WorldWideScience

Sample records for e4 electronic image

  1. An optimized negative-staining protocol of electron microscopy for apoE4•POPC lipoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Song, James; Newhouse, Yvonne; Zhang, Shengli; Weisgraber, Karl H.; Ren, Gang

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE), one of the major protein components of lipoproteins in the peripheral and central nervous systems, regulates cholesterol metabolism through its interaction with members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. One key to understanding apoE function is determining the structure of lipid-bound forms of apoE. Negative-staining (NS) electron microscopy (EM) is an easy and rapid approach for studying the structure and morphology of lipid-bound forms of apoE. However, an artifact of using the conventional NS protocol is that the apoE•phospholipid particles form rouleaux. In this study, we used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to examine apoE4•palmitoyl-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) particles in a frozen-hydrated native state. By comparing the particle sizes and shapes produced by different NS protocols to those produced by cryo-EM, we propose an optimized protocol to examine apoE4•POPC particles. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the particle sizes differ by less than 5% between the optimized protocol and the cryo-EM method, with similar shapes. The high contrast and fine detail of particle images produced using this optimized protocol lend themselves to the structural study of lipid-bound forms of apoE. PMID:19965615

  2. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging. 2. Radiofrequency FT-EPR Imaging. Sankaran Subramanian and Murali C Krishna. Keywords. FT-EPR, Hahn-echo, acquisition delay, single-point imaging (SPI), gradient-echo, k-space, echo-SPI, carbogen, oxygen relaxivity, T2*. T2- and T1-based oximetry, co- registration ...

  3. Conversion electron surface imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, G M; Wehner, A

    1999-01-01

    A method of imaging the Moessbauer absorption over the surface of a sample based on counting conversion electrons emitted from the surface following resonant absorption of gamma radiation is described. This Conversion Electron Surface Imaging (CESI) method is somewhat analogous to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), particularly chemical shift imaging, and similar tomographic reconstruction techniques are involved in extracting the image. The theory behind the technique and a prototype device is described, as well as the results of proof-of-principle experiments which demonstrate the function of the device. Eventually this same prototype device will be part of a system to determine the spatial variation of the Moessbauer spectrum over the surface of a sample. Applications include imaging of variations of surface properties of steels and other iron containing alloys, as well as other surfaces over which sup 5 sup 7 Fe has been deposited.

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the ...

  5. Imaging Characteristics Of Electronic Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    1989-03-01

    Electronic imaging in the form of television has served the public for over 40 years. Television cameras have up to now used mostly photoconductive tubes to capture the live image. However, the last ten years have seen the advances in microelectronics, including VLSI technology, introduce newer, more flexible ways to record images via the solid state sensor. One version of the solid state sensor, the charge coupled device (CCD) has found its way into consumer electronic imaging, replacing the Super 8 movie system, and today, portable, commercial television cameras are starting to use CCD arrays instead of the more conventional photoconductive tubes. There are several electronic still cameras (ESC) on the market using solid state sensors, but due to the limited number of imaging sites or pixels on these imaging sensors, the quality is far below that of present photographic-based systems. This paper will consider imaging characteristics of photoconductive tubes (solid state imaging sensors) and how they compare to photographic film. Also, based on a system analysis, the requirements for a solid state sensor that will provide image quality equal to current photographic systems will be defined. The importance of digital image processing and digital image compression will also be discussed.

  6. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Resonance Imaging (MRI). Unlike MRI which addresses the naturally occurring abundant water protons in vivo, EPRI re- quires the administration of non-toxic paramagnetic free radicals into the living system prior to monitoring their distribution. The principle behind imaging is to generate profiles of EPR spectra in presence ...

  7. Imaging electron motion in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sagar; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2017-02-01

    A cooled scanning probe microscope (SPM) is an ideal tool to image electronic motion in graphene: the SPM tip acts as a scanning gate, which interacts with the electron gas below. We introduce the technique using our group’s previous work on imaging electron flow from a quantum point contact in a GaAs 2DEG and tuning an InAs quantum dot in an InAs/InP nanowire. Carriers in graphene have very different characteristics: electrons and holes travel at a constant speed with no bandgap, and they pass through potential barriers via Klein tunneling. In this paper, we review the extension of SPM imaging techniques to graphene. We image the cyclotron orbits passing between two narrow contacts in a single-atomic-layer graphene device in a perpendicular magnetic field. Magnetic focusing produces a peak in transmission between the contacts when the cyclotron diameter is equal to the contact spacing. The charged SPM tip deflects electrons passing from one contact to the other, changing the transmission when it interrupts the flow. By displaying the change in transmission as the tip is raster scanned above the sample, an image of flow is obtained. In addition, we have developed a complementary technique to image electronic charge using a cooled scanning capacitance microscope (SCM) that uses a sensitive charge preamplifier near the SPM tip to achieve a charge noise level 0.13 e Hz-1/2 with high spatial resolution 100 nm. The cooled SPM and SCM can be used to probe the motion of electrons on the nanoscale in graphene devices.

  8. Advances in imaging and electron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    1995-01-01

    Academic Press is pleased to announce the creation of Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics. This serial publication results from the merger of two long running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics will feature extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies,microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Continuation order customers for either of the original Advances will receiveVolume 90, the first combined volume.

  9. Advances in imaging and electron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mulvey, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Academic Press is pleased to announce the creation of Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics. This serial publication results from the merger of two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics will feature extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies,microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.

  10. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. ECE imaging of electron temperature and electron temperature fluctuations (invited)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, B.H.; Domier, C.W.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Brower, D.L.; Cima, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Oyevaar, T.; van de Pol, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECE imaging or ECEI) is a novel plasma diagnostic technique for the study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in magnetic fusion plasma devices. Instead of a single receiver located in the tokamak midplane as in conventional ECE radiometers, ECEI

  12. Transmission Electron Microscopy Physics of Image Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kohl, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fifth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of aberration correction and energy filtering; moreover, the topics introduced in the fourth edition have been updated. Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation is written f...

  13. Fundamentals of electronic image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Weeks, Arthur R

    1996-01-01

    This book is directed to practicing engineers and scientists who need to understand the fundamentals of image processing theory and algorithms to perform their technical tasks. It is intended to fill the gap between existing high-level texts dedicated to specialists in the field and the need for a more practical, fundamental text on image processing. A variety of example images are used to enhance reader understanding of how particular image processing algorithms work.

  14. Imaging Electrons in Few-Electron Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, P.; Hanson, M.

    2005-03-01

    Single-electron quantum dots are important candidates for quantum information processing. We have developed a new technique to image electrons inside a single-electron quantum dot in the Coulomb blockade regime, using a scanning probe microscope (SPM) at liquid He temperatures (1). A single-electron quantum dot was formed in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) inside a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure by surface gates. Spatial images of an electron inside the dot were obtained by fixing the tip voltage and recording the dot conductance while scanning the SPM tip above the quantum dot. The images show a ring of increased conductance about the center of the dot, where the dot conductance is on the Coulomb blockade conductance peak between 0 and 1 electrons. Simulations show that this technique can be used to extract the wavefunction of electrons inside the dot if the tip perturbation is narrower than the wave function (2). A charged SPM tip promised to be a useful tool for manipulating electrons in quantum dot circuits. 1) P. Fallahi, A.C. Bleszynski, et al submitted to Nanoletters. 2) P. Fallahi, et al Proc. 27 Int. Conf. on Physics and Semiconductors (ICPS27), Flagstaff, July 26-30, 2004, in press. *This work was supported at Harvard University by DARPA DAAD19-01-1-0659 and by the NSEC, NSF PHY-01-17795, and at UCSB by QUEST NSF Science and Technology Center.

  15. Front-end electronics for imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Geronimo, G D; Radeka, V; Yu, B

    2001-01-01

    Front-end electronics for imaging detectors with large numbers of pixels (10 sup 5 -10 sup 7) is reviewed. The noise limits as a function of detector capacitance and power dissipation are presented for CMOS technology. Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPIs) are discussed and their potential noise performance is illustrated.

  16. Cellular imaging electron tomography and related techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book highlights important techniques for cellular imaging and covers the basics and applications of electron tomography and related techniques. In addition, it considers practical aspects and broadens the technological focus by incorporating techniques that are only now becoming accessible (e.g. block face imaging).  The first part of the book describes the electron microscopy 3D technique available to scientists around the world, allowing them to characterize organelles, cells and tissues. The major emphasis is on new technologies like scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography, though the book also reviews some of the more proven technologies like electron tomography. In turn, the second part is dedicated to the reconstruction of data sets, signal improvement and interpretation.

  17. Electronic Imaging in Astronomy Detectors and Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    McLean, Ian

    2008-01-01

    The second edition of Electronic Imaging in Astronomy: Detectors and Instrumentation describes the remarkable developments that have taken place in astronomical detectors and instrumentation in recent years – from the invention of the charge-coupled device (CCD) in 1970 to the current era of very large telescopes, such as the Keck 10-meter telescopes in Hawaii with their laser guide-star adaptive optics which rival the image quality of the Hubble Space Telescope. Authored by one of the world’s foremost experts on the design and development of electronic imaging systems for astronomy, this book has been written on several levels to appeal to a broad readership. Mathematical expositions are designed to encourage a wider audience, especially among the growing community of amateur astronomers with small telescopes with CCD cameras. The book can be used at the college level for an introductory course on modern astronomical detectors and instruments, and as a supplement for a practical or laboratory class.

  18. Imaging Electrons in Ultra-thin Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Erin E.

    2011-12-01

    Ultra-thin semiconductor nanowires are promising systems in which to explore novel low-dimensional physics and are attractive candidates for future nanoelectronics. Ultra-thin nanowires with diameters of 20 to 30 nm are essentially one-dimensional (ID) for moderate electron number, because only one radial subband is occupied. Low-temperature scanning gate microscopy is especially well suited for improving our understanding of nanowires in order to optimize the construction of nanowire systems. We use a home-built liquid-He cooled scanning gate microscope (SGM) to probe and manipulate electrons beneath the surface of devices. The SGM's conductance images are obtained by scanning the charged SGM tip above the sample and recording the change in conductance through the device as a function of tip position. We present simulations of extracting the amplitude of the 1D electron wavefunction along the length of the quantum dot in an ultra-thin InAs/InP heterostructure nanowire (diameter = 30 nm) using a SGM. A weakly perturbing SGM tip slightly dents the electron wavefunction inside the quantum dot, and we propose measuring the change in energy of the dot due to the perturbation as a function of tip position. By measuring the change in energy of the dot and by knowing the form of the tip potential, the amplitude of the wavefunction can be found. This extraction technique could serve as a powerful tool to improve our understanding of electron behavior in quasi-1 D systems. We have used our SGM to image the conductance through an ultra-thin (diameter ˜ 30 nm) 1nAs nanowire with two InP barriers. Our imaging technique provides detailed information regarding the position and flow of electrons in the nanowire. We demonstrate that the charged SPM tip's position or voltage can be used to control the number of electrons on the quantum dots. We spatially locate three quantum dots in series along the length of the ultra-thin nanowire. Using energy level spectroscopy and the

  19. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, E., E-mail: erich.mueller@kit.edu; Gerthsen, D.

    2017-02-15

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion. - Highlights: • Sample thickness and composition are quantified by backscattered electron imaging. • A thin sample is used to achieve spatial resolution of few nanometers. • Calculations are carried out with a time-saving electron diffusion model. • Small differences in atomic number and density detected at low electron energies.

  20. The role of electronic media in shaping the country's image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azel Zhanibek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the influence of electronic media in the country to external image of Kazakhstan. Special attention is paid to the experience of various countries in promoting the country's image by electronic media.

  1. Advances in imaging and electron physics time resolved electron diffraction for chemistry, biology and material science

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics merges two long-running serials-Advances in Electronics & Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  2. Image restoration in cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penczek, Pawel A

    2010-01-01

    Image restoration techniques are used to obtain, given experimental measurements, the best possible approximation of the original object within the limits imposed by instrumental conditions and noise level in the data. In molecular electron microscopy (EM), we are mainly interested in linear methods that preserve the respective relationships between mass densities within the restored map. Here, we describe the methodology of image restoration in structural EM, and more specifically, we will focus on the problem of the optimum recovery of Fourier amplitudes given electron microscope data collected under various defocus settings. We discuss in detail two classes of commonly used linear methods, the first of which consists of methods based on pseudoinverse restoration, and which is further subdivided into mean-square error, chi-square error, and constrained based restorations, where the methods in the latter two subclasses explicitly incorporates non-white distribution of noise in the data. The second class of methods is based on the Wiener filtration approach. We show that the Wiener filter-based methodology can be used to obtain a solution to the problem of amplitude correction (or "sharpening") of the EM map that makes it visually comparable to maps determined by X-ray crystallography, and thus amenable to comparative interpretation. Finally, we present a semiheuristic Wiener filter-based solution to the problem of image restoration given sets of heterogeneous solutions. We conclude the chapter with a discussion of image restoration protocols implemented in commonly used single particle software packages. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electron beam throughput from raster to imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywno, Marek

    2016-12-01

    Two architectures of electron beam tools are presented: single beam MEBES Exara designed and built by Etec Systems for mask writing, and the Reflected E-Beam Lithography tool (REBL), designed and built by KLA-Tencor under a DARPA Agreement No. HR0011-07-9-0007. Both tools have implemented technologies not used before to achieve their goals. The MEBES X, renamed Exara for marketing purposes, used an air bearing stage running in vacuum to achieve smooth continuous scanning. The REBL used 2 dimensional imaging to distribute charge to a 4k pixel swath to achieve writing times on the order of 1 wafer per hour, scalable to throughput approaching optical projection tools. Three stage architectures were designed for continuous scanning of wafers: linear maglev, rotary maglev, and dual linear maglev.

  4. Imaging Cytoskeleton Components by Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitkina, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex of detergent-insoluble components of the cytoplasm playing critical roles in cell motility, shape generation, and mechanical properties of a cell. Fibrillar polymers-actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments-are major constituents of the cytoskeleton, which constantly change their organization during cellular activities. The actin cytoskeleton is especially polymorphic, as actin filaments can form multiple higher order assemblies performing different functions. Structural information about cytoskeleton organization is critical for understanding its functions and mechanisms underlying various forms of cellular activity. Because of the nanometer-scale thickness of cytoskeletal fibers, electron microscopy (EM) is a key tool to determine the structure of the cytoskeleton. This article describes application of rotary shadowing (or metal replica) EM for visualization of the cytoskeleton. The procedure is applicable to thin cultured cells growing on glass coverslips and consists of detergent extraction of cells to expose their cytoskeleton, chemical fixation to provide stability, ethanol dehydration and critical point drying to preserve three-dimensionality, rotary shadowing with platinum to create contrast, and carbon coating to stabilize replicas. This technique provides easily interpretable three-dimensional images, in which individual cytoskeletal fibers are clearly resolved, and individual proteins can be identified by immunogold labeling. More importantly, replica EM is easily compatible with live cell imaging, so that one can correlate the dynamics of a cell or its components, e.g., expressed fluorescent proteins, with high resolution structural organization of the cytoskeleton in the same cell.

  5. A Document Imaging Technique for Implementing Electronic Loan Approval Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J. Manikandan; C.S. Celin; V.M. Gayathri

    2015-01-01

    ...), research fields, crime investigation fields and military fields. In this paper, we proposed a document image processing technique, for establishing electronic loan approval process (E-LAP) [2...

  6. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the theory of image and contrast formation and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal structure determination and imaging of lattice defects X-ray microanalysis and energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The second edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the areas of energy-loss spectroscopy, crystal-lattice imaging and reflection electron microscopy

  7. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1993-01-01

    "Transmission Electron Microscopy" presents the theory of image and contrastformation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy Theprinciples of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also analysed are the kinetical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure determination and imaging of lattices and their defects X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The third edition includes a brief discussionof Schottky emission guns, some clarification of minor details, and references to the recent literature

  8. Transmission electron imaging in the Delft multibeam scanning electron microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.; Kruit, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our group is developing a multibeam scanning electron microscope (SEM) with 196 beams in order to increase the throughput of SEM. Three imaging systems using, respectively, transmission electron detection, secondary electron detection, and backscatter electron detection are designed in order to

  9. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, K. S., E-mail: kssim@mmu.edu.my; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  10. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: Experimental observations and possible mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Su, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Egerton, R.F. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Konno, M. [Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Wu, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zhu, Y., E-mail: zhu@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. -- Research highlights: {yields} Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in an aberration-corrected electron microscope. {yields} High-resolution secondary electron imaging mechanism. {yields} Image contrast quantification and as functions of imaging conditions. {yields} Simultaneous acquisition of atomic images from surface and bulk.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1997-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray micronanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fourth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of Schottky emission guns, convergent-beam electron diffraction, electron tomography, holography and the high resolution of crystal lattices.

  12. Low energy electron imaging using Medipix 2 detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikharulidze, I.; van Gastel, Raoul; Schramm, S.; Abrahams, J.P.; Poelsema, Bene; Tromp, R.M.; van der Molen, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM) and Photo-Emission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) predominantly use a combination of microchannel plate (MCP), phosphor screen and optical camera to record images formed by 10–20 keV electrons. We have tested the performance of a LEEM/PEEM instrument with a Medipix2

  13. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  15. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi [Science and Medical Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hiroaki [Corporate Manufacturing Strategy Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-1991 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  16. Secondary electron imaging of monolayer materials inside a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cretu, Ovidiu, E-mail: cretu.ovidiu@nims.go.jp; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazutomo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan)

    2015-08-10

    A scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a backscattered and secondary electron detector is shown capable to image graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Secondary electron contrasts of the two lightest monolayer materials are clearly distinguished from the vacuum level. A signal difference between these two materials is attributed to electronic structure differences, which will influence the escape probabilities of the secondary electrons. Our results show that the secondary electron signal can be used to distinguish between the electronic structures of materials with atomic layer sensitivity, enhancing its applicability as a complementary signal in the analytical microscope.

  17. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging: 2. Radiofrequency FT ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FT-EPR, Hahn-echo, acquisition delay, single-point imaging (SPI), gradient-echo, k-space, echo-SPI, carbogen, oxygen relaxivity, T2* T2- and T1-based oximetry, coregistration, cycling hypoxia, blood volume, angiogram, Warburg effect, metabolic imaging.

  18. Advances in imaging and electron physics the scanning transmission electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.  This particular volume presents several timely articles on the scanning transmission electron microscope. Updated with contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends Provides an invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  19. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  20. Imaging with the gas electron multiplier

    CERN Document Server

    Sauli, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM), introduced several years ago, is finding numerous applications thanks to its excellent performances in detecting and localizing ionizing radiation. This note summarizes recent developments of the technology, and presents some examples of applications.

  1. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Jason, E-mail: jason.holm@nist.gov; Keller, Robert R.

    2016-08-15

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. - Highlights: • A modular aperture system for STEM-in-SEM imaging is described. • A flexible cantilever sample holder that can maximize camera length is described. • The aperture system and sample holder enable complete acceptance angle control. • Most STEM imaging modes can be implemented without multi-segment detectors.

  2. Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-12

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0045 Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules Martin Centurion UNIVERSITY OF NEBRSKA Final Report 01/12...Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...a gaseous target of atoms or molecules. An optical setup was designed and constructed to compensate for the blurring of the temporal resolution due

  3. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, B.H.; Hsia, R. P.; Domier, C.W.; Burns, S. R.; Hillyer, T. R.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Oyevaar, T.; Donne, A. J. H.; R. T. P. Team,

    1999-01-01

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 mu s. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low

  4. Analysis of electron energy-loss spectra and images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W.J. Sorber (Lianne)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSeveral methods are proposed for the elemental analysis of biological material with the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) in a Zeiss EM902. For spectra, the Simplex-method was tested and compared to Egerton's 2- area method, the

  5. Electron accelerating unit for streak image tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The distance between the cathode and the mesh is 1.2 mm. The electric field in the cathode-to-mesh region is a self-focusing field, which can reduce the electron beam size. There are three advantages of the accelerating unit. In the pulsed mode, a pulsed voltage is applied to the accelerating electrode. First, the SIT works ...

  6. [Electronic Device for Retinal and Iris Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drahanský, M; Kolář, R; Mňuk, T

    This paper describes design and construction of a new device for automatic capturing of eye retina and iris. This device has two possible ways of utilization - either for biometric purposes (persons recognition on the base of their eye characteristics) or for medical purposes as supporting diagnostic device. eye retina, eye iris, device, acquisition, image.

  7. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  8. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  9. Prospects for electron imaging with ultrafast time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Reed, Bryan W.; Torralva, Ben R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2007-03-01

    Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here the authors demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with 10nm/10ps spatiotemporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10km/s) without smearing. The authors outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, the authors present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10nm/10ps spatiotemporal resolution.

  10. Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M R; Reed, B W; Torralva, B R; Browning, N D

    2007-01-26

    Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with t10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10 kilometer/second) without smearing. We outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, we present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution.

  11. Imaging the motion of electrons across semiconductor heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Michael K. L.; Margiolakis, Athanasios; Deckoff-Jones, Skylar; Harada, Takaaki; Wong, E. Laine; Krishna, M. Bala Murali; Madéo, Julien; Winchester, Andrew; Lei, Sidong; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Dani, Keshav M.

    2017-01-01

    Technological progress since the late twentieth century has centred on semiconductor devices, such as transistors, diodes and solar cells. At the heart of these devices is the internal motion of electrons through semiconductor materials due to applied electric fields or by the excitation of photocarriers. Imaging the motion of these electrons would provide unprecedented insight into this important phenomenon, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Current studies of electron dynamics in semiconductors are generally limited by the spatial resolution of optical probes, or by the temporal resolution of electronic probes. Here, by combining femtosecond pump-probe techniques with spectroscopic photoemission electron microscopy, we imaged the motion of photoexcited electrons from high-energy to low-energy states in a type-II 2D InSe/GaAs heterostructure. At the instant of photoexcitation, energy-resolved photoelectron images revealed a highly non-equilibrium distribution of photocarriers in space and energy. Thereafter, in response to the out-of-equilibrium photocarriers, we observed the spatial redistribution of charges, thus forming internal electric fields, bending the semiconductor bands, and finally impeding further charge transfer. By assembling images taken at different time-delays, we produced a movie lasting a few trillionths of a second of the electron-transfer process in the photoexcited type-II heterostructure—a fundamental phenomenon in semiconductor devices such as solar cells. Quantitative analysis and theoretical modelling of spatial variations in the movie provide insight into future solar cells, 2D materials and other semiconductor devices.

  12. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B.H.; Hsia, R.P.; Domier, C.W.; Burns, S.R.; Hillyer, T.R.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. [University of California at Davis, 228 Walker Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Oyevaar, T.; Donne, A.J. [FOM-Inst. voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Association Euratom-FOM (International organizations without location); RTP team

    1999-01-01

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 {mu}s. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low cost linear mixer/receiver array. Unlike conventional ECE diagnostics, the sample volumes of the ECE imaging system are aligned vertically, and can be shifted across the plasma cross-section by varying the local oscillator frequency, making possible 2D measurements of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. The poloidal/radial wavenumber spectra and correlation lengths of T{sub e} fluctuations in the plasma core can also be obtained by properly positioning the focal plane of the imaging system. Due to these unique features, ECE imaging is an ideal tool for plasma transport study. Technical details of the system are described, together with preliminary experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Contribution of Metal Layer Thickness for Quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging of Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Hyonchol; Takei, Hiroyuki; Negishi, Tsutomu; Kudo, Masato; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    ...) imaging in field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were studied to evaluate the potential of using these particles as simultaneously distinguishable labels of target molecules in FE-SEM studies...

  14. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  15. Quantitative methods for the analysis of electron microscope images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skands, Peter Ulrik Vallø

    1996-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is an general introduction to quantitative methods for the analysis of digital microscope images. The images presented are primarily been acquired from Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) and interfermeter microscopes (IFM). The topic is approached though several examples...... foundation of the thesis fall in the areas of: 1) Mathematical Morphology; 2) Distance transforms and applications; and 3) Fractal geometry. Image analysis opens in general the possibility of a quantitative and statistical well founded measurement of digital microscope images. Herein lies also the conditions...

  16. Droplet Epitaxy Image Contrast in Mirror Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, S. M.; Zheng, C. X.; Jesson, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Image simulation methods are applied to interpret mirror electron microscopy (MEM) images obtained from a movie of GaAs droplet epitaxy. Cylindrical symmetry of structures grown by droplet epitaxy is assumed in the simulations which reproduce the main features of the experimental MEM image contrast, demonstrating that droplet epitaxy can be studied in real-time. It is therefore confirmed that an inner ring forms at the droplet contact line and an outer ring (or skirt) occurs outside the droplet periphery. We believe that MEM combined with image simulations will be increasingly used to study the formation and growth of quantum structures.

  17. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  18. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions and image interpretation in transmission electron mic­ roscopy. The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Munster and is a revised version of the first part of my earlier book Elek­ tronenmikroskopische Untersuchungs- und Priiparationsmethoden, omitting the part which describes specimen-preparation methods. In the introductory chapter, the different types of electron microscope are compared, the various electron-specimen interactions and their applications are summarized and the most important aspects of high-resolution, analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy are discussed. The optics of electron lenses is discussed in Chapter 2 in order to bring out electron-lens properties that are important for an understanding of the function of an electron microscope. In Chapter 3, the wave optics of elec­ trons and the phase shifts by electrostatic and magnetic fields are introduced; Fresne...

  19. The application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YuPing; Yin, Hua; Han, Dezhi; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional online shopping platform (OSP), which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers' experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system.

  20. The Application of Similar Image Retrieval in Electronic Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YuPing; Yin, Hua; Han, Dezhi; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional online shopping platform (OSP), which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers' experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system. PMID:24883411

  1. The Application of Similar Image Retrieval in Electronic Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YuPing Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional online shopping platform (OSP, which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers’ experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system.

  2. Imaging the motion of electrons in 2D semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Keshav

    Technological progress since the late 20th century has centered on semiconductor devices, such as transistors, diodes, and solar cells. At the heart of these devices, is the internal motion of electrons through semiconductor materials due to applied electric fields or by the excitation of photocarriers. Imaging the motion of these electrons would provide unprecedented insight into this important phenomenon, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Current studies of electron dynamics in semiconductors are generally limited by the spatial resolution of optical probes, or by the temporal resolution of electronic probes. In this talk, we combine femtosecond pump-probe techniques with spectroscopic photoemission electron microscopy to image the motion of photoexcited electrons from high-energy to low-energy states in a 2D InSe/GaAs heterostructure exhibiting a type-II band alignment. At the instant of photoexcitation, energy-resolved photoelectron images reveal a highly non-equilibrium distribution of photocarriers in space and energy. Thereafter, in response to the out-of-equilibrium photocarriers, we observe the spatial redistribution of charges, thus forming internal electric fields, bending the semiconductor bands, and finally impeding further charge transfer. By assembling images taken at different time-delays, we make a movie lasting a few tens of picoseconds of the electron transfer process in the photoexcited type-II heterostructure - a fundamental phenomenon in semiconductor devices like solar cells. Quantitative analysis and theoretical modeling of spatial variations in the video provide insight into future solar cells, electron dynamics in 2D materials, and other semiconductor devices.

  3. Characterization of encapsulated quantum dots via electron channeling contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitz, Julia I.; Carnevale, Santino D.; De Graef, Marc; McComb, David W.; Grassman, Tyler J.

    2016-08-01

    A method for characterization of encapsulated epitaxial quantum dots (QD) in plan-view geometry using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is presented. The efficacy of the method, which requires minimal sample preparation, is demonstrated with proof-of-concept data from encapsulated (sub-surface) epitaxial InAs QDs within a GaAs matrix. Imaging of the QDs under multiple diffraction conditions is presented, establishing that ECCI can provide effectively identical visualization capabilities as conventional two-beam transmission electron microscopy. This method facilitates rapid, non-destructive characterization of sub-surface QDs giving immediate access to valuable nanostructural information.

  4. Characterization of encapsulated quantum dots via electron channeling contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deitz, Julia I.; McComb, David W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Carnevale, Santino D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Grassman, Tyler J., E-mail: grassman.5@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2016-08-08

    A method for characterization of encapsulated epitaxial quantum dots (QD) in plan-view geometry using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is presented. The efficacy of the method, which requires minimal sample preparation, is demonstrated with proof-of-concept data from encapsulated (sub-surface) epitaxial InAs QDs within a GaAs matrix. Imaging of the QDs under multiple diffraction conditions is presented, establishing that ECCI can provide effectively identical visualization capabilities as conventional two-beam transmission electron microscopy. This method facilitates rapid, non-destructive characterization of sub-surface QDs giving immediate access to valuable nanostructural information.

  5. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k...

  6. Imaging attosecond electron wavepackets around the ionization threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swoboda, Marko; Remetter, Thomas; Mauritsson, Johan; L' Huillier, Anne [Dept. of Physics, Lund University (Sweden); Schafer, Kenneth J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Kelkensberg, Freek; Siu, Wing-Kiu; Johnsson, Per; Vrakking, Marc J.J. [AMOLF Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kling, Matthias F.; Znakovskaya, Irina; Uphues, Thorsten; Zherebtsov, Sergey [MPI fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Lepine, Franck [Univ. Lyon 1, CNRS, LASIM, UMR, Villeurbanne (France); Benedetti, Enrico; Ferrari, Federico; Sansone, Giuseppe; Nisoli, Mauro [CUSBO, ULTRAS-INFM, Politecnico, Milano (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    We image the momentum distributions of attosecond electron wavepackets generated from the ionization of Helium by attosecond XUV pulses. Using an infrared probing field, the evolution of these wavepackets can be captured in time and space. Tuning the central frequency of the pulses allows us to initiate a number of processes that originate from the interplay of partially bound and continuum wavepackets or returning electrons and the atomic potential. Using this attosecond pump-probe scheme, we can track electron dynamics around the ionization barrier, performing interferometric measurements of different ionization pathways.

  7. Comparison of Electron Imaging Modes for Dimensional Measurements in the Scanning Electron Microscope†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladár, András E.; Villarrubia, John S.; Muto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Dimensional measurements from secondary electron (SE) images were compared with those from backscattered electron (BSE) and low-loss electron (LLE) images. With the commonly used 50% threshold criterion, the lines consistently appeared larger in the SE images. As the images were acquired simultaneously by an instrument with the capability to operate detectors for both signals at the same time, the differences cannot be explained by the assumption that contamination or drift between images affected the SE, BSE, or LLE images differently. Simulations with JMONSEL, an electron microscope simulator, indicate that the nanometer-scale differences observed on this sample can be explained by the different convolution effects of a beam with finite size on signals with different symmetry (the SE signal’s characteristic peak versus the BSE or LLE signal’s characteristic step). This effect is too small to explain the > 100 nm discrepancies that were observed in earlier work on different samples. Additional modeling indicates that those discrepancies can be explained by the much larger sidewall angles of the earlier samples, coupled with the different response of SE versus BSE/LLE profiles to such wall angles. PMID:27452278

  8. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope images on desktop computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: christian.dwyer@mcem.monash.edu.au [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Two independent strategies are presented for reducing the computation time of multislice simulations of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images: (1) optimal probe sampling, and (2) the use of desktop graphics processing units. The first strategy is applicable to STEM images generated by elastic and/or inelastic scattering, and requires minimal effort for its implementation. Used together, these two strategies can reduce typical computation times from days to hours, allowing practical simulation of STEM images of general atomic structures on a desktop computer.

  10. Secondary-electron-bremsstrahlung imaging for proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Nagao, Yuto [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Ando, Koki; Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, 1-1-1 Hirate-cho, Kita-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Kataoka, Jun [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kawachi, Naoki [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    A feasibility study on an imaging technique of a therapeutic proton-beam trajectory using a gamma camera by measuring secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB) was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and a beam-irradiation experiment. From the simulation and experimental results, it was found that a significant amount of SEB yield exists between the beam-injection surface and the range position along the beam axis and the beam trajectory is clearly imaged by the SEB yield. It is concluded that the SEB imaging is a promising technique for monitoring of therapeutic proton-beam trajectories.

  11. Development of a new electronic neutron imaging system

    CERN Document Server

    Brenizer, J S; Gibbs, K M; Mengers, P; Stebbings, C T; Polansky, D; Rogerson, D J

    1999-01-01

    An electronic neutron imaging camera system was developed for use with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons in applications that include nondestructive inspection of explosives, corrosion, turbine blades, electronics, low Z components, etc. The neutron images are expected to provide information to supplement that available from X-ray tests. The primary camera image area was a 30x30 cm field-of-view with a spatial resolution approaching 1.6 line pairs/mm (lp/mm). The camera had a remotely changeable second lens to limit the field-of-view to 7.6x7.6 cm for high spatial resolution (at least 4 lp/mm) thermal neutron imaging, but neutron and light scatter will limit resolution for fast neutrons to about 0.5 lp/mm. Remote focus capability enhanced camera set-up for optimum operation. The 75 dB dynamic range camera system included sup 6 Li-based screens for imaging of thermal and epithermal neutrons and ZnS(Ag)-based screens for fast neutron imaging. The fast optics was input to a Super S-25 Gen II image intensifi...

  12. 77 FR 38829 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade.... International Trade Commission on May 23, 2012, under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S...

  13. Laser-induced electron diffraction for dynamic imaging of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chii-Dong

    2017-04-01

    Electron diffraction is the well-established tool for probing the structure of gas-phase molecules near the equilibrium geometry. To study chemical dynamics ultrashort electron pulses below a few tens of femtoseconds are needed. Laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) is a method where molecules can be probed with femtosecond temporal resolution and sub-angstrom spatial resolution. In LIED, molecules are exposed to an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The electrons that have been previously removed by the laser field can be driven back later to rescatter with the parent molecular ion. Using diffraction images from large-angle backscattered events, sub-angstrom spatial resolution can be achieved with tens to hundreds eV electrons. Recent LIED experimental results showing bond breaking in molecules will be illustrated. Practical issues related to the retrieval of diffraction images from LIED on aligned molecules and possibilities of real-time imaging of dissociating molecules using LIED will be presented. US Department of Energy. This work is performed in collaboration with Anh Thu Le (Kansas State University) and the experimental group of Jens Biegert (ICFO, Barcelona).

  14. A Document Imaging Technique for Implementing Electronic Loan Approval Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manikandan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The image processing is one of the leading technologies of computer applications. Image processing is a type of signal processing, the input for image processor is an image or video frame and the output will be an image or subset of image [1]. Computer graphics and computer vision process uses an image processing techniques. Image processing systems are used in various environments like medical fields, computer-aided design (CAD, research fields, crime investigation fields and military fields. In this paper, we proposed a document image processing technique, for establishing electronic loan approval process (E-LAP [2]. Loan approval process has been tedious process, the E-LAP system attempts to reduce the complexity of loan approval process. Customers have to login to fill the loan application form online with all details and submit the form. The loan department then processes the submitted form and then sends an acknowledgement mail via the E-LAP to the requested customer with the details about list of documents required for the loan approval process [3]. The approaching customer can upload the scanned copies of all required documents. All this interaction between customer and bank take place using an E-LAP system.

  15. Computational estimation of the gain image of Direct Electron Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Gimenez, E.; Peredo Robinson, V.; Sorzano, C.O.S.; Vargas, J.; Oton, J.; Vilas, J.L.; Rosa-Trevin, J.L. de la; Melero, R.; Gomez-Blanco, J.; Cuenca, J.; Cano, L. del; Conesa, P.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, J.M.

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of Direct Electron Detectors (DED) in the Electron Microscope field has boosted Single Particle Analysis to a point in which it is currently considered to be a key player technique in Structural Biology. In this article we address the issues of increasing the quality of current DED images as well as their ease of use. In this way, we introduce an algorithm to estimate the camera gain at each pixel from the movies themselves, so that the recorded movies can be compensated for differences amongst the detection capability of the camera sensors. This compensation is needed to set the recorded frames in a coherent gray level range, homogeneous over the whole image. The algorithm does not need any other input than the DED movie itself and it is able of estimating the camera gain image, identifying dead pixels and incorrectly calibrated cameras. We show the results for the three current DED camera models (DE, Falcon and K2). (Author)

  16. From the physics of secondary electron emission to image contrasts in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Image formation in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a combination of physical processes, electron emissions from the sample, and of a technical process related to the detection of a fraction of these electrons. For the present survey of image contrasts in SEM, simplified considerations in the physics of the secondary electron emission yield, δ, are combined with the effects of a partial collection of the emitted secondary electrons. Although some consideration is initially given to the architecture of modern SEM, the main attention is devoted to the material contrasts with the respective roles of the sub-surface and surface compositions of the sample, as well as with the roles of the field effects in the vacuum gap. The recent trends of energy filtering in normal SEM and the reduction of the incident energy to a few electron volts in very low-energy electron microscopy are also considered. For an understanding by the SEM community, the mathematical expressions are explained with simple physical arguments.

  17. Electron beam confinement and image contrast enhancement in near field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, T L; De Pietro, L G; Pescia, D; Ramsperger, U

    2009-04-01

    In conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the lateral resolution is limited by the electron beam diameter impinging on the specimen surface. Near field emission scanning electron microscopy (NFESEM) provides a simple means of overcoming this limit; however, the most suitable field emitter remains to be determined. NFESEM has been used in this work to investigate the W (110) surface with single-crystal tungsten tips of (310), (111), and (100)-orientations. The topographic images generated from both the electron intensity variations and the field emission current indicate higher resolution capabilities with decreasing tip work function than with polycrystalline tungsten tips. The confinement of the electron beam transcends the resolution limitations of the geometrical models, which are determined by the minimum beam width.

  18. Imaging systems in the Delft Multi-Beam Scanning Electron Microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this Ph.D. research is to develop imaging systems for the multiple beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM) built in Delft University of Technology. This thesis includes two imaging systems, transmission electron (TE) imaging system, and secondary electron (SE) imaging system. The major

  19. Neuron Segmentation in Electron Microscopy Images Using Partial Differential Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cory; Sayedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    In connectomics, neuroscientists seek to identify the synaptic connections between neurons. Segmentation of cell membranes using supervised learning algorithms on electron microscopy images of brain tissue is often done to assist in this effort. Here we present a partial differential equation with a novel growth term to improve the results of a supervised learning algorithm. We also introduce a new method for representing the resulting image that allows for a more dynamic thresholding to further improve the result. Using these two processes we are able to close small to medium sized gaps in the cell membrane detection and improve the Rand error by as much as 9% over the initial supervised segmentation.

  20. Digital imaging of stem cells by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathananthan, A Henry; Nottola, Stefania A

    2007-01-01

    This chapter deals with basic techniques of scanning and transmission electron microscopy applicable to stem cell imaging. It is sometimes desirable to characterize the fine structure of embryonic and adult stem cells to supplement the images obtained by phase-contrast and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy to compare with the microstructure of cells and tissues reported in the literature. This would help confirm their true identity whilst defining their surface and internal morphology. The intention is to put a face on stem cells during their differentiation.

  1. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Imaging Near-Earth Electron Densities Using Thomson Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-15

    telescopes (left and right squares). In these simulated images, we have assumed an input aperture diameter of 23.5 cm and a pixel plate scale of 270...diameter of 23.8 cm and a pixel plate scale of 120 km. The inner field of view begins near 320 km in altitude, which Imaging Near-Earth Electron...LFM) Global MHD Magnetospheric Simulation Code,” J. Atmos. Sol. Terres . Phys. 66, 1333. Meier, R.R., 1991. “Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and Remote

  3. Electron microscopy imaging of proteins on gallium phosphide semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, Martin; Bauer, Mikael; Gunnarsson, Stefan; Mårsell, Erik; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Karlsson, Gunnel; Sanfins, Elodie; Prinz, Christelle N.; Wallenberg, Reine; Cedervall, Tommy; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2016-02-01

    We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the laminin conformation on the NWs. In blood plasma, an intermediate sized corona around the NWs indicates a corona with a mixture of plasma proteins. The ability to directly visualize proteins on nanostructures in situ holds great promise for assessing the conformation and thickness of the protein corona, which is key to understanding and predicting the properties of engineered nanomaterials in a biological environment.We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the

  4. Atomic Imaging Using Secondary Electrons in a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope: Experimental Observations and Possible Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, D.; Inada, H.; Egerton, R.F.; Konno, M.; Wua, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-11-11

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondaryelectrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmissionelectron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. Apossiblemechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization.

  5. Lagrange time delay estimation for scanning electron microscope image magnification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K-S; Thong, L W; Ting, H Y; Tso, C P

    2010-02-01

    Interpolation techniques that are used for image magnification to obtain more useful details of the surface such as morphology and mechanical contrast usually rely on the signal information distributed around edges and areas of sharp changes and these signal information can also be used to predict missing details from the sample image. However, many of these interpolation methods tend to smooth or blur out image details around the edges. In the present study, a Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator method is proposed and this method only requires a small filter order and has no noticeable estimation bias. Comparing results with the original scanning electron microscope magnification and results of various other interpolation methods, the Lagrange time delay estimation interpolator is found to be more efficient, more robust and easier to execute.

  6. Neural Network for Nanoscience Scanning Electron Microscope Image Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, Mohammad Hadi; Aversa, Rossella; Cozzini, Stefano; Ciancio, Regina; Leto, Angelo; Brandino, Giuseppe Piero

    2017-10-16

    In this paper we applied transfer learning techniques for image recognition, automatic categorization, and labeling of nanoscience images obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Roughly 20,000 SEM images were manually classified into 10 categories to form a labeled training set, which can be used as a reference set for future applications of deep learning enhanced algorithms in the nanoscience domain. The categories chosen spanned the range of 0-Dimensional (0D) objects such as particles, 1D nanowires and fibres, 2D films and coated surfaces, and 3D patterned surfaces such as pillars. The training set was used to retrain on the SEM dataset and to compare many convolutional neural network models (Inception-v3, Inception-v4, ResNet). We obtained compatible results by performing a feature extraction of the different models on the same dataset. We performed additional analysis of the classifier on a second test set to further investigate the results both on particular cases and from a statistical point of view. Our algorithm was able to successfully classify around 90% of a test dataset consisting of SEM images, while reduced accuracy was found in the case of images at the boundary between two categories or containing elements of multiple categories. In these cases, the image classification did not identify a predominant category with a high score. We used the statistical outcomes from testing to deploy a semi-automatic workflow able to classify and label images generated by the SEM. Finally, a separate training was performed to determine the volume fraction of coherently aligned nanowires in SEM images. The results were compared with what was obtained using the Local Gradient Orientation method. This example demonstrates the versatility and the potential of transfer learning to address specific tasks of interest in nanoscience applications.

  7. 76 FR 55944 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof, and... importation of certain electronic devices with image processing systems, components thereof, and associated... having graphics processing units (``GPUs'') supplied by NVIDIA Corporation (``NVIDIA'') infringe any...

  8. Electron imaging with Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    McMullan, G; Chen, S; Henderson, R; Llopart, X; Summerfield, C; Tlustos, L; Faruqi, A R

    2007-01-01

    The electron imaging performance of Medipix2 is described. Medipix2 is a hybrid pixel detector composed of two layers. It has a sensor layer and a layer of readout electronics, in which each 55 μm×55 μm pixel has upper and lower energy discrimination and MHz rate counting. The sensor layer consists of a 300 μm slab of pixellated monolithic silicon and this is bonded to the readout chip. Experimental measurement of the detective quantum efficiency, DQE(0) at 120 keV shows that it can reach 85% independent of electron exposure, since the detector has zero noise, and the DQE(Nyquist) can reach 35% of that expected for a perfect detector (4/π2). Experimental measurement of the modulation transfer function (MTF) at Nyquist resolution for 120 keV electrons using a 60 keV lower energy threshold, yields a value that is 50% of that expected for a perfect detector (2/π). Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of electron tracks and energy deposited in adjacent pixels have been performed and used to calculate expected v...

  9. Electron transfer reactions for image and image-derived states in dielectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E. T.; Sanche, L.

    2008-08-01

    We have studied the cross section for electron trapping that occurs at the surfaces and interfaces of a variety of thin dielectric films (n-octane, methanol, n-butanol, and difluoromethane) that are grown on Kr buffer films. When such films are bombarded with electrons of very low incident energies (E<~300 meV), charging cross sections up to the order of 10-14 cm2 are measured for submonolayer quantities of a variety of coadsorbed molecules: CH3I, CH3Br, CH3Cl, and CO2. These huge cross sections are ascribed to the formation of image states at the dielectric film interfaces, which trap incoming electrons and, via coupling to the adsorbate electron affinity levels, dramatically enhance the capture probability. We have also shown that thin film dielectric layer structures can be created which display image-derived states, such as a ``quantum well'' in a sandwich structure with two ``electron barrier'' layers surrounding a Kr and adsorbate spacer film. These phenomena are shown to be of a general nature, occurring for a wide variety of molecular thin films, and depend on the dielectric constant and electron affinity of the selected species. We also report the absolute cross section for dissociative electron attachment of submonolayer CH3I adsorbed on Kr thin films.

  10. 75 FR 38118 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof, and... certain electronic devices with image processing systems, components thereof, and associated software that... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices with image...

  11. Suppression of COTR in electron beam imaging diagnosis at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Minjie

    2012-05-15

    The Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) demands electron beams with high peak current to generate high-brilliant, coherent X-ray pulses. Magnetic chicanes are used for longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to achieve the required high peak current. During bunch compression process, microstructures with a modulation length comparable to the visible light can be induced inside the bunch. This leads to coherent emission of optical transition radiation (OTR), which may impede the widely used beam diagnostic based on OTR imaging. In this thesis, two methods of using incoherent scintillation light are proposed to circumvent the problem of coherence effects in beam imaging diagnostics. The method of temporal separation has been proved experimentally to have successfully suppressed coherence effects. The longitudinal beam profiles measured using this method are in good agreement with reference measurements, verifying further the reliability of the method. The method of spatial separation has been investigated in preparation studies, from which an improved experimental setup has been designed.

  12. The CASSIOPE/e-POP Suprathermal Electron Imager (SEI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Cameron, T. G.; Enno, G. A.; Howarth, A.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-06-01

    The Suprathermal Electron Imager (SEI) on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) experiment uses a microchannel-plate-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) detector to record two-dimensional, energy-angle images of electron distributions for energies up to 350 eV. Alternatively, the SEI can be biased to measure positive ions at energies that include the ambient ionospheric population (360∘×±4∘, and includes viewing of the nadir and ram directions, nominally. At high latitude the nominal orientation allows coverage of most pitch angles. The SEI is included on e-POP to address the mission's principal scientific objectives, the first being to characterize polar ion outflow and its drivers including ambipolar electric fields generated by suprathermal electron populations, and direct energization of ions by plasma waves or through frictional heating. In addition, the SEI's focus on low energies and high time resolution allows a unique view of suprathermal particle populations and their role in wave-particle interactions, in support of e-POP's second scientific objective: to study plasma waves and wave propagation in the high-latitude ionosphere. Observations taken within geophysically quiet regions indicate that the instrument can track bulk ion flow velocity with a resolution of order 25 m/s or better.

