antiviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Mathew

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are a major global concern and despite major advancements in medical research, still cause significant morbidity and mortality. Progress in antiviral therapy is particularly hindered by appearance of mutants capable of overcoming the effects of drugs targeting viral components. Alternatively, development of drugs targeting host proteins essential for completion of viral lifecycle holds potential as a viable strategy for antiviral therapy. Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways in particular are involved in several pathological conditions including cancer and viral infections, where hijacking or alteration of function of key transporter proteins, such as Chromosome Region Maintenance1 (CRM1 is observed. Overexpression of CRM1-mediated nuclear export is evident in several solid and hematological malignancies. Interestingly, CRM1-mediated nuclear export of viral components is crucial in various stages of the viral lifecycle and assembly. This review summarizes the role of CRM1 in cancer and selected viruses. Leptomycin B (LMB is the prototypical inhibitor of CRM1 potent against various cancer cell lines overexpressing CRM1 and in limiting viral infections at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. However, the irreversible shutdown of nuclear export results in high cytotoxicity and limited efficacy in vivo. This has prompted search for synthetic and natural CRM1 inhibitors that can potentially be developed as broadly active antivirals, some of which are summarized in this review.

  3. Self-interest versus group-interest in antiviral control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Boven

    Full Text Available Antiviral agents have been hailed to hold considerable promise for the treatment and prevention of emerging viral diseases like H5N1 avian influenza and SARS. However, antiviral drugs are not completely harmless, and the conditions under which individuals are willing to participate in a large-scale antiviral drug treatment program are as yet unknown. We provide population dynamical and game theoretical analyses of large-scale prophylactic antiviral treatment programs. Throughout we compare the antiviral control strategy that is optimal from the public health perspective with the control strategy that would evolve if individuals make their own, rational decisions. To this end we investigate the conditions under which a large-scale antiviral control program can prevent an epidemic, and we analyze at what point in an unfolding epidemic the risk of infection starts to outweigh the cost of antiviral treatment. This enables investigation of how the optimal control strategy is moulded by the efficacy of antiviral drugs, the risk of mortality by antiviral prophylaxis, and the transmissibility of the pathogen. Our analyses show that there can be a strong incentive for an individual to take less antiviral drugs than is optimal from the public health perspective. In particular, when public health asks for early and aggressive control to prevent or curb an emerging pathogen, for the individual antiviral drug treatment is attractive only when the risk of infection has become non-negligible. It is even possible that from a public health perspective a situation in which everybody takes antiviral drugs is optimal, while the process of individual choice leads to a situation where nobody is willing to take antiviral drugs.

  4. Ribonuclease, deoxyribonuclease, and antiviral activity of Escherichia coli-expressed Bougainvillea xbuttiana antiviral protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, N L; Yadav, O P; Lodha, M L

    2008-03-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding ribosome-inactivating/antiviral protein from the leaves of Bougainvillea xbuttiana was recently isolated. The coding region of cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein product was designated as BBAP1 (Bougainvillea xbuttiana antiviral protein 1). BBAP1 showed ribonuclease activity against Torula yeast RNA. It also exhibited depurination activity against supercoiled pBlueScript SK+ plasmid DNA in a concentration dependent manner, and was found to convert nicked circular DNA into linear form only at higher concentration. On bioassay, BBAP1 exhibited antiviral activity against sunnhemp rosette virus infecting Cyamopsis tetragonoloba leaves in which 95% inhibition of local lesion formation was observed.

  5. RNA interference and antiviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionally conserved gene silencing mechanism present in a variety of eukaryotic species. RNAi uses short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to trigger degradation or translation repression of homologous RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner. This system can be induced effectively in vitro and in vivo by direct application of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), or by expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) with non-viral and viral vectors. To date, RNAi has been extensively used as a novel and effective tool for functional genomic studies, and has displayed great potential in treating human diseases, including human genetic and acquired disorders such as cancer and viral infections. In the present review, we focus on the recent development in the use of RNAi in the prevention and treatment of viral infections. The mechanisms,strategies, hurdles and prospects of employing RNAi in the pharmaceutical industry are also discussed.

  6. Compensatory cortical activation observed by fMRI during a cognitive task at the earliest stage of MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audoin, Bertrand; Ibarrola, Danielle; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Malikova, Irina; Ali-Chérif, André; Pelletier, Jean; Cozzone, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have suggested that functional cortical changes seen in patients with early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) can have an adaptive role to limit the clinical impact of tissue injury. To determine whether cortical reorganization occurs during high cognitive processes at the earliest stage of multiple sclerosis (MS), we performed an fMRI experiment using the conventional Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) as paradigm in a population of ten patients with clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of multiple sclerosis (CISSMS). At the time of the fMRI exploration, mean disease duration was 6.8 +/- 3.3 months. We compared these results to those obtained in a group of ten education-, age-, and sex-matched healthy controls. Subjects were explored on a 1.5 T MRI system using single-shot gradient-echo EPI sequence. Performances of the two groups during PASAT recorded inside the MR scanner were not different. Statistical assessment of brain activation was based on the random effect analysis (between-group analysis two-sample t-test P < 0.005 confirmed by individual analyses performed in the surviving regions P < 0.05 Mann Whitney U-test). Compared to controls, patients showed significantly greater activation in the right frontopolar cortex, the bilateral lateral prefrontal cortices, and the right cerebellum. Healthy controls did not show greater activation compared to CISSMS patients. The present study argues in favor of the existence of compensatory cortical activations at the earliest stage of MS mainly located in regions involved in executive processing in patients performing PASAT. It also suggests that fMRI can evidence the active processes of neuroplasticity contributing to mask the clinical cognitive expression of brain pathology at the earliest stage of MS.

  7. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans. PMID:26798663

  8. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Brutscher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD- affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans.

  9. Application of Orem self-care theory on injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients with

    OpenAIRE

    Xiujuan Tao; Ning Wang

    2015-01-01

    Guided by Orem self-care theory, the nursing staff evaluate the injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients, finding that patients with the presence of self-care was insufficient, so effective nursing care in different periods of application of different nursing system was necessary.

  10. Application of Orem self-care theory on injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guided by Orem self-care theory, the nursing staff evaluate the injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients, finding that patients with the presence of self-care was insufficient, so effective nursing care in different periods of application of different nursing system was necessary.

  11. [Preliminary screening for antiviral AIDS drugs. VI. Report for fiscal year 1993].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, H; Takahashi, K; Kunisada, T; Moritugu, Y; Kobayashi, N; Noguchi, Y; Matsuyama, M; Akiyoshi, K; Noro, S; Sawada, H; Sakurada, N; Yamada, A; Ishizaki, T; Kamimura, N; Yoshida, Y; Ono, T; Ohtomo, N; Morishita, T; Kobayashi, S; Miyake, T; Ishiwara, Y; Suzuki, R; Saito, T; Etoh, S; Mise, K

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary screening of antiviral AIDS drugs has been carried out using three different in vitro assay systems. Among 138 samples tested, two were found to inhibit the growth of HIV in vitro. Neither of the positive samples has hopeful signs, as the ranges of effective doses of the samples are very narrow.

  12. [Preliminary screening for antiviral AIDS drugs. VII. Report for fiscal year 1994].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmuki, N; Kazama, K; Sadamasu, T; Sekine, H; Ohta, K; Kudoh, Y; Kobayashi, N; Noguchi, Y; Matsuyama, M; Akiyoshi, K; Noro, S; Sawada, H; Kimura, H; Yamada, A; Ishizaki, T; Kamimura, N; Yoshida, Y; Ono, T; Tachibana, N; Morishita, T; Kobayashi, S; Miyake, T; Ishiwara, Y; Ishikawa, N; Moritugu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary screening of antiviral AIDS drugs has been carried out using three different in vitro assay systems. Among 246 samples of different origin tested, six were shown to inhibit the growth of HIV in vitro. Two of the positive samples have hopeful signs, as the ranges of effective doses are wider than those of most of positive samples which had been found by us.

  13. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines...

  14. Critical role of spatial information from chiral-asymmetric peptides in the earliest occurrence of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Rosas, Hugo I.; Riquelme, Francisco; Maldonado, Mariel; Cocho, Germinal

    2017-01-01

    The earliest functional living system on Earth should have been able to reproduce an ordered configuration and a self-organization dynamics. It was capable of resisting a random variability in time and space to keep the functionality. Amino acids (AAs) and nucleobases generated from abiotic reactions as seen in laboratory-based experiments have demonstrated that molecular elements for life can be obtained by predictable physicochemical processes. However, a functional, self-organized living system needs complex molecular interactions to endure. In this paper, we address the transference of spatial information on highly enantiopure polymers as a critical condition to support the dynamics in a self-organized biogenic system. Previous scenarios have considered almost exclusively the information encoded in sequences as the suitable source of prebiotic information. But the spatial information transference has been poorly understood thus far. We provide the supporting statements which predict that the ordered configuration in a biogenic system should be significantly influenced by spatial information, instead of being exclusively generated by sequences of polymers. This theoretical approach takes into consideration that the properties of mutation and inheritance did not develop before definition of the structures that allow the management of information. Rather, we postulate that the molecular structures to store and transfer information must exist at first, in order to retain particular functional `meaning', and subsequently, such information can be `inherited' and eventually modified. Thus, the present contribution follows the theory that life was originated from an unstable prebiotic environment that involves the early spatial information transference based on large chiral asymmetry.

  15. HIV/HCV Antiviral Drug Interactions in the Era of Direct-acting Antivirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Donald P.; Faragon, John J.; Banks, Sarah; Chirch, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chronic hepatitis C has evolved over the past decade, resulting in better control of infection and clinical outcomes; however, drug-drug interactions remain a significant hazard. Joint recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America regarding drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretroviral agents and direct-acting antiviral agents for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are reviewed here. This review is oriented to facilitate appropriate selection of an antiviral therapy regimen for HCV infection based on the choice of antiretroviral therapy being administered and, if necessary, switching antiretroviral regimens. PMID:27777891

  16. Coxsackievirus cloverleaf RNA containing a 5' triphosphate triggers an antiviral response via RIG-I activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Feng

    Full Text Available Upon viral infections, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and stimulate an antiviral state associated with the production of type I interferons (IFNs and inflammatory markers. Type I IFNs play crucial roles in innate antiviral responses by inducing expression of interferon-stimulated genes and by activating components of the adaptive immune system. Although pegylated IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis B and C virus infections for decades, they exert substantial side effects that limit their use. Current efforts are directed toward the use of PRR agonists as an alternative approach to elicit host antiviral responses in a manner similar to that achieved in a natural infection. RIG-I is a cytosolic PRR that recognizes 5' triphosphate (5'ppp-containing RNA ligands. Due to its ubiquitous expression profile, induction of the RIG-I pathway provides a promising platform for the development of novel antiviral agents and vaccine adjuvants. In this study, we investigated whether structured RNA elements in the genome of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3, a picornavirus that is recognized by MDA5 during infection, could activate RIG-I when supplied with 5'ppp. We show here that a 5'ppp-containing cloverleaf (CL RNA structure is a potent RIG-I inducer that elicits an extensive antiviral response that includes induction of classical interferon-stimulated genes, as well as type III IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In addition, we show that prophylactic treatment with CVB3 CL provides protection against various viral infections including dengue virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and enterovirus 71, demonstrating the antiviral efficacy of this RNA ligand.

  17. Hepatitis C virus cell entry: a target for novel antiviral strategies to address limitations of direct acting antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Che C; Baumert, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains a major global health problem, with 130-170 million chronically infected individuals at risk to develop severe liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the development of direct-acting antivirals offers cure for a large majority of patients, there are still a number of clinical challenges. These include DAA failure in a significant subset of patients, difficult-to-treat genotypes and limited access to therapy due to high costs. Moreover, recent data indicate that the risk for liver cancer persists in patients with advanced fibrosis. These challenges highlight the need for continued efforts towards novel therapeutic strategies for HCV. Over the past two decades, advances in HCV model systems have enabled a detailed understanding of HCV entry and its clinical impact. Many of the virus-host interactions involved in HCV entry have now been identified and explored as antiviral targets. Furthermore, viral entry is recognized as an important factor for graft reinfection and establishment of persistent infection. HCV entry inhibitors, therefore, offer promising opportunities to address the limitations of DAAs. Here, we summarize recent advances in the field of HCV entry and discuss perspectives towards the prevention and cure of HCV infection and virus-induced liver disease.

  18. Have deoxyribonucleotides and DNA been among the earliest biomolecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follmann, Hartmut

    Unlike ribose chemistry, the chemistry of 2-deoxyribose precludes its formation or at least its incorporation into nucleotides under accepted ``primordial soup'' conditions; therefore RNA and DNA could not develop in parallel during the evolution of protocells. However, deoxyribonucleotides might have been formed abiotically by direct reduction of ribonucleotides in a primitive version of the biochemical pathway. This sequence of events, in which DNA lagged behind RNA in the assembly of genetic information for an unknown - probably short - period of time is suggested by the primitive traits (i.e., nucleotide binding, thiol redox chemistry, and metal ion catalysis) of present-day enzyme systems of deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. The reaction should be amenable to experimental study.

  19. Nuclear shapes: from earliest ideas to multiple shape coexisting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyde, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of the atomic nucleus being characterized by an intrinsic property such as shape came as a result of high precision hyperfine studies in the field of atomic physics, which indicated a non-spherical nuclear charge distribution. Herein, we describe the various steps taken through ingenious experimentation and bold theoretical suggestions that mapped the way for later work in the early 50s by Aage Bohr, Ben Mottelson and James Rainwater. We lay out a long and winding road that marked, in the period of 50s to 70s, the way shell-model and collective-model concepts were reconciled. A rapid increase in both accelerator and detection methods (70s towards the early 2000s) opened new vistas into nuclear shapes, and their coexistence, in various regions of the nuclear mass table. Next, we outline a possible unified view of nuclear shapes: emphasizing decisive steps taken as well as questions remaining, next to the theoretical efforts that could result in an emerging understanding of nuclear shapes, building on the nucleus considered as a strongly interacting system of nucleons as the microscopic starting point.

  20. Research progress in the development of direct acting antiviral agents for hepatitis C and the anti-viral resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song YANG

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently,directly acting antiviral agents against hepatitic C virus with different mechanisms have been developed and put into clinical trials.Especially,results of phase Ⅲ clinical trials of Boceprevir and Telaprevir have been published,and these two agents are to be approved for marketing in recent years.Also much attention has been paid on anti-viral resistance against direct acting antiviral agents.Great progresses have been made in field of direct acting antiviral agents against hepatitic C virus.Domestic studies in this area should take characteristics of virus and host of Chinese chronic hepatitis C into consideration.

  1. Antiviral Activity of Some Plants Used in Nepalese Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rajbhandari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanolic extracts of 41 plant species belonging to 27 families used in the traditional medicine in Nepal have been investigated for in vitro antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and influenza virus A by dye uptake assay in the systems HSV-1/Vero cells and influenza virus A/MDCK cells. The extracts of Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata, Cassiope fastigiata and Thymus linearis showed potent anti-herpes viral activity. The extracts of Allium oreoprasum, Androsace strigilosa, Asparagus filicinus, Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata and Verbascum thapsus exhibited strong anti-influenza viral activity. Only the extracts of A. rivularis and B. ciliata demonstrated remarkable activity against both viruses.

  2. The clinically approved antiviral drug sofosbuvir inhibits Zika virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, Carolina Q.; de Melo, Gabrielle R.; de Freitas, Caroline S.; Rocha, Natasha; Hoelz, Lucas Villas Bôas; Miranda, Milene; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Marttorelli, Andressa; Ferreira, André C.; Barbosa-Lima, Giselle; Abrantes, Juliana L.; Vieira, Yasmine Rangel; Bastos, Mônica M.; de Mello Volotão, Eduardo; Nunes, Estevão Portela; Tschoeke, Diogo A.; Leomil, Luciana; Loiola, Erick Correia; Trindade, Pablo; Rehen, Stevens K.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Boechat, Nubia; Thompson, Fabiano L.; de Filippis, Ana M. B.; Brüning, Karin; Souza, Thiago Moreno L.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the Flaviviridae family, along with other agents of clinical significance such as dengue (DENV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viruses. Since ZIKV causes neurological disorders during fetal development and in adulthood, antiviral drugs are necessary. Sofosbuvir is clinically approved for use against HCV and targets the protein that is most conserved among the members of the Flaviviridae family, the viral RNA polymerase. Indeed, we found that sofosbuvir inhibits ZIKV RNA polymerase, targeting conserved amino acid residues. Sofosbuvir inhibited ZIKV replication in different cellular systems, such as hepatoma (Huh-7) cells, neuroblastoma (SH-Sy5y) cells, neural stem cells (NSC) and brain organoids. In addition to the direct inhibition of the viral RNA polymerase, we observed that sofosbuvir also induced an increase in A-to-G mutations in the viral genome. Together, our data highlight a potential secondary use of sofosbuvir, an anti-HCV drug, against ZIKV. PMID:28098253

  3. Mucin biopolymers as broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieleg, Oliver; Lieleg, Corinna; Bloom, Jesse; Buck, Christopher B.; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Mucus is a porous biopolymer matrix that coats all wet epithelia in the human body and serves as the first line of defense against many pathogenic bacteria and viruses. However, under certain conditions viruses are able to penetrate this infection barrier, which compromises the protective function of native mucus. Here, we find that isolated porcine gastric mucin polymers, key structural components of native mucus, can protect an underlying cell layer from infection by small viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), or a strain of influenza A virus. Single particle analysis of virus mobility inside the mucin barrier reveals that this shielding effect is in part based on a retardation of virus diffusion inside the biopolymer matrix. Our findings suggest that purified mucins may be used as a broad-range antiviral supplement to personal hygiene products, baby formula or lubricants to support our immune system. PMID:22475261

  4. Antiviral activity of squalamine: Role of electrostatic membrane binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckerman, Bernard; Qu, Wei; Mishra, Abhijit; Zasloff, Michael; Wong, Gerard; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent workootnotetextM. Zasloff et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA) 108, 15978 (2011). has demonstrated that squalamine, a molecule found in the liver of sharks, exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral properties. It has been proposed that this activity results from the charge-density matching of squalamine and phospholipid membranes, causing squalamine to bind to membranes and displace proteins such as Rac1 that are crucial for the viral replication cycle. Here we investigate this hypothesis by numerical simulation of a coarse-grained model for the competition between Rac1 and squalamine in binding affinity to a flat lipid bilayer. We perform free-energy calculations to test the ability of squalamine to condense stacked bilayer systems and thereby displace bulkier Rac1 molecules. We directly compare our findings to small-angle x-ray scattering results for the same setup.

  5. Attacked from All Sides: RNA Decay in Antiviral Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome M. Molleston

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system has evolved a number of sensors that recognize viral RNA (vRNA to restrict infection, yet the full spectrum of host-encoded RNA binding proteins that target these foreign RNAs is still unknown. The RNA decay machinery, which uses exonucleases to degrade aberrant RNAs largely from the 5′ or 3′ end, is increasingly recognized as playing an important role in antiviral defense. The 5′ degradation pathway can directly target viral messenger RNA (mRNA for degradation, as well as indirectly attenuate replication by limiting specific pools of endogenous RNAs. The 3′ degradation machinery (RNA exosome is emerging as a downstream effector of a diverse array of vRNA sensors. This review discusses our current understanding of the roles of the RNA decay machinery in controlling viral infection.

  6. The power of visual memory: the earliest remembered drawing of Alberto Giacometti, Snow White in Her Coffin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laurie

    2008-04-01

    Since the time of Freud, many psychoanalysts have seen screen memories and earliest memories as reflecting underlying dynamics. I propose that an earliest remembered artwork is a highly condensed construction similar to a screen memory. Alberto Giacometti's earliest remembered drawing, of Snow White in Her Coffin, contains clues to the artist's personality and references to childhood experience. Giacometti's memory of the drawing done in childhood is a striking condensation of significant biographical events and psychodynamic conflicts, as well as a marker of important unconscious fantasies. The artist's postwar sculptural style, utilizing gaunt figures, epitomizes the final transformation of the psychological meaning of his earliest remembered drawing.

  7. Microbial biosynthesis of wax esters during desiccation: an adaptation for colonization of the earliest terrestrial environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, D. B.; Brassell, S. C.; Pratt, L. M.

    2008-12-01

    Biosynthesis of wax esters (WE) by prokaryotes in natural systems, notably bacteria from hot springs and marine phytoplankton, is poorly documented, primarily because saponification is a routine step in the analysis of microbial mat lipids. Use of this preparative procedure, critical for characterization of the diagnostic distributions of carboxylic acids in phospholipids, precludes recovery of intact WE. Examination of non-saponified lipids in emergent and desiccated mats with comparable microbial communities from the Warner Lake region, Oregon, reveals increases in the relative abundance (18.6 to 59.9μg/g Corg) and average chain length (C38 to C46) of WE in the latter, combined with assimilation of phytol and tocopherol moieties. Prokaryotes can accumulate WE as storage lipids in vitro, notably at elevated temperature or under nitrogen limiting conditions, but we propose that biosynthesis of long-chain WE that have a low solubility and are resistant to degradation/oxidation may represent an evolutionary strategy to survive desiccation in evaporative environments. Moreover, aeolian transport of desiccated mat-rip-ups between lake flats allows for migration of microbial communities within and between lake flats and basins during arid conditions. Subsequent rehydration within an alkaline environment would naturally saponify WE, and thereby regenerate alcohol and acid moieties that could serve as membrane lipids for the next viable microbial generation. The evolutionary cradle of WE was likely abiotic generation under hydrothermal conditions, which is consistent with the antiquity of the ester linkage necessitated by its integral role in the membranes of Eubacteria (though not Archaea) and in bacteriochlorophyll. The subsequent capability of microbes to biosynthesize WE may have facilitated their survival when nutrients were limiting, and production of long-chain WE (>C40) may represent a further critical evolutionary threshold that enabled their persistence through

  8. Dicer is selectively important for the earliest stages of erythroid development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Cismasiu, Valeriu B; Moore, Susan

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are involved in many aspects of normal and malignant hematopoiesis, including hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal, proliferation, and terminal differentiation. However, a role for miRs in the generation of the earliest stages of lineage committed progenitors from HSCs has ...

  9. The earliest evidence of wheeled vehicles in Europe and the Near East

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, JA; Kruk, J; Lanting, AE; Milisauskas, S

    1999-01-01

    The earliest evidence of wheeled vehicles dates to the Funnel Beaker (TRB) culture in Europe and the Late Uruk period in the Near East. Results of excavations and C14 determinations from Poland, Germany, Iraq, Syria and Turkey suggest that the appearance of wheeled vehicles was contemporary in Europ

  10. Earliest record of the fossil snake Palaeophis from the Paleocene/Eocene boundary in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hans Viborg; Cuny, Gilles Guy Roger; Rasmussen, Arne Redsted;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. – The earliest record of Palaeophis ever found in Denmark is here based on vertebrae described from the Paleocene/Eocene Stolleklint Clay of the Isle of Mors (northern Denmark). Although much smaller, they appear quite similar to the Eocene vertebra described from the Fur Formation in t...

  11. Earliest Memories and Recent Memories of Highly Salient Events--Are They Similar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carole; Fowler, Tania; Brandeau, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Four- to 11-year-old children were interviewed about 2 different sorts of memories in the same home visit: recent memories of highly salient and stressful events--namely, injuries serious enough to require hospital emergency room treatment--and their earliest memories. Injury memories were scored for amount of unique information, completeness…

  12. Self-interest versus group-interest in antiviral control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, M. van; Klinkenberg, D.; Pen, I.; Weissing, F.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Antiviral agents have been hailed to hold considerable promise for the treatment and prevention of emerging viral diseases like H5N1 avian influenza and SARS. However, antiviral drugs are not completely harmless, and the conditions under which individuals are willing to participate in a large-scale

  13. Beyond RNAi: antiviral defense strategies in Drosophila and mosquito

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkling, S.H.; Rij, R.P. van

    2013-01-01

    Virus transmission and spread by arthropods is a major economic and public health concern. The ongoing dissemination of arthropod-borne viruses by blood-feeding insects is an important incentive to study antiviral immunity in these animals. RNA interference is a major mechanism for antiviral defense

  14. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Xin; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:23235364

  15. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Shi Guan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail.

  16. RNAi:antiviral therapy against dengue virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sobia Idrees; Usman A Ashfaq

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection.

  17. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Ye, Xiu Juan; Xia, Jiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-04-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (-)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (-)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1-5 (TH 1-5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the aforementioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The prospects of

  18. Atividade antiviral de Musa acuminata Colla, Musaceae Antiviral activity of Musa acuminata Colla, Musaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Otaviano Martins

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho avalia a atividade antiviral de extratos e frações de Musa acuminata Colla, Musaceae, coletada em duas regiões do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Petrópolis e Santo Antônio de Pádua. As inflorescências de M. acuminata apresentaram excelente atividade para os dois vírus avaliados: herpesvírus simples humano tipo 1 e herpesvírus simples humano tipo 2, ambos resistentes ao Aciclovir. Os resultados indicam que os extratos de M. acuminata testados podem constituir alvo potencial para uso em terapias antivirais.This study evaluates the antiviral activity of extracts and fractions of Musa acuminata Colla collected in two regions of Rio de Janeiro State (Petrópolis and Santo Antônio de Pádua. The inflorescences of M. acuminata showed excellent activity for the two virus evaluated: simple human herpesvirus type 1 and simple human herpesvirus type 2, both resistant to Acyclovir. The results indicate that the tested extracts of M. acuminata can be potential target for use in antiviral therapy.

  19. Antiviral immunity of Anopheles gambiae is highly compartmentalized, with distinct roles for RNA interference and gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carissimo, Guillaume; Pondeville, Emilie; McFarlane, Melanie; Dietrich, Isabelle; Mitri, Christian; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Antoniewski, Christophe; Bourgouin, Catherine; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Kohl, Alain; Vernick, Kenneth D

    2015-01-13

    Arboviruses are transmitted by mosquitoes and other arthropods to humans and animals. The risk associated with these viruses is increasing worldwide, including new emergence in Europe and the Americas. Anopheline mosquitoes are vectors of human malaria but are believed to transmit one known arbovirus, o'nyong-nyong virus, whereas Aedes mosquitoes transmit many. Anopheles interactions with viruses have been little studied, and the initial antiviral response in the midgut has not been examined. Here, we determine the antiviral immune pathways of the Anopheles gambiae midgut, the initial site of viral infection after an infective blood meal. We compare them with the responses of the post-midgut systemic compartment, which is the site of the subsequent disseminated viral infection. Normal viral infection of the midgut requires bacterial flora and is inhibited by the activities of immune deficiency (Imd), JAK/STAT, and Leu-rich repeat immune factors. We show that the exogenous siRNA pathway, thought of as the canonical mosquito antiviral pathway, plays no detectable role in antiviral defense in the midgut but only protects later in the systemic compartment. These results alter the prevailing antiviral paradigm by describing distinct protective mechanisms in different body compartments and infection stages. Importantly, the presence of the midgut bacterial flora is required for full viral infectivity to Anopheles, in contrast to malaria infection, where the presence of the midgut bacterial flora is required for protection against infection. Thus, the enteric flora controls a reciprocal protection tradeoff in the vector for resistance to different human pathogens.

  20. The combined use of alphavirus replicons and pseudoinfectious particles for the discovery of antivirals derived from natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delekta, Phillip C; Raveh, Avi; Larsen, Martha J; Schultz, Pamela J; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2015-06-01

    Alphaviruses are a prominent class of reemergent pathogens due to their globally expanding ranges, potential for lethality, and possible use as bioweapons. The absence of effective treatments for alphaviruses highlights the need for innovative strategies to identify antiviral agents. Primary screens that use noninfectious self-replicating RNAs, termed replicons, have been used to identify potential antiviral compounds for alphaviruses. Only inhibitors of viral genome replication, however, will be identified using replicons, which excludes many other druggable steps in the viral life cycle. To address this limitation, we developed a western equine encephalitis virus pseudoinfectious particle system that reproduces several crucial viral life cycle steps in addition to genome replication. We used this system to screen a library containing ~26,000 extracts derived from marine microbes, and we identified multiple bacterial strains that produce compounds with potential antiviral activity. We subsequently used pseudoinfectious particle and replicon assays in parallel to counterscreen candidate extracts, and followed antiviral activity during biochemical fractionation and purification to differentiate between inhibitors of viral entry and genome replication. This novel process led to the isolation of a known alphavirus entry inhibitor, bafilomycin, thereby validating the approach for the screening and identification of potential antiviral compounds.

  1. The differential antiviral activities of chicken interferon α (ChIFN-α and ChIFN-β are related to distinct interferon-stimulated gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongren Qu

    Full Text Available Chicken interferon α (ChIFN-α and ChIFN-β are type I IFNs that are important antiviral cytokines in the innate immune system. In the present study, we identified the virus-induced expression of ChIFN-α and ChIFN-β in chicken fibroblast DF-1 cells and systematically evaluated the antiviral activities of recombinant ChIFN-α and ChIFN-β by cytopathic-effect (CPE inhibition assays. We found that ChIFN-α exhibited stronger antiviral activity than ChIFN-β in terms of inhibiting the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus, Newcastle disease virus and avian influenza virus, respectively. To elucidate the mechanism of differential antiviral activities between the two ChIFNs, we measured the relative mRNA levels of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs in IFN-treated DF-1 cells by real-time PCR. ChIFN-α displayed greater induction potency than ChIFN-β on several ISGs encoding antiviral proteins and MHC-I, whereas ChIFN-α was less potent than ChIFN-β for inducing ISGs involved in signaling pathways. In conclusion, ChIFN-α and ChIFN-β presented differential induction potency on various sets of ISGs, and the stronger antiviral activity of ChIFN-α is likely attributed to the greater expression levels of downstream antiviral ISGs.

  2. An antiviral protein from Bougainvillea spectabilis roots; purification and characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasaraswathi, R; Sadasivam, S; Ward, M; Walker, J M

    1998-04-01

    An antiviral protein active against mechanical transmission of tomato spotted wilt virus was identified in the root tissues of Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd. Bougainvillea Antiviral Protein I (BAP I) was purified to apparent homogeneity from the roots of Bougainvillea by ammonium sulphate precipitation, CM- and DEAE-Sepharose chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. BAP I is a highly basic protein (pI value > 8.6) with an Mr of 28,000. The N-terminal sequence of BAP I showed homology with other plant antiviral proteins. Preliminary tests suggest that purified BAP I is capable of interfering with in vitro protein synthesis.

  3. Dietary specializations and diversity in feeding ecology of the earliest stem mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Pamela G; Purnell, Mark A; Crumpton, Nick; Brown, Kate Robson; Gostling, Neil J; Stampanoni, M; Rayfield, Emily J

    2014-08-21

    The origin and radiation of mammals are key events in the history of life, with fossils placing the origin at 220 million years ago, in the Late Triassic period. The earliest mammals, representing the first 50 million years of their evolution and including the most basal taxa, are widely considered to be generalized insectivores. This implies that the first phase of the mammalian radiation--associated with the appearance in the fossil record of important innovations such as heterodont dentition, diphyodonty and the dentary-squamosal jaw joint--was decoupled from ecomorphological diversification. Finds of exceptionally complete specimens of later Mesozoic mammals have revealed greater ecomorphological diversity than previously suspected, including adaptations for swimming, burrowing, digging and even gliding, but such well-preserved fossils of earlier mammals do not exist, and robust analysis of their ecomorphological diversity has previously been lacking. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis, using synchrotron X-ray tomography and analyses of biomechanics, finite element models and tooth microwear textures. We find significant differences in function and dietary ecology between two of the earliest mammaliaform taxa, Morganucodon and Kuehneotherium--taxa that are central to the debate on mammalian evolution. Morganucodon possessed comparatively more forceful and robust jaws and consumed 'harder' prey, comparable to extant small-bodied mammals that eat considerable amounts of coleopterans. Kuehneotherium ingested a diet comparable to extant mixed feeders and specialists on 'soft' prey such as lepidopterans. Our results reveal previously hidden trophic specialization at the base of the mammalian radiation; hence even the earliest mammaliaforms were beginning to diversify--morphologically, functionally and ecologically. In contrast to the prevailing view, this pattern suggests that lineage splitting during the earliest stages of mammalian evolution was

  4. Earliest record of the fossil snake Palaeophis from the Paleocene/Eocene boundary in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hans Viborg; Cuny, Gilles; Redsted Rasmussen, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. – The earliest record of Palaeophis ever found in Denmark is here based on vertebrae described from the Paleocene/Eocene Stolleklint Clay of the Isle of Mors (northern Denmark). Although much smaller, they appear quite similar to the Eocene vertebra described from the Fur Formation in t...... in the same area, and all belong to the ‘primitive’ grade of Palaeophis species, although a more precise identification cannot be provided at the moment....

  5. The earliest evidence of true lambdoid craniosynostosis: the case of "Benjamina", a Homo heidelbergensis child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, Ana; Martínez-Lage, Juan F; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Martínez, Ignacio; Lorenzo, Carlos; Pérez-Espejo, Miguel-Angel

    2010-06-01

    The authors report the morphological and neuroimaging findings of an immature human fossil (Cranium 14) diagnosed with left lambdoid synostosis. The skull was recovered at the Sima de los Huesos site in Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain). Since the human fossil remains from this site have been dated to a minimum age of 530,000 years, this skull represents the earliest evidence of craniosynostosis occurring in a hominid. A brief historical review of craniosynostosis and cranial deformation is provided.

  6. New evidence on the anatomy and phylogeny of the earliest vertebrates.

    OpenAIRE

    Xian-guang, Hou; Aldridge, Richard J; Siveter, David J; Siveter, Derek J.; Xiang-hong, Feng

    2002-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new agnathan specimen from the Lower Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte of China and thereby provide new evidence on the myomeres (V-shaped), the branchial apparatus (gill filaments and arches), the dorsal fin and the gonads (24-26) of the earliest vertebrates. The new specimen and the co-occurring Myllokunmingia fengjiaoa and Haikouichthys ercaicunensis represent a single species, which is a primitive member of the crown group craniates (vertebrates) and post-dates ...

  7. Antiviral activity of bovine uterus and placenta induced by Newcastle disease virus Atividade antiviral do útero e da placenta bovina induzida pelo vírus da doença de Newcastle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Barreto Filho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity profile of the uterus and fetal membranes from bovine placenta, induced by the Newcastle disease virus (NDV throughout gestation, was investigated. Explants of the endometrium and caruncles were collected from the uterus, and amniochorion, allantochorion and cotyledons, from fetal placenta. Tissue cultures were induced with ~6.0 hemagglutinating units (HU of NDV. Supernatants were concentrated 20 fold, filtered in 100kDa cut-off membranes and antiviral activity was titrated in MDBK x VSV system. Tissues of the uterus did not exhibit antiviral activity, while allantochorion and amniochorion produced antiviral factors throughout gestation. Antiviral factors were not related with IFN-alpha, gamma, tau or TNF-alpha. The antiviral activity pattern observed showed to be related with the development of fetal membranes and increased at the end of pregnancy. Such data suggest that IFN genes inducible by virus are present in fetal membranes of the cow placenta and their expression is dependent on the age of gestation.Investigou-se a atividade antiviral do útero e da placenta bovina, ao longo da gestação, induzidos pelo vírus da doença de Newcastle (NDV. Explantes do endométrio e carúnculas foram colhidos do útero. Os tecidos corioamniótico, corioalantóide e cotilédones foram dissecados da placenta fetal. Os cultivos celulares foram induzidos com aproximadamente 6,0 unidades hemaglutinantes do NDV. Os sobrenadantes foram concentrados 20 vezes, filtrados em dispositivos com superfície de separação de 100kDa e a atividade antiviral foi titulada em células MDBK e vírus da estomatite vesicular (VSV. Endométrio, carúnculas e cotilédones não apresentaram atividade antiviral. Corioamniótico e corioalantóide produziram fatores antivirais ao longo da gestação. Estes fatores não foram relacionados aos IFN - alfa, gama ou tau e nem ao TNF - alfa. O padrão de produção de fatores antivirais acompanhou o desenvolvimento

  8. Earliest mechanical evidence of cross-bridge activity after stimulation of single skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claflin, D R; Morgan, D L; Julian, F J

    1990-03-01

    The stiffness of single fibers from frog skeletal muscle was measured by the application of small 2-kHz sinusoidal length oscillations during twitch and tetanic contractions at a range of initial sarcomere lengths. The earliest mechanical signs of activation were a fall in tension (latency relaxation) and a rise in stiffness. The earliest stiffness increase and the earliest tension fall occurred simultaneously at all sarcomere lengths. This suggests a cross-bridge origin for the latency relaxation. The lead of stiffness over tension seen during the rise of tension was substantially established during the latent period. Reducing the size of the twitch by reducing calcium release with D-600 (methoxyverapamil) reduced the latency relaxation and the stiffness development during latency much less than it reduced the twitch tension. For very small twitches the peak of the stiffness response occurred during the latent period and the times of onset of both latency relaxation and stiffness rise were delayed, but remained coincident. This suggests a strong connection between the latency relaxation and the rise of stiffness during the latent period, whereas the connection between these events and positive tension generation appears to be less strong.