  13. Statistical reconstruction algorithms for continuous wave electron spin resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissos, Imry; Levit, Michael; Feuer, Arie; Blank, Aharon

    2013-06-01

    Electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI) is an important branch of ESR that deals with heterogeneous samples ranging from semiconductor materials to small live animals and even humans. ESRI can produce either spatial images (providing information about the spatially dependent radical concentration) or spectral-spatial images, where an extra dimension is added to describe the absorption spectrum of the sample (which can also be spatially dependent). The mapping of oxygen in biological samples, often referred to as oximetry, is a prime example of an ESRI application. ESRI suffers frequently from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which results in long acquisition times and poor image quality. A broader use of ESRI is hampered by this slow acquisition, which can also be an obstacle for many biological applications where conditions may change relatively quickly over time. The objective of this work is to develop an image reconstruction scheme for continuous wave (CW) ESRI that would make it possible to reduce the data acquisition time without degrading the reconstruction quality. This is achieved by adapting the so-called "statistical reconstruction" method, recently developed for other medical imaging modalities, to the specific case of CW ESRI. Our new algorithm accounts for unique ESRI aspects such as field modulation, spectral-spatial imaging, and possible limitation on the gradient magnitude (the so-called "limited angle" problem). The reconstruction method shows improved SNR and contrast recovery vs. commonly used back-projection-based methods, for a variety of simulated synthetic samples as well as in actual CW ESRI experiments.

  14. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  15. Biomolecular imaging and electronic damage using X-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Quiney, Harry M

    2010-01-01

    Proposals to determine biomolecular structures from diffraction experiments using femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses involve a conflict between the incident brightness required to achieve diffraction-limited atomic resolution and the electronic and structural damage induced by the illumination. Here we show that previous estimates of the conditions under which biomolecular structures may be obtained in this manner are unduly restrictive, because they are based on a coherent diffraction model that is not appropriate to the proposed interaction conditions. A more detailed imaging model derived from optical coherence theory and quantum electrodynamics is shown to be far more tolerant of electronic damage. The nuclear density is employed as the principal descriptor of molecular structure. The foundations of the approach may also be used to characterize electrodynamical processes by performing scattering experiments on complex molecules of known structure.

  16. Clean electromigrated nanogaps imaged by transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Douglas R; Smith, Deirdre E; Fischbein, Michael D; Johnston, Danvers E; Guiton, Beth S; Drndić, Marija; Bonnell, Dawn A; Johnson, Alan T

    2006-03-01

    Electromigrated nanogaps have shown great promise for use in molecular scale electronics. We have fabricated nanogaps on free-standing transparent SiN(x) membranes which permit the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image the gaps. The electrodes are formed by extending a recently developed controlled electromigration procedure and yield a nanogap with approximately 5 nm separation clear of any apparent debris. The gaps are stable, on the order of hours as measured by TEM, but over time (months) relax to about 20 nm separation determined by the surface energy of the Au electrodes. A major benefit of electromigrated nanogaps on SiN(x) membranes is that the junction pinches in away from residual metal left from the Au deposition which could act as a parasitic conductance path. This work has implications to the design of clean metallic electrodes for use in nanoscale devices where the precise geometry of the electrode is important.

  17. Imaging and Quantification of Extracellular Vesicles by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Romain; Tan, Sisareuth; Gounou, Céline; Brisson, Alain R

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles that are present in blood and other body fluids. EVs raise major interest for their diverse physiopathological roles and their potential biomedical applications. However, the characterization and quantification of EVs constitute major challenges, mainly due to their small size and the lack of methods adapted for their study. Electron microscopy has made significant contributions to the EV field since their initial discovery. Here, we describe the use of two transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for imaging and quantifying EVs. Cryo-TEM combined with receptor-specific gold labeling is applied to reveal the morphology, size, and phenotype of EVs, while their enumeration is achieved after high-speed sedimentation on EM grids.

  18. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane......, connected by a horizontal flux-line in the plane, resembling a connecting Josephson vortex (JV) segment. Such structures may arise when a magnetic field is applied almost in the plane, and the line tension of the fluxon breaks down under its influence. The existence of kinked vortices was hinted in earlier...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  19. Aplanatic imaging systems for the transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Heiko, E-mail: mueller@ceos-gmbh.de [Corrected Electron Optical Systems GmbH, Englerstr. 28, D-69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Massmann, Ingo; Uhlemann, Stephan; Hartel, Peter; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Maximilian [Corrected Electron Optical Systems GmbH, Englerstr. 28, D-69126 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-07-21

    During the last decade aberration correctors have become a well-accepted tool in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The available correctors compensate for the spherical aberration C{sub s} of the imaging system. Recently, for instruments with considerably improved information limit also the off-axial aberrations have attracted more attention since these aberrations limit the high-resolution field of view. We have proposed a novel hexapole-type C{sub s}/B{sub 3}-corrector which corrects for the spherical aberration and the off-axial coma of the imaging system. We discuss the assessment and correction of off-axial aberrations and report about the optical performance of the first prototype instrument.

  20. Alternative optical concept for electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J X; Milbourne, T; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Dominguez, A; Efthimion, P C; Hill, K W; Kramer, G J; Kung, C; Kubota, S; Kasparek, W; Lu, J; Pablant, N A; Park, H; Tobias, B

    2014-11-01

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on tokamak experiments has revolutionized the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities and improved our understanding of instabilities, which lead to disruptions. It is therefore desirable to have an ECEI system on the ITER tokamak. However, the large size of optical components in presently used ECEI systems have, up to now, precluded the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER. This paper describes a new optical ECEI concept that employs a single spherical mirror as the only optical component and exploits the astigmatism of such a mirror to produce an image with one-dimensional spatial resolution on the detector. Since this alternative approach would only require a thin slit as the viewing port to the plasma, it would make the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER feasible. The results obtained from proof-of-principle experiments with a 125 GHz microwave system are presented.

  1. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy of Polydopamine Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrówczyński, Radosław; Coy, L Emerson; Scheibe, Błażej; Czechowski, Tomasz; Augustyniak-Jabłokow, Maria; Jurga, Stefan; Tadyszak, Krzysztof

    2015-08-13

    A thorough investigation of biomimetic polydopamine (PDA) by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is shown. In addition, temperature dependent spectroscopic EPR data are presented in the range 3.8-300 K. Small discrepancies in magnetic susceptibility behavior are observed between previously reported melanin samples. These variations were attributed to thermally acitivated processes. More importantly, EPR spatial-spatial 2D imaging of polydopamine radicals on a phantom is presented for the first time. In consequence, a new possible application of polydopamine as EPR imagining marker is addressed.

  2. Application of FPGA's in Flexible Analogue Electronic Image Generator Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kulla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on usage of the FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays Xilinx as a part of our more complex workdedicated to design of flexible analogue electronic images generator for application in TV measurement technique or/and TV servicetechnique or/and education process. The FPGAs performs here the role of component colour R, G, B, synchronization and blanking signals source. These signals are next processed and amplified in other parts of the generator as NTSC/PAL source encoder and RF modulator. The main aim of this paper is to show the possibilities how with suitable development software use a FPGAs in analog TV technology.

  3. Residual Deconvolutional Networks for Brain Electron Microscopy Image Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhry, Ahmed; Zeng, Tao; Ji, Shuiwang

    2017-02-01

    Accurate reconstruction of anatomical connections between neurons in the brain using electron microscopy (EM) images is considered to be the gold standard for circuit mapping. A key step in obtaining the reconstruction is the ability to automatically segment neurons with a precision close to human-level performance. Despite the recent technical advances in EM image segmentation, most of them rely on hand-crafted features to some extent that are specific to the data, limiting their ability to generalize. Here, we propose a simple yet powerful technique for EM image segmentation that is trained end-to-end and does not rely on prior knowledge of the data. Our proposed residual deconvolutional network consists of two information pathways that capture full-resolution features and contextual information, respectively. We showed that the proposed model is very effective in achieving the conflicting goals in dense output prediction; namely preserving full-resolution predictions and including sufficient contextual information. We applied our method to the ongoing open challenge of 3D neurite segmentation in EM images. Our method achieved one of the top results on this open challenge. We demonstrated the generality of our technique by evaluating it on the 2D neurite segmentation challenge dataset where consistently high performance was obtained. We thus expect our method to generalize well to other dense output prediction problems.

  4. An electron beam imaging system for quality assurance in IORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, F.; Rossi, M.; Morigi, M.P. E-mail: morigi@df.unibo.it; Brancaccio, R.; Paltrinieri, E.; Bettuzzi, M.; Romani, D.; Ciocca, M.; Tosi, G.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, M

    2004-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy is a special radiotherapy technique, which enables a high dose of radiation to be given in a single fraction during oncological surgery. The major stumbling block to the large-scale application of the technique is the transfer of the patient, with an open wound, from the operating room to the radiation therapy bunker, with the consequent organisational problems and the increased risk of infection. To overcome these limitations, in the last few years a new kind of linear accelerator, the Novac 7, conceived for direct use in the surgical room, has become available. Novac 7 can deliver electron beams of different energies (3, 5, 7 and 9 MeV), with a high dose rate (up to 20 Gy/min). The aim of this work, funded by ENEA in the framework of a research contract, is the development of an innovative system for on-line measurements of 2D dose distributions and electron beam characterisation, before radiotherapy treatment with Novac 7. The system is made up of the following components: (a) an electron-light converter; (b) a 14 bit cooled CCD camera; (c) a personal computer with an ad hoc written software for image acquisition and processing. The performances of the prototype have been characterised experimentally with different electron-light converters. Several tests have concerned the assessment of the detector response as a function of impulse number and electron beam energy. Finally, the experimental results concerning beam profiles have been compared with data acquired with other dosimetric techniques. The achieved results make it possible to say that the developed system is suitable for fast quality assurance measurements and verification of 2D dose distributions.

  5. Electron tomography of whole cultured cells using novel transmission electron imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Taiga; Shoji, Minami; Hisada, Akiko; Ominami, Yusuke; Ito, Sukehiro; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Nakajima, Masato; Ohshima, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Since a three-dimensional (3D) cellular ultrastructure is significant for biological functions, it has been investigated using various electron microscopic techniques. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-based techniques are traditionally used, cells must be embedded in resin and sliced into ultrathin sections in sample preparation processes. Block-face observation using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has also been recently applied to 3D observation of cellular components, but this is a destructive inspection and does not allow re-examination. Therefore, we developed electron tomography using a transmission electron imaging technique called Plate-TEM. With Plate-TEM, the cells cultured directly on a scintillator plate are inserted into a conventional SEM equipped with a Plate-TEM observation system, and their internal structures are observed by detecting scintillation light produced by electrons passing through the cells. This technology has the following four advantages. First, the cells cultured on the plate can be observed at electron-microscopic resolution since they remain on the plate. Second, both surface and internal information can be obtained simultaneously by using electron- and photo-detectors, respectively, because a Plate-TEM detector is installed in an SEM. Third, the cells on the scintillator plate can also be inspected using light microscopy because the plate has transparent features. Finally, correlative observation with other techniques, such as conventional TEM, is possible after Plate-TEM observation because Plate-TEM is a non-destructive analysis technique. We also designed a sample stage to tilt the samples for tomography with Plate-TEM, by which 3D organization of cellular structures can be visualized as a whole cell. In the present study, Mm2T cells were investigated using our tomography system, resulting in 3D visualization of cell organelles such as mitochondria, lipid droplets, and microvilli. Correlative observations

  6. Evaluating dot and Western blots using image analysis and pixel quantification of electronic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierck, J L; Bryne, K M; Dodson, M V

    2000-01-01

    Inexpensive computer imaging technology was used to assess levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) on dot blots (DB) and alpha-Actinin on Western blots (WB). In the first procedure, known IGF-I samples were dotted on nitrocellulose membranes using a vacuum manifold. After the DB were developed and dried, the images were digitized using an HP Deskscan II flat bed scanner, exported into Image-Pro Plus and analyzed by taking the combined mean of 45 degrees and 135 degrees sample lines drawn through each dot. Dot blots corresponding to a linear concentration range from 10 to 300 ng IGF-I were assessed by this method. In the second procedure, WB were scanned with a ScanJet 3c flat bed scanner and their backgrounds were clarified using Image-Pro Plus. A second image analysis program, Alpha Imager 2000, was then used to define the boundaries of protein bands, assess pixel number and density, and to obtain final numerical data for quantifying alpha-Actinin on the WB. Collectively, the results of these two studies suggest that specific proteins may be evaluated by using relatively inexpensive image analysis software systems via pixel quantification of electronic images.

  7. Enhanced dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of in vivo physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Gage

    It is well established that low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) in tumors strongly affects their malignant state and resistance to therapy. The importance of tumor oxygenation status has led to increased interest in the development of robust oxygen imaging modalities. One such method is electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). EPRI has provided a non-invasive, quantitative imaging modality with sensitivity deep in tissues, capable of investigating static oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo and has helped to corroborate the correlation between chronic states of hypoxia and tumor malignancy. However, when studying the complicated physiology of a living animal, the situation tends to be inherently dynamic. It has been found that in certain tumor regions there may exist steady states of hypoxia, or chronic hypoxia, whereas in other regions there may exist transient states of hypoxia, or acute hypoxia. It has been postulated that the negative prognostic implications associated with hypoxic tumors may be amplified for acutely hypoxic tumors. However, controversial data and a current lack in methods with the capability to noninvasively image tumor pO2 in vivo with sufficient spatial, temporal, and pO 2 resolution preclude definitive conclusions on the relationships between the different forms of hypoxia and the differences in their clinical implications. A particularly promising oxygen imaging modality that can help to study both chronic and acute hypoxia and elucidate important physiological and clinical differences is rapid Dynamic EPRI. The focus of this work is the development of methods enabling Dynamic EPRI of in vivo physiology as well as its potential applications. This work describes methods which enhance various aspects of EPRI in order to establish a more robust Dynamic EPRI capable of noninvasively studying and quantifying acute hypoxia in vivo. These enhancements are achieved through improvements that span from methods for the acquisition of individual

  8. Segmentation of electron microscopy images through Gabor texture descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Rafael B.; Nestares, Oscar

    1996-03-01

    We have developed a robust method for image segmentation based on a local multiscale texture description. We first apply a set of 4 by 4 complex Gabor filters, plus a low-pass residual (LPR), producing a log-polar sampling of the frequency domain. Contrary to other analysis methods, our Gabor scheme produces a visually complete multipurpose representation of the image, so that it can also be applied to coding, synthesis, etc. Our sixteen texture features consist of local contrast descriptors, obtained by dividing the modulus of the response of the complex Gabor filter by that of the LPR at each location. Contrast descriptors are basically independent of slow variations in intensity, while increasing the robustness and invariance of the representation. Before applying the segmentation algorithm, we equalize the number of samples of the four layers in the resulting pyramid of local contrast descriptors. This method has been applied to segmentation of electron microscopy images, obtaining very good results in this real case, where robustness is a basic requirement, because intensity, textures and other factors are not completely homogeneous.

  9. Femtosecond photoelectron imaging of transient electronic states and Rydberg atom emission from electronically excited he droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Bünermann, Oliver; Haxton, Daniel J; Leone, Stephen R; Neumark, Daniel M; Gessner, Oliver

    2011-07-14

    Ultrafast relaxation of electronically excited pure He droplets is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging. Droplets are excited by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses with photon energies below 24 eV. Excited states and relaxation products are probed by ionization with an infrared (IR) pulse with 1.6 eV photon energy. An initially excited droplet state decays on a time scale of 220 fs, leading predominantly to the emission of unaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms. In a second relaxation channel, electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are emitted from the droplet within less than 120 fs. The experimental results are described within a model that approximates electronically excited droplet states by localized, atomic Rydberg states perturbed by the local droplet environment in which the atom is embedded. The model suggests that, below 24 eV, EUV excitation preferentially leads to states that are localized in the surface region of the droplet. Electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are expected to originate from excitations in the outermost surface regions, while nonaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms emerge from a deeper surface region with higher local densities. The model is used to simulate the He droplet EUV absorption spectrum in good agreement with previously reported fluorescence excitation measurements.

  10. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  11. NOTE: A method for controlling image acquisition in electronic portal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-02-01

    Certain types of camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) which initiate image acquisition based on sensing a change in video level have been observed to trigger unreliably at the beginning of dynamic multileaf collimation sequences. A simple, novel means of controlling image acquisition with an Elekta linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is proposed which is based on illumination of a photodetector (ORP-12, Silonex Inc., Plattsburgh, NY, USA) by the electron gun of the accelerator. By incorporating a simple trigger circuit it is possible to derive a beam on/off status signal which changes at least 100 ms before any dose is measured by the accelerator. The status signal does not return to the beam-off state until all dose has been delivered and is suitable for accelerator pulse repetition frequencies of 50-400 Hz. The status signal is thus a reliable means of indicating the initiation and termination of radiation exposure, and thus controlling image acquisition of such EPIDs for this application.

  12. Computer Archiving and Image Enhancement of Diagnostic Electron Micrographs Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope as Real-Time Digitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okagaki, T.; Jones, M.H.; Clark, B.A.; Pan, T.; Ferro, J.M.; Hsing, R.; Tzou, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    Diagnostic electron micrographs were digitized in real time using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) controlled by a devoted front end processor at a resolution of 1K × 1K × 8. Various methods of image enhancement produced satisfactory results. From our experience, a faster front end processor with a larger memory size and 2K × 2K or 4K × 4K spatial resolution of an image are desirable. In order to facilitate storage and retrieval of an image archive, efficient data compression is necessary. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3

  13. Analysis of virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Loris; Paci, Michelangelo; Caetano Dos Santos, Florentino Luciano; Brahnam, Sheryl; Hyttinen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an ensemble of texture descriptors for analyzing virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images. Specifically, we present several novel multi-quinary (MQ) codings of local binary pattern (LBP) variants: the MQ version of the dense LBP, the MQ version of the rotation invariant co-occurrence among adjacent LBPs, and the MQ version of the LBP histogram Fourier. To reduce computation time as well as to improve performance, a feature selection approach is utilized to select the thresholds used in the MQ approaches. In addition, we propose new variants of descriptors where two histograms, instead of the standard one histogram, are produced for each descriptor. The two histograms (one for edge pixels and the other for non-edge pixels) are calculated for training two different SVMs, whose results are then combined by sum rule. We show that a bag of features approach works well with this problem. Our experiments, using a publicly available dataset of 1500 images with 15 classes and same protocol as in previous works, demonstrate the superiority of our new proposed ensemble of texture descriptors. The MATLAB code of our approach is available at https://www.dei.unipd.it/node/2357.

  14. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Z., E-mail: zhongbo.lee@uni-ulm.de; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-10-15

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions.

  15. Review on usefulness of EPID (Electronic Portal Imaging Device)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choong Won; Park, Do Keun; Choi, A Hyun; Ahn, Jong Ho; Song, Ki Weon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Replacing the film which used to be used for checking the set-up of the patient and dosimetry during radiation therapy, more and more EPID equipped devices are in use at present. Accordingly, this article tried to evaluated the accuracy of the position check-up and the usefulness of dosimetry during the use of an electronic portal imaging device. On 50 materials acquired with the search of Korea Society Radiotherapeutic Technology, The Korean Society for Radiation Oncology, and Pubmed using 'EPID', 'Portal dosimetry', 'Portal image', 'Dose verification', 'Quality control', 'Cine mode', 'Quality - assurance', and 'In vivo dosimetry' as indexes, the usefulness of EPID was analyzed by classifying them as history of EPID and dosimetry, set-up verification and characteristics of EPID. EPID is developed from the first generation of Liquid-filled ionization chamber, through the second generation of Camera-based fluoroscopy, and to the third generation of Amorphous-silicon EPID imaging modes can be divided into EPID mode, Cine mode and Integrated mode. When evaluating absolute dose accuracy of films and EPID, it was found that EPID showed within 1% and EDR2 film showed within 3% errors. It was confirmed that EPID is better in error measurement accuracy than film. When gamma analyzing the dose distribution of the base exposure plane which was calculated from therapy planning system, and planes calculated by EDR2 film and EPID, both film and EPID showed less than 2% of pixels which exceeded 1 at gamma values (r%>1) with in the thresholds such as 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm respectively. For the time needed for full course QA in IMRT to compare loads, EDR2 film recorded approximately 110 minutes, and EPID recorded approximately 55 minutes. EPID could easily replace conventional complicated and troublesome film and ionization chamber which used to be used for dosimetry and set-up verification, and it was

  16. Electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct sensing CCD array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, J.D.; Langford, D.S.; Williams, D.W. [General Imaging Corp., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A commercial prototype intraoral radiography system has been developed that can provide digital x-ray images for diagnosis. The system consists of an intraoral detector head, an intermediate drive electronics package, a main drive electronics package and a PC-based digital image management system. The system has the potential to replace the use of dental film in intraoral radiographic examinations. High-resolution images are acquired, then displayed on a CRT within seconds of image acquisition.

  17. Electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct-sensing CCD array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John D.; Langford, D. S.; Williams, Donald W.

    1993-12-01

    A commercial prototype intraoral radiography system has been developed that can provide digital x-ray images for diagnosis. The system consists of an intraoral detector head, an intermediate drive electronics package, a main drive electronics package, and a PC-based digital image management system. The system has the potential to replace the use of dental film in intraoral radiographic examinations. High-resolution images are acquired, then displayed on a CRT within seconds of image acquisition.

  18. Analysis of the IMAGE RPI electron density data and CHAMP plasmasphere electron density reconstructions with focus on plasmasphere modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere contributes essentially to the overall Total Electron Content (TEC) budget affecting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals. The plasmasphere can cause half or even more of the GNSS range error budget due to ionospheric propagation errors. This paper presents a comparative study of different plasmasphere and topside ionosphere data aiming at establishing an appropriate database for plasmasphere modelling. We analyze electron density profiles along the geomagnetic field lines derived from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite/Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) records of remote plasma sounding with radio waves. We compare these RPI profiles with 2D reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density derived from GNSS based TEC measurements onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite. Most of the coincidences between IMAGE profiles and CHAMP reconstructions are detected in the region with L-shell between 2 and 5. In general the CHAMP reconstructed electron densities are below the IMAGE profile densities, with median of the CHAMP minus IMAGE residuals around -588 cm-3. Additionally, a comparison is made with electron densities derived from passive radio wave RPI measurements onboard the IMAGE satellite. Over the available 2001-2005 period of IMAGE measurements, the considered combined data from the active and passive RPI operations cover the region within a latitude range of ±60°N, all longitudes, and an L-shell ranging from 1.2 to 15. In the coincidence regions (mainly 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 4), we check the agreement between available active and passive RPI data. The comparison shows that the measurements are well correlated, with a median residual of ∼52 cm-3. The RMS and STD values of the relative residuals are around 22% and 21% respectively. In summary, the results encourage the application of IMAGE RPI data for

  19. Removal of Vesicle Structures From Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred J.; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruction. In our approach, we estimate the subspace of the vesicle structures and project the micrographs onto the orthogonal complement of this subspace. We construct a 2d statistical model of the vesicle structure, based on higher order singular value decomposition (HOSVD), by considering the structural symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion are proposed to make a compact and general model. The results show that the vesicle structures are accurately separated from the background by the HOSVD model that is also able to adapt to the asymmetries of the vesicles. This is a promising result and suggests even wider applicability of the proposed approach in learning and removal of statistical structures. PMID:26642456

  20. Monte Carlo modeling of cavity imaging in pure iron using back-scatter electron scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Garner, F. A.; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Backscattered electrons (BSE) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) can produce images of subsurface cavity distributions as a nondestructive characterization technique. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the mechanism of void imaging and to identify key parameters in optimizing void resolution. The modeling explores an iron target of different thicknesses, electron beams of different energies, beam sizes, and scan pitch, evaluated for voids of different sizes and depths below the surface. The results show that the void image contrast is primarily caused by discontinuity of energy spectra of backscattered electrons, due to increased outward path lengths for those electrons which penetrate voids and are backscattered at deeper depths. Size resolution of voids at specific depths, and maximum detection depth of specific voids sizes are derived as a function of electron beam energy. The results are important for image optimization and data extraction.

  1. Electron beam induced chemical dry etching and imaging in gaseous NH3 environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Charlene J; Martin, Aiden; Phillips, Matthew R; Toth, Milos

    2012-09-21

    We report the use of ammonia (NH(3)) vapor as a new precursor for nanoscale electron beam induced etching (EBIE) of carbon, and an efficient imaging medium for environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Etching is demonstrated using amorphous carbonaceous nanowires grown by electron beam induced deposition (EBID). It is ascribed to carbon volatilization by hydrogen radicals generated by electron dissociation of NH(3) adsorbates. The volatilization process is also effective at preventing the buildup of residual hydrocarbon impurities that often compromise EBIE, EBID and electron imaging. We also show that ammonia is a more efficient electron imaging medium than H(2)O, which up to now has been the most commonly used ESEM imaging gas.

  2. Features of atomic images reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holography using SPEA-MEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop a 3D atomic image reconstruction algorithm for photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector holography. • We examine the shapes of the atomic images reconstructed by using a developed kernel function. • We examine refraction effect at surface, limitation effect of the hologram data, energy resolution effect, and angular resolution effect. • These discussions indicate the experimental requirements to obtain the clear 3D atomic image. - Abstract: Three-dimensional atomic images can be reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holograms using a scattering pattern extraction algorithm using the maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM) that utilizes an integral transform. An integral kernel function for the integral transform is the key to clear atomic image reconstruction. We composed the kernel function using a scattering pattern function and estimated its ability. Image distortion caused by multiple scattering was also evaluated. Four types of Auger electron wave functions were investigated, and the effect of these wave function types was estimated. In addition, we addressed refraction at the surface, the effects of data limitation, and energy and angular resolutions.

  3. A simple image based method for obtaining electron density and atomic number in dual energy CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    The extraction of electron density and atomic number information in computed tomography is possible when image values can be sampled using two different effective energies. The foundation for this extraction lies in the ability to express the linear attenuation coefficient using two basis functions that are dependent on electron density and atomic number over the diagnostic energy range used in CT. Material basis functions separate images into clinically familiar quantities such as 'bone' images and 'soft tissue' images. Physically, all basis function choices represent the expression of the linear attenuation coefficient in terms of a photoelectric and a Compton scattering term. The purpose of this work is to develop a simple dual energy decomposition method that requires no a priori knowledge about the energy characteristics of the imaging system. It is shown that the weighted sum of two basis images yields an electron density image where the weights for each basis image are the electron density of that basis image's basis material. Using the electron density image, effective atomic number information can also be obtained. These methods are performed solely in the image domain and require no spectrum or detector energy response information as required by some other dual energy decomposition methods.

  4. 78 FR 69440 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY... Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov , and will be available for inspection during... public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http...

  5. 78 FR 16531 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof...,084; 7,453,605; 7,936,391; and 6,292,218 by certain electronic devices for capturing and transmitting....usitc.gov . The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket...

  6. New Efficient Detector for Radiation Therapy Imaging using Gas Electron Multipliers

    OpenAIRE

    Östling, Janina

    2006-01-01

    Currently film is being replaced by electronic detectors for portal imaging in radiation therapy. This development offers obvious advantages such as on-line quality assurance and digital images that can easily be accessed, processed and communicated. In spite of the improvements, the image quality has not been significantly enhanced, partly since the quantum efficiency compared to film is essentially the same, and the new electronic devices also suffer from sensitivity to the harsh radiation ...

  7. Optimal imaging techniques in the scanning transmission electron microscope: applications to biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, M; Crewe, A V

    1980-01-01

    We show applications of the optimal imaging method to stained biological macromolecules. This optimal imaging method involves the following basic procedures: (i) for any given resolution, which is represented by the electron probe size in the scanning transmission electron microscope, a preferred magnification is used; (ii) the micrographs taken at the condition described above are then spatially filtered by using a low-pass filter (nu < 1/2d, in which d is the space between scan lines) to optically reconstruct the final optimal image. It is found that the micrographs obtained by using the optimal imaging method clearly show an improvement in contrast. Images PMID:6933454

  8. Guiding the Design of Radiation Imagers with Experimentally Benchmarked Geant4 Simulations for Electron-Tracking Compton Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffer, Amy Beth

    Radiation imagers are import tools in the modern world for a wide range of applications. They span the use-cases of fundamental sciences, astrophysics, medical imaging, all the way to national security, nuclear safeguards, and non-proliferation verification. The type of radiation imagers studied in this thesis were gamma-ray imagers that detect emissions from radioactive materials. Gamma-ray imagers goal is to localize and map the distribution of radiation within their specific field-of-view despite the fact of complicating background radiation that can be terrestrial, astronomical, and temporal. Compton imaging systems are one type of gamma-ray imager that can map the radiation around the system without the use of collimation. Lack of collimation enables the imaging system to be able to detect radiation from all-directions, while at the same time, enables increased detection efficiency by not absorbing incident radiation in non-sensing materials. Each Compton-scatter events within an imaging system generated a possible cone-surface in space that the radiation could have originated from. Compton imaging is limited in its reconstructed image signal-to-background due to these source Compton-cones overlapping with background radiation Compton-cones. These overlapping cones limit Compton imaging's detection-sensitivity in image space. Electron-tracking Compton imaging (ETCI) can improve the detection-sensitivity by measuring the Compton-scattered electron's initial trajectory. With an estimate of the scattered electron's trajectory, one can reduce the Compton-back-projected cone to a cone-arc, thus enabling faster radiation source detection and localization. However, the ability to measure the Compton-scattered electron-trajectories adds another layer of complexity to an already complex methodology. For a real-world imaging applications, improvements are needed in electron-track detection efficiency and in electron-track reconstruction. One way of measuring Compton

  9. Fundamental and experimental aspects of diffraction for characterizing dislocations by electron channeling contrast imaging in scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kriaa, H.; Guitton, A.; Maloufi, N.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopes provide detailed crystallographic information with high spatial and angular resolutions, and allow direct observation of crystalline defects, such as dislocations, through an attractive technique called Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI). Dislocations play a crucial role in the properties of materials and ECCI has naturally emerged as an adapted tool for characterizing defects in bulk specimen. Nevertheless, fine control of th...

  10. Main: 1E4N [RPSD[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1E4N トウモロコシ Corn Zea mays L. Beta-Glucosidase, Chloroplast Precursor Name=Glu1; Zea...EVNGPDGKPIGPPMGNPWIYMYPEGLKDLLMIMKNKYGNPPIYITENGIGDVDTKETPLPMEAALNDYKRLDYIQRHIATLKESIDLGSNVQGYFAWSLLDNFEWFAGFTERYGIVYVDRNNNCTRYMKESAKWLKEFNTAKKPSKKILTPA corn_1E4N.jpg ...

  11. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    the non-adiabatic photodissociation of carbon disulphide demonstrate how the purely electronic rearrangements of the valence electrons can be projected from inherently coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics. Combined with ongoing efforts in molecular frame alignment(20) and orientation(21,22), TRMFPADs...... offer the promise of directly imaging valence-electron dynamics during molecular processes without involving the use of strong, highly perturbing laser fields(23)....

  12. Diffraction effects and inelastic electron transport in angle-resolved microscopic imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, A; Nolze, G; Vespucci, S; Naresh-Kumar, G; Trager-Cowan, C; Vilalta-Clemente, A; Wilkinson, A J; Vos, M

    2017-09-01

    We analyse the signal formation process for scanning electron microscopic imaging applications on crystalline specimens. In accordance with previous investigations, we find nontrivial effects of incident beam diffraction on the backscattered electron distribution in energy and momentum. Specifically, incident beam diffraction causes angular changes of the backscattered electron distribution which we identify as the dominant mechanism underlying pseudocolour orientation imaging using multiple, angle-resolving detectors. Consequently, diffraction effects of the incident beam and their impact on the subsequent coherent and incoherent electron transport need to be taken into account for an in-depth theoretical modelling of the energy- and momentum distribution of electrons backscattered from crystalline sample regions. Our findings have implications for the level of theoretical detail that can be necessary for the interpretation of complex imaging modalities such as electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) of defects in crystals. If the solid angle of detection is limited to specific regions of the backscattered electron momentum distribution, the image contrast that is observed in ECCI and similar applications can be strongly affected by incident beam diffraction and topographic effects from the sample surface. As an application, we demonstrate characteristic changes in the resulting images if different properties of the backscattered electron distribution are used for the analysis of a GaN thin film sample containing dislocations. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. From Relativistic Electrons to X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Garson, A. B. [Washington U., St. Louis; Anastasio, M. A. [Washington U., St. Louis

    2017-10-09

    We report the initial demonstrations of the use of single crystals in indirect x-ray imaging for x-ray phase contrast imaging at the Washington University in St. Louis Computational Bioimaging Laboratory (CBL). Based on single Gaussian peak fits to the x-ray images, we observed a four times smaller system point spread function (21 μm (FWHM)) with the 25-mm diameter single crystals than the reference polycrystalline phosphor’s 80-μm value. Potential fiber-optic plate depth-of-focus aspects and 33-μm diameter carbon fiber imaging are also addressed.

  14. Analysis list: E4f1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E4f1 Embryonic fibroblast + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/E4f1....1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/E4f1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedb...c.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/E4f1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/E4f1.Embryonic_fibr

  15. Laser-assisted electron diffraction for femtosecond molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Kanya, Reika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamanouchi, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); NANOQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-02-14

    We report the observation of laser-assisted electron diffraction (LAED) through the collision of 1 keV electrons with gas-phase CCl{sub 4} molecules in a femtosecond near-infrared laser field. In the angular distribution of the scattered electrons with the energy shifts of ±ℏω, we observed clear diffraction patterns which reflect the geometrical structure of the molecules at the moment of laser irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast nuclear dynamics of molecules can be probed by LAED with the high temporal (<10 fs) and spatial (∼0.01 Å) resolutions.

  16. Prototype system for proton beam range measurement based on gamma electron vertex imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Rim [Neutron Utilization Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jong Hoon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Won Gyun [Heavy-ion Clinical Research Division, Korean Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hansang [Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Hyeong, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-11

    In proton therapy, for both therapeutic effectiveness and patient safety, it is very important to accurately measure the proton dose distribution, especially the range of the proton beam. For this purpose, recently we proposed a new imaging method named gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI), in which the prompt gammas emitting from the nuclear reactions of the proton beam in the patient are converted to electrons, and then the converted electrons are tracked to determine the vertices of the prompt gammas, thereby producing a 2D image of the vertices. In the present study, we developed a prototype GEVI system, including dedicated signal processing and data acquisition systems, which consists of a beryllium plate (= electron converter) to convert the prompt gammas to electrons, two double-sided silicon strip detectors (= hodoscopes) to determine the trajectories of those converted electrons, and a plastic scintillation detector (= calorimeter) to measure their kinetic energies. The system uses triple coincidence logic and multiple energy windows to select only the events from prompt gammas. The detectors of the prototype GEVI system were evaluated for electronic noise level, energy resolution, and time resolution. Finally, the imaging capability of the GEVI system was tested by imaging a {sup 90}Sr beta source, a {sup 60}Co gamma source, and a 45-MeV proton beam in a PMMA phantom. The overall results of the present study generally show that the prototype GEVI system can image the vertices of the prompt gammas produced by the proton nuclear interactions.

  17. Imaging the dynamics of free-electron Landau states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattschneider, P; Schachinger, Th; Stöger-Pollach, M; Löffler, S; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A; Bliokh, K Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-08-08

    Landau levels and states of electrons in a magnetic field are fundamental quantum entities underlying the quantum Hall and related effects in condensed matter physics. However, the real-space properties and observation of Landau wave functions remain elusive. Here we report the real-space observation of Landau states and the internal rotational dynamics of free electrons. States with different quantum numbers are produced using nanometre-sized electron vortex beams, with a radius chosen to match the waist of the Landau states, in a quasi-uniform magnetic field. Scanning the beams along the propagation direction, we reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the Landau wave functions with angular frequency ~100 GHz. We observe that Landau modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers belong to three classes, which are characterized by rotations with zero, Larmor and cyclotron frequencies, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to the uniform cyclotron rotation of classical electrons, and in perfect agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  18. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  19. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E.; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  20. Imaging and identifying defects in nitride semiconductor thin films using a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN, 6, Caen (France); Gamarra, P.; Lacam, C.; Tordjman, M.; Di Forte-Poisson, M.A. [Thales Research and Technology, III-V Lab, Marcoussis (France); Parbrook, P.J. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Claremont House, High St, Lydney (United Kingdom); England, G. [K. E. Developments Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    We describe the use of electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) - in a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) - to reveal and identify defects in nitride semiconductor thin films. In ECCI changes in crystallographic orientation, or changes in lattice constant due to local strain, are revealed by changes in grey scale in an image constructed by monitoring the intensity of backscattered electrons (BSEs) as an electron beam is scanned over a suitably oriented sample. Extremely small orientation changes are detectable, enabling small angle tilt and rotation boundaries and dislocations to be imaged. Images with a resolution of tens of nanometres are obtainable with ECCI. In this paper, we describe the use of ECCI with TEM to determine threading dislocation densities and types in InAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on SiC and sapphire substrates. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Imaging screw dislocations at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected electron optical sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Lozano, J G; Pennycook, T J; Jones, L; Hirsch, P B; Nellist, P D

    2015-06-04

    Screw dislocations play an important role in materials' mechanical, electrical and optical properties. However, imaging the atomic displacements in screw dislocations remains challenging. Although advanced electron microscopy techniques have allowed atomic-scale characterization of edge dislocations from the conventional end-on view, for screw dislocations, the atoms are predominantly displaced parallel to the dislocation line, and therefore the screw displacements are parallel to the electron beam and become invisible when viewed end-on. Here we show that screw displacements can be imaged directly with the dislocation lying in a plane transverse to the electron beam by optical sectioning using annular dark field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Applying this technique to a mixed [a+c] dislocation in GaN allows direct imaging of a screw dissociation with a 1.65-nm dissociation distance, thereby demonstrating a new method for characterizing dislocation core structures.

  2. Diffraction effects and inelastic electron transport in angle-resolved microscopic imaging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Winkelmann, A.; Nolze, G.; Vespucci, S.; Naresh-Kumar, G; Trager-Cowan, C.; Vilalta-Clementes, A; Wilkinson, A; De Vos, M.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the signal formation process for scanning electronmicroscopic imaging applications on crystalline specimens. Inaccordance with previous investigations, we find nontrivialeffects of incident beam diffraction on the backscattered elec-tron distribution in energy and momentum. Specifically, inci-dent beam diffraction causes angular changes of the backscat-tered electron distribution which we identify as the dominantmechanism underlying pseudocolour orientation imaging us-ing multiple,...

  3. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga+ -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga+ density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  5. Advances in navigation and intraoperative imaging for intraoperative electron radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    García Vázquez, Verónica

    2017-01-01

    Mención Internacional en el título de doctor Esta tesis se enmarca dentro del campo de la radioterapia y trata específicamente sobre la radioterapia intraoperatoria (RIO) con electrones. Esta técnica combina la resección quirúrgica de un tumor y la radiación terapéutica directamente aplicada sobre el lecho tumoral post-resección o sobre el tumor no resecado. El haz de electrones de alta energía es colimado y conducido por un aplicador específico acoplado a un acelerador line...

  6. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorbar, John, E-mail: jdoorba@nimr.mrc.ac.uk

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup ∧}E

  7. 76 FR 73677 - Investigations: Terminations, Modifications and Rulings: Certain Electronic Devices With Image...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... COMMISSION Investigations: Terminations, Modifications and Rulings: Certain Electronic Devices With Image... this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov... entirety. On September 15, 2011, non-parties Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (``AMD'') and its subsidiaries...

  8. Fully relativistic treatment of electron-optical image formation based on the Dirac equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, H.A.; Hoenders, B.J.; Slump, C.H.

    The theory of image formation for an electron microscope is based on the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation, whereas present-day electron microscopes operate with acceleration voltages of the order of one hundred to several hundreds of kilovolts, in which case relativistic effects become

  9. Digital direct electron imaging of energy-filtered electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespucci, S.; Winkelmann, A.; Naresh-Kumar, G.; Mingard, K. P.; Maneuski, D.; Edwards, P. R.; Day, A. P.; O'Shea, V.; Trager-Cowan, C.

    2015-11-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction is a scanning electron microscopy technique used to obtain crystallographic information on materials. It allows the nondestructive mapping of crystal structure, texture, and strain with a lateral and depth resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. Electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs) are presently acquired using a detector comprising a scintillator coupled to a digital camera, and the crystallographic information obtainable is limited by the conversion of electrons to photons and then back to electrons again. In this article we will report the direct acquisition of energy-filtered EBSPs using a digital complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor hybrid pixel detector, Timepix. We show results from a range of samples with different mass and density, namely diamond, silicon, and GaN. Direct electron detection allows the acquisition of EBSPs at lower (≤5 keV) electron beam energies. This results in a reduction in the depth and lateral extension of the volume of the specimen contributing to the pattern and will lead to a significant improvement in lateral and depth resolution. Direct electron detection together with energy filtering (electrons having energy below a specific value are excluded) also leads to an improvement in spatial resolution but in addition provides an unprecedented increase in the detail in the acquired EBSPs. An increase in contrast and higher-order diffraction features are observed. In addition, excess-deficiency effects appear to be suppressed on energy filtering. This allows the fundamental physics of pattern formation to be interrogated and will enable a step change in the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for crystal phase identification and the mapping of strain. The enhancement in the contrast in high-pass energy-filtered EBSD patterns is found to be stronger for lighter, less dense materials. The improved contrast for such materials will enable the application of the EBSD

  10. Mineral element analysis of carious and sound rat dentin by electron probe microanalyzer combined with back-scattered electron image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjäderhane, L; Hietala, E L; Larmas, M

    1995-11-01

    We recently demonstrated the advantages of back-scattered electron images (COMPO) in the visualization of dentinal caries, and the relationship of the change in the dentin fluorescence pattern in caries lesions. However, the exact nature of these changes is not known. In this paper, the nature of the changes in the areas with reduced mineral content in COMPO images was investigated. We examined the relation of changes in mineral elements and the appearance of soft carious and sound dentin in COMPO images using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). Rat molars with small dentinal caries lesions just under the DEJ were chosen for the study. The Ca, P, Na, Mg, Zn, F, and total contents were determined by EPMA from five different dentin sites, and the Ca/P and Mg/Ca ratios were calculated. Generally, the lowest contents were found in caries lesions and highest in mantle dentin, with the exceptions of Mg and Zn. The Ca/P ratio was lowest in mantle dentin and highest in carious dentin. The results confirm that the change in fluorescence in the dentinal caries lesion is correlated with the very initial changes in mineral content, and that EPMA used in combination with COMPO images is a useful tool for determining small changes in mineral elements in the carious and adjacent areas of dentin.

  11. Magnetic imaging with a Zernike-type phase plate in a transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollard, Shawn; Malac, Marek; Beleggia, Marco

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a hole-free phase plate (HFPP) for magnetic imaging in transmission electron microscopy by mapping the domain structure in PrDyFeB samples. The HFPP, a Zernike-like imaging method, allows for detecting magnetic signals in-focus to correlate the sample crystal structure a...

  12. Novel low-dose imaging technique for characterizing atomic structures through scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Ping; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To investigate dislocations or heterostructures across interfaces is now of great interest to condensed matter and materials scientists. With the advances in aberration-corrected electron optics, the scanning transmission electron microscope has demonstrated its excellent capability of characterizing atomic structures within nanomaterials, and well-resolved atomic-resolution images can be obtained through long-exposure data acquisition. However, the sample drifting, carbon contamination, and radiation damage hinder further analysis, such as deriving three-dimensional (3D) structures from a series of images. In this study, a method for obtaining atomic-resolution images with significantly reduced exposure time was developed, using which an original high-resolution image with approximately one tenth the electron dose can be obtained by combining a fast-scan high-magnification image and a slow-scan low-magnification image. The feasibility of obtaining 3D atomic structures using the proposed approach was demonstrated through multislice simulation. Finally, the feasibility and accuracy of image restoration were experimentally verified. This general method cannot only apply to electron microscopy but also benefit to image radiation-sensitive materials using various light sources.

  13. Electron beam imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic nanoantenna resonances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vesseur, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoantennas are metal structures that provide strong optical coupling between a nanoscale volume and the far field. This coupling is mediated by surface plasmons, oscillations of the free electrons in the metal. Increasing the control over the resonant plasmonic field distribution opens up a wide

  14. Modeling of Image Formation in Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulovic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure of biological specimens is crucial for understanding life. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) permits structural studies of biological specimen at their near-native state. The research performed in this thesis represents one of two subprojects of the FOM industrial

  15. Advanced electron crystallography through model-based imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aert, Sandra; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; den Dekker, A.J.; Van Dyck, Dirk; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2016-01-01

    The increasing need for precise determination of the atomic arrangement of non-periodic structures in materials design and the control of nanostructures explains the growing interest in quantitative transmission electron microscopy. The aim is to extract precise and accurate numbers for unknown

  16. A Simple Metric for Determining Resolution in Optical, Ion, and Electron Microscope Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Alexandra E; Skinner, Ryan; Sanders, Aric W

    2015-06-01

    A resolution metric intended for resolution analysis of arbitrary spatially calibrated images is presented. By fitting a simple sigmoidal function to pixel intensities across slices of an image taken perpendicular to light-dark edges, the mean distance over which the light-dark transition occurs can be determined. A fixed multiple of this characteristic distance is then reported as the image resolution. The prefactor is determined by analysis of scanning transmission electron microscope high-angle annular dark field images of Si. This metric has been applied to optical, scanning electron microscope, and helium ion microscope images. This method provides quantitative feedback about image resolution, independent of the tool on which the data were collected. In addition, our analysis provides a nonarbitrary and self-consistent framework that any end user can utilize to evaluate the resolution of multiple microscopes from any vendor using the same metric.

  17. Visualization of oxidative stress in ex vivo biopsies using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Håkan; Hallbeck, Martin; Lindgren, Mikael; Kolbun, Natallia; Jonson, Maria; Engström, Maria; de Muinck, Ebo; Zachrisson, Helene

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an X-Band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging protocol for visualization of oxidative stress in biopsies. The developed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging protocol was based on spin trapping with the cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine and X-Band EPR imaging. Computer software was developed for deconvolution and back-projection of the EPR image. A phantom containing radicals of known spatial characteristic was used for evaluation of the developed protocol. As a demonstration of the technique electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of oxidative stress was performed in six sections of atherosclerotic plaques. Histopathological analyses were performed on adjoining sections. The developed computer software for deconvolution and back-projection of the EPR images could accurately reproduce the shape of a phantom of known spatial distribution of radicals. The developed protocol could successfully be used to image oxidative stress in six sections of the three ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques. We have shown that oxidative stress can be imaged using a combination of spin trapping with the cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine and X-Band EPR imaging. A thorough and systematic evaluation on different types of biopsies must be performed in the future to validate the proposed technique. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A High-Speed CMOS Image Sensor with Global Electronic Shutter Pixels Using Pinned Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Tamura, Toshihiro; Furuta, Masanori; Itoh, Shinya; Kawahito, Shoji

    This paper describes a high-speed CMOS image sensor with a new type of global electronic shutter pixel. A global electronic shutter is necessary for imaging fast-moving objects without motion blur or distortion. The proposed pixel has two potential wells with pinned diode structure for two-stage charge transfer that enables a global electronic shuttering and reset noise canceling. A prototype high-speed image sensor fabricated in 0.18μm standard CMOS image sensor process consists of the proposed pixel array, 12-bit column-parallel cyclic ADC arrays and 192-channel digital outputs. The sensor achieves a good linearity at low-light intensity, demonstrating the perfect charge transfer between two pinned diodes. The input referred noise of the proposed pixel is measured to be 6.3 e-.

  19. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  20. Fast imaging readout and electronics--a novel high-speed imaging system for micro-channel plates

    CERN Document Server

    Lapington, J S

    2002-01-01

    The band-width of charge division readout anodes used with micro-channel plates (MCP) is usually limited by the speed of the acquisition electronics. We present a novel charge division anode that does not require analogue to digital conversion. The Fast Imaging Readout and Electronics is a new concept in high-speed imaging using an MCP detector. The imaging system described comprises an MCP intensifier coupled to a charge division image readout using high-speed, multichannel electronics. It has a projected spatial resolution of up to 128x128 pixels, though the image format is inherently flexible, and the potential for rates up to 100 million events per second with nanosecond timing resolution. The readout pattern has a planar electrode structure and the collected charge from each event is shared amongst all electrodes, grouped in pairs. The unique design of the readout obviates the need for charge measurement, usually the dominant process determining the event-processing deadtime. Instead, high-speed signal c...

  1. Characterization and optimization of a thin direct electron detector for fast imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourki, I.; Westermeier, F.; Schopper, F.; Richter, R. H.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovic, J.; Treis, J.; Koffmane, C.; Wassatsch, A.; Peric, I.; Epp, S. W.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Direct electron detectors are increasingly used to explore the dynamics of macromolecules in real space and real time using transmission electron microscopy. The purpose of this work is to optimize the most suitable detector configuration of a thin silicon detector by Monte Carlo Simulations. Several simulations were performed to achieve an advanced detector geometry that reduces significantly the background signal due to backscattered electrons resulting in an enhanced imaging performance of the detector. Utilizing DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology and the novel ideas for the optimized detector geometry, a unique direct hit electron detector is currently being produced.

  2. Imaging the potential distribution of individual charged impurities on graphene by low-energy electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Wicki, Flavio; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2017-11-01

    While imaging individual atoms can routinely be achieved in high resolution transmission electron microscopy, visualizing the potential distribution of individually charged adsorbates leading to a phase shift of the probing electron wave is still a challenging task. Low-energy electrons (30 - 250 eV) are sensitive to localized potential gradients. We employed low-energy electron holography to acquire in-line holograms of individual charged impurities on free-standing graphene. By applying an iterative phase retrieval reconstruction routine we recover the potential distribution of the localized charged impurities present on free-standing graphene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Su Kang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube emitter, and the transmitted X-ray image was of high resolution.

  4. A Practical and Portable Solids-State Electronic Terahertz Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Smart

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A practical compact solid-state terahertz imaging system is presented. Various beam guiding architectures were explored and hardware performance assessed to improve its compactness, robustness, multi-functionality and simplicity of operation. The system performance in terms of image resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, the electronic signal modulation versus optical chopper, is evaluated and discussed. The system can be conveniently switched between transmission and reflection mode according to the application. A range of imaging application scenarios was explored and images of high visual quality were obtained in both transmission and reflection mode.

  5. New insights into subsurface imaging of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T; Villarrubia, J S; Vladár, András E; Alexander Liddle, J

    2015-02-27

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by three-dimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  6. New Insights on Subsurface Imaging of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composites via Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladar, Andras E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by threedimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  7. 75 FR 8115 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices Having Image Capture or Display Functionality and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices Having Image Capture or Display Functionality and... sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices having image capture or... public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at http...

  8. Molecular Imaging by Optically Detected Electron Spin Resonance of Nitrogen-Vacancies in Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Alex; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2013-03-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demonstrating Optically-Detected Functional-Electron-Spin-Resonance-Imaging, OD-f-ESRI. By combining optical detection with magnetic resonance, nanodiamond imaging achieves high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. It is absent of the complications of ionizing radiation, and the cost should be similar to all-optical imaging. Because nanodiamond imaging is limited by the depth of optical penetration into tissue to depths of a few cm, nanodiamond imaging should open up new avenues of investigation for applications where high depth penetration is not required, such as in small-animal imaging, tumor margin imaging, sentinel lymph node mapping, and perhaps mammography.

  9. Counterfeit Electronics Detection Using Image Processing and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadizanjani, Navid; Tehranipoor, Mark; Forte, Domenic

    2017-01-01

    Counterfeiting is an increasing concern for businesses and governments as greater numbers of counterfeit integrated circuits (IC) infiltrate the global market. There is an ongoing effort in experimental and national labs inside the United States to detect and prevent such counterfeits in the most efficient time period. However, there is still a missing piece to automatically detect and properly keep record of detected counterfeit ICs. Here, we introduce a web application database that allows users to share previous examples of counterfeits through an online database and to obtain statistics regarding the prevalence of known defects. We also investigate automated techniques based on image processing and machine learning to detect different physical defects and to determine whether or not an IC is counterfeit.

  10. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    . Next, a plausible neighborhood structure is estimated. Finally, atom positions are adjusted by simulation of a Markov random field model, integrating image evidence and the strong geometric prior. A pristine sample with high regularity and a sample with an induced hole are analyzed. False discovery...... rate-controlled large-scale simultaneous hypothesis testing is used as a statistical framework for interpretation of results. The first sample yields, as expected, a homogeneous distribution of carbon–carbon (C–C) bond lengths. The second sample exhibits regions of shorter C–C bond lengths...... with a preferred orientation, suggesting either strain in the structure or a buckling of the graphene sheet. The precision of the method is demonstrated on simulated model structures and by its application to multiple exposures of the two graphene samples....

  11. The complementary use of electron backscatter diffraction and ion channelling imaging for the characterization of nanotwins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Pantleon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    On the example of electrodeposited nickel films, it is shown that unique information on twins with dimensions on the nanoscale can be obtained by suitable combination of ion channelling imaging and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, whereas both (routine) single techniques cannot meet...... the requirements for analysis of these films. High‐resolution electron backscatter diffraction is inadequate for full characterization of nanotwins, but image quality maps obtained from electron backscatter diffraction at least yield a qualitative estimation of the location and number of nanotwins. Complementing...... this information with ion channelling imaging provides more representative insights into the microstructure, because it supplements the quantitative investigation of the number and width of twin lamellae with additional crystallographic orientation analysis provided by EBSD. To this end, two methods for adjusting...

  12. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2015-10-20

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  13. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W.; Dehope, William J; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M

    2016-06-21

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  14. Imaging of soft and hard materials using a Boersch phase plate in a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloyeau, D., E-mail: alloyeau.damien@gmail.com [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS/72, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hsieh, W.K. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS/72, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Anderson, E.H.; Hilken, L. [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States); Benner, G. [Carl Zeiss NTS GmbH, Oberkochen 73447 (Germany); Meng, X. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1770 (United States); Chen, F.R. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Kisielowski, C. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS/72, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Using two levels of electron beam lithography, vapor phase deposition techniques, and FIB etching, we have fabricated an electrostatic Boersch phase plate for contrast enhancement of weak phase objects in a transmission electron microscope. The phase plate has suitable dimensions for the imaging of small biological samples without compromising the high-resolution capabilities of the microscope. A micro-structured electrode allows for phase tuning of the unscattered electron beam, which enables the recording of contrast enhanced in-focus images and in-line holograms. We have demonstrated experimentally that our phase plate improves the contrast of carbon nanotubes while maintaining high-resolution imaging performance, which is demonstrated for the case of an AlGaAs heterostructure. The development opens a new way to study interfaces between soft and hard materials.

  15. High-speed multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2016-02-23

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses each being of a programmable pulse duration, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has a plurality of plates. A control system having a digital sequencer controls the laser and a plurality of switching components, synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to enable programmable pulse durations and programmable inter-pulse spacings.

  16. Imaging plant nuclei and membrane-associated cytoskeleton by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišerová, Jindřiška; Goldberg, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a powerful technique that can image exposed surfaces in 3D. Modern scanning electron microscopes, with field emission electron sources and in-lens specimen chambers, achieve resolutions of better than 0.5 nm and thus offer views of ultrastructural details of subcellular structures or even macromolecular complexes. Obtaining a reliable image is, however, dependent on sample preparation methods that robustly but accurately preserve biological structures. In plants, exposing the object of interest may be difficult due to the existence of a cell wall. This protocol shows how to isolate plant nuclei for SEM imaging of the nuclear envelope and associated structures from both sides of the nuclear envelope in cultured cells as well as in leaf or root cells. Further, it provides a method for uncovering membrane-associated cytoskeletal structures.

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by energy dispersive x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, R.; Mascali, D.; Biri, S.; Caliri, C.; Castro, G.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L.; Pálinkás, J.; Romano, F. P.; Torrisi, G.

    2017-07-01

    Pinhole and CCD based quasi-optical x-ray imaging technique was applied to investigate the plasma of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Spectrally integrated and energy resolved images were taken from an axial perspective. The comparison of integrated images taken of argon plasma highlights the structural changes affected by some ECRIS setting parameters, like strength of the axial magnetic confinement, RF frequency and microwave power. Photon counting analysis gives precise intensity distribution of the x-ray emitted by the argon plasma and by the plasma chamber walls. This advanced technique points out that the spatial positions of the electron losses are strongly determined by the kinetic energy of the electrons themselves to be lost and also shows evidences how strongly the plasma distribution is affected by slight changes in the RF frequency.

  18. Analysis of FIB-induced damage by electron channelling contrast imaging in the SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Urrutia, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the Ga+ ion-damage effect induced by focused ion beam (FIB) milling in a [001] single crystal of a 316 L stainless steel by the electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) technique. The influence of FIB milling on the characteristic electron channelling contrast of surface dislocations was analysed. The ECCI approach provides sound estimation of the damage depth produced by FIB milling. For comparison purposes, we have also studied the same milled surface by a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) approach. We observe that the ECCI approach provides further insight into the Ga+ ion-damage phenomenon than the EBSD technique by direct imaging of FIB artefacts in the scanning electron microscope. We envisage that the ECCI technique may be a convenient tool to optimize the FIB milling settings in applications where the surface crystal defect content is relevant. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Can X-ray spectrum imaging replace backscattered electrons for compositional contrast in the scanning electron microscope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2011-01-01

    The high throughput of the silicon drift detector energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SDD-EDS) enables X-ray spectrum imaging (XSI) in the scanning electron microscope to be performed in frame times of 10-100 s, the typical time needed to record a high-quality backscattered electron (BSE) image. These short-duration XSIs can reveal all elements, except H, He, and Li, present as major constituents, defined as 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%) or higher, as well as minor constituents in the range 0.01-0.1 mass fraction, depending on the particular composition and possible interferences. Although BSEs have a greater abundance by a factor of 100 compared with characteristic X-rays, the strong compositional contrast in element-specific X-ray maps enables XSI mapping to compete with BSE imaging to reveal compositional features. Differences in the fraction of the interaction volume sampled by the BSE and X-ray signals lead to more delocalization of the X-ray signal at abrupt compositional boundaries, resulting in poorer spatial resolution. Improved resolution in X-ray elemental maps occurs for the case of a small feature composed of intermediate to high atomic number elements embedded in a matrix of lower atomic number elements. XSI imaging strongly complements BSE imaging, and the SDD-EDS technology enables an efficient combined BSE-XSI measurement strategy that maximizes the compositional information. If 10 s or more are available for the measurement of an area of interest, the analyst should always record the combined BSE-XSI information to gain the advantages of both measures of compositional contrast. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    OpenAIRE

    Pullen, M. G.; Wolter, B.; Le, A. -T.; Baudisch, M; Sclafani, M.; Pires, H.; Schr?ter, C. D.; Ullrich, J; R. Moshammer; Pfeifer, T.; Lin, C. D.; Biegert, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly follow and time resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as {\\pi}g) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction...

  1. Picosecond imaging of inertial confinement fusion plasmas using electron pulse-dilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Nagel, S. R.; Hares, J. D.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.; Piston, K.; Chung, T. M.

    2017-02-01

    Laser driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas typically have burn durations on the order of 100 ps. Time resolved imaging of the x-ray self emission during the hot spot formation is an important diagnostic tool which gives information on implosion symmetry, transient features and stagnation time. Traditional x-ray gated imagers for ICF use microchannel plate detectors to obtain gate widths of 40-100 ps. The development of electron pulse-dilation imaging has enabled a 10X improvement in temporal resolution over legacy instruments. In this technique, the incoming x-ray image is converted to electrons at a photocathode. The electrons are accelerated with a time-varying potential that leads to temporal expansion as the electron signal transits the tube. This expanded signal is recorded with a gated detector and the effective temporal resolution of the composite system can be as low as several picoseconds. An instrument based on this principle, known as the Dilation X-ray Imager (DIXI) has been constructed and fielded at the National Ignition Facility. Design features and experimental results from DIXI will be presented.

  2. Very-Low-Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging of Nitroxide-Loaded Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Barth, Eugene D.; Burks, Scott R.; Smithback, Philip; Mailer, Colin; Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Halpern, Howard J.; Rosen, Gerald M

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging have made it possible to image, in real time in vivo, cells that have been labeled with nitroxide spin probes. We previously reported that cells can be loaded to high (millimolar) intracellular concentrations with (2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl-3-ylmethyl)amine-N,N-diacetic acid by incubation with the corresponding acetoxymethyl (AM) ester. Furthermore, the intracellular lifetime (t1/e) of this nitroxide is 114 min—suffic...

  3. Electronic cleansing for dual-energy CT colonography based on material decomposition and virtual monochromatic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Rie; Näppi, Janne J.; Kim, Se Hyung; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    CT colonography (CTC) uses orally administered fecal-tagging agents to enhance retained fluid and feces that would otherwise obscure or imitate polyps on CTC images. To visualize the complete region of colon without residual materials, electronic cleansing (EC) can be used to perform virtual subtraction of the tagged materials from CTC images. However, current EC methods produce subtraction artifacts and they can fail to subtract unclearly tagged feces. We developed a novel multi-material EC (MUMA-EC) method that uses dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC) and machine-learning methods to improve the performance of EC. In our method, material decomposition is performed to calculate wateriodine decomposition images and virtual monochromatic (VIM) images. Using the images, a random forest classifier is used to label the regions of lumen air, soft tissue, fecal tagging, and their partial-volume boundaries. The electronically cleansed images are synthesized from the multi-material and VIM image volumes. For pilot evaluation, we acquired the clinical DE-CTC data of 7 patients. Preliminary results suggest that the proposed MUMA-EC method is effective and that it minimizes the three types of image artifacts that were present in previous EC methods.

  4. Nanoscale Imaging of Whole Cells Using a Liquid Enclosure and a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckys, Diana B.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Joy, David C.; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory. PMID:20020038

  5. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana B Peckys

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7 were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM laboratory.

  6. Dancing with the Electrons: Time-Domain and CW In Vivo EPR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali C. Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The progress in the development of imaging the distribution of unpaired electrons in living systems and the functional and the potential diagnostic dimensions of such an imaging process, using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging (EPRI, is traced from its origins with emphasis on our own work. The importance of EPR imaging stems from the fact that many paramagnetic probes show oxygen dependent spectral broadening. Assessment of in vivo oxygen concentration is an important factor in radiation oncology in treatment-planning and monitoring treatment-outcome. The emergence of narrow-line trairylmethyl based, bio-compatible spin probes has enabled the development of radiofrequency time-domain EPRI. Spectral information in time-domain EPRI can be achieved by generating a time sequence of T2* or T2 weighted images. Progress in CW imaging has led to the use of rotating gradients, more recently rapid scan with direct detection, and a combination of all the three. Very low field MRI employing Dynamic Nuclear polarization (Overhauser effect is also employed for monitoring tumor hypoxia, and re-oxygenation in vivo. We have also been working on the co-registration of MRI and time domain EPRI on mouse tumor models at 300 MHz using a specially designed resonator assembly. The mapping of the unpaired electron distribution and unraveling the spectral characteristics by using magnetic resonance in presence of stationary and rotating gradients in indeed ‘dancing with the (unpaired electrons’, metaphorically speaking.

  7. Dancing with the Electrons: Time-Domain and CW EPR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaran Subramanian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The progress in the development of imaging the distribution of unpaired electrons in living systems and the functional and the potential diagnostic dimensions of such an imaging process, using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging (EPRI, is traced from its origins with emphasis on our own work. The importance of EPR imaging stems from the fact that many paramagnetic probes show oxygen dependent spectral broadening. Assessment of in vivo oxygen concentration is an important factor in radiation oncology in treatment-planning and monitoring treatment-outcome. The emergence of narrow-line trairylmethyl based, bio-compatible spin probes has enabled the development of radiofrequency time-domain EPRI. Spectral information in time-domain EPRI can be achieved by generating a time sequence of T 2 * or T 2 weighted images. Progress in CW imaging has led to the use of rotating gradients, more recently rapid scan with direct detection, and a combination of all the three. Very low field MRI employing Dynamic Nuclear polarization (Overhauser effect is also employed for monitoring tumor hypoxia, and re-oxygenation in vivo . We have also been working on the co-registration of MRI and time domain EPRI on mouse tumor models at 300 MHz using a specially designed resonator assembly. The mapping of the unpaired electron distribution and unraveling the spectral characteristics by using magnetic resonance in presence of stationary and rotating gradients in indeed ‘dancing with the ( unpaired electrons’, metaphorically speaking.

  8. Fundamental and experimental aspects of diffraction for characterizing dislocations by electron channeling contrast imaging in scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriaa, H; Guitton, A; Maloufi, N

    2017-08-29

    Nowadays Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopes provide detailed crystallographic information with high spatial and angular resolutions, and allow direct observation of crystalline defects, such as dislocations, through an attractive technique called Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI). Dislocations play a crucial role in the properties of materials and ECCI has naturally emerged as an adapted tool for characterizing defects in bulk specimen. Nevertheless, fine control of the channeling conditions is absolutely required to get strong dislocation contrast for achieving comprehensive analysis. In this work, experiment-assisted fundamental aspects of the origin of dislocation contrast are studied. Experimentally, the potential of ECCI is explored in several dislocation configurations in Interstitial-Free steel (Fe - 1% Si) used as a model material. Full interpretations of dislocation contrast in (g, -g) and its evolution along the Kikuchi band are shown. Furthermore, a dislocation dipole is observed and fully characterized for the first time in an SEM.

  9. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  10. Comparing Fourier optics and contrast transfer function modeling of image formation in low energy electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K M; Locatelli, A; Altman, M S

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical understanding of image formation in cathode lens microscopy can facilitate image interpretation. We compare Fourier Optics (FO) and Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) approaches that were recently adapted from other realms of microscopy to model image formation in low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Although these two approaches incorporate imaging errors from several sources similarly, they differ in the way that the image intensity is calculated. The simplification that is used in the CTF calculation advantageously leads to its computational efficiency. However, we find that lens aberrations, and spatial and temporal coherence may affect the validity of the CTF approach to model LEEM image formation under certain conditions. In particular, these effects depend strongly on the nature of the object being imaged and also become more pronounced with increasing defocus. While the use of the CTF approach appears to be justified for objects that are routinely imaged with LEEM, comparison of theory to experimental observations of a focal image series for rippled, suspended graphene reveals one example where FO works, but CTF does not. This work alerts us to potential pitfalls and guides the effective use of FO and CTF approaches. It also lays the foundation for quantitative image evaluation using these methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Snow crystal imaging using scanning electron microscopy: III. Glacier ice, snow and biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, A.; Wergin, W.P.; Erbe, E.F.; Josberger, E.G.

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe metamorphosed snow, glacial firn, and glacial ice obtained from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State, USA. Biotic samples consisting of algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and ice worms (a species of oligochaetes) were also collected and imaged. In the field, the snow and biological samples were mounted on copper plates, cooled in liquid nitrogen, and stored in dry shipping containers which maintain a temperature of -196??C. The firn and glacier ice samples were obtained by extracting horizontal ice cores, 8 mm in diameter, at different levels from larger standard glaciological (vertical) ice cores 7.5 cm in diameter. These samples were cooled in liquid nitrogen and placed in cryotubes, were stored in the same dry shipping container, and sent to the SEM facility. In the laboratory, the samples were sputter coated with platinum and imaged by a low-temperature SEM. To image the firn and glacier ice samples, the cores were fractured in liquid nitrogen, attached to a specimen holder, and then imaged. While light microscope images of snow and ice are difficult to interpret because of internal reflection and refraction, the SEM images provide a clear and unique view of the surface of the samples because they are generated from electrons emitted or reflected only from the surface of the sample. In addition, the SEM has a great depth of field with a wide range of magnifying capabilities. The resulting images clearly show the individual grains of the seasonal snowpack and the bonding between the snow grains. Images of firn show individual ice crystals, the bonding between the crystals, and connected air spaces. Images of glacier ice show a crystal structure on a scale of 1-2 mm which is considerably smaller than the expected crystal size. Microscopic air bubbles, less than 15 ??m in diameter, clearly marked the boundaries between these crystal-like features. The life forms associated with the glacier were

  12. Testing an inversion method for estimating electron energy fluxes from all-sky camera images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available An inversion method for reconstructing the precipitating electron energy flux from a set of multi-wavelength digital all-sky camera (ASC images has recently been developed by tomografia. Preliminary tests suggested that the inversion is able to reconstruct the position and energy characteristics of the aurora with reasonable accuracy. This study carries out a thorough testing of the method and a few improvements for its emission physics equations.

    We compared the precipitating electron energy fluxes as estimated by the inversion method to the energy flux data recorded by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites during four passes over auroral structures. When the aurorae appear very close to the local zenith, the fluxes inverted from the blue (427.8nm filtered ASC images or blue and green line (557.7nm images together give the best agreement with the measured flux values. The fluxes inverted from green line images alone are clearly larger than the measured ones. Closer to the horizon the quality of the inversion results from blue images deteriorate to the level of the ones from green images. In addition to the satellite data, the precipitating electron energy fluxes were estimated from the electron density measurements by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR. These energy flux values were compared to the ones of the inversion method applied to over 100 ASC images recorded at the nearby ASC station in Longyearbyen. The energy fluxes deduced from these two types of data are in general of the same order of magnitude. In 35% of all of the blue and green image inversions the relative errors were less than 50% and in 90% of the blue and green image inversions less than 100%.

    This kind of systematic testing of the inversion method is the first step toward using all-sky camera images in the way in which global UV images have recently been used to estimate the energy fluxes. The

  13. Testing an inversion method for estimating electron energy fluxes from all-sky camera images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available An inversion method for reconstructing the precipitating electron energy flux from a set of multi-wavelength digital all-sky camera (ASC images has recently been developed by tomografia. Preliminary tests suggested that the inversion is able to reconstruct the position and energy characteristics of the aurora with reasonable accuracy. This study carries out a thorough testing of the method and a few improvements for its emission physics equations. We compared the precipitating electron energy fluxes as estimated by the inversion method to the energy flux data recorded by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites during four passes over auroral structures. When the aurorae appear very close to the local zenith, the fluxes inverted from the blue (427.8nm filtered ASC images or blue and green line (557.7nm images together give the best agreement with the measured flux values. The fluxes inverted from green line images alone are clearly larger than the measured ones. Closer to the horizon the quality of the inversion results from blue images deteriorate to the level of the ones from green images. In addition to the satellite data, the precipitating electron energy fluxes were estimated from the electron density measurements by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR. These energy flux values were compared to the ones of the inversion method applied to over 100 ASC images recorded at the nearby ASC station in Longyearbyen. The energy fluxes deduced from these two types of data are in general of the same order of magnitude. In 35% of all of the blue and green image inversions the relative errors were less than 50% and in 90% of the blue and green image inversions less than 100%. This kind of systematic testing of the inversion method is the first step toward using all-sky camera images in the way in which global UV images have recently been used to estimate the energy fluxes. The advantages of ASCs, compared to the space-born imagers, are

  14. Automatic magnification determination of electron cryomicroscopy images using apoferritin as a standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Sebastian; Karelina, Darya; Berriman, John A; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2012-10-01

    Interpretation of the structural information in cryomicroscopy images recorded on film or CCD camera requires a precise knowledge of the electron microscope parameters that affect image features such as magnification and defocus. Magnification must be determined in order to combine data from different images in a three-dimensional reconstruction and to accurately scale reconstructions for fitting with atomic resolution models. A method is described for estimating the absolute magnification of an electron micrograph of a frozen-hydrated specimen using horse spleen apoferritin as a standard. Apoferritin is a widely available protein complex of known structure that may be included with the specimen of interest and imaged under conditions identical to those used for imaging other biological specimens by cryomicroscopy. The sum of the structure factor intensities of images of randomly-oriented apoferritin particles shows three low resolution peaks to 25Å that arise from the hollow ball structure of apoferritin. Comparison of peak positions of the experimental intensities with structure factor intensities of an atomic model of apoferritin determined by X-ray crystallography provides a scale factor for estimating the absolute magnification of the micrograph. We compare the magnification estimate using apoferritin to that obtained with tobacco mosaic virus, another common magnification standard for cryomicroscopy. We verify the precision of the method by acquiring images with a systematic variation of magnification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. PENGARUH ELECTRONIC WORD OF MOUTH (eWOM TWITTER @batikair TERHADAP BRAND IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherry Kartika

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the influence of the Electronic Word of Mouth twitter @batikair in terms of the following dimensions are intensity dimension to the brand image, valence of opinion dimension to the brand image, and content dimension to the brand image.The sampling technique in this study using purposive sampling technique with criteria from Batik Air passengers in period of June 2015. The data in this study are primary data that collected through questionnaires. Data were analyzed using multiple regression analysis with the classical assumptions.Based on the results of data analysis and discussion, it can be concluded as follows: (1 There is eWOM twitter @batikair influence in terms of intensity dimension to the brand image. (2 There is a eWOM twitter @batikair influence in terms of valence of opinion dimension to the brand image. @batikair. (3 There is a positive eWOM twitter @batikair influence in terms of content dimension to the brand image, it means that the better available information from social network sites relating to products and services will be a positive influence on @batikairbrand image enhancement.   Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh Electronic Word of Mouth (eWOM twitter @batikair ditinjau dari dimensi-dimensi berikut yaitu dimensi intensity terhadap brand image, dimensi valence of opinion terhadap brand image, dan dimensi content terhadap brand image.Teknik pengambilan sampel pada penelitian ini menggunakan teknik purposive sampling dengan kriteria tertentu yaitu para penumpang Batik Air. Data pada penelitian ini adalah data primer yang dikumpulkan melalui kuesioner. Teknik analisis data menggunakan analisis regresi berganda dengan asumsi klasik.Berdasarkan pada hasil analisis data dan pembahasan maka dapat disimpulkan sebagai berikut: (1 Terdapat pengaruh eWOM twitter @batikair ditinjau dari dimensi intensity terhadap brand imag.e. (2 Terdapat pengaruh eWOM twitter @batikair ditinjau dari dimensi

  16. Grain size distributions of chalk from image analysis of electron micrographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    In the chalk of the Ekofisk formation in the Chalk Group of the North Sea, substantial depth-related variations in porosityare observed. With the aim of obtaining a textural interpretation of these porositydata, we have developed a method to assess the grain size distribution of the chalk from...... image analysis. The chalk is composed of a fine-grained matrix of nannofossils and predominantlycalcitic fossil debris with larger microfossil grains, but the chalk may also contain significant amounts of silica and siliciclastic clay. For image analysis, we used backscatter electron images of epoxy...... from image analysis due to rim effects inherent in backscatter images at high magnification. Thus, in order to obtain a consistent interpretation, we use total (He) porosity and insoluble residue as measured in the laboratory. We find that the volume density of larger grains (cross section larger than...

  17. An introduction to sample preparation and imaging by cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rebecca F.; Walker, Matt; Siebert, C. Alistair; Muench, Stephen P.; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (EM) is a versatile technique that can be used to image biological specimens ranging from intact eukaryotic cells to individual proteins >150 kDa. There are several strategies for preparing samples for imaging by EM, including negative staining and cryogenic freezing. In the last few years, cryo-EM has undergone a ‘resolution revolution’, owing to both advances in imaging hardware, image processing software, and improvements in sample preparation, leading to growing number of researchers using cryo-EM as a research tool. However, cryo-EM is still a rapidly growing field, with unique challenges. Here, we summarise considerations for imaging of a range of specimens from macromolecular complexes to cells using EM. PMID:26931652

  18. A novel algorithm for electronic image stabilization based on improved optical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-mei; Bai, Hong-yang; Guo, Hong-wei; Liang, Hua-ju

    2017-11-01

    Aiming at the problem of the jitter of video sequence recorded by the strapdown seeker in the terminal guidance process, a novel algorithm for electronic image stabilization based on improved optical flow is proposed. The algorithm uses Shi-Tomasi corner detection method to extract the image corner, and estimates the global motion parameters of jittery video sequence based on improved Pyramid LK optical flow which is designed. Then the Kalman smoothing global motion vector is adopted, which effectively makes compensation on the current image motion and retains the active movement while filtering random jitter parameters. Finally, stable image sequence output is achieved. The simulation test and the embedded platform for the actual test results indicate that the proposed algorithm has a good image stabilization effect on the translation, rotation and scaling motion of the random jittery video sequence recorded by the strapdown seeker, and possesses good robustness and real-time performance.

  19. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwe, R. J. W.; Tielenburg, R.; van Ingen, K. M.; Mijnheer, B. J.; van Herk, M. B.

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the

  20. RGB color coded images in scanning electron microscopy of biological surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 349-352 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biological surfaces * Color images * Scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  1. 75 FR 39971 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of investigation pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1337. SUMMARY: Notice...

  2. 77 FR 4059 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof; Receipt...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof; Receipt... Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade...

  3. 77 FR 11588 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a complaint...

  4. Chemical-state imaging of Li using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ISHIDA.Nobuyuki@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Fujita, Daisuke [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Advanced Nanocharacterization Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: •Scanning Auger electron microscopy is used to image chemical states of Li. •The combined use of AES and EELS signals for the elemental mapping is powerful. •Distribution corresponding to metallic and oxidized states of Li can be imaged. -- Abstract: The demand for measurement tools to detect Li with high spatial resolution and precise chemical sensitivity is increasing with the spread of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for use in a wide range of applications. In this work, scanning Auger electron microscopy (SAM) is used to image chemical states of a partially oxidized Li surface on the basis of the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data obtained during an oxidation process of a metal Li. We show that distribution of metallic and oxidized states of Li is clearly imaged by mapping the intensity of the corresponding AES and EELS peaks. Furthermore, a tiny difference in the extent of oxidation can be distinguished by comparing the elemental map of an AES peak with that of an EELS peak owing to the different behaviors of those signals to the chemical states of Li.

  5. On the influence of the electron dose rate on the HRTEM image contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Juri, E-mail: ju.barthel@fz-juelich.de [RWTH Aachen University, Ahornstraße 55, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Lentzen, Markus; Thust, Andreas [Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    We investigate a possible dependence between the applied electron dose-rate and the magnitude of the resulting image contrast in HRTEM of inorganic crystalline objects. The present study is focussed on the question whether electron irradiation can induce excessively strong atom vibrations or displacements, which in turn could significantly reduce the resulting image contrast. For this purpose, high-resolution images of MgO, Ge, and Au samples were acquired with varying dose rates using a C{sub S}-corrected FEI Titan 80–300 microscope operated at 300 kV accelerating voltage. This investigation shows that the magnitude of the signal contrast is independent from the dose rates occurring in conventional HRTEM experiments and that excessively strong vibrations or displacements of bulk atoms are not induced by the applied electron irradiation. - Highlights: • No dependence between electron dose rate and HRTEM image contrast is found. • This finding is in full accordance with established solid-state physics theory. • Object-related causes for the previous Stobbs-factor phenomenon are ruled out.

  6. Accuracy of surface strain measurements from transmission electron microscopy images of nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob; Liu, Pei; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2017-01-01

    Strain analysis from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images offers a convenient tool for measuring strain in materials at the atomic scale. In this paper we present a theoretical study of the precision and accuracy of surface strain measurements directly from aberration-c...

  7. In situ imaging of electromigration-induced nanogap formation by transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heersche, H.B.; Lientschnig, G.; O'Neill, K.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Zandbergen, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    The authors imaged electromigration-induced nanogap formation in situ by transmission electron microscopy. Real-time video recordings show that edge voids form near the cathode side. The polycrystalline gold wires narrow down until a single-grain boundary intersects the constriction along which the

  8. Electronic portal images (EPIs) based position verification for the breast simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, Nanna M; van Dijk-Peters, Femke B J; Langendijk, Johannes a; Maduro, John H; van 't Veld, Aart a

    Background and purpose: To develop a method based on electronic portal images (EPIs) for the position verification of breast cancer patients that are treated with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique. Method: 3D setup errors of the breast outline and the thoracic wall were determined from

  9. Comparison of LV mass and volume measurements derived from electron beam tomography using cine imaging and angiographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Songshou; Takasu, Junichiro; Child, Janis; Carson, Sivi; Oudiz, Ronald; Budoff, Matthew J

    2003-10-01

    To estimate the variation of left ventricular (LV) mass and volume measurement with cine and angiography by electron beam tomography (EBT). Sixty-three consecutive patients (41 men, 22 women; age range 46-91) referred for cardiac imaging for clinical indications underwent cine and coronary artery electron beam angiography (EBA) studies on the same day. The cine images consisted of 144 images (12 slices/level x 12 levels), taken 12 frames/s for a full cardiac cycle. The EBA images consisted of 50-70 slices triggered at end-systole, with an acquisition time of 100 ms/slice. Slice thickness was 8 mm for the cine images and 1.5 mm for the EBA images. A total volume of 120-180 ml of nonionic contrast was used for each subject. The LV mass (myocardial tissue volume), LV cavity volume and total LV volume (tissue + cavity) measurements were completed using the software from the EBT computer console (G.E., S. San Francisco, CA). The LV mass, cavity volume and total LV volumes at end-systole were 124.11 g, 45.66 and 163.86 ml when derived from the cine images and 130.74 g, 41.31 and 165.82 ml when derived from the EBA images. There were no significant differences between the cine and EBA-derived measurements, however the EBA-derived measurements showed slightly larger LV mass (mean 6.63 g), smaller cavity volume (mean -4.35 ml) and larger total LV volume (mean 1.96 ml, all p > 0.05) than did the cine-derived measurements. Based on case-by-case observations, these differences appear to be related to the higher spatial resolution of the thinner EBA images which allows better discrimination between papillary and trabecular muscle and LV. This leads to slightly smaller cavity size estimations and greater LV mass measurements. There was significant correlation between cine and EBA-derived measurements. Formulas were developed for relating the measurements made from the two modalities as follows: For LV mass: EBA value = 0.91 x cine value + 17.09, R = 0.95, p cine value - 6.91, R

  10. The effect of electronic word of mouth communication and brand image on purchase intention: A case of consumer electronics in Haripur, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anees Kazmi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to focus on the purchase intention of the consumer specifically the millennial age group with respect to the effect of Electronic word of mouth communication and brand image. The study is performed among the students of the University of Haripur. Study reveals that the effect of Electronic word of mouth and brand image for the purchase of consumer electronics products have positively correlated and the effect is significant, which means that the Word of mouth communication can positively respond to the purchase of the said products in case when the products are branded and have certain image in the mind of consumer.

  11. Observation of electron beam moiré fringes in an image conversion tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yunfei; Liao, Yubo; Long, Jing-Hua; Cai, Houzhi; Bai, Yanli; Liu, Jinyuan

    2016-11-01

    An image conversion tube with a magnetic lens was designed to observe electron beam moiré fringes. Electron beam moiré fringes result from the interference between the photocathode and the anode meshes. The photocathode had a strip line structure with a spatial frequency of 10L/mm. The anode mesh had a fixed spatial frequency of 10L/mm, and could be rotated around the axis of the image tube. The changes to the fringe direction and the spacing as a function of the rotation angle between the photocathode and the anode mesh were examined. The experimental results agreed with the theoretical analysis. Moiré fringes with a modulation of ~20% were obtained using a 3keV electron beam. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Towards understanding the influence of electron-gas interactions on imaging in an environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Boothroyd, Chris; Beleggia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    improved the point resolution to the sub-Ångström level [1] and reduced image delocalization, allowing images of surface and interface structures to be interpreted more directly [2]. However, when gas is present in the microscope the path of electrons along the column is modified due to gas......-electron scattering [3]. In general there are two approaches for performing TEM experiments in the presence of gases. These approaches are based on a differential pumping scheme and the closed cell TEM holder approach and each has its advantages and disadvantages. In the closed cell approach, gas molecules...... are confined to a thin (typically 50-200 μm thick) slab around the sample, but the electrons interact with the window material (e.g. C, SiN) as well as with the gas and the sample. In addition, the field of view is typically smaller than in a conventional TEM and a limited range of sample geometries can...

  13. Building the atomic model for the bacterial flagellar filament by electron cryomicroscopy and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura, Koji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Namba, Keiichi

    2005-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar filament is a helical propeller for bacterial locomotion. It is a well-ordered helical assembly of a single protein, flagellin, and its tubular structure is formed by 11 protofilaments, each in either of the two distinct conformations, L- and R-type, for supercoiling. We have been studying the three-dimensional structures of the flagellar filaments by electron cryomicroscopy and recently obtained a density map of the R-type filament up to 4 angstroms resolution from an image data set containing only about 41,000 molecular images. The density map showed the features of the alpha-helical backbone and some large side chains, which allowed us to build the complete atomic model as one of the first atomic models of macromolecules obtained solely by electron microscopy image analysis (Yonekura et al., 2003a). We briefly review the structure and the structure analysis, and point out essential techniques that have made this analysis possible.

  14. Light Printing of Grayscale Pixel Images on Optical Rewritable Electronic Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravsky, Alexander; Murauski, Anatoli; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2008-08-01

    The new principle of electronic paper that can display two-dimensional (2D) or even stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) images was developed by us. We review the structure of the display unit that is the light printable rewritable matter with polarization dependent gray scale. It consists of one or two liquid crystal displays based on optical rewritable (ORW) technology. ORW display uses bare plastic or polarizers as substrates, while no conductor is required. Continuous grey image on ORW e-paper maintains proper performance even when the device is bent. The image is changed by light printer. We discuss and experimentally verify the possible design of the light printer device based on polarization rotation. Alternative designs based on twist nematic (TN) or ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLC) operational element are also suggested. Simple construction provides durability and low cost of the ORW e-paper concept, while amazing possibility of 3D picture on ORW electronic paper is principally proved.

  15. Iodine vapor staining for atomic number contrast in backscattered electron and X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan; Mccorkell, Fergus A; Taylor, Graham K; Bomphrey, Richard J; Doube, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Iodine imparts strong contrast to objects imaged with electrons and X-rays due to its high atomic number (53), and is widely used in liquid form as a microscopic stain and clinical contrast agent. We have developed a simple technique which exploits elemental iodine's sublimation-deposition state-change equilibrium to vapor stain specimens with iodine gas. Specimens are enclosed in a gas-tight container along with a small mass of solid I2 . The bottle is left at ambient laboratory conditions while staining proceeds until empirically determined completion (typically days to weeks). We demonstrate the utility of iodine vapor staining by applying it to resin-embedded tissue blocks and whole locusts and imaging them with backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM) or X-ray microtomography (XMT). Contrast is comparable to that achieved with liquid staining but without the consequent tissue shrinkage, stain pooling, or uneven coverage artefacts associated with immersing the specimen in iodine solutions. Unmineralized tissue histology can be read in BSE SEM images with good discrimination between tissue components. Organs within the locust head are readily distinguished in XMT images with particularly useful contrast in the chitin exoskeleton, muscle and nerves. Here, we have used iodine vapor staining for two imaging modalities in frequent use in our laboratories and on the specimen types with which we work. It is likely to be equally convenient for a wide range of specimens, and for other modalities which generate contrast from electron- and photon-sample interactions, such as transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy. © 2014 The Authors. Microscopy Research Technique published by Wiley Periodocals, Inc.

  16. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-07

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  17. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. IBIS integrated biological imaging system: electron micrograph image-processing software running on Unix workstations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flifla, M J; Garreau, M; Rolland, J P; Coatrieux, J L; Thomas, D

    1992-12-01

    'IBIS' is a set of computer programs concerned with the processing of electron micrographs, with particular emphasis on the requirements for structural analyses of biological macromolecules. The software is written in FORTRAN 77 and runs on Unix workstations. A description of the various functions and the implementation mode is given. Some examples illustrate the user interface.

  20. Efficient elastic imaging of single atoms on ultrathin supports in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovden, Robert, E-mail: rmh244@cornell.edu [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 148532 (United States); Muller, David A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 148532 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Mono-atomic-layer membranes such as graphene offer new opportunities for imaging and detecting individual light atoms in transmission electron microscopes (TEM). For such applications where multiple scattering and diffraction effects are weak, we evaluate the detection efficiency and interpretability of single atom images for the most common detector geometries using quantitative quantum mechanical simulations. For well-resolved and atomically-thin specimens, the low angle annular dark field (LAADF) detector can provide a significant increase in signal-to-noise over other common detector geometries including annular bright field and incoherent bright field. This dramatically improves the visibility of organic specimens on atomic-layer membranes. Simulations of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) imaged under ideal conditions indicate the minimal dose requirements for elastic imaging by STEM or conventional TEM still exceed previously reported dose limits. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphene offers new opportunities for imaging individual light atoms in electron microscopes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For ultrathin materials, a low angle annular dark field detector can provide a SNR comparable to TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LAADF dramatically improves the visibility of organic specimens on atomic-layer membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulations for atomic imaging of ATP nucleotides exceed the molecules' dose limits.

  1. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    based on a slab model for the metal surface. The ordered monolayer offers a platform for submolecular scale electronic mapping that is an issue of fundamental interest but remains a challenge in STM imaging science and surface chemistry. Single Cys molecules were mapped as three electronic subunits......We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry...... contributed mainly from three chemical moieties: thiol (-SH), carboxylic (-COOH), and amine (-NH2) groups. The contrasts of the three subunits depend on the environment (e.g., pH), which affects the electronic structure of adsorbed species. From the DFT computations focused on single molecules, rational...

  2. EPR and DNP Properties of Certain Novel Single Electron Contrast Agents Intended for Oximetric Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, J. H.; Laursen, I; Leunbach, I.

    1998-01-01

    Parameters of relevance to oximetry with Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) have been measured for three single electron contrast agents of the triphenylmethyl type. The single electron contrast agents are stable and water soluble. Magnetic resonance properties of the agents have been...... examined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.5 mT in water, isotonic saline, plasma, and blood at 23 and 37°C. The relaxivities of the agents are about 0.2–0.4 mM−1s−1and the DNP enhancements extrapolate close...... than 1 μT in water at room temperature. The longitudinal electron spin relaxation rate is calculated from the DNP enhancement curves. The oxygen broadening in water is about 50 μT/mM O2at 37°C. These agents have good properties for oximetry with OMRI....

  3. Determining optimum red filter slide distance on creating 3D electron microscope images using anaglyph method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresna, W. P.; Isnaeni

    2017-04-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a proven instrument for analyzing material in which a 2D image of an object is produced. However, the optimization of a 3D image in the SEM system is usually difficult and costly. There is a simple method to produce a 3D image by using two light sources with a red and a blue filter combined in a certain angle. In this experiment, the authors conducted a simulation of the 3D image formation using anaglyph method by finding the optimum point of shifting the red and blue filters in an SEM image. The method used in this experiment was an image processing that employed a digital manipulation on a certain deviation distance of the central point of the main object. The simulation result of an SEM image with a magnification of 5000 times showed an optimal 3D effect that was achieved when the red filter was shifted by 1 μm to the right and the blue filter was shifted by 1 µm to the left from the central position. The result of this simulation can be used to understand better the viewing angle and the optimal position of the two light sources, i.e. red and blue filter pairs. The produced 3D image can be clearly seen using 3D glasses.

  4. Formation and annihilation of E4 centers in ZnO: Influence of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupfer, A.; Bhoodoo, C.; Vines, L.; Svensson, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrothermally grown n-type ZnO bulk samples have been implanted with protons and deuterium ions to fluences in the range of 8 × 1010 to 8 × 1011 cm-2. The implantations were performed at the temperature of 285 K, and the samples were then analyzed in-situ by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) using a setup connected to the implanter beam line. The concentration of the so-called E4 center, having an apparent energy level at ˜0.57 eV below the conduction edge, is found to increase linearly with the ion fluence and the generation rate is proportional to the elastic energy deposition, as expected for a primary defect. Isothermal annealing of the E4 center at temperatures between 290 and 315 K reveals first-order kinetics with the activation energy of ˜0.6 eV. The annealing rate is strongly enhanced with increasing hydrogen fluence, and a model invoking migration of interstitial hydrogen and subsequent reaction with E4 exhibits close agreement with the experimental data. The rate of electron capture by E4 during the DLTS filling pulse depends on temperature, and it displays a thermal barrier of ˜0.15 eV. Most of these experimental results for E4 conform to the theoretically predicted properties of the oxygen vacancy (VO) and a tentative assignment of E4 to VO is made, corroborating previous suggestions in the literature. In particular, the 0.57 eV level is ascribed to the double donor state of VO.

  5. Formation and annihilation of E4 centers in ZnO: Influence of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer, A.; Bhoodoo, C.; Vines, L.; Svensson, B. G. [Physics Department/Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048, Blindern, Oslo N-0316 (Norway)

    2016-05-14

    Hydrothermally grown n-type ZnO bulk samples have been implanted with protons and deuterium ions to fluences in the range of 8 × 10{sup 10} to 8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. The implantations were performed at the temperature of 285 K, and the samples were then analyzed in-situ by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) using a setup connected to the implanter beam line. The concentration of the so-called E4 center, having an apparent energy level at ∼0.57 eV below the conduction edge, is found to increase linearly with the ion fluence and the generation rate is proportional to the elastic energy deposition, as expected for a primary defect. Isothermal annealing of the E4 center at temperatures between 290 and 315 K reveals first-order kinetics with the activation energy of ∼0.6 eV. The annealing rate is strongly enhanced with increasing hydrogen fluence, and a model invoking migration of interstitial hydrogen and subsequent reaction with E4 exhibits close agreement with the experimental data. The rate of electron capture by E4 during the DLTS filling pulse depends on temperature, and it displays a thermal barrier of ∼0.15 eV. Most of these experimental results for E4 conform to the theoretically predicted properties of the oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}) and a tentative assignment of E4 to V{sub O} is made, corroborating previous suggestions in the literature. In particular, the 0.57 eV level is ascribed to the double donor state of V{sub O}.