  9. Repeated diffusion MRI reveals earliest time point for stratification of radiotherapy response in brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Johannesen, Helle H.; Geertsen, Poul; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2017-04-01

    An imaging biomarker for early prediction of treatment response potentially provides a non-invasive tool for better prognostics and individualized management of the disease. Radiotherapy (RT) response is generally related to changes in gross tumor volume manifesting months later. In this prospective study we investigated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient derived from diffusion weighted MRI as potential early biomarkers for radiotherapy response of brain metastases. It was a particular aim to assess the optimal time point for acquiring the DW-MRI scan during the course of treatment, since to our knowledge this important question has not been addressed directly in previous studies. Twenty-nine metastases (N  =  29) from twenty-one patients, treated with whole-brain fractionated external beam RT were analyzed. Patients were scanned with a 1 T MRI system to acquire DW-, T2*W-, T2W- and T1W scans, before start of RT, at each fraction and at follow up two to three months after RT. The DW-MRI parameters were derived using regions of interest based on high b-value images (b  =  800 s mm‑2). Both volumetric and RECIST criteria were applied for response evaluation. It was found that in non-responding metastases the mean ADC decreased and in responding metastases it increased. The volume based response proved to be far more consistently predictable by the ADC change found at fraction number 7 and later, compared to the linear response (RECIST). The perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient did not show sufficient prognostic value with either response assessment criteria. In conclusion this study shows that the ADC derived using high b-values may be a reliable biomarker for early assessment of radiotherapy response for brain metastases patients. The earliest response stratification can be achieved using two DW-MRI scans, one pre-treatment and one at treatment day 7–9 (equivalent to 21

  10. [Preliminary screening for antiviral AIDS drugs. VIII. Report for fiscal year 1995].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, T; Kobayashi, S; Sato, K; Sakae, K; Ishikawa, N; Kobayashi, N; Noguchi, Y; Akiyoshi, K; Suga, T; Ogawa, A; Noro, S; Sawada, H; Kimura, H; Yamada, A; Ishizaki, T; Kamimura, N; Iwashima, A; Ono, T; Tachibana, N; Sekine, H; Ohnuki, N; Kazama, K; Sadamasu, K; Ohta, K; Mise, K

    1997-01-01

    Preliminary screening of antiviral AIDS drugs has been carried out using three different in vitro assay systems. Among 96 samples of different origin tested, two were shown to inhibit the growth of HIV in vitro. One of the positive samples (plant origin) has hopeful signs, as the ranges of effective doses are wider than those of most of positive samples which had been found by us.

  11. Antiviral activity and mechanism of action of arbidol against Hantaan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: HUVEC cells infected with HTNV 76-118 were treated with serially diluted arbidol solutions at. -2h (2 h before viral infection, .... murine leukemia virus (M-MLV) Reverse .... DISCUSSION. Arbidol is a small antiviral compound with a.

  12. Regulation of antiviral innate immunity by deubiquitinase CYLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minying Zhang; Andrew J Lee; Xuefeng Wu; Shao-Cong Sun

    2011-01-01

    An antiviral innate immune response involves induction of type Ⅰ interferons (IFNs) and their subsequent autocrine and paracrine actions,but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are incompletely understood.Here we report that CYLD,a deubiquitinase that specifically digests lysine 63-1inked ubiquitin chains,is required for antiviral host defense.Loss of CYLD renders mice considerably more susceptible to infection by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV).Consistently,CYLD-deficient dendritic cells are more sensitive to VSV infection.This functional defect was not due to lack of type I IFN production but rather because of attenuated IFN receptor signaling.In the absence of CYLD,IFN-β is ineffective in the induction of antiviral genes and protection of cells from viral infection.These findings establish CYLD as a novel regulator of antiviral innate immunity and suggest a role for CYLD in regulating IFN receptor signaling.

  13. Anti-viral Effect of Caulis Tripterygii Wilfordii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guo-qin

    2005-01-01

    @@ There have appeared more and more antibiotics to antagonize against causative organism, but in comparison few antivirals have. Hence, many viral diseases remain refractory and fatal due to lack of effective medicine.

  14. Antiviral chemotherapy in veterinary medicine: current applications and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pozzo, F; Thiry, E

    2014-12-01

    The current situation in the use of antiviral drugs in veterinary medicine is characterised by a novel and optimistic approach.Viruses of veterinary importance are still used as animal models in the developmentof human therapeutics, but there is growing interest in many of these viruses in the identification of antiviral molecules for use in both livestock and companion animals. The use of antiviral drugs in livestock animals is envisaged for the treatment or control of disease on a large scale (mass treatment), whereas in companion animals an individual approach is favoured. An overview of the most recent examples of research in the use of antivirals in veterinary medicine is presented, with particular emphasis on their in vivo applications.

  15. STUDY OF ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF SOME HYDRAZONE PINOSTROBIN DERIVATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Mukusheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New derivatives on the basis of hydrazone pinostrobin molecule were synthesized. Significant antiviral activity of received samples of new hydrazone pinstrobin derivatives was identified.

  16. Antiviral resistance and the control of pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lipsitch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The response to the next influenza pandemic will likely include extensive use of antiviral drugs (mainly oseltamivir, combined with other transmission-reducing measures. Animal and in vitro studies suggest that some strains of influenza may become resistant to oseltamivir while maintaining infectiousness (fitness. Use of antiviral agents on the scale anticipated for the control of pandemic influenza will create an unprecedented selective pressure for the emergence and spread of these strains. Nonetheless, antiviral resistance has received little attention when evaluating these plans.We designed and analyzed a deterministic compartmental model of the transmission of oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant influenza infections during a pandemic. The model predicts that even if antiviral treatment or prophylaxis leads to the emergence of a transmissible resistant strain in as few as 1 in 50,000 treated persons and 1 in 500,000 prophylaxed persons, widespread use of antivirals may strongly promote the spread of resistant strains at the population level, leading to a prevalence of tens of percent by the end of a pandemic. On the other hand, even in circumstances in which a resistant strain spreads widely, the use of antivirals may significantly delay and/or reduce the total size of the pandemic. If resistant strains carry some fitness cost, then, despite widespread emergence of resistance, antivirals could slow pandemic spread by months or more, and buy time for vaccine development; this delay would be prolonged by nondrug control measures (e.g., social distancing that reduce transmission, or use of a stockpiled suboptimal vaccine. Surprisingly, the model suggests that such nondrug control measures would increase the proportion of the epidemic caused by resistant strains.The benefits of antiviral drug use to control an influenza pandemic may be reduced, although not completely offset, by drug resistance in the virus. Therefore, the risk of resistance

  17. Phytochemical, antioxidant, antiviral and cytotoxic evaluation of Opuntia dillenii flowers

    OpenAIRE

    Arthanari Saravana Kumar; Mani Ganesh; Mei Mei Peng; Jang Hyun Tae

    2014-01-01

    Opuntia dillenii used in Asian traditional medicine especially in China. We here report on the investigation of the phytochemical content, antioxidant, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanolic extract of O. dillenii flowers. The antioxidant activity was measured with the DPPH, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals scavenging method. In the antiviral and cytotoxic assay we used different viruses in different cell lines. In antioxidant assay, the DPPH assay exhibited potent antioxid...

  18. Antiviral activities of coffee extracts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Uozaki, Misao; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime

    2008-06-01

    Both hot water extracts of coffee grinds and instant coffee solutions inhibited the multiplication of herpes simplex virus type 1, a representative enveloped DNA virus, when they were added to the culture medium of the virus-infected cells at a dose of one fifth the concentration suitable for drinking. The antiherpetic activity was independent of the suppliers (companies) of the coffee grinds and of the locations where the coffee beans were produced. Further characterization revealed that there are two different mechanisms, by which the coffee extracts exert inhibitory activities on the virus infection; (1) a direct inactivation of the infectivity of virus particle (i.e., a virucidal activity) and (2) the inhibition of progeny infectious virus formation at the late stage of viral multiplication in the infected cells. Caffeine, but not quinic acid and chlorogenic acid, inhibited the virus multiplication to some extent, but none of them showed the virucidal activity, suggesting that other component(s) in the coffee extracts must play a role in the observed antiviral activity. In addition, the coffee extracts inhibited the multiplication of poliovirus, a non-enveloped RNA virus, but showed no virucidal effect on this virus.

  19. RNA interference: Antiviral weapon and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Chu Wang; Qing-He Nie; Zhi-Hua Feng

    2003-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a remarkable type of gene regulation based on sequence-specific targeting and degradation of RNA. The term encompasses related pathways found in a broad range of eukaryotic organisms, including fungi, plants, and animals. RNA interference is part of a sophisticated network of interconnected pathways for cellular defense, RNA surveillance, and development and it may become a powerful tool to manipulate gene expression experimentally. RNAi technology is currently being evaluated not only as an extremely powerful instrument for functional genomic analyses, but also as a potentially useful method to develop specific dsRNA based gene-silencing therapeutics.Several laboratories have been interested in using RNAi to control viral infection and many reports in Nature and in Cell show that short interfering (si) RNAs can inhibit infection by HIV-1, polio and hepatitis C viruses in a sequence-specific manner. RNA-based strategies for gene inhibition in mammalian cells have recently been described, which offer the promise of antiviral therapy.

  20. Probiotics as Antiviral Agents in Shrimp Aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestha Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are chosen as the best alternatives to these antimicrobial agents and they act as natural immune enhancers, which provoke the disease resistance in shrimp farm. Viral diseases stand as the major constraint causing an enormous loss in the production in shrimp farms. Probiotics besides being beneficial bacteria also possess antiviral activity. Exploitation of these probiotics in treatment and prevention of viral diseases in shrimp aquaculture is a novel and efficient method. This review discusses the benefits of probiotics and their criteria for selection in shrimp aquaculture and their role in immune power enhancement towards viral diseases.

  1. Probiotics as antiviral agents in shrimp aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Bestha; Viswanath, Buddolla; Sai Gopal, D V R

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are chosen as the best alternatives to these antimicrobial agents and they act as natural immune enhancers, which provoke the disease resistance in shrimp farm. Viral diseases stand as the major constraint causing an enormous loss in the production in shrimp farms. Probiotics besides being beneficial bacteria also possess antiviral activity. Exploitation of these probiotics in treatment and prevention of viral diseases in shrimp aquaculture is a novel and efficient method. This review discusses the benefits of probiotics and their criteria for selection in shrimp aquaculture and their role in immune power enhancement towards viral diseases.

  2. Antiviral activity of lactoferrin towards naked viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seganti, Lucilla; Di Biase, Assunta Maria; Marchetti, Magda; Pietrantoni, Agostina; Tinari, Antonella; Superti, Fabiana

    2004-06-01

    It is well known that lactoferrin (Lf) is a potent inhibitor towards several enveloped and naked viruses, such as rotavirus, enterovirus and adenovirus. Lf is resistant to tryptic digestion and breast-fed infants excrete high levels of faecal Lf, so that its effect on viruses replicating in the gastrointestinal tract is of great interest. In this report, we analysed the mechanism of the antiviral action of this protein in three viral models which, despite representing different genoma and replication strategies, share the ability to infect the gut. Concerning the mechanism of action against rotavirus, Lf from bovine milk (BLf) possesses a dual role, preventing virus attachment to intestinal cells by binding to viral particles, and inhibiting a post adsorption step. The BLf effect towards poliovirus is due to the interference with an early infection step but, when the BLf molecule is saturated with Zn+2 ions, it is also capable of inhibiting viral replication after the viral adsorption phase. The anti-adenovirus action of BLf takes place on virus attachment to cell membranes through competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors and a specific interaction with viral structural polypeptides. Taken together, these findings provide further evidence that Lf is an excellent candidate in the search of natural agents against viral enteric diseases, as it mainly acts by hindering adsorption and internalisation into cells through specific binding to cell receptors and/or viral particles.

  3. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Skalickova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides.

  4. Natural Products as Source of Potential Dengue Antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbson Ricardo Teixeira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a neglected disease responsible for 22,000 deaths each year in areas where it is endemic. To date, there is no clinically approved dengue vaccine or antiviral for human beings, even though there have been great efforts to accomplish these goals. Several approaches have been used in the search for dengue antivirals such as screening of compounds against dengue virus enzymes and structure-based computational discovery. During the last decades, researchers have turned their attention to nature, trying to identify compounds that can be used as dengue antivirals. Nature represents a vast reservoir of substances that can be explored with the aim of discovering new leads that can be either used directly as pharmaceuticals or can serve as lead structures that can be optimized towards the development of new antiviral agents against dengue. In this review we describe an assortment of natural products that have been reported as possessing dengue antiviral activity. The natural products are organized into classes of substances. When appropriate, structure-activity relationships are outlined. The biological assays used to assess antiviral activity are briefly described.

  5. Interaction of SARS and MERS Coronaviruses with the Antiviral Interferon Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, E; Thiel, V; Weber, F

    2016-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) are the most severe coronavirus (CoV)-associated diseases in humans. The causative agents, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, are of zoonotic origin but may be transmitted to humans, causing severe and often fatal respiratory disease in their new host. The two coronaviruses are thought to encode an unusually large number of factors that allow them to thrive and replicate in the presence of efficient host defense mechanisms, especially the antiviral interferon system. Here, we review the recent progress in our understanding of the strategies that highly pathogenic coronaviruses employ to escape, dampen, or block the antiviral interferon response in human cells. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko Gagyor

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUND: Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy, but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy.METHODS:Search methods:On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies.Selection criteria:We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy.We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains.Data collection and analysis:Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures.MAIN RESULTS: Eleven trials, including 2883 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. We added four studies to the previous review for this update. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recovery:We found no significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.47 to 1.02, n = 1715. For people with severe Bell's palsy (House Brackmann scores of 5 and 6 or the equivalent in other scales, we found a

  7. Assessment of the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine SP-D against various influenza A viruses in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine L B Hillaire

    Full Text Available The emergence of influenza viruses resistant to existing classes of antiviral drugs raises concern and there is a need for novel antiviral agents that could be used therapeutically or prophylacticaly. Surfactant protein D (SP-D belongs to the family of C-type lectins which are important effector molecules of the innate immune system with activity against bacteria and viruses, including influenza viruses. In the present study we evaluated the potential of recombinant porcine SP-D as an antiviral agent against influenza A viruses (IAVs in vitro. To determine the range of antiviral activity, thirty IAVs of the subtypes H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1 that originated from birds, pigs and humans were selected and tested for their sensitivity to recombinant SP-D. Using these viruses it was shown by hemagglutination inhibition assay, that recombinant porcine SP-D was more potent than recombinant human SP-D and that especially higher order oligomeric forms of SP-D had the strongest antiviral activity. Porcine SP-D was active against a broad range of IAV strains and neutralized a variety of H1N1 and H3N2 IAVs, including 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Using tissue sections of ferret and human trachea, we demonstrated that recombinant porcine SP-D prevented attachment of human seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 virus to receptors on epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract. It was concluded that recombinant porcine SP-D holds promise as a novel antiviral agent against influenza and further development and evaluation in vivo seems warranted.

  8. [Pietro U. Dini. Prelude to Baltic linguistics : earliest theories about Baltic languages (16th century)] / Stefan Donecker

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Donecker, Stefan, 1977-

    2015-01-01

    Arvustus: Dini, Pietro U. Prelude to Baltic linguistics : earliest theories about Baltic languages (16th century). (On the boundary of two worlds : identity, freedom, and moral imagination in the Baltics, 36). Verlag Rodopi, Amsterdam und New York 2014

  9. [Pietro U. Dini. Prelude to Baltic linguistics : earliest theories about Baltic languages (16th century)] / Stefan Donecker

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Donecker, Stefan, 1977-

    2015-01-01

    Arvustus: Dini, Pietro U. Prelude to Baltic linguistics : earliest theories about Baltic languages (16th century). (On the boundary of two worlds : identity, freedom, and moral imagination in the Baltics, 36). Verlag Rodopi, Amsterdam und New York 2014

  10. Electronic inventions and discoveries electronics from its earliest beginnings to the present day

    CERN Document Server

    Dummer, G W A

    1983-01-01

    Electronic Inventions and Discoveries: Electronics from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Present Day provides a summary of the development of the whole field of electronics. Organized into 13 chapters, the book covers and reviews the history of electronics as a whole and its aspects. The opening chapter covers the beginnings of electronics, while the next chapter discusses the development of components, transistors, and integrated circuits. The third chapter tackles the expansion of electronics and its effects on industry. The succeeding chapters discuss the history of the aspects of electronics

  11. New evidence on the anatomy and phylogeny of the earliest vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian-guang, Hou; Aldridge, Richard J; Siveter, David J; Siveter, Derek J; Xiang-hong, Feng

    2002-09-22

    We report the discovery of a new agnathan specimen from the Lower Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte of China and thereby provide new evidence on the myomeres (V-shaped), the branchial apparatus (gill filaments and arches), the dorsal fin and the gonads (24-26) of the earliest vertebrates. The new specimen and the co-occurring Myllokunmingia fengjiaoa and Haikouichthys ercaicunensis represent a single species, which is a primitive member of the crown group craniates (vertebrates) and post-dates the origin of the myxinoids (hagfish). The origin of the vertebrate clade is at least as old as Early Cambrian.

  12. Earliest tea as evidence for one branch of the Silk Road across the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Houyuan; Zhang, Jianping; Yang, Yimin; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Baiqing; Yang, Wuzhan; Tong, Tao; Jin, Shubo; Shen, Caiming; Rao, Huiyun; Li, Xingguo; Lu, Hongliang; Fuller, Dorian Q.; Wang, Luo; Wang, Can; Xu, Deke; Wu, Naiqin

    2016-01-01

    Phytoliths and biomolecular components extracted from ancient plant remains from Chang’an (Xi’an, the city where the Silk Road begins) and Ngari (Ali) in western Tibet, China, show that the tea was grown 2100 years ago to cater for the drinking habits of the Western Han Dynasty (207BCE-9CE), and then carried toward central Asia by ca.200CE, several hundred years earlier than previously recorded. The earliest physical evidence of tea from both the Chang’an and Ngari regions suggests that a branch of the Silk Road across the Tibetan Plateau, was established by the second to third century CE.

  13. Regulation of the Host Antiviral State by Intercellular Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Assil

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses usually induce a profound remodeling of host cells, including the usurpation of host machinery to support their replication and production of virions to invade new cells. Nonetheless, recognition of viruses by the host often triggers innate immune signaling, preventing viral spread and modulating the function of immune cells. It conventionally occurs through production of antiviral factors and cytokines by infected cells. Virtually all viruses have evolved mechanisms to blunt such responses. Importantly, it is becoming increasingly recognized that infected cells also transmit signals to regulate innate immunity in uninfected neighboring cells. These alternative pathways are notably mediated by vesicular secretion of various virus- and host-derived products (miRNAs, RNAs, and proteins and non-infectious viral particles. In this review, we focus on these newly-described modes of cell-to-cell communications and their impact on neighboring cell functions. The reception of these signals can have anti- and pro-viral impacts, as well as more complex effects in the host such as oncogenesis and inflammation. Therefore, these “broadcasting” functions, which might be tuned by an arms race involving selective evolution driven by either the host or the virus, constitute novel and original regulations of viral infection, either highly localized or systemic.

  14. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs.

  15. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Will, Hans; Nagata, Kyosuke; Wodrich, Harald

    2016-04-22

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle.

  16. Antiviral activity of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles against herpes simplex virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Swapnil Gaikwad,1 Avinash Ingle,1 Aniket Gade,1 Mahendra Rai,1 Annarita Falanga,3 Novella Incoronato,2 Luigi Russo,2 Stefania Galdiero,3 Massimilano Galdiero2 1Department of Biotechnology, Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University, Amravati, Maharashtra, India; 2Department of Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, II University of Naples, 3Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples “Federico II”, DFM and Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, Naples, Italy Abstract: The interaction between silver nanoparticles and viruses is attracting great interest due to the potential antiviral activity of these particles, and is the subject of much research effort in the treatment of infectious diseases. In this work, we demonstrate that silver nanoparticles undergo a size-dependent interaction with herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and with human parainfluenza virus type 3. We show that production of silver nanoparticles from different fungi is feasible, and their antiviral activity is dependent on the production system used. Silver nanoparticles are capable of reducing viral infectivity, probably by blocking interaction of the virus with the cell, which might depend on the size and zeta potential of the silver nanoparticles. Smaller-sized nanoparticles were able to inhibit the infectivity of the viruses analyzed. Keywords: silver nanoparticles, antiviral, herpes simplex virus, parainfluenza virus

  17. Neuraminidase inhibition of Dietary chlorogenic acids and derivatives - potential antivirals from dietary sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaleldin Elsadig Karar, Mohamed; Matei, Marius-Febi; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Illenberger, Susanne; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Plants rich in chlorogenic acids (CGAs), caffeic acids and their derivatives have been found to exert antiviral effects against influenza virus neuroaminidase. In this study several dietary naturally occurring chlorogenic acids, phenolic acids and derivatives were screened for their inhibitory activity against neuroaminidases (NAs) from C. perfringens, H5N1 and recombinant H5N1 (N-His)-Tag using a fluorometric assay. There was no significant difference in inhibition between the different NA enzymes. The enzyme inhibition results indicated that chlorogenic acids and selected derivatives, exhibited high activities against NAs. It seems that the catechol group from caffeic acid was important for the activity. Dietary CGA therefore show promise as potential antiviral agents. However, caffeoyl quinic acids show low bioavailibility and are intensly metabolized by the gut micro flora, only low nM concentrations are observed in plasma and urine, therefore a systemic antiviral effect of these compounds is unlikely. Nevertheless, gut floral metabolites with a catechol moiety or structurally related dietary phenolics with a catechol moiety might serve as interesting compounds for future investigations.

  18. Dufulin Activates HrBP1 to Produce Antiviral Responses in Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zeng, Mengjiao; Song, Baoan; Hou, Chengrui; Hu, Deyu; Li, Xiangyang; Wang, Zhenchao; Fan, Huitao; Bi, Liang; Liu, Jiaju; Yu, Dandan; Jin, Linhong; Yang, Song

    2012-01-01

    Background Dufulin is a new antiviral agent that is highly effective against plant viruses and acts by activating systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. In recent years, it has been used widely to prevent and control tobacco and rice viral diseases in China. However, its targets and mechanism of action are still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) techniques were combined with mass spectrometry (MS) to identify the target of Dufulin. More than 40 proteins were found to be differentially expressed (≥1.5 fold or ≤1.5 fold) upon Dufulin treatment in Nicotiana tabacum K326. Based on annotations in the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, these proteins were found to be related to disease resistance. Directed acyclic graph (DAG) analysis of the various pathways demonstrated harpin binding protein-1 (HrBP1) as the target of action of Dufulin. Additionally, western blotting, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and real time PCR analyses were also conducted to identify the specific mechanism of action of Dufulin. Our results show that activation of HrBP1 triggers the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway and thereby produces antiviral responses in the plant host. A protective assay based on lesion counting further confirmed the antiviral activity of Dufulin. Conclusion This study identified HrBP1 as a target protein of Dufulin and that Dufulin can activate the SA signaling pathway to induce host plants to generate antiviral responses. PMID:22662252

  19. Dufulin activates HrBP1 to produce antiviral responses in tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dufulin is a new antiviral agent that is highly effective against plant viruses and acts by activating systemic acquired resistance (SAR in plants. In recent years, it has been used widely to prevent and control tobacco and rice viral diseases in China. However, its targets and mechanism of action are still poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE and classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE techniques were combined with mass spectrometry (MS to identify the target of Dufulin. More than 40 proteins were found to be differentially expressed (≥1.5 fold or ≤1.5 fold upon Dufulin treatment in Nicotiana tabacum K(326. Based on annotations in the Gene Ontology (GO and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG databases, these proteins were found to be related to disease resistance. Directed acyclic graph (DAG analysis of the various pathways demonstrated harpin binding protein-1 (HrBP1 as the target of action of Dufulin. Additionally, western blotting, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and real time PCR analyses were also conducted to identify the specific mechanism of action of Dufulin. Our results show that activation of HrBP1 triggers the salicylic acid (SA signaling pathway and thereby produces antiviral responses in the plant host. A protective assay based on lesion counting further confirmed the antiviral activity of Dufulin. CONCLUSION: This study identified HrBP1 as a target protein of Dufulin and that Dufulin can activate the SA signaling pathway to induce host plants to generate antiviral responses.

  20. Bio-mathematical models of viral dynamics to tailor antiviral therapy in chronic viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maurizia Rossana Brunetto; Piero Colombatto; Ferruccio Bonino

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of the dynamics of viral infections by mathematical equations has been applied successfully to the study of viral infections during antiviral therapy. Standard models applied to viral hepatitis describe the viral load decline in the first 2-4 wk of antiviral therapy, but do not adequately simulate the dynamics of viral infection for the following period. The hypothesis of a constant clearance rate of the infected cells provides an unrealistic estimation of the time necessary to reach the control or the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV)/ hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To overcome the problem, we have developed a new multiphasic model in which the immune system activity is modulated by a negative feedback caused by the infected cells reduction, and alanine aminotransferase kinetics serve as a surrogate marker of infected-cell clearance. By this approach, we can compute the dynamics of infected cells during the whole treatment course, and find a good correlation between the number of infected cells at the end of therapy and the long-term virological response in patients with chronic hepatitis C. The new model successfully describes the HBV infection dynamics far beyond the third month of antiviral therapy under the assumption that the sum of infected and non-infected cells remains roughly constant during therapy, and both target and infected cells concur in the hepatocyte turnover. In clinical practice, these new models will allow the development of simulators of treatment response that will be used as an "automatic pilot" for tailoring antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B as well as chronic hepatitis C patients.

  1. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France); Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Will, Hans [Department of Tumor Biology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Nagata, Kyosuke [Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Wodrich, Harald, E-mail: harald.wodrich@u-bordeaux.fr [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France)

    2016-04-22

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle. - Highlights: • Host nuclear antiviral factors were analyzed upon adenovirus genome delivery. • Interferon treatments fail to permit PML nuclear bodies to target adenoviral genomes. • Neither Sp100A nor B targets adenoviral genomes despite potentially opposite roles. • The nuclear DNA sensor IFI16 does not target incoming adenoviral genomes. • PHF13/SPOC1 targets neither incoming adenoviral genomes nor genome-bound protein VII.

  2. Bio-mathematical models of viral dynamics to tailor antiviral therapy in chronic viral hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetto, Maurizia Rossana; Colombatto, Piero; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of the dynamics of viral infections by mathematical equations has been applied successfully to the study of viral infections during antiviral therapy. Standard models applied to viral hepatitis describe the viral load decline in the first 2-4 wk of antiviral therapy, but do not adequately simulate the dynamics of viral infection for the following period. The hypothesis of a constant clearance rate of the infected cells provides an unrealistic estimation of the time necessary to reach the control or the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To overcome the problem, we have developed a new multiphasic model in which the immune system activity is modulated by a negative feedback caused by the infected cells reduction, and alanine aminotransferase kinetics serve as a surrogate marker of infected-cell clearance. By this approach, we can compute the dynamics of infected cells during the whole treatment course, and find a good correlation between the number of infected cells at the end of therapy and the long-term virological response in patients with chronic hepatitis C. The new model successfully describes the HBV infection dynamics far beyond the third month of antiviral therapy under the assumption that the sum of infected and non-infected cells remains roughly constant during therapy, and both target and infected cells concur in the hepatocyte turnover. In clinical practice, these new models will allow the development of simulators of treatment response that will be used as an “automatic pilot” for tailoring antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B as well as chronic hepatitis C patients. PMID:19195054

  3. Effect of antiviral prophylaxis on influenza outbreaks om aged care facilities in three local health districts in New South Wales, Australia, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Merritt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There was a record number (n = 111 of influenza outbreaks in aged care facilities in New South Wales, Australia during 2014. To determine the impact of antiviral prophylaxis recommendations in practice, influenza outbreak data were compared for facilities in which antiviral prophylaxis and treatment were recommended and for those in which antivirals were recommended for treatment only. Methods: Routinely collected outbreak data were extracted from the Notifiable Conditions Information Management System for two Local Health Districts where antiviral prophylaxis was routinely recommended and one Local Health District where antivirals were recommended for treatment but not routinely for prophylaxis. Data collected on residents included counts of influenza-like illness, confirmed influenza, hospitalizations and related deaths. Dates of onset, notification, influenza confirmation and antiviral recommendations were also collected for analysis. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to assess the significance of differences between group medians for key parameters. Results: A total of 41 outbreaks (12 in the prophylaxis group and 29 in the treatment-only group were included in the analysis. There was no significant difference in overall outbreak duration; outbreak duration after notification; or attack, hospitalization or case fatality rates between the two groups. The prophylaxis group had significantly higher cases with influenza-like illness (P = 0.03 and cases recommended antiviral treatment per facility (P = 0.01. Discussion: This study found no significant difference in key outbreak parameters between the two groups. However, further high quality evidence is needed to guide the use of antivirals in responding to influenza outbreaks in aged care facilities.

  4. New insights into the earliest Quaternary environments in the Central North Sea from 3D seismic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Rachel; Huuse, Mads; Stewart, Margaret; Brocklehurst, Simon H.

    2014-05-01

    In the past the transition between an unconformable surface in the south to a conformable horizon towards the north has made identification and mapping the base-Quaternary in the central North Sea difficult (Sejrup et al 1991; Gatliff et al 1994). However recent integration of biostratigraphy, pollen analysis, paleomagnetism and amino acid analysis in the Dutch and Danish sectors (Rasmussen et al 2005; Kuhlmann et al 2006) has allowed greater confidence in the correlation to the region 3D seismic datasets and thus has allowed the base-Quaternary to be mapped across the entire basin. The base-Quaternary has been mapped using the PGS MegaSurvey dataset from wells in the Danish Sector along the initially unconformable horizon and down the delta front into the more conformable basin giving a high degree of confidence in the horizon pick. The revised base-Quaternary surface reaches a depth of 1248 ms TWT with an elongate basin shape which is significantly deeper than the traditionally mapped surface. Using RMS amplitudes and other seismic attributes the revised base-Quaternary has been investigated along the horizon and in time slice to interpret the environments of the earliest Quaternary prior to the onset of glaciation. Combined with analysis of aligned elongate furrows over 10 km long, 100 m wide and 100 m deep suggest a deep marine environment in an almost enclosed basin with persistent strong NW-SE bottom currents in the deepest parts. Pockmarks were formed by the escape of shallow gas on the sides of a small delta in the eastern part of the basin. The progradation of large deltas from both the north and south into the basin make up the majority of the deposition of sediment into the basin. Key Words: base-Quaternary; seismic interpretation; paleoenvironments References: Gatliff, R.W, Richards, P.C, Smith, K, Graham, C.C, McCormac, M, Smith, N.J.P, Long, D, Cameron, T.D.J, Evans, D, Stevenson, A.G, Bulat, J, Ritchie, J.D, (1994) 'United Kingdom offshore regional

  5. the denver tube Combined with antiviral drugs In the treatment of HBV-related Cirrhosis with Refractory ascites:a Report of three Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-jin Wang; Li-qin Shi; Qing-chun Fu; Liu-da Ni; Feng Zhou; Jin-wei Chen; Cheng-wei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of nucleos(t)ide antiviral drugs for decompensated HBV-related cirrhosis can signiifcantly improve the prognosis. But those patients with refractory ascites possibly deteriorate due to the complications of ascites before any beneift from anti-viral drugs could be observed. Therefore, it is important to ifnd a way to help the patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and refractory ascites to receive the full beneifts from antiviral therapy. Peritoneovenous shunt (PVS) using Denver tube enables ascites to continuously bypass into systemic circulation, thereby reducing ascites and albumin input and improving quality of life. We report herein 3 cases of decompensated HBV-related cirrhosis with refractory ascites, PVS using Denver tube was combined with lamivudine for antiviral treatment before and after. Then, ascites was alleviated significantly or disapeared and viral responsed well. All patients achieved a satisfactory long-term survival from 6.7 to 14.7 years. It was suggested that the Denver shunt could be used as an adjuvant method to antiviral drugs for decompensated HBV-related cirrhosis with refractory ascites to help the patients reap the full beneifts and maximize efifcacy of antiviral treatment.

  6. A structural intermediate between triisodontids and mesonychians (Mammalia, Acreodi) from the earliest Eocene of Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuce, Rodolphe; Clavel, Julien; Antunes, Miguel Telles

    2011-02-01

    A new mammal, Mondegodon eutrigonus gen. et sp. nov., is described from the earliest Eocene locality of Silveirinha, Portugal. This species shows dental adaptations indicative of a carnivorous diet. M. eutrigonus is referred to the order Acreodi and considered, along with the early Paleocene North American species Oxyclaenus cuspidatus, as a morphological intermediate between two groups of ungulate-like mammals, namely, the triisodontids and mesonychians. Considering that triisodontids are early to early-late Paleocene North American taxa, Mondegodon probably belongs to a group that migrated from North America towards Europe during the first part of the Paleocene. Mondegodon could represent thus a relict genus, belonging to the ante-Eocene European mammalian fauna. The occurrence of such a taxon in Southern Europe may reflect a period of isolation of this continental area during the Paleocene/Eocene transition. In this context, the non-occurrence of closely allied forms of Mondegodon in the Eocene North European mammalian faunas is significant. This strengthens the hypothesis that the mammalian fauna from Southern Europe is characterized by a certain degree of endemism during the earliest Eocene. Mondegodon also presents some striking similarities with an unnamed genus from the early Eocene of India which could represent the first Asian known transitional form between the triisodontids and mesonychians.

  7. Earliest economic exploitation of chicken outside East Asia: Evidence from the Hellenistic Southern Levant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry-Gal, Lee; Erlich, Adi; Gilboa, Ayelet; Bar-Oz, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is today one of the most widespread domesticated species and is a main source of protein in the human diet. However, for thousands of years exploitation of chickens was confined to symbolic and social domains such as cockfighting. The question of when and where chickens were first used for economic purposes remains unresolved. The results of our faunal analysis demonstrate that the Hellenistic (fourth–second centuries B.C.E.) site of Maresha, Israel, is the earliest site known today where economic exploitation of chickens was widely practiced. We base our claim on the exceptionally high frequency of chicken bones at that site, the majority of which belong to adult individuals, and on the observed 2:1 ratio of female to male bones. These results are supported further by an extensive survey of faunal remains from 234 sites in the Southern Levant, spanning more than three millennia, which shows a sharp increase in the frequency of chicken during the Hellenistic period. We further argue that the earliest secure evidence for economic exploitation of chickens in Europe dates to the first century B.C.E. and therefore is predated by the finds in the Southern Levant by at least a century. We suggest that the gradual acclimatization of chickens in the Southern Levant and its gradual integration into the local economy, the latter fully accomplished in the Hellenistic period, was a crucial step in the adoption of this species in European husbandry some 100 y later. PMID:26195775

  8. Earliest economic exploitation of chicken outside East Asia: Evidence from the Hellenistic Southern Levant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry-Gal, Lee; Erlich, Adi; Gilboa, Ayelet; Bar-Oz, Guy

    2015-08-11

    Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is today one of the most widespread domesticated species and is a main source of protein in the human diet. However, for thousands of years exploitation of chickens was confined to symbolic and social domains such as cockfighting. The question of when and where chickens were first used for economic purposes remains unresolved. The results of our faunal analysis demonstrate that the Hellenistic (fourth-second centuries B.C.E.) site of Maresha, Israel, is the earliest site known today where economic exploitation of chickens was widely practiced. We base our claim on the exceptionally high frequency of chicken bones at that site, the majority of which belong to adult individuals, and on the observed 2:1 ratio of female to male bones. These results are supported further by an extensive survey of faunal remains from 234 sites in the Southern Levant, spanning more than three millennia, which shows a sharp increase in the frequency of chicken during the Hellenistic period. We further argue that the earliest secure evidence for economic exploitation of chickens in Europe dates to the first century B.C.E. and therefore is predated by the finds in the Southern Levant by at least a century. We suggest that the gradual acclimatization of chickens in the Southern Levant and its gradual integration into the local economy, the latter fully accomplished in the Hellenistic period, was a crucial step in the adoption of this species in European husbandry some 100 y later.

  9. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, A.; Gramlich, G.; Kellerhals, T.; Tobler, L.; Rehren, Th.; Schwikowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200–800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700–50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures. PMID:28139760

  10. Laetoli footprints preserve earliest direct evidence of human-like bipedal biomechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Raichlen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Debates over the evolution of hominin bipedalism, a defining human characteristic, revolve around whether early bipeds walked more like humans, with energetically efficient extended hind limbs, or more like apes with flexed hind limbs. The 3.6 million year old hominin footprints at Laetoli, Tanzania represent the earliest direct evidence of hominin bipedalism. Determining the kinematics of Laetoli hominins will allow us to understand whether selection acted to decrease energy costs of bipedalism by 3.6 Ma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental design, we show that the Laetoli hominins walked with weight transfer most similar to the economical extended limb bipedalism of humans. Humans walked through a sand trackway using both extended limb bipedalism, and more flexed limb bipedalism. Footprint morphology from extended limb trials matches weight distribution patterns found in the Laetoli footprints. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide us with the earliest direct evidence of kinematically human-like bipedalism currently known, and show that extended limb bipedalism evolved long before the appearance of the genus Homo. Since extended-limb bipedalism is more energetically economical than ape-like bipedalism, energy expenditure was likely an important selection pressure on hominin bipeds by 3.6 Ma.