  6. Three-dimensional imaging of cerebellar mossy fiber rosettes by ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Ki Woo; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2013-08-01

    The detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) organization of the nervous tissue provides essential information on its functional elucidation. We used serial block-face scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam (FIB) milling to reveal 3D morphologies of the mossy fiber rosettes in the mice cerebellum. Three-week-old C57 black mice were perfused with a fixative of 1% paraformaldehyde/1% glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer; the cerebellum was osmicated and embedded in the Araldite. The block containing granule cell layer was sliced with FIB and observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The contrast of backscattered electron image of the block-face was similar to that of transmission electron microscopy and processed using 3D visualization software for further analysis. The mossy fiber rosettes on each image were segmented and rendered to visualize the 3D model. The complete 3D characters of the mossy fiber rosette could be browsed on the A-Works, in-house software, and some preliminary quantitative data on synapse of the rosette could be extracted from these models. Thanks to the development of two-beam imaging and optimized software, we could get 3D information on cerebellar mossy fiber rosettes with ease and speedily, which would be an additive choice to explore 3D structures of the nervous systems and their networks.

  7. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-03

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints.

  8. Ximdisp--A visualization tool to aid structure determination from electron microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M

    1999-01-01

    The display of digitized electron microscope images on a computer screen is a crucial first step in the computation of macromolecular structures. It is also essential to be able to visualize the final computed density map in a way that reveals its shape in three dimensions. Ximdisp is an X-windows based, menu-driven computer program that forms the core of the MRC image processing package. Raw electron microscope images, Fourier transforms, and computed density maps may all be displayed in a variety of ways with a choice of colour representations suitable for manuscript illustration purposes. It gives the user full interactive control over its many functions with clear, simple menus, labels, and editable dialogue boxes. Ximdisp plays a part in single-particle analysis with a straightforward particle selection procedure, in processing 2D crystal and electron diffraction data with extended lattice refinement, and in the analysis of helical structures with filament straightening and interactive Fourier transform display of automatically rotated, padded, and floated particles. The role of Ximdisp in all of these analyses and the most effective ways in which it can be used to display images are described. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Embedded electronics for a video-rate distributed aperture passive millimeter-wave imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt, Petersen F.; Bonnett, James; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.

    2013-05-01

    Optical upconversion for a distributed aperture millimeter wave imaging system is highly beneficial due to its superior bandwidth and limited susceptibility to EMI. These features mean the same technology can be used to collect information across a wide spectrum, as well as in harsh environments. Some practical uses of this technology include safety of flight in degraded visual environments (DVE), imaging through smoke and fog, and even electronic warfare. Using fiber-optics in the distributed aperture poses a particularly challenging problem with respect to maintaining coherence of the information between channels. In order to capture an image, the antenna aperture must be electronically steered and focused to a particular distance. Further, the state of the phased array must be maintained, even as environmental factors such as vibration, temperature and humidity adversely affect the propagation of the signals through the optical fibers. This phenomenon cannot be avoided or mitigated, but rather must be compensated for using a closed-loop control system. In this paper, we present an implementation of embedded electronics designed specifically for this purpose. This novel architecture is efficiently small, scalable to many simultaneously operating channels and sufficiently robust. We present our results, which include integration into a 220 channel imager and phase stability measurements as the system is stressed according to MIL-STD-810F vibration profiles of an H-53E heavy-lift helicopter.

  10. Refinement procedure for the image alignment in high-resolution electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houben, L., E-mail: l.houben@fz-juelich.de [Peter Gruenberg Institute and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Research Centre Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Bar Sadan, M. [Peter Gruenberg Institute and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Research Centre Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    High-resolution electron tomography from a tilt series of transmission electron microscopy images requires an accurate image alignment procedure in order to maximise the resolution of the tomogram. This is the case in particular for ultra-high resolution where even very small misalignments between individual images can dramatically reduce the fidelity of the resultant reconstruction. A tomographic-reconstruction based and marker-free method is proposed, which uses an iterative optimisation of the tomogram resolution. The method utilises a search algorithm that maximises the contrast in tomogram sub-volumes. Unlike conventional cross-correlation analysis it provides the required correlation over a large tilt angle separation and guarantees a consistent alignment of images for the full range of object tilt angles. An assessment based on experimental reconstructions shows that the marker-free procedure is competitive to the reference of marker-based procedures at lower resolution and yields sub-pixel accuracy even for simulated high-resolution data. -- Highlights: {yields} Alignment procedure for electron tomography based on iterative tomogram contrast optimisation. {yields} Marker-free, independent of object, little user interaction. {yields} Accuracy competitive with fiducial marker methods and suited for high-resolution tomography.

  11. Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The imaging of fast-moving electron-density structures in the polar cap presents a unique set of challenges that are not encountered in other ionospheric imaging problems. GPS observations of total electron content in the polar cap are sparse compared to other regions in the Northern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the slow relative motion of the satellites across the sky complicates the problem since the velocity of the plasma can be large in comparison and traditional approaches could result in image blurring. This paper presents a Kalman-filter based method that incorporates a forward projection of the solution based on a model plasma drift velocity field. This is the first time that the plasma motion, rather than just integrations of electron density, has been used in an ionospheric imaging algorithm. The motion is derived from the Weimer model of the electric field. It is shown that this novel approach to the implementation of a Kalman filter provides a detailed view of the polar cap ionosphere under severe storm conditions. A case study is given for the October 2003 Halloween storm where verification is provided by incoherent scatter radars.

  12. An asynchronous, pipelined, electronic acquisition system for Active Matrix Flat-Panel Imagers (AMFPIs)

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, W; Berry, J; Maolinbay, M; Martelli, C; Mody, P; Nassif, S; Yeakey, M

    1999-01-01

    The development of a full-custom electronic acquisition system designed for readout of large-area active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays is reported. The arrays, which comprise two-dimensional matrices of pixels utilizing amorphous silicon thin-film transistors, are themselves under development for a wide variety of X-ray imaging applications. The acquisition system was specifically designed to facilitate detailed, quantitative investigations of the properties of these novel imaging arrays and contains significant enhancements compared to a previously developed acquisition system. These enhancements include pipelined preamplifier circuits to allow faster readout speed, expanded addressing capabilities allowing a maximum of 4096 array data lines, and on-board summing of image frames. The values of many acquisition system parameters, including timings and voltages, may be specified and downloaded from a host computer. Once acquisition is enabled, the system operates asynchronously of its host computer. The sys...

  13. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bainbridge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics.

  14. Imaging laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons using miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Weingartner

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of the energy spread, beam divergence, and pointing fluctuations are some of the main challenges currently facing the field of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons. We address these issues by manipulating the electron beams after their generation using miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses with field gradients of ∼500  T/m. By imaging electron beams the spectral resolution of dipole magnet spectrometers can be significantly increased, resulting in measured energy spreads down to 1.0% rms at 190 MeV. The focusing of different electron energies demonstrates the tunability of the lens system and could be used to filter out off-target energies in order to reduce the energy spread even further. By collimating the beam, the shot-to-shot spatial stability of the beam is improved by a factor of 5 measured at a distance of 1 m from the source. Additionally, by deliberately transversely offsetting a quadrupole lens, the electron beam can be steered in any direction by several mrad. These methods can be implemented while still maintaining the ultrashort bunch duration and low emittance of the beam and, except for undesired electron energies in the energy filter, without any loss of charge. This reliable and compact control of laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams is independent of the accelerator itself, allowing immediate application of currently available beams.

  15. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field.

  16. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G F; Grysan, P; Guennou, M; Kreisel, J; Martinotti, D; Rountree, C L; Mathieu, C; Barrett, N

    2016-09-09

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field.

  17. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed, E-mail: samasoumia@hotmail.fr [Science and Technology Faculty, El Bachir El Ibrahimi University, BordjBouArreridj (Algeria); Messali, Zoubeida, E-mail: messalizoubeida@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Electrical Engineering(LGE), University of M' sila (Algeria); Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil, E-mail: abdeldjalil.ouahabi@univ-tours.fr [Polytechnic School, University of Tours (EPU - PolytechTours), EPU - Energy and Electronics Department (France); Trepout, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.trepout@curie.fr, E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr, E-mail: sergio.marco@curie.fr; Messaoudi, Cedric, E-mail: sylvain.trepout@curie.fr, E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr, E-mail: sergio.marco@curie.fr; Marco, Sergio, E-mail: sylvain.trepout@curie.fr, E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr, E-mail: sergio.marco@curie.fr [INSERMU759, University Campus Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-01-13

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the

  18. Imaging the atomic orbitals of carbon atomic chains with field-emission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskij, I. M.; Sadanov, E. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Velicodnaja, O. A.

    2009-10-01

    A recently developed high-field technique of atomic chains preparation has made it possible to attain the ultrahigh resolution of field-emission electron microscopy (FEEM), which can be used to direct imaging the intra-atomic electronic structure. By applying cryogenic FEEM, we are able to resolve the spatial configuration of atomic orbitals, which correspond to quantized states of the end atom in free-standing carbon atomic chains. Knowledge of the intra-atomic structure will make it possible to visualize generic aspects of quantum mechanics and also lead to approaches for a wide range of nanotechnological applications.

  19. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murugesan; Cook; Devasahayam

    1997-01-01

    Imaging of free radicals by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using time domain acquisition as in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has not been attempted because of the short spin-spin relaxation times, typically under 1 μs, of most biologically relevant paramagnetic species......, Recent advances in radiofrequency (RF) electronics have enabled the generation of pulses of the order of 10-50 ns. Such short pulses provide adequate spectral coverage for EPR studies at 300 MHz resonant frequency. Acquisition of free induction decays (FID) of paramagnetic species possessing...

  20. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Fumio, E-mail: hosokawa@bio-net.co.jp [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Sawada, Hidetaka [JEOL (UK) Ltd., JEOL House, Silver Court, Watchmead, Welwyn Garden City, Herts AL7 1LT (United Kingdom); Shinkawa, Takao [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Sannomiya, Takumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field’s components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field’s derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. - Highlights: • The formula of partial coherence for aberration corrected TEM is derived. • Transfer functions are calculated with several residual aberrations. • The calculated transfer function shows the characteristic damping. • The odd-symmetric wave aberrations can cause the attenuation of image via coherence. • The examples of aberration corrected TEM image simulations are shown.

  1. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of the specimen even at the nanometer scale lead to random image distortions that make precise atom localization difficult. Given a series of STEM images, we derive a Bayesian method that jointly estimates the distortion in each image and reconstructs the underlying atomic grid of the material by fitting the atom bumps with suitable bump functions. The resulting highly non-convex minimization problems are solved numerically with a trust region approach. Existence of minimizers and the model behavior for faster and faster rastering are investigated using variational techniques. The performance of the method is finally evaluated on both synthetic and real experimental data.

  2. Automated detection of synapses in serial section transmission electron microscopy image stacks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kreshuk

    Full Text Available We describe a method for fully automated detection of chemical synapses in serial electron microscopy images with highly anisotropic axial and lateral resolution, such as images taken on transmission electron microscopes. Our pipeline starts from classification of the pixels based on 3D pixel features, which is followed by segmentation with an Ising model MRF and another classification step, based on object-level features. Classifiers are learned on sparse user labels; a fully annotated data subvolume is not required for training. The algorithm was validated on a set of 238 synapses in 20 serial 7197×7351 pixel images (4.5×4.5×45 nm resolution of mouse visual cortex, manually labeled by three independent human annotators and additionally re-verified by an expert neuroscientist. The error rate of the algorithm (12% false negative, 7% false positive detections is better than state-of-the-art, even though, unlike the state-of-the-art method, our algorithm does not require a prior segmentation of the image volume into cells. The software is based on the ilastik learning and segmentation toolkit and the vigra image processing library and is freely available on our website, along with the test data and gold standard annotations (http://www.ilastik.org/synapse-detection/sstem.

  3. Automated detection of synapses in serial section transmission electron microscopy image stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreshuk, Anna; Koethe, Ullrich; Pax, Elizabeth; Bock, Davi D; Hamprecht, Fred A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for fully automated detection of chemical synapses in serial electron microscopy images with highly anisotropic axial and lateral resolution, such as images taken on transmission electron microscopes. Our pipeline starts from classification of the pixels based on 3D pixel features, which is followed by segmentation with an Ising model MRF and another classification step, based on object-level features. Classifiers are learned on sparse user labels; a fully annotated data subvolume is not required for training. The algorithm was validated on a set of 238 synapses in 20 serial 7197×7351 pixel images (4.5×4.5×45 nm resolution) of mouse visual cortex, manually labeled by three independent human annotators and additionally re-verified by an expert neuroscientist. The error rate of the algorithm (12% false negative, 7% false positive detections) is better than state-of-the-art, even though, unlike the state-of-the-art method, our algorithm does not require a prior segmentation of the image volume into cells. The software is based on the ilastik learning and segmentation toolkit and the vigra image processing library and is freely available on our website, along with the test data and gold standard annotations (http://www.ilastik.org/synapse-detection/sstem).

  4. E4: The 2-Axis Diffractometer at BER II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Prokes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The double-axis diffractometer E4 is operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin. It is suited for magnetic structure determinations and parametric studies on single crystals in a wide range of external conditions. Pyrolytic graphite and germanium focusing monochromators offer two fixed neutron incident wavelengths of about 1.0*106 ncm-2s-1.

  5. Cross-correlation based high resolution electron backscatter diffraction and electron channelling contrast imaging for strain mapping and dislocation distributions in InAlN thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Naresh-Kumar, G; Nouf-Allehiani, M.; Gamarra, P.; di Forte-Poisson, M. A.; Trager-Cowan, C.; Wilkinson, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the development of cross-correlation based high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI), in the scanning electron microscope (SEM), to quantitatively map the strain variation and lattice rotation and determine the density and identify dislocations in nitride semiconductor thin films. These techniques can provide quantitative, rapid, non-destructive analysis of the structural properties of materials with a spatial resol...

  6. Imaging metazoan nuclear pore complexes by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Shaulov, Lihi; Harel, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    High resolution three-dimensional surface images of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) can be obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy. We present a short retrospective view starting from the early roots of microscopy, through the discovery of the cell nucleus and the development of some modern techniques for sample preparation and imaging. Detailed protocols are presented for assembling anchored nuclei in a Xenopus cell-free reconstitution system and for the exposure of the nuclear surface in mammalian cell nuclei. Immunogold labeling of metazoan NPCs and a promising new technique for delicate coating with iridium are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nuclear uptake of ultrasmall gold-doxorubicin conjugates imaged by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shastry, Sathvik; Bradforth, Stephen E; Nadeau, Jay L

    2015-01-07

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in Dox-resistant cancers.

  8. Developments in electronic imaging techniques; Proceedings of the Seminar-in-Depth, San Mateo, Calif., October 16, 17, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkind, R. (Editor); Nudelman, S. S.; Schnitzler, A.

    1973-01-01

    Capabilities and limitations of infrared imaging systems are discussed, and a real-time simulator for image data systems is described. Ultrahigh resolution electronic imaging and storage with the return beam vidicon is treated, and a description is given of an electron-lens for opaque photocathodes. Ground surveillance with an active low light level TV, digital processing of Mariner 9 TV data, image enhancement by holography, and application of data compression techniques to spacecraft imaging systems are given attention. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  9. Structural Study of the Bacterial Flagellar Basal Body by Electron Cryomicroscopy and Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Akihiro; Namba, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a large assembly of about 30 different proteins and is divided into three parts: filament, hook, and basal body. The machineries for its crucial functions, such as torque generation, rotational switch regulation, protein export, and assembly initiation, are all located around the basal body. Although high-resolution structures of the filament and hook have already been revealed, the structure of the basal body remains elusive. Recently, the purification protocol for the MS ring, which is the core ring of the basal body, has been improved for the structural study of the MS ring by electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) and single particle image analysis. The structure of intact basal body has also been revealed in situ at a resolution of a few nanometers by electron cryotomography (ECT) of minicells. Here, we describe the methods for the MS ring purification, Salmonella minicell culture, and cryoEM/ECT data collection and image analysis.

  10. Superficial dosimetry imaging of Čerenkov emission in electron beam radiotherapy of phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Fox, Colleen J.; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-08-01

    Čerenkov emission is generated from ionizing radiation in tissue above 264 keV energy. This study presents the first examination of this optical emission as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial dose. Čerenkov emission was imaged from the surface of flat tissue phantoms irradiated with electrons, using a range of field sizes from 6 cm × 6 cm to 20 cm × 20 cm, incident angles from 0° to 50°, and energies from 6 to 18 MeV. The Čerenkov images were compared with the estimated superficial dose in phantoms from direct diode measurements, as well as calculations by Monte Carlo and the treatment planning system. Intensity images showed outstanding linear agreement (R2 = 0.97) with reference data of the known dose for energies from 6 to 18 MeV. When orthogonal delivery was carried out, the in-plane and cross-plane dose distribution comparisons indicated very little difference (±2-4% differences) between the different methods of estimation as compared to Čerenkov light imaging. For an incident angle 50°, the Čerenkov images and Monte Carlo simulation show excellent agreement with the diode data, but the treatment planning system had a larger error (OPT = ±1˜2%, diode = ±2˜3%, TPS = ±6-8% differences) as would be expected. The sampling depth of superficial dosimetry based on Čerenkov radiation has been simulated in a layered skin model, showing the potential of sampling depth tuning by spectral filtering. Taken together, these measurements and simulations indicate that Čerenkov emission imaging might provide a valuable method of superficial dosimetry imaging from incident radiotherapy beams of electrons.

  11. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yi, Byong Yong; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as "reference" images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the time of planning CT was

  12. Fractal dimension determination of sol-gel powders using transmission electron microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Gianina; Crisan, Maria; Zaharescu, Maria; Ionescu, N.I

    2004-09-15

    SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} and AlO(OH) powders obtained by the sol-gel method were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The mass-radius relation was used to determine the fractal dimensions from the images. These fractal dimensions were corrected in order to obtain the powder fractal dimensions. The results indicate a good fractal behavior and high fractal dimensions.

  13. A streaming multi-GPU implementation of image simulation algorithms for scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Alan; Ophus, Colin; Miao, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Simulation of atomic-resolution image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy can require significant computation times using traditional methods. A recently developed method, termed plane-wave reciprocal-space interpolated scattering matrix (PRISM), demonstrates potential for significant acceleration of such simulations with negligible loss of accuracy. Here, we present a software package called Prismatic for parallelized simulation of image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using both the PRISM and multislice methods. By distributing the workload between multiple CUDA-enabled GPUs and multicore processors, accelerations as high as 1000 × for PRISM and 15 × for multislice are achieved relative to traditional multislice implementations using a single 4-GPU machine. We demonstrate a potentially important application of Prismatic, using it to compute images for atomic electron tomography at sufficient speeds to include in the reconstruction pipeline. Prismatic is freely available both as an open-source CUDA/C++ package with a graphical user interface and as a Python package, PyPrismatic.

  14. In-Process Thermal Imaging of the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Domack, Christopher S.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Taminger, Brian L.; Hafley, Robert A.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have been developing the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) metal additive manufacturing process for the past 15 years. In this process, an electron beam is used as a heat source to create a small molten pool on a substrate into which wire is fed. The electron beam and wire feed assembly are translated with respect to the substrate to follow a predetermined tool path. This process is repeated in a layer-wise fashion to fabricate metal structural components. In-process imaging has been integrated into the EBF3 system using a near-infrared (NIR) camera. The images are processed to provide thermal and spatial measurements that have been incorporated into a closed-loop control system to maintain consistent thermal conditions throughout the build. Other information in the thermal images is being used to assess quality in real time by detecting flaws in prior layers of the deposit. NIR camera incorporation into the system has improved the consistency of the deposited material and provides the potential for real-time flaw detection which, ultimately, could lead to the manufacture of better, more reliable components using this additive manufacturing process.

  15. Imaging transient blood vessel fusion events in zebrafish by correlative volume electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E J Armer

    Full Text Available The study of biological processes has become increasingly reliant on obtaining high-resolution spatial and temporal data through imaging techniques. As researchers demand molecular resolution of cellular events in the context of whole organisms, correlation of non-invasive live-organism imaging with electron microscopy in complex three-dimensional samples becomes critical. The developing blood vessels of vertebrates form a highly complex network which cannot be imaged at high resolution using traditional methods. Here we show that the point of fusion between growing blood vessels of transgenic zebrafish, identified in live confocal microscopy, can subsequently be traced through the structure of the organism using Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM and Serial Block Face/Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBF/SEM. The resulting data give unprecedented microanatomical detail of the zebrafish and, for the first time, allow visualization of the ultrastructure of a time-limited biological event within the context of a whole organism.

  16. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwe, R J W; Tielenburg, R; van Ingen, K M; Mijnheer, B J; van Herk, M B

    2004-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the response (e.g., temperature fluctuations, radiation damage, and the performance of the electronic hardware). It was shown that testing the performance of the electronic hardware as well as the short-term stability of the imagers may reveal the cause of a poor long-term stability of the imager response. In addition, the short-term stability was measured to verify the validity of the fitted dose-response curve immediately after beam startup. The long-term stability of these imagers could be considerably improved by correcting for room temperature fluctuations and gradual changes in response due to radiation damage. As a result, the reproducibility was better than 1% (1 SD) over a period of two years. The results of this study were used to formulate recommendations for a quality control program for portal dosimetry. The effect of such a program was assessed by comparing the results of portal dosimetry and in vivo dosimetry using diodes during the treatment of 31 prostate patients. The improvement of the results for portal dosimetry was consistent with the deviations observed with the reproducibility tests in that particular period. After a correction for the variation in response of the imager, the average difference between the measured and prescribed dose during the treatment of prostate patients was -0.7%+/-1.5% (1 SD), and -0.6%+/-1.1% (1 SD) for EPID and diode in vivo dosimetry, respectively. It can be concluded that a high stability of the response can be achieved for this type of EPID by applying a rigorous quality control program.

  17. Higher-order aberration corrector for an image-forming system in a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, H., E-mail: hsawada@jeol.co.jp [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, T. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo (Japan); Hosokawa, F.; Yuasa, S.; Terao, M.; Kawazoe, M.; Nakamichi, T. [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo (Japan); Kaneyama, T. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Y. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kimoto, K. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Suenaga, K. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Research Center for Advanced Carbon Materials, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    We developed a new electron optical system with three dodecapoles to compensate for spherical aberration and six-fold astigmatism, which generally remains in a two-hexapole type corrector. In this study, we applied the corrector for image-forming system in transmission electron microscope. Compensation for higher-order aberration was demonstrated through a diffractogram tableau using a triple three-fold astigmatism field system, which was then compared with a double hexapole field system. Using this electron optical system, six-fold astigmatism was measured to be less than 0.1 mm at an acceleration voltage of 60 kV, showing that the system successfully compensated for six-fold astigmatism.

  18. 3-D readout-electronics packaging for high-bandwidth massively paralleled imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lyke, James

    2007-12-18

    Dense, massively parallel signal processing electronics are co-packaged behind associated sensor pixels. Microchips containing a linear or bilinear arrangement of photo-sensors, together with associated complex electronics, are integrated into a simple 3-D structure (a "mirror cube"). An array of photo-sensitive cells are disposed on a stacked CMOS chip's surface at a 45.degree. angle from light reflecting mirror surfaces formed on a neighboring CMOS chip surface. Image processing electronics are held within the stacked CMOS chip layers. Electrical connections couple each of said stacked CMOS chip layers and a distribution grid, the connections for distributing power and signals to components associated with each stacked CSMO chip layer.

  19. Retrieving the unretrievable in electronic imaging systems: emotions, themes, and stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joergensen, Corinne

    1999-05-01

    New paradigms such as 'affective computing' and user-based research are extending the realm of facets traditionally addressed in IR systems. This paper builds on previous research reported to the electronic imaging community concerning the need to provide access to more abstract attributes of images than those currently amenable to a variety of content-based and text-based indexing techniques. Empirical research suggest that, for visual materials, in addition to standard bibliographic data and broad subject, and in addition to such visually perceptual attributes such as color, texture, shape, and position or focal point, additional access points such as themes, abstract concepts, emotions, stories, and 'people-related' information such as social status would be useful in image retrieval. More recent research demonstrates that similar results are also obtained with 'fine arts' images, which generally have no access provided for these types of attributes. Current efforts to match image attributes as revealed in empirical research with those addressed both in current textural and content-based indexing systems are discussed, as well as the need for new representations for image attributes and for collaboration among diverse communities of researchers.

  20. A methodology for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, P. L.; Pizarro, J.; Guerrero, E.; Guerrero-Lebrero, M. P.; Scavello, G.; Yáñez, A.; Núñez-Moraleda, B. M.; Maestre, J. M.; Sales, D. L.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology developed at the University of Cadiz (Spain) in the past few years for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level. This work is based on a coordinated and synergic activity of several research groups that have been working together over the last decade in two different and complementary fields: Materials Science and Computer Science. The aim of our joint research has been to develop innovative high-performance computing techniques and simulation methods in order to address computationally challenging problems in the analysis, modelling and simulation of materials at the atomic scale, providing significant advances with respect to existing techniques. The methodology involves several fundamental areas of research including the analysis of high resolution electron microscopy images, materials modelling, image simulation and 3D reconstruction using quantitative information from experimental images. These techniques for the analysis, modelling and simulation allow optimizing the control and functionality of devices developed using materials under study, and have been tested using data obtained from experimental samples.

  1. Marker-free image registration of electron tomography tilt-series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilbao-Castro JR

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tilt series are commonly used in electron tomography as a means of collecting three-dimensional information from two-dimensional projections. A common problem encountered is the projection alignment prior to 3D reconstruction. Current alignment techniques usually employ gold particles or image derived markers to correctly align the images. When these markers are not present, correlation between adjacent views is used to align them. However, sequential pairwise correlation is prone to bias and the resulting alignment is not always optimal. Results In this paper we introduce an algorithm to find regions of the tilt series which can be tracked within a subseries of the tilt series. These regions act as landmarks allowing the determination of the alignment parameters. We show our results with synthetic data as well as experimental cryo electron tomography. Conclusion Our algorithm is able to correctly align a single-tilt tomographic series without the help of fiducial markers thanks to the detection of thousands of small image patches that can be tracked over a short number of images in the series.

  2. High-resolution electron microscope and computed images of human tooth enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brés, E F; Barry, J C; Hutchison, J L

    1985-03-01

    The structure of human enamel crystallites has been studied at a near atomic level by high-resolution electron microscopy. Electron micrographs have been obtained from crystallites present in human enamel with a structure resolution of 0.2 nm in the [0001], [1210], [1213], [1100] and [4510] zone axes directions. In most cases it was possible to match the experimental images with images calculated using the atomic positions of mineral hydroxyapatite. However, in some cases a discrepancy between calculated and experimental image detail was observed in the c direction of the [1210] and the [1100] images. This shows: (i) a structural heterogeneity of the crystals, and (ii) a loss of hexagonal symmetry of the structure. The resolution required to distinguish individual atomic sites in the different zones has been determined, and this will provide a useful basis for future work. As the determination of the "real structure" of biological crystals is of prime importance for the study of calcification mechanisms (crystal growth), biological properties and destructive phenomena of calcified tissues (i.e., dental caries and bone resorption).

  3. Modelling experimental image formation for likelihood-based classification of electron microscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Gómez-Llorente, Yacob; Martín, Carmen San; Eggermont, Paul P. B.; Carazo, José María

    2007-01-01

    The coexistence of multiple distinct structural states often obstructs the application of three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy to large macromolecular complexes. Maximum likelihood approaches are emerging as robust tools for solving the image classification problems that are posed by such samples. Here, we propose a statistical data model that allows for a description of the experimental image formation within the formulation of 2D and 3D maximum likelihood refinement. The proposed approach comprises a formulation of the probability calculations in Fourier space, including a spatial frequency-dependent noise model and a description of defocus-dependent imaging effects. The Expectation-Maximization like algorithms presented are generally applicable to the alignment and classification of structurally heterogeneous projection data. Their effectiveness is demonstrated with various examples, including 2D classification of top views of the archaeal helicase MCM, and 3D classification of 70S E.coli ribosome and Simian Virus 40 large T-antigen projections. PMID:17937907

  4. In vivo time-lapse imaging and serial section electron microscopy reveal developmental synaptic rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianli; Erisir, Alev; Cline, Hollis

    2010-01-01

    Dendrites, axons and synapses are dynamic during circuit development, however changes in microcircuit connections as branches stabilize have not been directly demonstrated. By combining in vivo time-lapse imaging of Xenopus tectal neurons with electron microscope reconstructions of imaged neurons, we report for the first time the distribution and ultrastructure of synapses on individual vertebrate neurons and relate these synaptic properties to dynamics in dendritic and axonal arbor structure over hours or days of imaging. Dynamic dendrites have a high density of immature synapses whereas stable dendrites have sparser, mature synapses. Axons initiate contacts from multisynapse boutons on stable branches. Connections are refined by decreasing convergence from multiple inputs to postsynaptic dendrites and by decreasing divergence from multisynapse boutons to postsynaptic sites. Visual deprivation or NMDAR antagonists decreased synapse maturation and elimination, suggesting that coactive input activity promotes microcircuit development by concurrently regulating synapse elimination and maturation of remaining contacts. PMID:21262466

  5. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectrometry and Imaging in Melanomas: Comparison between Pigmented and Nonpigmented Human Malignant Melanomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Godechal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been known for a long time that the melanin pigments present in normal skin, hair, and most of malignant melanomas can be detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometry. In this study, we used EPR imaging as a tool to map the concentration of melanin inside ex vivo human pigmented and nonpigmented melanomas and correlated this cartography with anatomopathology. We obtained accurate mappings of the melanin inside pigmented human melanoma samples. The signal intensity observed on the EPR images correlated with the concentration of melanin within the tumors, visible on the histologic sections. In contrast, no EPR signal coming from melanin was observed from nonpigmented melanomas, therefore demonstrating the absence of EPR-detectable pigments inside these particular cases of skin cancer and the importance of pigmentation for further EPR imaging studies on melanoma.

  6. Electronic Navigational Chart as an Equivalent to Image Produced by Hypercatadioptric Camera System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naus Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a dynamic hyperboloidal mapping model aimed at building image of electronic navigational chart which constitutes an equivalent to that obtained from a hypercatadioptric camera system. In the 1st part, space and three reference frames located in it are defined. These are: the observer frame and horizontal topocentric frame considered secondary (both connected with water-surface platform, and the geocentric frame, primary one. The 2nd part provides description of a way of interconnection between the observer frame and horizontal topocentric one as well as of determination of their location in relation to the geocentric reference frame, depending on course and position of water-surface platform. In the final part is presented a model of panoramic image mapping in the observer reference frame and principles of generating ENC image by using dynamic hyperboloidal mapping. Finally, conclusions indicating possible applications of the developed model are presented.

  7. Imaging thiol redox status in murine tumors in vivo with rapid-scan electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Sundramoorthy, Subramanian V.; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Maggio, Matthew C.; Tseytlin, Mark; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Halpern, Howard J.

    2017-03-01

    Thiol redox status is an important physiologic parameter that affects the success or failure of cancer treatment. Rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance (RS EPR) is a novel technique that has shown higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional continuous-wave EPR in in vitro studies. Here we used RS EPR to acquire rapid three-dimensional images of the thiol redox status of tumors in living mice. This work presents, for the first time, in vivo RS EPR images of the kinetics of the reaction of 2H,15N-substituted disulfide-linked dinitroxide (PxSSPx) spin probe with intracellular glutathione. The cleavage rate is proportional to the intracellular glutathione concentration. Feasibility was demonstrated in a FSa fibrosarcoma tumor model in C3H mice. Similar to other in vivo and cell model studies, decreasing intracellular glutathione concentration by treating mice with L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) markedly altered the kinetic images.

  8. Innovations in optical coupling of the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Tobias, B; Kong, X; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Lee, W; Yun, G S; Park, H K

    2010-10-01

    The installation of a new electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) is underway, making use of a unique optical port cassette design, which allows placement of refractive elements inside the cryostat region without adverse effects. The result is unprecedented window access for the implementation of a state of the art imaging diagnostic. A dual-array optical design has been developed, capable of simultaneously imaging the high and low field sides of the plasma with independent features of focal plane translation, vertical zoom, and radial channel spacing. The number of translating optics has been minimized by making use of a zoom lens triplet and parabolic plasma facing lens for maximum channel uniformity over a continuous vertical zoom range of 3:1. The simulated performance of this design is presented along with preliminary laboratory characterization data.

  9. Projection imaging with directional electron and proton beams emitted from an ultrashort intense laser-driven thin foil target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Choi, I. W.; Daido, H.; Nakamura, T.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Yogo, A.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Daito, I.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Yu, T. J.; Jeong, T. M.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, C. M.; Kang, S. W.; Pae, K. H.; Oishi, Y.; Lee, J.

    2015-02-01

    Projection images of a metal mesh produced by directional MeV electron beam together with directional proton beam, emitted simultaneously from a thin foil target irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser, are recorded on an imaging plate for the electron imaging and on a CR-39 nuclear track detector for the proton imaging. The directional electron beam means the portion of the electron beam which is emitted along the same direction (i.e., target normal direction) as the proton beam. The mesh patterns are projected to each detector by the electron beam and the proton beam originated from tiny virtual sources of ~20 µm and ~10 µm diameters, respectively. Based on the observed quality and magnification of the projection images, we estimate sizes and locations of the virtual sources for both beams and characterize their directionalities. To carry out physical interpretation of the directional electron beam qualitatively, we perform 2D particle-in-cell simulation which reproduces a directional escaping electron component, together with a non-directional dragged-back electron component, the latter mainly contributes to building a sheath electric field for proton acceleration. The experimental and simulation results reveal various possible applications of the simultaneous, synchronized electron and proton sources to radiography and pump-probe measurements with temporal resolution of ~ps and spatial resolution of a few tens of µm.

  10. Absolute Calibration of Image Plate for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Back, N L; Eder, D C; Ping, Y; Song, P M; Throop, A

    2007-12-10

    The authors measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV to 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on the solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate Photon Stimulated Luminescence PSL per electrons at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energies depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of the absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

  11. A method for 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x-rays with application to mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Uytven, Eric [National Research Council Institute for Biodiagnostics, 435 Ellice Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 1Y6 (Canada); Pistorius, Stephen [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3A 1R9 (Canada); Gordon, Richard [Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)], E-mail: eric.vanuytven@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: Stephen.Pistorius@cancercare.mb.ca, E-mail: gordonr@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2008-10-07

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal, heterogeneous tissue. In this work, we examine the potential of single scattered photon electron density imaging in a mammographic environment. Simulating a low-energy (<20 keV) scanning pencil beam, we have developed an algorithm capable of producing 3D electron density images from a single projection. We have tested the algorithm by imaging parts of a simulated mammographic accreditation phantom containing lesions of various sizes. The results indicate that the group of imaged lesions differ significantly from background breast tissue (p < 0.005), confirming that electron density imaging may be a useful diagnostic test for the presence of breast cancer.

  12. Automated sub-5 nm image registration in integrated correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence pointers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, Martijn T.; Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Voortman, Lenard M.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2017-03-01

    In the biological sciences, data from fluorescence and electron microscopy is correlated to allow fluorescence biomolecule identification within the cellular ultrastructure and/or ultrastructural analysis following live-cell imaging. High-accuracy (sub-100 nm) image overlay requires the addition of fiducial markers, which makes overlay accuracy dependent on the number of fiducials present in the region of interest. Here, we report an automated method for light-electron image overlay at high accuracy, i.e. below 5 nm. Our method relies on direct visualization of the electron beam position in the fluorescence detection channel using cathodoluminescence pointers. We show that image overlay using cathodoluminescence pointers corrects for image distortions, is independent of user interpretation, and does not require fiducials, allowing image correlation with molecular precision anywhere on a sample.

  13. Light Distribution in the E3 and E4 Scintillation Counters of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment is an important component of the ATLAS calorimetry because they play a crucial role in the search for new particles. The E3 and E4 are crack scintillators of TileCal that extend into the gap region between the EM barrel and EM endcaps. They thus sample the energy of the EM showers produced by particles interacting with the dead material in the EM calorimeters and with the inner detector cables. This project focuses on the study of the light collection uniformity in the E3 and E4 scintillating tiles using low energy electrons as the ionising particles. It is important to have uniform light response in the tiles because it would ensure a good energy resolution for the dead region. However, many factors affect the uniform light collection within the scintillating tiles.

  14. Thirty per cent contrast in secondary-electron imaging by scanning field-emission microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, D A; De Pietro, L G; Peter, Q; Kostanyan, A; Cabrera, H; Vindigni, A; Bähler, Th; Pescia, D; Ramsperger, U

    2016-11-01

    We perform scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) in a regime where primary electrons are field-emitted from the tip and excite secondary electrons out of the target-the scanning field-emission microscopy regime (SFM). In the SFM mode, a secondary-electron contrast as high as 30% is observed when imaging a monoatomic step between a clean W(110)- and an Fe-covered W(110)-terrace. This is a figure of contrast comparable to STM. The apparent width of the monoatomic step attains the 1 nm mark, i.e. it is only marginally worse than the corresponding width observed in STM. The origin of the unexpected strong contrast in SFM is the material dependence of the secondary-electron yield and not the dependence of the transported current on the tip-target distance, typical of STM: accordingly, we expect that a technology combining STM and SFM will highlight complementary aspects of a surface while simultaneously making electrons, selected with nanometre spatial precision, available to a macroscopic environment for further processing.

  15. Automated determination of size and morphology information from soot transmission electron microscope (TEM)-generated images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cheng; Chan, Qing N., E-mail: qing.chan@unsw.edu.au; Zhang, Renlin; Kook, Sanghoon; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yeoh, Guan H. [UNSW, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (Australia); Medwell, Paul R. [The University of Adelaide, Centre for Energy Technology (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    The thermophoretic sampling of particulates from hot media, coupled with transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging, is a combined approach that is widely used to derive morphological information. The identification and the measurement of the particulates, however, can be complex when the TEM images are of low contrast, noisy, and have non-uniform background signal level. The image processing method can also be challenging and time consuming, when the samples collected have large variability in shape and size, or have some degree of overlapping. In this work, a three-stage image processing sequence is presented to facilitate time-efficient automated identification and measurement of particulates from the TEM grids. The proposed processing sequence is first applied to soot samples that were thermophoretically sampled from a laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame. The parameter values that are required to be set to facilitate the automated process are identified, and sensitivity of the results to these parameters is assessed. The same analysis process is also applied to soot samples that were acquired from an externally irradiated laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame, which have different geometrical characteristics, to assess the morphological dependence of the proposed image processing sequence. Using the optimized parameter values, statistical assessments of the automated results reveal that the largest discrepancies that are associated with the estimated values of primary particle diameter, fractal dimension, and prefactor values of the aggregates for the tested cases, are approximately 3, 1, and 10 %, respectively, when compared with the manual measurements.

  16. High-speed digital holography for neutral gas and electron density imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstedt, E. M., E-mail: egranstedt@gmail.com [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Thomas, C. E. [Third Dimension Technologies, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Baylor, L. R.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An instrument was developed using digital holographic reconstruction of the wavefront from a CO{sub 2} laser imaged on a high-speed commercial IR camera. An acousto-optic modulator is used to generate 1–25 μs pulses from a continuous-wave CO{sub 2} laser, both to limit the average power at the detector and also to freeze motion from sub-interframe time scales. Extensive effort was made to characterize and eliminate noise from vibrations and second-surface reflections. Mismatch of the reference and object beam curvature initially contributed substantially to vibrational noise, but was mitigated through careful positioning of identical imaging lenses. Vibrational mode amplitudes were successfully reduced to ≲1 nm for frequencies ≳50 Hz, and the inter-frame noise across the 128 × 128 pixel window which is typically used is ≲2.5 nm. To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, a piezo-electric valve and a reducing-expanding nozzle were used to generate a super-sonic gas jet which was imaged with high spatial resolution (better than 0.8 lp/mm) at high speed. Abel inversions were performed on the phase images to produce 2-D images of localized gas density. This system could also be used for high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of plasma electron density or surface deformations.

  17. Detection and Imaging of Superoxide in Roots by an Electron Spin Resonance Spin-Probe Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwar, Nasim; Mor, Avishai; Fluhr, Robert; Pandian, Ramasamy P.; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Blank, Aharon

    2011-01-01

    The detection, quantification, and imaging of short-lived reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide, in live biological specimens have always been challenging and controversial. Fluorescence-based methods are nonspecific, and electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping methods require high probe concentrations and lack the capability for sufficient image resolution. In this work, a novel (to our knowledge), sensitive, small ESR imaging resonator was used together with a stable spin probe that specifically reacts with superoxide with a high reaction rate constant. This ESR spin-probe-based methodology was used to examine superoxide generated in a plant root as a result of an apical leaf injury. The results show that the spin probe rapidly permeated the plant's extracellular space. Upon injury of the plant tissue, superoxide was produced and the ESR signal decreased rapidly in the injured parts as well as in the distal part of the root. This is attributed to superoxide production and thus provides a means of quantifying the level of superoxide in the plant. The spin probe's narrow single-line ESR spectrum, together with the sensitive imaging resonator, facilitates the quantitative measurement of superoxide in small biological samples, such as the plant's root, as well as one-dimensional imaging along the length of the root. This type of methodology can be used to resolve many questions involving the production of apoplastic superoxide in plant biology. PMID:21943435

  18. Experiments and Computational Theory for Electrical Breakdown in Critical Components: THz Imaging of Electronic Plasmas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutavern, Fred J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hjalmarson, Harold P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bigman, Verle Howard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallegos, Richard Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the development of ultra-short pulse laser (USPL) induced terahertz (THz) radiation to image electronic plasmas during electrical breakdown. The technique uses three pulses from two USPLs to (1) trigger the breakdown, (2) create a 2 picosecond (ps, 10 -12 s), THz pulse to illuminate the breakdown, and (3) record the THz image of the breakdown. During this three year internal research program, sub-picosecond jitter timing for the lasers, THz generation, high bandwidth (BW) diagnostics, and THz image acquisition was demonstrated. High intensity THz radiation was optically-induced in a pulse-charged gallium arsenide photoconductive switch. The radiation was collected, transported, concentrated, and co-propagated through an electro-optic crystal with an 800 nm USPL pulse whose polarization was rotated due to the spatially varying electric field of the THz image. The polarization modulated USPL pulse was then passed through a polarizer and the resulting spatially varying intensity was detected in a high resolution digital camera. Single shot images had a signal to noise of %7E3:1. Signal to noise was improved to %7E30:1 with several experimental techniques and by averaging the THz images from %7E4000 laser pulses internally and externally with the camera and the acquisition system (40 pulses per readout). THz shadows of metallic films and objects were also recorded with this system to demonstrate free-carrier absorption of the THz radiation and improve image contrast and resolution. These 2 ps THz pulses were created and resolved with 100 femtosecond (fs, 10 -15 s) long USPL pulses. Thus this technology has the capability to time-resolve extremely fast repetitive or single shot phenomena, such as those that occur during the initiation of electrical breakdown. The goal of imaging electrical breakdown was not reached during this three year project. However, plans to achieve this goal as part of a follow-on project are described in this document

  19. An Evaluation of Dynamic Partial Reconfiguration for Signal and Image Processing in Professional Electronics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Manet

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Signal and image processing applications require a lot of computing resources. For low-volume applications like in professional electronics applications, FPGA are used in combination with DSP and GPP in order to reach the performances required by the product roadmaps. Nevertheless, FPGA designs are static, which raises a flexibility issue with new complex or software defined applications like software-defined radio (SDR. In this scope, dynamic partial reconfiguration (DPR is used to bring a virtualization layer upon the static hardware of FPGA. During the last decade, DPR has been widely studied in academia. Nevertheless, there are very few real applications using it, and therefore, there is a lack of feedback providing relevant issues to address in order to improve its applicability. This paper evaluates the interest and limitations when using DPR in professional electronics applications and provides guidelines to improve its applicability. It makes a fair evaluation based on experiments made on a set of signal and image processing applications. It identifies the missing elements of the design flow to use DPR in professional electronics applications. Finally, it introduces a fast reconfiguration manager providing an 84-time improvement compared to the vendor solution.

  20. Imaging surface acoustic wave dynamics in semiconducting polymers by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Ebrahim; Liao, Bolin; Scarborough, Timothy; Zewail, Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of organic semiconductors is essential to their electronic and photovoltaic applications. Despite a large volume of research directed toward elucidating the chemical, physical and electronic properties of these materials, little attention has been directed toward understanding their thermo-mechanical behavior. Here, we report the ultrafast imaging of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on the surface of the Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) thin film at the picosecond and nanosecond timescales. We then use these images to measure the propagation velocity of SAWs, which we then employ to determine the Young's modulus of P3HT. We further validate our experimental observation by performing a semi-empirical transient thermoelastic finite element analysis. Our findings demonstrate the potential of ultrafast electron microscopy to not only probe charge carrier dynamics in materials as previously reported, but also to measure their mechanical properties with great accuracy. This is particularly important when in situ characterization of stiffness for thin devices and nanomaterials is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. An Evaluation of Dynamic Partial Reconfiguration for Signal and Image Processing in Professional Electronics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulagnier Denis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Signal and image processing applications require a lot of computing resources. For low-volume applications like in professional electronics applications, FPGA are used in combination with DSP and GPP in order to reach the performances required by the product roadmaps. Nevertheless, FPGA designs are static, which raises a flexibility issue with new complex or software defined applications like software-defined radio (SDR. In this scope, dynamic partial reconfiguration (DPR is used to bring a virtualization layer upon the static hardware of FPGA. During the last decade, DPR has been widely studied in academia. Nevertheless, there are very few real applications using it, and therefore, there is a lack of feedback providing relevant issues to address in order to improve its applicability. This paper evaluates the interest and limitations when using DPR in professional electronics applications and provides guidelines to improve its applicability. It makes a fair evaluation based on experiments made on a set of signal and image processing applications. It identifies the missing elements of the design flow to use DPR in professional electronics applications. Finally, it introduces a fast reconfiguration manager providing an 84-time improvement compared to the vendor solution.

  2. Global auroral conductance distribution due to electron and proton precipitation from IMAGE-FUV observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Coumans

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The Far Ultraviolet (FUV imaging system on board the IMAGE satellite provides a global view of the north auroral region in three spectral channels, including the SI12 camera sensitive to Doppler shifted Lyman-α emission. FUV images are used to produce instantaneous maps of electron mean energy and energy fluxes for precipitated protons and electrons. We describe a method to calculate ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductivities induced by auroral proton and electron ionization based on a model of interaction of auroral particles with the atmosphere. Different assumptions on the energy spectral distribution for electrons and protons are compared. Global maps of ionospheric conductances due to instantaneous observation of precipitating protons are calculated. The contribution of auroral protons in the total conductance induced by both types of auroral particles is also evaluated and the importance of proton precipitation is evaluated. This method is well adapted to analyze the time evolution of ionospheric conductances due to precipitating particles over the auroral region or in particular sectors. Results are illustrated with conductance maps of the north polar region obtained during four periods with different activity levels. It is found that the proton contribution to conductance is relatively higher during quiet periods than during substorms. The proton contribution is higher in the period before the onset and strongly decreases during the expansion phase of substorms. During a substorm which occurred on 28 April 2001, a region of strong proton precipitation is observed with SI12 around 14:00MLT at ~75° MLAT. Calculation of conductances in this sector shows that neglecting the protons contribution would produce a large error. We discuss possible effects of the proton precipitation on electron precipitation in auroral arcs. The increase in the ionospheric conductivity, induced by a former proton precipitation can reduce the potential drop

  3. Global auroral conductance distribution due to electron and proton precipitation from IMAGE-FUV observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Coumans

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The Far Ultraviolet (FUV imaging system on board the IMAGE satellite provides a global view of the north auroral region in three spectral channels, including the SI12 camera sensitive to Doppler shifted Lyman-α emission. FUV images are used to produce instantaneous maps of electron mean energy and energy fluxes for precipitated protons and electrons. We describe a method to calculate ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductivities induced by auroral proton and electron ionization based on a model of interaction of auroral particles with the atmosphere. Different assumptions on the energy spectral distribution for electrons and protons are compared. Global maps of ionospheric conductances due to instantaneous observation of precipitating protons are calculated. The contribution of auroral protons in the total conductance induced by both types of auroral particles is also evaluated and the importance of proton precipitation is evaluated. This method is well adapted to analyze the time evolution of ionospheric conductances due to precipitating particles over the auroral region or in particular sectors. Results are illustrated with conductance maps of the north polar region obtained during four periods with different activity levels. It is found that the proton contribution to conductance is relatively higher during quiet periods than during substorms. The proton contribution is higher in the period before the onset and strongly decreases during the expansion phase of substorms. During a substorm which occurred on 28 April 2001, a region of strong proton precipitation is observed with SI12 around 14:00MLT at ~75° MLAT. Calculation of conductances in this sector shows that neglecting the protons contribution would produce a large error. We discuss possible effects of the proton precipitation on electron precipitation in auroral arcs. The increase in the ionospheric conductivity, induced by a former proton precipitation can reduce the potential drop

  4. Dark field imaging of biological macromolecules with the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Mitsuo; Isaacson, Michael S.; Crewe, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    A scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with a field emission gun has been employed for the examination of biological macromolecules at high resolution. The quality of micrographs obtained with the STEM is dependent upon the quality of the substrate used to support biological objects because the image contrast in dark field is proportional to the mass density of the specimen. In order to reduce deleterious effects of the substrates on the image quality, we have developed a method of fabricating substrates consisting of very thin, very clean carbon films supported on very clean fenestrated plastic films. These films are approximately 15 Å thick. Well-known biological macromolecules such as glutamine synthetase and tobacco mosaic virus (both stained) and low-density lipoprotein and ferritin (both unstained were placed on these substrates and examined with the STEM by using various modes of contrast. The micrographs obtained by using the dark field mode of contrast employing an annular detector were free from phase contrast, as expected. Using this contrast mode, we have been able to directly observe (in-focus) 2.5- to 4.4-Å lattice spacings in the ferritin core. The effect of electron radiation damage on the helical structure of tobacco mosaic virus was also examined. Micrographs as well as corresponding optical diffraction patterns obtained with moderately low doses showed very clear helical structure from both sides of the virus. In addition, the (11.5 Å)-1 layer lines indicated the effective resolution attained on these particles. Images PMID:35788

  5. Cryo-field emission scanning electron microscopy imaging of a rigid surfactant mesophase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace; Xu, Peng; John, Vijay T; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Agarwal, Vivek; Bose, Arijit

    2008-10-07

    The aerosol OT/ L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine/isooctane/water system forms a rigid mesophase that transitions from reverse hexagonal to multilamellar in structure at specific water contents. This study shows that characteristics of ordered liquid-crystalline mesophases can be distinguished and imaged in high clarity using cryo-field emission scanning electron microscopy (cryo-FESEM). The reverse hexagonal phase consists of bundles of long cylinders, some with length scales of over 2 microm, that are randomly oriented as part of a larger domain. Cryo-imaging allows the visualization of the intercylinder spacings and the details of transitions from one domain to another. The multilamellar structured mesophase consists of spherical vesicles of 100 nm to 10 microm in diameter, with intervening noncrystalline isotropic regions. Coexistence regions containing both the reverse hexagonal and lamellar structures are also observed in the transition from the reverse hexagonal to the lamellar phase. These results complement and qualitatively verify our earlier studies with small-angle neutron scattering, high-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and freeze-fracture direct imaging transmission electron microscopy. The information is useful in understanding materials templating in these rigid systems.

  6. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  7. Electronic spreadsheet to acquire the reflectance from the TM and ETM+ Landsat images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio R. Formaggio

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The reflectance of agricultural cultures and other terrestrial surface "targets" is an intrinsic parameter of these targets, so in many situations, it must be used instead of the values of "gray levels" that is found in the satellite images. In order to get reflectance values, it is necessary to eliminate the atmospheric interference and to make a set of calculations that uses sensor parameters and information regarding the original image. The automation of this procedure has the advantage to speed up the process and to reduce the possibility of errors during calculations. The objective of this paper is to present an electronic spreadsheet that simplifies and automatizes the transformation of the digital numbers of the TM/Landsat-5 and ETM+/Landsat-7 images into reflectance. The method employed for atmospheric correction was the dark object subtraction (DOS. The electronic spreadsheet described here is freely available to users and can be downloaded at the following website: http://www.dsr.inpe.br/Calculo_Reflectancia.xls.

  8. Diverse protocols for correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of chemically fixed samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopek, Benjamin G.; Paez-Segala, Maria G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Sochacki, Kem A.; Sun, Mei G.; Wang, Yalin; Xu, C. Shan; van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Taraska, Justin W.; Looger, Loren L.; Hess, Harald F.

    2017-01-01

    Our groups have recently developed related approaches for sample preparation for super-resolution imaging within endogenous cellular environments using correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM). Four distinct techniques for preparing and acquiring super-resolution CLEM datasets on aldehyde-fixed specimens are provided, including Tokuyasu cryosectioning, whole-cell mount, cell unroofing and platinum replication, and resin embedding and sectioning. Choice of the best protocol for a given application depends on a number of criteria that are discussed in detail. Tokuyasu cryosectioning is relatively rapid but is limited to small, delicate specimens. Whole-cell mount has the simplest sample preparation but is restricted to surface structures. Cell unroofing and platinum replica creates high-contrast, 3-dimensional images of the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, but is more challenging than whole-cell mount. Resin embedding permits serial sectioning of large samples, but is limited to osmium-resistant probes, and is technically difficult. Expected results from these protocols include super-resolution localization (~10–50 nm) of fluorescent targets within the context of electron microscopy ultrastructure, which can help address cell biological questions. These protocols can be completed in 2–7 days, are compatible with a number of super-resolution imaging protocols, and are broadly applicable across biology. PMID:28384138

  9. Momentum-resolved electron dynamics of image-potential states on Cu and Ag surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, K.; Damm, A.; Eremeev, S. V.; Marks, M.; Shibuta, M.; Berthold, W.; Güdde, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Tsirkin, S. S.; Chulkov, E. V.; Höfer, U.

    2012-05-01

    The dependence of the inelastic lifetime of electrons in the first n=1 image-potential state of clean and rare-gas covered Ag(111), Cu(111), and Cu(100) surfaces on their momentum parallel to the surface has been studied experimentally by means of time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy (2PPE) and theoretically by calculations based on the many-body theory within the self-energy formalism. Similar to the previously studied clean Cu(100) surface, the theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experiment findings for Cu(111). For Ag(111), the theory overestimates the decay rate and its momentum dependence, which is attributed to the neglect of surface plasmon excitations. With increasing parallel momentum, the n=1 state shifts out of the projected bulk band gap on both surfaces and turns into an image-potential resonance. This opens an additional decay channel by resonant electron transfer into the bulk, which is theoretically treated by the application of the wave packet propagation approach. The expected stronger increase of the decay rate upon crossing the edge of the band gap, however, is not observed in the experiment. The decoupling of the image-potential states from the metal surface upon adsorption of rare-gas layers results in a decrease of the decay rate as well as of its momentum dependence by a similar factor, which can be successfully explained by the change of interband and intraband contributions to the total decay rate.

  10. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging of field emission scanning electron microscopy for discrimination of nano-scale elements with nm-order spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Negishi, Tsutomu; Kudo, Masato; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Discrimination of thin film elements by backscattered electron (BSE) imaging of field emission scanning electron microscope was examined. Incident electron acceleration voltage dependence on thin films' BSE intensities in five elements (Au, Ag, Ge, Cu and Fe) on a silicon substrate was experimentally measured from 3 to 30 kV. Normalization of BSE intensities using the difference between maximum and minimum brightness was proposed and allowed reproducible comparison among the elements. Measured intensities, which have correlation with electron backscattering coefficient against atomic number, indicated the existence of adequate acceleration voltage for improvement of resolution to discriminate different elements, showing the possibility of discriminating at least these six elements simultaneously by BSE imaging with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.

  11. Scanning Electron Microscope Calibration Using a Multi-Image Non-Linear Minimization Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Le; Marchand, Éric

    2015-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) calibrating approach based on non-linear minimization procedure is presented in this article. A part of this article has been published in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2014. . Both the intrinsic parameters and the extrinsic parameters estimations are achieved simultaneously by minimizing the registration error. The proposed approach considers multi-images of a multi-scale calibration pattern view from different positions and orientations. Since the projection geometry of the scanning electron microscope is different from that of a classical optical sensor, the perspective projection model and the parallel projection model are considered and compared with distortion models. Experiments are realized by varying the position and the orientation of a multi-scale chessboard calibration pattern from 300× to 10,000×. The experimental results show the efficiency and the accuracy of this approach.

  12. Threading dislocation density characterization in III-V photovoltaic materials by electron channeling contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaung, Kevin Nay; Kirnstoetter, Stefan; Faucher, Joseph; Gerger, Andy; Lochtefeld, Anthony; Barnett, Allen; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2016-11-01

    Accurate and rapid threading dislocation density (TDD) characterization of III-V photovoltaic materials using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is demonstrated. TDDs measured using ECCI showed close agreement with those from electron beam-induced current mapping (EBIC) and defect selective etching (DSE). ECCI is shown to be well-suited for measuring TDD values over a range of 5×106-5×108 cm-2. ECCI can distinguish individual dislocations in clusters closer than 0.2 μm, highlighting its excellent spatial resolution compared to DSE and EBIC. Taken together, ECCI is shown to be a versatile and complementary method to rapidly quantify TDD in III-V solar cells.

  13. Imaging Individual Molecules and Atoms by Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    Spherical aberration correctors recently developed for transmission electron microscopes (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) have enabled direct imaging of single molecules and atoms at low electron acceleration voltages. Here, we review some recent studies on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and fullerene nanopeapods using aberration-corrected TEM/STEM operated at 120 kV or lower voltages. Local structures of individual CNTs are visualized in details including various defects such as atomic vacancies and so-called Stone-Wales defects. Atomic-level structures of fullerene molecules inside CNTs are unambiguously visualized. Single atoms of lanthanides and calcium in nanopeapods are identified by using STEM-EELS operated at 60 kV.

  14. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, Michael J.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastien; /SLAC; Chapman, Henry N.; /DESY /Hamburg U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /LLNL, Livermore /TOFWERK AG; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bajt, Sasa; /DESY; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; /Uppsala U.; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  15. Conjugate echoes of artificially injected electron beams detected optically by means of new image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Thomas J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C.; Baldridge, James; Winckler, John; Malcolm, Perry

    1990-01-01

    Artificial auroral streaks were detected following two upward injections of energetic electrons (38 keV and 26 keV) from the Echo 4 rocket-borne electron accelerator. Newly developed image processing techniques are used to detect and describe the streaks. It is found that the potential of the payload remained below 1 kV during 45 mA injections at an altitude of 210 km. The echo streaks show little dispersion in time or space, suggesting that the portion of the beam returning to the northern hemisphere loss cone remained collimated and nearly monoenergetic. There was, however, a 70 percent loss in the return flux. The causes of this loss are discussed.

  16. Electron spin resonance studies on reduction process of nitroxyl spin radicals used in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India); Jawahar, A. [Department of Chemistry, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-04-24

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters such as signal intensity ratio, line width, g-value, hyperfine coupling constant and rotational correlation time were determined. The half life time was estimated for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. The ESR study reveals that the TEMPONE has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL. From the results, TEMPONE has long half life time and high stability compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL radical. Therefore, this study reveals that the TEMPONE radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for molecular imaging.

  17. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-03-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  18. Imaging Magnetic Vortices Dynamics Using Lorentz Electron Microscopy with GHz Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimei

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic vortices in thin films are naturally formed spiral spin configurations with a core polarization pointing out of the film plane. They typically represent ground states with high structural and thermal stability as well as four different chirality-polarity combinations, offering great promise in the development of spin-based devices. For applications to spin oscillators, non-volatile memory and logic devices, the fundamental understanding and precise control of vortex excitations and dynamic switching behavior are essential. The compact dimensionality and fast spin dynamics set grand challenges for direct imaging technologies. Recently, we have developed a unique method to directly visualize the dynamic magnetic vortex motion using advanced Lorentz electron microscopy combined with GHz electronic excitations. It enables us to map the orbit of a magnetic vortex core in a permalloy square with Material Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  19. Characterization of complex phase steel using backscattered electron images with controlled collection angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaoru; Sueyoshi, Hitoshi; Yamada, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    For optimizing the microstructure of complex phase (CP) steels, characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is powerful because it allows observations from very low to high magnification. SEM specimens of steels are often etched in order to distinguish between the different phases by producing topographic information. This is however an 'indirect' method of characterization, which does not give precise structural information. We have developed a new technique for the selective imaging of the martensite (M) phase in a ferritic (F)-M complex phase steel. Backscattered electron (BSE) images at 15-20 kV were recorded by systematically changing the collection angle θ, where θ is measured from the specimen surface. When θ was 30-45°, strong channeling contrast was observed. For lower values of θ, it is the low energy loss electrons that mainly contribute to the contrast. As θ increases, the M phase exhibits brighter contrast. When θ exceeds 60°, a selective imaging of the M phase is achieved. This is not because martensite has a larger mean atomic number than ferrite, but is due to the fact that martensite has a high crystallographic defect density. Anomalously bright M contrast is due to multiple scattering of BSE due to the high density of planar defects and dislocations. Low angle BSE allows high resolution characterization of complex microstructures, while high angle BSE gives quantitative assessment of the distribution and the volume fraction of the martensite phase. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2017-07-01

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical and electronic structure imaging of graphene on Cu: a NanoARPES study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, José; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-05-01

    Electronic structure, which describes the distribution of electronic states in reciprocal space, is one of the most fundamental concepts in condensed matter physics, since it determines the electrical, optical and magnetic behaviours of materials. Graphene has great promise for both fundamental physics and future applications. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is currently the dominant technology for its scaled growth on metal foils. The polycrystalline nature of metal foil makes NanoARPES, one energy-momentum dispersion probe with spatial resolution down to a few tens of nanometers, a unique tool to study the intrinsic electronic structure of polycrystalline graphene films. In this topical review, we present the latest NanoARPES studies on graphene grains and films grown on copper foil by CVD. The comprehensive chemical and electronic images probed by NanoARPES provide deep insight about graphene and point out potential ways to functionalize graphene properties. This knowledge may stimulate us to look into the future of this field from both the material synthesis and the instrumental characterisation.

  2. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  3. Large area strain analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy across multiple images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oni, A. A.; Sang, X.; LeBeau, J. M., E-mail: jmlebeau@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7907 (United States); Raju, S. V.; Saxena, S. [Center for the Study of Matter under Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Dumpala, S.; Broderick, S.; Rajan, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kumar, A.; Sinnott, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Here, we apply revolving scanning transmission electron microscopy to measure lattice strain across a sample using a single reference area. To do so, we remove image distortion introduced by sample drift, which usually restricts strain analysis to a single image. Overcoming this challenge, we show that it is possible to use strain reference areas elsewhere in the sample, thereby enabling reliable strain mapping across large areas. As a prototypical example, we determine the strain present within the microstructure of a Ni-based superalloy directly from atom column positions as well as geometric phase analysis. While maintaining atomic resolution, we quantify strain within nanoscale regions and demonstrate that large, unit-cell level strain fluctuations are present within the intermetallic phase.

  4. Material interface detection based on secondary electron images for focused ion beam machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Hang-Eun; Lee, Won-Sup; Jun, Martin B G; Park, No-Cheol; Min, Byung-Kwon

    2018-01-01

    A method for interface detection is proposed for focused ion beam (FIB) processes of multilayered targets. As multilayers have emerged as promising structures for nanodevices, the FIB machining of multilayers has become a challenging issue. We proposed material interface detection by monitoring secondary electron (SE) images captured during the FIB process. The average of the gray-levels and the skewness coefficient of gray-level histograms of the SE images were evaluated to recognize endpoints for the FIB processes. The FIB process control with the proposed method was demonstrated by fabricating the nanostructures on the multilayered target without thickness information. It was also demonstrated on a curved surface. Grooves with a desired depth into the target and an aperture as an opening window were precisely fabricated by the FIB process control. The proposed strategy of the FIB process can be used for complex substrates such as curved or flexible targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic Referrals and Digital Imaging Systems in Ophthalmology: A Global Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeganathan, V Swetha E; Hall, H Nikki; Sanders, Roshini

    2017-01-01

    Ophthalmology departments face intensifying pressure to expedite sight-saving treatments and reduce the global burden of disease. The use of electronic communication systems, digital imaging, and redesigned service care models is imperative for addressing such demands. The recently developed Scottish Eyecare Integration Project involves an electronic referral system from community optometry to the hospital ophthalmology department using National Health Service (NHS) email with digital ophthalmic images attached, via a virtual private network connection. The benefits over the previous system include reduced waiting times, improved triage, e-diagnosis in 20% without the need for hospital attendance, and rapid electronic feedback to referrers. We draw on the experience of the Scottish Eyecare Integration Project and discuss the global applications of this and other advances in teleophthalmology. We focus particularly on the implications for management and screening of chronic disease, such as glaucoma and diabetic eye disease, and ophthalmic disease, such as retinopathy of prematurity where diagnosis is almost entirely and critically dependent on fundus appearance. Currently in Scotland, approximately 75% of all referrals are electronic from community to hospital. The Scottish Eyecare Integration Project is globally the first of its kind and unique in a national health service. Such speedy, safe, and efficient models of communication are geographically sensitive to service provision, especially in remote and rural regions. Along with advances in teleophthalmology, such systems promote the earlier detection of sight-threatening disease and safe follow-up of non-sight-threatening disease in the community. Copyright© 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  6. Electronic readout system for the Belle II imaging Time-Of-Propagation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-07-01

    The imaging Time-Of-Propagation (iTOP) detector, constructed for the Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB e+e- collider, is an 8192-channel high precision Cherenkov particle identification detector with timing resolution below 50 ps. To acquire data from the iTOP, a novel front-end electronic readout system was designed, built, and integrated. Switched-capacitor array application-specific integrated circuits are used to sample analog signals. Triggering, digitization, readout, and data transfer are controlled by Xilinx Zynq-7000 system on a chip devices.

  7. Imaging the He$_2$ quantum halo state using a free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zeller, S; Voigtsberger, J; Kalinin, A; Schottelius, A; Schober, C; Waitz, M; Sann, H; Hartung, A; Bauer, T; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Goihl, C; Janke, C; Richter, M; Kastirke, G; Weller, M; Czasch, A; Kitzler, M; Braune, M; Grisenti, R E; Schöllkopf, W; Schmidt, L Ph H; Schöffer, M; Williams, J B; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2016-01-01

    We report on coulomb explosion imaging of the wavefunction of the quantum halo system He$_2$. Each atom of this system is ionized by tunnelionization in a femto second laser pulse and in a second experiment by single photon ionization employing a free electron laser. We visualize the exponential decay of the probability density of the tunneling particle over distance for over two orders of magnitude up to an internuclear distance of 250 \\r{A}. By fitting the slope of the density in the tunneling regime we obtain a binding energy of 151.9 $\\pm$ 13.3 neV, which is in agreement with most recent calculations.

  8. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom

    2009-11-11

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  9. Gas mixing system for imaging of nanomaterials under dynamic environments by environmental transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatay, M Cem; Zvinevich, Yury; Baumann, Philipp; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Stach, Eric A

    2014-03-01

    A gas mixing manifold system that is capable of delivering a stable pressure stream of a desired composition of gases into an environmental transmission electron microscope has been developed. The system is designed to provide a stable imaging environment upon changes of either the composition of the gas mixture or upon switching from one gas to another. The design of the system is described and the response of the pressure inside the microscope, the sample temperature, and sample drift in response to flow and composition changes of the system are reported.

  10. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundhikanjana, W.

    2010-06-02

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces.

  11. Assessment of dosimetrical performance in 11 Varian a-Si500 electronic portal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2008-12-01

    Dosimetrical characteristics of 11 Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) in clinical use for periods ranging between 10 and 86 months were investigated for consistency of performance and portal dosimetry implications. Properties studied include short-term reproducibility, signal linearity with monitor units, response to reference beam, signal uniformity across the detector panel, signal dependence on field size, dose-rate influence, memory effects and image profiles as a function of monitor units. The EPID measurements were also compared with those of the ionization chambers' to ensure stability of the linear accelerators. Depending on their clinical installation date, the EPIDs were interfaced with one of the two different acquisition control software packages, IAS2/IDU-II or IAS3/IDU-20. Both the EPID age and image acquisition system influenced the dosimetric characteristics with the newer version (IAS3 with IDU-20) giving better data reproducibility and linearity fit than the older version (IAS2 with IDU-II). The relative signal response (uniformity) after 50 MU was better than 95% of the central value and independent of detector. Sensitivity for all EPIDs reduced continuously with increasing dose rates for the newer image acquisition software. In the dose-rate range 100-600 MU min-1, the maximum variation in sensitivity ranged between 1 and 1.8% for different EPIDs. For memory effects, the increase in the measured signal at the centre of the irradiated field for successive images was within 1.8% and 1.0% for the older and newer acquisition systems, respectively. Image profiles acquired at a lower MU in the radial plane (gun-target) had gradients in measured pixel values of up to 25% for the older system. Detectors with software/hardware versions IAS3/IDU-20 have a high degree of accuracy and are more suitable for routine quantitative IMRT dosimetrical verification.

  12. Assessment of dosimetrical performance in 11 Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2008-12-07

    Dosimetrical characteristics of 11 Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) in clinical use for periods ranging between 10 and 86 months were investigated for consistency of performance and portal dosimetry implications. Properties studied include short-term reproducibility, signal linearity with monitor units, response to reference beam, signal uniformity across the detector panel, signal dependence on field size, dose-rate influence, memory effects and image profiles as a function of monitor units. The EPID measurements were also compared with those of the ionization chambers' to ensure stability of the linear accelerators. Depending on their clinical installation date, the EPIDs were interfaced with one of the two different acquisition control software packages, IAS2/IDU-II or IAS3/IDU-20. Both the EPID age and image acquisition system influenced the dosimetric characteristics with the newer version (IAS3 with IDU-20) giving better data reproducibility and linearity fit than the older version (IAS2 with IDU-II). The relative signal response (uniformity) after 50 MU was better than 95% of the central value and independent of detector. Sensitivity for all EPIDs reduced continuously with increasing dose rates for the newer image acquisition software. In the dose-rate range 100-600 MU min(-1), the maximum variation in sensitivity ranged between 1 and 1.8% for different EPIDs. For memory effects, the increase in the measured signal at the centre of the irradiated field for successive images was within 1.8% and 1.0% for the older and newer acquisition systems, respectively. Image profiles acquired at a lower MU in the radial plane (gun-target) had gradients in measured pixel values of up to 25% for the older system. Detectors with software/hardware versions IAS3/IDU-20 have a high degree of accuracy and are more suitable for routine quantitative IMRT dosimetrical verification.

  13. Automated Classification Of Scanning Electron Microscope Particle Images Using Morphological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, B. L.; Lewis, R. R.; Girvin, D. C.; McKinley, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing a software tool that can automatically classify anthropogenic and natural aerosol particulates using morphological analysis. Our method was developed using SEM (background and secondary electron) images of single particles. Particle silhouettes are detected and converted into polygons using Intel's OpenCV image processing library. Our analysis then proceeds independently for the two kinds of images. Analysis of secondary images concerns itself solely with the silhouette and seeks to quantify its shape and roughness. Traversing the polygon with spline interpolation, we uniformly sample k(s), the signed curvature of the silhouette's path as a function of distance along the perimeter s. k(s) is invariant under rotation and translation. The power spectrum of k(s) qualitatively shows both shape and roughness: more power at low frequencies indicates variation in shape; more power at higher frequencies indicates a rougher silhouette. We present a series of filters (low-, band-, and high-pass) which we convolve with k(s) to yield a set of parameters that characterize the shape and roughness numerically. Analysis of backscatter images focuses on the (visual) texture, which is the result of both composition and geometry. Using the silhouette as a boundary, we compute the variogram, a statistical measure of inter-pixel covariance as a function of distance. Variograms take on characteristic curves, which we fit with a heuristic, asymptotic function that uses a small set of parameters. The combination of silhouette and variogram fit parameters forms the basis of a multidimensional classification space whose dimensionality we may reduce by principal component analysis and whose region boundaries allow us to classify new particles. This analysis is performed without a priori knowledge of other physical, chemical, or climatic properties. The method will be adapted to multi-particulate images.

  14. Detection of neuron membranes in electron microscopy images using a serial neural network architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurrus, Elizabeth; Paiva, Antonio R C; Watanabe, Shigeki; Anderson, James R; Jones, Bryan W; Whitaker, Ross T; Jorgensen, Erik M; Marc, Robert E; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2010-12-01

    Study of nervous systems via the connectome, the map of connectivities of all neurons in that system, is a challenging problem in neuroscience. Towards this goal, neurobiologists are acquiring large electron microscopy datasets. However, the shear volume of these datasets renders manual analysis infeasible. Hence, automated image analysis methods are required for reconstructing the connectome from these very large image collections. Segmentation of neurons in these images, an essential step of the reconstruction pipeline, is challenging because of noise, anisotropic shapes and brightness, and the presence of confounding structures. The method described in this paper uses a series of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in a framework combined with a feature vector that is composed of image intensities sampled over a stencil neighborhood. Several ANNs are applied in series allowing each ANN to use the classification context provided by the previous network to improve detection accuracy. We develop the method of serial ANNs and show that the learned context does improve detection over traditional ANNs. We also demonstrate advantages over previous membrane detection methods. The results are a significant step towards an automated system for the reconstruction of the connectome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance image reconstruction with total variation and curvelets regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Sylvain; Frapart, Yves-Michel; Kerebel, Maud

    2017-11-01

    Spatial electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a recent method to localize and characterize free radicals in vivo or in vitro, leading to applications in material and biomedical sciences. To improve the quality of the reconstruction obtained by EPRI, a variational method is proposed to inverse the image formation model. It is based on a least-square data-fidelity term and the total variation and Besov seminorm for the regularization term. To fully comprehend the Besov seminorm, an implementation using the curvelet transform and the L 1 norm enforcing the sparsity is proposed. It allows our model to reconstruct both image where acquisition information are missing and image with details in textured areas, thus opening possibilities to reduce acquisition times. To implement the minimization problem using the algorithm developed by Chambolle and Pock, a thorough analysis of the direct model is undertaken and the latter is inverted while avoiding the use of filtered backprojection (FBP) and of non-uniform Fourier transform. Numerical experiments are carried out on simulated data, where the proposed model outperforms both visually and quantitatively the classical model using deconvolution and FBP. Improved reconstructions on real data, acquired on an irradiated distal phalanx, were successfully obtained.

  16. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursley, Randall H.; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C.; Pohida, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency (Lf) of 300 MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency Lf, in conjunction with our ~10 MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented. PMID:16243552

  17. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursley, Randall H; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C; Pohida, Thomas J

    2006-02-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency (L(f)) of 300MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency L(f), in conjunction with our approximately 10MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented.

  18. Autoregressive linear least square single scanning electron microscope image signal-to-noise ratio estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kok Swee; NorHisham, Syafiq

    2016-11-01

    A technique based on linear Least Squares Regression (LSR) model is applied to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. In order to test the accuracy of this technique on SNR estimation, a number of SEM images are initially corrupted with white noise. The autocorrelation function (ACF) of the original and the corrupted SEM images are formed to serve as the reference point to estimate the SNR value of the corrupted image. The LSR technique is then compared with the previous three existing techniques known as nearest neighbourhood, first-order interpolation, and the combination of both nearest neighborhood and first-order interpolation. The actual and the estimated SNR values of all these techniques are then calculated for comparison purpose. It is shown that the LSR technique is able to attain the highest accuracy compared to the other three existing techniques as the absolute difference between the actual and the estimated SNR value is relatively small. SCANNING 38:771-782, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Image sharpness measurement in the scanning electron-microscope--part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N F; Postek, M T; Larrabee, R D; Vladár, A E; Keery, W J; Jones, S N

    1999-01-01

    Fully automated or semi-automated scanning electron microscopes (SEM) are now commonly used in semiconductor production and other forms of manufacturing. Testing and proving that the instrument is performing at a satisfactory level of sharpness is an important aspect of quality control. The application of Fourier analysis techniques to the analysis of SEM images is a useful methodology for sharpness measurement. In this paper, a statistical measure known as the multivariate kurtosis is proposed as an additional useful measure of the sharpness of SEM images. Kurtosis is designed to be a measure of the degree of departure of a probability distribution. For selected SEM images, the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transforms were computed. Then the bivariate kurtosis of this Fourier transform was calculated as though it were a probability distribution. Kurtosis has the distinct advantage that it is a parametric (i.e., a dimensionless) measure and is sensitive to the presence of the high spatial frequencies necessary for acceptable levels of image sharpness. The applications of this method to SEM metrology will be discussed.

  20. Comparative electron microscopy and image analysis of oxy- and deoxy-hemocyanin from the spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, Felix de; Breemen, Jan F.L. van; Boekema, Egbert J.; Keegstra, Wilko; Bruggen, Ernst F.J. van

    1993-01-01

    Structural differences between oxy-hemocyanin and deoxy-hemocyanin from the spiny lobster P. interruptus were studied by electron microscopy and image analysis of negatively stained preparations. Projections of the hexameric P. interruptus hemocyanin from electron microscopy were compared with

  1. SU-E-T-775: Use of Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Quality Assurance (QA) of Electron Beams On Varian Truebeam System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Mutic, S; Goddu, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In a previous study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using EPID to QA electron beam parameters on a single Varian TrueBeam LINAC. This study aims to provide further investigation on (1) reproducibility of using EPID to detect electron beam energy changes on multiple machines and (2) evaluation of appropriate calibration methods to compare results from different EPIDs. Methods: Ad-hoc mode electron beam images were acquired in developer mode with XML code. Electron beam data were collected on a total of six machines from four institutions. A custom-designed double-wedge phantom was placed on the EPID detector. Two calibration methods - Pixel Sensitivity Map (PSM) and Large Source-to-Imager Distance Flood Field (LSID-FF) - were used. To test the sensitivity of EPID in detecting energy drifts, Bending Magnet Current (BMC) was detuned to invoke energy changes corresponding to ∼±1.5 mm change in R50% of PDD on two machines from two institutions. Percent depth ionization (PDI) curves were then analyzed and compared with the respective baseline images using LSID-FF calibration. For reproducibility testing, open field EPID images and images with a standard testing phantom were collected on multiple machines. Images with and without PSM correction for same energies on different machines were overlaid and compared. Results: Two pixel shifts were observed in PDI curve when energy changes exceeded the TG142 tolerance. PSM showed the potential to correct the differences in pixel response of different imagers. With PSM correction, the histogram of images differences obtained from different machines showed narrower distributions than those images without PSM correction. Conclusion: EPID is sensitive for electron energy changes and the results are reproducible on different machines. When overlaying images from different machines, PSM showed the ability to partially eliminate the intrinsic variation of various imagers. Research Funding from Varian Medical Systems

  2. Study of combined filter based on wavelet transform to denoise stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongling; Jing, Chao; Zhang, Yimo

    2011-11-01

    Stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry, in which stripe distribution are correlated with vertical micro distortion or micro vibration of objects, are severely disturbed by noises, and so denoising stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry is necessary to extract useful stripe distribution information. Denoising methods and flow for stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry are analyzed in this paper to get the stripe distribution correlated with vertical micro distortion or micro vibration of objects. The noises in the stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry are comprised of speckle noise and other random noises induced by environmental disturb and instrumental performance, so it's difficult to use familiar filters, such as mean-value filter, medium-value filter and adaptive filter, etc, to remove all noises in the stripe images. The combined filter composed of mean-value filter and wavelet filter is designed to denoise stripe images. The aim of mean-value filter is to remove random noises induced by environmental disturb and instrumental performance, and then the wavelet filter, in which the Meyer wavelet is adopted, is designed to remove speckle noise in the stripe images. The final stripe distribution images after denoising and binarization are listed to prove the denoising validity of combined filter based on wavelet transform.

  3. Automated sub-5 nm image registration in integrated correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence pointers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haring, M.T.; Liv Hamarat, N.; Zonnevylle, A.C.; Narvaez Gonzalez, A.C.; Voortman, L.M.; Kruit, P.; Hoogenboom, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    In the biological sciences, data from fluorescence and electron microscopy is correlated to allow fluorescence biomolecule identification within the cellular ultrastructure and/or ultrastructural analysis following live-cell imaging. High-accuracy (sub-100 nm) image overlay requires the addition of

  4. Adenoviral E4 34K protein interacts with virus packaging components and may serve as the putative portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahi, Yadvinder S; Hassan, Ahmed O; Vemula, Sai V; Li, Kunpeng; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Guang Jun; Mittal, Suresh K

    2017-08-08

    Studies on dsDNA bacteriophages have revealed that a DNA packaging complex assembles at a special vertex called the 'portal vertex' and consists of a portal, a DNA packaging ATPase and other components. AdV protein IVa2 is presumed to function as a DNA packaging ATPase. However, a protein that functions as a portal is not yet identified in AdVs. To identify the AdV portal, we performed secondary structure analysis on a set of AdV proteins and compared them with the clip region of the portal proteins of bacteriophages phi29, SPP1 and T4. Our analysis revealed that the E4 34K protein of HAdV-C5 contains a region of strong similarity with the clip region of the known portal proteins. E4 34K was found to be present in empty as well as mature AdV particles. In addition, E4 34K co-immunoprecipitates and colocalizes with AdV packaging proteins. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that E4 34K is located at a single site on the virus surface. Finally, tertiary structure prediction of E4 34K and its comparison with that of single subunits of Phi29, SPP1 and T4 portal proteins revealed remarkable similarity. In conclusion, our results suggest that E4 34K is the putative AdV portal protein.

  5. Electronic structure of the cuprate superconducting and pseudogap phases from spectroscopic imaging STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A. R.; Fujita, K.; Kim, E.-A.; Lawler, M. J.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lee, D.-H.; Davis, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We survey the use of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) to probe the electronic structure of underdoped cuprates. Two distinct classes of electronic states are observed in both the d-wave superconducting (dSC) and the pseudogap (PG) phases. The first class consists of the dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of a homogeneous d-wave superconductor, existing below a lower energy scale E=Δ0. We find that the Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference (QPI) signatures of delocalized Cooper pairing are restricted to a k-space arc, which terminates near the lines connecting k=±(π/a0,0) to k=±(0,π/a0). This arc shrinks continuously with decreasing hole density such that Luttinger's theorem could be satisfied if it represents the front side of a hole-pocket that is bounded behind by the lines between k=±(π/a0,0) and k=±(0,π/a0). In both phases, the only broken symmetries detected for the |E|translational symmetries, coexist with this intra-unit-cell electronic symmetry breaking at E=Δ1. Their characteristic wavevector Q is determined by the k-space points where Bogoliubov QPI terminates and therefore changes continuously with doping. The distinct broken electronic symmetry states (intra-unit-cell and finite Q) coexisting at E~Δ1 are found to be indistinguishable in the dSC and PG phases. The next challenge for SI-STM studies is to determine the relationship of the E~Δ1 broken symmetry electronic states with the PG phase, and with the E<Δ0 states associated with Cooper pairing.

  6. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, M G; Wolter, B; Le, A-T; Baudisch, M; Sclafani, M; Pires, H; Schröter, C D; Ullrich, J; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Lin, C D; Biegert, J

    2016-06-22

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms.

  7. Photo-excited hot carrier dynamics in hydrogenated amorphous silicon imaged by 4D electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bolin; Najafi, Ebrahim; Li, Heng; Minnich, Austin J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2017-09-01

    Charge carrier dynamics in amorphous semiconductors has been a topic of intense research that has been propelled by modern applications in thin-film solar cells, transistors and optical sensors. Charge transport in these materials differs fundamentally from that in crystalline semiconductors owing to the lack of long-range order and high defect density. Despite the existence of well-established experimental techniques such as photoconductivity time-of-flight and ultrafast optical measurements, many aspects of the dynamics of photo-excited charge carriers in amorphous semiconductors remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate direct imaging of carrier dynamics in space and time after photo-excitation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (SUEM). We observe an unexpected regime of fast diffusion immediately after photoexcitation, together with spontaneous electron-hole separation and charge trapping induced by the atomic disorder. Our findings demonstrate the rich dynamics of hot carrier transport in amorphous semiconductors that can be revealed by direct imaging based on SUEM.

  8. Picosecond phase-velocity dispersion of hypersonic phonons imaged with ultrafast electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Du, Daniel X.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we describe the direct imaging—with four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy—of the emergence, evolution, dispersion, and decay of photoexcited, hypersonic coherent acoustic phonons in nanoscale germanium wedges. Coherent strain waves generated via ultrafast in situ photoexcitation were imaged propagating with initial phase velocities of up to 35 km/s across discrete micrometer-scale crystal regions. We observe that, while each wave front travels at a constant velocity, the entire wave train evolves with a time-varying phase-velocity dispersion, displaying a single-exponential decay to the longitudinal speed of sound (5 km/s) and with a mean lifetime of 280 ps. We also find that the wave trains propagate along a single in-plane direction oriented parallel to striations introduced during specimen preparation, independent of crystallographic direction. Elastic-plate modeling indicates the dynamics arise from excitation of a single, symmetric (dilatational) guided acoustic mode. Further, by precisely determining the experiment time-zero position with a plasma-lensing method, we find that wave-front emergence occurs approximately 100 ps after femtosecond photoexcitation, which matches well with Auger recombination times in germanium. We conclude by discussing the similarities between the imaged hypersonic strain-wave dynamics and electron/hole plasma-wave dynamics in strongly photoexcited semiconductors.

  9. Pixel electronic noise as a function of position in an active matrix flat panel imaging array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Wu, Dali; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    We present an analysis of output referred pixel electronic noise as a function of position in the active matrix array for both active and passive pixel architectures. Three different noise sources for Active Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays are considered: readout period noise, reset period noise and leakage current noise of the reset TFT during readout. For the state-of-the-art Passive Pixel Sensor (PPS) array, the readout noise of the TFT switch is considered. Measured noise results are obtained by modeling the array connections with RC ladders on a small in-house fabricated prototype. The results indicate that the pixels in the rows located in the middle part of the array have less random electronic noise at the output of the off-panel charge amplifier compared to the ones in rows at the two edges of the array. These results can help optimize for clearer images as well as help define the region-of-interest with the best signal-to-noise ratio in an active matrix digital flat panel imaging array.

  10. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J., E-mail: yangzj@hust.edu.cn; Ma, X. D.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Zhu, Y. L. [School of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W. [Davis Millimeter Wave Research Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  11. Dynamics and control of gold-encapped gallium arsenide nanowires imaged by 4D electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Fu, Xuewen; Tang, Jau; Lysevych, Mykhaylo; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2017-11-20

    Eutectic-related reaction is a special chemical/physical reaction involving multiple phases, solid and liquid. Visualization of a phase reaction of composite nanomaterials with high spatial and temporal resolution provides a key understanding of alloy growth with important industrial applications. However, it has been a rather challenging task. Here, we report the direct imaging and control of the phase reaction dynamics of a single, as-grown free-standing gallium arsenide nanowire encapped with a gold nanoparticle, free from environmental confinement or disturbance, using four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy. The nondestructive preparation of as-grown free-standing nanowires without supporting films allows us to study their anisotropic properties in their native environment with better statistical character. A laser heating pulse initiates the eutectic-related reaction at a temperature much lower than the melting points of the composite materials, followed by a precisely time-delayed electron pulse to visualize the irreversible transient states of nucleation, growth, and solidification of the complex. Combined with theoretical modeling, useful thermodynamic parameters of the newly formed alloy phases and their crystal structures could be determined. This technique of dynamical control aided by 4D imaging of phase reaction processes on the nanometer-ultrafast time scale opens new venues for engineering various reactions in a wide variety of other systems. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging for real-time monitoring of Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiya, M.; Leriche, J.-B.; Salager, E.; Gourier, D.; Tarascon, J.-M.; Vezin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Batteries for electrical storage are central to any future alternative energy paradigm. The ability to probe the redox mechanisms occurring at electrodes during their operation is essential to improve battery performances. Here we present the first report on Electron Paramagnetic Resonance operando spectroscopy and in situ imaging of a Li-ion battery using Li2Ru0.75Sn0.25O3, a high-capacity (>270 mAh g−1) Li-rich layered oxide, as positive electrode. By monitoring operando the electron paramagnetic resonance signals of Ru5+ and paramagnetic oxygen species, we unambiguously prove the formation of reversible (O2)n− species that contribute to their high capacity. In addition, we visualize by imaging with micrometric resolution the plating/stripping of Li at the negative electrode and highlight the zones of nucleation and growth of Ru5+/oxygen species at the positive electrode. This efficient way to locate ‘electron’-related phenomena opens a new area in the field of battery characterization that should enable future breakthroughs in battery research. PMID:25662295

  13. Quadrupole lens alignment with improved STIM and secondary electron imaging for Proton Beam Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Sarfraz; Raman, P. Santhana; Stegmaier, Alrik; van Kan, Jeroen A.

    2017-08-01

    Minimal proximity effect coupled with uniform energy deposition in thin polymer layers make Proton Beam Writing (PBW) an intuitive direct-write lithographic technique. Feature sizes matching the focused beam spot size have been fabricated in photoresists down to 19 nm. Reproducible sub-10 nm beam focusing will make PBW a promising contender for sub-10 nm lithography. In this paper, we present beam size characterization by imaging a PBW resolution standard using transmitted/scattered ions and secondary electrons. Using Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) spectra for 1 and 2 MeV H2+ beams, we experimentally measure the thickness of the resolution standard to be 0.9 ± 0.1 μm, applying two independent calibration methods, which match the original intended thickness during fabrication. Through bias optimization of a Micro-Channel Plate (MCP), we show a tuneable secondary electron detection per proton for imaging with a maximum of 75% e/p for a beam of 1 MeV H2+. Based on STIM mode beam size measurement, we discuss considerations for quadrupole system alignment in order to remove higher order translational and rotational misalignments critical to achieve sub-40 nm spot sizes. A spot size of 13 × 32 nm2 (STIM) was achieved using a newly developed interface, capable of autofocusing ion beams and performing PBW.

  14. Electronic structure and STM imaging of the KBr-InSb interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciochoń, Piotr, E-mail: ciochon.piotr@gmail.com; Olszowska, Natalia; Kołodziej, Jacek J.

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The structure of the InSb (001) surface covered with thin KBr layers is reported. • KBr growth does not perturb strongly the structure of a clean InSb surface. • A model of the system with KBr treated as a thin dielectric layer is proposed. • The atomic structure of the KBr-InSb interface is directly imaged using STM. - Abstract: We study the properties of the InSb (001) surface covered with ultrathin KBr films, with a thickness of 1–4 ML. KBr deposition does not strongly perturb the crystallographic structure of the InSb surface and the electronic structure of the substrate also remains unaffected by the overlayer. A simple model of the studied system is proposed, in which a thin KBr layer is treated as a dielectric film, modifying potential barrier for the electrons tunneling to/from the InSb substrate. Apparent step heights on the KBr film, measured using scanning tunneling microscope (STM), agree well with the predictions of the model and the atomically-resolved STM images show the structure of the InSb-KBr interface. Our results demonstrate that STM may be used as a tool for investigations of the semiconductor–insulator interfaces.

  15. Performance assessment of methods for estimation of fractal dimension from scanning electron microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risović, Dubravko; Pavlović, Zivko

    2013-01-01

    Processing of gray scale images in order to determine the corresponding fractal dimension is very important due to widespread use of imaging technologies and application of fractal analysis in many areas of science, technology, and medicine. To this end, many methods for estimation of fractal dimension from gray scale images have been developed and routinely used. Unfortunately different methods (dimension estimators) often yield significantly different results in a manner that makes interpretation difficult. Here, we report results of comparative assessment of performance of several most frequently used algorithms/methods for estimation of fractal dimension. To that purpose, we have used scanning electron microscope images of aluminum oxide surfaces with different fractal dimensions. The performance of algorithms/methods was evaluated using the statistical Z-score approach. The differences between performances of six various methods are discussed and further compared with results obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on the same samples. The analysis of results shows that the performance of investigated algorithms varies considerably and that systematically erroneous fractal dimensions could be estimated using certain methods. The differential cube counting, triangulation, and box counting algorithms showed satisfactory performance in the whole investigated range of fractal dimensions. Difference statistic is proved to be less reliable generating 4% of unsatisfactory results. The performances of the Power spectrum, Partitioning and EIS were unsatisfactory in 29%, 38%, and 75% of estimations, respectively. The results of this study should be useful and provide guidelines to researchers using/attempting fractal analysis of images obtained by scanning microscopy or atomic force microscopy. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1E4WH-2ATKA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1E4WH-2ATKA 1E4W 2ATK H A QVQLQQPGAELVKPGASVKLSCKASGFTFTNYWMHWVKQ...RPGQGLEWIGEILPSNGRTNYNEKFKTKATLTVDKSSNTAYMQLSSLTSEDSAVYYCARSPS----DYWGQGTTLTVSSAKTTAPSVYPLAPVCGDTTGSSVTLGCLV...69 2ATK A 2ATKA

  17. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1E4XI-2ATKA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1E4XI-2ATKA 1E4X 2ATK I A QVQLQQPGAELVKPGPSVKLSCKASGFTFTNYWMHWVKQ...RPGQGLEWIGEILPSNGRTNYNEKFKTKATLTVDKSSNTAYMQLSSLTSEDSAVYYCARSPS----DYWGQGTTLTVSSAKTTAPSVYPLAPVCGDTTGSSVTLGCLV...dbChain> 2ATKA ARERGDGYFAVWGA EEE

  18. The impact of non-thermal electrons on event horizon scale images and spectra of Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, S. Alwin; Dexter, Jason; Quataert, Eliot

    2017-04-01

    Decomposing an arbitrary electron energy distribution into sums of Maxwellian and power-law components is an efficient method to calculate synchrotron emission and absorption. We use this method to study the effect of non-thermal electrons on submillimetre images and spectra of the Galactic Centre black hole, Sgr A*. We assume a spatially uniform functional form for the electron distribution function and use a semi-analytic radiatively inefficient accretion flow and a 2D general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic snapshot as example models of the underlying accretion flow structure. We develop simple analytic models that allow us to generalize from the numerical examples. A high-energy electron component containing a small fraction (few per cent) of the total internal energy (e.g. a 'power-law tail') can produce a diffuse halo of emission, which modifies the observed image size and structure. A population of hot electrons with a larger energy fraction (e.g. resulting from a diffusion in electron energy space) can dominate the emission, so that the observed images and spectra are well approximated by considering only a single thermal component for a suitable choice of the electron temperature. We discuss the implications of these results for estimating accretion flow or black hole parameters from images and spectra, and for the identification of the black hole 'shadow' in future millimetre-very long baseline interferometry data. In particular, the location of the first minimum in visibility profiles does not necessarily correspond to the shadow size as sometimes assumed.