  11. Structural mouthpart interaction evolved already in the earliest lineages of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Alexander; Rühr, Peter T; Mokso, Rajmund; Villanueva, Pablo; Wilde, Fabian; Stampanoni, Marco; Uesugi, Kentaro; Machida, Ryuichiro; Misof, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    In butterflies, bees, flies and true bugs specific mouthparts are in close contact or even fused to enable piercing, sucking or sponging of particular food sources. The common phenomenon behind these mouthpart types is a complex composed of several consecutive mouthparts which structurally interact during food uptake. The single mouthparts are thus only functional in conjunction with other adjacent mouthparts, which is fundamentally different to biting-chewing. It is, however, unclear when structural mouthpart interaction (SMI) evolved since this principle obviously occurred multiple times independently in several extant and extinct winged insect groups. Here, we report a new type of SMI in two of the earliest wingless hexapod lineages--Diplura and Collembola. We found that the mandible and maxilla interact with each other via an articulatory stud at the dorsal side of the maxillary stipes, and they are furthermore supported by structures of the hypopharynx and head capsule. These interactions are crucial stabilizing elements during food uptake. The presence of SMI in these ancestrally wingless insects, and its absence in those crustacean groups probably ancestral to insects, indicates that SMI is a groundplan apomorphy of insects. Our results thus contradict the currently established view of insect mouthpart evolution that biting-chewing mouthparts without any form of SMI are the ancestral configuration. Furthermore, SMIs occur in the earliest insects in a high anatomical variety. SMIs in stemgroup representatives of insects may have triggered efficient exploitation and fast adaptation to new terrestrial food sources much earlier than previously supposed.

  12. Osteogenic tumour in Australopithecus sediba: Earliest hominin evidence for neoplastic disease

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    Patrick S. Randolph-Quinney

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe the earliest evidence for neoplastic disease in the hominin lineage. This is reported from the type specimen of the extinct hominin Australopithecus sediba from Malapa, South Africa, dated to 1.98 million years ago. The affected individual was male and developmentally equivalent to a human child of 12 to 13 years of age. A penetrating lytic lesion affected the sixth thoracic vertebra. The lesion was macroscopically evaluated and internally imaged through phase-contrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography. A comprehensive differential diagnosis was undertaken based on gross- and micro-morphology of the lesion, leading to a probable diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. These neoplasms are solitary, benign, osteoid and bone-forming tumours, formed from well-vascularised connective tissue within which there is active production of osteoid and woven bone. Tumours of any kind are rare in archaeological populations, and are all but unknown in the hominin record, highlighting the importance of this discovery. The presence of this disease at Malapa predates the earliest evidence of malignant neoplasia in the hominin fossil record by perhaps 200 000 years.

  13. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, A.; Gramlich, G.; Kellerhals, T.; Tobler, L.; Rehren, Th.; Schwikowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200-800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700-50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures.

  14. Bioprospecting of Red Sea Sponges for Novel Antiviral Pharmacophores

    KAUST Repository

    O'Rourke, Aubrie

    2015-05-01

    Natural products offer many possibilities for the treatment of disease. More than 70% of the Earth’s surface is ocean, and recent exploration and access has allowed for new additions to this catalog of natural treasures. The Central Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia serves as a newly accessible location, which provides the opportunity to bioprospect marine sponges with the purpose of identifying novel antiviral scaffolds. Antivirals are underrepresented in present day clinical trials, as well as in the academic screens of marine natural product libraries. Here a high-throughput pipeline was initiated by prefacing the antiviral screen with an Image-based High-Content Screening (HCS) technique in order to identify candidates with antiviral potential. Prospective candidates were tested in a biochemical or cell-based assay for the ability to inhibit the NS3 protease of the West Nile Virus (WNV NS protease) as well as replication and reverse transcription of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1). The analytical chemistry techniques of High-Performance Liquid Chromatograpy (HPLC), Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) where used in order to identify the compounds responsible for the characteristic antiviral activity of the selected sponge fractions. We have identified a 3-alkyl pyridinium from Amphimedon chloros as the causative agent of the observed WNV NS3 protease inhibition in vitro. Additionally, we identified debromohymenialdisine, hymenialdisine, and oroidin from Stylissa carteri as prospective scaffolds capable of HIV-1 inhibition.

  15. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

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    Akram Astani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  16. Antiviral Screening of Multiple Compounds against Ebola Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart D. Dowall

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In light of the recent outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV disease in West Africa, there have been renewed efforts to search for effective antiviral countermeasures. A range of compounds currently available with broad antimicrobial activity have been tested for activity against EBOV. Using live EBOV, eighteen candidate compounds were screened for antiviral activity in vitro. The compounds were selected on a rational basis because their mechanisms of action suggested that they had the potential to disrupt EBOV entry, replication or exit from cells or because they had displayed some antiviral activity against EBOV in previous tests. Nine compounds caused no reduction in viral replication despite cells remaining healthy, so they were excluded from further analysis (zidovudine; didanosine; stavudine; abacavir sulphate; entecavir; JB1a; Aimspro; celgosivir; and castanospermine. A second screen of the remaining compounds and the feasibility of appropriateness for in vivo testing removed six further compounds (ouabain; omeprazole; esomeprazole; Gleevec; D-LANA-14; and Tasigna. The three most promising compounds (17-DMAG; BGB324; and NCK-8 were further screened for in vivo activity in the guinea pig model of EBOV disease. Two of the compounds, BGB324 and NCK-8, showed some effect against lethal infection in vivo at the concentrations tested, which warrants further investigation. Further, these data add to the body of knowledge on the antiviral activities of multiple compounds against EBOV and indicate that the scientific community should invest more effort into the development of novel and specific antiviral compounds to treat Ebola virus disease.

  17. Evolving volcanism at the tip of a propagating arc: The earliest high-Mg andesites in northern New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booden, Mathijs A.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Black, Philippa M.

    2010-08-01

    A NNW-striking string of isolated volcanic centers, the Kiwitahi chain, erupted between 15 and 5.5 Ma in northern New Zealand. Prior to 6.2 Ma, the erupted rocks were plagioclase- and hornblende-dominated andesites, which are geochemically comparable to coeval andesites erupted in the nearby, much larger Coromandel Volcanic Zone (CVZ). Compared to CVZ andesites, however, the Kiwitahi andesites show more subdued incompatible element enrichments, and they generally have relatively unradiogenic Sr isotope compositions. These features, and the small eruption volumes involved, suggest that the Kiwitahi centers formed over the edge of a magmatic system that was centered on the CVZ. The Kiwitahi centers progressively become younger towards the SSE representing the migration over the time of the edge of this magmatic system. Between 6.2 and 5.5 Ma, four centers at the southern end of the chain erupted pyroxene-dominated, high-magnesium andesites that are geochemically unlike coeval andesites in the CVZ, but similar to Quaternary high-Mg andesites erupted along the western edge of the Taupo Volcanic Zone. These are the earliest known high-Mg andesites in northern New Zealand; their appearance may mark the inception of the current configuration where high-Mg andesite eruptions precede regular andesitic volcanism at the leading edge of the arc.

  18. UNC93B1 mediates innate inflammation and antiviral defense in the liver during acute murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith J Crane

    Full Text Available Antiviral defense in the liver during acute infection with the hepatotropic virus murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV involves complex cytokine and cellular interactions. However, the mechanism of viral sensing in the liver that promotes these cytokine and cellular responses has remained unclear. Studies here were undertaken to investigate the role of nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors (TLRs in initiating antiviral immunity in the liver during infection with MCMV. We examined the host response of UNC93B1 mutant mice, which do not signal properly through TLR3, TLR7 and TLR9, to acute MCMV infection to determine whether liver antiviral defense depends on signaling through these molecules. Infection of UNC93B1 mutant mice revealed reduced production of systemic and liver proinflammatory cytokines including IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α when compared to wild-type. UNC93B1 deficiency also contributed to a transient hepatitis later in acute infection, evidenced by augmented liver pathology and elevated systemic alanine aminotransferase levels. Moreover, viral clearance was impaired in UNC93B1 mutant mice, despite intact virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the liver. Altogether, these results suggest a combined role for nucleic acid-sensing TLRs in promoting early liver antiviral defense during MCMV infection.

  19. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss: Is antiviral treatment really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Övet, Gültekin; Alataş, Necat; Kocacan, Fatma Nur; Gürcüoğlu, Sermin Selver; Görgülü, Hakan; Güzelkara, Fatih; Övet, Habibe

    2015-01-01

    It was aimed to investigate the necessity of antiviral agents in the ISSHL treatment. In this study, the patients, diagnosed with sudden hearing loss and admitted in the first 7 days of hearing loss were divided into two groups; a combination therapy was administered to one of the groups, and famciclovir was administered to the other group as an antiviral treatment in addition to the combined therapy. Both groups were compared in terms of levels of recovery. No statistically significant difference was found in the recovery rates between the two groups (p=0.7). In this study, the additional antiviral treatment was found to have no effect on the remission rates in patients with ISSHL treated with combined therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phytochemistry, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of Eleusine indica (sambau)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iberahim, Rashidah; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Goose grass also known as Eleusine indica (EI) is a local medicinal plant that displays antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The present study is to determine the phytochemical constituents, cytotoxicity and antiviral activities for both crude extract and fraction obtained from the plant. The crude extract contained more secondary metabolites compared to the hexane fraction as gauged using standard phytochemical tests. Cytotoxicity screening against Vero cells using MTT assay showed that the CC50 values for crude extract and hexane fraction were 2.07 and 5.62 mg/ml respectively. The antiviral activity towards Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using plaque reduction assay. The selective indices (SI = CC50 / EC50) for both methanol extract and hexane fraction were 12.2 and 6.2 respectively. These results demonstrate that the extract prepared from E. indica possesses phytochemical compound that was non cytotoxic to the cell with potential antiviral activity.

  1. Host Cell Factors as Antiviral Targets in Arenavirus Infection

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    Elsa B. Damonte

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection.

  2. Host cell factors as antiviral targets in arenavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linero, Florencia N; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Giovannoni, Federico; Castilla, Viviana; García, Cybele C; Scolaro, Luis A; Damonte, Elsa B

    2012-09-01

    Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF) in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection.

  3. The Antiviral Effect of Baicalin on Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Baicalin is a flavonoid compound extracted from Scutellaria roots that has been reported to possess antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. However, the antiviral effect of baicalin on enterovirus 71 (EV71 is still unknown. In this study, we found that baicalin showed inhibitory activity on EV71 infection and was independent of direct virucidal or prophylactic effect and inhibitory viral absorption. The expressions of EV71/3D mRNA and polymerase were significantly blocked by baicalin treatment at early stages of EV71 infection. In addition, baicalin could decrease the expressions of FasL and caspase-3, as well as inhibit the apoptosis of EV71-infected human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells. Altogether, these results indicate that baicalin exhibits potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection, probably through inhibiting EV71/3D polymerase expression and Fas/FasL signaling pathways.

  4. Antiviral properties from plants of the Mediterranean flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, G; Farci, P; Busonera, B; Murgia, G; La Colla, P; Giliberti, G

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are a successful source in drug discovery, playing a significant role in maintaining human health. We investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of extracts from 18 traditionally used Mediterranean plants. Noteworthy antiviral activity was found in the extract obtained from the branches of Daphne gnidium L. against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (EC50 = 0.08 μg/mL) and coxsackievirus B5 (EC50 = 0.10 μg/mL). Other relevant activities were found against BVDV, YFV, Sb-1, RSV and HSV-1. Interestingly, extracts from Artemisia arborescens L. and Rubus ulmifolius Schott, as well as those from D. gnidium L., showed activities against two different viruses. This extensive antiviral screening allowed us to identify attractive activities, offering opportunities to develop lead compounds with a great pharmaceutical potential.

  5. High throughput screening for small molecule enhancers of the interferon signaling pathway to drive next-generation antiviral drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhara A Patel

    Full Text Available Most of current strategies for antiviral therapeutics target the virus specifically and directly, but an alternative approach to drug discovery might be to enhance the immune response to a broad range of viruses. Based on clinical observation in humans and successful genetic strategies in experimental models, we reasoned that an improved interferon (IFN signaling system might better protect against viral infection. Here we aimed to identify small molecular weight compounds that might mimic this beneficial effect and improve antiviral defense. Accordingly, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS assay to identify small molecules that enhance the IFN signaling pathway components. The assay is based on a phenotypic screen for increased IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE activity in a fully automated and robust format (Z'>0.7. Application of this assay system to a library of 2240 compounds (including 2160 already approved or approvable drugs led to the identification of 64 compounds with significant ISRE activity. From these, we chose the anthracycline antibiotic, idarubicin, for further validation and mechanism based on activity in the sub-µM range. We found that idarubicin action to increase ISRE activity was manifest by other members of this drug class and was independent of cytotoxic or topoisomerase inhibitory effects as well as endogenous IFN signaling or production. We also observed that this compound conferred a consequent increase in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression and a significant antiviral effect using a similar dose-range in a cell-culture system inoculated with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The antiviral effect was also found at compound concentrations below the ones observed for cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results provide proof of concept for using activators of components of the IFN signaling pathway to improve IFN efficacy and antiviral immune defense as well as a validated HTS approach to identify

  6. Synthesis, antibacterial, and antiviral evaluation of new heterocycles containing the pyridine moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Marwa S; Sakr, Sameh I; El-Senousy, Waled M; Madkour, Hassan M F

    2013-10-01

    A facile one-pot four-component reaction was utilized to construct 2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile as a scaffold for the synthesis of many fused heterocyclic systems, namely, furopyridine, pyridothiadiazepinthione, and pyridotriazine, as well as non-fused heterocyclic systems such as phthalazin-2(1H)-ylnicotinonitrile, pyridin-2-yl-1H-pyrazole, and pyrazol-1-ylnicotino-nitrile,1-(3-cyanopyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole. The new compounds were evaluated as antimicrobial and antiviral agents.

  7. Molecular Sleds and More: Novel Antiviral Agents via Single-Molecule Biology (441st Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangel, Wally (Ph.D., Biology Department)

    2008-10-15

    Vaccines are effective against viruses such as polio and measles, but vaccines against other important viruses, such as HIV and flu viruses, may be impossible to obtain. These viruses change their genetic makeup each time they replicate so that the immune system cannot recognize all their variations. Hence it is important to develop new antiviral agents that inhibit virus replication. During this lecture, Dr. Mangel will discuss his group's work with a model system, the human adenovirus, which causes, among other ailments, pink eye, blindness and obesity. Mangel's team has developed a promising drug candidate that works by inihibiting adenovirus proteinase, an enzyme necessary for viral replication.

  8. Antiviral drugs for viruses other than human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razonable, Raymund R

    2011-10-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M(2) protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M(2) inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects.

  9. Optimizing antiviral agents for hepatitis B management in malignant lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozoya, Oluwatobi O.; Chavez, Julio; Sokol, Lubomir

    2017-01-01

    The global scale of hepatitis B infection is well known but its impact is still being understood. Missed hepatitis B infection impacts lymphoma therapy especially increased risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and poor treatment outcomes. The presence of undiagnosed chronic hepatitis also undermines chronic HBV screening methods that are based on a positive HBsAg alone. The goal of this review is to evaluate the literature for optimizing antiviral therapy for lymphoma patients with HBV infection or at risk of HBV reactivation. Relevant articles for this review were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, Ovid Medline, and Scopus using the following terms, alone and in combination: “chronic hepatitis B”, “occult hepatitis B”, ”special groups”, “malignant lymphoma”, “non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma”, “Hodgkin’s lymphoma”, “immunocompromised host”, “immunosuppressive agents”, “antiviral”, “HBV reactivation”. The period of the search was restricted to a 15-year period to limit the search to optimizing antiviral agents for HBV infection in malignant lymphomas [2001–2016]. Several clinical practice guidelines recommend nucleos(t)ide analogues-entecavir, tenofovir and lamivudine among others. These agents are best initiated along with or prior to immunosuppressive therapy. Additional methods recommended for optimizing antiviral therapy include laboratory modalities such as HBV genotyping, timed measurements of HBsAg and HBV DNA levels to measure and predict antiviral treatment response. In conclusion, optimizing antiviral agents for these patients require consideration of geographic prevalence of HBV, cost of antiviral therapy or testing, screening modality, hepatitis experts, type of immunosuppressive therapy and planned duration of therapy.

  10. The earliest settlers' antiquity and evolutionary history of Indian populations: evidence from M2 mtDNA lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotal M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "out of Africa" model postulating single "southern route" dispersal posits arrival of "Anatomically Modern Human" to Indian subcontinent around 66–70 thousand years before present (kyBP. However the contributions and legacy of these earliest settlers in contemporary Indian populations, owing to the complex past population dynamics and later migrations has been an issue of controversy. The high frequency of mitochondrial lineage "M2" consistent with its greater age and distribution suggests that it may represent the phylogenetic signature of earliest settlers. Accordingly, we attempted to re-evaluate the impact and contribution of earliest settlers in shaping the genetic diversity and structure of contemporary Indian populations; using our newly sequenced 72 and 4 published complete mitochondrial genomes of this lineage. Results The M2 lineage, harbouring two deep rooting subclades M2a and M2b encompasses approximately one tenth of the mtDNA pool of studied tribes. The phylogeographic spread and diversity indices of M2 and its subclades among the tribes of different geographic regions and linguistic phyla were investigated in detail. Further the reconstructed demographic history of M2 lineage as a surrogate of earliest settlers' component revealed that the demographic events with pronounced regional variations had played pivotal role in shaping the complex net of populations phylogenetic relationship in Indian subcontinent. Conclusion Our results suggest that tribes of southern and eastern region along with Dravidian and Austro-Asiatic speakers of central India are the modern representatives of earliest settlers of subcontinent. The Last Glacial Maximum aridity and post LGM population growth mechanised some sort of homogeneity and redistribution of earliest settlers' component in India. The demic diffusion of agriculture and associated technologies around 3 kyBP, which might have marginalized hunter-gatherer, is

  11. The earliest settlers' antiquity and evolutionary history of Indian populations: evidence from M2 mtDNA lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Padmanabham, P B S V; Ravuri, Rajasekhara R; Uttaravalli, Kiran; Koneru, Padmaja; Mukherjee, P Aditi; Das, B; Kotal, M; Xaviour, D; Saheb, S Y; Rao, V R

    2008-08-11

    The "out of Africa" model postulating single "southern route" dispersal posits arrival of "Anatomically Modern Human" to Indian subcontinent around 66-70 thousand years before present (kyBP). However the contributions and legacy of these earliest settlers in contemporary Indian populations, owing to the complex past population dynamics and later migrations has been an issue of controversy. The high frequency of mitochondrial lineage "M2" consistent with its greater age and distribution suggests that it may represent the phylogenetic signature of earliest settlers. Accordingly, we attempted to re-evaluate the impact and contribution of earliest settlers in shaping the genetic diversity and structure of contemporary Indian populations; using our newly sequenced 72 and 4 published complete mitochondrial genomes of this lineage. The M2 lineage, harbouring two deep rooting subclades M2a and M2b encompasses approximately one tenth of the mtDNA pool of studied tribes. The phylogeographic spread and diversity indices of M2 and its subclades among the tribes of different geographic regions and linguistic phyla were investigated in detail. Further the reconstructed demographic history of M2 lineage as a surrogate of earliest settlers' component revealed that the demographic events with pronounced regional variations had played pivotal role in shaping the complex net of populations phylogenetic relationship in Indian subcontinent. Our results suggest that tribes of southern and eastern region along with Dravidian and Austro-Asiatic speakers of central India are the modern representatives of earliest settlers of subcontinent. The Last Glacial Maximum aridity and post LGM population growth mechanised some sort of homogeneity and redistribution of earliest settlers' component in India. The demic diffusion of agriculture and associated technologies around 3 kyBP, which might have marginalized hunter-gatherer, is coincidental with the decline of earliest settlers' population

  12. Antiviral, antifungal and antiprotozoal agents in the cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, Jose Elias; García-Sánchez, E; Merino Marcos, M L

    2007-03-01

    Among the antimicrobial agents, antibacterials are the most frequently mentioned in cinematographic plots. Nevertheless, it is not uncommon to come across other antiviral agents, especially antiretrovirals and antiprotozoals. We analyzed the presence of antiviral and antifungal agents in different commercial films, both when they were merely mentioned in passing and when they played a major role in the film. This review essentially aims to address the historical portrayal of these agents in film and to list their appearances. The fictional treatments that appear in some films are not addressed.

  13. Antiviral and cytotoxic activities of some Indonesian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, F; Bakhtiar, A; Bézivin, C; Amoros, M; Boustie, J

    2002-08-01

    Ten methanolic extracts from eight Indonesian medicinal plants were phytochemically screened and evaluated for antiviral (HSV-1 and Poliovirus) and cytotoxic activities on murine and human cancer lines (3LL, L1210, K562, U251, DU145, MCF-7). Besides Melastoma malabathricum (Melastomataceae), the Indonesian Loranthaceae species among which Elytranthe tubaeflora, E. maingayi, E. globosa and Scurrula ferruginea exhibited attractive antiviral and cytotoxic activities. Piper aduncum (Piperaceae) was found active on Poliovirus. S. ferruginea was selected for further studies because of its activity on the U251 glioblastoma cells.

  14. Transgenic Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat/Cas9-Mediated Viral Gene Targeting for Antiviral Therapy of Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuqing; Hou, Chengxiang; Bi, Honglun; Wang, Yueqiang; Xu, Jun; Li, Muwang; James, Anthony A; Huang, Yongping; Tan, Anjiang

    2017-04-15

    We developed a novel antiviral strategy by combining transposon-based transgenesis and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) system for the direct cleavage of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) genome DNA to promote virus clearance in silkworms. We demonstrate that transgenic silkworms constitutively expressing Cas9 and guide RNAs targeting the BmNPV immediate early-1 (ie-1) and me53 genes effectively induce target-specific cleavage and subsequent mutagenesis, especially large (∼7-kbp) segment deletions in BmNPV genomes, and thus exhibit robust suppression of BmNPV proliferation. Transgenic animals exhibited higher and inheritable resistance to BmNPV infection than wild-type animals. Our approach will not only contribute to modern sericulture but also shed light on future antiviral therapy.IMPORTANCE Pathogen genome targeting has shown its potential in antiviral research. However, transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 system-mediated viral genome targeting has not been reported as an antiviral strategy in a natural animal host of a virus. Our data provide an effective approach against BmNPV infection in a real-world biological system and demonstrate the potential of transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 systems in antiviral research in other species. Copyright © 2017 Chen et al.

  15. Antiviral activity of glycyrrhizin against hepatitis C virus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhizin (GL has been used in Japan to treat patients with chronic viral hepatitis, as an anti-inflammatory drug to reduce serum alanine aminotransferase levels. GL is also known to exhibit various biological activities, including anti-viral effects, but the anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV effect of GL remains to be clarified. In this study, we demonstrated that GL treatment of HCV-infected Huh7 cells caused a reduction of infectious HCV production using cell culture-produced HCV (HCVcc. To determine the target step in the HCV lifecycle of GL, we used HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp, replicon, and HCVcc systems. Significant suppressions of viral entry and replication steps were not observed. Interestingly, extracellular infectivity was decreased, and intracellular infectivity was increased. By immunofluorescence and electron microscopic analysis of GL treated cells, HCV core antigens and electron-dense particles had accumulated on endoplasmic reticulum attached to lipid droplet (LD, respectively, which is thought to act as platforms for HCV assembly. Furthermore, the amount of HCV core antigen in LD fraction increased. Taken together, these results suggest that GL inhibits release of infectious HCV particles. GL is known to have an inhibitory effect on phospholipase A2 (PLA2. We found that group 1B PLA2 (PLA2G1B inhibitor also decreased HCV release, suggesting that suppression of virus release by GL treatment may be due to its inhibitory effect on PLA2G1B. Finally, we demonstrated that combination treatment with GL augmented IFN-induced reduction of virus in the HCVcc system. GL is identified as a novel anti-HCV agent that targets infectious virus particle release.

  16. Earliest known coelacanth skull extends the range of anatomically modern coelacanths to the Early Devonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Yu, Xiaobo; Lu, Jing; Qiao, Tuo; Zhao, Wenjin; Jia, Liantao

    2012-04-10

    Coelacanths are known for their evolutionary conservatism, and the body plan seen in Latimeria can be traced to late Middle Devonian Diplocercides, Holopterygius and presumably Euporosteus. However, the group's early history is unclear because of an incomplete fossil record. Until now, the only Early Devonian coelacanth is an isolated dentary (Eoactinistia) from Australia, whose position within the coelacanths is unknown. Here we report the earliest known coelacanth skull (Euporosteus yunnanensis sp. nov.) from the Early Devonian (late Pragian) of Yunnan, China. Resolved by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses as crownward of Diplocercides or as its sister taxon, the new form extends the chronological range of anatomically modern coelacanths by about 17 Myr. The finding lends support to the possibility that Eoactinistia is also an anatomically modern coelacanth, and provides a more refined reference point for studying the rapid early diversification and subsequent evolutionary conservatism of the coelacanths.

  17. The earliest relationship between an infant and a mother through the prism of the psychoanalytic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danaja Lorenčič

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the mother-infant dyad in the oral or cannibal phase which in Freudian psychoanalysis denotes the first psychosexual development stage. In the first part of the article author describes the child's development in the earliest stage, from primary narcissism, the primal state where id, ego and external world are not yet differentiated, to object relations wherein an infant realizes that the existence of object is necessary for satisfaction of needs. The second part of the article discusses the role of the mother who appears as the omnipotent Other to the infant and at the same time acts as an infant's "support ego". The third part reviews results of the oral stage that are reflected in the mother- infant relations.

  18. Phytoliths reveal the earliest fine reedy textile in China at the Tianluoshan site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Sun, Guoping; Flad, Rowan; Wu, Naiqin; Huan, Xiujia; He, Keyang; Wang, Yonglei

    2016-01-01

    Textiles are among the longest and most widespread technologies in human history, although poor preservation of perishable artifacts in Paleolithic and Neolithic contexts makes them difficult to unearth and has hampered study of their production and use. Here we report evidence of a plain-woven mat from the Tianluoshan site, Zhejiang, Eastern China. Phytolith and AMS dating from the mat and modern reference collections shown that the mat was made of reeds (Phragmites australis (Cav.)) and dated to 6775-6645 cal. yr. BP. This is the earliest directly dated fiber artifact so far known in China, over at least one thousand years earlier than any established dates for woven remains elsewhere. The evidence of the mat and other related remains suggest that textile products might occur earlier than 7000-8000 years ago and are significant for understanding the history of textiles, as well as production and human adaptation in Neolithic China.

  19. Functional Capabilities of the Earliest Peptides and the Emergence of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Russell

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering how biological macromolecules first evolved, probably within a marine environment, it seems likely the very earliest peptides were not encoded by nucleic acids, or at least not via the genetic code as we know it. An objective of the present work is to demonstrate that sequence-independent peptides, or peptides with variable and unreliable lengths and sequences, have the potential to perform a variety of chemically useful functions such as anion and cation binding and membrane and channel formation as well as simple types of catalysis. These functions tend to be performed with the assistance of the main chain CONH atoms rather than the more variable or limited side chain atoms of the peptides presumed to exist then.

  20. Vanished Thresholds: Colonial Gentry and the Shaping of One of Sydney's Earliest Suburbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Johnson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the way a colonial gentry was constituting itself as a social grouping in the mid nineteenth century through shaping the landscape and material culture of suburbs such as Darling Point in Sydney. In doing so , they sought to create an 'infrastructure of certainty' for themselves in the challenging and volatile world of what was still predominantly a penal colony. Important to this investigation is an understanding of the lack of stability of this social grouping, particularly in its earliest years, and how this was played out in the subdivisions of land and the building, ownship and furnishing of the early stone villas of this area. I am interested in what this built environment might suggest about the effectivity of material culture in the mobilisation and performance of class, gendered and racial identities in particular urban environments in the nineteenth century.

  1. Earliest crinoids: New evidence for the origin of the dominant Paleozoic echinoderms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guensburg, Thomas E.; Sprinkle, James

    2001-02-01

    The oldest crinoids have been discovered in Early Ordovician strata of the western United States. A set of emergent crinoid traits based on these and other early crinoids enables reinterpretation of crinoid origins and early history. The new fossils retain primitive echinoderm characteristics, including ambulacral floor plates and largely unorganized cup plating, a first for crinoids. They lack shared derived characteristics linking them to other stalked echinoderms, including blastozoans. Contrary to current widespread opinion, crinoids originated as an independent group during the Cambrian, apparently from an edrioasteroid ancestor. All four major Paleozoic crinoid clades had evolved by the early Ibexian (Tremadocian), and this initial diversification slightly preceded those of most other Paleozoic evolutionary fauna components. These earliest crinoids attached to carbonate hardgrounds developed on sponge-algal mounds, intraformational conglomerates, and grainstones.

  2. The evolution of the primate foot from the earliest primates to the Miocene hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, G C; Rose, M D

    1983-01-01

    The fossil evidence relating to the evolution of the primate foot is reviewed and evaluated. Many of the characteristic features of the primate foot had evolved by the early Tertiary over 40 million years ago. Probably the most significant of these developments was the progressive migration of the talus to a position over the calcaneum. These morphological features are followed through the Miocene hominoid genera from East Africa, Europe, and South Asia. While some features of Miocene hominoids, especially those relating to climbing abilities, are still evident in the predominantly bipedal earliest hominids of the Plio-Pleistocene, there is no evidence yet from the Miocene of the first stages in the evolution of that bipedalism.

  3. Why cauldrons come first: taxonomic transparency in the earliest Chinese antiquarian catalogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Moser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘antiquarianism’ is increasingly being deployed as an analytical heuristic for comparing different world traditions of thinking about old things. Central to almost all characterizations of “Chinese antiquarianism” is the construction of a pedigree stretching back to the inventories and catalogs of antiquities produced during the Northern Song dynasty (960-1127. Close comparison reveals significant ideological differences between the values implicit in the earliest Chinese inventories of two-dimensional inscriptions on metal and stone, and those underlying catalogues of three-dimensional antiquities like bronzes. By situating these differences within the wider intellectual milieu of the Northern Song, this essay explains how the unique ‘taxonomic transparency’ of ancient bronzes reinforced Neo-Confucianism’s conquest of the Chinese ideological landscape at the dawn of the second millennium.

  4. Antiviral therapy for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Dahl, Emilie Kristine; Gluud, Lise Lotte;

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether antiviral therapy reduces the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis C.......To determine whether antiviral therapy reduces the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis C....

  5. DMPD: The interferon in TLR signaling: more than just antiviral. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14552837 The interferon in TLR signaling: more than just antiviral. Hertzog PJ, O'N...on in TLR signaling: more than just antiviral. PubmedID 14552837 Title The interferon in TLR signaling: more than just anti

  6. Deep-water Earliest Oligocene Glacial Maximum (EOGM) in South Atlantic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhifei; TUO Shouting; ZHAO Quanhong; CHENG Xinrong; HUANG Wei

    2004-01-01

    The most prominent cooling event of the Earth surface during Cenozoic in the long-term transition from a non-glaciated planet, or "green-house world", to a polar, glaciated planet, or "ice-house world", is the Earliest Oligocene Glacial Maximum (EOGM) above the Eocene/Oligocene boundary at about 33.7 Ma. Planktonic and benthic foraminiferal oxygen and carbon isotopes, carbonate content, and coarse fraction, along with high-resolution color reflectance and magnetic susceptibility records during 35-30 Ma, from deep-water Sites 1262 and 1265, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 208 in South Atlantic, reveal the global cooling event occurring in both surface and deep oceans. The results show that the earliest Oligocene δ18O values during 33.5-33.1 Ma represent the magnitude of continental ice sheets on east Antarctica and indicate the large decrease in both surface and deep water temperatures of worldwide oceans. The δ13C records show the large excursion during the period of EOGM event and indicate some types of shift in global carbon reservoir, probably demonstrating the sudden increase in organic carbon burial rates and the changes in the distribution and timing of production. At the same time, lithologic composition, carbonate content, color reflectance, and coarse fraction brought about significant changes close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, reflecting the abrupt deepening in the carbonate compensation depth (CCD). Changes in carbonate content were revealed from the color reflectance identify periodicities associated with eccentricity of the Earth's orbit (100 and 400 ka), further indicating orbitally forced global climate variations in the Early Oligocene.

  7. Volutidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) of the Lakhra Formation (Earliest Eocene, Sindh, Pakistan): systematics, biostratigraphy and paleobiogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Didier; Pacaud, Jean-Michel; Métais, Grégoire; Bartolini, Annachiara; Lashari, Rafiq A; Brohi, Imdad A; Solangi, Sarfraz H; Marivaux, Laurent; Welcomme, Jean-Loup

    2014-06-27

    The paleobiodiversity of the Volutidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) of the Ranikot Group (Sindh, Pakistan) and particularly of the Lakhra Formation (SBZ 5 biozone, Earliest Eocene), is reconsidered on the basis of new material collected during recent field trips. Ten new species are described (Mitreola brohii sp. nov., Lyrischapa vredenburgi sp. nov., L. brevispira sp. nov., Athleta (Volutopupa) citharopsis sp. nov., A. (Volutocorbis) lasharii sp. nov., Volutilithes welcommei sp. nov., V. sindhiensis sp. nov., Pseudaulicina coxi sp. nov., Sindhiluta lakhraensis sp. nov. and Pakiluta solangii sp. nov.) and one species is in open nomenclature (Lyria sp.). Three new genera are described: Lyriopsis gen. nov. [Volutinae, ?Lyriini, type species: Lyriopsis cossmanni (Vredenburg, 1923)], Sindhiluta gen. nov. [Volutilithinae, type species: Sindhiluta lakhraensis n. sp.] and Pakiluta gen. nov. [?Volutodermatinae, type species: Pakiluta solangii n. sp.]. Two new combinations are proposed: Lyriopsis cossmanni (Vredenburg, 1923) comb. nov. and Athleta (Volutopupa) intercrenatus (Cossmann & Pissarro, 1909) comb. nov. Lectotypes are designated for Lyria cossmanni Vredenburg, 1923, L. feddeni Vredenburg, 1923, Volutospina noetlingi Cossmann & Pissarro, 1909, V. intercrenata Cossmann & Pissarro, 1909 and Athleta (Volutocorbis) victoriae Vredenburg, 1923. With 21 species, this volutid fauna is the most diverse recorded from the Tethys Ocean during Earliest Eocene time. The assemblage is characterized by a strong turnover marked by regional speciation and the appearance of many western Tethyan invaders. Although at the species level, the assemblage documents a strong provincialism, at the genus level, the high number of shared genera between Eastern Tethyan and Old World Tethyan realms begins a phase of long-term homogeneity of volutid assemblages from the Tethyan paleobiogeographic province.

  8. Technique: imaging earliest tooth development in 3D using a silver-based tissue contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Muhammad T; Prusinkiewicz, Martin; Cooper, David M L; George, Belev; Webb, M Adam; Boughner, Julia C

    2014-02-01

    Looking in microscopic detail at the 3D organization of initiating teeth within the embryonic jaw has long-proved technologically challenging because of the radio-translucency of these tiny un-mineralized oral tissues. Yet 3D image data showing changes in the physical relationships among developing tooth and jaw tissues are vital to understand the coordinated morphogenesis of vertebrate teeth and jaws as an animal grows and as species evolve. Here, we present a new synchrotron-based scanning solution to image odontogenesis in 3D and in histological detail using a silver-based contrast agent. We stained fixed, intact wild-type mice aged embryonic (E) day 10 to birth with 1% Protargol-S at 37°C for 12-32 hr. Specimens were scanned at 4-10 µm pixel size at 28 keV, just above the silver K-edge, using micro-computed tomography (µCT) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron. Synchrotron µCT scans of silver-stained embryos showed even the earliest visible stages of tooth initiation, as well as many other tissue types and structures, in histological detail. Silver stain penetration was optimal for imaging structures in intact embryos E15 and younger. This silver stain method offers a powerful yet straightforward approach to visualize at high-resolution and in 3D the earliest stages of odontogenesis in situ, and demonstrates the important of studying the tooth organ in all three planes of view. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effect of combinations of antiviral drugs on herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M Gebhardt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bryan M Gebhardt1, Federico Focher2, Richard Eberle3, Andrzej Manikowski4, George E Wright41LSU Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Istituto di Genetica Molecolare, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia, Italy; 3Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 4GLSynthesis Inc., Worcester, MA, USAAbstract: 2-Phenylamino-6-oxo-9-(4-hydroxybutylpurine (HBPG is a thymidine kinase inhibitor that prevents encephalitic death in mice caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2, although its potency is somewhat less than that of acyclovir (ACV. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of combinations of HBPG and either ACV, phosphonoformate (PFA, or cidofovir (CDF against HSV encephalitis. BALB/c mice were given ocular infections with HSV-1 or HSV-2, and treated twice daily intraperitoneally for five days with HBPG, alone or in combination with ACV, PFA, or CDF. Animals were observed daily for up to 30 days, and the day of death of each was recorded. All of the combinations showed additivity, and the combination of HBPG + ACV appeared to be synergistic, ie, protected more mice against HSV-1 encephalitis compared with each drug given alone. Delay of treatment with HBPG for up to two days was still effective in preventing HSV-2 encephalitis. The combination of the thymidine kinase inhibitor HBPG and the antiherpes drug ACV may have synergistic activity against HSV encephalitis. The development of a potent and safe combination therapy for the prevention and/or treatment of HSV infection of the central nervous system can improve the outcome of this infection in humans.Keywords: antivirals, herpetic encephalitis

  10. Flu Resistance to Antiviral Drug in North Carolina

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-19

    Dr. Katrina Sleeman, Associate Service Fellow at CDC, discusses resistance to an antiviral flu drug in North Carolina.  Created: 12/19/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/19/2011.

  11. Antiviral effects of green tea ( Camellia sinensis ) against pathogenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Materials and Methods: We performed a search using the key words “green tea” AND “antiviral” covering the last 10 years. ... Conclusion: A detailed information on the antiviral activity of green tea in a number of different viruses show a promising future as a popular ...

  12. Phytochemical, antioxidant, antiviral and cytotoxic evaluation of Opuntia dillenii flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthanari Saravana Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Opuntia dillenii used in Asian traditional medicine especially in China. We here report on the investigation of the phytochemical content, antioxidant, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanolic extract of O. dillenii flowers. The antioxidant activity was measured with the DPPH, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals scavenging method. In the antiviral and cytotoxic assay we used different viruses in different cell lines. In antioxidant assay, the DPPH assay exhibited potent antioxidant abilities with IC50 of 58.7 µg/mL. In antiviral assay, the extract possess strongest antiviral activity against herpes simplex 1(EC50= 25 µg/mL and 2 (EC50= 20 µg/mL, vaccinia (EC50= 100 µg/mL and moderate activity for remaining viruses (EC50= >100 µg/mL. The cytotoxicity effect was evaluated using MTT assay and the results revealed that the extracts exhibited cytotoxicity above the range of 100 µg/mL. Our present reports confirmed that the O. dillenii could be a potential antioxidant and antimicrobial agent in near future.

  13. Effective inhibition of viral reproduction by hydrophobised antiviral antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, A V; Ovcharenko, A V; Melik-Nubarov, N S; Bannikov, A I; Lisok, T P; Klyushnenkova, E V; Cherchenko, N G; Alakhov VYu; Levashov, A V; Kiselev, V I

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for the inhibition of viral reproduction in cells by means of fatty-acylated antiviral antibodies which, in contrast to the unmodified antibodies, have the ability to enter the cells. The potential of this technique is demonstrated in experiments involving inhibition of the reproduction of various strains of influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus.

  14. Evaluation of antiseptic antiviral activity of chemical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Chloé; Finance, Chantal; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    Antiviral antisepsis and disinfection are crucial for preventing the environmental spread of viral infections. Emerging viruses and associated diseases, as well as nosocomial viral infections, have become a real issue in medical fields, and there are very few efficient and specific treatments available to fight most of these infections. Another issue is the potential environmental resistance and spread of viral particles. Therefore, it is essential to properly evaluate the efficacy of antiseptics-disinfectants (ATS-D) on viruses. ATS-D antiviral activity is evaluated by (1) combining viruses and test product for an appropriately defined and precise contact time, (2) neutralizing product activity, and (3) estimating the loss of viral infectivity. A germicide can be considered to have an efficient ATS-D antiviral activity if it induces a >3 or >4 log(10) reduction (American and European regulatory agency requirements, respectively) in viral titers in a defined contact time. This unit describes a global methodology for evaluating chemical ATS-D antiviral activity.

  15. Antiviral Therapy for Chronic HCV Infection - Tolerability and Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Maan (Raoel)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes the safety and outcome of antiviral therapy for chronic HCV infection. In the first chapters, the authors investigated (hematological) adverse events during interferon-based therapy among patients with compensated cirrhosis. By using a patient-tailored approach, int

  16. H1N1 Flu and Antiviral Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-02

    This podcast discusses the use of antiviral drugs for treating and preventing the H1N1 flu virus.  Created: 5/2/2009 by Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Influenza Division (CCID/NCIRD/ID).   Date Released: 5/2/2009.

  17. Developing antiviral surgical gown using nonwoven fabrics for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    tensile strength of the trilaminate fabric in both machine and cross direction was 145 ... Conclusion: The surgical gown exhibits antiviral property which can protect the ... The protective performance of surgical gown fabrics ... be made with two types of materials based on ... dioxide nanoparticle has photocatalytic action and.

  18. INVESTMENT IN ANTIVIRAL DRUGS : A REAL OPTIONS APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, Arthur E.; Lugner, Anna K.; Feenstra, Talitha L.

    2010-01-01

    Real options analysis is a promising approach to model investment under uncertainty. We employ this approach to value stockpiling of antiviral drugs as a precautionary measure against a possible influenza pandemic. Modifications of the real options approach to include risk attitude and deviations fr

  19. John F. Enders lecture 2006: antivirals for influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Adrian K; Hayden, Frederick G

    2007-07-15

    The long history of influenza drug development has both contributed practical advances in antiviral chemotherapy and improved the understanding of influenza pathogenesis and epidemiology. The role played by these antivirals continues to grow with the dual threats of seasonal and pandemic influenza. The neuraminidase inhibitors are proven effective for the chemoprophylaxis and treatment of influenza A and B, although early therapy is essential for disease mitigation. Studies of topically applied zanamivir have demonstrated the importance of viral replication in the lower respiratory tract, even in uncomplicated influenza. Antiviral resistance, especially to the M2 ion channel inhibitors, sometimes limits clinical utility. Oseltamivir-resistant variants may emerge during treatment but have not yet circulated widely and are usually less fit than wild-type virus; most retain susceptibility to zanamivir. The transmission fitness cost of these resistant variants is drug-, neuraminidase subtype-, and mutation-specific. Continued vigilance in drug resistance surveillance is imperative, as is research into the development of new agents that will provide the potential for alternative and combination antiviral therapy.

  20. De novo computer-aided design of novel antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarotti, Alberto; Coluccia, Antonio; Sorba, Giovanni; Silvestri, Romano; Brancale, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design techniques have become an integral part of the drug discovery process. In particular, de novo methodologies can be useful to identify putative ligands for a specific target relying only on the structural information of the target itself. Here we discuss the basic de novo approaches available and their application in antiviral drug design.:

  1. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-06

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  2. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus.

  3. 75 FR 16151 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  4. 78 FR 57166 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  5. 76 FR 62418 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  6. Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activity Against Herpesvirus Replication and Gene. Expression ... Method: Antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using thiazolyl ..... Marker; 1 = Vero cells; 2 = HSV-1; 3 = ACV; 4 = H9);. (D) effect of H9 on ...

  7. Synthesis and antiviral evaluation of bisnoradamantane sulfites and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Elena; Torres, Eva; Guardiola, Salvador; Naesens, Lieve; Vázquez, Santiago

    2011-03-01

    The reaction of a series of 1,2-diols with thionyl chloride led to bisnoradamantane sulfites in very good yields. The reaction has also been applied to related polycyclic scaffolds. The compounds have been tested for antiviral activity but none of them showed to be active. Several attempts to generate and trap SO from these polycyclic sulfites have been unsuccessful.

  8. Synthesis and antiviral evaluation of bisnoradamantane sulfites and related compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde, Elena; Torres, Eva; Guardiola, Salvador; Naesens, Lieve; Vázquez, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of a series of 1,2-diols with thionyl chloride led to bisnoradamantane sulfites in very good yields. The reaction has also been applied to related polycyclic scaffolds. The compounds have been tested for antiviral activity but none of them showed to be active. Several attempts to generate and trap SO from these polycyclic sulfites have been unsuccessful.

  9. INVESTMENT IN ANTIVIRAL DRUGS : A REAL OPTIONS APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, Arthur E.; Lugner, Anna K.; Feenstra, Talitha L.

    2010-01-01

    Real options analysis is a promising approach to model investment under uncertainty. We employ this approach to value stockpiling of antiviral drugs as a precautionary measure against a possible influenza pandemic. Modifications of the real options approach to include risk attitude and deviations

  10. DMPD: Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18703349 Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Komur...Show Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. PubmedID 18703349 Title Negative r...egulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Authors Komuro A, Bamm

  11. DMPD: Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18549796 Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Moore CB, Ting J...P. Immunity. 2008 Jun;28(6):735-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral ...signaling pathways. PubmedID 18549796 Title Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Author

  12. DMPD: What is disrupting IFN-alpha's antiviral activity? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15283983 What is disrupting IFN-alpha's antiviral activity? Mbow ML, Sarisky RT. Tr...ends Biotechnol. 2004 Aug;22(8):395-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show What is disrupting IFN-alpha's ant...iviral activity? PubmedID 15283983 Title What is disrupting IFN-alpha's antiviral activity? Authors Mbow ML,

  13. DMPD: TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16027039 TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? Schroder M, Bowie AG.... Trends Immunol. 2005 Sep;26(9):462-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key pl...ayer or bystander? PubmedID 16027039 Title TLR3 in antiviral immunity: key player or bystander? Authors Schr

  14. DMPD: Triggering the innate antiviral response through IRF-3 activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17395583 Triggering the innate antiviral response through IRF-3 activation. Hiscott...g the innate antiviral response through IRF-3 activation. PubmedID 17395583 Title Triggering the innate anti...viral response through IRF-3 activation. Authors Hiscott J. Publication J Biol Ch

  15. [Antiviral activity of plant components. 1st communication: Flavonoids (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, A; Eilmes, H G

    1978-01-01

    Some drugs effective against influenza contain flavonoids. We therefore examined the antiviral effect of hesperidin, hesperidinmethylchalcon, trihydroxyethylrutin, catechol, quercitrin, rutin and aurantiin against vesicular stromatitis virus (VSV) action on mouse fibroblasts and that of hesperidin against influenza virus in HeLa cells system by means of dye uptake measurements (Finter) and by plaque reduction test, respectively. Preincubation of the cells with the flavonoids 6--8 h before virus addition was inevitable. Protection of cells against virus action persisted for about 24 h and it abruptly disappeared after an addition of hyaluronidase. Maximal inhibition of virus action was achieved with a concentration of 200 microgram/ml flavonoid.

  16. Antiviral effect of methylated flavonol isorhamnetin against influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdal Dayem

    Full Text Available Influenza is an infectious respiratory disease with frequent seasonal epidemics that causes a high rate of mortality and morbidity in humans, poultry, and animals. Influenza is a serious economic concern due to the costly countermeasures it necessitates. In this study, we compared the antiviral activities of several flavonols and other flavonoids with similar, but distinct, hydroxyl or methyl substitution patterns at the 3, 3', and 4' positions of the 15-carbon flavonoid skeleton, and found that the strongest antiviral effect was induced by isorhamnetin. Similar to quercetin and kaempferol, isorhamnetin possesses a hydroxyl group on the C ring, but it has a 3'-methyl group on the B ring that is absent in quercetin and kaempferol. Co-treatment and pre-treatment with isorhamnetin produced a strong antiviral effect against the influenza virus A/PR/08/34(H1N1. However, isorhamnetin showed the most potent antiviral potency when administered after viral exposure (post-treatment method in vitro. Isorhamnetin treatment reduced virus-induced ROS generation and blocked cytoplasmic lysosome acidification and the lipidation of microtubule associated protein1 light chain 3-B (LC3B. Oral administration of isorhamnetin in mice infected with the influenza A virus significantly decreased lung virus titer by 2 folds, increased the survival rate which ranged from 70-80%, and decreased body weight loss by 25%. In addition, isorhamnetin decreased the virus titer in ovo using embryonated chicken eggs. The structure-activity relationship (SAR of isorhamnetin could explain its strong anti-influenza virus potency; the methyl group located on the B ring of isorhamnetin may contribute to its strong antiviral potency against influenza virus in comparison with other flavonoids.

  17. Antiviral agents derived from novel 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesel, Andreas J; Weiss, Hans-Christoph; Schönleber, Andreas; Day, Craig W; Barnard, Dale L; Detorio, Mervi A; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2012-12-07

    Amantadine constitutes an interesting, diamond crystal lattice-shaped, antivirally active amine with an inhibitory effect on influenza A viruses causing common 'flu' in humans. Unfortunately, amantadine forfeited most of its therapeutic potential because of resistance development in recent influenza A virus isolates. The antiviral efficacy of amantadine congeners can be chemically modified, resulting in re-constitution, improvement and/or extension of antiviral activities mediated by amino-adamantyls. Newly synthesized compounds were evaluated towards HIV type-1 (HIV-1) replication in primary human lymphocytes. One N-phenacyl amantadine derivative was investigated for inhibiting the in vitro replication of respiratory viruses (influenza A viruses, influenza B virus, human parainfluenza virus type 3 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus). Two ketone-stabilized 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes were discovered serendipitously. To our best knowledge these are the first persistently stable nitrenes to be reported. Their structure was proved by determining the X-ray single crystal structure of one hydrolytic elaboration product. This salt adduct revealed an incommensurately modulated crystal structure, which was solved by extensive computational refinement. We could show that ketone-stabilized 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes are versatile synthons for the synthesis of antiviral drug candidates. An amantadine-folate conjugate was inhibitory on HIV-1 replication in primary human lymphocytes, and one N-phenacyl amantadine derivative was inhibitory towards low pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1) replication in vitro. These results indicate that the aromatic-aliphatic ketone-stabilized 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes, beyond being of fundamental interest in organic chemistry, represent versatile synthons for the synthesis of new amantadine-related potentially antiviral drugs.

  18. Antiviral effect of methylated flavonol isorhamnetin against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Choi, Hye Yeon; Kim, Young Bong; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is an infectious respiratory disease with frequent seasonal epidemics that causes a high rate of mortality and morbidity in humans, poultry, and animals. Influenza is a serious economic concern due to the costly countermeasures it necessitates. In this study, we compared the antiviral activities of several flavonols and other flavonoids with similar, but distinct, hydroxyl or methyl substitution patterns at the 3, 3', and 4' positions of the 15-carbon flavonoid skeleton, and found that the strongest antiviral effect was induced by isorhamnetin. Similar to quercetin and kaempferol, isorhamnetin possesses a hydroxyl group on the C ring, but it has a 3'-methyl group on the B ring that is absent in quercetin and kaempferol. Co-treatment and pre-treatment with isorhamnetin produced a strong antiviral effect against the influenza virus A/PR/08/34(H1N1). However, isorhamnetin showed the most potent antiviral potency when administered after viral exposure (post-treatment method) in vitro. Isorhamnetin treatment reduced virus-induced ROS generation and blocked cytoplasmic lysosome acidification and the lipidation of microtubule associated protein1 light chain 3-B (LC3B). Oral administration of isorhamnetin in mice infected with the influenza A virus significantly decreased lung virus titer by 2 folds, increased the survival rate which ranged from 70-80%, and decreased body weight loss by 25%. In addition, isorhamnetin decreased the virus titer in ovo using embryonated chicken eggs. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) of isorhamnetin could explain its strong anti-influenza virus potency; the methyl group located on the B ring of isorhamnetin may contribute to its strong antiviral potency against influenza virus in comparison with other flavonoids.

  19. Magnetic resonance study of the influence of tissue damage and cortical reorganization on PASAT performance at the earliest stage of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audoin, Bertrand; Au Duong, My Van; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Ibarrola, Danielle; Malikova, Irina; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Soulier, Elisabeth; Viout, Patrick; Ali-Chérif, André; Pelletier, Jean; Cozzone, Patrick J

    2005-03-01

    We sought to determine the influence of tissue damage and the potential impact of cortical reorganization on the performance to the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) in patients at the earliest stage of multiple sclerosis (MS). Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments using PASAT as paradigm were carried out in 18 patients with clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of MS (CISSMS) compared to 18 controls. MTR histogram analyses showed structural abnormalities in patients involving the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) but also the gray matter (GM). Mean PASAT scores were significantly lower in the group of patients taken as a whole, and were correlated with the mean NAWM MTR value. No correlation was observed between PASAT scores and GM MTR. However, in the subgroup of patients with normal PASAT performance (n = 9), fMRI showed larger activations in bilateral Brodmann area 45 (BA45) and right BA44 compared to that in controls (n = 18). In these areas with potentially compensatory reorganization, the whole group of patients (n = 18) showed significantly greater activation than controls (n = 18). Activation in the right BA45 was inversely correlated with the mean NAWM MTR and the peak position of GM MTR histograms of patients. This study indicates that even at the earliest stage of MS, cortical reorganization is present inside the executive system of working memory and could tend to limit the determinant functional impact of NAWM injury on the execution of the PASAT.

  20. Epimedium koreanum Nakai Displays Broad Spectrum of Antiviral Activity in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Cellular Antiviral State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Kyung Cho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant’s known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakai markedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV, Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2. Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans.

  1. Pharmacokinetic Characteristics, Pharmacodynamic Effect and In Vivo Antiviral Efficacy of Liver-Targeted Interferon Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycroft, Daniel; Sosabowski, Jane; Coulstock, Edward; Davies, Marie; Morrey, John; Friel, Sarah; Kelly, Fiona; Hamatake, Robert; Ovečka, Milan; Prince, Rob; Goodall, Laura; Sepp, Armin; Walker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNα) is used for the treatment of hepatitis B virus infection, and whilst efficacious, it is associated with multiple adverse events caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting IFN directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. Furthermore we investigated whether directing IFN to the reservoir of infection in the liver may improve antiviral efficacy by increasing local concentration in target organs and tissues. Our previous results show that the mIFNα2 fused to an ASGPR specific liver targeting antibody, DOM26h-196-61, results in a fusion protein which retains the activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. In vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-DOM26h-196-61, hereafter referred to as targeted mIFNα2, was observed in microSPECT imaging studies in mice. In this study we show by pharmacokinetic analysis that antibody mediated liver-targeting results in increased uptake and exposure of targeted mIFNα2 in target tissues, and correspondingly reduced uptake and exposure in systemic circulation, clearance organs and non-target tissues. We also show that cytokine activity and antiviral activity of liver-targeted IFN is observed in vivo, but that, contrary to expectations, liver-targeting of mIFNα2 using ASGPR specific dAbs actually leads to a reduced pharmacodynamic effect in target organs and lower antiviral activity in vivo when compared to non-targeted mIFNα2-dAb fusions. PMID:25689509

  2. Pharmacokinetic characteristics, pharmacodynamic effect and in vivo antiviral efficacy of liver-targeted interferon alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rycroft

    Full Text Available Interferon alpha (IFNα is used for the treatment of hepatitis B virus infection, and whilst efficacious, it is associated with multiple adverse events caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting IFN directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. Furthermore we investigated whether directing IFN to the reservoir of infection in the liver may improve antiviral efficacy by increasing local concentration in target organs and tissues. Our previous results show that the mIFNα2 fused to an ASGPR specific liver targeting antibody, DOM26h-196-61, results in a fusion protein which retains the activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. In vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-DOM26h-196-61, hereafter referred to as targeted mIFNα2, was observed in microSPECT imaging studies in mice. In this study we show by pharmacokinetic analysis that antibody mediated liver-targeting results in increased uptake and exposure of targeted mIFNα2 in target tissues, and correspondingly reduced uptake and exposure in systemic circulation, clearance organs and non-target tissues. We also show that cytokine activity and antiviral activity of liver-targeted IFN is observed in vivo, but that, contrary to expectations, liver-targeting of mIFNα2 using ASGPR specific dAbs actually leads to a reduced pharmacodynamic effect in target organs and lower antiviral activity in vivo when compared to non-targeted mIFNα2-dAb fusions.

  3. Analysis and prediction of highly effective antiviral peptides based on random forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Y Chang

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to examine and predict antiviral peptides. Although antiviral peptides hold great potential in antiviral drug discovery, little is done in antiviral peptide prediction. In this study, we demonstrate that a physicochemical model using random forests outperform in distinguishing antiviral peptides. On the experimental benchmark, our physicochemical model aided with aggregation and secondary structural features reaches 90% accuracy and 0.79 Matthew's correlation coefficient, which exceeds the previous models. The results suggest that aggregation could be an important feature for identifying antiviral peptides. In addition, our analysis reveals the characteristics of the antiviral peptides such as the importance of lysine and the abundance of α-helical secondary structures.

  4. Keratinocyte Antiviral Response to Poly(dA:dT) Stimulation and Papillomavirus Infection in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luff, Jennifer A.; Yuan, Hang; Kennedy, Douglas; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter; Moore, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is caused by a genetic mutation within the common gamma chain (γc), an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. XSCID patients are most commonly treated with bone marrow transplants (BMT) to restore systemic immune function. However, BMT-XSCID humans and dogs remain at an increased risk for development of cutaneous papillomavirus (PV) infections and their associated neoplasms, most typically cutaneous papillomas. Since basal keratinocytes are the target cell for the initial PV infection, we wanted to determine if canine XSCID keratinocytes have a diminished antiviral cytokine response to poly(dA:dT) and canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2) upon initial infection. We performed quantitative RT-PCR for antiviral cytokines and downstream interferon stimulated genes (ISG) on poly(dA:dT) stimulated and CPV-2 infected monolayer keratinocyte cultures derived from XSCID and normal control dogs. We found that XSCID keratinocytes responded similarly to poly(dA:dT) as normal keratinocytes by upregulating antiviral cytokines and ISGs. CPV-2 infection of both XSCID and normal keratinocytes did not result in upregulation of antiviral cytokines or ISGs at 2, 4, or 6 days post infection. These data suggest that the antiviral response to initial PV infection of basal keratinocytes is similar between XSCID and normal patients, and is not the likely source for the remaining immunodeficiency in XSCID patients. PMID:25025687

  5. Keratinocyte antiviral response to Poly(dA:dT stimulation and papillomavirus infection in a canine model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Luff

    Full Text Available X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID is caused by a genetic mutation within the common gamma chain (γc, an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. XSCID patients are most commonly treated with bone marrow transplants (BMT to restore systemic immune function. However, BMT-XSCID humans and dogs remain at an increased risk for development of cutaneous papillomavirus (PV infections and their associated neoplasms, most typically cutaneous papillomas. Since basal keratinocytes are the target cell for the initial PV infection, we wanted to determine if canine XSCID keratinocytes have a diminished antiviral cytokine response to poly(dA:dT and canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2 upon initial infection. We performed quantitative RT-PCR for antiviral cytokines and downstream interferon stimulated genes (ISG on poly(dA:dT stimulated and CPV-2 infected monolayer keratinocyte cultures derived from XSCID and normal control dogs. We found that XSCID keratinocytes responded similarly to poly(dA:dT as normal keratinocytes by upregulating antiviral cytokines and ISGs. CPV-2 infection of both XSCID and normal keratinocytes did not result in upregulation of antiviral cytokines or ISGs at 2, 4, or 6 days post infection. These data suggest that the antiviral response to initial PV infection of basal keratinocytes is similar between XSCID and normal patients, and is not the likely source for the remaining immunodeficiency in XSCID patients.

  6. Part 2: the Earliest World Map, Babylonia, c. 500 B.C. European Cartography on the Eve of the Discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, Gerald A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses a cuneiform Babylonian tablet from about 500 B.C., the earliest extant world map. Explores bases for contemporary interpretation of the map. Observes that the map contains representations found in later maps. Suggests that modern views of the world are no less culturally laden than much earlier perspectives were. (SG)

  7. Cypris metamorphosis, injection and earliest internal development of theRrizocephalan Loxothylacus panopaei (Gissler). Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala: Sacculinidae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenner, H

    2001-01-01

    , and the succeeding developmental stages up to the stage of the earliest primordium reported from the literature. The anlage of the ovary is traced back to the free-swimming cypris stage and it is implied that the mesoderm and ectoderm of the endoparasite are already differentiated in the cyprid....

  8. The earliest fossil record of Panorpidae (Mecoptera from the Middle Jurassic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ding

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The early history of Panorpidae (Mecoptera is poorly known due to sparse fossil records. Up to date, only nine fossil species have been described, all from the Paleogene, except the Early Cretaceous Solusipanorpa gibbidorsa Lin, 1980. However, we suggest S. gibbidorsa is too incompletely preserved to permit even family classification. A new genus with two new species, Jurassipanorpa impunctata gen. et sp. n. and Jurassipanorpa sticta sp. n., are described based on four well-preserved specimens from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China. These two new species are the earliest fossil records of Panorpidae. The new genus is erected based on a combination of forewing characters: both R1 and Rs1 with two branches, 1A reaching posterior margin of wing distad of the forking of Rs from R1, and no crossveins or only one crossvein between veins of 1A and 2A. In all four specimens, long and robust setae ranging from 0.09 to 0.38 mm in length and pointing anteriorly, are present on anal veins of forewings. The function of these setae is enigmatic.

  9. Potential Biomarkers of the Earliest Clinical Stages of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelya Kh. Alieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a widespread neurodegenerative disorder. Despite the intensive studies of this pathology, in general, the picture of the etiopathogenesis has still not been clarified fully. To understand better the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of PD, we analyzed the expression of 10 genes in the peripheral blood of treated and untreated patients with PD. 35 untreated patients with PD and 12 treated patients with Parkinson’s disease (Hoehn and Yahr scores 1-2 were studied. An analysis of the mRNA levels of ATP13A2, PARK2, PARK7, PINK1, LRRK2, SNCA, ALDH1A1, PDHB, PPARGC1A, and ZNF746 genes in the peripheral blood of patients was carried out using reverse transcription followed by real-time PCR. A statistically significant and specific increase by more than 1.5-fold in the expression of the ATP13A2, PARK7, and ZNF746 genes was observed in patients with PD. Based on these results, it can be suggested that the upregulation of the mRNA levels of ATP13A2, PARK7, and ZNF746 in untreated patients in the earliest clinical stages can also be observed in the preclinical stages of PD, and that these genes can be considered as potential biomarkers of the preclinical stage of PD.

  10. A Swift Look at SN 2011fe: The Earliest Ultraviolet Observations of a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Samantha; Holland, Stephen; Immler, Stefan; Brown, Peter J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; DePasquale, Massimiliano; Gronwall, Caryl; Kuin, Paul; Mazzali, Paolo; Miline, Peter; Siegel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We present the earliest ultraviolet (UV) observations of the bright Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe/PTF11kly in the nearby galaxy M101 at a distance of only 6.4 Mpc. It was discovered shortly after explosion by the Palomar Transient Factory and first observed by Swift/UVOT about a day after explosion. The early UV light is well-defined, with approx. 20 data points per filter in the 5 days after explosion. With these early UV observations, we extend the near-UV template of SNe Ia to earlier times for comparison with observations at low and high redshift and report fits from semiempirical models of the explosion. We find the early UV count rates to be well fit by the superposition of two parabolic curves. Finally, we use the early UV flux measurements to examine a possible shock interaction with a non-degenerate companion. We find that even a solar mass companion at a distance of a few solar radii is unlikely at more than 95% confidence.

  11. Earliest and first Northern Hemispheric hoatzin fossils substantiate Old World origin of a "Neotropic endemic".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Gerald; De Pietri, Vanesa L

    2014-02-01

    The recent identification of hoatzins (Opisthocomiformes) in the Miocene of Africa showed part of the evolution of these birds, which are now only found in South America, to have taken place outside the Neotropic region. Here, we describe a new fossil species from the late Eocene of France, which constitutes the earliest fossil record of hoatzins and the first one from the Northern Hemisphere. Protoazin parisiensis gen. et sp. nov. is more closely related to South American Opisthocomiformes than the African taxon Namibiavis and substantiates an Old World origin of hoatzins, as well as a relictual distribution of the single extant species. Although recognition of hoatzins in Europe may challenge their presumed transatlantic dispersal, there are still no North American fossils in support of an alternative, Northern Hemispheric, dispersal route. In addition to Opisthocomiformes, other avian taxa are known from the Cenozoic of Europe, the extant representatives of which are only found in South America. Recognition of hoatzins in the early Cenozoic of Europe is of particular significance because Opisthocomiformes have a fossil record in sub-Saharan Africa, which supports the hypothesis that extinction of at least some of these "South American" groups outside the Neotropic region was not primarily due to climatic factors.

  12. The earliest post-paleozoic freshwater bivalves preserved in coprolites from the karoo basin, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Yates

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clades of bivalve molluscs have invaded freshwaters at various times throughout Phanerozoic history. The most successful freshwater clade in the modern world is the Unionoida. Unionoids arose in the Triassic Period, sometime after the major extinction event at the End-Permian boundary and are now widely distributed across all continents except Antarctica. Until now, no freshwater bivalves of any kind were known to exist in the Early Triassic. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report on a faunule of two small freshwater bivalve species preserved in vertebrate coprolites from the Olenekian (Lower Triassic of the Burgersdorp Formation of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Positive identification of these bivalves is not possible due to the limited material. Nevertheless they do show similarities with Unionoida although they fall below the size range of extant unionoids. Phylogenetic analysis is not possible with such limited material and consequently the assignment remains somewhat speculative. CONCLUSIONS: Bivalve molluscs re-invaded freshwaters soon after the End-Permian extinction event, during the earliest part of the recovery phase during the Olenekian Stage of the Early Triassic. If the specimens do represent unionoids then these Early Triassic examples may be an example of the Lilliput effect. Since the oldest incontrovertible freshwater unionoids are also from sub-Saharan Africa, it is possible that this subcontinent hosted the initial freshwater radiation of the Unionoida. This find also demonstrates the importance of coprolites as microenvironments of exceptional preservation that contain fossils of organisms that would otherwise have left no trace.

  13. The Earliest Near-infrared Time-series Spectroscopy of a Type Ia Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Hsiao, E Y; Phillips, M M; Burns, C R; Winge, C; Morrell, N; Contreras, C; Freedman, W L; Kromer, M; Gall, E E E; Gerardy, C L; Hoeflich, P H; Im, M; Jeon, Y; Kirshner, R P; Nugent, P E; Persson, S E; Pignata, G; Roth, M; Stanishev, V; Stritzinger, M; Suntzeff, N B

    2013-01-01

    We present ten medium-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio near-infrared (NIR) spectra of SN 2011fe from SpeX on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph (GNIRS) on Gemini North, obtained as part of the Carnegie Supernova Project. This data set constitutes the earliest time-series NIR spectroscopy of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), with the first spectrum obtained at 2.58 days past the explosion and covering -14.6 to +17.3 days relative to B-band maximum. C I {\\lambda}1.0693 {\\mu}m is detected in SN 2011fe with increasing strength up to maximum light. The delay in the onset of the NIR C I line demonstrates its potential to be an effective tracer of unprocessed material. For the first time in a SN Ia, the early rapid decline of the Mg II {\\lambda}1.0927 {\\mu}m velocity was observed, and the subsequent velocity is remarkably constant. The Mg II velocity during this constant phase locates the inner edge of carbon burning and probes the conditions under which the transition...

  14. Ancestral feeding state of ruminants reconsidered: earliest grazing adaptation claims a mixed condition for Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azanza Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specialised leaf-eating is almost universally regarded as the ancestral state of all ruminants, yet little evidence can be cited in support of this assumption, apart from the fact that all early ruminants had low crowned cheek teeth. Instead, recent years have seen the emergence evidence contradicting the conventional view that low tooth crowns always indicate leaf-eating and high tooth crowns grass-eating. Results Here we report the results of two independent palaeodietary reconstructions for one of the earliest deer, Procervulus ginsburgi from the Early Miocene of Spain, suggesting that despite having lower tooth crowns than any living ruminant, this species included a significant proportion of grass in its diet. Conclusion The phylogenetic distribution of feeding styles strongly supports that leaf-grass mixed feeding was the original feeding style of deer, and that later dietary specialization on leaves or grass occurred independently in several lineages. Evidence for other ruminant clades suggests that facultative mixed feeding may in fact have been the primitive dietary state of the Ruminantia, which would have been morphologically expressed only under specific environmental factors.

  15. Earliest date for milk use in the Near East and southeastern Europe linked to cattle herding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evershed, Richard P; Payne, Sebastian; Sherratt, Andrew G; Copley, Mark S; Coolidge, Jennifer; Urem-Kotsu, Duska; Kotsakis, Kostas; Ozdoğan, Mehmet; Ozdoğan, Aslý E; Nieuwenhuyse, Olivier; Akkermans, Peter M M G; Bailey, Douglass; Andeescu, Radian-Romus; Campbell, Stuart; Farid, Shahina; Hodder, Ian; Yalman, Nurcan; Ozbaşaran, Mihriban; Biçakci, Erhan; Garfinkel, Yossef; Levy, Thomas; Burton, Margie M

    2008-09-25

    The domestication of cattle, sheep and goats had already taken place in the Near East by the eighth millennium bc. Although there would have been considerable economic and nutritional gains from using these animals for their milk and other products from living animals-that is, traction and wool-the first clear evidence for these appears much later, from the late fifth and fourth millennia bc. Hence, the timing and region in which milking was first practised remain unknown. Organic residues preserved in archaeological pottery have provided direct evidence for the use of milk in the fourth millennium in Britain, and in the sixth millennium in eastern Europe, based on the delta(13)C values of the major fatty acids of milk fat. Here we apply this approach to more than 2,200 pottery vessels from sites in the Near East and southeastern Europe dating from the fifth to the seventh millennia bc. We show that milk was in use by the seventh millennium; this is the earliest direct evidence to date. Milking was particularly important in northwestern Anatolia, pointing to regional differences linked with conditions more favourable to cattle compared to other regions, where sheep and goats were relatively common and milk use less important. The latter is supported by correlations between the fat type and animal bone evidence.

  16. Rise of the earliest tetrapods: an early Devonian origin from marine environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David George

    Full Text Available Tetrapod fossil tracks are known from the Middle Devonian (Eifelian at ca. 397 million years ago--MYA, and their earliest bony remains from the Upper Devonian (Frasnian at 375-385 MYA. Tetrapods are now generally considered to have colonized land during the Carboniferous (i.e., after 359 MYA, which is considered to be one of the major events in the history of life. Our analysis on tetrapod evolution was performed using molecular data consisting of 13 proteins from 17 species and different paleontological data. The analysis on the molecular data was performed with the program TreeSAAP and the results were analyzed to see if they had implications on the paleontological data collected. The results have shown that tetrapods evolved from marine environments during times of higher oxygen levels. The change in environmental conditions played a major role in their evolution. According to our analysis this evolution occurred at about 397-416 MYA during the Early Devonian unlike previously thought. This idea is supported by various environmental factors such as sea levels and oxygen rate, and biotic factors such as biodiversity of arthropods and coral reefs. The molecular data also strongly supports lungfish as tetrapod's closest living relative.

  17. Earliest ultrasound findings and description of splicing mutations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann-Scholz, Christel; Jonat, Walter; Zerres, Klaus; Ortiz-Brüchle, Nadine

    2012-10-01

    To describe early ultrasound findings in Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) in first and second trimester of three families, detailed ultrasound findings have been documented in addition to pathoanatomical findings and results of DNA studies. A splice site mutation in the MKS4 gene could be detected. Clinical management accounting risk assessment for future pregnancies is discussed and early ultrasound markers in MKS are described. All cases were examined in a tertiary center for prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound. Necroscopy confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Fetal DNA analysis was accomplished in a reference center for MKS. In addition, ultrasound findings in early pregnancy of two further cases are described. Three couples presented with pregnancies complicated by MKS. The earliest diagnosis was suspected in 11 + 6 weeks of gestation and was confirmed in 13 + 0 weeks by ultrasound revealing a large occipital encephalocele and polycystic kidneys. Another case with recurrent MKS in two consecutive pregnancies was diagnosed in 20 weeks and 14 weeks of gestation, respectively. Here a close molecular genetic follow-up was performed leading to the detection of two mutations in the MKS4 gene in both fetuses. The third case was diagnosed in 15 weeks of gestation. Ultrasound findings in all pregnancies were doubtless and autopsies confirmed the diagnosis. Detection of MKS is already possible in the first trimester. Knowledge of the underlying genetic defect helps counseling the couples with recurrence of MKS and chorionic villi sampling in the first trimester of pregnancy can be offered.

  18. Origin and timing of New Zealand's earliest domestic chickens: Polynesian commensals or European introductions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jamie R.; Herrera, Michael J. B.; Scofield, R. Paul; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    2016-08-01

    Human settlers transported chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) to most East Polynesian archipelagos between AD 1000 and 1300; however, it has long been assumed that New Zealand was an exception. Despite the fact that chicken bones have been recovered from localities of early archaeological middens in New Zealand, their age and genetic relationships have never been critically assessed. Here, we test the assumption that chickens were not introduced to New Zealand during prehistory through ancient DNA and radiocarbon analyses of chicken bones from sites of Māori middens containing prehistoric material. The chickens belong to the widespread mitochondrial control region haplogroup E. Radiocarbon dating reveals that the bones are not prehistoric, but are still the earliest chicken remains known from New Zealand. Two of the bones pre-date permanent European settlement (ca 1803s onwards) but overlap with the arrival of James Cook's second voyage (1773-1774), and, therefore, they are likely to be chickens, or progeny thereof, liberated during that voyage. Our results support the idea that chickens were first introduced to New Zealand by Europeans, and provide new insights into Māori uptake and integration of resources introduced during the early post-European period.

  19. Evaluation of antiviral activity of fractionated extracts of sage Salvia officinalis L. (Lamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šmidling Dragana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we examined cytotoxicity and extracellular and intracellular antiviral activity of frac­tionated extracts of wild and cultivated sage Salvia officinalis L. (Lamiaceae in vitro using the WISH-VSV model system. Extracts were obtained by fractionating depigmented ethanol extracts of sage plants with supercritical CO2 at different pressures. Cytotoxicity was determined by examining cellular morphology in situ with the aid of a colorimetric micromethod and by cell staining with trypan blue. The fraction of distilled cultivated sage obtained at CO2 pressure of 300 bars and temperature of 60°C (149/3 was the most cytotoxic, with CTD10 44 μg/ml. That of non-distilled cultivated sage obtained at CO2 pressure of 500 bars and temperature of 100°C (144/5 was the least toxic (CTD10 199 μg/ml. Moreover, 144/5 had an antiviral effect at the intracellular level: when added 5 hours before VSV infection, it caused 100% reduction of CPE at concentrations of 99.5 and 199.0 μg/ml; when added after virus penetration had occurred, the same concentrations caused 35 and 60% reduction, respectively. The obtained results indicate that antiviral activity of 144/5 involves inhibition of the early steps of the virus infective cycle without a direct virucidal effect. Abbreviations: WISH - human amnion epithelial cells, VSV - vesicular stomatitis virus, HSV - herpes simplex virus, CPE - cytopathic effect, IS - selectivity index, TCID50 - tissue culture infective dose, CTD10 - 10% cytotoxic concentrations.