  19. Application of backscatter electrons for large area imaging of cavities produced by neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, V. I.; Averin, S. A.; Panchenko, V. L.; Portnykh, I. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Giannuzzi, L. A.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that with proper optimization, backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope can produce images of cavity distribution in austenitic steels over a large specimen surface for a depth of ˜500-700 nm, eliminating the need for electropolishing or multiple specimen production. This technique is especially useful for quantifying cavity structures when the specimen is known or suspected to contain very heterogeneous distributions of cavities. Examples are shown for cold-worked EK-164, a very heterogeneously-swelling Russian fast reactor fuel cladding steel and also for AISI 304, a homogeneously-swelling Western steel used for major structural components of light water cooled reactors. This non-destructive overview method of quantifying cavity distribution can be used to direct the location and number of required focused ion beam prepared transmission electron microscopy specimens for examination of either neutron or ion-irradiated specimens. This technique can also be applied in stereo mode to quantify the depth dependence of cavity distributions.

  20. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO) and Nd 0.5 Sr 0.5 MnO 3 , in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging: diffraction background of superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Lei, Lei; Alghamdi, Maha; Oswalt, Andrew; Kong, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to solve the crystallization problem in crystallography, we have been engaged in developing a method termed "serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging" (SS-EDI). The unique features of SS-EDI are superfluid helium droplet cooling and field-induced orientation: together the two features constitute a molecular goniometer. Unfortunately, the helium atoms surrounding the sample molecule also contribute to a diffraction background. In this report, we analyze the properties of a superfluid helium droplet beam and its doping statistics, and demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming the background issue by using the velocity slip phenomenon of a pulsed droplet beam. Electron diffraction profiles and pair correlation functions of ferrocene-monomer-doped droplets and iodine-nanocluster-doped droplets are presented. The timing of the pulsed electron gun and the effective doping efficiency under different dopant pressures can both be controlled for size selection. This work clears any doubt of the effectiveness of superfluid helium droplets in SS-EDI, thereby advancing the effort in demonstrating the "proof-of-concept" one step further.

  2. Front-end electronics and data acquisition system for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.T., E-mail: chenytao@ynu.edu.cn [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Yunnan University, 650091 Kunming (China); La Taille, C. de [OMEGA (UMS 3605) - IN2P3/CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Suomijärvi, T. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Cao, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, 100049 Beijing (China); Deligny, O. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Dulucq, F. [OMEGA (UMS 3605) - IN2P3/CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Ge, M.M. [Yunnan University, 650091 Kunming (China); Lhenry-Yvon, I. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Martin-Chassard, G. [OMEGA (UMS 3605) - IN2P3/CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Nguyen Trung, T.; Wanlin, E. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Xiao, G.; Yin, L.Q. [Institute of High Energy Physics, 100049 Beijing (China); Yun Ky, B. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Zhang, L. [Yunnan University, 650091 Kunming (China); Zhang, H.Y. [Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Zhang, S.S.; Zhu, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, 100049 Beijing (China)

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, a front-end electronics based on an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented for the future imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). To achieve this purpose, a 16-channel ASIC chip, PARISROC 2 (Photomultiplier ARray Integrated in SiGe ReadOut Chip) is used in the analog signal processing and digitization. The digitized results are sent to the server by a user-defined User Datagram Protocol/Internet Protocol (UDP/IP) hardcore engine through Ethernet that is managed by a FPGA. A prototype electronics fulfilling the requirements of the Wide Field of View Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA) of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project has been designed, fabricated and tested to prove the concept of the design. A detailed description of the development with the results of the test measurements are presented. By using a new input structure and a new configuration of the ASIC, the dynamic range of the circuit is extended. A highly precise-time calibrating algorithm is also proposed, verified and optimized for the mass production. The test results suggest that the proposed electronics design fulfills the general specification of the future IACTs.

  3. Determination of line edge roughness in low dose top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduin, T.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C. W.

    2014-04-01

    We investigated off-line metrology for LER determination in low-dose SEM images to reduce the acquisition time and the risk of shrinkage. Our first attempts are based on filtering noisy (experimental) SEM images and use peak detection to measure the edge displacements and calculating the discrete PSD. However, the result of the filtering is that the power spectrum of the filter leaks into the PSD. So it is better to avoid a filter at all. We subsequently developed a method to detect edge displacements without the use of a filter. This method considers the signal profile of a SEM by integrating an experimental image of lines in the direction of the edges. The signal profile of an isolated edge is modeled as two merged Gaussians. This signal profile is then fitted against the raw (unfiltered) data of the edge pattern using an interior trust-region-reflective minimization procedure. This gives the edge displacements without the use of a filter and a filter-free version of the discrete PSD is obtained. The determination of edge displacements without the use of a filter, enables us to study how much noise is acceptable and still determine LER. To answer this question we generate random lines using the model of Palasantzas and the algorithm of Thorsos. This gives random generated edge displacements for typical values of experimental lines for the parameters of the model: 2 μm long lines (256 pixels), a correlation length ξ of 25 nm and a roughness exponent of 0.75. A noise-free top-down SEM-like image of lines is created by shifting the profile signal according to the random generated edge displacements. The image is further processed by adding Poisson-distributed noise. We consider three noise cases where the average electron density is about 2, 20 and 200 electrons per pixel. This corresponds to a charge density of (in respective order) 10 μC/cm2, 100 μC/cm2 and 1000 μC/cm2. The edge displacements of the random generated images are determined using our new

  4. NOTE: Recording accelerator monitor units during electronic portal imaging: application to collimator position verification during IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-06-01

    The application of multiple portal image acquisition to collimator position verification during dynamic multileaf collimation (DMLC) using a commercial camera-based electronic portal imaging device (EPID) (TheraviewTM, Cablon Medical BV, Leusden, The Netherlands) mounted on an Elekta SL15i accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is described. This is achieved using a custom-built dose acquisition system optically interfaced to both the camera control unit of the EPID and the monitor unit (MU) channel of the accelerator. The method uses the beam blanking camera control signal to trigger the dose acquisition system to read the cumulative accelerator MUs at the beginning and end of each period of image formation. A maximum delay of 15 ms has been estimated for recording of accelerator MUs in the current system. The camera interface was observed to have no effect on the operation of the EPID during normal clinical use and could therefore be left permanently in situ. Use of the system for collimator position verification of a test case is presented. The technique described uses a specific camera-based EPID and accelerator, although the general principle of using an EPID control signal to trigger recording of accelerator MUs may be applicable to other EPIDs/accelerators with suitable knowledge of the accelerator dosimetry system.

  5. Image Processor Electronics (IPE): The High-Performance Computing System for NASA SWIFT Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang H.; Settles, Beverly A.

    2003-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are believed to be the most powerful explosions that have occurred in the Universe since the Big Bang and are a mystery to the scientific community. Swift, a NASA mission that includes international participation, was designed and built in preparation for a 2003 launch to help to determine the origin of Gamma Ray Bursts. Locating the position in the sky where a burst originates requires intensive computing, because the duration of a GRB can range between a few milliseconds up to approximately a minute. The instrument data system must constantly accept multiple images representing large regions of the sky that are generated by sixteen gamma ray detectors operating in parallel. It then must process the received images very quickly in order to determine the existence of possible gamma ray bursts and their locations. The high-performance instrument data computing system that accomplishes this is called the Image Processor Electronics (IPE). The IPE was designed, built and tested by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in order to meet these challenging requirements. The IPE is a small size, low power and high performing computing system for space applications. This paper addresses the system implementation and the system hardware architecture of the IPE. The paper concludes with the IPE system performance that was measured during end-to-end system testing.

  6. Measurement of the electron and ion temperatures by the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on joint Texas experimental tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Wang, S. Y.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610200 (China); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    An x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been developed on joint Texas experimental tokamak for the measurement of electron and ion temperatures from the K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. A two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter has been applied to detect the spectra. The electron and ion temperatures have been obtained from the Voigt fitting with the spectra of helium-like argon ions. The profiles of electron and ion temperatures show the dependence on electron density in ohmic plasmas.

  7. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn-internal electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Rajon, Didier [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Jokisch, Derek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC (United States)], E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu

    2010-04-07

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  8. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn—internal electron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  9. Streamlined embedding of cell monolayers on gridded glass-bottom imaging dishes for correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Hugo H; Reilly, James E; Lee, Rebecca; Janssen, William G; Phillips, Greg R

    2010-12-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has facilitated study of intracellular trafficking. Routine application of CLEM would be advantageous for many laboratories but previously described techniques are particularly demanding, even for those with access to laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe streamlined methods for TEM of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled organelles after imaging by LSCM using gridded glass bottom imaging dishes. GFP-MAP 1A/1B LC3 (GFP-LC3) transfected cells were treated with rapamycin, fixed and imaged by LSCM. Confocal image stacks were acquired enabling full visualization of each GFP-LC3 labeled organelle. After LSCM, cells were embedded for TEM using a simplified two step method that stabilizes the glass bottom such that the block can be separated from the glass by mild heating. All imaging and TEM processing are performed in the same dish. The LSCM imaged cells were relocated on the block and serial sectioned. Correlation of LSCM, DIC, and TEM images was facilitated by cellular landmarks. All GFP labeled structures were successfully reidentified and imaged by serial section TEM. This method could make CLEM more accessible to nonspecialized laboratories with basic electron microscopy expertise and could be used routinely to confirm organelle localization of fluorescent puncta.

  10. Problems in obtaining perfect images by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy of biological structures in amorphous ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Richard; McMullan, Greg

    2013-02-01

    Theoretical considerations together with simulations of single-particle electron cryomicroscopy images of biological assemblies in ice demonstrate that atomic structures should be obtainable from images of a few thousand asymmetric units, provided the molecular weight of the whole assembly being studied is greater than the minimum needed for accurate position and orientation determination. However, with present methods of specimen preparation and current microscope and detector technologies, many more particles are needed, and the alignment of smaller assemblies is difficult or impossible. Only larger structures, with enough signal to allow good orientation determination and with enough images to allow averaging of many hundreds of thousands or even millions of asymmetric units, have successfully produced high-resolution maps. In this review, we compare the contrast of experimental electron cryomicroscopy images of two smaller molecular assemblies, namely apoferritin and beta-galactosidase, with that expected from perfect simulated images calculated from their known X-ray structures. We show that the contrast and signal-to-noise ratio of experimental images still require significant improvement before it will be possible to realize the full potential of single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. In particular, although reasonably good orientations can be obtained for beta-galactosidase, we have been unable to obtain reliable orientation determination from experimental images of apoferritin. Simulations suggest that at least 2-fold improvement of the contrast in experimental images at ~10 Å resolution is needed and should be possible.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy combined with image processing technique: Microstructure and texture analysis of legumes and vegetables for instant meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieniazek, Facundo; Messina, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    Development and innovation of new technologies are necessary especially in food quality; due that most instrumental technique for measuring quality properties involves a considerable amount of manual work. Image analysis is a technique that allows to provide objective evaluations from digitalized images that can estimate quality parameters for consumer's acceptance. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of freeze drying on the microstructure and texture of legume and vegetables using scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications' combined with image analysis. Cooked and cooked freeze dried rehydrated legumes and vegetables were analyzed individually by scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications' (250, 500, and 1000×).Texture properties were analyzed by texture analyzer and image analysis. Significant differences (P image and instrumental texture parameters. A linear trend with a linear correlation was applied for instrumental and image features. Results showed that image features calculated from Grey level co-occurrence matrix at 1,000× had high correlations with instrumental features. In rice, homogeneity and contrast can be applied to evaluate texture parameters gumminess and adhesiviness; Lentils: contrast, correlation, energy, homogeneity, and entropy for hardness, adhesiviness, gumminess, and chewiness; Potato and carrots: contrast, energy, homogeneity and entropy for adhesiviness, chewiness, hardness, cohesiviness, and resilence. Results revealed that combing scanning electron microscopy with image analysis can be a useful tool to analyze quality parameters in legumes and vegetables. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A Picture is Worth 1,000 Words. The Use of Clinical Images in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Angela C; Maloney, Francine L; Hickman, Thu-Trang; Wilcox, Allison R; Ramelson, Harley; Wright, Adam

    2017-07-12

    To understand how clinicians utilize image uploading tools in a home grown electronic health records (EHR) system. A content analysis of patient notes containing non-radiological images from the EHR was conducted. Images from 4,000 random notes from July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010 were reviewed and manually coded. Codes were assigned to four properties of the image: (1) image type, (2) role of image uploader (e.g. MD, NP, PA, RN), (3) practice type (e.g. internal medicine, dermatology, ophthalmology), and (4) image subject. 3,815 images from image-containing notes stored in the EHR were reviewed and manually coded. Of those images, 32.8% were clinical and 66.2% were non-clinical. The most common types of the clinical images were photographs (38.0%), diagrams (19.1%), and scanned documents (14.4%). MDs uploaded 67.9% of clinical images, followed by RNs with 10.2%, and genetic counselors with 6.8%. Dermatology (34.9%), ophthalmology (16.1%), and general surgery (10.8%) uploaded the most clinical images. The content of clinical images referencing body parts varied, with 49.8% of those images focusing on the head and neck region, 15.3% focusing on the thorax, and 13.8% focusing on the lower extremities. The diversity of image types, content, and uploaders within a home grown EHR system reflected the versatility and importance of the image uploading tool. Understanding how users utilize image uploading tools in a clinical setting highlights important considerations for designing better EHR tools and the importance of interoperability between EHR systems and other health technology.

  13. The Role of Gas in Determining Image Quality and Resolution During In Situ Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan [Physical & Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Browning, Nigel D. [Physical & Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA

    2017-08-02

    As gas-solid heterogeneous catalytic reactions are molecular in nature, a full mechanistic understanding of the process requires atomic scale characterization under realistic operating conditions. While atomic resolution imaging has become a routine in modern high-vacuum (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM), both image quality and resolution nominally degrade when reaction gases are introduced. In this work, we systematically assess the effects of different gases at various pressures on the quality and resolution of images obtained at room temperature in the annular dark field STEM imaging mode using a differentially pumped (DP) gas cell. This imaging mode is largely free from inelastic scattering effects induced by the presence of gases and retains good imaging properties over a wide range of gas mass/pressures. We demonstrate the application of the ESTEM with atomic resolution images of a complex oxide alkane oxidation catalyst MoVNbTeOx (M1) immersed in light and heavy gas environments.

  14. Electronic Image Readout Devices Used In Conjunction With Picosecond Streak Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavailler, C.; Genoud, M.; Fleurot, N.; Launspach, J.; Mazataud, D.; Mens, A.

    1985-02-01

    Understanding the laser-matter interaction experiments require a dynamic recording of the phenomena as well as a good knowledge of the laser pulse occuring during the irradiation of the target ; those measurements are made with streak cameras the increasing number of which leads to processing problems when the results are recorded on films. Furthermore, since physicists wish to have those temporal information immediatly, we unfolded automatic image readout devices fitted specially to streak cameras. The first one used an ISOCON tube operating with a slow sweep (0.5 s frame)1-2. The sensitivity of the tube was very good but its dynamic range was too limited when seeing pulsed images at low light level. So we developped two electronic readout chains with solid state devices which behave better for that kind of light. The first one was designed to get the most information along the temporal axis of the camera sweep (1024 points) in one or two spatial channels ; this device operates a linear 1024 photodiodes array the signal of which is digitized on 12 bits. We have obtained a temporal resolution better than 15 ps and a dynamic range over 500 ; this system is mainly useful to study laser pulses (rise time, temporal profile...)3. For applications requiring two dimension images, we studied and realized a device operating a CCD array and a fiber optics reducer (40-18 mm) adapting the image of the streak camera screen to the dimensions of the input fiber optics of the CCD. A comparison has been made on different CCD cameras on a test setup which simulates the experimental conditions, in order to choose the CCD which would fit the best for that purpose ; we present these results here, as well as those of the associated readout chains.

  15. E4 True and false color hot spot mosaic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    True and false color views of Jupiter from NASA's Galileo spacecraft show an equatorial 'hotspot' on Jupiter. These images cover an area 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles). The top mosaic combines the violet and near infrared continuum filter images to create an image similar to how Jupiter would appear to human eyes. Differences in coloration are due to the composition and abundances of trace chemicals in Jupiter's atmosphere. The bottom mosaic uses Galileo's three near-infrared wavelengths displayed in red, green, and blue) to show variations in cloud height and thickness. Bluish clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are low, and white clouds are high and thick. The dark blue hotspot in the center is a hole in the deep cloud with an overlying thin haze. The light blue region to the left is covered by a very high haze layer. The multicolored region to the right has overlapping cloud layers of different heights. Galileo is the first spacecraft to distinguish cloud layers on Jupiter.North is at the top. The mosaic covers latitudes 1 to 10 degrees and is centered at longitude 336 degrees west. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers (about 930,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging camera system aboard Galileo. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at: http:/ /www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  16. Atomic resolution elemental mapping using energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy with chromatic aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, F F; Rosenauer, A; Barthel, J; Mayer, J; Urban, K; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Brown, H G; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses a novel approach to atomic resolution elemental mapping, demonstrating a method that produces elemental maps with a similar resolution to the established method of electron energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dubbed energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM) this mode of imaging is, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, equivalent to tilting the probe in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) through a cone and incoherently averaging the results. In this paper we present a proof-of-principle EFISTEM experimental study on strontium titanate. The present approach, made possible by chromatic aberration correction, has the advantage that it provides elemental maps which are immune to spatial incoherence in the electron source, coherent aberrations in the probe-forming lens and probe jitter. The veracity of the experiment is supported by quantum mechanical image simulations, which provide an insight into the image-forming process. Elemental maps obtained in EFTEM suffer from the effect known as preservation of elastic contrast, which, for example, can lead to a given atomic species appearing to be in atomic columns where it is not to be found. EFISTEM very substantially reduces the preservation of elastic contrast and yields images which show stability of contrast with changing thickness. The experimental application is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study on strontium titanate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The X-Ray Beam Imager for Transversal Profiling of Low-Emittance Electron Beam at the SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, S; Ohkuma, H

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the X-ray beam imager (XBI) at the accelerator diagnostics beamline I of the SPring-8 to observe transverse profiles of small electron beam of a low-emittance synchrotron light source. The XBI is based on a single Fresnel zone plate (FZP) and an X-ray zooming tube (XZT). The electron beam moving in a bending magnet is imaged by the FZP. Monochromatic X-ray is selected by a double crystal monochromator to avoid the effect of chromatic aberration of the FZP. The X-ray images of the electron beam obtained are converted by the XZT to enlarged images in visible light. The XBI has achieved a superior 1 σ spatial resolution in the micron range, and a fast time resolution of 1 ms. It has also realized a vignetting-free field of view larger than 1.5 mm in diameter on the coordinates of the electron beam, which is not easily obtained by imaging optics using two FZPs. With the XBI, we have successfully measured the profiles of the small electron beam having low vertical emittance in the pm ra...

  18. Apolipoprotein E4 and sex affect neurobehavioral performance in primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Summer F; Piper, Brian J; Craytor, Michael J; Benice, Ted S; Raber, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) and female sex are risk factors for developing Alzheimer's disease. It is unclear whether apoE4 contributes to behavioral function at younger ages. Standard neuropsychological assessments [intelligence quotient (IQ), attention, and executive function] and a test developed in this laboratory (Memory Island test of spatial learning and memory) were used to determine whether E4 and sex affect neuropsychological performance in healthy primary school children (age 7-10). A medical history was also obtained from the mother to determine whether negative birth outcomes were associated with apoE4. Mothers of apoE4+ children were more likely to report that their newborn was placed in an intensive care unit. A sex difference in birth weight was noted among apoE4- (males > females), but not apoE4+, offspring. Conversely, among apoE4+, but not apoE4- children, there was a sex difference in the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) vocabulary score favoring boys. ApoE4- girls had better visual recall than apoE4+ girls or apoE4- boys on the Family Pictures test. Finally, apoE4+, unlike apoE4-, children did not show spatial memory retention during the Memory Island probe trial. Thus, apoE4 may affect neurobehavioral performance, particularly spatial memory, and antenatal health decades before any clinical expression of neurodegenerative processes.

  19. Microtubules in Plant Cells: Strategies and Methods for Immunofluorescence, Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Live Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celler, Katherine; Fujita, Miki; Kawamura, Eiko; Ambrose, Chris; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are required throughout plant development for a wide variety of processes, and different strategies have evolved to visualize and analyze them. This chapter provides specific methods that can be used to analyze microtubule organization and dynamic properties in plant systems and summarizes the advantages and limitations for each technique. We outline basic methods for preparing samples for immunofluorescence labeling, including an enzyme-based permeabilization method, and a freeze-shattering method, which generates microfractures in the cell wall to provide antibodies access to cells in cuticle-laden aerial organs such as leaves. We discuss current options for live cell imaging of MTs with fluorescently tagged proteins (FPs), and provide chemical fixation, high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution, and post-fixation staining protocols for preserving MTs for transmission electron microscopy and tomography.

  20. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...... Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.......We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent...

  1. Response functions of imaging plates to photons, electrons and 4He particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, T; Comet, M; Denis-Petit, D; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Tarisien, M; Versteegen, M; Aléonard, M M

    2013-10-01

    Imaging plates from Fuji (BAS-SR, MS, and TR types) are phosphor films routinely used in ultra high intensity laser experiments. However, few data are available on the absolute IP response functions to ionizing particles. We have previously measured and modeled the IP response functions to protons. We focus here on the determination of the responses to photons, electrons, and (4)He particles. The response functions are obtained on an energy range going from a few tens of keV to a few tens of MeV and are compared to available data. The IP sensitivities to the different ionizing particles demonstrate a quenching effect depending on the particle stopping power.

  2. Time-resolved Chemical Imaging of Molecules by High-order Harmonics and Ultrashort Rescattering Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chii Dong [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometre spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  3. Data acquisition and processing system of the electron cyclotron emission imaging system of the KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J B; Lee, W; Yun, G S; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2010-10-01

    A new innovative electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic system for the Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) produces a large amount of data. The design of the data acquisition and processing system of the ECEI diagnostic system should consider covering the large data production and flow. The system design is based on the layered structure scalable to the future extension to accommodate increasing data demands. Software architecture that allows a web-based monitoring of the operation status, remote experiment, and data analysis is discussed. The operating software will help machine operators and users validate the acquired data promptly, prepare next discharge, and enhance the experiment performance and data analysis in a distributed environment.

  4. New compact and efficient local oscillator optic system for the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Y. B., E-mail: southub@postech.ac.kr; Yun, G. S. [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D. J.; Lee, J.; Lee, W. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C. [Pennsylvania State University, Old Main, State College, Pennsylvania 16801 (United States); Park, H. K. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic on Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research utilizes quasi-optical heterodyne-detection method to measure 2D (vertical and radial) T{sub e} fluctuations from two toroidally separated poloidal cross section of the plasma. A cylindrical lens local oscillator (LO) optics with optical path length (OPL) 2–2.5 m has been used in the current ECEI system to couple the LO source to the 24 vertically aligned array of ECE detectors. For efficient and compact LO optics employing the Powell lens is proposed so that the OPL of the LO source is significantly reduced from ∼2.0 m to 0.4 m with new optics. The coupling efficiency of the LO source is expected to be improved especially at the edge channels. Results from the optical simulation together with the laboratory test of the prototype optics will be discussed in this paper.

  5. Imaging heterostructured quantum dots in cultured cells with epifluorescence and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Erin M.; Trujillo Provencio, Casilda; Steinbrueck, Andrea; Rastogi, Pawan; Dennis, Allison; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Serrano, Elba

    2011-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with extensive imaging and diagnostic capabilities, including the potential for single molecule tracking. Commercially available QDs offer distinct advantages over organic fluorophores, such as increased photostability and tunable emission spectra, but their cadmium selenide (CdSe) core raises toxicity concerns. For this reason, replacements for CdSe-based QDs have been sought that can offer equivalent optical properties. The spectral range, brightness and stability of InP QDs may comprise such a solution. To this end, LANL/CINT personnel fabricated moderately thick-shell novel InP QDs that retain brightness and emission over time in an aqueous environment. We are interested in evaluating how the composition and surface properties of these novel QDs affect their entry and sequestration within the cell. Here we use epifluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to evaluate the structural properties of cultured Xenopus kidney cells (A6; ATCC) that were exposed either to commercially available CdSe QDs (Qtracker® 565, Invitrogen) or to heterostructured InP QDs (LANL). Epifluorescence imaging permitted assessment of the general morphology of cells labeled with fluorescent molecular probes (Alexa Fluor® ® phalloidin; Hoechst 33342), and the prevalence of QD association with cells. In contrast, TEM offered unique advantages for viewing electron dense QDs at higher resolution with regard to subcellular sequestration and compartmentalization. Preliminary results show that in the absence of targeting moieties, InP QDs (200 nM) can passively enter cells and sequester nonspecifically in cytosolic regions whereas commercially available targeted QDs principally associate with membranous structures within the cell. Supported by: NIH 5R01GM084702.

  6. Structure of avian orthoreovirus virion by electron cryomicroscopy and image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Tang, Jinghua; Walker, Stephen B; O'Hara, David; Nibert, Max L; Duncan, Roy; Baker, Timothy S

    2005-12-05

    Among members of the genus Orthoreovirus, family Reoviridae, a group of non-enveloped viruses with genomes comprising ten segments of double-stranded RNA, only the "non-fusogenic" mammalian orthoreoviruses (MRVs) have been studied to date by electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. In addition to MRVs, this genus comprises other species that induce syncytium formation in cultured cells, a property shared with members of the related genus Aquareovirus. To augment studies of these "fusogenic" orthoreoviruses, we used electron cryomicroscopy and image reconstruction to analyze the virions of a fusogenic avian orthoreovirus (ARV). The structure of the ARV virion, determined from data at an effective resolution of 14.6 A, showed strong similarities to that of MRVs. Of particular note, the ARV virion has its pentameric lambda-class core turret protein in a closed conformation as in MRVs, not in a more open conformation as reported for aquareovirus. Similarly, the ARV virion contains 150 copies of its monomeric sigma-class core-nodule protein as in MRVs, not 120 copies as reported for aquareovirus. On the other hand, unlike that of MRVs, the ARV virion lacks "hub-and-spokes" complexes within the solvent channels at sites of local sixfold symmetry in the incomplete T=13l outer capsid. In MRVs, these complexes are formed by C-terminal sequences in the trimeric mu-class outer-capsid protein, sequences that are genetically missing from the homologous protein of ARVs. The channel structures and C-terminal sequences of the homologous outer-capsid protein are also genetically missing from aquareoviruses. Overall, the results place ARVs between MRVs and aquareoviruses with respect to the highlighted features.

  7. Optical shadowgraphy and proton imaging as diagnostics tools for fast electron propagation in ultrahigh-intensity laser-matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manclossi, M.; Batani, D.; Piazza, D.; Baton, S.; Amiranoff, F.; Koenig, M.; Popescu, H.; Audebert, P.; Santos, J. J.; Martinolli, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Le Gloahec, M. R.; Antonicci, A.; Rousseaux, C.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C.; Malka, V.; Hall, T.

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports the results of some recent experiments performed at the LULI laboratory (Palaiseau, France) concerning the propagation of large relativistic electron currents in a gas jet. We present our experimental results according to the type of diagnostics used in the experiments: (1) time resolved optical shadowgraphy and (2) proton imaging. Proton radiography images did show the presence of very strong fields in the gas probably produced by charge separation. In turn, these imply a slowing down of the fast electron cloud as it penetrates in the gas. Indeed, shadowgraphy images show a strong inhibition of propagation and a strong reduction in time of the velocity of the electron cloud from the initial value, which is of the order of a fraction of c.

  8. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  9. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  10. Projected thickness reconstruction from a single defocused transmission electron microscope image of an amorphous object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.C.Y., E-mail: amelia.liu@sci.monash.edu.au [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Paganin, D.M. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Bourgeois, L. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Nakashima, P.N.H. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    Single defocused transmission electron microscope phase contrast images are used to reconstruct the projected thickness map of a single-material object. The algorithm is non-iterative and stable, and we extend it to account for the presence of spherical aberration in the objective optics. The technique can reconstruct the projected thickness map of general single-material objects in the strong phase/weak amplitude regime. It is sensitive to any excursions in the projected thickness from the average, and ideal for examining voids and free volume accumulation in amorphous/glassy materials at the nanometer scale. The resolution of the technique depends on the choice of defocus and the thickness of the specimen. In a certain regime, we demonstrate that variations in the transverse projected thickness with a lateral diameter of {approx}0.25nm may be detected. We use our algorithm to quantitatively reconstruct the projected thickness of latex sphere test specimens from single defocused electron micrographs. We demonstrate that the reconstruction has a large tolerance for error in the input parameters. Simulations confirm that the technique is quantitative, and demonstrate that the origin of low-frequency artifacts is an instability due to noise. We show that the autocorrelation of the projected thickness map may be used to measure the size of open structures in the object using both simulation and latex sphere data. -- Highlights: {yields} We reconstruct the projected thickness of a specimen using a phase retrieval technique. {yields} The technique requires a single out-of-focus phase contrast transmission electron micrograph. {yields} We demonstrate this technique is quantitative using simulation and experiment. {yields} We discuss the technique's realm of application and its nominal resolution. {yields} We employ this technique to measure the size of voids in latex sphere test objects.

  11. A non-tomographic method for imaging the global ionospheric electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunini, C.; Meza, A.; Azpilicueta, F.; Schmidt, M.; Nava, B.; Coïson, P.; Radicella, S.

    There are today a variety of approaches for processing dual-frequency GPS observations and to produce global ionospheric maps of TEC. The majority of these researches use ground-based GPS observations from the worldwide tracking network of the International GPS Service. While ground-based ionospheric maps represent a big advance for ionosphere weather, the radial geometry of the ground-based observations limits their capability for providing information on the vertical electron distribution. This limitation can be removed by the introduction of horizontal cuts through the ionosphere, affordable by space-born GPS receivers flying on low-Earth orbiting satellites (e.g. GPS-Met, CHAMP, GRACE, SAC-C). Several empirical models are currently used to describe the electron density distribution in the ionosphere. Among them, the NeQuick model is being used by the ESA EGNOS project for assessment analysis and has been proposed for single-frequency operation in the Galileo project. NeQuick is mostly droved by the two parameters NmF2 and hmF2, whose values are usually computed as function of position and time, using the CCIR climatologic database. Since the CCIR provides monthly averaged values, so significant day-to-day deviations between the actual and predicted TEC can be expected. Therefore, it seems suitable to determine appropriate corrections for the CCIR values in order to better fit the observed TEC. In this contribution we present a non-tomographic method for 3-D imaging of the global electron density distribution that uses the NeQuick model and two-dimensional spherical wavelet expansions for representing the spatial variability of the driving parameters of NeQuick. The coefficients of the wavelet series are computable from TEC observations using parameter estimation methods.

  12. Examination of Scanning Electron Microscope and Computed Tomography Images of PICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Shklover, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Micrographs of PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D images taken with a Computed Tomography (CT) system are examined. PICA is a carbon fiber based composite (Fiberform ) with a phenolic polymer matrix. The micrographs are taken at different surface depths and at different magnifications in a sample after arc jet testing and show different levels of oxidative removal of the charred matrix (Figs 1 though 13). CT scans, courtesy of Xradia, Inc. of Concord CA, were captured for samples of virgin PICA, charred PICA and raw Fiberform (Fig. 14). We use these images to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of these materials using correlation function (CF) methods. CF methods give a mathematical description of how one material is embedded in another and is thus ideally suited for modeling composites like PICA. We will evaluate how the TC of the materials changes as a function of surface depth. This work is in collaboration with ETH-Zurich, which has expertise in high temperature materials and TC modeling (including CF methods).

  13. Atomic modeling of cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions--joint refinement of model and imaging parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Michael S; Trzynka, Andrew; Chapman, Brynmor K

    2013-04-01

    When refining the fit of component atomic structures into electron microscopic reconstructions, use of a resolution-dependent atomic density function makes it possible to jointly optimize the atomic model and imaging parameters of the microscope. Atomic density is calculated by one-dimensional Fourier transform of atomic form factors convoluted with a microscope envelope correction and a low-pass filter, allowing refinement of imaging parameters such as resolution, by optimizing the agreement of calculated and experimental maps. A similar approach allows refinement of atomic displacement parameters, providing indications of molecular flexibility even at low resolution. A modest improvement in atomic coordinates is possible following optimization of these additional parameters. Methods have been implemented in a Python program that can be used in stand-alone mode for rigid-group refinement, or embedded in other optimizers for flexible refinement with stereochemical restraints. The approach is demonstrated with refinements of virus and chaperonin structures at resolutions of 9 through 4.5 Å, representing regimes where rigid-group and fully flexible parameterizations are appropriate. Through comparisons to known crystal structures, flexible fitting by RSRef is shown to be an improvement relative to other methods and to generate models with all-atom rms accuracies of 1.5-2.5 Å at resolutions of 4.5-6 Å. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensor fusion of electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetorelaxometry data for quantitative magnetic nanoparticle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coene, A.; Leliaert, J.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetorelaxometry (MRX) imaging and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) are two non-invasive techniques capable of recovering the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) distribution. Both techniques solve an ill-posed inverse problem in order to find the spatial MNP distribution. A lot of research has been done on increasing the stability of these inverse problems with the main objective to improve the quality of MNP imaging. In this paper a proof of concept is presented in which the sensor data of both techniques is fused into EPR-MRX, with the intention to stabilize the inverse problem. First, both techniques are compared by reconstructing several phantoms with different sizes for various noise levels and calculating stability, sensitivity and reconstruction quality parameters for these cases. This study reveals that both techniques are sensitive to different information from the MNP distributions and generate complementary measurement data. As such, their merging might stabilize the inverse problem. In a next step we investigated how both techniques need to be combined to reduce their respective drawbacks, such as a high number of required measurements and reduced stability, and to improve MNP reconstructions. We were able to stabilize both techniques, increase reconstruction quality by an average of 5% and reduce measurement times by 88%. These improvements could make EPR-MRX a valuable and accurate technique in a clinical environment.

  15. Digital electronics for 256 anode Hamamatsu H9500 PSPMT arrays in full-volume Compton imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. T.; Grudberg, P. M.; Warburton, W. K.

    2014-07-01

    Ziock et al.'s [1] recent Monte Carlo study of a proposed ``full-volume'' Compton Imaging Camera concluded that simultaneously locating a Compton scatter event's multiple interaction points within a single large scintillator crystal might be possible at 1 mm spatial resolution using a coded aperture mask sandwiched between two light guides and coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier (PSPMT) to record the output light pattern. The method promises high efficiency at a relatively low cost. They are currently developing a lower resolution prototype using a large cubic scintillator (25.4 cm/side) whose masked face will be tiled with 25 Hamamatsu H9500 PSPMTs (6,400 outputs). XIA has contracted to develop and produce the readout electronics, which present several significant design challenges, including capturing all 6,400 anode outputs individually, with single photon sensitivity, in a compact format that will fit behind the tiled PSPMTs. 10,000 event/sec operation is desired, as is a cost of less than about 50/channel. In our approach, each PSPMT front end integrates the 256 anode signals and 8-1 multiplexes them to 32 differential outputs that are digitized in a PXI card using 4 octal 50 MHz ADCs. The multiplexers run at 8 MHz, sampling each anode at 1 MHz, which becomes the image frame rate. The ADC signals are demultiplexed and digitally filtered to extract the number of photons in each pixel in the full 2-D image. The design has been completed and built and is undergoing evaluation tests at the single PSPMT level.

  16. Transmission dosimetry with a liquid-filled electronic portal imaging device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boellaard, R.; Van Herk, M.; Mijnheer, B.J. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    The aim of transmission dosimetry is to correlate transmission dose values with patient dose values. A liquid-filled electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed. After determination of the dose response relationship, i.e. the relation between pixel value and dose rate, for clinical situations it was found that the EPID is applicable for two-dimensional dosimetry with an accuracy of about 1%. The aim of this study was to investigate transmission dose distributions at different phantom-detector distances to predict exit dose distributions from transmission dose images. An extensive set of transmission dose measurements below homogeneous phantoms were performed with the EPID. The influence of several parameters such as field size, phantom thickness, phantom-detector distance and phantom-source distance on the transmission dose and its distribution were investigated. The two-dimensional transmission dose images were separated into two components: a primary dose and a scattered dose distribution. It was found that the scattered dose is maximal at a phantom thickness of about 10 cm. The scattered dose distribution below a homogeneous phantom has a Gaussian shape. The width of the Gaussian is small at small phantom-detector distances and increases for larger phantom-detector distances. The dependence of the scattered dose distribution on the field size at various phantom-detector distances has been used to estimate the dose distribution at the exit site of the phantom. More work is underway to determine the exit dose distributions for clinical situations, including the presence of inhomogeneities.

  17. Imaging many-body Coulomb interactions and ultrafast photoionization and diffraction with cold atom electron and ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Robert; Speirs, Rory; Murphy, Dene; Torrance, Joshua; Thompson, Daniel; Sparkes, Benjamin; McCulloch, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The CAEIS cold-atom electron/ion source, based on photoionisation of laser cooled atoms, provides a powerful tool for investigating fundamental physical processes. The very low temperature of the ions has allowed us to image intra-beam Coulomb effects with unprecedented detail. With ultrafast laser excitation and streak detection we can probe competing ionization processes, particularly via Rydberg states, including sequential excitation, multiphoton excitation, resonance-enhanced multiphoton excitation and two-color multiphoton excitation. Knowledge from these studies has enabled ultrafast single-shot diffractive electron imaging with atomic resolution using a CAEIS.

  18. Dislocation imaging for orthopyroxene using an atom-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Akihito; Kogure, Toshihiro; Raimbourg, Hugues; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-11-01

    Dislocations, one-dimensional lattice defects, appear as a microscopic phenomenon while they are formed in silicate minerals by macroscopic dynamics of the earth crust such as shear stress. To understand ductile deformation mechanisms of silicates, atomic structures of the dislocations have been examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Among them, it has been proposed that {100} primary slip system of orthopyroxene (Opx) is dissociated into partial dislocations, and a stacking fault with the clinopyroxene (Cpx) structure is formed between the dislocations. This model, however, has not been determined completely due to the complex structures of silicates. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has a potential to determine the structure of dislocations with single-atomic column sensitivity, particularly by using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) and annular bright field (ABF) imaging with a probing aberration corrector.[1] Furthermore, successive analyses from light microscopy to atom-resolved STEM have been achieved by focused ion beam (FIB) sampling techniques.[2] In this study, we examined dislocation arrays at a low-angle grain boundary of ∼1° rotation about the b-axis in natural deformed Opx using a simultaneous acquisition of HAADF/ABF (JEM-ARM200F, JEOL) equipped with 100 mm2 silicon drift detector (SDD) for energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Figure 1 shows averaged STEM images viewed along the b- axis of Opx extracted from repeating units. HAADF provides the cation-site arrangement, and ABF distinguishes the difference of slightly rotated SiO4 tetrahedron around the a- axis. This is useful to distinguish the change of stacking sequence between the partial dislocations. Two types of stacking faults with Cpx and protopyroxene (Ppx) structures were identified between three partial dislocations. Furthermore, Ca accumulation in M2 (Fe) site around the stacking faults was detected by STEM-EDS. Interestingly, Ca is

  19. Validation of an electronic image reader training programme for interpretation of [18F]flutemetamol β-amyloid PET brain images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christopher J; Sherwin, Paul F; Smith, Adrian P L; Wolber, Jan; Weick, Sharon M; Brooks, David J

    2017-03-01

    An electronic training programme (ETP) was developed for interpretation of images during routine clinical use of the PET amyloid imaging agent [F]flutemetamol injection (VIZAMYL). This study was carried out to validate the ETP. Five nuclear medicine technologists (NMTs) and five readers previously inexperienced in amyloid image interpretation were required to self-train using the ETP and pass a test to participate. A total of 305 [F]flutemetamol PET images were then tested as the validation set, following preassessment and reorientation (where required) by one of five NMTs. Next, a new set of readers blinded to clinical information independently assessed all 305 images. Images had been acquired in previous studies from patients representing the full spectrum of cognitive capacity. When available, a standard of truth determined by histopathology or clinical history was used to derive sensitivity and specificity for image interpretation from this validation set. Randomly selected images (n=29) were read in duplicate to measure intrareader reproducibility. Images were read first without, and subsequently with anatomic images, if available. All NMTs and all readers scored 100% on the qualifying test. The interpretation of 135 cases without anatomic image support resulted in sensitivity ranging from 84% to 94% (majority 94%, median 92%) and specificity ranging from 77% to 96% (majority 92%, median 81%). Inter-reader agreement was very high, with most κ scores more than 0.8. Intrareader reproducibility ranged from 93 to 100%. The self-guided ETP effectively trained new amyloid PET image readers to accurately and reproducibly interpret [F]flutemetamol PET images.

  20. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high resolution electron imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step towards the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:21919532

  1. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high-resolution electron imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A; Craighead, Harold G

    2011-10-12

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high-resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step toward the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information.

  2. Electron spin resonance microscopic imaging of oxygen concentration in cancer spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Mada; Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Neufeld, Gera; Neeman, Michal; Blank, Aharon

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen (O2) plays a central role in most living organisms. The concentration of O2 is important in physiology and pathology. Despite the importance of accurate knowledge of the O2 levels, there is very limited capability to measure with high spatial resolution its distribution in millimeter-scale live biological samples. Many of the current oximetric methods, such as oxygen microelectrodes and fluorescence lifetime imaging, are compromised by O2 consumption, sample destruction, invasiveness, and difficulty to calibrate. Here, we present a new method, based on the use of the pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) microimaging technique to obtain a 3D mapping of oxygen concentration in millimeter-scale biological samples. ESR imaging requires the incorporation of a suitable stable and inert paramagnetic spin probe into the desirable object. In this work, we use microcrystals of a paramagnetic spin probe in a new crystallographic packing form (denoted tg-LiNc-BuO). These paramagnetic species interact with paramagnetic oxygen molecules, causing a spectral line broadening that is linearly proportional to the oxygen concentration. Typical ESR results include 4D spatial-spectral images that give an indication about the oxygen concentration in different regions of the sample. This new oximetry microimaging method addresses all the problems mentioned above. It is noninvasive, sensitive to physiological oxygen levels, and easy to calibrate. Furthermore, in principle, it can be used for repetitive measurements without causing cell damage. The tissue model used in this research is spheroids of Human Colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT-116) with a typical diameter of ∼600 μm. Most studies of the microenvironmental O2 conditions inside such viable spheroids carried out in the past used microelectrodes, which require an invasive puncturing of the spheroid and are also not applicable to 3D O2 imaging. High resolution 3D oxygen maps could make it possible to evaluate the

  3. Characterization of Amorphous Oxide Nano-Thick Layers on 316L Stainless Steel by Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging and Electron Backscatter Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorri, Mahrokh; Turgeon, Stéphane; Brodusch, Nicolas; Cloutier, Maxime; Chevallier, Pascale; Gauvin, Raynald; Mantovani, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Characterization of the topmost surface of biomaterials is crucial to understanding their properties and interactions with the local environment. In this study, the oxide layer microstructure of plasma-modified 316L stainless steel (SS316L) samples was analyzed by a combination of electron backscatter diffraction and electron channeling contrast imaging using low-energy incident electrons. Both techniques allowed clear identification of a nano-thick amorphous oxide layer, on top of the polycrystalline substrate, for the plasma-modified samples. A methodology was developed using Monte Carlo simulations combined with the experimental results to estimate thickness of the amorphous layer for different surface conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiles were used to validate these estimations.

  4. Robust Estimation of Electron Density From Anatomic Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain Using a Unifying Multi-Atlas Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Shangjie [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Process Measurement and Control, School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States); Hara, Wendy; Wang, Lei; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States); Li, Ruijiang, E-mail: rli2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a reliable method to estimate electron density based on anatomic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Methods and Materials: We proposed a unifying multi-atlas approach for electron density estimation based on standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. First, a composite atlas was constructed through a voxelwise matching process using multiple atlases, with the goal of mitigating effects of inherent anatomic variations between patients. Next we computed for each voxel 2 kinds of conditional probabilities: (1) electron density given its image intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR images; and (2) electron density given its spatial location in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration. These were combined into a unifying posterior probability density function using the Bayesian formalism, which provided the optimal estimates for electron density. We evaluated the method on 10 patients using leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for detecting different tissue types were performed. Results: The proposed method significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute Hounsfield unit error of 119, compared with 140 and 144 (P<.0001) using conventional T1-weighted intensity and geometry-based approaches, respectively. For detection of bony anatomy, the proposed method achieved an 89% area under the curve, 86% sensitivity, 88% specificity, and 90% accuracy, which improved upon intensity and geometry-based approaches (area under the curve: 79% and 80%, respectively). Conclusion: The proposed multi-atlas approach provides robust electron density estimation and bone detection based on anatomic MRI. If validated on a larger population, our work could enable the use of MRI as a primary modality for radiation treatment planning.

  5. Whole-cell imaging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-voltage scanning transmission electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: kazum@nips.ac.jp [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru [Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Arai, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Tanaka, Nobuo [Ecotopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Electron tomography using a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) provides three-dimensional information about cellular components in sections thicker than 1 μm, although in bright-field mode image degradation caused by multiple inelastic scattering of transmitted electrons limit the attainable resolution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is believed to give enhanced contrast and resolution compared to conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Samples up to 1 μm in thickness have been analyzed with an intermediate-voltage electron microscope because inelastic scattering is not a critical limitation, and probe broadening can be minimized. Here, we employed STEM at 1 MeV high-voltage to extend the useful specimen thickness for electron tomography, which we demonstrate by a seamless tomographic reconstruction of a whole, budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell, which is ∼3 μm in thickness. High-voltage STEM tomography, especially in the bright-field mode, demonstrated sufficiently enhanced contrast and intensity, compared to CTEM tomography, to permit segmentation of major organelles in the whole cell. STEM imaging also reduced specimen shrinkage during tilt-series acquisition. The fidelity of structural preservation was limited by cytoplasmic extraction, and the spatial resolution was limited by the relatively large convergence angle of the scanning probe. However, the new technique has potential to solve longstanding problems of image blurring in biological specimens beyond 1 μm in thickness, and may facilitate new research in cellular structural biology. - Highlights: • High voltage TEM and STEM tomography were compared to visualize whole yeast cells. • 1-MeV STEM-BF tomography had significant improvements in image contrast and SNR. • 1-MeV STEM tomography showed less specimen shrinkage than the TEM tomography. • KMnO{sub 4} post-treatment permitted segmenting the major cellular components.

  6. DFT quantum chemical studies of (E)-4-Bromo- N-(2-chlorobenzylidene)-aniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evecen, Meryem; Tanak, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    The molecular geometry and electronic properties of the Schiff base compound (E)-4-Bromo- N-(2-chlorobenzylidene)-aniline in the ground state have been investigated using the density functional theory method (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d) basis set. Besides, important nonlinear properties such as the electric dipole moment ( μ), polarizability ( α) and the first hyperpolarizability ( β) values of the compound were computed using B3LYP quantum chemical calculation. The first hyperpolarizability of the molecule shows that this compound can be a good candidate as nonlinear optical material. The atomic charges and frontier molecular orbital energies were also performed. In addition to that, the molecular electrostatic potential has been mapped primarily and the intramolecular contacts have been interpreted using natural bond orbital analysis.

  7. Imaging complement by phase-plate cryo-electron tomography from initiation to pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Thomas H; Faas, Frank G A; Koster, Abraham J; Gros, Piet

    2017-02-01

    Phase plates in cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) improve contrast, increasing the ability to discern separate molecules and molecular complexes in dense biomolecular environments. Here, we applied this new technology to the activation of the human complement system. Binding of C1 to antigen-antibody complexes initiates a cascade of proteolytic events that deposits molecules onto adjacent surfaces and terminates with the formation of membrane-attack-complex (MAC) pores in the targeted membranes. We imaged steps in this process using a Volta phase plate mounted on a Titan Krios equipped with a Falcon-II direct electron detector. The data show patches of single-layer antibodies on the surface and C1 bound to antibody platforms, with ca. ∼4% of instances where C1r and C1s proteases have dissociated from C1, and potentially instances of C1 transiently interacting with its substrate C4 or product C4b. Next, extensive deposition of C4b and C3b molecules is apparent, although individual molecules cannot always be properly distinguished with the current methods. Observations of MAC pores include formation of both single and composite pores, and instances of potential soluble-MAC dissociation upon failure of membrane insertion. Overall, application of the Volta phase plate cryoET markedly improved the contrast in the tomograms, which allowed for individual components to be more readily interpreted. However, variability in the phase shift induced by the phase-plate during the course of an experiment, together with incomplete sampling during tomogram acquisition, limited the interpretability of the resulting tomograms. Our studies exemplify the potential in studying molecular processes with complex spatial topologies by phase-plate cryoET. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Electron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  9. Electron Cryo-Tomography of Vitreous Cryo-Sections : Towards Imaging Biological Nanomachines in their Cellular Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierson, J.

    2011-01-01

    The field of biological electron microcopy (EM) has evolved into a reliable imaging technique for examining the ultrastructure of cells and their constituents at molecular, and, in some cases, atomic1, 2 resolution. Conventional EM techniques are being overshadowed by cryo-techniques, which ensure a

  10. Overview of 3-year experience with large-scale electronic portal imaging device-based 3-dimensional transit dosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijnheer, Ben J.; González, Patrick; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Rozendaal, Roel A.; van Herk, Marcel; Mans, Anton

    2015-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based 3-dimensional (3D) transit dosimetry in a radiation therapy department by analyzing a large set of dose verification results. In our institution, routine in vivo dose verification of all treatments is performed by means of 3D

  11. A method for geometrical verification of dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy using a scanning electronic portal imaging device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, Lennert S.; Smitsmans, Monique H. P.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A.; van Herk, Marcel

    2002-01-01

    In order to guarantee the safe delivery of dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), verification of the leaf trajectories during the treatment is necessary. Our aim in this study is to develop a method for on-line verification of leaf trajectories using an electronic portal imaging device

  12. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G.T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage

  13. The use of an electronic portal imaging device for exit dosimetry and quality control measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, M C; Williams, P C

    1995-02-01

    To determine ways in which electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) could be used to (a) measure exit doses for external beam radiotherapy and (b) perform quality control checks on linear accelerators. When imaging, our fluoroscopic EPID adjusts the gain, offset, and frame acquisition time of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera automatically, to allow for the range of photon transmissions through the patient, and to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio. However, our EPID can be programmed to act as an integrating dosemeter. EPID dosemeter measurements were made for 20 MV photons, for different field sizes and thicknesses of unit density phantom material placed at varying exit surface to detector distances. These were compared with simultaneous Silicon diode exit dose measurements. Our exit dosimetry technique was verified using an anthropomorphic type phantom, and some initial measurements have been made for patients treated with irregularly shaped 20 MV x-ray fields. In this dosimetry mode, our EPID was also used to measure certain quality control parameters, x-ray field flatness, and the verification of segmented intensity modulated field prescriptions. Configured for dosimetry, our EPID exhibited a highly linear response, capable of resolving individual monitor units. Exit doses could be measured to within about 3% of that measured using Silicon diodes. Field flatness was determined to within 1.5% of Farmer dosemeter measurements. Segmented intensity modulated fields can be easily verified. Our EPID has the versatility to assess a range of parameters pertinent to the delivery of high quality, high precision radiotherapy. When configured appropriately, it can measure exit doses in vivo, with reasonable accuracy, perform certain quick quality control checks, and analyze segmented intensity modulated treatment fields.

  14. Imaging and elemental mapping of biological specimens with a dual-EDS dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.S.; Kim, A. M.; Bleher, R.; Myers, B.D.; Marvin, R. G.; Inada, H.; Nakamura, K.; Zhang, X.F.; Roth, E.; Li, S.Y.; Woodruff, T. K.; O'Halloran, T. V.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated analytical scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with dual energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detectors has been designed for complementary high performance imaging as well as high sensitivity elemental analysis and mapping of biological structures. The performance of this new design, based on a Hitachi HD-2300A model, was evaluated using a variety of biological specimens. With three imaging detectors, both the surface and internal structure of cells can be examined simultaneously. The whole-cell elemental mapping, especially of heavier metal species that have low cross-section for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), can be faithfully obtained. Optimization of STEM imaging conditions is applied to thick sections as well as thin sections of biological cells under low-dose conditions at room- and cryogenic temperatures. Such multimodal capabilities applied to soft/biological structures usher a new era for analytical studies in biological systems. PMID:23500508

  15. Synthesis of (E-2,4-Dinitro-N-((2E,4E-4-phenyl-5-(pyrrolidin-1-ylpenta-2,4-dienylideneaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Fesanghari

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available (E-2,4-Dinitro-N-((2E,4E-4-phenyl-5-(pyrrolidin-1-ylpenta-2,4-dienylidene aniline dye was prepared in one pot by reaction of premade N-2,4-dinitrophenyl-3-phenylpyridinium chloride (DNPPC and pyrrolidine in absolute MeOH.

  16. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1E4XH-2ATKA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1E4LB-2RGMA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1E4LB-2RGMB [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1E4LA-2RGMB [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. Observations of the spatial structure of electron precipitation pulsations using an imaging riometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Senior

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron precipitation can be modulated by geomagnetic pulsation activity. This can be observed as pulsation of cosmic noise absorption as measured by riometers. Observations of such pulsations exhibiting field-line resonance and particle-driven characteristics using an imaging riometer are presented and the capability of the instrument to map their spatial structure is demonstrated. It is shown that for the events studied, the spatial variation of pulsation phase as measured by the riometer agrees with that inferred from ground-based magnetometers, whereas the spatial variation of pulsation amplitude may show a different structure. It is suggested that this is consistent with the mechanism proposed by Coroniti and Kennel (1970 where one would expect a fixed phase relationship between magnetic and absorption pulsations, but where the amplitude of the absorption pulsation can depend on several factors other than the amplitude of the magnetic pulsation.Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere–magnetosphere interactions; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  1. Observations of the spatial structure of electron precipitation pulsations using an imaging riometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Senior

    Full Text Available Electron precipitation can be modulated by geomagnetic pulsation activity. This can be observed as pulsation of cosmic noise absorption as measured by riometers. Observations of such pulsations exhibiting field-line resonance and particle-driven characteristics using an imaging riometer are presented and the capability of the instrument to map their spatial structure is demonstrated. It is shown that for the events studied, the spatial variation of pulsation phase as measured by the riometer agrees with that inferred from ground-based magnetometers, whereas the spatial variation of pulsation amplitude may show a different structure. It is suggested that this is consistent with the mechanism proposed by Coroniti and Kennel (1970 where one would expect a fixed phase relationship between magnetic and absorption pulsations, but where the amplitude of the absorption pulsation can depend on several factors other than the amplitude of the magnetic pulsation.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere–magnetosphere interactions; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  2. Imaging Few-Electron Double Quantum Dots in InAs/InP Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trodahl, Halvar J.; Boyd, Erin E.; Bleszynski, Ania; Westervelt, R. M.; Froberg, Linus E.; Samuelson, Lars

    2007-03-01

    InAs quantum dots formed in InAs/InP nanowire heterostructures are attractive candidates for nanoelectronics, spintronics and quantum information processing. Tunnel-coupled double InAs dots defined by InP barriers can be grown using chemical beam epitaxy; each dot can be small enough to hold just a few electrons. It is difficult to lithographically define gates small enough to individually address each dot. With use of a liquid-He cooled scanning probe microscope (SPM), the Coulomb blockade conductance of a single InAs quantum dot in an InAs/InP nanowire has been imaged, using the SPM tip as a movable gate [1]. This approach can individually tune the charge on each InAs dot in an InAs/InP nanowire. We plan to use this technique to investigate tunnel-coupled InAs double dots. [1] A. Bleszynski et al., 28th Int. Conf. on the Physics of Semiconductors, 2006.

  3. Complementarity in the Supramolecular Design of Arenaviruses and Retroviruses Revealed by Electron Cryomicroscopy and Image Analysis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Benjamin W.; Adair, Brian D.; Burns, John W.; Milligan, Ronald A.; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Yeager, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Arenaviruses are rodent-borne agents of diseases, including potentially lethal human hemorrhagic fevers. These enveloped viruses encapsidate a bisegmented ambisense single-stranded RNA genome that can be packaged in variable copy number. Electron cryomicroscopy and image analysis of New World Pichinde and Tacaribe arenaviruses and Old World lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus revealed pleomorphic enveloped particles ranging in diameter from ∼400 to ∼2,000 Å. The surface spikes were spaced ∼100 Å apart and extended ∼90 Å from the maximum phospholipid headgroup density of the outer bilayer leaflet. Distinctive stalk and head regions extended radially ∼30 and ∼60 Å from the outer bilayer leaflet, respectively. Two interior layers of density apposed to the inner leaflet of the viral lipid bilayer were assigned as protein Z and nucleoprotein (NP) molecules on the basis of their appearance, spacing, and projected volume. Analysis of en face views of virions lacking the GP-C spikes showed reflections consistent with paracrystalline packing of the NP molecules in a lattice with edges of ∼57 and ∼74 Å. The structural proteins of retroviruses and arenaviruses assemble with similar radial density distributions, using common cellular components. PMID:15731275

  4. Complementarity in the supramolecular design of arenaviruses and retroviruses revealed by electron cryomicroscopy and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Benjamin W; Adair, Brian D; Burns, John W; Milligan, Ronald A; Buchmeier, Michael J; Yeager, Mark

    2005-03-01

    Arenaviruses are rodent-borne agents of diseases, including potentially lethal human hemorrhagic fevers. These enveloped viruses encapsidate a bisegmented ambisense single-stranded RNA genome that can be packaged in variable copy number. Electron cryomicroscopy and image analysis of New World Pichinde and Tacaribe arenaviruses and Old World lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus revealed pleomorphic enveloped particles ranging in diameter from approximately 400 to approximately 2,000 A. The surface spikes were spaced approximately 100 A apart and extended approximately 90 A from the maximum phospholipid headgroup density of the outer bilayer leaflet. Distinctive stalk and head regions extended radially approximately 30 and approximately 60 A from the outer bilayer leaflet, respectively. Two interior layers of density apposed to the inner leaflet of the viral lipid bilayer were assigned as protein Z and nucleoprotein (NP) molecules on the basis of their appearance, spacing, and projected volume. Analysis of en face views of virions lacking the GP-C spikes showed reflections consistent with paracrystalline packing of the NP molecules in a lattice with edges of approximately 57 and approximately 74 A. The structural proteins of retroviruses and arenaviruses assemble with similar radial density distributions, using common cellular components.

  5. Atom Resolved Electron Microscpe Images of Polyvinylidene Fluoride Nanofibers for Water Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suqi; Reneker, Darrell

    Ultra-thin nanofibers of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), observed with an aberration corrected transmission electron microscope, in a through focus series of 50 images, revealed three-dimensional positions and motions of some molecular segments. The x,y positions of fluorine atoms in the PVDF segments were observed at high resolution as described in (DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01619c). The methods described in (DOI:10.1038/nature11074) were used to measure the positions of fluorine atoms along the observation direction of the microscope. PVDF is widely used to separate salt ions from water in reverse osmosis systems. The observed separation depends on the atomic scale positions and motions of segments of the PVDF molecules. Conformational changes and the associated changes in the directions of the dipole moments of PVDF segments distinguish the diffusion of dipolar water molecules from diffusion of salt ions to accomplish desalination. Authors thank Coalescence Filtration Nanofibers Consortium at The University of Akron for support.

  6. Characterization of the nanomorphology of polymer-silica colloidal nanocomposites using electron spectroscopy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalvy, J I; Percy, M J; Armes, S P; Leite, C A P; Galembeck, F

    2005-02-15

    The internal nanomorphologies of two types of vinyl polymer-silica colloidal nanocomposites were assessed using electron spectroscopy imaging (ESI). This technique enables the spatial location and concentration of the ultrafine silica sol within the nanocomposite particles to be determined. The ESI data confirmed that the ultrafine silica sol was distributed uniformly throughout the poly(4-vinylpyridine)/silica nanocomposite particles, which is consistent with the "currant bun" morphology previously used to describe this system. In contrast, the polystyrene/silica particles had a pronounced "core-shell" morphology, with the silica sol forming a well-defined monolayer surrounding the nanocomposite cores. Thus these ESI results provide direct verification of the two types of nanocomposite morphologies that were previously only inferred on the basis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and aqueous electrophoresis studies. Moreover, ESI also allows the unambiguous identification of a minor population of polystyrene/silica nanocomposite particles that are not encapsulated by silica shells. The existence of this second morphology was hitherto unsuspected, but it is understandable given the conditions employed to synthesize these nanocomposites. It appears that ESI is a powerful technique for the characterization of colloidal nanocomposite particles.

  7. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope : All-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Schelen, B.; Schouten, R.

    2012-01-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device

  8. Dark-field image contrast in transmission scanning electron microscopy: Effects of substrate thickness and detector collection angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehl, Taylor, E-mail: tjwoehl@umd.edu; Keller, Robert

    2016-12-15

    An annular dark field (ADF) detector was placed beneath a specimen in a field emission scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV to calibrate detector response to incident beam current, and to create transmission images of gold nanoparticles on silicon nitride (SiN) substrates of various thicknesses. Based on the linear response of the ADF detector diodes to beam current, we developed a method that allowed for direct determination of the percentage of that beam current forward scattered to the ADF detector from the sample, i.e. the transmitted electron (TE) yield. Collection angles for the ADF detector region were defined using a masking aperture above the detector and were systematically varied by changing the sample to detector distance. We found the contrast of the nanoparticles, relative to the SiN substrate, decreased monotonically with decreasing inner exclusion angle and increasing substrate thickness. We also performed Monte Carlo electron scattering simulations, which showed quantitative agreement with experimental contrast associated with the nanoparticles. Together, the experiments and Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the decrease in contrast with decreasing inner exclusion angle was due to a rapid increase in the TE yield of the low atomic number substrate. Nanoparticles imaged at low inner exclusion angles (<150 mrad) and on thick substrates (>50 nm) showed low image contrast in their centers surrounded by a bright high-contrast halo on their edges. This complex image contrast was predicted by Monte Carlo simulations, which we interpreted in terms of mixing of the nominally bright field (BF) and ADF electron signals. Our systematic investigation of inner exclusion angle and substrate thickness effects on ADF t-SEM imaging provides fundamental understanding of the contrast mechanisms for image formation, which in turn suggest practical limitations and optimal imaging conditions for different substrate thicknesses. - Highlights: • Developed a

  9. Atomic resolution imaging of YAlO{sub 3}: Ce in the chromatic and spherical aberration corrected PICO electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Lei [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Jia, Chun-Lin [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Urban, Knut W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • First time resolution of 57 pm atom separations by HRTEM with 200 keV electrons. • Quantification of the image spread by absolute matching of experiment and simulation. • An information limit of 52 pm is deduced from the determined image spread. • Substantial deviations from the bulk structure are observed for the ultra-thin sample. - Abstract: The application of combined chromatic and spherical aberration correction in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy enables a significant improvement of the spatial resolution down to 50 pm. We demonstrate that such a resolution can be achieved in practice at 200 kV. Diffractograms of images of gold nanoparticles on amorphous carbon demonstrate corresponding information transfer. The Y atom pairs in [010] oriented yttrium orthoaluminate are successfully imaged together with the Al and the O atoms. Although the 57 pm pair separation is well demonstrated separations between 55 pm and 80 pm are measured. This observation is tentatively attributed to structural relaxations and surface reconstruction in the very thin samples used. Quantification of the resolution limiting effective image spread is achieved based on an absolute match between experimental and simulated image intensity distributions.

  10. 76 FR 33660 - Airworthiness Directives; Austro Engine GmbH Model E4 Diesel Piston Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... Model E4 Diesel Piston Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... 2010-23-09, Amendment 39-16498 (75 FR 68179, November 5, 2010), for Austro Engine GmbH model E4 diesel... 2011-0039, dated March 8, 2011, adding a terminating action on Austro Engine GmbH model E4 diesel...

  11. Molecular imaging by optically-detected electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancies in nanodiamond

    CERN Document Server

    Hegyi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demo...

  12. Molecular imaging by optically-detected electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancies in nanodiamond

    OpenAIRE

    Hegyi, Alex; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging mo...

  13. 2D hybrid analysis: Approach for building three-dimensional atomic model by electron microscopy image matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Takagi, Junichi; Iwasaki, Kenji

    2017-03-23

    In this study, we develop an approach termed "2D hybrid analysis" for building atomic models by image matching from electron microscopy (EM) images of biological molecules. The key advantage is that it is applicable to flexible molecules, which are difficult to analyze by 3DEM approach. In the proposed approach, first, a lot of atomic models with different conformations are built by computer simulation. Then, simulated EM images are built from each atomic model. Finally, they are compared with the experimental EM image. Two kinds of models are used as simulated EM images: the negative stain model and the simple projection model. Although the former is more realistic, the latter is adopted to perform faster computations. The use of the negative stain model enables decomposition of the averaged EM images into multiple projection images, each of which originated from a different conformation or orientation. We apply this approach to the EM images of integrin to obtain the distribution of the conformations, from which the pathway of the conformational change of the protein is deduced.

  14. Electron Bio-Imaging Centre (eBIC): the UK national research facility for biological electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Daniel K; Siebert, C Alistair; Hecksel, Corey; Hagen, Christoph; Mordhorst, Valerie; Grange, Michael; Ashton, Alun W; Walsh, Martin A; Grünewald, Kay; Saibil, Helen R; Stuart, David I; Zhang, Peijun

    2017-06-01

    The recent resolution revolution in cryo-EM has led to a massive increase in demand for both time on high-end cryo-electron microscopes and access to cryo-electron microscopy expertise. In anticipation of this demand, eBIC was set up at Diamond Light Source in collaboration with Birkbeck College London and the University of Oxford, and funded by the Wellcome Trust, the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) to provide access to high-end equipment through peer review. eBIC is currently in its start-up phase and began by offering time on a single FEI Titan Krios microscope equipped with the latest generation of direct electron detectors from two manufacturers. Here, the current status and modes of access for potential users of eBIC are outlined. In the first year of operation, 222 d of microscope time were delivered to external research groups, with 95 visits in total, of which 53 were from unique groups. The data collected have generated multiple high- to intermediate-resolution structures (2.8-8 Å), ten of which have been published. A second Krios microscope is now in operation, with two more due to come online in 2017. In the next phase of growth of eBIC, in addition to more microscope time, new data-collection strategies and sample-preparation techniques will be made available to external user groups. Finally, all raw data are archived, and a metadata catalogue and automated pipelines for data analysis are being developed.

  15. Phenomena of non-thermal electrons from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu 610200, Sichuan (China); Huang, D.W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lee, S.G.; Shi, Y.J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Tong, R.H.; Wang, S.Y.; Wei, Y.N.; Ma, T.K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Some lines from X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) can be enhanced by non-thermal electrons, such as q, r satellite lines and z lines. • Analyze the non-thermal phenomena can reduce the error of electron temperature deduced from the intensity ratio of different lines of the He-like argon spectra from XICS. • XICS can be a tool to measure the non-thermal phenomena from these enhanced lines. - Abstract: A high spectra resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on J-TEXT Tokamak for the measurements of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. The wavelength range of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon is from 3.9494 Å to 3.9944 Å that includes the resonance line w, intercombination lines x and y, forbidden line z and numerous satellite lines, referenced using standard Gabriel notation. In low-density discharge, the intensity of q, r satellite lines and z lines can be significantly enhanced by non-thermal electrons. Non-thermal electrons are produced due to the low plasma density. The high hard X-ray flux from NaI detector and significant downshift electron cyclotron emissions from energetic runaway electrons also indicated that there is a large population of runaway electrons in the low-density discharge. The non-thermal part of electrons can affect the excitation/transition equilibrium or ionization/recombination equilibrium. The q line is mainly produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon, and the r line is partially produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon and dielectronic recombination of helium-like argon.

  16. Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI) and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Study of Forsterite Olivine Deformed in the D-DIA Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboli, S.; Burnley, P. C.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the rheology of Earth's interior requires a detailed study of microstructure and crystallographic texture on a micro- and nanoscale. Quantitative microstructure characterization of geological materials is commonly performed on thin foils using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The main drawbacks of TEM include time consuming and destructive thin foil preparation, limited field of view and statistically unreliable results in the case of heterogeneous microstructures which are common in geological materials. Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is a complementary technique to electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for quantitative microstructure characterization of bulk samples in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The main application of ECCI is in characterization of deformed materials since it allows the warping of the lattice to be imaged based on the electron channeling contrast. In comparison to TEM, the main advantages of using ECCI in SEM include non-destructive bulk sample preparation and statistically reliable results from a large field of view. In this study, in-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction deformation experiments were conducted on forsterite olivine at a variety of pressures (2-7 GPa) in the D-DIA apparatus. A suitable sample preparation procedure was established using vibratory polishing in conjunction with chemical etching prior to performing ECCI in SEM. ECCI was performed at 5 keV electron beam energy and 8 mm working distance in a JEOL JSM-6700 FE-SEM. The work hardening of forsterite olivine original grains, recrystallization and grain growth were classified based on electron channeling contrast observations in each sample. EBSD crystal orientation mapping was performed on regions of interest to quantify crystallographic texture and identify various microstructure substructures for each experiment. In addition, ECCI and EBSD were performed on the alumina piston in order to examine spatial

  17. Imaging interactions of metal oxide nanoparticles with macrophage cells by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Starr, Clarise R; Armstrong, Linda S; Ponce, Arturo; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-11-01

    Use of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles in a plethora of biological applications and custom products has warned about some possible dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. Macrophages are key components of the innate immune system used to study possible toxic effects and internalization of different nanoparticulate materials. In this work, ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to offer new insights into the dynamical processes of interaction of nanomaterials with macrophage cells dosed with different concentrations of metal oxide nanoparticles (CeO(2), TiO(2) and ZnO). The versatility of FE-SEM has allowed obtaining a detailed characterization of processes of adsorption and endocytosis of nanoparticles, by using advanced analytical and imaging techniques on complete unstained uncoated cells, including secondary electron imaging, high-sensitive backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and stereoimaging. Low voltage BF/DF-STEM confirmed nanoparticle adsorption and internalization into endosomes of CeO(2) and TiO(2), whereas ZnO develop apoptosis after 24 h of interaction caused by dissolution and invasion of cell nucleus. Ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques provided new insights into interactions of inorganic nanoparticles with macrophage cells with high spatial resolution.

  18. StatSTEM: An efficient program for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; van den Bos, K. H. W.; Van den Broek, W.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2017-09-01

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced in order to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for the overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, is investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license.

  19. The Effects of Traditional and Electronic Word-of-Mouth on Destination Image: A Case of Vacation Tourists Visiting Branson, Missouri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Ishida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of integrated word-of-mouth (WOM, both traditional and electronic, on tourism products are yet to be fully investigated. The current study aims to assess the effects of and differences between traditional WOM and electronic WOM, between personal WOM and commercial WOM, and between positive and negative WOM on a destination image. Results of the study indicate that traditional WOM had a greater influence on destination image compared to electronic WOM. Personal traditional WOM had a greater influence on destination image compared to electronic personal WOM and commercial WOM. However, negative WOM exerted less influence on the destination’s image compared to positive WOM while negative electronic WOM had a greater influence on destination image compared to negative traditional WOM.

  20. Visualization of the cytostome in Trypanosoma cruzi by high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy using secondary and backscattered electron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatarunakamura, Celso; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2005-01-15

    High resolution scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the surface of epimastigote, amastigote and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Significant differences were observed between these forms and in different areas of the same cell. The cytostome found in amastigote and epimastigote forms could be easily visualized in images, which resemble those obtained only using the freeze-fracture technique. In contrast to other areas of the cell surface, the region of the cytostome, localized close to the flagellar pocket, showed a rugous surface and an opening with a diameter of 90 nm. Gold-labeled concanavalin A binds to the whole cell surface. However, the extent of binding was much higher in the region of the cytostome. The results obtained show that high resolution scanning electron microscopy is a powerful technique for analyzing the surface of protozoa.

  1. Molecular shape of Lumbricus terrestris erythrocruorin studied by electron microscopy and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Heel, Marin van

    1989-01-01

    The molecular structure of erythrocruorin (hemoglobin) from Lumbricus terrestris has been studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained particles. Over 1000 molecular projections were selected from a number of electron micrographs and were then classified by multivariate statistical

  2. A high-speed scintillation-based electronic portal imaging device to quantitatively characterize IMRT delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Manisha K; Lynch, Bart D; Li, Jonathan G; Dempsey, James F

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) employing a fast scintillator and a high-speed camera. The device is designed to accurately and independently characterize the fluence delivered by a linear accelerator during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with either step-and-shoot or dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) delivery. Our aim is to accurately obtain the beam shape and fluence of all segments delivered during IMRT, in order to study the nature of discrepancies between the plan and the delivered doses. A commercial high-speed camera was combined with a terbium-doped gadolinium-oxy-sulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillator to form an EPID for the unaliased capture of two-dimensional fluence distributions of each beam in an IMRT delivery. The high speed EPID was synchronized to the accelerator pulse-forming network and gated to capture every possible pulse emitted from the accelerator, with an approximate frame rate of 360 frames-per-second (fps). A 62-segment beam from a head-and-neck IMRT treatment plan requiring 68 s to deliver was recorded with our high speed EPID producing approximately 6 Gbytes of imaging data. The EPID data were compared with the MLC instruction files and the MLC controller log files. The frames were binned to provide a frame rate of 72 fps with a signal-to-noise ratio that was sufficient to resolve leaf positions and segment fluence. The fractional fluence from the log files and EPID data agreed well. An ambiguity in the motion of the MLC during beam on was resolved. The log files reported leaf motions at the end of 33 of the 42 segments, while the EPID observed leaf motions in only 7 of the 42 segments. The static IMRT segment shapes observed by the high speed EPID were in good agreement with the shapes reported in the log files. The leaf motions observed during beam-on for step-and-shoot delivery were not temporally resolved by the log files.

  3. Dopant Contrast in Semiconductors as Interpretation Challenge at Imaging by Electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Mika, Filip; Hovorka, Miloš; Valdaitsev, D.; Schönhense, G.; Müllerová, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 5 (2007), s. 936-939 ISSN 1345-9678 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0281 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : electron microscopic contrasts * semiconductors * dopant contrast * scanning electron microscopy * scanning low energy electron microscopy * photoelectron emission microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.018, year: 2007

  4. StatSTEM: An efficient approach for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; Bos, K.H.W. van den [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van den Broek, W. [AG Strukturforschung/Elektronenmikroskopie, Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-12-15

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, has been investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, the advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. This is done for the estimation of the distance between two neighbouring columns as a function of their distance and for the estimation of the scattering cross-section which is compared to the integrated intensity from a Voronoi cell. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license. - Highlights: • An efficient model-based method for quantitative electron microscopy is introduced. • Images are modelled as a superposition of 2D Gaussian peaks. • Overlap between neighbouring columns is taken into account. • Structure parameters can be obtained with the highest precision and accuracy. • StatSTEM, auser friendly program (GNU public license) is developed.

  5. Quantification of total calcium in terminal cisternae of skinned muscle fibers by imaging electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, H; Wepf, R; Schröder, R R; Fink, R H

    1999-08-01

    Skinned muscle fibers are ideal model preparations for the investigation of Ca2+ -regulatory mechanisms. Their internal ionic milieu can be easily controlled and distinct physiological states are well defined. We have measured the total Ca content in the terminal cisternae of such preparations using imaging electron energy-loss spectroscopy (Image-EELS) as a new approach for quantification of sub-cellular element distributions. Murine muscle fibers submitted to a standardized calcium-loading procedure were cryo-fixed with a combined solution exchanger/plunge freezing device. Energy-filtered image series were recorded from ultrathin freeze-dried cryosections of samples immobilized in either relaxed or caffeine-contracted state. From these image series, electron energy-loss spectra were extracted by digital image-processing and quantitatively processed by multiple-least-squares-fitting with reference spectra. The calculated fit coefficients were converted to Ca-concentrations by a calibration obtained from Ca-standards. Total Ca-contents in the terminal cisternae of skinned skeletal muscle fibers decreased upon caffeine-induced Ca-release from 123+/-159 (+/-11) to 73+/-102 (+/-8) mmol/kg d.w. (weighted mean +/- SD (+/-SEM)).

  6. Reproducible strain measurement in electronic devices by applying integer multiple to scanning grating in scanning moiré fringe imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhyun Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Scanning moiré fringe (SMF imaging by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the strain field in the channel of a transistor with a CoSi2 source and drain. Nanometer-scale SMFs were formed with a scanning grating size of ds at integer multiples of the Si crystal lattice spacing dl (ds ∼ ndl, n = 2, 3, 4, 5. The moiré fringe formula was modified to establish a method for quantifying strain measurement. We showed that strain fields in a transistor measured by SMF images were reproducible with an accuracy of 0.02%.

  7. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  8. Estimating the thickness of ultra thin sections for electron microscopy by image statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sporring, Jon; Khanmohammadi, Mahdieh; Darkner, Sune

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method for estimating the thickness of ultra thin histological sections by image statistics alone. Our method works for images, that are the realisations of a stationary and isotropic stochastic process, and it relies on the existence of statistical image-measures that are strictly...... show that these images with high certainty belong to the required statistical class, and that the reconstructions are valid....

  9. Evaluation of Cobalt-Labeled Octreotide Analogs for Molecular Imaging and Auger Electron-Based Radionuclide Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Dam, Johan Hygum

    2014-01-01

    The somatostatin receptor, which is overexpressed by many neuroendocrine tumors, is a well-known target for molecular imaging and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Recently, (57)Co-labeled DOTATOC, an octreotide analog, was shown to have the highest affinity yet found for somatostatin receptor...... subtype 2. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biologic effects of novel cobalt-labeled octreotide analogs targeting the somatostatin receptor to identify promising candidates for molecular imaging and Auger electron-based radionuclide therapy. METHODS: Cobalt-labeled DOTATATE, DOTATOC, and DOTANOC...... were prepared with (57)Co or (58m)Co for SPECT or Auger electron-based therapy, respectively. The cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of the radioligands were characterized with the pancreatic tumor cell line AR42J in vitro, including assessment of the therapeutic effects of (58m...

  10. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2015-07-01

    Single photon detecting capabilities of an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD), where a photon is converted into a photoelectron that is accelerated through a high voltage before hitting the CCD chip, were characterised. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. Based on these results, we propose that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an EBCCD or EBCMOS camera would allow photon arrival time determination from the photon event pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), or a 2-dimensional streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), may benefit from this approach. Moreover, the EBCCD was used on a fluorescence microscope to image fluorescently labelled cells in single photon counting mode.

  11. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface flow and reactive transport simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of subsurface electrical conductivity changes, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from river stage fluctuations and associated river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev.

  12. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of changes subsurface electrical conductivity, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from water table changes and from river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev .

  13. The effect of sidewall roughness on line edge roughness in top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduin, T.; Lokhorst, S. R.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated in a numerical study the determination of sidewall roughness (SWR) from top down scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. In a typical metrology application, top-down SEM images are acquired in a (critical-dimension) SEM and the roughness is analyzed. However, the true size, shape and roughness characteristics of resist features are not fully investigated in the analysis of top-down SEM images. In reality, rough resist features are complex three-dimensional structures and the characterization naturally extends to the analysis of SWR. In this study we randomly generate images of rough lines and spaces, where the lines are made of PMMA on a silicon substrate. The lines that we study have a length of 2 µm, a width of 32nm and a height of 32 nm. The SWR is modeled by using the power spectral density (PSD) function of Palasantzas, which characterizes roughness by the standard deviation σ, correlation length ξ and roughness exponent α . The actual roughness is generated by application of the method of Thorsos in two dimensions. The images are constructed by using a home-built program for simulating electron-specimen interactions. The program that we have developed is optimized for complex arbitrary geometries and large number of incident low energy primary electrons by using multi-core CPUs and GPUs. The program uses the dielectric function model for inelastic scattering events and has an implementation specifically for low energy electrons. A satisfactory comparison is made between the secondary electron yields from the home-built program and another program found in literature. In order to reduce the risk of shrinkage, we use a beam energy of 300 eV and a spot size of 3 nm. Each pixel is exposed with 20 electrons on average (≍ 276 µC/cm2), following the Poisson distribution to account for illumination shot noise. We have assumed that the detection of electrons is perfect and does not introduce additional noise. We measure line edge

  14. Fast 3D dosimetric verifications based on an electronic portal imaging device using a GPU calculation engine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jinhan; Chen, Lixin; Chen, Along; Luo, Guangwen; Deng, Xiaowu; Liu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To use a graphic processing unit (GPU) calculation engine to implement a fast 3D pre-treatment dosimetric verification procedure based on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods The GPU algorithm includes the deconvolution and convolution method for the fluence-map calculations, the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) algorithm for the 3D dose calculations and the 3D gamma evaluation calculations. The results of the GPU-based CCCS algorithm were compared to tho...

  15. STEMsalabim: A high-performance computing cluster friendly code for scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of thin specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelerich, Jan Oliver; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Baranovskii, Sergei D; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-06-01

    We present a new multislice code for the computer simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images based on the frozen lattice approximation. Unlike existing software packages, the code is optimized to perform well on highly parallelized computing clusters, combining distributed and shared memory architectures. This enables efficient calculation of large lateral scanning areas of the specimen within the frozen lattice approximation and fine-grained sweeps of parameter space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    We have used an electron-bombarded CCD for optical photon counting imaging. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. We propose on this basis that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor would allow photon arrival time determination with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter, or a two-dimensional photon counting streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, may benefit from such an approach. A simulation of a voltage sweep performed with experimental data collected with different acceleration voltages validates the principle of this approach. Moreover, photon event centroiding was performed and a hybrid 50% Gaussian/Centre of Gravity + 50% Hyperbolic cosine centroiding algorithm was found to yield the lowest fixed pattern noise. Finally, the camera was mounted on a fluorescence microscope to image F-actin filaments stained with the fluorescent dye Alexa 488 in fixed cells.

  17. Automatic Prostate Tracking and Motion Assessment in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azcona, Juan Diego, E-mail: jdazcona@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305 (United States); Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Li, Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the prostate intrafraction motion in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments using cine megavoltage (MV) images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy using a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator equipped with an EPID for acquiring cine MV images during treatment. Cine MV images acquisition was scheduled for single or multiple treatment fractions (between 1 and 8). A novel automatic fiducial detection algorithm that can handle irregular multileaf collimator apertures, field edges, fast leaf and gantry movement, and MV image noise and artifacts in patient anatomy was used. All sets of images (approximately 25,000 images in total) were analyzed to measure the positioning accuracy of implanted fiducial markers and assess the prostate movement. Results: Prostate motion can vary greatly in magnitude among different patients. Different motion patterns were identified, showing its unpredictability. The mean displacement and standard deviation of the intrafraction motion was generally less than 2.0 ± 2.0 mm in each of the spatial directions. In certain patients, however, the percentage of the treatment time in which the prostate is displaced more than 5 mm from its planned position in at least 1 spatial direction was 10% or more. The maximum prostate displacement observed was 13.3 mm. Conclusion: Prostate tracking and motion assessment was performed with MV imaging and an EPID. The amount of prostate motion observed suggests that patients will benefit from its real-time monitoring. Megavoltage imaging can provide the basis for real-time prostate tracking using conventional linear accelerators.

  18. Analysis of dislocation configurations in a [0 0 1] fcc single crystal by electron channeling contrast imaging in the SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Urrutia, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the dislocation configurations in a [0 0 1] single crystal of a face-centered alloy (316L stainless steel) by the electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) technique in the scanning electron microscope under controlled diffraction conditions. Specific dislocations such as piled-up dislocations and Lomer-Cottrell dislocations were characterized by the analysis of dislocation contrast and dislocation line trace analysis. The ECCI technique also allows the sound estimation of the local resolved stress acting on gliding dislocations by the analysis of the radius of curvature following a transmission electron microscopy-based geometrical approach. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A phase contrast imaging-interferometer system for detection of multiscale electron density fluctuations on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Marinoni, A.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Heterodyne interferometry and phase contrast imaging (PCI) are robust, mature techniques for measuring low-k and high-k electron density fluctuations, respectively. This work describes the first-ever implementation of a combined PCI-interferometer. The combined system uses a single 10.6 μm probe beam, two interference schemes, and two detectors to measure electron density fluctuations at large spatiotemporal bandwidth (10 kHz electron-scale instabilities. Further, correlating our interferometer's measurements with those from DIII-D's pre-existing, toroidally separated interferometer allows core-localized, low-n MHD studies that may otherwise be inaccessible via external magnetic measurements. The combined diagnostic's small port requirements and minimal access restrictions make it well-suited to the harsh neutron environments and limited port space expected in next-step devices.

  20. Acid-sensitive semiperfluoroalkyl resorcinarene: an imaging material for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Kyun; Chatzichristidi, Margarita; Zakhidov, Alexander A; Taylor, Priscilla G; DeFranco, John A; Hwang, Ha Soo; Fong, Hon Hang; Holmes, Andrew B; Malliaras, George G; Ober, Christopher K

    2008-09-03

    An acid-sensitive semiperfluoroalkyl resorcinarene was synthesized, and its lithographic properties were evaluated. Its solubility in segregated hydrofluoroether solvents enables the patterning of delicate organic electronic materials.

  1. Collaborative Research and Development. Delivery Order 0006: Transmission Electron Microscope Image Modeling and Semiconductor Heterointerface Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2006-01-01

    .... Transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization studies were performed on a variety of novel III-V semiconductor heterostructures being developed for advanced optoelectronic device applications...

  2. A Fast Method for the Segmentation of Synaptic Junctions and Mitochondria in Serial Electron Microscopic Images of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez Neila, Pablo; Baumela, Luis; González-Soriano, Juncal; Rodríguez, Jose-Rodrigo; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Ángel

    2016-04-01

    Recent electron microscopy (EM) imaging techniques permit the automatic acquisition of a large number of serial sections from brain samples. Manual segmentation of these images is tedious, time-consuming and requires a high degree of user expertise. Therefore, there is considerable interest in developing automatic segmentation methods. However, currently available methods are computationally demanding in terms of computer time and memory usage, and to work properly many of them require image stacks to be isotropic, that is, voxels must have the same size in the X, Y and Z axes. We present a method that works with anisotropic voxels and that is computationally efficient allowing the segmentation of large image stacks. Our approach involves anisotropy-aware regularization via conditional random field inference and surface smoothing techniques to improve the segmentation and visualization. We have focused on the segmentation of mitochondria and synaptic junctions in EM stacks from the cerebral cortex, and have compared the results to those obtained by other methods. Our method is faster than other methods with similar segmentation results. Our image regularization procedure introduces high-level knowledge about the structure of labels. We have also reduced memory requirements with the introduction of energy optimization in overlapping partitions, which permits the regularization of very large image stacks. Finally, the surface smoothing step improves the appearance of three-dimensional renderings of the segmented volumes.

  3. A new electron-ion coincidence 3D momentum-imaging method and its application in probing strong field dynamics of 2-phenylethyl-N, N-dimethylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Tu, Yi-Jung; Mignolet, Benoît; Couch, David; Dorney, Kevin; Nguyen, Quynh; Wooldridge, Laura; Murnane, Margaret; Remacle, Françoise; Schlegel, H. Bernhard; Li, Wen

    2017-07-01

    We report the development of a new three-dimensional (3D) momentum-imaging setup based on conventional velocity map imaging to achieve the coincidence measurement of photoelectrons and photo-ions. This setup uses only one imaging detector (microchannel plates (MCP)/phosphor screen) but the voltages on electrodes are pulsed to push both electrons and ions toward the same detector. The ion-electron coincidence is achieved using two cameras to capture images of ions and electrons separately. The time-of-flight of ions and electrons are read out from MCP using a digitizer. We demonstrate this new system by studying the dissociative single and double ionization of PENNA (2-phenylethyl-N,N-dimethylamine). We further show that the camera-based 3D imaging system can operate at 10 kHz repetition rate.

  4. Imaging and elemental mapping of biological specimens with a dual-EDS dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.S., E-mail: jinsong-wu@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Atomic and Nanoscale Characterization Experimental (NUANCE) Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Kim, A.M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Bleher, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Myers, B.D. [Northwestern University Atomic and Nanoscale Characterization Experimental (NUANCE) Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Marvin, R.G. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Inada, H.; Nakamura, K. [Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Zhang, X.F. [Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc., 5960 Inglewood Drive, Pleasanton, California 94588 (United States); Roth, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Li, S.Y. [Northwestern University Atomic and Nanoscale Characterization Experimental (NUANCE) Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    A dedicated analytical scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with dual energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detectors has been designed for complementary high performance imaging as well as high sensitivity elemental analysis and mapping of biological structures. The performance of this new design, based on a Hitachi HD-2300A model, was evaluated using a variety of biological specimens. With three imaging detectors, both the surface and internal structure of cells can be examined simultaneously. The whole-cell elemental mapping, especially of heavier metal species that have low cross-section for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), can be faithfully obtained. Optimization of STEM imaging conditions is applied to thick sections as well as thin sections of biological cells under low-dose conditions at room and cryogenic temperatures. Such multimodal capabilities applied to soft/biological structures usher a new era for analytical studies in biological systems. - Highlights: ► Applications of STEM in characterization of biological samples are demonstrated. ► Elemental analyses are performed by dual EDS and EELS. ► Both the surface and internal structure of cells can be studied simultaneously. ► The imaging contrast in low-dose cryo-STEM has been analyzed.

  5. Deceleration of probe beam by stage bias potential improves resolution of serial block-face scanning electron microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, James C; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Astakhov, Vadim; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Peltier, Steven T; Ellisman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    Serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) is quickly becoming an important imaging tool to explore three-dimensional biological structure across spatial scales. At probe-beam-electron energies of 2.0 keV or lower, the axial resolution should improve, because there is less primary electron penetration into the block face. More specifically, at these lower energies, the interaction volume is much smaller, and therefore, surface detail is more highly resolved. However, the backscattered electron yield for metal contrast agents and the backscattered electron detector sensitivity are both sub-optimal at these lower energies, thus negating the gain in axial resolution. We found that the application of a negative voltage (reversal potential) applied to a modified SBEM stage creates a tunable electric field at the sample. This field can be used to decrease the probe-beam-landing energy and, at the same time, alter the trajectory of the signal to increase the signal collected by the detector. With decelerated low landing-energy electrons, we observed that the probe-beam-electron-penetration depth was reduced to less than 30 nm in epoxy-embedded biological specimens. Concurrently, a large increase in recorded signal occurred due to the re-acceleration of BSEs in the bias field towards the objective pole piece where the detector is located. By tuning the bias field, we were able to manipulate the trajectories of the  primary and secondary electrons, enabling the spatial discrimination of these signals using an advanced ring-type BSE detector configuration or a standard monolithic BSE detector coupled with a blocking aperture.

  6. STEMsalabim: A high-performance computing cluster friendly code for scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of thin specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelerich, Jan Oliver, E-mail: jan.oliver.oelerich@physik.uni-marburg.de; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Baranovskii, Sergei D.; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • We present STEMsalabim, a modern implementation of the multislice algorithm for simulation of STEM images. • Our package is highly parallelizable on high-performance computing clusters, combining shared and distributed memory architectures. • With STEMsalabim, computationally and memory expensive STEM image simulations can be carried out within reasonable time. - Abstract: We present a new multislice code for the computer simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images based on the frozen lattice approximation. Unlike existing software packages, the code is optimized to perform well on highly parallelized computing clusters, combining distributed and shared memory architectures. This enables efficient calculation of large lateral scanning areas of the specimen within the frozen lattice approximation and fine-grained sweeps of parameter space.

  7. Electronic Time-Gated and Spectroscopic Near-Infrared Imaging of Lesions in Human Tissues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, S. K.; Alrubaiee, M.; Alfano, R. R.; Koutcher, J.; Savage, H.