  20. Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in Drosophila larvae and adults following oral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Aleksej L; Arnold, Pieter A; Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-12-01

    Understanding viral dynamics in arthropods is of great importance when designing models to describe how viral spread can influence arthropod populations. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia spp., which is present in up to 40% of all insect species, has the ability to alter viral dynamics in both Drosophila spp. and mosquitoes, a feature that in mosquitoes may be utilized to limit spread of important arboviruses. To understand the potential effect of Wolbachia on viral dynamics in nature, it is important to consider the impact of natural routes of virus infection on Wolbachia antiviral effects. Using adult Drosophila strains, we show here that Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that have previously been shown to confer antiviral protection following systemic viral infection also confer protection against virus-induced mortality following oral exposure to Drosophila C virus in adults. Interestingly, a different pattern was observed when the same fly lines were challenged with the virus when still larvae. Analysis of the four Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that were protective in adults indicated that only the w1118-wMelPop association conferred protection in larvae following oral delivery of the virus. Analysis of Wolbachia density using quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a high Wolbachia density was congruent with antiviral protection in both adults and larvae. This study indicates that Wolbachia-mediated protection may vary between larval and adult stages of a given Wolbachia-host combination and that the variations in susceptibility by life stage correspond with Wolbachia density. The differences in the outcome of virus infection are likely to influence viral dynamics in Wolbachia-infected insect populations in nature and could also have important implications for the transmission of arboviruses in mosquito populations.

  1. The nitric oxide pathway provides innate antiviral protection in conjunction with the type I interferon pathway in fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devangi R Mehta

    Full Text Available The innate host response to virus infection is largely dominated by the production of type I interferon and interferon stimulated genes. In particular, fibroblasts respond robustly to viral infection and to recognition of viral signatures such as dsRNA with the rapid production of type I interferon; subsequently, fibroblasts are a key cell type in antiviral protection. We recently found, however, that primary fibroblasts deficient for the production of interferon, interferon stimulated genes, and other cytokines and chemokines mount a robust antiviral response against both DNA and RNA viruses following stimulation with dsRNA. Nitric oxide is a chemical compound with pleiotropic functions; its production by phagocytes in response to interferon-γ is associated with antimicrobial activity. Here we show that in response to dsRNA, nitric oxide is rapidly produced in primary fibroblasts. In the presence of an intact interferon system, nitric oxide plays a minor but significant role in antiviral protection. However, in the absence of an interferon system, nitric oxide is critical for the protection against DNA viruses. In primary fibroblasts, NF-κB and interferon regulatory factor 1 participate in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, which subsequently produces nitric oxide. As large DNA viruses encode multiple and diverse immune modulators to disable the interferon system, it appears that the nitric oxide pathway serves as a secondary strategy to protect the host against viral infection in key cell types, such as fibroblasts, that largely rely on the type I interferon system for antiviral protection.

  2. Modulation of the antioxidant/pro-oxidant balance, cytotoxicity and antiviral actions of grape seed extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignea, Codruţa; Dorobanţu, Cristina Mihaela; Mintoff, Christopher Paul; Branza-Nichita, Norica; Ladomery, Michael R; Kefalas, Panagiotis; Chedea, Veronica Sanda

    2013-12-15

    Grape seed extracts (GSEs) were investigated in yeast cells harbouring defects in their antioxidant system (regarding the cellular growth and growth recovery from H2O2 insult). GSEs antioxidant activity was detected in wild-type and mutant strains Δcta1, Δgsh1 and Δoye2glr1, while pro-oxidant activity in Δsod1 cells was seen. Assessment of proliferation of prostate cancer PC3 and HBV-replicating HepG2 2.2.15 cells treated with GSEs has shown higher cytotoxicity of red grape seed extract (RW) than white grape seed extract (WW) subjective to dose and period of administration. No antiviral effect was detected by measuring the secreted virion particles in HepG2 2.2.15 cells treated with GSEs. The GSEs play a dual antioxidant/pro-oxidant role in vivo according with the cellular antioxidant system deficiencies and exhibit cytotoxic properties in PC3 and HepG2 2.2.15 cell lines, but no antiviral action against HBV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Amorphous polymeric binary blend pH-responsive nanoparticles for dissolution enhancement of antiviral drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep R. Naik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and optimize a nanoparticulate carrier based on polymeric blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP to enhance dissolution profile of an antiviral drug. These nanoparticles are studied by means of X-ray powder diffraction, FTIR and DSC while the morphology evaluated using SEM analysis. Drug-loaded nanoparticles were produced in spherical shape with sizes and encapsulation efficiency ranging from 322 to 434 nm and 50% to 70% respectively. The effects of different CAB/PVP ratios, concentration of drug and emulsifier on the nanoparticle size, drug encapsulation and in vitro release were studied in detail. In vitro release along with mechanism and kinetics were studied in different pHs indicating that the release of drug from nanoparticles was pH-responsive. All the nanoparticles displayed a slowed release pattern with the reduced burst release. The mechanism and kinetics of the drug delivery system was also systematically studied using various models such as zero order, first order, Higuchi model and Korsmeyer–Peppas. The results indicate that the new CAB/PVP nanoparticles have a promising potential to serve as an antiviral controlled delivery system.

  4. The Imd pathway is involved in antiviral immune responses in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Costa

    Full Text Available Cricket Paralysis virus (CrPV is a member of the Dicistroviridae family of RNA viruses, which infect a broad range of insect hosts, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila has emerged as an effective system for studying innate immunity because of its powerful genetic techniques and the high degree of gene and pathway conservation. Intra-abdominal injection of CrPV into adult flies causes a lethal infection that provides a robust assay for the identification of mutants with altered sensitivity to viral infection. To gain insight into the interactions between viruses and the innate immune system, we injected wild type flies with CrPV and observed that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs were not induced and hemocytes were depleted in the course of infection. To investigate the contribution of conserved immune signaling pathways to antiviral innate immune responses, CrPV was injected into isogenic mutants of the Immune Deficiency (Imd pathway, which resembles the mammalian Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor (TNFR pathway. Loss-of-function mutations in several Imd pathway genes displayed increased sensitivity to CrPV infection and higher CrPV loads. Our data show that antiviral innate immune responses in flies infected with CrPV depend upon hemocytes and signaling through the Imd pathway.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of the Antiviral Lectin Griffithsin Administered by Different Routes Indicates Multiple Potential Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Barton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Griffithsin (GRFT is a red alga-derived lectin with demonstrated broad spectrum antiviral activity against enveloped viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome–Coronavirus (SARS-CoV, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2. However, its pharmacokinetic profile remains largely undefined. Here, Sprague Dawley rats were administered a single dose of GRFT at 10 or 20 mg/kg by intravenous, oral, and subcutaneous routes, respectively, and serum GRFT levels were measured at select time points. In addition, the potential for systemic accumulation after oral dosing was assessed in rats after 10 daily treatments with GRFT (20 or 40 mg/kg. We found that parenterally-administered GRFT in rats displayed a complex elimination profile, which varied according to administration routes. However, GRFT was not orally bioavailable, even after chronic treatment. Nonetheless, active GRFT capable of neutralizing HIV-Env pseudoviruses was detected in rat fecal extracts after chronic oral dosing. These findings support further evaluation of GRFT for pre-exposure prophylaxis against emerging epidemics for which specific therapeutics are not available, including systemic and enteric infections caused by susceptible enveloped viruses. In addition, GRFT should be considered for antiviral therapy and the prevention of rectal transmission of HIV-1 and other susceptible viruses.

  6. Hepatitis C virus: Virology, diagnosis and management of antiviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stéphane Chevaliez; Jean-Michel Pawlotsky

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects approximately 170 million individuals worldwide. Prevention of HCV infection complications is based on antiviral therapy with the combination of pegylatecl interferon alfa and ribavirin.The use of serological and virological tests has become essential in the management of HCV infection in order to diagnose infection, guide treatment decisions and assess the virological response to antiviral therapy. Anti-HCV antibody testing and HCV RNA testing are used to diagnose acute and chronic hepatitis C. The HCV genotype should be systematically determined before treatment, as it determines the indication, the duration of treatment,the dose of ribavirin and the virological monitoring procedure. HCV RNA monitoring during therapy is used to tailor treatment duration in HCV genotype 1 infection, and molecular assays are used to assess the end-of-treatment and, most importantly the sustained virological response,i.e. the enlpoint of therapy.

  7. Antiviral Activity of Resveratrol against Human and Animal Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Abba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a potent polyphenolic compound that is being extensively studied in the amelioration of viral infections both in vitro and in vivo. Its antioxidant effect is mainly elicited through inhibition of important gene pathways like the NF-κβ pathway, while its antiviral effects are associated with inhibitions of viral replication, protein synthesis, gene expression, and nucleic acid synthesis. Although the beneficial roles of resveratrol in several viral diseases have been well documented, a few adverse effects have been reported as well. This review highlights the antiviral mechanisms of resveratrol in human and animal viral infections and how some of these effects are associated with the antioxidant properties of the compound.

  8. Historical Perspectives in the Development of Antiviral Agents Against Poxviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik De Clercq

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The poxvirus vaccinia virus (VV served as the model virus for which the first antivirals, the thiosemicarbazones, were identified. This dates back to 1950; and, although there is at present no single antiviral drug specifically licensed for the chemotherapy or -prophylaxis of poxvirus infections, numerous candidate compounds have been described over the past 50 years. These compounds include interferon and inducers thereof (i.e., polyacrylic acid, 5-substituted 2’-deoxyuridines (i.e., idoxuridine, IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors, acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (such as cidofovir and alkoxyalkyl prodrugs thereof (such as CMX001, viral egress inhibitors (such as tecovirimat, and cellular kinase inhibitors (such as imatinib.

  9. Antiviral Effect of Matrine against Human Enterovirus 71

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangning Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Human enterovirus 71, a member of the Picornaviridae family, is one of the major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease in children less than six years old. This illness has caused mortalities in large-scale outbreaks in the Asia-Pacific region in recent years. No vaccine or antiviral therapy is available. In this study, antiviral effect of matrine against enterovirus 71 were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Matrine could suppress the viral RNA copy number on rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Moreover, matrine treatment of mice challenged with a lethal dose of enterovirus 71 reduced the mortality and relieved clinical symptoms. The results showed that matrine may represent a potential therapeutic agent for enterovirus 71 infection.

  10. 5th Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Wade; Perros, Manos

    2004-08-01

    The 5th Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Summit provided an up-to-date snapshot of the ongoing developments in the area. The topics covered ranged from updates on recently launched drugs (Kaletra), Fuzeon) and new investigational inhibitors (T-1249, Reverset, UK-427857, L-870810, PA-457, remofovir, VX-950), to the discovery of new antiviral targets and advances in technologies that may provide the substrate for the next generation of therapeutics. It is apparent from the range of presentations that much of today's efforts are focused on developing new classes of HIV inhibitors (gp41, integrase), while there is also considerable progress in hepatitis C, where a number of inhibitors have or should reach proof-of-concept studies in the coming months. Here we provide the highlights of this meeting, with particular emphasis on the new developments in HIV and hepatitis C virus.

  11. Genetic Consequences of Antiviral Therapy on HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Arenas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of enzyme inhibitors have been developed in combating HIV-1, however the fast evolutionary rate of this virus commonly leads to the emergence of resistance mutations that finally allows the mutant virus to survive. This review explores the main genetic consequences of HIV-1 molecular evolution during antiviral therapies, including the viral genetic diversity and molecular adaptation. The role of recombination in the generation of drug resistance is also analyzed. Besides the investigation and discussion of published works, an evolutionary analysis of protease-coding genes collected from patients before and after treatment with different protease inhibitors was included to validate previous studies. Finally, the review discusses the importance of considering genetic consequences of antiviral therapies in models of HIV-1 evolution that could improve current genotypic resistance testing and treatments design.

  12. Senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana M; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A T; Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J; Lavin, Martin F; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) has been linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here we identified a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells that had undergone depletion of SETX and SETX-deficient cells derived from patients with AOA2 had higher expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection than did wild-type cells. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at genes stimulated after a virus is sensed and thus controls the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of various RNA viruses (e.g., influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link among inborn errors in SETX, susceptibility to infection and the development of neurologic disorders.

  13. The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 in antiviral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andreasen, Susanne Ørding

    2002-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor CCR5 is an important coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and there is a major thrust to develop anti-CCR5-based therapies for HIV-1. However, it is not known whether CCR5 is critical for a normal antiviral T-cell response. This study investigated the immune...... response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking CCR5 (CCR5(-/-) mice). This infection is a classical model for studying antiviral immunity, and influx of CCR5-expressing CD8(+) T cells and macrophages is essential for both virus control and associated immunopathology. Results showed...... influence of CCR5 was found, not even when viral peptide was used as local trigger instead of live virus. Finally, long-term CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune surveillance was efficiently sustained in CCR5(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results indicate that expression of CCR5 is not critical for T cell...

  14. Direct versus sequential immunoglobulin switch in allergy and antiviral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirshchevskaya, E; Fattakhova, G; Khlgatian, S; Chudakov, D; Kashirina, E; Ryazantsev, D; Kotsareva, O; Zavriev, S

    2016-09-01

    Allergy is characterized by IgE production to innocuous antigens. The question whether the switch to IgE synthesis occurs via direct or sequential pathways is still unresolved. The aim of this work was to analyze the distribution of immunoglobulins (Ig) to house dust mite D. farinae and A. alternata fungus in allergic children with primarily established diagnosis and compare it to Epstein-Barr antiviral (EBV) response in the same patients. In allergy patients the only significant difference was found in allergen specific IgE, likely mediated by a direct isotype switch, while antiviral response was dominated by EBV specific IgG and low level of concordant IgA and IgG4 production consistent with a minor sequential Ig switches. Taken collectively, we concluded that sequential isotype switch is likely to be a much rarer event than a direct one.

  15. Antiviral therapy for hepatitis B virus associated hepatic failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Ming Wang; Ying-Zi Tang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major global health issue, and the prognosis of patients with HBV-associated fulminant hepatic failure is extremely poor. The application of antiviral therapies has led to signiifcant improvements in patient outcomes. This article aimed to review the current strategies in antiviral treatment of HBV-associated fulminant hepatic failure. DATA SOURCES: Literature search was conducted using PubMed on the related subjects. Part of the data was from the most recent work of the authors' laboratory. RESULTS: Hepatitis B immunoglobulin in prevention of recurrent HBV infection after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has been proven effective. However, its cost is high, and signiifcant side effects have been found to induce viral mutations. Lamivudine has a potent suppression for HBV replication and an excellent safety proifle in decompensated cirrhotic patients, but its major drawback is the high rate of drug-resistance. Adefovir is effective for lamivudine-resistance strains in the post-OLT situation, and its drug-resistance rate is relatively low. Combination therapies such as hepatitis B immunoglobulin combined with lamivudine and lamivudine combined with adefovir have been widely adopted for prophylaxis against HBV recurrence of infection after OLT. Entecavir, telbivudine, tenofovir and other newer agents have been widely used in antiviral therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The prognosis of HBV-associated ful-minant hepatic failure is being transformed by developments in antiviral therapy. However, it should be noticed that HBV is controlled but never eliminated, and drug-resistance still remains a major issue. Hopefully, newer strategies may help to solve these problems.

  16. Antiviral Effect of Methylated Flavonol Isorhamnetin against Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Abdal Dayem; Hye Yeon Choi; Young Bong Kim; Ssang-Goo Cho

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is an infectious respiratory disease with frequent seasonal epidemics that causes a high rate of mortality and morbidity in humans, poultry, and animals. Influenza is a serious economic concern due to the costly countermeasures it necessitates. In this study, we compared the antiviral activities of several flavonols and other flavonoids with similar, but distinct, hydroxyl or methyl substitution patterns at the 3, 3', and 4' positions of the 15-carbon flavonoid skeleton, and found t...

  17. Phosprenyl: a novel drug with antiviral and immunomodulatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, L L; Maltsev, S D; Deyeva, A V; Narovlyansky, A N; Sanin, A V; Ozherelkov, S V; Pronin, A V

    1996-01-01

    A novel antiviral drug with immunomodulatory activity (Phosprenyl) is presented. The main active ingredient of the preparation is polyprenyl phosphates. This medicine is highly efficient against a number of viruses, including HIV in vitro, and tick-borne encephalitis and rabies viruses in the experimental models in vivo. In veterinary practice Phosprenyl is now regarded as an effective therapeutic means for treatment of canine distemper, hepatitis, enteritis, etc.

  18. Structure and antiviral activity of sulfated fucans from Stoechospermum marginatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Utpal; Mateu, Cecilia G; Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Pujol, Carlos A; Damonte, Elsa B; Ray, Bimalendu

    2006-11-01

    A sulfated fucan containing fraction (SmWE) was isolated from water extract of the brown seaweed Stoechospermum marginatum collected from the Arabian Sea. Anion exchange chromatography of the crude fraction results in the production of a sulfated fucan (F3) having a molecular mass of 40 kDa and specific rotation [alpha]D(30) - 124 degrees (c 0.5, H2O). NMR spectroscopic studies and methylation analysis suggested that the polymer consists of a backbone of (1-->4)- and (1-->3)-linked-alpha-L-fucopyranosyl residues that are substituted at C-2 and C-3, and that fucosyl residues are sulfated mostly at C-2 and/or C-4. SmWE and F3 were selective inhibitors of herpes simplex virus type 1 (strain F, thymidine kinase-deficient strains field and B2006 and syncytial variants arising after selection with a natural carrageenan syn 13-8 and 14-1) and type 2 (strain MS) in Vero cells, with antiviral effective concentration 50% (EC50) values in the range 0.63-10.0 microg/ml. The compounds were highly selective due to the lack of cytotoxicity. The antiviral activity was dependent on the presence of the sulfated fucans during the adsorption period. No direct inactivating effect on virions was observed in a virucidal assay. The absence of anticoagulant activity at concentrations near EC50 confirmed that there was no correlation between the antiviral and anticoagulant properties.

  19. Anti-viral RNA silencing: do we look like plants ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecellier Charles-Henri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anti-viral function of RNA silencing was first discovered in plants as a natural manifestation of the artificial 'co-suppression', which refers to the extinction of endogenous gene induced by homologous transgene. Because silencing components are conserved among most, if not all, eukaryotes, the question rapidly arose as to determine whether this process fulfils anti-viral functions in animals, such as insects and mammals. It appears that, whereas the anti-viral process seems to be similarly conserved from plants to insects, even in worms, RNA silencing does influence the replication of mammalian viruses but in a particular mode: micro(miRNAs, endogenous small RNAs naturally implicated in translational control, rather than virus-derived small interfering (siRNAs like in other organisms, are involved. In fact, these recent studies even suggest that RNA silencing may be beneficial for viral replication. Accordingly, several large DNA mammalian viruses have been shown to encode their own miRNAs. Here, we summarize the seminal studies that have implicated RNA silencing in viral infection and compare the different eukaryotic responses.

  20. Antioxidants: potential antiviral agents for Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zehua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Zongtao; Tian, Yanping

    2014-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is prevalent throughout eastern and southern Asia and the Pacific Rim. It is caused by the JE virus (JEV), which belongs to the family Flaviviridae. Despite the importance of JE, little is known about its pathogenesis. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of viral infections has led to increased interest in its role in JEV infections. This review focuses mainly on the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of JEV infection and the antiviral effect of antioxidant agents in inhibiting JEV production. First, this review summarizes the pathogenesis of JE. The pathological changes include neuronal death, astrocyte activation, and microglial proliferation. Second, the relationship between oxidative stress and JEV infection is explored. JEV infection induces the generation of oxidants and exhausts the supply of antioxidants, which activates specific signaling pathways. Finally, the therapeutic efficacy of a variety of antioxidants as antiviral agents, including minocycline, arctigenin, fenofibrate, and curcumin, was studied. In conclusion, antioxidants are likely to be developed into antiviral agents for the treatment of JE. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Antiviral Effect of Interferon Lambda Against Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacikova, Lubomira; Oveckova, Ingrid; Betakova, Tatiana; Laposova, Katarina; Polcicova, Katarina; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir; Tomaskova, Jana

    2015-07-01

    Lambda interferons inhibit replication of many viruses, but their role in the inhibition of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection remains unclear. In this study, we examined the antiviral effects of interferon (IFN)-λ2 and IFN-λ3 against LCMV in A549 cells. We found that IFN-λ2 is a more potent inhibitor of LCMV strain MX compared with IFN-λ3, whereas both cytokines have similar antiviral effects against an immunosuppressive variant of LCMV, clone-13. We also demonstrated that the antiviral activity of IFN-λ2 is more effective if it is delivered early rather than after establishment of a long-term infection, suggesting that virus replication is only partially responsive to the cytokine. In agreement with this observation, we showed that LCMV infection significantly reduces IFNLR1 mRNA expression in infected cells. In addition, LCMV infection, to some extent, compromises the signal transduction pathway of IFN-λ2. This implies that IFN receptors as well as their downstream signaling components could be selectively targeted either directly by LCMV proteins or indirectly by cellular factor(s) that are induced or activated by LCMV infection.

  2. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on feline calicivirus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Liu, Jiasen; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2015-12-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a highly contagious pathogen that causes oral and upper respiratory tract disease in cats. Despite widespread vaccination, the prevalence of FCV remains high. Furthermore, a high gene mutation rate has led to the emergence of variants, and some infections are lethal. To date, there is no effective antiviral drug available for treating FCV infection. Here, we show that lithium chloride (LiCl) effectively suppresses the replication of FCV strain F9 in Crandell-Reese feline kidney (CRFK) cells. The antiviral activity of LiCl occurred primarily during the early stage of infection and in a dose-dependent manner. LiCl treatment also inhibited the cytopathic effect. LiCl treatment exhibited a strong inhibitory effect against a panel of other two reference strains and two recent FCV isolates from China. These results demonstrate that LiCl might be an effective anti-FCV drug for controlling FCV disease. Further studies are required to explore the antiviral activity of LiCl against FCV replication in vivo.

  3. In vitro antiviral effect of germacrone on feline calicivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongxia; Liu, Yongxiang; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-06-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) often causes respiratory tract and oral disease in cats and is a highly contagious virus. Widespread vaccination does not prevent the spread of FCV. Furthermore, the low fidelity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of FCV leads to the emergence of new variants, some of which show increased virulence. Currently, few effective anti-FCV drugs are available. Here, we found that germacrone, one of the main constituents of volatile oil from rhizoma curcuma, was able to effectively reduce the growth of FCV strain F9 in vitro. This compound exhibited a strong anti-FCV effect mainly in the early phase of the viral life cycle. The antiviral effect depended on the concentration of the drug. In addition, germacrone treatment had a significant inhibitory effect against two other reference strains, 2280 and Bolin, and resulted in a significant reduction in the replication of strains WZ-1 and HRB-SS, which were recently isolated in China. This is the first report of antiviral effects of germacrone against a calicivirus, and extensive in vivo research is needed to evaluate this drug as an antiviral therapeutic agent for FCV.

  4. Polar profile of antiviral peptides from AVPpred Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Diseases of viral origin in humans are among the most serious threats to health and the global economy. As recent history has shown the virus has a high pandemic potential, among other reasons, due to its ability to spread by air, hence the identification, investigation, containment, and treatment of viral diseases should be considered of paramount importance. In this sense, the bioinformatics research has focused on finding fast and efficient algorithms that can identify highly toxic antiviral peptides and to serve as a first filter, so that trials in the laboratory are substantially reduced. The work presented here contributes to this effort through the use of an algorithm already published by this team, called polarity index method, which identifies with high efficiency antiviral peptides from the exhaustive analysis of the polar profile, using the linear sequence of the peptide. The test carried out included all peptides in APD2 Database and 60 antiviral peptides identified by Kumar and co-workers (Nucleic Acids Res 40:W199-204, 2012), to build its AVPpred algorithm. The validity of the method was focused on its discriminating capacity so we included the 15 sub-classifications of both Databases.

  5. Antiviral activity of lanatoside C against dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yan Yi; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Chen, Huixin; Seng, Eng Khuan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-11-01

    Dengue infection poses a serious threat globally due to its recent rapid spread and rise in incidence. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or effective antiviral drug for dengue virus infection. In response to the urgent need for the development of an effective antiviral for dengue virus, the US Drug Collection library was screened in this study to identify compounds with anti-dengue activities. Lanatoside C, an FDA approved cardiac glycoside was identified as a candidate anti-dengue compound. Our data revealed that lanatoside C has an IC50 of 0.19μM for dengue virus infection in HuH-7 cells. Dose-dependent reduction in dengue viral RNA and viral proteins synthesis were also observed upon treatment with increasing concentrations of lanatoside C. Time of addition study indicated that lanatoside C inhibits the early processes of the dengue virus replication cycle. Furthermore, lanatoside C can effectively inhibit all four serotypes of dengue virus, flavivirus Kunjin, alphavirus Chikungunya and Sindbis virus as well as the human enterovirus 71. These findings suggest that lanatoside C possesses broad spectrum antiviral activity against several groups of positive-sense RNA viruses.

  6. Antiviral and antimicrobial assessment of some selected flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Berrin; Orhan, Ilkay; Toker, Gülnur

    2006-01-01

    In the current study, the results of antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activity tests of four flavonoid derivatives, scandenone (1), tiliroside (2), quercetin-3,7-O-alpha-L-dirhamnoside (3), and kaempferol-3,7-O-alpha-L-dirhamnoside (4), are presented. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these compounds were tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Enterococcus faecalis, as well as the fungus Candida albicans by a micro-dilution method. On the other hand, both DNA virus Herpes simplex (HSV) and RNA virus Parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) were employed for antiviral assessment of the compounds using Madin-Darby bovine kidney and Vero cell lines. According to our data, all of the compounds tested were found to be quite active against S. aureus and E. faecalis with MIC values of 0.5 microg/ml, followed by E. coli (2 microg/ml), K. pneumoniae (4 microg/ml), A. baumannii (8 micro/g/ml), and B. subtilis (8 microg/ml), while they inhibited C. albicans at 1 microg/ml as potent as ketoconazole. However, only compound 3 displayed an antiviral effect towards PI-3 in the range of 8-32 microg/ml of inhibitory concentration for cytopathogenic effect (CPE).

  7. Antiviral effect of cidofovir on parvovirus B19 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvicini, Francesca; Bua, Gloria; Manaresi, Elisabetta; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a human ssDNA virus responsible for a wide range of clinical manifestations, still lacking for a specific antiviral therapy. The identification of compounds active against B19V may add therapeutic options to the treatment of B19V infections, that now entirely relies on symptomatic treatments. In the search for compounds possibly inhibiting B19V replication, a particular focus was raised to cidofovir, an acyclic nucleoside phosphonate broadly active against dsDNA viruses. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of cidofovir against B19V in two model systems, the UT7/EpoS1 cell line and erythroid progenitor cells (EPC), generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Experiments were carried out at different multiplicity of infections and cidofovir concentrations (0-500 μM) during a course of infection. The effects of cidofovir on B19V replication were assessed by qPCR assays while influence of cidofovir on host cells was measured by cell proliferation and viability assays. Our findings demonstrated that cidofovir has a relevant inhibiting activity on B19V replication within infected UT7/EpoS1, and that the effect on B19V DNA amounts is dose-dependent allowing for the determination of EC50 and EC90 values (7.45-41.27 μM, and 84.73-360.7 μM, respectively). In EPCs, that constitute a cellular population close to the natural target cells in bone marrow, the inhibitory effect was demonstrated to a lesser extent, however provoking a significant reduction on B19V DNA amounts at 500 μM (68.2-92.8%). To test infectivity of virus released from EPCs cultured in the presence of cidofovir, cell culture supernatants were used as inoculum for a further course of infection in UT7/EpoS1 cells, indicating a significant reduction in viral infectivity at 500 μM cidofovir. Since the drug did not interfere with the overall cellular DNA synthesis and metabolic activity, the observed effect of cidofovir could be likely related to a specific

  8. Development of Systems for Delivery of Antiviral Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-31

    half-life of over twenty hours. In pH 7 buffer (ammonium dihydrogen phosphate ), however, the half-life for 1 was only about an hour. We have sent nine...solutions were also unstable. In a single experiment the stability of the reduced form of the prodrug in methanol and its instability in the HPLC buffer were...confirmed by analyzing aliquots of these solutions periodically for 24 hr. The half-life of the prodrug in the buffer at 50 was less than one hour

  9. Origin and age of the earliest Martian crust from meteorite NWA 7533.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, M; Nemchin, A; Zanda, B; Hewins, R H; Grange, M; Kennedy, A; Lorand, J-P; Göpel, C; Fieni, C; Pont, S; Deldicque, D

    2013-11-28

    The ancient cratered terrain of the southern highlands of Mars is thought to hold clues to the planet's early differentiation, but until now no meteoritic regolith breccias have been recovered from Mars. Here we show that the meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 7533 (paired with meteorite NWA 7034) is a polymict breccia consisting of a fine-grained interclast matrix containing clasts of igneous-textured rocks and fine-grained clast-laden impact melt rocks. High abundances of meteoritic siderophiles (for example nickel and iridium) found throughout the rock reach a level in the fine-grained portions equivalent to 5 per cent CI chondritic input, which is comparable to the highest levels found in lunar breccias. Furthermore, analyses of three leucocratic monzonite clasts show a correlation between nickel, iridium and magnesium consistent with differentiation from impact melts. Compositionally, all the fine-grained material is alkalic basalt, chemically identical (except for sulphur, chlorine and zinc) to soils from Gusev crater. Thus, we propose that NWA 7533 is a Martian regolith breccia. It contains zircons for which we measured an age of 4,428 ± 25 million years, which were later disturbed 1,712 ± 85 million years ago. This evidence for early crustal differentiation implies that the Martian crust, and its volatile inventory, formed in about the first 100 million years of Martian history, coeval with earliest crust formation on the Moon and the Earth. In addition, incompatible element abundances in clast-laden impact melt rocks and interclast matrix provide a geochemical estimate of the average thickness of the Martian crust (50 kilometres) comparable to that estimated geophysically.

  10. THE EARLIEST NEAR-INFRARED TIME-SERIES SPECTROSCOPY OF A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, N.; Contreras, C.; Roth, M. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Burns, C. R.; Freedman, W. L.; Persson, S. E. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Winge, C. [Gemini South Observatory, c/o AURA Inc., Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Kromer, M.; Gall, E. E. E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Gerardy, C. L.; Hoeflich, P. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Im, M.; Jeon, Y. [CEOU/Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nugent, P. E. [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94611 (United States); Pignata, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Stanishev, V., E-mail: hsiao@lco.cl [CENTRA - Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); and others

    2013-04-01

    We present ten medium-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio near-infrared (NIR) spectra of SN 2011fe from SpeX on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph (GNIRS) on Gemini North, obtained as part of the Carnegie Supernova Project. This data set constitutes the earliest time-series NIR spectroscopy of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), with the first spectrum obtained at 2.58 days past the explosion and covering -14.6 to +17.3 days relative to B-band maximum. C I {lambda}1.0693 {mu}m is detected in SN 2011fe with increasing strength up to maximum light. The delay in the onset of the NIR C I line demonstrates its potential to be an effective tracer of unprocessed material. For the first time in a SN Ia, the early rapid decline of the Mg II {lambda}1.0927 {mu}m velocity was observed, and the subsequent velocity is remarkably constant. The Mg II velocity during this constant phase locates the inner edge of carbon burning and probes the conditions under which the transition from deflagration to detonation occurs. We show that the Mg II velocity does not correlate with the optical light-curve decline rate {Delta}m{sub 15}(B). The prominent break at {approx}1.5 {mu}m is the main source of concern for NIR k-correction calculations. We demonstrate here that the feature has a uniform time evolution among SNe Ia, with the flux ratio across the break strongly correlated with {Delta}m{sub 15}(B). The predictability of the strength and the onset of this feature suggests that the associated k-correction uncertainties can be minimized with improved spectral templates.

  11. Stable Isotopes and Zooarchaeology at Teotihuacan, Mexico Reveal Earliest Evidence of Wild Carnivore Management in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Nawa; Somerville, Andrew D; Schoeninger, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    From Roman gladiatorial combat to Egyptian animal mummies, the capture and manipulation of carnivores was instrumental in helping to shape social hierarchies throughout the ancient world. This paper investigates the historical inflection point when humans began to control animals not only as alimental resources but as ritual symbols and social actors in the New World. At Teotihuacan (A.D. 1-550), one of the largest pre-Hispanic cities, animal remains were integral components of ritual caches expressing state ideology and militarism during the construction of the Moon and the Sun Pyramids. The caches contain the remains of nearly 200 carnivorous animals, human sacrificial victims and other symbolic artifacts. This paper argues the presence of skeletal pathologies of infectious disease and injuries manifest on the carnivore remains show direct evidence of captivity. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N) of bones and teeth confirms that some of these carnivores were consuming high levels of C4 foods, likely reflecting a maize-based anthropocentric food chain. These results push back the antiquity of keeping captive carnivores for ritualistic purposes nearly 1000 years before the Spanish conquistadors described Moctezuma's zoo at the Aztec capital. Mirroring these documents the results indicate a select group of carnivores at Teotihuacan may have been fed maize-eating omnivores, such as dogs and humans. Unlike historical records, the present study provides the earliest and direct archaeological evidence for this practice in Mesoamerica. It also represents the first systematic isotopic exploration of a population of archaeological eagles (n = 24) and felids (n = 29).

  12. Stable Isotopes and Zooarchaeology at Teotihuacan, Mexico Reveal Earliest Evidence of Wild Carnivore Management in Mesoamerica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawa Sugiyama

    Full Text Available From Roman gladiatorial combat to Egyptian animal mummies, the capture and manipulation of carnivores was instrumental in helping to shape social hierarchies throughout the ancient world. This paper investigates the historical inflection point when humans began to control animals not only as alimental resources but as ritual symbols and social actors in the New World. At Teotihuacan (A.D. 1-550, one of the largest pre-Hispanic cities, animal remains were integral components of ritual caches expressing state ideology and militarism during the construction of the Moon and the Sun Pyramids. The caches contain the remains of nearly 200 carnivorous animals, human sacrificial victims and other symbolic artifacts. This paper argues the presence of skeletal pathologies of infectious disease and injuries manifest on the carnivore remains show direct evidence of captivity. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N of bones and teeth confirms that some of these carnivores were consuming high levels of C4 foods, likely reflecting a maize-based anthropocentric food chain. These results push back the antiquity of keeping captive carnivores for ritualistic purposes nearly 1000 years before the Spanish conquistadors described Moctezuma's zoo at the Aztec capital. Mirroring these documents the results indicate a select group of carnivores at Teotihuacan may have been fed maize-eating omnivores, such as dogs and humans. Unlike historical records, the present study provides the earliest and direct archaeological evidence for this practice in Mesoamerica. It also represents the first systematic isotopic exploration of a population of archaeological eagles (n = 24 and felids (n = 29.

  13. Assessing the duration and possible causes of the earliest Toarcian carbon isotopic excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Bodin, Stéphane; Suan, Guillaume; Kabiri, Lahcen; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    The early Toarcian stage (Early Jurassic) records two short-lived events of major faunal turnover and environmental perturbation. The first event (eT-E) occurs during the earliest Toarcian (early Polymorphum chronozone) and has been documented only in a few sites worldwide. The second event, better known as the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) has been documented in numerous sites from Northern Siberia to Argentina. Both events are marked by negative carbon isotope excursions (CIE) recorded in carbonate and organic substrate. Therefore they are thought to be associated with major changes in carbon cycling. Similarities between the eT-E and the T-OAE thus lead to the conclusion that these events might have been triggered by similar mechanisms. If this is the case, the CIEs associated with both events should have a comparable duration. In order to valid or falsify this hypothesis, it is therefore crucial to constrain the duration of both events. The duration of the T-OAE CIE was assessed in several papers by cyclostratigraphic analyses thanks to favourable outcropping condition. It is however not the case for the eT-E CIE, this latter being often associated with sedimentary condensation or hiatal surfaces. We make use of the high palaeo-subsidence rates of the Lower Toarcian Moroccan shelf leading to extended sections in the High Atlas Basin. The Foum Tillicht section was sampled in increments of 20 cm across a stratigraphic interval of 50 m, covering the Polymorphum chronozone. Carbon and oxygen isotopes analyses were performed on micritic and organic matter. Ammonites and nannofossils biostratigraphy aided in calibrating geochemical analyses. Carbon isotopes data display a rhythmic pattern. Preliminary results indicate that the eT-E negative carbon isotope excursion lasted around 400 kyr.

  14. Lapa vermelha IV Hominid 1: morphological affinities of the earliest known American

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies concerning the extra-continental morphological affinities of Paleo-Indian skeletons, carried out independently in South and North America, have indicated that the Americas were first occupied by non-Mongoloids that made their way to the New World through the Bering Strait in ancient times. The first South Americans show a clear resemblance to modern South Pacific and African populations, while the first North Americans seem to be at an unresolved morphological position between modern South Pacific and Europeans. In none of these analyses the first Americans show any resemblance to either northeast Asians or modern native Americans. So far, these studies have included affirmed and putative early skeletons thought to date between 8,000 and 10,000 years B.P. In this work the extra-continental morphological affinities of a Paleo-Indian skeleton well dated between 11,000 and 11,500 years B.P. (Lapa Vermelha IV Hominid 1, or "Luzia" is investigated, using as comparative samples Howells' (1989 world-wide modern series and Habgood's (1985 Old World Late Pleistocene fossil hominids. The comparison between Lapa Vermelha IV Hominid 1 and Howells' series was based on canonical variate analysis, including 45 size-corrected craniometric variables, while the comparison with fossil hominids was based on principal component analysis, including 16 size-corrected variables. In the first case, Lapa Vermelha IV Hominid 1 exhibited an undisputed morphological affinity firstly with Africans and secondly with South Pacific populations. In the second comparison, the earliest known American skeleton had its closest similarities with early Australians, Zhoukoudian Upper Cave 103, and Taforalt 18. The results obtained clearly confirm the idea that the Americas were first colonized by a generalized Homo sapiens population which inhabited East Asia in the Late Pleistocene, before the definition of the classic Mongoloid morphology.

  15. Evaluating the earliest traces of Archean sub-seafloor life by NanoSIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcloughlin, N.; Grosch, E. G.; Kilburn, M.; Wacey, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Paleoarchean sub-seafloor has been proposed as an environment for the emergence of life with titanite microtextures in pillow lavas argued to be the earliest traces of microbial micro-tunneling (Furnes et al. 2004). Here we use a nano-scale ion microprobe (NanoSIMS) to evaluate possible geochemical traces of life in 3.45 Ga pillow lavas of the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. We investigated both surface and drill core samples from the original "Biomarker" outcrop in the Hooggenoeg Fm. Pillow lava metavolcanic glass contain clusters of segmented microcrystalline titanite filaments, ~4μm across and inclusions in the microtextures have strongly depleted δ34SVCDT values of -39.8 to +3.2‰ (n= 32). The magnitude, range and spatial heterogeneity of these δ34S values are consistent with an early microbial origin (McLoughlin et al. 2012). In contrast, sulfides cross-cutting the microtextures related to later veining have positive δ34S of +6.7 to +18.0‰ (n=20). These data can be compared to magmatic sulfides (δ34S = +3±3‰), Archean seawater (δ34S ca. +5‰) and Archean sedimentary sulfides (δ34S = +8 to -23‰). We propose that the Hooggenoeg sulfides probably formed during early fluid-rock-microbe interaction involving sulfate-reducing microbes (c.f. Rouxel et al. 2008). The pillow lavas were then metamorphosed, the glass transformed to a greenschist facies assemblage and titanite growth encapsulated the microbial sulfides. In summary, the extreme sulfur isotope fractionations reported here independently point towards the potential involvement of microbes in the alteration of Archean volcanic glass. In situ sulfur isotope analysis of basalt-hosted sulfides may provide an alternative approach to investigating the existence of an Archean sub-seafloor biosphere that does not require the mineralization of early microbial microborings with organic linings.

  16. Protein structural and surface water rearrangement constitute major events in the earliest aggregation stages of tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Anna; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kinnebrew, Maia; Lew, John; Dahlquist, Frederick W.; Han, Songi

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and the mechanism of its progression is poorly understood. Here, we examine the structural and dynamic characteristics of transiently evolving protein aggregates under ambient conditions by directly probing protein surface water diffusivity, local protein segment dynamics, and interprotein packing as a function of aggregation time, along the third repeat domain and C terminus of Δtau187 spanning residues 255–441 of the longest isoform of human tau. These measurements were achieved with a set of highly sensitive magnetic resonance tools that rely on site-specific electron spin labeling of Δtau187. Within minutes of initiated aggregation, the majority of Δtau187 that is initially homogeneously hydrated undergoes structural transformations to form partially structured aggregation intermediates. This is reflected in the dispersion of surface water dynamics that is distinct around the third repeat domain, found to be embedded in an intertau interface, from that of the solvent-exposed C terminus. Over the course of hours and in a rate-limiting process, a majority of these aggregation intermediates proceed to convert into stable β-sheet structured species and maintain their stacking order without exchanging their subunits. The population of β-sheet structured species is >5% within 5 min of aggregation and gradually grows to 50–70% within the early stages of fibril formation, while they mostly anneal block-wisely to form elongated fibrils. Our findings suggest that the formation of dynamic aggregation intermediates constitutes a major event occurring in the earliest stages of tau aggregation that precedes, and likely facilitates, fibril formation and growth. PMID:26712030

  17. Plant mitochondrial genome peculiarities evolving in the earliest vascular plant lineages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Volker KNOOP

    2013-01-01

    In plants,the mitochondrial DNA has evolved in peculiar ways.Simple circular mitochondrial genomes found in most other eukaryotic lineages have expanded tremendously in size.Mitochondrial DNAs in some flowering plants may in fact be larger than genomes of free-living bacteria.Introns,retrotransposons,pseudogene fragments,and promiscuous DNA copied from the chloroplast or nuclear genome contribute to the size expansion but most intergenic DNA remains unaccounted for so far.Additionally,frequent recombination results in heterogeneous pools of coexisting,subgenomic mtDNA molecules in angiosperms.In contrast,the mitochondrial DNAs of bryophytes,the extant representatives of very early splits in plant phylogeny,are more conservative in structural evolution and seem to be devoid of active recombination.However,whereas mitochondrial introns are highly conserved among seed plants (spermatophytes),not a single one of more than 80 different introns in bryophyte mtDNAs is conserved among the three divisions,liverworts,mosses,and hornworts.Lycophytes are now unequivocally identified as living representatives of the earliest vascular plant branch in a crucial phylogenetic position between bryophytes and later diversifying tracheophytes including spermatophytes.Very recently,mtDNAs have become available for the three orders of extant lycophytes-Isoetales,Selaginellales,and Lycopodiales.As I will discuss here,the lycophyte mtDNAs not only show a surprising diversity of features but also previously unseen novelties of plant mitochondrial DNA evolution.The transition from a gametophyte-dominated bryophyte lifestyle to a sporophytedominated vascular plant lifestyle apparently gave rise to several peculiar independent changes in plant chondrome evolution.

  18. The earliest evidence for Upper Paleolithic occupation in the Armenian Highlands at Aghitu-3 Cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Andrew W; Gasparyan, Boris; Allué, Ethel; Bigga, Gerlinde; Bruch, Angela A; Cullen, Victoria L; Frahm, Ellery; Ghukasyan, Robert; Gruwier, Ben; Jabbour, Firas; Miller, Christopher E; Taller, Andreas; Vardazaryan, Varduhi; Vasilyan, Davit; Weissbrod, Lior

    2017-09-01

    With its well-preserved archaeological and environmental records, Aghitu-3 Cave permits us to examine the settlement patterns of the Upper Paleolithic (UP) people who inhabited the Armenian Highlands. We also test whether settlement of the region between ∼39-24,000 cal BP relates to environmental variability. The earliest evidence occurs in archaeological horizon (AH) VII from ∼39-36,000 cal BP during a mild, moist climatic phase. AH VI shows periodic occupation as warm, humid conditions prevailed from ∼36-32,000 cal BP. As the climate becomes cooler and drier at ∼32-29,000 cal BP (AH V-IV), evidence for occupation is minimal. However, as cooling continues, the deposits of AH III demonstrate that people used the site more intensively from ∼29-24,000 cal BP, leaving behind numerous stone artifacts, faunal remains, and complex combustion features. Despite the climatic fluctuations seen across this 15,000-year sequence, lithic technology remains attuned to one pattern: unidirectional reduction of small cores geared towards the production of bladelets for tool manufacture. Subsistence patterns also remain stable, focused on medium-sized prey such as ovids and caprids, as well as equids. AH III demonstrates an expansion of social networks to the northwest and southwest, as the transport distance of obsidian used to make stone artifacts increases. We also observe the addition of bone tools, including an eyed needle, and shell beads brought from the east, suggesting that these people manufactured complex clothing and wore ornaments. Remains of micromammals, birds, charcoal, pollen, and tephra relate the story of environmental variability. We hypothesize that UP behavior was linked to shifts in demographic pressures and climatic changes. Thus, by combining archaeological and environmental data, we gain a clearer picture about the first UP inhabitants of the Armenian Highlands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Late Paleocene fossils from the Cerrejon Formation, Colombia, are the earliest record of Neotropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Scott L; Herrera, Fabiany; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Gómez-Navarro, Carolina; Wilf, Peter; Labandeira, Conrad C

    2009-11-03

    Neotropical rainforests have a very poor fossil record, making hypotheses concerning their origins difficult to evaluate. Nevertheless, some of their most important characteristics can be preserved in the fossil record: high plant diversity, dominance by a distinctive combination of angiosperm families, a preponderance of plant species with large, smooth-margined leaves, and evidence for a high diversity of herbivorous insects. Here, we report on an approximately 58-my-old flora from the Cerrejón Formation of Colombia (paleolatitude approximately 5 degrees N) that is the earliest megafossil record of Neotropical rainforest. The flora has abundant, diverse palms and legumes and similar family composition to extant Neotropical rainforest. Three-quarters of the leaf types are large and entire-margined, indicating rainfall >2,500 mm/year and mean annual temperature >25 degrees C. Despite modern family composition and tropical paleoclimate, the diversity of fossil pollen and leaf samples is 60-80% that of comparable samples from extant and Quaternary Neotropical rainforest from similar climates. Insect feeding damage on Cerrejón fossil leaves, representing primary consumers, is abundant, but also of low diversity, and overwhelmingly made by generalist feeders rather than specialized herbivores. Cerrejón megafossils provide strong evidence that the same Neotropical rainforest families have characterized the biome since the Paleocene, maintaining their importance through climatic phases warmer and cooler than present. The low diversity of both plants and herbivorous insects in this Paleocene Neotropical rainforest may reflect an early stage in the diversification of the lineages that inhabit this biome, and/or a long recovery period from the terminal Cretaceous extinction.

  20. Whole network, temporal and parietal lobe contributions to the earliest phases of language production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, Alessandro; Calabria, Marco; Campo, Adrià Tauste; Cruzat, Josephine; Conesa, Gerardo; Costa, Albert; Rocamora, Rodrigo

    2017-10-01

    We investigated whether it is possible to study the network dynamics and the anatomical regions involved in the earliest moments of picture naming by using invasive electroencephalogram (EEG) traces to predict naming errors. Four right-handed participants with focal epilepsy explored with extensive stereotactic implant montages that recorded temporal, parietal and occipital regions -in two patients of both hemispheres-named a total of 228 black and white pictures in three different sessions recorded in different days. The subjects made errors that involved anomia and semantic dysphasia, which related to word frequency and not to visual complexity. Using different modalities of spectrum analysis and classification with a support vector machine (SVM) we could predict errors with rates that ranged from slightly above chance level to 100%, even in the preconscious phase, i.e., 100 msec after stimulus presentation. The highest rates were obtained using the gamma bands of all contact spectra without averaging, which implies a fine modulation of the neuronal activity at a network level. Despite no subset of nodes could match the whole set, rates close to the best prediction scores were obtained through the spectra of the temporal-parietal and temporal-occipital junction along with the temporal pole and hippocampus. When both hemispheres were explored nodes from the left side dominated in the best subsets. We argue that posterior temporal regions, especially of the dominant side, are involved very early, even in the preconscious phase (100 msec), in language production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ASK1 restores the antiviral activity of APOBEC3G by disrupting HIV-1 Vif-mediated counteraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Kei; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Matsuzawa, Atsushi; Morishita, Ryo; Kudoh, Ayumi; Shindo, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Masaru; Sato, Hironori; Kimura, Hirokazu; Tamura, Tomohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ichijo, Hidenori; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-04-22

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is an innate antiviral restriction factor that strongly inhibits the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vif, hijacks the host ubiquitin-proteasome system to execute A3G degradation. Identification of the host pathways that obstruct the action of Vif could provide a new strategy for blocking viral replication. We demonstrate here that the host protein ASK1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1) interferes with the counteraction by Vif and revitalizes A3G-mediated viral restriction. ASK1 binds the BC-box of Vif, thereby disrupting the assembly of the Vif-ubiquitin ligase complex. Consequently, ASK1 stabilizes A3G and promotes its incorporation into viral particles, ultimately reducing viral infectivity. Furthermore, treatment with the antiretroviral drug AZT (zidovudine) induces ASK1 expression and restores the antiviral activity of A3G in HIV-1-infected cells. This study thus demonstrates a distinct function of ASK1 in restoring the host antiviral system that can be enhanced by AZT treatment.

  2. Using Zebrafish Models of Human Influenza A Virus Infections to Screen Antiviral Drugs and Characterize Host Immune Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Con; Jurcyzszak, Denise; Goody, Michelle F; Gabor, Kristin A; Longfellow, Jacob R; Millard, Paul J; Kim, Carol H

    2017-01-20

    Each year, seasonal influenza outbreaks profoundly affect societies worldwide. In spite of global efforts, influenza remains an intractable healthcare burden. The principle strategy to curtail infections is yearly vaccination. In individuals who have contracted influenza, antiviral drugs can mitigate symptoms. There is a clear and unmet need to develop alternative strategies to combat influenza. Several animal models have been created to model host-influenza interactions. Here, protocols for generating zebrafish models for systemic and localized human influenza A virus (IAV) infection are described. Using a systemic IAV infection model, small molecules with potential antiviral activity can be screened. As a proof-of-principle, a protocol that demonstrates the efficacy of the antiviral drug Zanamivir in IAV-infected zebrafish is described. It shows how disease phenotypes can be quantified to score the relative efficacy of potential antivirals in IAV-infected zebrafish. In recent years, there has been increased appreciation for the critical role neutrophils play in the human host response to influenza infection. The zebrafish has proven to be an indispensable model for the study of neutrophil biology, with direct impacts on human medicine. A protocol to generate a localized IAV infection in the Tg(mpx:mCherry) zebrafish line to study neutrophil biology in the context of a localized viral infection is described. Neutrophil recruitment to localized infection sites provides an additional quantifiable phenotype for assessing experimental manipulations that may have therapeutic applications. Both zebrafish protocols described faithfully recapitulate aspects of human IAV infection. The zebrafish model possesses numerous inherent advantages, including high fecundity, optical clarity, amenability to drug screening, and availability of transgenic lines, including those in which immune cells such as neutrophils are labeled with fluorescent proteins. The protocols detailed here

  3. Potential chemotherapeutic targets for Japanese encephalitis: current status of antiviral drug development and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) remains a public health threat in Asia. Although several vaccines have been licensed, ∼ 67,900 cases of the disease are estimated to occur annually, probably because the vaccine coverage is low. Therefore, effective antiviral drugs are required to control JE. However, no licensed anti-JE drugs are available, despite extensive efforts to develop them. We provide a general overview of JE and JE virus, including its transmission cycle, distribution, structure, replication machinery, immune evasion mechanisms and vaccines. The current situation in antiviral drug development is then reviewed and future perspectives are discussed. Although the development of effective anti-JE drugs is an urgent issue, only supportive care is currently available. Recent progress in our understanding of the viral replication machinery and immune evasion strategies has identified new targets for anti-JE drug development. To date, most candidate drugs have only been evaluated in single-drug formulations, and efficient drug delivery to the CNS has virtually not been considered. However, an effective anti-JE treatment is expected to be achieved with multiple-drug formulations and a targeted drug delivery system in the near future.

  4. Hepatitis C virus lymphotropism and peculiar immunological phenotype: Effects on natural history and antiviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Conca; Giovanni Tarantino

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been recognized to be both a hepato- and lymphotropic virus. HCV lymphotropism represents an essential lap in the pathogenesis of virusrelated autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders, ranging from clonal expansion of B-cells with organ-and non-organ-specific autoantibody production up step-by-step model of B-cell lymphomagenesis, where the intermediated mixed cryoglobulinemia could be considered as a stage of suppressible antigen-driven lymphoproliferation. HCV infection of lymphoid cells could set up privileged reservoirs able to interfere with the host viral clearance efficiency and may be implicated in viral recurrence after apparently successful antiviral therapy. The HCV long-lasting extrahepatic replicative state generates an abnormal systemic immunological response, easily detectable by searching simple laboratory and clinical parameters, mainly represented by vasculitis-like skin features and hypocomplementemia.The presence or absence of this hypersensitivity pattern seems to correlate with the antiviral response and could be identified as a novel immunological cofactor. Further research is required to fully verify the real impact on therapeutic choice/regimen.

  5. An antiviral role for antimicrobial peptides during the arthropod response to alphavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhijing; Kingsolver, Megan B; Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Hardy, Richard W

    2013-04-01

    Alphaviruses establish a persistent infection in arthropod vectors which is essential for the effective transmission of the virus to vertebrate hosts. The development of persistence in insects is not well understood, although it is thought to involve the innate immune response. Using a transgenic fly system expressing a self-replicating viral RNA genome analog, we have previously demonstrated antiviral roles of the Drosophila Imd (immune deficiency) and Jak-STAT innate immunity pathways in response to alphavirus replication. In the present study, comparative microarray analysis of flies harboring an alphavirus replicon and control green fluorescent protein flies identified 95 SINrep-sensitive genes. Furthermore, a subset of these genes is regulated by Rel or STAT transcription factors of the Imd and Jak-STAT pathways, respectively. We identified two antimicrobial peptide genes, attC and dptB, which are SINrep sensitive and regulated by STAT and Rel, respectively. SINrep flies heterozygous for attC had an increased viral RNA level, while knocking down dptB in SINrep flies resulted in impaired development. When injected with whole virus, the double-stranded RNA knockdowns of either attC or dptB showed a significant increase in virus titers. Our data demonstrate an antiviral response involving the Imd and Jak-STAT mediated expression of dptB and attC.

  6. Evasion of antiviral innate immunity by Theiler's virus L* protein through direct inhibition of RNase L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sorgeloos

    Full Text Available Theiler's virus is a neurotropic picornavirus responsible for chronic infections of the central nervous system. The establishment of a persistent infection and the subsequent demyelinating disease triggered by the virus depend on the expression of L*, a viral accessory protein encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the virus. We discovered that L* potently inhibits the interferon-inducible OAS/RNase L pathway. The antagonism of RNase L by L* was particularly prominent in macrophages where baseline oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS and RNase L expression levels are elevated, but was detectable in fibroblasts after IFN pretreatment. L* mutations significantly affected Theiler's virus replication in primary macrophages derived from wild-type but not from RNase L-deficient mice. L* counteracted the OAS/RNase L pathway through direct interaction with the ankyrin domain of RNase L, resulting in the inhibition of this enzyme. Interestingly, RNase L inhibition was species-specific as Theiler's virus L* protein blocked murine RNase L but not human RNase L or RNase L of other mammals or birds. Direct RNase L inhibition by L* and species specificity were confirmed in an in vitro assay performed with purified proteins. These results demonstrate a novel viral mechanism to elude the antiviral OAS/RNase L pathway. By targeting the effector enzyme of this antiviral pathway, L* potently inhibits RNase L, underscoring the importance of this enzyme in innate immunity against Theiler's virus.

  7. Phytochemical screening and antiviral activity of some medicinal plants from the island Soqotra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothana, Ramzi A A; Mentel, Renate; Reiss, Christiane; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2006-04-01

    Methanol and hot-aqueous extracts of 25 different plant species, used in Yemeni traditional medicine and growing, partly as endemic plants, on the island Soqotra have been investigated for their antiviral activity. In addition, the phytochemical identification of the main chemical constituents was performed. The extracts were assayed in two in vitro viral systems, which used influenza virus type A/MDCK cells and herpes simplex virus type 1/Vero cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The herpes simplex virus type 1 showed more sensitivity than the influenza virus type A against the extracts investigated. The methanol extracts of Boswellia ameero, Boswellia elongata, Buxus hildebrandtii, Cissus hamaderohensis, Cleome socotrana, Dracaena cinnabari, Exacum affine, Jatropha unicostata and Kalanchoe farinacea showed anti-influenza virus type A activity with 50% inhibition (IC50) concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 12.5 microg/mL. In addition, 17 plants of the 25 investigated exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity. The antiviral activity of some active extracts was also observed on a molecular level.

  8. The pharmaceuticalisation of security: Molecular biomedicine, antiviral stockpiles, and global health security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbe, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals are now critical to the security of populations. Antivirals, antibiotics, next-generation vaccines, and antitoxins are just some of the new 'medical countermeasures' that governments are stockpiling in order to defend their populations against the threat of pandemics and bioterrorism. How has security policy come to be so deeply imbricated with pharmaceutical logics and solutions? This article captures, maps, and analyses the 'pharmaceuticalisation' of security. Through an in-depth analysis of the prominent antiviral medication Tamiflu, it shows that this pharmaceutical turn in security policy is intimately bound up with the rise of a molecular vision of life promulgated by the biomedical sciences. Caught in the crosshairs of powerful commercial, political, and regulatory pressures, governments are embracing a molecular biomedicine promising to secure populations pharmaceutically in the twenty-first century. If that is true, then the established disciplinary view of health as a predominantly secondary matter of 'low' international politics is mistaken. On the contrary, the social forces of health and biomedicine are powerful enough to influence the core practices of international politics - even those of security. For a discipline long accustomed to studying macrolevel processes and systemic structures, it is in the end also our knowledge of the minute morass of molecules that shapes international relations.

  9. Virus-Heat Shock Protein Interaction and a Novel Axis for Innate Antiviral Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oglesbee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Virus infections induce heat shock proteins that in turn enhance virus gene expression, a phenomenon that is particularly well characterized for the major inducible 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp70. However, hsp70 is also readily induced by fever, a phylogenetically conserved response to microbial infections, and when released from cells, hsp70 can stimulate innate immune responses through toll like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and 4. This review examines how the virus-hsp70 relationship can lead to host protective innate antiviral immunity, and the importance of hsp70 dependent stimulation of virus gene expression in this host response. Beginning with the well-characterized measles virus-hsp70 relationship and the mouse model of neuronal infection in brain, we examine data indicating that the innate immune response is not driven by intracellular sensors of pathogen associated molecular patterns, but rather by extracellular ligands signaling through TLR2 and 4. Specifically, we address the relationship between virus gene expression, extracellular release of hsp70 (as a damage associated molecular pattern, and hsp70-mediated induction of antigen presentation and type 1 interferons in uninfected macrophages as a novel axis of antiviral immunity. New data are discussed that examines the more broad relevance of this protective mechanism using vesicular stomatitis virus, and a review of the literature is presented that supports the probable relevance to both RNA and DNA viruses and for infections both within and outside of the central nervous system.

  10. Antiviral Protein of Momordica charantia L. Inhibits Different Subtypes of Influenza A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Pongthanapisith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The new antiviral activity of the protein extracted from Momordica charantia was determined with different subtypes of influenza A. The protein was purified from the seed of M. charantia using an anion exchanger and a Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC system. At the concentration of 1.401 mg/mL, the protein did not exhibit cytotoxicity in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK but inhibited FFU influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus at 56.50%, 65.72%, and 100% inhibition by the protein treated before the virus (pretreated, the protein treated alongside with the virus (simultaneously treated, and the protein treated after the virus (posttreated during incubation, respectively. Using 5, 25, and 100 TCID50 of influenza A/New Caledonia/20/99 H1N1, A/Fujian/411/01 H3N2 and A/Thailand/1(KAN-1/2004 H5N1, the IC50 was calculated to be 100, 150, and 200; 75, 175, and 300; and 40, 75, and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Our present finding indicated that the plant protein inhibited not only H1N1 and H3N2 but also H5N1 subtype. As a result of the broad spectrum of its antiviral activity, this edible plant can be developed as an effective therapeutic agent against various and even new emerging subtypes of influenza A.

  11. Antibacterial and antiviral study of dialdehyde polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Le

    Concerns for microbial contamination and infection to the general population, especially the spread of drug-resistant microorganisms, have greatly increased. Polymeric biocides have been found to be a feasible strategy to inactivate drug-resistant bacteria. However, current polymeric biocide systems involve multi-step chemical reactions and they are not cost-effective. Desirable antimicrobial systems need to be designed to be environmentally friendly, broad-spectrum effective against microorganisms, flexible for various delivery methods and economically affordable. We demonstrated that dialdehyde polysaccharides (including dialdehyde starch and dialdehdye cellulose) were broad-spectrum polymeric biocides against gram-positive/negative bacteria, bacteriophages and human virus. These polymers can be easily converted from starch and cellulose through one-step periodate oxidation. Destructions of microorganism by dialdehyde polysaccharides have been achieved in aqueous suspension or by solid surface contact. The dialdehdye functions of dialdehdye polysaccharides were found to be the dominant action against microorganism. The reactivity of the dialdehyde functionality was found to be pH-dependent as well as related to the dispersion of dialdehyde polysaccharides. Degradation of dialdehyde starch during cooking was confirmed. Degradation of dialdehyde starch was more liable in alkaline condition. Carboxylic acid and conjugated aldehyde functionalities were the two main degradation products, confirmed from the spectroscopic studies. The pH effect on the polysaccharide structure and the corresponding antimicrobial activity was very complicated. No decisive conclusions could be obtained from this study. Liner inactivation kinetics was found for dialdehyde starch aqueous suspension against bacteria. This linear inactivation kinetics was derived from the pseudo-first chemical reaction between the dialdehyde starch and the bacteria. The established inactivation kinetics was

  12. Channel catfish reovirus (CRV) inhibits replication of channel catfish herpesvirus (CCV) by two distinct mechanisms: viral interference and induction of an anti-viral factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchar, V G; Logue, O; Antao, A; Chinchar, G D

    1998-06-19

    Catfish reovirus (CRV), a double stranded RNA virus, inhibited channel catfish herpes-virus (CCV) replication by 2 different mechanisms: (1) directly as a consequence of its own replication, and (2) indirectly due to the induction of an anti-viral factor. In the former, prior infection with CRV significantly reduced subsequent CCV protein synthesis and virus yield. CRV mediated-interference was greatest when CRV infection preceded CCV infection by 16 h, and was least when cell cultures were simultaneously infected with both viruses. in the latter case, the infection of channel catfish ovary (CCO) cultures with UV-inactivated CRV resulted in the synthesis (or release) of an anti-viral factor. Cells producing the factor were protected from CCV infection, as were cells which had been treated with spent culture medium containing anti-viral activity. Interestingly an anti-viral activity was constitutively present in long-term cultures of catfish T-cells and macrophages. Whether this factor and the one induced by UV-inactivated CRV are identical is not known, but analogy to mammalian systems suggests that the former may be similar to type II interferon, whereas the latter may be the piscine equivalent of type I interferon. These results suggest that UV-inactivated CRV may prove useful in the induction and characterization of interferon-like anti-viral proteins in the channel catfish and that long-term cultures of catfish T-cells and monocytes may serve as a ready source of additional anti-viral factors.

  13. Studies on the Antiviral Activities in vitro of Polysaccharide from Eucheuma striatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CEN,Ying-Zhou; KHOO,Gaik-Ming; YE,Shao-Ming; RUI,Wen

    2004-01-01

    @@ To assay the antiviral activities on HSV-1 and CVB3 in vitro of the polysaccharide from Eucheuma striatum, its antiviral mechanism was explored. Vero cells were infected by HSV-1 and CVB3, and they were cultured with serial dilutions of polysaccharide. The cells cytotoxicity of Polysaccharide was evaluated by the MTT method. The inhibitory effects were evaluated by the cytopathic effect (CPE). Its antiviral mechanism was researched by the method of giving samples in different time. The polysaccharide could inhibit the CPE of cells infected by HSV-1 and CVB3. It showed low cytotoxicity on vero cells. Its antiviral activities were better than those of acyclovir and ribavirin which were run in parallel as the positive control samples. The polysaccharide from Eucheuma striatum has potent antiviral activities. Its antiviral mechanism is that it can prevent the virus from absorbing to the cell surface.

  14. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus-Like Particle Binding to Target Cells by Antiviral Antibodies in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Daniel; Barth, Heidi; Gissler, Bettina; Schürmann, Peter; Adah, Mohammed I.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Pape, Gerd R.; Depla, Erik; Jacobs, Dirk; Maertens, Geert; Patel, Arvind H.; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Liang, T. Jake; Blum, Hubert E.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic viral hepatitis worldwide. The study of antibody-mediated virus neutralization has been hampered by the lack of an efficient and high-throughput cell culture system for the study of virus neutralization. The HCV structural proteins have been shown to assemble into noninfectious HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs). Similar to serum-derived virions, HCV-LPs bind and enter human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we developed an HCV-LP-based model system for a systematic functional analysis of antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. We demonstrate that cellular HCV-LP binding was specifically inhibited by antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C in a dose-dependent manner. Using a library of homologous overlapping envelope peptides covering the entire HCV envelope, we identified an epitope in the N-terminal E2 region (SQKIQLVNTNGSWHI; amino acid positions 408 to 422) as one target of human antiviral antibodies inhibiting cellular particle binding. Using a large panel of serum samples from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C, we demonstrated that the presence of antibodies with inhibition of binding activity was not associated with viral clearance. In conclusion, antibody-mediated inhibition of cellular HCV-LP binding represents a convenient system for the functional characterization of human anti-HCV antibodies, allowing the mapping of envelope neutralization epitopes targeted by naturally occurring antiviral antibodies. PMID:15308699

  15. Exploitation of the Vistula River from earliest times to the outbreak of World War II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Marcin Duchnowski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the earliest times, the Vistula River has been an artery used for movement of people, commodities and cultures. The settlement network that began to develop along it constituted the foundation of the emerging Polish state in the Early Middle Ages. In the 13th century, the Teutonic Knights appeared downriver. After the outbreak of Prussia and Gdańsk Pomerania, they formed a state with a powerful economy and army. During their reign along the Vistula River (Wisła, many castles and fortified towns guarding its particular sections were erected. After the end of the Thirteen Years’ War (1466, almost the whole river with its tributaries was incorporated within the limits of Poland or countries recognising its authority. From the middle of the 16th century to the mid-17th century, the Vistula River performed the role of the main Polish trade route for many products sent to Western European countries through Gdańsk. The city was then experiencing the apogee of its magnificence. Cereals were the most important commodity back then. The gentry – the producers – and many towns intermediating in trade were growing rich thanks to the good economic situation. Then, the rich folklore of raftsmen immortalised by poets and pictured by painters came into being. In the 18th century, changes in agriculture in Western European countries and increasing competition caused depression in the export of Polish cereals. In addition, the partitions of Poland affected its balance. Because of this, the Vistula River flowed through three states: Austria, Russia and Prussia. All of them conducted separate policies concerning the river, which caused its decline as an important European water artery. In the 19th century, it remained unregulated. Germans performed the most works in the lower course of the river, while Russians did the least in its middle course. In the period of Second Polish Republic, the revived state had new needs, thus river development was not

  16. Secondary Phosphatization of the Earliest Cambrian Small Shelly Fossil Anabarites from Southern Shaanxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yali Chen; Xuelei Chu; Xingliang Zhang; Mingguo Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralization may have an extremely long evolutionary history since the Paleoarchean, while the widespread biomineralization among metazoan lineages started at the earliest Cambrian. However, the primary mineralogy of Anabarites shell remains controversial. Optical microscopic observations combined with the Back-Scattered Electron (BSE) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analyses are used to study the shell of the fossil Anabarites from the Kuanchuanpu fauna in southern Shaanxi Province in China, which is correlated to the Cambrian Fortunian Stage. The EDS analysis shows that the phosphorus-rich layer closely adjacent to the calcified layer exhibits a Ca: P: C ratio compositionally similar to the mineral fluorapatite (Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,CO3). The result that the calcified layer and the phosphorus-rich layer have different chemical compositions is consistent with the optical observation that there is an obvious gap between these two layers and the phosphorus-rich layer can extend to the phosphatic material inside of the tube, suggesting the phosphorus-rich layer doesn’t belong to the original shell. We suggest that the phosphorous-rich layer is diagenetic in origin, precipitated as a result of phosphorus release during the decay of organic matter by microbes. Considering the outermost shell layer (OMS, biologically controlled carbonate shell layer) should display different isotopic information from the carbonate matrix (i.e., OMS is 12C concentrated due to the biogenic organic matter template is readily rich in 12C), NanoSIMS was used to map ion distributions of C and N in the shell of Anabarites and matrix. However, ion images show that the concentration differences of 12C, 13C and 26CN among the OMS and the matrix are unclear, while 12C and 26CN are supposed to be enriched in the OMS. Therefore, the minor isotopic differences between the shell and the matrix is hard to be detected by NanoSIMS, at least in our sample, probably due to alteration of

  17. Mineralogical, crystallographic and redox features of the earliest stages of fluid alteration in CM chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatelli, Isabella; Marrocchi, Yves; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Bourdelle, Franck; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2017-07-01

    The CM chondrites represent the largest group of hydrated meteorites and span a wide range of conditions, from less altered (i.e., CM2) down to heavily altered (i.e., CM1). The Paris chondrite is considered the least altered CM and thus enables the earliest stages of aqueous alteration processes to be deciphered. Here, we report results from a nanoscale study of tochilinite/cronstedtite intergrowths (TCIs) in Paris-TCIs being the emblematic secondary mineral assemblages of CM chondrites, formed from the alteration of Fe-Ni metal beads (type-I TCIs) and anhydrous silicates (type-II TCIs). We combined high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and electron diffraction tomography to characterize the crystal structure, crystal chemistry and redox state of TCIs. The data obtained are useful to reconstruct the alteration conditions of Paris and to compare them with those of other meteorites. Our results show that tochilinite in Paris is characterized by a high hydroxide layer content (n = 2.1-2.2) regardless of the silicate precursors. When examined alongside other CMs, it appears that the hydroxide layer and iron contents of tochilinites correlate with the degree of alteration experienced by the chondrites. The Fe3+/ΣFe ratios of TCIs are high: 8-15% in tochilinite, 33-60% in cronstedtite and 70-80% in hydroxides. These observations suggest that alteration of CM chondrites took place under oxidizing conditions that could have been induced by significant H2 release during serpentinization. Similar results were recently reported in CR chondrites (Le Guillou et al., 2015), suggesting that the process(es) controlling the redox state of the secondary mineral assemblages were quite similar in the CM and CR parent bodies despite the different alteration conditions. According to our mineralogical and crystallographic survey, the formation of TCIs in Paris occurred at temperatures lower than 100 °C, under neutral, slightly alkaline

  18. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhara-Bell Jarred; Yang Yongbo; Barlow Russell; Trapido-Rosenthal Hank; Lu Yuanan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These ex...

  19. Late Permian-earliest Triassic high-resolution organic carbon isotope and palynofacies records from Kap Stosch (East Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson-Barrera, Anna; Hochuli, Peter A.; Bucher, Hugo; Schneebeli-Hermann, Elke; Weissert, Helmut; Adatte, Thierry; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2015-10-01

    During and after the end Permian mass extinction terrestrial and marine biota underwent major changes and reorganizations. The latest Permian and earliest Triassic is also characterized by major negative carbon isotope shifts reflecting fundamental changes in the carbon cycle. The present study documents a high-resolution bulk organic carbon isotope record and palynofacies analysis spanning the latest Permian-earliest Triassic of East Greenland. An almost 700 meter thick composite section from Kap Stosch allowed discriminating 6 chemostratigraphic intervals that provide the basis for the correlation with other coeval records across the world, and for the recognition of basin wide transgressive-regressive events documenting tectonic activity during the opening of the Greenland-Norway Basin. The identification of the main factors that influenced the organic carbon isotope signal during the earliest Triassic (Griesbachian to Dienerian) was possible due to the combination of bulk organic carbon isotope, palynofacies and Rock-Eval data. Two negative carbon isotopic shifts in the Kap Stosch record can be correlated with negative shifts recorded in coeval sections across the globe. A first negative shift precedes the base of the Triassic as defined by the first occurrence of the conodont Hindeodus parvus in the Meishan reference section, and the second one coincides with the suggested Griesbachian-Dienerian boundary. This new organic carbon isotope record from the extended Kap Stosch section from the Boreal Realm documents regional and global carbon cycle signals of the interval between the latest Palaeozoic and the onset of the Mesozoic.

  20. In vitro comparison of antiviral drugs against feline herpesvirus 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garré B

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1 is a common cause of respiratory and ocular disease in cats. Especially in young kittens that have not yet reached the age of vaccination, but already lost maternal immunity, severe disease may occur. Therefore, there is a need for an effective antiviral treatment. In the present study, the efficacy of six antiviral drugs, i.e. acyclovir, ganciclovir, cidofovir, foscarnet, adefovir and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl-2, 6-diaminopurine (PMEDAP, against FHV-1 was compared in Crandell-Rees feline kidney (CRFK cells using reduction in plaque number and plaque size as parameters. Results The capacity to reduce the number of plaques was most pronounced for ganciclovir, PMEDAP and cidofovir. IC50 (NUMBER values were 3.2 μg/ml (12.5 μM, 4.8 μg/ml (14.3 μM and 6 μg/ml (21.5 μM, respectively. Adefovir and foscarnet were intermediately efficient with an IC50 (NUMBER of 20 μg/ml (73.2 μM and 27 μg/ml (140.6 μM, respectively. Acyclovir was least efficient (IC50 (NUMBER of 56 μg/ml or 248.7 μM. All antiviral drugs were able to significantly reduce plaque size when compared with the untreated control. As observed for the reduction in plaque number, ganciclovir, PMEDAP and cidofovir were most potent in reducing plaque size. IC50 (SIZE values were 0.4 μg/ml (1.7 μM, 0.9 μg/ml (2.7 μM and 0.2 μg/ml (0.7 μM, respectively. Adefovir and foscarnet were intermediately potent, with an IC50 (SIZE of 4 μg/ml (14.6 μM and 7 μg/ml (36.4 μM, respectively. Acyclovir was least potent (IC50 (SIZE of 15 μg/ml or 66.6 μM. The results demonstrate that the IC50 (SIZE values were notably lower than the IC50 (NUMBER values. The most remarkable effect was observed for cidofovir and ganciclovir. None of the products were toxic for CRFK cells at antiviral concentrations. Conclusion In conclusion, measuring reduction in plaque number and plaque size are two valuable and complementary means of assessing the efficacy of

  1. Novel cycloalkylthiophene-imine derivatives bearing benzothiazole scaffold: synthesis, characterization and antiviral activity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Shaoyong; Wei, Yanhong; Yang, Ziwen; Wang, Kaimei; Liang, Ying; Shi, Liqiao

    2013-09-15

    A series of novel cycloalkylthiophene-imine derivatives containing benzothiazole unit were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-viral activities. The bio-evaluation results indicated that some of the target compounds (such as 5g, 5i, 5u) exhibited good to moderate antiviral effect on CVB5, ADV7 and EV71 viruses, however, these compounds did not have inhibition activity against H1N1 virus. Especially, the compounds 4c and 4d also exhibited high antiviral activities, which provide a new and efficient approach to evolve novel multi-functional antiviral agents by rational integration of active pharmacophores. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antiviral therapy effects upon hepatitis C cholestatic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vere, C C; Gofiţă, Eliza; Forţofoiu, C; Streba, Letiţia Adela Maria; Genunche, Amelia

    2007-01-01

    Cholestasis includes, as a syndrome, all clinical and biological manifestations caused by the deficient or simply absent biliar secretion or caused by the obstruction of the biliary ducts. The hepatic cholestasis from the chronic hepatitis C (HC VHC) is a result of the altered interlobular biliary canalicules, caused by the modified cellular transport mechanisms and it is associated with a medium to severe degree of fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of antiviral therapy in HC VHC patients. The study included a number of 37 HC VHC patients admitted at the Medical Department no. 1 of the Emergency County Hospital of Craiova; they were treated with Pegasys, 180 microg/week and Copegus, 1000 or 1200 mg/day, taking in consideration their weight, for 48 weeks and they were monitored for 24 weeks after the treatment. The following parameters were analyzed: direct bilirubine, total cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamiltranspeptidase and leucin-aminopeptidase. Under treatment, the clinical status caused by the cholestasis (pruritus, icteric syndrome, hemoragipary syndrome) was improved in six of the given cases (16.22%). Before therapy, the hepatic cholestasis was present in 20 patients (54.05%), and after treatment in 14 patients (37.83%). During therapy, the average values for all the monitored parameters decreased: direct bilirubine (0.38 +/- 0.18 mg/dl vs. 0.34 +/- 0.24 mg/dl, p = 0.0867), total cholesterol (198.53 md/dl vs. 183.16 mg/dl, p = 0.0808), alkaline phosphatase (236.99 +/- 79.09 iu/l vs. 227.82 +/- 87.59 iu/l, p = 0.0845), gamma-glutamiltranspeptidase (47 +/- 32.89 iu/l vs. 43.91 +/- 29.66 iu/l, p = 0.1509), and leucin-aminopeptidase (32.33 +/- 13.22 iu/l vs. 28.95 +/- 14.22 iu/l, p = 0.0038). Under antiviral treatment there was noticed an improvement of the cholestasis clinical status in a small number of cases. Antiviral therapy favorably influenced the liver cholestasis associated in patients with chronic hepatitis

  3. Defective Natural Killer cell antiviral capacity in paediatric HBV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ida Louise; Laura J., Pallett; Winther, Thilde Nordmann

    2015-01-01

    cell frequency, phenotype and function in HBV-infected children relative to uninfected children. We observed a selective defect in NK cell IFN-γ production, with conserved cytolytic function, mirroring the functional dichotomy observed in adult infection. Reduced expression of NKp30 on NK cells...... suggests a role of impaired NK-Dendritic Cell (DC) cellular interactions as a potential mechanism leading to reduced IFN-γ production. The finding that NK cells are already defective in paediatric CHB, albeit less extensively than in adult CHB, has potential implications for the timing of antiviral therapy...

  4. Isolation of a polysaccharide with antiviral effect from Ulva lactuca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, V; Rouseva, R; Kolarova, M; Serkedjieva, J; Rachev, R; Manolova, N

    1994-05-01

    A polysaccharide from the green marine algae Ulva lactuca has been isolated. The substance has been investigated after acid hydrolysis by thin-layer and gas chromatography. The following carbohydrate components have been found: arabinose-xylose-rhamnose-galactose-mannose-glucose in ratio 1:1:9:5:2.5:16 respectively. One unidentified sugar has been demonstrated too. The polysaccharide has been studied for antiviral activity in vitro against a number of human and avian influenza viruses. A considerable inhibition of the viral reproduction was found. The effect was dose-dependent, strain-specific and selective.

  5. Chitosan-induced antiviral activity and innate immunity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriti, Marcello; Varoni, Elena Maria

    2015-02-01

    Immunity represents a trait common to all living organisms, and animals and plants share some similarities. Therefore, in susceptible host plants, complex defence machinery may be stimulated by elicitors. Among these, chitosan deserves particular attention because of its proved efficacy. This survey deals with the antiviral activity of chitosan, focusing on its perception by the plant cell and mechanism of action. Emphasis has been paid to benefits and limitations of this strategy in crop protection, as well as to the potential of chitosan as a promising agent in virus disease control.

  6. NEW ANTIVIRAL DRUG COMBINED EFFECT OF THERAPY ARVI IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Nikolaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available  This article contains a review of Russian and foreign publications with the results of experimental and clinical studies of effectiveness and safety using of a new release active medicine — Ergoferon for the treatment of acute respiratory viral infection (ARVI, including influenza virus. The results of investigation of antiviral activities of Ergoferon and its components in adults are presented in the article, as well as absolutely new data about efficacy and safety of a liquid form Ergoferon in ARVI in children. 

  7. Antiviral therapy and prophylaxis of acute respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Osidak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thearticle presents the results of years of studies (including biochemical and immunological of the effectiveness of application and prophylaxis (in relation to nosocomial infections and the safety of antiviral chemical preparation Arbidol in 694 children with influenza and influenza-like illness, including the coronavirus infection (43 children and combined lesions of respiratory tract (150, indicating the possible inclusion of the drug in the complex therapy for children with the listed diseases, regardless of the severity and nature of their course. The studies were conducted according to the regulated standard of test conditions and randomized clinical trials.

  8. Depletion of elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins by CRISPR/Cas9 enhances the antiviral response in porcine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Carvajal, Lisbeth; Singh, Neetu; de los Santos, Teresa; Rodríguez, Luis L; Long, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are key mediators of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) are translational controllers of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7), the "master regulator" of IFN transcription. Previous studies have suggested that mouse cells depleted of 4E-BPs are more sensitive to IFNβ treatment and had lower viral loads as compared to wild type (WT) cells. However, such approach has not been tested as an antiviral strategy in livestock species. In this study, we tested the antiviral activity of porcine cells depleted of 4E-BP1 by a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering system. We found that 4E-BP1 knockout (KO) porcine cells had increased expression of IFNα and β, IFN stimulated genes, and significant reduction in vesicular stomatitis virus titer as compare to WT cells. No phenotypical changes associated with CRISPR/Cas9 manipulation were observed in 4E-BP1 KO cells. This work highlights the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to enhance the antiviral response in porcine cells.

  9. The cytoplasmic location of chicken mx is not the determining factor for its lack of antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla T O Benfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chicken Mx belongs to the Mx family of interferon-induced dynamin-like GTPases, which in some species possess potent antiviral properties. Conflicting data exist for the antiviral capability of chicken Mx. Reports of anti-influenza activity of alleles encoding an Asn631 polymorphism have not been supported by subsequent studies. The normal cytoplasmic localisation of chicken Mx may influence its antiviral capacity. Here we report further studies to determine the antiviral potential of chicken Mx against Newcastle disease virus (NDV, an economically important cytoplasmic RNA virus of chickens, and Thogoto virus, an orthomyxovirus known to be exquisitely sensitive to the cytoplasmic MxA protein from humans. We also report the consequences of re-locating chicken Mx to the nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chicken Mx was tested in virus infection assays using NDV. Neither the Asn631 nor Ser631 Mx alleles (when transfected into 293T cells showed inhibition of virus-directed gene expression when the cells were subsequently infected with NDV. Human MxA however did show significant inhibition of NDV-directed gene expression. Chicken Mx failed to inhibit a Thogoto virus (THOV minireplicon system in which the cytoplasmic human MxA protein showed potent and specific inhibition. Relocalisation of chicken Mx to the nucleus was achieved by inserting the Simian Virus 40 large T antigen nuclear localisation sequence (SV40 NLS at the N-terminus of chicken Mx. Nuclear re-localised chicken Mx did not inhibit influenza (A/PR/8/34 gene expression during virus infection in cell culture or influenza polymerase activity in A/PR/8/34 or A/Turkey/50-92/91 minireplicon systems. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The chicken Mx protein (Asn631 lacks inhibitory effects against THOV and NDV, and is unable to suppress influenza replication when artificially re-localised to the cell nucleus. Thus, the natural cytoplasmic localisation of the chicken Mx protein does

  10. Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA): A software tool for analyzing mutations associated with antiviral resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatierra, Karina; Florez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health problem, with 200 million people infected worldwide. The treatment for HCV chronic infection with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin inhibitors is unspecific; consequently, the treatment is effective in only 50% of patients infected. This has prompted the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) that target virus proteins. These DAA have demonstrated a potent effect in vitro and in vivo; however, virus mutations associated with the development of resistance have been described. To design and develop an online information system for detecting mutations in amino acids known to be implicated in resistance to DAA.    We have used computer applications, technological tools, standard languages, infrastructure systems and algorithms, to analyze positions associated with resistance to DAA for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes of HCV. We have designed and developed an online information system named Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA), which allows users to calculate changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each selected sequence from conventional Sanger and cloning sequencing using a graphical interface. BMA quickly, easily and effectively analyzes mutations, including complete documentation and examples. Furthermore, the development of different visualization techniques allows proper interpretation and understanding of the results. The data obtained using BMA will be useful for the assessment and surveillance of HCV resistance to new antivirals, and for the treatment regimens by selecting those DAA to which the virus is not resistant, avoiding unnecessary treatment failures. The software is available at: http://bma.itiud.org.

  11. Potencial antiviral da quercetina sobre o parvovírus canino Antiviral potencial of quercetin in canine parvovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Carvalho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito do flavonoide quercetina na replicação do parvovírus canino in vitro por meio do ensaio de determinação da atividade virucida (ensaio 1, ensaio de determinação da atividade sobre a célula (ensaio 2 e ensaio de tempo de adição das drogas em diferentes etapas do ciclo replicativo viral (ensaio 3. A quercetina apresentou significante atividade antiviral, com valores máximos de redução do título viral de 96,3% no ensaio 1, 90% no ensaio 2 e 90% no ensaio 3. Os efeitos mais expressivos ocorreram nas etapas de adsorção e penetração viral. Os resultados deste trabalho sugerem a importância da quercetina para a medicina veterinária.The in vitro effect of the flavonoid quercetin against canine parvovirus was evaluated. The antiviral activity of quercetin was evaluated by determining the virucidal activity (assay 1, determining the activity on the cell (assay 2 and using the time of addition assay to test the inhibition of the viral replication cycle (assay 3. Quercetin showed a significant antiviral activity, with maximum viral titer reduction of 96.3% in assay 1, 90% in assay 2 and 90% in assay 3. The most expressive effects occurred in the stages of viral adsorption and penetration. The results show the importance of quercetin for veterinary medicine.

  12. The Earliest Fossil Evidence for Life on Land and the Freshwater Origin of Algae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battison, L.; Brasier, M. D.; Antcliffe, J. B.

    2009-04-01

    Some 150 years ago, in 1859, Charles Darwin was greatly puzzled by a seeming absence of fossils in rocks older than the Cambrian period. He drew attention to a veritable Lost World that it is now known to have spanned more than 80 per cent of Earth History. And he made a prediction that we here bring again into focus: 'The presence of phosphate nodules and bituminous matter in some of the lowest azoic rocks probably indicates the former existence of life at these periods (Darwin 1859, p.307). His prediction came to fruition in 1899, when Sir Archibald Geikie announced to the world the first discovery of genuine microfossils in Precambrian phosphatic rocks, made by Jephro Teall, Ben Peach and John Horne within the Torridonian rocks of Scotland. The Torridonian phosphate of NW Scotland has, however, been rather little studied until recently. It is remarkable for its fidelity of fossil preservation, and also for its non-marine depositional setting. Dating to the end of the Mesoproterozoic Era around 1Ga ago, thick packages of fluvial sandstones are found to serve the remains of very ancient intermontane lake ecosystems. Fossil assemblages from terrestrial settings are rarely seen before the Devonian ~ 350 Ma ago. Evidence for freshwater and terrestrial life in the Precambrian has therefore been circumstantial rather than detailed and none has yet come from freshwater phosphate. We here demonstrate that phosphate from ~ 1200-1000 Ma Mesoproterozoic lake sediments of the Torridon Group preserve a remarkable suite of organisms forming a freshwater, terrestrial, phototrophic ecosystem. Ephemeral lakes and streams developed in intermontane basins within the interior of the supercontinent of Rodinia and periodically experienced prolonged desiccation allowing phosphate precipitation. The microbiology of these lake sediments is being studied in detail, where they are yielding - with the aid of Automontage - fresh evidence for the earliest known terrestrial ecology and

  13. Unidentified angular recurrent ulceration responsive to antiviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Amtha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent ulcer on angular area is usually called stomatitis angularis. It is caused by many factors such as vertical dimension reduce, vitamin B12, and immune system deficiency, C. albicans and staphylococcus involvement. Clinically is characterized by painful fissure with erythematous base without fever. Purpose: to describe an unidentified angular ulcer proceeded by recurrent ulcers with no response of topical therapy. Case: An 18-years old male came to Oral Medicine clinic in RSCM who complained of angular recurrent ulcers since 3 years ago which developed on skin and bleed easily on mouth opening. Patient had fever before the onset of ulcers. Large, painful, irregular ulcers covered by red crustae on angular area bilaterally. Patient has been treated with various drugs without improvement and lead to mouth opening limitation. Intra oral shows herpetiformtype of ulcer and swollen of gingival. Case management: Provisional diagnosis was established as viral infection thus acyclovir 200 mg five times daily for two weeks and topical anti inflammation gel were administered. Blood test for IgG/IgM of HSV1 and HSV2 were non reactive, however ulceration showed a remarkable improvement. The ulcers healed completely after next 2 weeks with acyclovir. Conclusion: The angular ulceration on above patient failed to fulfill the criteria of stomatitis angularis or herpes labialis lesion. However it showed a good response to antiviral. Therefore, unidentified angular ulceration was appointed, as the lesion might be triggered by other type of human herpes virus or types of virus that response to acyclovir.Latar belakang: ulser rekuren pada sudut mulut biasanya disebut stomatitis angularis. Kelainan ini disebabkan oleh banyak faktor seperti berkurangnya dimensi vertikal, defisiensi vitamin B12 dan sistem kekebalan tubuh, infeksi C. albicans serta staphylococcus. Secara klinis kelainan ini ditandai dengan fisur sakit pada sudut mulut dengan dasar

  14. New antivirals for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Vincent; Barreiro, Pablo; Benitez, Laura; Peña, Jose M; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    Current treatment with oral nucleos(t)ides entecavir or tenofovir provide sustained suppression of HBV replication and clinical benefit in most chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected persons. However, HBV rebound generally occurs upon drug discontinuation due to persistence of genomic HBV reservoirs as episomic cccDNA and chromosomic integrated HBV-DNA. There is renewed enthusiasm on HBV drug discovery following recent successes with antivirals for hepatitis C and immunotherapies for some cancers. Areas covered: New drugs that target distinct steps of the HBV life cycle are been developed, including inhibitors of viral entry, new polymerase inhibitors, capsid and assembly inhibitors, virus release blockers, and disruptors of cccDNA formation and transcription. Alongside these antivirals, agents that enhance anti-HBV specific immune responses are being tested, including TLR agonists, checkpoint inhibitors and therapeutic vaccines. Expert opinion: The achievement of a 'functional cure' for chronic HBV infection, with sustained HBsAg clearance and undetectable viremia once medications are stopped, represents the next step in the pace towards HBV elimination. Hopefully, the combination of new drugs that eliminate or functionally inactivate the genomic HBV reservoirs (cccDNA and integrated HBV-DNA) along with agents that enhance or activate immune responses against HBV will lead to a 'definitive cure' for chronic HBV infection.

  15. Danger, diversity and priming in innate antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Susan E; Mossman, Karen L

    2014-10-01

    The prototypic response to viral infection involves the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to the activation of transcription factors such as IRF3 and NFkB and production of type 1 IFN. While this response can lead to the induction of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and recruitment and activation of immune cells, such a comprehensive response is likely inappropriate for routine low level virus exposure. Moreover, viruses have evolved a plethora of immune evasion strategies to subvert antiviral signalling. There is emerging evidence that cells have developed very sensitive methods of detecting not only specific viral PAMPS, but also more general danger or stress signals associated with viral entry and replication. Such stress-induced cellular responses likely serve to prime cells to respond to further PAMP stimulation or allow for a rapid and localized intracellular response independent of IFN production and its potential immune sequelae. This review discusses diversity in innate antiviral players and pathways, the role of "danger" sensing, and how alternative pathways, such as the IFN-independent pathway, may serve to prime cells for further pathogen attack.

  16. Arenaviruses and hantaviruses: from epidemiology and genomics to antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrel, R N; Coutard, B; Baronti, C; Canard, B; Nougairede, A; Frangeul, A; Morin, B; Jamal, S; Schmidt, C L; Hilgenfeld, R; Klempa, B; de Lamballerie, X

    2011-05-01

    The arenaviruses and hantaviruses are segmented genome RNA viruses that are hosted by rodents. Due to their association with rodents, they are globally widespread and can infect humans via direct or indirect routes of transmission, causing considerable human morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, despite their obvious and emerging importance as pathogens, there are currently no effective antiviral drugs (except ribavirin which proved effective against Lassa virus) with which to treat humans infected by any of these viruses. The EU-funded VIZIER project (Comparative Structural Genomics of Viral Enzymes Involved in Replication) was instigated with an ultimate view of contributing to the development of antiviral therapies for RNA viruses, including the arenaviruses and bunyaviruses. This review highlights some of the major features of the arenaviruses and hantaviruses that have been investigated during recent years. After describing their classification and epidemiology, we review progress in understanding the genomics as well as the structure and function of replicative enzymes achieved under the VIZIER program and the development of new disease control strategies.

  17. Anti-Viral Antibody Profiling by High Density Protein Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wiktor, Peter; Kahn, Peter; Brunner, Al; Khela, Amritpal; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Barker, Kristi; Yu, Xiaobo; Magee, Mitch; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Gibson, David; Rooney, Madeleine E; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections elicit anti-viral antibodies and have been associated with various chronic diseases. Detection of these antibodies can facilitate diagnosis, treatment of infection and understanding of the mechanisms of virus associated diseases. In this work, we assayed anti-viral antibodies using a novel high density-nucleic acid programmable protein array (HD-NAPPA) platform. Individual viral proteins were expressed in situ directly from plasmids encoding proteins in an array of microscopic reaction chambers. Quality of protein display and serum response was assured by comparing intra- and inter- array correlation within or between printing batches with average correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, respectively. HD-NAPPA showed higher signal to background (S/B) ratio compared with standard NAPPA on planar glass slides and ELISA. Antibody responses to 761 antigens from 25 different viruses were profiled among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Common as well as unique antibody reactivity patterns were detected between patients and healthy controls. We believe HD-viral-NAPPA will enable the study of host-pathogen interactions at unprecedented dimensions and elucidate the role of pathogen infections in disease development. PMID:25758251

  18. Antiviral Drug- and Multidrug Resistance in Cytomegalovirus Infected SCT Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Göhring

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In pediatric and adult patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT disseminated infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV can cause life threatening diseases. For treatment, the three antivirals ganciclovir (GCV, foscarnet (PFA and cidofovir (CDV are approved and most frequently used. Resistance to all of these antiviral drugs may induce a severe problem in this patient cohort. Responsible for resistance phenomena are mutations in the HCMV phosphotransferase-gene (UL97 and the polymerase-gene (UL54. Most frequently mutations in the UL97-gene are associated with resistance to GCV. Resistance against all three drugs is associated to mutations in the UL54-gene. Monitoring of drug resistance by genotyping is mostly done by PCR-based Sanger sequencing. For phenotyping with cell culture the isolation of HCMV is a prerequisite. The development of multidrug resistance with mutation in both genes is rare, but it is often associated with a fatal outcome. The manifestation of multidrug resistance is mostly associated with combined UL97/UL54-mutations. Normally, mutations in the UL97 gene occur initially followed by UL54 mutation after therapy switch. The appearance of UL54-mutation alone without any detection of UL97-mutation is rare. Interestingly, in a number of patients the UL97 mutation could be detected in specific compartments exclusively and not in blood.

  19. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  20. Experimental rhinovirus infection in COPD: implications for antiviral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardana, Natasha; Finney, Lydia; Johnston, Sebastian L; Mallia, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem and will be one of the leading global causes of mortality over the coming decades. Much of the morbidity, mortality and health care costs of COPD are attributable to acute exacerbations, the commonest causes of which are respiratory infections. Respiratory viruses are frequently detected in COPD exacerbations but direct proof of a causative relationship has been lacking. We have developed a model of COPD exacerbation using experimental rhinovirus infection in COPD patients and this has established a causative relationship between virus infection and exacerbations. In addition it has determined some of the molecular mechanisms linking virus infections to COPD exacerbations and identified potential new therapeutic targets. This new data should stimulate research into the role of antiviral agents as potential treatments for COPD exacerbations. Testing of antiviral agents has been hampered by the lack of a small animal model for rhinovirus infection and experimental rhinovirus infection in healthy volunteers has been used to test treatments for the common cold. Experimental rhinovirus infection in COPD subjects offers the prospect of a model that can be used to evaluate the effects of new treatments for virus-induced COPD exacerbations, and provide essential data that can be used in making decisions regarding large scale clinical trials.

  1. Mechanisms of Hepatitis C Viral Resistance to Direct Acting Antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a remarkable transformation in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in recent years with the development of direct acting antiviral agents targeting virus encoded proteins important for viral replication including NS3/4A, NS5A and NS5B. These agents have shown high sustained viral response (SVR rates of more than 90% in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials; however, this is slightly lower in real-life cohorts. Hepatitis C virus resistant variants are seen in most patients who do not achieve SVR due to selection and outgrowth of resistant hepatitis C virus variants within a given host. These resistance associated mutations depend on the class of direct-acting antiviral drugs used and also vary between hepatitis C virus genotypes and subtypes. The understanding of these mutations has a clear clinical implication in terms of choice and combination of drugs used. In this review, we describe mechanism of action of currently available drugs and summarize clinically relevant resistance data.

  2. Flexibility as a Strategy in Nucleoside Antiviral Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H L; Ku, T C; Seley-Radtke, K L

    2015-01-01

    As far back as Melville Wolfrom's acyclic sugar synthesis in the 1960's, synthesis of flexible nucleoside analogues have been an area of interest. This concept, however, went against years of enzyme-substrate binding theory. Hence, acyclic methodology in antiviral drug design did not take off until the discovery and subsequent FDA approval of such analogues as Acyclovir and Tenofovir. More recently, the observation that flexible nucleosides could overcome drug resistance spawned a renewed interest in the field of nucleoside drug design. The next generation of flexible nucleosides shifted the focus from the sugar moiety to the nucleobase. With analogues such as Seley-Radtke "fleximers", and Herdewijn's C5 substituted 2'-deoxyuridines, the area of base flexibility has seen great expansion. More recently, the marriage of these methodologies with acyclic sugars has resulted in a series of acyclic flex-base nucleosides with a wide range of antiviral properties, including some of the first to exhibit anti-coronavirus activity. Various flexible nucleosides and their corresponding nucleobases will be compared in this review.

  3. Specifically targeted antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects 180 million people worldwide with the predominant prevalence being infection with genotype 1, followed by genotypes 2 and 3. Standard anti-HCV therapy currently aims to enhance natural immune responses to the virus, whereas new therapeutic concepts directly target HCV RNA and viral enzymes or influence host-virus interactions. Novel treatment options now in development are focused on inhibitors of HCV-specific enzymes, NS3 protease and NS5B polymerase.These agents acting in concert represent the concept of specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C).STAT-C is an attractive strategy in which the main goal is to increase the effectiveness of antiviral responses across all genotypes, with shorter treatment duration and better tolerability. However, the emergence of resistant mutations that limit the use of these compounds in monotherapy complicates the regimens. Thus, a predictable scenario for HCV treatment in the future will be combinations of drugs with distinct mechanisms of action. For now, it seems that interferon will remain a fundamental component of any new anti-HCV therapeutic regimens in the near future;therefore, there is pressure to develop forms of interferon that are more effective, less toxic, and more convenient than pegylated interferon.

  4. Antiviral Activity of Natural Products Extracted from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobia Tabassum

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many epidemics have broken out over the centuries. Hundreds and thousands of humans have died over a disease. Available treatments for infectious diseases have always been limited. Some infections are more deadly than the others, especially viral pathogens. These pathogens have continuously resisted all kinds of medical treatment, due to a need for new treatments to be developed. Drugs are present in nature and are also synthesized in vitro and they help in combating diseases and restoring health. Synthesizing drugs is a hard and time consuming task, which requires a lot of man power and financial aid. However, the natural compounds are just lying around on the earth, may it be land or water. Over a thousand novel compounds isolated from marine organisms are used as antiviral agents. Others are being pharmacologically tested. Today, over forty antiviral compounds are present in the pharmacological market. Some of these compounds are undergoing clinical and pre-clinical stages. Marine compounds are paving the way for a new trend in modern medicine.

  5. Interactions of macrophages with probiotic bacteria lead to increased antiviral response against vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivec, Martin; Botic, Tanja; Koren, Srecko

    2007-01-01

    and by producing chemokines and immunoregulatory cytokines that enable the adaptive immune response to recognize infected cells and perform antiviral effector functions. Probiotics, as a part of the normal gut intestinal flora, are important in supporting a functional yet balanced immune system. Improving our...... understanding of their role in the activation of macrophages and their stimulation of proinflammatory cytokine production in early viral infection was the main goal of this study. Our in vitro model study showed that probiotic bacteria, either from the species Lactobacillus or Bifidobacteria have the ability...... dehydrogenases activity could be implied as the first indicator of potential inhibitory effects of the probiotics on virus replication. The interactions between probiotic bacteria, macrophages and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), markedly depended on the bacterial strain studied....

  6. Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis) as potential antiviral treatment in naturally BQCV infected honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurori, Adriana C; Bobiş, Otilia; Dezmirean, Daniel S; Mărghitaş, Liviu A; Erler, Silvio

    2016-08-15

    Viral diseases are one of the multiple factors associated with honeybee colony losses. Apart from their innate immune system, including the RNAi machinery, honeybees can use secondary plant metabolites to reduce or fully cure pathogen infections. Here, we tested the antiviral potential of Laurus nobilis leaf ethanolic extracts on forager honeybees naturally infected with BQCV (Black queen cell virus). Total viral loads were reduced even at the lowest concentration tested (1mg/ml). Higher extract concentrations (≥5mg/ml) significantly reduced virus replication. Measuring vitellogenin gene expression as an indicator for transcript homeostasis revealed constant RNA levels before and after treatment, suggesting that its expression was not impacted by the L. nobilis treatment. In conclusion, plant secondary metabolites can reduce virus loads and virus replication in naturally infected honeybees.

  7. Purification and properties of antiviral proteins from the leaves of Bougainvillea xbuttiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, S; Balasubrahmanyam, A; Lodha, M L; Kapoor, H C

    2001-10-01

    A non-phytotoxic, resistance inducing, proteinaceous antiviral principle was purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration from the leaves of Bougainvillea xbuttiana. It imparted resistance against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and sunnhemp rosette virus (SRV) in their respective test hosts viz. Nicotiana glutinosa, N. tabacum var. Samsun NN, and Cyamopsis tetragonoloba, respectively. The purified principle eluted as a single peak upon gel filtration, but exhibited two polypeptides on SDS-PAGE with Mr 28,000 and 24,000. The two polypeptides were found to be highly basic, rich in lysine with pI around 10.0 and 10.5, respectively. Since this principle effected local lesion inhibition in both treated and untreated top leaves of test host, it might be acting in the initial stages of virus infection as a systemic inducer.

  8. Current scenario of peptide-based drugs: the key roles of cationic antitumor and antiviral peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eMulder

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and host defense peptides (HDPs show vast potential as peptide-based drugs. Great effort has been made in order to exploit their mechanisms of action, aiming to identify their targets as well as to enhance their activity and bioavailability. In this review, we will focus on both naturally occurring and designed antiviral and antitumor cationic peptides, including those here called promiscuous, in which multiple targets are associated with a single peptide structure. Emphasis will be given to their bio-chemical features, selectivity against extra targets and molecular mechanisms. Peptides which possess antitumor activity against different cancer cell lines will be discussed, as well as peptides which inhibit virus replication, focusing on their applications for human health, animal health and agriculture, and their potential as new therapeutic drugs. Moreover, the development of production and nano-delivery systems for both classes of cationic peptides and perspectives on improving them will be considered.

  9. Antiviral and Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship Study for Dihydropyridones Derived from Curcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed, Bahjat A.; Kawkab Y. Saour; Rita S. Elias; AL-MASOUDI, NAJIM A.

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Pyridones are known to have variety of biological activities like antitumor, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antimalarial activities. This study presents antiviral evaluation of dihydropyridones derived from curcumin, as well as curcumin for comparison. Approach: The compounds evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against the viruses: HIV-1, Bovin viral Diarrhea, Yellow Fever, Reovirus 1, Herpesvirus 1, Vaccinia, Vescular Stomatitis, ...

  10. Antiviral Effect Assay of Aqueous Extract of Echium Amoenum-L against HSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farahani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal plants have been used for different diseases in past. There is an increasing need for substances with antiviral activity since the treatment of viral infections with the available antiviral drugs often leads to the problem of viral resistance. Therefore in the present study Echium amoenum L plant with ethnomedical background was screened for antiviral activity against HSV-1 in different times. Materials and Methods: Flower part of Echium amoenum L plant collected from Iran was extracted with different methods to obtain crude aqueous extract. This extract was screened for its cytotoxicity against Hep II cell line by CPE assay. Antiviral properties of the plant extract were determined by cytopathic effect inhibition assay.Results: Echium amoenum L extract exhibited significant antiviral activity at non toxic concentrations to the cell line used. Findings indicated that plant extract has the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation.Conclusion: Echium amoenum L plant had not toxic effect at highest concentrations to the cell lines used and showed the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation. Further research is needed to elucidate the active constituents of this plant which may be useful in the development of new and effective antiviral agents.

  11. Antiviral activity of monoterpenes beta-pinene and limonene against herpes simplex virus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Astani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are complex mixtures containing compounds of several different functional- group classes. Depending on the structure, we can distinguish monoterpenes, phenylpropanes, and other components. Here in this study two monoterpene compounds of essential oils, i.e. β-pinene and limonene were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro.All antiviral assays were performed using RC-37 cells. Cytotoxicity was determined in a neutral red assay, antiviral assays were performed with HSV-1 strain KOS. The mode of antiviral action was evaluated at different periods during the viral replication cycle. Acyclovir was used as positive antiviral control.Beta-pinenene and limonenen reduced viral infectivity by 100 %. The mode of antiviral action has been determined, only moderate antiviral effects were revealed by monoterpenes when these drugs were added to host cells prior infection or after entry of HSV into cells. However, both monoterpenes exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity by direct interaction with free virus particles. Both tested drugs interacted with HSV-1 in a dose-dependent manner thereby inactivating viral infection.These results suggest that monoterpenes in essential oils exhibit antiherpetic activity in the early phase of viral multiplication and might be used as potential antiviral agents.

  12. Antiviral effect of diammonium glycyrrhizinate on cell infection by porcine parvovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) can cause reproductive failure in swine resulting in economic losses to the industry. Antiviral effects of diammonium glycyrrhizinate (DG) have been reported on several animal viruses; however, to date it has yet to be tested on PPV. In this study, the antiviral activity of ...

  13. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iorio, Alfonso; Marchesini, Emanuela; Awad, Tahany;

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).......Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)....

  14. DMPD: An arms race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategies. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031256 An arms race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategie...s. Schroder M, Bowie AG. Biochem Soc Trans. 2007 Dec;35(Pt 6):1512-4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show An arms race...: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategies. PubmedID 18031256 Title An arms race

  15. Antiviral effect of ribavirin and acyclic nucleosid phosphonates against Radish mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    VOZÁBOVÁ, Tereza

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the antiviral effectiveness of ribavirin and acyclic nucleotide phosphonates to radish mosaic virus. Virus inoculation of plants with RaMV and immunological assay of the virus by ELISA. Subsequent application of antiviral agents and monitoring relative content of the virus in plants. Subsequent processing of data in tables and graphs, and then statistical evaluation.

  16. Coxsackievirus cloverleaf RNA containing a 5' triphosphate triggers an antiviral response via RIG-I activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Qian; Langereis, Martijn A; Olagnier, David; Chiang, Cindy; van de Winkel, Roel; van Essen, Peter; Zoll, Jan; Hiscott, John; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2014-01-01

    Upon viral infections, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and stimulate an antiviral state associated with the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and inflammatory markers. Type I IFNs play crucial roles in innate antiviral responses by

  17. Evaluation of the combination effect of different antiviral compounds against HIV in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt;

    1993-01-01

    3'-azido-3'deoxythymidine (AZT), a clinically used anti-HIV compound, was evaluated for antiviral effect on HIV infection in combination with other antiviral compounds in vitro. Interactions were evaluated by the median-effect principle and the isobologram technique. Synergistic effect was obtained...

  18. Evaluation of the combination effect of different antiviral compounds against HIV in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1993-01-01

    3'-azido-3'deoxythymidine (AZT), a clinically used anti-HIV compound, was evaluated for antiviral effect on HIV infection in combination with other antiviral compounds in vitro. Interactions were evaluated by the median-effect principle and the isobologram technique. Synergistic effect was obtained...

  19. Induction and suppression of tick cell antiviral RNAi responses by tick-borne flaviviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnettler, E.; Tykalova, H.; Watson, M.; Sharma, M.; Sterken, M.G.; Obbard, D.J.; Lewis, S.H.; McFarlane, M.; Bell-Sakyi, L.; Barry, G.; Weisheit, S.; Best, S.M.; Kuhn, R.J.; Pijlman, G.P.; Chase-Topping, M.E.; Gould, E.A.; Grubhoffer, L.; Fazakerley, J.K.; Kohl, A.

    2014-01-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted by distantly related arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes (class Insecta) and ticks (class Arachnida). RNA interference (RNAi) is the major antiviral mechanism in arthropods against arboviruses. Unlike in mosquitoes, tick antiviral RNAi is not understood, although this in

  20. The Range of Application of Domestic Antiviral Drug in Рediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Shamsheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies of the effectiveness and safety of domestic antiviral drug Аrbidol in children. Arbidol demonstrated antiviral activity not only against influenza viruses, and other respiratory viruses (respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, rhinovirus, coronavirus, rotavirus, and others.

  1. Host translation shutoff mediated by non-structural protein 2 is a critical factor in the antiviral state resistance of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Nishank; Sun, Chengqun; Metthew Lam, L K; Gardner, Christina L; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2016-09-01

    Most previous studies of interferon-alpha/beta (IFN-α/β) response antagonism by alphaviruses have focused upon interruption of IFN-α/β induction and/or receptor signaling cascades. Infection of mice with Venezuelan equine encephalitis alphavirus (VEEV) or Sindbis virus (SINV) induces serum IFN-α/β, that elicits a systemic antiviral state in uninfected cells successfully controlling SINV but not VEEV replication. Furthermore, VEEV replication is more resistant than that of SINV to a pre-existing antiviral state in vitro. While host macromolecular shutoff is proposed as a major antagonist of IFN-α/β induction, the underlying mechanisms of alphavirus resistance to a pre-existing antiviral state are not fully defined, nor is the mechanism for the greater resistance of VEEV. Here, we have separated viral transcription and translation shutoff with multiple alphaviruses, identified the viral proteins that induce each activity, and demonstrated that VEEV nonstructural protein 2-induced translation shutoff is likely a critical factor in enhanced antiviral state resistance of this alphavirus.

  2. Antiviral effect of HPMPC (Cidofovir®), entrapped in cationic liposomes: in vitro study on MDBK cell and BHV-1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korvasová, Zina; Drašar, Lukáš; Mašek, Josef; Turánek Knotigová, Pavlína; Kulich, Pavel; Matiašovic, Ján; Kovařčík, Kamil; Bartheldyová, Eliška; Koudelka, Štěpán; Škrabalová, Michaela; Miller, Andrew D; Holý, Antonín; Ledvina, Miroslav; Turánek, Jaroslav

    2012-06-10

    We designed and synthesised a series of new cationic lipids based on spermine linked to various hydrophobic anchors. These lipids could be potentially useful for the preparation of stable cationic liposomes intended for the construction of drug targeting systems applicable in the field of anticancer/antiviral therapy, vaccine carriers, and vectors for the gene therapy. Low in vitro toxicity was found for these compounds, especially for LD1, in several cell lines. The delivery of both a fluorescence marker (calcein) and antiviral drugs into cells has been achieved owing to a large extent of internalization of cationic liposomes (labelled by Lyssamine-Rhodamine PE or fluorescein-PE) as demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy and quantified by flow cytometry. The bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV-1) virus infection in vitro model using MDBK cells was employed to study the effect of the established antiviral drug HPMPC (Cidofovir®) developed by Prof. A. Holý. Inhibition of BHV-1 virus replication was studied by quantitative RT-PCR and confirmed by both Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We found that in vitro antiviral activity of HPMPC was significantly improved by formulation in cationic liposomes, which decreased the viral replication by about 2 orders of magnitude.

  3. Cross-Species Antiviral Activity of Goose Interferons against Duck Plague Virus Is Related to Its Positive Self-Feedback Regulation and Subsequent Interferon Stimulated Genes Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Wei, Yunan; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a group of antiviral cytokines acting as the first line of defense in the antiviral immunity. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of goose type I interferon (IFNα) and type II interferon (IFNγ) against duck plague virus (DPV). Recombinant goose IFNα and IFNγ proteins of approximately 20 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively, were expressed. Following DPV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) infection of duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) with IFNα and IFNγ pre-treatment, the number of viral gene copies decreased more than 100-fold, with viral titers dropping approximately 100-fold. Compared to the control, DPV-EGFP cell positivity was decreased by goose IFNα and IFNγ at 36 hpi (3.89%; 0.79%) and 48 hpi (17.05%; 5.58%). In accordance with interferon-stimulated genes being the "workhorse" of IFN activity, the expression of duck myxovirus resistance (Mx) and oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) was significantly upregulated (p interferon. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of the interferon antiviral system in aquatic birds and to the development of interferon-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against viral disease.

  4. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Debin; Zhao, Mingzhi; Dong, Liwei; Zhao, Lu; Zou, Mingwei; Sun, Hetong; Zhang, Mengying; Liu, Hongyu; Zou, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4) are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the expression of the antiviral genes MxA and OAS and two of them, analog-6 and -7, displayed an unexpected high potency that is higher than that of type I IFN (IFN-α2a) in activating the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-luciferase reporter. Importantly, both analog-6 and -7 effectively inhibited replication of hepatitis C virus in Huh-7.5.1 cells, with an IC50 that is comparable to that of IFN-α2a; and consistent with the roles of IFN-λ in mucosal epithelia, both analogs potently inhibited replication of H3N2 influenza A virus in A549 cells. Together, these studies identified two IFN-λ analogs as candidates to be developed as novel antiviral biologics.

  5. Antiviral effects of two Ganoderma lucidum triterpenoids against enterovirus 71 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Tao, Junyan; Yang, Xiaoping [State Key Laboratory of Virology and College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yang, Zhuliang [Key Laboratory of Biodiversity and Biogeography, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Science, Kunming 650201 (China); Zhang, Li; Liu, Hongsheng [Department of Academy of Sciences, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Wu, Kailang [State Key Laboratory of Virology and College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, Jianguo, E-mail: jwu@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology and College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • Triterpenoids GLTA and GLTB display anti-EV71 activities without cytotoxicity. • The compounds prevent EV71 infection by blocking adsorption of the virus to the cells. • GLTA and GLTB bind to EV71 capsid at the hydrophobic pocket to block EV71 uncoating. • The two compounds significantly inhibit the replication of EV71 viral RNA. • GLTA and GLTB may be used as potential therapeutic agents to treat EV71 infection. - Abstract: Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and fatal neurological and systemic complications in children. However, there is currently no clinical approved antiviral drug available for the prevention and treatment of the viral infection. Here, we evaluated the antiviral activities of two Ganoderma lucidum triterpenoids (GLTs), Lanosta-7,9(11),24-trien-3-one,15;26-dihydroxy (GLTA) and Ganoderic acid Y (GLTB), against EV71 infection. The results showed that the two natural compounds display significant anti-EV71 activities without cytotoxicity in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells as evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay. The mechanisms by which the two compounds affect EV71 infection were further elucidated by three action modes using Ribavirin, a common antiviral drug, as a positive control. The results suggested that GLTA and GLTB prevent EV71 infection through interacting with the viral particle to block the adsorption of virus to the cells. In addition, the interactions between EV71 virion and the compounds were predicated by computer molecular docking, which illustrated that GLTA and GLTB may bind to the viral capsid protein at a hydrophobic pocket (F site), and thus may block uncoating of EV71. Moreover, we demonstrated that GLTA and GLTB significantly inhibit the replication of the viral RNA (vRNA) of EV71 replication through blocking EV71 uncoating. Thus, GLTA and GLTB may represent two potential

  6. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Debin; Zhao, Mingzhi; Dong, Liwei; Zhao, Lu; Zou, Mingwei; Sun, Hetong; Zhang, Mengying; Liu, Hongyu; Zou, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4) are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the expression of the antiviral genes MxA and OAS and two of them, analog-6 and -7, displayed an unexpected high potency that is higher than that of type I IFN (IFN-α2a) in activating the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-luciferase reporter. Importantly, both analog-6 and -7 effectively inhibited replication of hepatitis C virus in Huh-7.5.1 cells, with an IC50 that is comparable to that of IFN-α2a; and consistent with the roles of IFN-λ in mucosal epithelia, both analogs potently inhibited replication of H3N2 influenza A virus in A549 cells. Together, these studies identified two IFN-λ analogs as candidates to be developed as novel antiviral biologics. PMID:26792983

  7. Streptovirudins -- new antibiotics with antiviral activity. The antiviral spectrum and inhibition of Newcastle disease virus in cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonew, E; Tonew, M; Eckardt, K; Thrum, H; Gumpert, B

    1975-07-01

    Streptovirudins are new antibiotics isolated as a mixture of several structurally related compounds from fermentations of Streptomyces griseoflavus (Krainsky) Waksman et Henrici var. thuringensis JA 10124. They possess antiviral activity against RNA and DNA viruses cultivated in chick embryo cells, namely Sindbis, fowl plague, Newcastle disease (NDV), pseudorabies, vaccinia and sheep abortion viruses. The naturally formed streptovirudin complex, in concentrations of 20-2.5 mug/ml inhibited the viral cytopathic effect and caused 100 percent plaque reduction. Mengo, Coxsackie B1-B5, ECHO 30 and 33, and polio (wild and attenuated types 1, 2, and 3) viruses grown in FL cells were not sensitive in the agar-diffusion plaque-inhibition test. The antibiotics failed to show a direct virucidal effect on the NDV virion itself or to influence virus adsorption and penetration processes. Addition of streptovirudin complex during a one-step growth cycle of NDV from 0-4 hours after virus adsorption resulted in complete suppression of virus yield. The antibiotic complex consists of two main groups: I - A1, B1, C1, D1, E1 and II - A2, B2, C2, D2, E2, each of which possess antiviral activity.

  8. Meeting report: 4th ISIRV antiviral group conference: Novel antiviral therapies for influenza and other respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Fry, Alicia M

    2016-05-01

    The International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (isirv) held its 4th Antiviral Group Conference at the University of Texas on 2-4 June, 2015. With emerging resistance to the drugs currently licensed for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza viruses, primarily the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) and the M2 inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine, and the lack of effective interventions against other respiratory viruses, the 3-day programme focused on the discovery and development of inhibitors of several virus targets and key host cell factors involved in virus replication or mediating the inflammatory response. Virus targets included the influenza haemagglutinin, neuraminidase and M2 proteins, and both the respiratory syncytial virus and influenza polymerases and nucleoproteins. Therapies for rhinoviruses and MERS and SARS coronaviruses were also discussed. With the emerging development of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics, the potential implications of antibody-dependent enhancement of disease were also addressed. Topics covered all aspects from structural and molecular biology to preclinical and clinical studies. The importance of suitable clinical trial endpoints and regulatory issues were also discussed from the perspectives of both industry and government. This meeting summary provides an overview, not only for the conference participants, but also for those interested in the current status of antivirals for respiratory viruses.

  9. Design, synthesis and antiviral activity of 2-(3-amino-4-piperazinylphenyl)chromone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Kyoung; Yoon, Hyunjun; Barnard, Dale Lynn; Chong, Youhoon

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have confirmed that the antiviral activities of the chromone derivatives were controlled by the type as well as the position of the substituents attached to the chromone core structure. In the course of our ongoing efforts to optimize the antiviral activity of the chromone derivatives, we have been attempting to derivatize the chromone scaffold via introduction of various substituents. In this proof-of-concept study, we introduced a 3-amino-4-piperazinylphenyl functionality to the chromone scaffold and evaluated the antiviral activities of the resulting chromone derivatives. The synthesized 2-(3-amino-4-piperazinylphenyl)-chromones showed severe acute respiratory syndrome-corona virus (SARS-CoV)-specific antiviral activity. In particular, the 2-pyridinylpiperazinylphenyl substituents provided the resulting chromone derivatives with selective antiviral activity. Taken together, this result indicates the possible pharmacophoric role of the 2-pyridinylpiperazine functionality attached to the chromone scaffold, which warrants further in-depth structure-activity relationship study.

  10. Further iinvestigations on the antiviral activities of medicinal plants of togo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J B; Anani, K; Lee, M K; de Souza, C; Arnason, J T; Gbeassor, M

    2000-01-01

    Further studies were done on the antiviral activities of 10 species of Togolese medicinal plants, previously shown to possess activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV). The dominant activity in all cases was virucidal (direct inactivation of virus particles), although Adansonia digitata extracts also appeared to have intracellular antiviral activities as well, which could indicate the presence of multiple antiviral compounds, or a single compound with multiple actions. In the seven most active extracts, the anti-HSV activity was considerably enhanced by light, especially UVA (long wavelength UV), although they all showed "dark" antiviral activity as well. Thus, all the extracts contained antiviral photosensitizers. In all tests, the root-bark and leaf extracts of A. digitata were the most potent.

  11. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  12. Specific intracellular localization and antiviral property of genetic and splicing variants in bovine Mx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kohji; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Onogi, Akio; Ueda, Junji; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2009-12-01

    In bovine Mx1, only an amino acid substitution between Ile and Met at position 120 was detected by the nucleotide sequence and mismatched PCR-RFLP technique. The Ile variant was assumed to distribute mainly in the bovine population since the gene frequency was 79.3%. Furthermore, we cloned water buffalo Mx1 cDNA, which showed 51 nucleotide and 20 amino acid substitutions in comparison with that of the cow. Another kind of Mx1 cDNA, bovine Mx1B cDNA, was found and it was deduced to cause 27 amino acid substitutions at the N-terminus compared to the original Mx1 by alternative splicing. However, no variation was detected in 27 amino acids specific for Mx1B among 29 cows and a water buffalo. We established four kinds of mRNA-expressing 3T3 cells and Vero cells. When infection experiments were performed using recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVDeltaG*-G), bovine Ile and Met types and water buffalo Mx1 mRNA-expressing cell lines showed equally positive antiviral activities (p Mx1 and Mx1B proteins was examined by a transiently GFP-fused expression system in 3T3 cells. Bovine Mx1 was localized in the cytoplasm, while bovine Mx1B was mainly localized in the nucleus. An arginine-rich nuclear localization signal was found in 27 amino acids specific for Mx1B. N-terminus-deleted Mx1B was only localized in the cytoplasm, and the deleted Mx1B-expressing cell lines showed significantly positive antiviral activities (p < 0.05) against VSVDeltaG*-G.

  13. Antiviral activity of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor occurs via induction of the unfolded protein response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Perry

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin (Ub is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs. However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR. WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1 through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies.

  14. Multiscale modeling of influenza A virus infection supports the development of direct-acting antivirals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S Heldt

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses are respiratory pathogens that cause seasonal epidemics with up to 500,000 deaths each year. Yet there are currently only two classes of antivirals licensed for treatment and drug-resistant strains are on the rise. A major challenge for the discovery of new anti-influenza agents is the identification of drug targets that efficiently interfere with viral replication. To support this step, we developed a multiscale model of influenza A virus infection which comprises both the intracellular level where the virus synthesizes its proteins, replicates its genome, and assembles new virions and the extracellular level where it spreads to new host cells. This integrated modeling approach recapitulates a wide range of experimental data across both scales including the time course of all three viral RNA species inside an infected cell and the infection dynamics in a cell population. It also allowed us to systematically study how interfering with specific steps of the viral life cycle affects virus production. We find that inhibitors of viral transcription, replication, protein synthesis, nuclear export, and assembly/release are most effective in decreasing virus titers whereas targeting virus entry primarily delays infection. In addition, our results suggest that for some antivirals therapy success strongly depends on the lifespan of infected cells and, thus, on the dynamics of virus-induced apoptosis or the host's immune response. Hence, the proposed model provides a systems-level understanding of influenza A virus infection and therapy as well as an ideal platform to include further levels of complexity toward a comprehensive description of infectious diseases.

  15. Antiviral effects of artesunate on JC polyomavirus replication in COS-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Biswa Nath; Marschall, Manfred; Rinaldo, Christine Hanssen

    2014-11-01

    The human JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) causes the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). A growing number of patients with induced or acquired immunosuppression are at risk for infection, and no effective antiviral therapy is presently available. The widely used antimalarial drug artesunate has shown broad antiviral activity in vitro but limited clinical success. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of artesunate on JCPyV replication in vitro. The permissivity for JCPyV MAD-4 was first compared in four cell lines, and the monkey kidney cell line COS-7 was selected. Artesunate caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the extracellular JCPyV DNA load 96 h postinfection, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2.9 μM. This effect correlated with a decreased expression of capsid protein VP1 and a reduced release of infectious viral progeny. For concentrations of <20 μM, transient reductions in cellular DNA replication and proliferation were seen, while for higher concentrations, some cytotoxicity was detected. A selective index of 16.6 was found when cytotoxicity was calculated based on cellular DNA replication in the mock-infected cells, but interestingly, cellular DNA replication in the JCPyV-infected cells was more strongly affected. In conclusion, artesunate is efficacious in inhibiting JCPyV replication at micromolar concentrations, which are achievable in plasma. The inhibition at EC50 probably reflects an effect on cellular proteins and involves transient cytostatic effects. Our results, together with the favorable distribution of the active metabolite dihydroartemisinin to the central nervous system, suggest a potential use for artesunate in patients with PML.

  16. Aminoadamantanes versus other antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamers, Mieke H; Broekman, Mark; Drenth, Joost Ph

    2014-01-01

    months after the end of treatment) in approximately 40% to 80% of treated patients, depending on viral genotype. Recently, a new class of drugs have emerged for hepatitis C infection, the direct acting antivirals, which in combination with standard therapy or alone can lead to sustained virological......BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus infection affects around 3% of the world population or approximately 160 million people. A variable proportion (5% to 40%) of the infected people develop clinical symptoms. Hence, hepatitis C virus is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality...... with hepatic fibrosis, end-stage liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma as the dominant clinical sequelae. Combination therapy with pegylated (peg) interferon-alpha and ribavirin achieves sustained virological response (that is, undetectable hepatitis C virus RNA in serum by sensitivity testing six...

  17. Detection and management of antiviral resistance for influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Guy

    2013-11-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) are first-line agents for the treatment and prevention of influenza virus infections. As for other antivirals, the development of resistance to NAIs has become an important concern particularly in the case of A(H1N1) viruses and oseltamivir. The most frequently reported change conferring oseltamivir resistance in that viral context is the H275Y neuraminidase mutation (N1 numbering). Recent studies have shown that, in the presence of the appropriate permissive mutations, the H275Y variant can retain virulence and transmissibility in some viral backgrounds. Most oseltamivir-resistant influenza A virus infections can be managed with the use of inhaled or intravenous zanamivir, another NAI. New NAI compounds and non-neuraminidase agents as well as combination therapies are currently in clinical evaluation for the treatment for severe influenza infections. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Antiviral treatment in patients with cytomegalovirus positive ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kadir; Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus(CMV) is a common virus in patients with ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive drugs. Many studies suggested that CMV infection is an exacerbating factor in patients with ulcerative colitis. The role of CMV in exacerbations of ulcerative colitis has been discussed. One of studies starting this discussion is an article entitled "CMV positive ulcerative colitis: A single center experience and literature review" by Kopylov et al. However, we think that there are some points that should be emphasized about the study. Especially, the small number of patients in the study has led to meaningless results. Large controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify the benefit of antiviral therapy for active ulcerative colitis patients.

  19. Monitoring the antiviral effect of alpha interferon on individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chon Saeng; Jung, Jong Ha; Wakita, Takaji; Yoon, Seung Kew; Jang, Sung Key

    2007-08-01

    An infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) cDNA clone (JFH1) was generated recently. However, quantitative analysis of HCV infection and observation of infected cells have proved to be difficult because the yield of HCV in cell cultures is fairly low. We generated infectious HCV clones containing the convenient reporters green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Renilla luciferase in the NS5a-coding sequence. The new viruses responded to antiviral agents in a dose-dependent manner. Responses of individual cells containing HCV to alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) were monitored using GFP-tagged HCV and time-lapse confocal microscopy. Marked variations in the response to IFN-alpha were observed among HCV-containing cells.

  20. Identification and Analysis of Antiviral Compounds Against Poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyssen, Pieter; Franco, David; Tijsma, Aloys; Lacroix, Céline; De Palma, Armando; Neyts, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative, launched in 1988, had as its goal the eradication of polio worldwide by the year 2000 through large-scale vaccinations campaigns with the live attenuated oral PV vaccine (OPV) (Griffiths et al., Biologicals 34:73-74, 2006). Despite substantial progress, polio remains endemic in several countries and new imported cases are reported on a regular basis ( http://www.polioeradication.org/casecount.asp ).It was recognized by the poliovirus research community that developing antivirals against poliovirus would be invaluable in the post-OPV era. Here, we describe three methods essential for the identification of selective inhibitors of poliovirus replication and for determining their mode of action by time-of-drug-addition studies as well as by the isolation of compound-resistant poliovirus variants.

  1. Milestones in the discovery of antiviral agents: nucleosides and nucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik de Clercq

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, a number of milestones in the antiviral research field on nucleosides and nucleotides are reviewed in which the author played a significant part, especially in the initial stages of their development. Highlighted are the amino acyl esters of acyclovir, particularly valacyclovir (VACV, brivudin (BVDU and the valine ester of Cf1743 (FV-100, the 2′,3′-dideoxynucleosides (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, NRTIs, the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S-HPMPA, (S-HPMPC (cidofovir and alkoxyalkyl esters thereof (HDP-, ODE-CDV, adefovir and adefovir dipivoxil, tenofovir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF, combinations containing TDF and emtricitabine, i.e., Truvada®, Atripla®, Complera®/Eviplera® and the Quad pill, and the phosphonoamidate derivatives GS-7340, GS-9131, GS-9191 and GS-9219.

  2. Antiviral activities of medicinal plants of southern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R S; Hudson, J B; Manandhar, N P; Towers, G H

    1996-08-01

    In a screening of plants used traditionally in Nepal to treat diseases that could be caused by viruses, twenty-one methanol extracts from twenty species were quantitatively assayed for activity against three mammalian viruses: herpes simplex virus, Sindbis virus and poliovirus. Assays were performed in ultraviolet (UV)-A or visible light, as well as dark, and cytotoxicity was also noted. Impressive antiviral activities were exhibited by species of Bauhinia (Fabaceae), Carissa (Apocynaceae), Milletia (Fabaceae), Mallotus (Fabaceae), Rumex (Polygonaceae), Streblus (Moraceae), Terminalia (Combretaceae) and Tridax (Asteraceae). The Carissa extract was the most active, showing activity against all three viruses at a concentration of 12 micrograms/ml. Many of the other extracts showed partial inactivation of one or more test viruses.

  3. Polymorphisms and the antiviral property of porcine Mx1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Atsushi; Ko, Jae Hong; Morozumi, Takeya; Hamashima, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2002-12-01

    We determined the cDNA sequences of the type I interferon-inducible proteins, pig Mx1 from PK(15) and LLC-PK1 cells, and compared the antiviral activities of both Mx proteins, including Mx1 polymorphisms against vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Mx1 cDNA derived from PK(15) cells had an 11 bp-deletion in the 3' end of the coding region, and was estimated to encode 8 amino acid substitutions and a 23 amino acid extension compared to that from LLC-PK1 cells. VSV replication was inhibited in the 3T3 cells expressing Mx1 mRNA after the cDNA was transfected. However, the efficiency of this inhibition was not different between the cells expressing Mx1 mRNA from both PK and LLC. These results indicate that pig Mx1 protein confers resistance to VSV.

  4. Optimal antiviral switching to minimize resistance risk in HIV therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutao Luo

    Full Text Available The development of resistant strains of HIV is the most significant barrier to effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The most common causes of resistance development are patient noncompliance and pre-existence of resistant strains. In this paper, methods of antiviral regimen switching are developed that minimize the risk of pre-existing resistant virus emerging during therapy switches necessitated by virological failure. Two distinct cases are considered; a single previous virological failure and multiple virological failures. These methods use optimal control approaches on experimentally verified mathematical models of HIV strain competition and statistical models of resistance risk. It is shown that, theoretically, order-of-magnitude reduction in risk can be achieved, and multiple previous virological failures enable greater success of these methods in reducing the risk of subsequent treatment failures.

  5. Type I Interferons in Newborns—Neurotoxicity versus Antiviral Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Bogunovic

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In most children and adults, primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 is asymptomatic. However, very rarely (incidence of 1 in 1,000,000, it can cause herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. HSE also occurs in infants but with a much starker incidence of one in three. This age difference in susceptibility to HSV-1-caused HSE is not well understood. In a recent article in mBio, authors have identified the choroid plexus as the anatomical site of robust HSV-1 replication in the brain. They point to low levels of type I interferon (IFN receptor as causal of the lack of HSV-1 replication control in neonates, in contrast to adults. Here, I discuss these findings in the context of human genetic evidence. I point to the balancing act of type I IFN acting as a neurotoxin and an antiviral agent, an evolutionary choice of a lesser evil.

  6. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Lusvarghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Griffithsin (GRFT, an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin.

  7. Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus C; Nielsen, Emil Eik; Feinberg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Millions of people worldwide suffer from hepatitis C, which can lead to severe liver disease, liver cancer, and death. Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are relatively new and expensive interventions for chronic hepatitis C, and preliminary results suggest that DAAs may eradicate...... hepatitis C virus (HCV) from the blood (sustained virological response). However, it is still questionable if eradication of hepatitis C virus in the blood eliminates hepatitis C in the body, and improves survival and leads to fewer complications. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of DAAs...... HCV. We included trials irrespective of publication type, publication status, and language. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Our primary outcomes were hepatitis C-related morbidity, serious adverse events, and quality of life. Our secondary...

  8. An antiviral defense role of AGO2 in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagger J W Harvey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Argonaute (AGO proteins bind to small-interfering (siRNAs and micro (miRNAs to target RNA silencing against viruses, transgenes and in regulation of mRNAs. Plants encode multiple AGO proteins but, in Arabidopsis, only AGO1 is known to have an antiviral role. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To uncover the roles of specific AGOs in limiting virus accumulation we inoculated turnip crinkle virus (TCV to Arabidopsis plants that were mutant for each of the ten AGO genes. The viral symptoms on most of the plants were the same as on wild type plants although the ago2 mutants were markedly hyper-susceptible to this virus. ago2 plants were also hyper-susceptible to cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, confirming that the antiviral role of AGO2 is not specific to a single virus. For both viruses, this phenotype was associated with transient increase in virus accumulation. In wild type plants the AGO2 protein was induced by TCV and CMV infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these results we propose that there are multiple layers to RNA-mediated defense and counter-defense in the interactions between plants and their viruses. AGO1 represents a first layer. With some viruses, including TCV and CMV, this layer is overcome by viral suppressors of silencing that can target AGO1 and a second layer involving AGO2 limits virus accumulation. The second layer is activated when the first layer is suppressed because AGO2 is repressed by AGO1 via miR403. The activation of the second layer is therefore a direct consequence of the loss of the first layer of defense.

  9. Evaluation of antiviral effects of various disinfectants on dental handpieces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasani Tabatabai M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Handpieces are in current use in dental practice. Cross contamination from these instruments is very high because of their direct contact with blood and saliva. The purpose of this study was the evaluation of antiviral effects of different disinfectants on dental handpieces. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the effects of 5 groups of different materials and methods of sterilization and disinfection on virus elimination from dental handpieces were evaluated. Groups were as follows: 1- autoclave 2- Solarsept 3- Unisepta 4- Sodium hypochlorite (2% solution of household bleach 5- Sanosil. 14 handpieces in each group were washed, dried and autoclaved, then contaminated with polio and Herpes Simplex virus type I. Samples were washed with sterile distilled water. Antiviral agents were applied according to the manufacturer or previous investigations. After washing with water, the instruments were washed with MEM (Minimum Essential Medium and two samples of cell culture from each handpiece were prepared. In each group one handpiece was treated as control. The results were recorded after one week. Results: The percent of negative cell cultures in each group were as follow: A- For Poliovirus: 1- Autoclave: 100%. 2- Solarsept: 28.6%. 3- Unisepta: 0%. 4- Sodium hypochlorite: 28.6%. 5- Sanosil 92.9%. B- For Herpesvirus: 1- Autoclave: 100%. 2- Solarsept: 100%. 3- Unisepta: 100%. 4- Sodium hypochlorite: 57.1%. 5- Sanosil: 100%. Conclusion: According to our findings autoclave is the best method for virus elimination from dental handpieces. Sanosil with 92.9% efficiency was the best solution. Solarsept, hypochlorite with special method and Unisepta had the lowest effectiveness.

  10. Potential of small-molecule fungal metabolites in antiviral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Biswajit G

    2017-08-01

    Various viral diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, influenza, and hepatitis, have emerged as leading causes of human death worldwide. Scientific endeavor since invention of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase of pox virus in 1967 resulted in better understanding of virus replication and development of various novel therapeutic strategies. Despite considerable advancement in every facet of drug discovery process, development of commercially viable, safe, and effective drugs for these viruses still remains a big challenge. Decades of intense research yielded a handful of natural and synthetic therapeutic options. But emergence of new viruses and drug-resistant viral strains had made new drug development process a never-ending battle. Small-molecule fungal metabolites due to their vast diversity, stereochemical complexity, and preapproved biocompatibility always remain an attractive source for new drug discovery. Though, exploration of therapeutic importance of fungal metabolites has started early with discovery of penicillin, recent prediction asserted that only a small percentage (5-10%) of fungal species have been identified and much less have been scientifically investigated. Therefore, exploration of new fungal metabolites, their bioassay, and subsequent mechanistic study bears huge importance in new drug discovery endeavors. Though no fungal metabolites so far approved for antiviral treatment, many of these exhibited high potential against various viral diseases. This review comprehensively discussed about antiviral activities of fungal metabolites of diverse origin against some important viral diseases. This also highlighted the mechanistic details of inhibition of viral replication along with structure-activity relationship of some common and important classes of fungal metabolites.

  11. Curious discoveries in antiviral drug development: the role of serendipity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Antiviral drug development has often followed a curious meandrous route, guided by serendipity rather than rationality. This will be illustrated by ten examples. The polyanionic compounds (i) polyethylene alanine (PEA) and (ii) suramin were designed as an antiviral agent (PEA) or known as an antitrypanosomal agent (suramin), before they emerged as, respectively, a depilatory agent, or reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides (ddNs analogues) (iii) have been (and are still) used in the "Sanger" DNA sequencing technique, although they are now commercialized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the treatment of HIV infections. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (iv) was discovered as a selective anti-herpes simplex virus compound and is now primarily used for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. The prototype of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA], (v) was never commercialized, although it gave rise to several marketed products (cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir). 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (vi) and TIBO (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)]-one and -thione) (vii) paved the way to a number of compounds (i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, etravirine, and rilpivirine), which are now collectively called non-NRTIs. The bicyclam AMD3100 (viii) was originally described as an anti-HIV agent before it became later marketed as a stem cell mobilizer. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors (ix), while active against a broad range of (-)RNA viruses and poxviruses may be particularly effective against Ebola virus, and for (x) the O-ANP derivatives, the potential application range encompasses virtually all DNA viruses.

  12. Evasion of the Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Response by Filoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington B. Cárdenas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The members of the filoviruses are recognized as some of the most lethal viruses affecting human and non-human primates. The only two genera of the Filoviridae family, Marburg virus (MARV and Ebola virus (EBOV, comprise the main etiologic agents of severe hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in central Africa, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. Fatal outcomes have been associated with a late and dysregulated immune response to infection, very likely due to the virus targeting key host immune cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that are necessary to mediate effective innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite major progress in the development of vaccine candidates for filovirus infections, a licensed vaccine or therapy for human use is still not available. During the last ten years, important progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of filovirus pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence implicate the impairment of the host interferon (IFN antiviral innate immune response by MARV or EBOV as an important determinant of virulence. In vitro and in vivo experimental infections with recombinant Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV, the best characterized filovirus, demonstrated that the viral protein VP35 plays a key role in inhibiting the production of IFN-α/β. Further, the action of VP35 is synergized by the inhibition of cellular responses to IFN-α/β by the minor matrix viral protein VP24. The dual action of these viral proteins may contribute to an efficient initial virus replication and dissemination in the host. Noticeably, the analogous function of these viral proteins in MARV has not been reported. Because the IFN response is a major component of the innate immune response to virus infection, this chapter reviews recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of IFN-mediated antiviral evasion by filovirus infection.

  13. In Vitro Antiviral Effect of "Nanosilver" on Influenza Virus

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    P Mehrbod

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Influenza is a viral infectious disease with frequent seasonal epidemics causing world-wide economical and social effects. Due to antigenic shifts and drifts of influenza virus, long-lasting vaccine has not been developed so far. The current annual vaccines and effective antiviral drugs are not available sufficiently. Therefore in order to prevent spread of infectious agents including viruses, antiseptics are considered by world health authorities. Small particles of silver have a long history as general antiseptic and disinfectant. Silver does not induce resistance in microorganisms and this ability in Nano-size is stronger. Materials and methods: The aim of this study was to determine antiviral effects of Nanosilver against influenza virus. TCID50 (50% Tissue Culture Infectious Dose of the virus as well as CC50 (50% Cytotoxic Concentration of Nanosilver was obtained by MTT (3- [4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, Sigma method. This compound was non-toxic to MDCK (Madin-Darbey Canin Kidney cells at concentration up to 1 µg/ml.  Effective minimal cytotoxic concentration and 100 TCID50 of the virus were added to the confluent cells.  Inhibitory effects of Nanosilver on the virus and its cytotoxicity were assessed at different temperatures using Hemagglutination (HA assay, RT-PCR (Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction, and DIF (Direct Immunofluorescent. RT-PCR and free band densitometry software were used to compare the volume of the PCR product bands on the gel. Results and Discussion:  In this study it was found that Nanosilver has destructive effect on the virus membrane glycoprotein knobs as well as the cells.

  14. Sensing of HSV-1 by the cGAS-STING pathway in microglia orchestrates antiviral defence in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line S; Lopušná, Katarína; Winther, Henriette;

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV...... is strongly increased in neurons in STING-deficient mice. Interestingly, HSV-infected microglia confer STING-dependent antiviral activities in neurons and prime type I IFN production in astrocytes through the TLR3 pathway. Thus, sensing of HSV-1 infection in the CNS by microglia through the cGAS-STING pathway...

  15. Synthesis of new acridines and hydrazones derived from cyclic beta-diketone for cytotoxic and antiviral evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sabbagh, Osama I; Rady, Hanaa M

    2009-09-01

    Cyclic beta-diketone namely, dimedone was utilized to prepare different chemical entities whether cyclic such as acridines, thiadiazole and triazole or acyclic systems as hydrazide, hydrazones, thiosemicarbazide and semicarbazide. The structures of the novel compounds were determined using elemental analyses and various spectroscopic methods. Most acyclic derivatives especially semicarbazide 19, hydrazide 9 and thiosemicarbazide 16 showed a higher in vitro cytotoxic activity against hepatoma cell line (HepG2) than the cyclized acridine derivatives. The antiviral activity of the new compounds against Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) using the plague infectivity reduction assay revealed that the acridine 4 and the hydrazone 12 were more active than the reference drug amantadine.

  16. Sensing of HSV-1 by the cGAS-STING pathway in microglia orchestrates antiviral defence in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line S; Lopušná, Katarína; Winther, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV...... is strongly increased in neurons in STING-deficient mice. Interestingly, HSV-infected microglia confer STING-dependent antiviral activities in neurons and prime type I IFN production in astrocytes through the TLR3 pathway. Thus, sensing of HSV-1 infection in the CNS by microglia through the cGAS-STING pathway...

  17. Hybrid origins and the earliest stages of diploidization in the highly successful recent polyploid Capsella bursa-pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Gavin M; Gos, Gesseca; Steige, Kim A; Salcedo, Adriana; Holm, Karl; Josephs, Emily B; Arunkumar, Ramesh; Ågren, J Arvid; Hazzouri, Khaled M; Wang, Wei; Platts, Adrian E; Williamson, Robert J; Neuffer, Barbara; Lascoux, Martin; Slotte, Tanja; Wright, Stephen I

    2015-03-03

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) events have occurred repeatedly during flowering plant evolution, and there is growing evidence for predictable patterns of gene retention and loss following polyploidization. Despite these important insights, the rate and processes governing the earliest stages of diploidization remain poorly understood, and the relative importance of genetic drift, positive selection, and relaxed purifying selection in the process of gene degeneration and loss is unclear. Here, we conduct whole-genome resequencing in Capsella bursa-pastoris, a recently formed tetraploid with one of the most widespread species distributions of any angiosperm. Whole-genome data provide strong support for recent hybrid origins of the tetraploid species within the past 100,000-300,000 y from two diploid progenitors in the Capsella genus. Major-effect inactivating mutations are frequent, but many were inherited from the parental species and show no evidence of being fixed by positive selection. Despite a lack of large-scale gene loss, we observe a decrease in the efficacy of natural selection genome-wide due to the combined effects of demography, selfing, and genome redundancy from WGD. Our results suggest that the earliest stages of diploidization are associated with quantitative genome-wide decreases in the strength and efficacy of selection rather than rapid gene loss, and that nonfunctionalization can receive a "head start" through a legacy of deleterious variants and differential expression originating in parental diploid populations.

  18. Boreal earliest Triassic biotas elucidate globally depauperate hard substrate communities after the end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatoń, Michał; Niedźwiedzki, Grzegorz; Blom, Henning; Kear, Benjamin P.

    2016-11-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction constituted the most devastating biotic crisis of the Phanerozoic. Its aftermath was characterized by harsh marine conditions incorporating volcanically induced oceanic warming, widespread anoxia and acidification. Bio-productivity accordingly experienced marked fluctuations. In particular, low palaeolatitude hard substrate communities from shallow seas fringing Western Pangaea and the Tethyan Realm were extremely impoverished, being dominated by monogeneric colonies of filter-feeding microconchid tubeworms. Here we present the first equivalent field data for Boreal hard substrate assemblages from the earliest Triassic (Induan) of East Greenland. This region bordered a discrete bio-realm situated at mid-high palaeolatitude (>30°N). Nevertheless, hard substrate biotas were compositionally identical to those from elsewhere, with microconchids encrusting Claraia bivalves and algal buildups on the sea floor. Biostratigraphical correlation further shows that Boreal microconchids underwent progressive tube modification and unique taxic diversification concordant with changing habitats over time. We interpret this as a post-extinction recovery and adaptive radiation sequence that mirrored coeval subequatorial faunas, and thus confirms hard substrate ecosystem depletion as a hallmark of the earliest Triassic interval globally.

  19. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu D

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Debin Yu,1 Mingzhi Zhao,2 Liwei Dong,1 Lu Zhao,1 Mingwei Zou,3 Hetong Sun,4 Mengying Zhang,4 Hongyu Liu,4 Zhihua Zou1 1National Engineering Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine, Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, 2State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, National Engineering Research Center for Protein Drugs, Beijing Proteome Research Center, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Prosit Sole Biotechnology, Co., Ltd., Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Type III interferons (IFNs (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4 are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the

  20. Expression of Canine Interferon Alpha in Silkworm-baculovirus Expression System and the Antiviral Activity Assay%犬α干扰素在家蚕杆状病毒表达系统中的表达及其抗病毒活性的测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李皓洋; 胡小元; 易咏竹; 杨鑫; 张志芳; 李轶女

    2015-01-01

    犬α干扰素(CaIFNα)在犬病防治过程中应用广泛。旨在开发一种高效的CaIFNα表达方法。首先按家蚕密码子的偏好性对GenBank中的一个CaIFNα基因进行了优化与合成,将其克隆到杆状病毒转移载体pVL1393中,并与亲本病毒BmBacmid共转染家蚕细胞进行细胞内重组。得到的重组病毒用于感染家蚕幼虫,收集发病幼虫的蚕血淋巴用于CaIFNα检测。采用细胞病变抑制法在MDCK-VSV*GFP系统中测定其抗病毒活性。结果显示家蚕表达的CaIFNα能有效抑制VSV*GFP在细胞内的复制,其抗病毒活性不低于1.78×106U/mL。%Canine interferon alpha(CaIFNα)was widely used in the prophylaxis and cure of canine diseases. The purpose of this study is to develop an efficient method to express CaIFNα. A canine interferon alpha gene in GenBank was optimized according to the codon bias of silkworm and synthesized, and then cloned into the baculovirus transfer vector pVL1393 to construct the recombinant plasmid pVL-CaIFNα. The pVL-CaIFNα was co-transfected with the BmBacmid DNA into silkworm cells and afterin vivo recombination. The recombinant virus was gathered and used to infect silkworm larvae. The hemolymph of infected larvae was collected for antiviral activity assay. The antiviral activity of expressed CaIFNα was examined on Madin-Darby canine kidney cells infected with the vesicular stomatitis virus expressing green fluorescent protein(VSV*GFP). The result showed that CaIFNα expressed in silkworm can inhibit the multiplication of VSV*GFP and the antiviral activity was about 1.78×106U/mL.