    2000-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) transillumination imaging is used to investigate normal and cancerous tissues of human breast, thyroid, and parotid gland. The time-sliced imaging arrangement uses 130-fs, 1 kHz repetition-rate, 800 nm pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser and amplifier system for sample illumination and a CCD camera coupled to a gated image intensifier for recording two-dimensional (2D) images. Images recorded with earlier temporal slices of transmitted light highlight cancerous tissues while those recorded with later slices accentuate normal fibrous tissues. The spectroscopic imaging arrangement uses 1210-1300 nm tunable output of a Cr:forsterite laser for sample illumination, a Fourier space gate to discriminate against multiple-scattered light, and a NIR area camera to record 2D images. When light is tuned to a known absorption resonance of a particular tissue type, a marked enhancement in image contrast is observed which is indicative of the diagnostic potential of spectroscopic imaging.

  8. Expression of the Transcription Factor E4BP4 in Human Basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina Margrethe; Gohr, Maria; Poulsen, Lars Kærgaard

    2014-01-01

    by Alcian blue. RNA was extracted (0.005-0.02 µg RNA from 0.5 - 1 x 106 cells), and the corresponding cDNA analyzed by real-time PCR where E4BP4 expression was calculated as 2-(CT(E4BP4) - CT(β-actin)). E4BP4 protein expression was visualized in basophil lysates (107 cells/ml) by Western blot followed...

  9. Imaging of organelles by electron microscopy reveals protein-protein interactions in mitochondria and chloroplasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Kouril, Roman; Bultema, Jelle B.; Boekema, Egbert J.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing progress in electron microscopy (EM) offers now an opening to visualize cells at the nanoscale by cryo-electron tomography (ET). Large protein complexes can be resolved at near-atomic resolution by single particle averaging. Some examples from mitochondria and chloroplasts illustrate the

  10. STEM imaging of 47-pm-separated atomic columns by a spherical aberration-corrected electron microscope with a 300-kV cold field emission gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hidetaka; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Ohashi, Nobuhiro; Tomita, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kaneyama, Toshikatsu; Kondo, Yukihito; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2009-12-01

    A spherical aberration-corrected electron microscope has been developed recently, which is equipped with a 300-kV cold field emission gun and an objective lens of a small chromatic aberration coefficient. A dumbbell image of 47 pm spacing, corresponding to a pair of atomic columns of germanium aligned along the [114] direction, is resolved in high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a 0.4-eV energy spread of the electron beam. The observed image was compared with a simulated image obtained by dynamical calculation.

  11. Photoionization and Velocity Map Imaging spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters with Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser radiation at Elettra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fraia, M.; Sergo, R.; Stebel, L.; Giuressi, D.; Cautero, G.; Tudor, M.; Callegari, C.; O'Keeffe, P.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Lyamayev, V.; Feyer, V.; Moise, A.; Devetta, M.; Piseri, P.; Grazioli, C.; Coreno, M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in laser and Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation are continuously boosting fundamental research on the electronic structure of matter. At Elettra the collaboration between several groups active in the field of atomic, molecular and cluster physics and the Instrumentation and Detector Laboratory has resulted in an experimental set-up that successfully tackles the challenges posed by the investigation of the electronic structure of isolated species in the gas phase. The use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) light, allows to cover a wide spectrum of targets from energetic to dynamics. We developed a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer that allows to perform as well SR as FEL experiments, just by changing part of the detection system. In SR experiments, at the Gasphase beamline of Elettra, a cross delay line detector is used, coupled to a 4-channel time-to-digital converter that reconstructs the position of the electrons. Simultaneously, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer is used to acquire photoion spectra. Such a system allows PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters. In FEL experiments (notably differing from SR experiments in the much higher rate of events produced and detected, which forces one to forfeit coincidence detection), at the Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline of FERMI, a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) a phosphor screen and a CCD camera are used instead, capable of shot-by-shot collection of practically all events, albeit without time resolution.

  12. Portable digital electronic radiography system with a solid-state area-imaging detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sawicka, B D; Sonnenburg, K

    1999-01-01

    A digital system for radiographic inspection was constructed in a portable version suitable for field use. The system uses typical film radiography sources, including sup 6 sup 0 Co, sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 1r and X-ray generators. Radiographic images are formed using an area-imaging scintillating detector coupled to a charge-coupled device camera and a portable industrial computer. Compared to film radiography, this technology offers imaging without wet-film processing, shorter exposure times, larger dynamic range, and digital imaging that permits compact archiving, easy data access and mathematical image processing to improve sensitivity. System performance is illustrated for typical applications, i.e., for radiographing valves and pipes. Using ' sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir, the system works well on smaller water-filled valves and pipes; larger valves have to be drained. Work is under way to address this problem.

  13. Multi-MHz time-of-flight electronic bandstructure imaging of graphene on Ir(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tusche, C., E-mail: c.tusche@fz-juelich.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Goslawski, P.; Engel, D.; Jankowiak, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kutnyakhov, D.; Elmers, H. J.; Chernov, S.; Wallauer, R.; Schönhense, G. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Ellguth, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Medjanik, K. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); MAX IV Laboratory, Ole Römers vag 1, 22363 Lund (Sweden)

    2016-06-27

    In the quest for detailed spectroscopic insight into the electronic structure at solid surfaces in a large momentum range, we have developed an advanced experimental approach. It combines the 3D detection scheme of a time-of-flight momentum microscope with an optimized filling pattern of the BESSY II storage ring. Here, comprehensive data sets covering the full surface Brillouin zone have been used to study faint substrate-film hybridization effects in the electronic structure of graphene on Ir(111), revealed by a pronounced linear dichroism in angular distribution. The method paves the way to 3D electronic bandmapping with unprecedented data recording efficiency.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of the transit dosimetric response of an a-Si electronic portal imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, S. J.; McNamara, A. L.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.; Greer, P. B.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-03-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are x-ray detectors frequently used in radiotherapy imaging and dosimetry applications. EPIDs employ a copper plate and gadolinium oxysulfide phosphor screen with an array of a-Si photodiodes to indirectly detect incident radiation. In this study, a previously developed Monte Carlo (MC) model of an a-Si EPID has been extended for transit dosimetry. The GEANT4 MC toolkit was used to integrate an a-Si EPID model with two phantoms and a 6 MV x-ray source. A solid water phantom was used to simulate EPID transmission factors, field size output factors and relative dose profiles and results were compared to experimental measurements. An anthropomorphic head phantom was used to qualitatively compare simulated and measured portal images of humanoid anatomy. Calculated transmission factors and field size output factors agreed to within 2.0% and 1.9% of experimental measurements, respectively. A comparison of calculated and measured relative dose profiles yielded >98% of points passing a gamma analysis with 3%/3 mm criterion for all field sizes. The simulated anthropomorphic head phantom image shows macroscopic anatomical features and qualitatively agrees with the measured image. Results validate the suitability of the MC model for predicting EPID response in transit dosimetry.

  15. Diagnostic value and cost-effectiveness of good quality digital images accompanying electronic referrals for suspected skin malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Michael F Y; Stevenson, J Howard

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome and cost-effectiveness of good and poor quality photographs accompanying the electronic referrals for suspected skin malignancies. A retrospective study of 100 patients, divided into 2 groups, 50 with good quality photographs and 50 with poor quality photographs. Patients with no digital images, or who failed to attend, or patients with incomplete notes were excluded from the study. The treatment pathway, waiting times, and estimated cost between the 2 groups were compared. Good photographs were more likely to be treated at the 1-Stop Clinic (P = 0.05). Good images had a better positive predictive value than poor quality images (62.55% vs. 42.86%). Good quality images are more accurate than poor quality images in triaging of patients, and thus more effective in facilitating the treatment of malignant lesions timely. Good quality photographs allow a delayed appropriate treatment of benign lesions. This increases the safety for patients in a queue in a rationed health care system, and improves patient flow.

  16. Reduced hippocampal volume in healthy young ApoE4 carriers: an MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence O'Dwyer

    Full Text Available The E4 allele of the ApoE gene has consistently been shown to be related to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The E4 allele is also associated with functional and structural grey matter (GM changes in healthy young, middle-aged and older subjects. Here, we assess volumes of deep grey matter structures of 22 healthy younger ApoE4 carriers and 22 non-carriers (20-38 years. Volumes of the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, pallidum, putamen, thalamus and brain stem were calculated by FMRIB's Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool (FIRST algorithm. A significant drop in volume was found in the right hippocampus of ApoE4 carriers (ApoE4+ relative to non-carriers (ApoE4-, while there was a borderline significant decrease in the volume of the left hippocampus of ApoE4 carriers. The volumes of no other structures were found to be significantly affected by genotype. Atrophy has been found to be a sensitive marker of neurodegenerative changes, and our results show that within a healthy young population, the presence of the ApoE4+ carrier gene leads to volume reduction in a structure that is vitally important for memory formation. Our results suggest that the hippocampus may be particularly vulnerable to further degeneration in ApoE4 carriers as they enter middle and old age. Although volume reductions were noted bilaterally in the hippocampus, atrophy was more pronounced in the right hippocampus. This finding relates to previous work which has noted a compensatory increase in right hemisphere activity in ApoE4 carriers in response to preclinical declines in memory function. Possession of the ApoE4 allele may lead to greater predilection for right hemisphere atrophy even in healthy young subjects in their twenties.

  17. Dosimetric characterization and application of an imaging beam line with a carbon electron target for megavoltage cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Ryan T; Hartmann, Julia; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Nixon, Earl; Alfredo, R; Siochi, C; Pennington, Edward C; Bayouth, John E

    2009-06-01

    Imaging dose from megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) can be significantly reduced without loss of image quality by using an imaging beam line (IBL), with no flattening filter and a carbon, rather than tungsten, electron target. The IBL produces a greater keV-range x-ray fluence than the treatment beam line (TBL), which results in a more optimal detector response. The IBL imaging dose is not necessarily negligible, however. In this work an IBL was dosimetrically modeled with the Philips Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS), verified experimentally, and applied to clinical cases. The IBL acquisition dose for a 200 degrees gantry rotation was verified in a customized acrylic cylindrical phantom at multiple imaging field sizes with 196 ion chamber measurements. Agreement between the measured and calculated IBL dose was quantified with the 3D gamma index. Representative IBL and TBL imaging dose distributions were calculated for head and neck and prostate patients and included in treatment plans using the imaging dose incorporation (IDI) method. Surface dose was measured for the TBL and IBL for four head and neck cancer patients with MOSFETs. The IBL model, when compared to the percentage depth dose and profile measurements, had 97% passing gamma indices for dosimetric and distance acceptance criteria of 3%, 3 mm, and 100% passed for 5.2%, 5.2 mm. For the ion chamber measurements of phantom image acquisition dose, the IBL model had 93% passing gamma indices for acceptance criteria of 3%, 3 mm, and 100% passed for 4%, 4 mm. Differences between the IBL- and TBL-based IMRT treatment plans created with the IDI method were dosimetrically insignificant for both the prostate and head and neck cases. For IBL and TBL beams with monitor unit values that would result in the delivery of the same dose to the depth of maximum dose under standard calibration conditions, the IBL imaging surface dose was higher than the TBL imaging surface dose by an average of 18

  18. Development of a high-brightness electron beam system towards femtosecond microdiffraction and imaging and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kiseok

    To make a `molecular movie', an `ultrafast camera' with simultaneously very high spatial and temporal resolution to match the atomic dynamics is required. The ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) technique based on femtosecond laser technology can provide a basic framework for realizing such an `ultrafast camera' although this technology has not achieved its full utility as a universal imaging and spectroscopy tool, due to limitations in generation and preservation of a high-brightness electron beam in the ultrafast regime. With moderate electron pulse intensity (103-10 4 electrons per pulse), UED experiments have been successfully applied to investigate photo-induced non-thermal melting processes, structural phase transitions, and transient surface charge dynamics. Based on the previous development of ultrafast electron diffractive voltammetry (UEDV), we extend the UEDV with an aim to identify the different constituents of the measured transient surface voltage (TSV) and discuss their respective roles in Coulomb refraction. From applying this methodology on Si/SiO2 interface and surfaces decorated with nano-structures, we are able to elucidate localized charge injection, dielectric relaxation, carrier diffusion, and enhancements on such processes through surface plasmon resonances, with direct resolution in the charge state and possibly correlated structural dynamics at these interfaces. These new results highlight the high sensitivity of the interfacial charge transfer to the nanoscale modification, environment, and surface plasmonics enhancement and demonstrate the diffraction-based ultrafast surface voltage probe as a unique method to resolve the nanometer scale charge carrier dynamics. The future applications of the UED and UEDV techniques lie in the direct visualization and site-selected studies such as nano-structured interfaces, a single nanoparticle or domain, which can be enabled by the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron beam system for

  19. Tilt-pair analysis of images from a range of different specimens in single-particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Richard; Chen, Shaoxia; Chen, James Z; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Passmore, Lori A; Ciccarelli, Luciano; Rubinstein, John L; Crowther, R Anthony; Stewart, Phoebe L; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2011-11-11

    The comparison of a pair of electron microscope images recorded at different specimen tilt angles provides a powerful approach for evaluating the quality of images, image-processing procedures, or three-dimensional structures. Here, we analyze tilt-pair images recorded from a range of specimens with different symmetries and molecular masses and show how the analysis can produce valuable information not easily obtained otherwise. We show that the accuracy of orientation determination of individual single particles depends on molecular mass, as expected theoretically since the information in each particle image increases with molecular mass. The angular uncertainty is less than 1° for particles of high molecular mass (~50 MDa), several degrees for particles in the range 1-5 MDa, and tens of degrees for particles below 1 MDa. Orientational uncertainty may be the major contributor to the effective temperature factor (B-factor) describing contrast loss and therefore the maximum resolution of a structure determination. We also made two unexpected observations. Single particles that are known to be flexible showed a wider spread in orientation accuracy, and the orientations of the largest particles examined changed by several degrees during typical low-dose exposures. Smaller particles presumably also reorient during the exposure; hence, specimen movement is a second major factor that limits resolution. Tilt pairs thus enable assessment of orientation accuracy, map quality, specimen motion, and conformational heterogeneity. A convincing tilt-pair parameter plot, where 60% of the particles show a single cluster around the expected tilt axis and tilt angle, provides confidence in a structure determined using electron cryomicroscopy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  1. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A P; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-12-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  2. Optically Imaged Striped Domains of Nonequilibrium Electronic and Nuclear Spins in a Fractional Quantum Hall Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John N; Hayakawa, Junichiro; Mano, Takaaki; Noda, Takeshi; Yusa, Go

    2017-02-17

    Using photoluminescence microscopy enhanced by magnetic resonance, we visualize in real space both electron and nuclear polarization occurring in nonequilibrium fraction quantum Hall (FQH) liquids. We observe stripelike domain regions comprising FQH excited states which discretely form when the FQH liquid is excited by a source-drain current. These regions are deformable and give rise to bidirectionally polarized nuclear spins as spin-resolved electrons flow across their boundaries.

  3. Characterization of the morphological properties of welding fume particles by transmission electron microscopy and digital image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrants, G; Schüler, B; Karlsen, J; Reith, A; Langård, S

    1989-09-01

    The morphological characteristics of welding fume particles have been determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and automatic image analysis (AIA). Two personal samples and one background sample were collected using a new, easy to handle sampling method, during tungsten inert gas (TIG) and manual metal arc (MMA) welding on Inconel in the same shop. The collection method gave samples which were suitable for TEM and AIA. Electron micrographs were taken in a transmission electron microscope and further analyzed using an image analysis unit. Aggregates composed of many individual particles were analyzed both for the parameters of the aggregate and for the parameters of the individual particles by using an algorithm based on a grain boundary reconstruction technique. The morphological parameters allowed the welding fume's particulate matter to be divided into three types - here called small, medium, and large - with a somewhat unclear distinction between medium and large. Medium and large particles occur either as individual particles or as clusters of approximately spherical particles with average diameters of 0.07 and 0.15 microm, respectively. Small particles occur almost exclusively as long chains or lace-like structures of aggregates of particles, often in the range of 5-10 microm. The aggregates have an average projected area of 2.6 x 10-3 microm2 and are composed of several hundred individual particles.

  4. Characterization of the thickness and distribution of latex coatings on polyvinylidene chloride beads by backscattered electron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Clifford S; Beyer, Douglas E

    2015-04-01

    Polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) co-polymer resins are commonly formulated with a variety of solid additives for the purpose of processing or stabilization. A homogeneous distribution of these additives during handling and processing is important. The Dow Chemical Company developed a process to incorporate solid materials in latex form onto PVDC resin bead surfaces using a coagulation process. In this context, we present a method to characterize the distribution and thickness of these latex coatings. The difference in backscattered electron signal from the higher mean atomic number PVDC core and lower atomic number latex coating in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging using a range of accelerating voltages was used to characterize latex thickness and distribution across large numbers of beads quickly and easily. Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively estimate latex thickness as a function of brightness in backscatter electron images. This thickness calibration was validated by cross-sectioning using a focused ion-beam SEM. Thicknesses from 100 nm up to about 1.3 µm can be determined using this method.

  5. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult female—internal electron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Shannon E.; DeWeese, Lindsay S.; Maynard, Matthew R.; Rajon, Didier A.; Wayson, Michael B.; Marshall, Emily L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2016-12-01

    An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for internal electron sources was created for the ICRP-defined reference adult female. Many previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used internal dosimetry software, do not properly account for electron escape from trabecular spongiosa, electron cross-fire from cortical bone, and the impact of marrow cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation. Furthermore, these existing models do not employ the current ICRP definition of a 50 µm bone endosteum (or shallow marrow). Each of these limitations was addressed in the present study. Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to both active and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the University of Florida reference adult female. The skeletal macrostructure and microstructure were modeled separately. The bone macrostructure was based on the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference models, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 years-old female cadaver. The active and shallow marrow are typically adopted as surrogate tissue regions for the hematopoietic stem cells and osteoprogenitor cells, respectively. Source tissues included active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume, and cortical bone surfaces. Marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. All other sources were run at the defined ICRP Publication 70 cellularity for each bone site. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or analytically modeled. The method of combining skeletal macrostructure and microstructure absorbed fractions assessed using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model applied to the UF adult male skeletal dosimetry model. Calculated

  6. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult female-internal electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Shannon E; DeWeese, Lindsay S; Maynard, Matthew R; Rajon, Didier A; Wayson, Michael B; Marshall, Emily L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2016-12-21

    An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for internal electron sources was created for the ICRP-defined reference adult female. Many previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used internal dosimetry software, do not properly account for electron escape from trabecular spongiosa, electron cross-fire from cortical bone, and the impact of marrow cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation. Furthermore, these existing models do not employ the current ICRP definition of a 50 µm bone endosteum (or shallow marrow). Each of these limitations was addressed in the present study. Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to both active and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the University of Florida reference adult female. The skeletal macrostructure and microstructure were modeled separately. The bone macrostructure was based on the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference models, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 years-old female cadaver. The active and shallow marrow are typically adopted as surrogate tissue regions for the hematopoietic stem cells and osteoprogenitor cells, respectively. Source tissues included active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume, and cortical bone surfaces. Marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. All other sources were run at the defined ICRP Publication 70 cellularity for each bone site. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or analytically modeled. The method of combining skeletal macrostructure and microstructure absorbed fractions assessed using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model applied to the UF adult male skeletal dosimetry model. Calculated

  7. Phenotype analysis of early risk factors from electronic medical records improves image-derived diagnostic classifiers for optic nerve pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nabar, Kunal P.; Nelson, Katrina M.; Mawn, Louise A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-03-01

    We examine imaging and electronic medical records (EMR) of 588 subjects over five major disease groups that affect optic nerve function. An objective evaluation of the role of imaging and EMR data in diagnosis of these conditions would improve understanding of these diseases and help in early intervention. We developed an automated image processing pipeline that identifies the orbital structures within the human eyes from computed tomography (CT) scans, calculates structural size, and performs volume measurements. We customized the EMR-based phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) to derive diagnostic EMR phenotypes that occur at least two years prior to the onset of the conditions of interest from a separate cohort of 28,411 ophthalmology patients. We used random forest classifiers to evaluate the predictive power of image-derived markers, EMR phenotypes, and clinical visual assessments in identifying disease cohorts from a control group of 763 patients without optic nerve disease. Image-derived markers showed more predictive power than clinical visual assessments or EMR phenotypes. However, the addition of EMR phenotypes to the imaging markers improves the classification accuracy against controls: the AUC improved from 0.67 to 0.88 for glaucoma, 0.73 to 0.78 for intrinsic optic nerve disease, 0.72 to 0.76 for optic nerve edema, 0.72 to 0.77 for orbital inflammation, and 0.81 to 0.85 for thyroid eye disease. This study illustrates the importance of diagnostic context for interpretation of image-derived markers and the proposed PheWAS technique provides a flexible approach for learning salient features of patient history and incorporating these data into traditional machine learning analyses.

  8. Hybrid opto-electronic processor for the delineation of tumors of the liver from CT-Scan images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasquel, Jean-Baptiste; Bruynooghe, Michel M.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2001-12-01

    In order to help hepatic surgery planning, an unsupervised method is needed to automate the delineation of liver tumors. Moreover, due to the large amount of images acquired by Computer Tomography Scanner (CT-Scan), the processing has to be fast for a clinical use. Current methods are based on filterings and have the drawback of being time consuming. In this paper, to reach the purpose of speed and quality, we propose a fast unsupervised method which is implementable on an opto-electronical processor. The proposed method is based on the expansion/compression paradigm and combines a multiresolution approach with the principal component analysis (PCA). The multiresolution representation is done by several Gaussian filterings. The compression of the expanded information is then achieved by only keeping the first PCA factorial image. Endly, the object of interest is detected and delineated using the standard valley thresholding technique which is applied to the first factorial image. For the delineation of liver tumors, regions of interest (ROI) containing tumors have been preliminary extracted before applying PCA. Experimental results obtained by the processing of difficult clinical cases show, according to the radiologist experts, that our method is able to efficiently delineate liver tumors. Because Gaussian filterings are time consuming when carried out on a digital processor, we propose to implement them on an optical correlator. Clinical cases have been processed using the resulting opto-electronical processor to show the feasibility of such an implementation.

  9. 76 FR 54373 - Airworthiness Directives; Austro Engine GmbH Model E4 Diesel Piston Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ...; AD 2011-18-19] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Austro Engine GmbH Model E4 Diesel Piston...: For service information identified in this AD, contact Austro Engine GmbH, Rudolf-Diesel-Strasse 11, A... estimate that this AD will affect about 32 model E4 diesel piston engines, installed on airplanes of US...

  10. 75 FR 68179 - Airworthiness Directives; Austro Engine GmbH Model E4 Diesel Piston Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... Model E4 Diesel Piston Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule...) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to Austro Engine GmbH model E4 diesel piston engines. These.... Contact Austro Engine GmbH, Rudolf-Diesel- Strasse 11, A-2700 Weiner Neustadt, Austria, telephone: +43...

  11. 29 CFR 2584.8477(e)-4 - Revocation and termination of allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revocation and termination of allocation. 2584.8477(e)-4 Section 2584.8477(e)-4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT SYSTEM ACT...

  12. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1E4XL-1MCCA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1E4XL-1MCCA 1E4X 1MCC L A DIQMTQTPSSLSASLGDRVTISCRAS---QDISHYLNWF...dbChain>A 1MCCA YYCSSYEGSDN ALA CA 288 1MCC A 1MCCA...hain>A 1MCCA PSKQS-NNKYA ...pdbChain> 1MCCA QVTHE--GSTVE EEEE --

  13. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1BGAA-1E4LA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1BGAA-1E4LA 1BGA 1E4L A A --------TIFQFPQDFMWGTATAAYQIEGAYQEDGRGL...GYMAWSLLDNFEWAEGYNMRFGMIHVDFRT-QVRTPKESYYWYRNVVSNNWLETRR MLSPSEIPQRDWFPSDFTFGAATSAYQIEGAWNEDGKG...D> 0 1BGA A 1BGAA 1 1BGA A 1BGAA 1BGA A 1BGAA RELGT--SG

  14. Country of Origin Image and Brand Equity Formation of Electronic Goods

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Moradi; Azim Zarei

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of country of origin image on consumer based brand equity formation. Moreover, the second aim of this research is to examine the moderating role of product related consumer intellectual involvement. For these purposes, a conceptual framework has been designed and relationships among its constructs (i.e. country of origin image, brand equity dimensions and overall brand equity) have been hypothesized. Data has been coll...

  15. A mobile app for securely capturing and transferring clinical images to the electronic health record: description and preliminary usability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Adam; Emani, Srinivas; Carlile, Narath; Rosenthal, David I; Semakov, Simon; Pallin, Daniel J; Poon, Eric G

    2015-01-02

    Photographs are important tools to record, track, and communicate clinical findings. Mobile devices with high-resolution cameras are now ubiquitous, giving clinicians the opportunity to capture and share images from the bedside. However, secure and efficient ways to manage and share digital images are lacking. The aim of this study is to describe the implementation of a secure application for capturing and storing clinical images in the electronic health record (EHR), and to describe initial user experiences. We developed CliniCam, a secure Apple iOS (iPhone, iPad) application that allows for user authentication, patient selection, image capture, image annotation, and storage of images as a Portable Document Format (PDF) file in the EHR. We leveraged our organization's enterprise service-oriented architecture to transmit the image file from CliniCam to our enterprise clinical data repository. There is no permanent storage of protected health information on the mobile device. CliniCam also required connection to our organization's secure WiFi network. Resident physicians from emergency medicine, internal medicine, and dermatology used CliniCam in clinical practice for one month. They were then asked to complete a survey on their experience. We analyzed the survey results using descriptive statistics. Twenty-eight physicians participated and 19/28 (68%) completed the survey. Of the respondents who used CliniCam, 89% found it useful or very useful for clinical practice and easy to use, and wanted to continue using the app. Respondents provided constructive feedback on location of the photos in the EHR, preferring to have photos embedded in (or linked to) clinical notes instead of storing them as separate PDFs within the EHR. Some users experienced difficulty with WiFi connectivity which was addressed by enhancing CliniCam to check for connectivity on launch. CliniCam was implemented successfully and found to be easy to use and useful for clinical practice. CliniCam is

  16. Approaches for ultrafast imaging of transient materials processes in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W; Santala, Melissa K; McKeown, Joseph T; Kulovits, Andreas; Wiezorek, Jörg M K; Nikolova, Liliya; Rosei, Federico; Siwick, Bradely J; Campbell, Geoffrey H

    2012-11-01

    The growing field of ultrafast materials science, aimed at exploring short-lived transient processes in materials on the microsecond to femtosecond timescales, has spawned the development of time-resolved, in situ techniques in electron microscopy capable of capturing these events. This article gives a brief overview of two principal approaches that have emerged in the past decade: the stroboscopic ultrafast electron microscope and the nanosecond-time-resolved single-shot instrument. The high time resolution is garnered through the use of advanced pulsed laser systems and a pump-probe experimental platforms using laser-driven photoemission processes to generate time-correlated electron probe pulses synchronized with laser-driven events in the specimen. Each technique has its advantages and limitations and thus is complementary in terms of the materials systems and processes that they can investigate. The stroboscopic approach can achieve atomic resolution and sub-picosecond time resolution for capturing transient events, though it is limited to highly repeatable (>10(6) cycles) materials processes, e.g., optically driven electronic phase transitions that must reset to the material's ground state within the repetition rate of the femtosecond laser. The single-shot approach can explore irreversible events in materials, but the spatial resolution is limited by electron source brightness and electron-electron interactions at nanosecond temporal resolutions and higher. The first part of the article will explain basic operating principles of the stroboscopic approach and briefly review recent applications of this technique. As the authors have pursued the development of the single-shot approach, the latter part of the review discusses its instrumentation design in detail and presents examples of materials science studies and the near-term instrumentation developments of this technique. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical and pathologic presentation in Parkinson’s disease by Apolipoprotein e4 allele status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Lilah M; Heller, Katherine B; Checkoway, Harvey; Litvan, Irene; Kukull, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Background Apolipoprotein (APOE) e4 allele status has been linked to clinical presentation and progression in Alzheimer’s disease; however, evidence for a role of APOE e4 in Parkinson’s disease (PD) remains largely inconclusive. In this analysis we explored potential significant associations between APOE e4 allele status and characteristics of clinical presentation in patients with PD. Methods Data came from 424 subjects evaluated using the Uniform Data Set (UDS) assessment collected by the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center. Subjects had a known year of diagnosis of PD and experienced change in motor function prior to any change in cognition. Linear and logistic regression were used to model the association between APOE e4 carrier status and clinical characteristics including measures of cognitive decline and motor and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Amyloid burden was also evaluated for a subset of patients who died and consented to autopsy. Results Odds of dementia were higher in APOE e4 carriers (OR=5.15), and, on average, APOE e4 carriers scored two points worse on tests of episodic memory and the Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes assessment. There was little evidence to support an association between e4 carrier status and severity of motor features, and, of the four neuropsychiatric symptoms evaluated, only presence of hallucinations was significantly associated with APOE e4 carrier status (OR=5.29). Neuropathology data revealed higher frequencies of neuritic and diffuse amyloid plaques in APOE e4 carriers compared to non-carriers. Conclusions APOE e4 allele status is associated with dementia and severity of Alzheimer’s disease pathologic features in PD. PMID:24582705

  18. Radiation oxygen biology with pulse electron paramagnetic resonance imaging in animal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Gage; Elas, Martyna; Epel, Boris; Barth, Eugene D; Halpern, Howard J

    2013-01-01

    The reduced oxygen in tumors (hypoxia) generates radiation resistance and limits tumor control probability (TCP) at radiation doses without significant normal tissue complication. Modern radiation therapy delivery with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) enables complex, high-dose gradient patterns, which avoid sensitive human tissues and organs. EPR oxygen images may allow selection of more resistant parts of a tumor to which to deliver more radiation dose to enhance TCP. EPR O2 images are obtained using injected narrow-line, low relaxation rate trityl spin probes that enable pulse radiofrequency EPR O2 images of tumors in the legs of mice, rats, and rabbits, the latter exceeding 4 cm in size. Low relaxation rates of trityls have enabled novel T1-, rather than T2-, based oximetry, which provides near absolute pO2 imaging. Tomographic image formation and filtered back projection reconstruction are used to generate these images with fixed, linear stepped gradients. Images obtained both with T2 and T1 oximetric images have demonstrated the complex in vivo mechanism explaining the unexpected efficacy of TNFerade, a radiation-inducible adenoviral construct to locally produce TNF-induced vascular as well as radiation damage [1, 2]. The unexpected efficacy of large-dose radiation fractions is seen to be due to an interaction between host microvasculature and tumor cells producing a prompt (15 min) postradiation hypoxia, paralyzing tumor cell repair, and sensitizing tumors. Finally, cure of tumors treated to a single 50 % control dose shows a significant dependence on EPR O2 image hypoxic fractions, best shown with the fraction of voxels less than 10 Torr (HF10). We show that these O2 images provide a quantitative basis for measuring tumor and normal tissue response to abnormally low O2 levels. Measurements of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in a specific syngeneic mouse fibrosarcoma, FSa versus fraction of tissue voxels with pO2 less than 10

  19. Angle-resolved 2D imaging of electron emission processes in atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukk, E.; Wills, A.A.; Langer, B.; Bozek, J.D.; Berrah, N.

    2004-09-02

    A variety of electron emission processes have been studied in detail for both atomic and molecular systems, using a highly efficient experimental system comprising two time-of-flight (TOF) rotatable electron energy analyzers and a 3rd generation synchrotron light source. Two examples are used here to illustrate the obtained results. Firstly, electron emissions in the HCL molecule have been mapped over a 14 eV wide photon energy range over the Cl 2p ionization threshold. Particular attention is paid to the dissociative core-excited states, for which the Auger electron emission shows photon energy dependent features. Also, the evolution of resonant Auger to the normal Auger decay distorted by post-collision interaction has been observed and the resonating behavior of the valence photoelectron lines studied. Secondly, an atomic system, neon, in which excitation of doubly excited states and their subsequent decay to various accessible ionic states has been studied. Since these processes only occurs via inter-electron correlations, the many body dynamics of an atom can be probed, revealing relativistic effects, surprising in such a light atom. Angular distribution of the decay of the resonances to the parity unfavored continuum exhibits significant deviation from the LS coupling predictions.

  20. Three-dimensional atomic models from a single projection using Z-contrast imaging: verification by electron tomography and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A; Jones, L; Lobato, I; Altantzis, T; Goris, B; Nellist, P D; Bals, S; Van Aert, S

    2017-06-29

    In order to fully exploit structure-property relations of nanomaterials, three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale is often required. In recent years, the resolution of electron tomography has reached the atomic scale. However, such tomography typically requires several projection images demanding substantial electron dose. A newly developed alternative circumvents this by counting the number of atoms across a single projection. These atom counts can be used to create an initial atomic model with which an energy minimization can be applied to obtain a relaxed 3D reconstruction of the nanoparticle. Here, we compare, at the atomic scale, this single projection reconstruction approach with tomography and find an excellent agreement. This new approach allows for the characterization of beam-sensitive materials or where the acquisition of a tilt series is impossible. As an example, the utility is illustrated by the 3D atomic scale characterization of a nanodumbbell on an in situ heating holder of limited tilt range.

  1. Maximum usable thickness revisited: Imaging dislocations in Si by modern high-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuhisa; Yamashita, Yuki; Yasuda, Hidehiro; Mori, Hirotaro

    2017-10-01

    We have quantitatively evaluated the usable thickness of specimens in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at 1 MV using a wedge-shaped Si(110) single crystal including artificially introduced high-density dislocations. The width of dislocation images was employed as a criterion for the quantitative evaluation of usable thickness. Superior usable thickness in STEM than in TEM was found; the obtained results were 14.7 µm for STEM and 5.8 µm for TEM. In particular, in STEM, dislocations can be observed as thin lines with 10-15 nm width in the thickness range up to 10 µm. The latest high-voltage STEM is useful for imaging crystal defects in thick semiconductors.

  2. Fast Focal Point Correction in Prism-Coupled Total Internal Reflection Scanning Imager Using an Electronically Tunable Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenggang Zhu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Total internal reflection (TIR is useful for interrogating physical and chemical processes that occur at the interface between two transparent media. Yet prism-coupled TIR imaging microscopes suffer from limited sensing areas due to the fact that the interface (the object plane is not perpendicular to the optical axis of the microscope. In this paper, we show that an electrically tunable lens can be used to rapidly and reproducibly correct the focal length of an oblique-incidence scanning microscope (OI-RD in a prism-coupled TIR geometry. We demonstrate the performance of such a correction by acquiring an image of a protein microarray over a scan area of 4 cm2 with an effective resolution of less than 20 microns. The electronic focal length tuning eliminates the mechanical movement of the illumination lens in the scanning microscope and in turn the noise and background drift associated with the motion.

  3. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Kirian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam.

  4. New integrated Monte Carlo code for the simulation of high-resolution scanning electron microscopy images for metrology in microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgüsatiroglu, Emre; Illarionov, Alexey Yu.; Ciappa, Mauro; Pfäffli, Paul; Bomholt, Lars

    2014-04-01

    A new Monte Carlo code is presented that includes among others definition of arbitrary geometries with sub-nanometer resolution, high performance parallel computing capabilities, trapped charge, electric field calculation, electron tracking in electrostatic field, and calculation of 3D dose distributions. These functionalities are efficiently implemented thanks to the coupling of the Monte Carlo simulator with a TCAD environment. Applications shown are the synthesis of SEM linescans and images that focus on the evaluation of the impact of proximity effects and self charging on the quantitative extraction of critical dimensions in dense photoresist structures.

  5. Penetration depth measurement of a 6 MeV electron beam in water by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. Hammer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI visualization of a 6 MeV electron beam in ferrous-doped water; a 25 mm penetration depth was measured. Time domain nuclear magnetic resonance was used to investigate the effect of generated free radicals on the free induction decay (FID in nondoped water; no apparent effects to the FID were observed. We show that MRI visualization of charged particle beams used in medical applications will require exogenous agents to provide contrast enhancement.

  6. Nanostructure size determination in p-type porous silicon by the use of transmission electron diffraction image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Porras, A. [CICIMA and Escuela de Fisica, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro 2060 (Costa Rica)

    2005-06-01

    The structure of p-type porous silicon (PS) has been investigated by the use of transmission electron diffraction (TED) microscopy and image processing. The results suggest the presence of well oriented crystalline phases and polycrystalline phases characterized by random orientation. These phases are believed to be formed by spheres with a mean diameter of 4.3 nm and a standard deviation of 1.3 nm. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Yun, G S; Lee, J E; Kim, M; Choi, M J; Lee, W; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Sabbagh, S A; Park, Y S; Lee, S G; Bak, J G

    2014-06-01

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α* of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α* is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  8. Contrast of Backscattered Electron SEM Images of Nanoparticles on Substrates with Complex Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Erich; Fritsch-Decker, Susanne; Hettler, Simon; Störmer, Heike; Weiss, Carsten; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    This study is concerned with backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM) contrast of complex nanoscaled samples which consist of SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on indium-tin-oxide covered bulk SiO2 and glassy carbon substrates. BSE SEM contrast of NPs is studied as function of the primary electron energy and working distance. Contrast inversions are observed which prevent intuitive interpretation of NP contrast in terms of material contrast. Experimental data is quantitatively compared with Monte-Carlo- (MC-) simulations. Quantitative agreement between experimental data and MC-simulations is obtained if the transmission characteristics of the annular semiconductor detector are taken into account. MC-simulations facilitate the understanding of NP contrast inversions and are helpful to derive conditions for optimum material and topography contrast. PMID:29109816

  9. Contrast of Backscattered Electron SEM Images of Nanoparticles on Substrates with Complex Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowoll, Thomas; Müller, Erich; Fritsch-Decker, Susanne; Hettler, Simon; Störmer, Heike; Weiss, Carsten; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    This study is concerned with backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM) contrast of complex nanoscaled samples which consist of SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on indium-tin-oxide covered bulk SiO2 and glassy carbon substrates. BSE SEM contrast of NPs is studied as function of the primary electron energy and working distance. Contrast inversions are observed which prevent intuitive interpretation of NP contrast in terms of material contrast. Experimental data is quantitatively compared with Monte-Carlo- (MC-) simulations. Quantitative agreement between experimental data and MC-simulations is obtained if the transmission characteristics of the annular semiconductor detector are taken into account. MC-simulations facilitate the understanding of NP contrast inversions and are helpful to derive conditions for optimum material and topography contrast.

  10. Contrast of Backscattered Electron SEM Images of Nanoparticles on Substrates with Complex Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kowoll

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM contrast of complex nanoscaled samples which consist of SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs deposited on indium-tin-oxide covered bulk SiO2 and glassy carbon substrates. BSE SEM contrast of NPs is studied as function of the primary electron energy and working distance. Contrast inversions are observed which prevent intuitive interpretation of NP contrast in terms of material contrast. Experimental data is quantitatively compared with Monte-Carlo- (MC- simulations. Quantitative agreement between experimental data and MC-simulations is obtained if the transmission characteristics of the annular semiconductor detector are taken into account. MC-simulations facilitate the understanding of NP contrast inversions and are helpful to derive conditions for optimum material and topography contrast.

  11. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  12. E4orf1: a novel ligand that improves glucose disposal in cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Dhurandhar

    Full Text Available Reducing dietary fat intake and excess adiposity, the cornerstones of behavioral treatment of insulin resistance (IR, are marginally successful over the long term. Ad36, a human adenovirus, offers a template to improve IR, independent of dietary fat intake or adiposity. Ad36 increases cellular glucose uptake via a Ras-mediated activation of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase(PI3K, and improves hyperglycemia in mice, despite a high-fat diet and without reducing adiposity. Ex-vivo studies suggest that Ad36 improves hyperglycemia in mice by increasing glucose uptake by adipose tissue and skeletal muscle, and by reducing hepatic glucose output. It is impractical to use Ad36 for therapeutic action. Instead, we investigated if the E4orf1 protein of Ad36, mediates its anti-hyperglycemic action. Such a candidate protein may offer an attractive template for therapeutic development. Experiment-1 determined that Ad36 'requires' E4orf1 protein to up-regulate cellular glucose uptake. Ad36 significantly increased glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, which was abrogated by knocking down E4orf1 with siRNA. Experiment-2 identified E4orf1 as 'sufficient' to up-regulate glucose uptake. 3T3-L1 cells that inducibly express E4orf1, increased glucose uptake in an induction-dependent manner, compared to null vector control cells. E4orf1 up-regulated PI3K pathway and increased abundance of Ras--the obligatory molecule in Ad36-induced glucose uptake. Experiment-3: Signaling studies of cells transiently transfected with E4orf1 or a null vector, revealed that E4orf1 may activate Ras/PI3K pathway by binding to Drosophila discs-large (Dlg1 protein. E4orf1 activated total Ras and, particularly the H-Ras isoform. By mutating the PDZ domain binding motif (PBM of E4orf1, Experiment-4 showed that E4orf1 requires its PBM to increase Ras activation or glucose uptake. Experiment-5: In-vitro, a transient transfection by E4orf1 significantly increased glucose uptake in preadipocytes

  13. Miniaturized Ultrasound Imaging Probes Enabled by CMUT Arrays with Integrated Frontend Electronic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. (Pierre) T.; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Wygant, Ira O.; Zhuang, Steve; Gencel, Mustafa; Choe, Jung Woo; Stephens, Douglas N.; de la Rama, Alan; Chen, Peter; Lin, Feng; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Mahajan, Aman; Seo, Chi Hyung; O’Donnell, Matthew; Truong, Uyen; Sahn, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays are conveniently integrated with frontend integrated circuits either monolithically or in a hybrid multichip form. This integration helps with reducing the number of active data processing channels for 2D arrays. This approach also preserves the signal integrity for arrays with small elements. Therefore CMUT arrays integrated with electronic circuits are most suitable to implement miniaturized probes required for many intravascular, intracardiac, and endoscopic applications. This paper presents examples of miniaturized CMUT probes utilizing 1D, 2D, and ring arrays with integrated electronics. PMID:21097106

  14. Decontamination of digital image sensors and assessment of electron microscope performance in a BSL-3 containment

    OpenAIRE

    Michael B. Sherman; Juan Trujillo; Bammes, Benjamin E.; Liang Jin; Matthias W. Stumpf; Weaver, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    A unique biological safety level (BSL)-3 cryo-electron microscopy facility with a 200 keV high-end cryo-electron microscope has been commissioned at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) to study the structure of viruses and bacteria classified as select agents. We developed a microscope decontamination protocol based on chlorine dioxide gas with a continuous flow system. In this paper we report on testing digital camera sensors (both CCD and CMOS direct detector) in a BSL-3 environme...

  15. Decontamination of digital image sensors and assessment of electron microscope performance in a BSL-3 containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Sherman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A unique biological safety level (BSL-3 cryo-electron microscopy facility with a 200 keV high-end cryo-electron microscope has been commissioned at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB to study the structure of viruses and bacteria classified as select agents. We developed a microscope decontamination protocol based on chlorine dioxide gas with a continuous flow system. In this paper we report on testing digital camera sensors (both CCD and CMOS direct detector in a BSL-3 environment, and microscope performance after chlorine dioxide (ClO2 decontamination cycles.

  16. High-resolution Electronic and Chemical imaging of wonder nanomaterials beyond graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Chen, Chaoyu; Lorcy, Stephane; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-06-01

    Despite the great progress made recently in spectroscopic imagery and even the remarkable success achieved, the challenge still remain concerning the precise determination of the chemical and electronic imagery of advances materials, which usually are available as heterogeneous large crystals or tiny homogeneous monocrystals. Here we report, a recently developed novel X-ray microscope, labelled, k-microscope or Nano-ARPES (Nano Angle Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy) particularly well suited to provide both high resolved chemical and electronic information in the real and reciprocal space of complex materials with nano-scale resolution.

  17. Fabrication of high aspect-ratio polymer microstructures for large-area electronic portal x-ray imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J.H.; Sawant, A.; Teepe, M.; Shih, C.; Street, R.A.; Antonuk, L.E.

    2007-01-01

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging performed during radiotherapy is the method of choice for geometric verification of patient localization and dose delivery. Presently, such imaging is increasingly performed using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) based on indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPIs). These devices use a scintillating phosphor screen in order to convert incident x-rays into optical photons, which are then detected by the underlying active matrix photodiode array. The use of a continuous phosphor introduces a trade-off between x-ray quantum efficiency and spatial resolution, which limits current devices to use only ∼2% of the incident x-rays. This trade-off can be circumvented by “segmented phosphor screens”, comprising a two-dimensional matrix of optically-isolated cell structures filled with scintillating phosphor. In this work we describe the fabrication of millimeter-thick segmented phosphor screens using the MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical-system) polymer SU-8. This method is capable of being extended to large-area substrates. PMID:18159218

  18. Fabrication of high aspect-ratio polymer microstructures for large-area electronic portal x-ray imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J H; Sawant, A; Teepe, M; Shih, C; Street, R A; Antonuk, L E

    2007-11-10

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging performed during radiotherapy is the method of choice for geometric verification of patient localization and dose delivery. Presently, such imaging is increasingly performed using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) based on indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPIs). These devices use a scintillating phosphor screen in order to convert incident x-rays into optical photons, which are then detected by the underlying active matrix photodiode array. The use of a continuous phosphor introduces a trade-off between x-ray quantum efficiency and spatial resolution, which limits current devices to use only ∼2% of the incident x-rays. This trade-off can be circumvented by "segmented phosphor screens", comprising a two-dimensional matrix of optically-isolated cell structures filled with scintillating phosphor. In this work we describe the fabrication of millimeter-thick segmented phosphor screens using the MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical-system) polymer SU-8. This method is capable of being extended to large-area substrates.

  19. A novel method of estimating dose responses for polymer gels using texture analysis of scanning electron microscopy images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ting Shih

    Full Text Available Polymer gels are regarded as a potential dosimeter for independent validation of absorbed doses in clinical radiotherapy. Several imaging modalities have been used to convert radiation-induced polymerization to absorbed doses from a macro-scale viewpoint. This study developed a novel dose conversion mechanism by texture analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM images. The modified N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPAM gels were prepared under normoxic conditions, and were administered radiation doses from 5 to 20 Gy. After freeze drying, the gel samples were sliced for SEM scanning with 50×, 500×, and 3500× magnifications. Four texture indices were calculated based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM. The results showed that entropy and homogeneity were more suitable than contrast and energy as dose indices for higher linearity and sensitivity of the dose response curves. After parameter optimization, an R (2 value of 0.993 can be achieved for homogeneity using 500× magnified SEM images with 27 pixel offsets and no outlier exclusion. For dose verification, the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the measured dose for 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy were -7.60%, 5.80%, 2.53%, and -0.95%, respectively. We conclude that texture analysis can be applied to the SEM images of gel dosimeters to accurately convert micro-scale structural features to absorbed doses. The proposed method may extend the feasibility of applying gel dosimeters in the fields of diagnostic radiology and radiation protection.

  20. COMPARATIVE ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY AND IMAGE-ANALYSIS OF OXY-HEMOCYANIN AND DEOXY-HEMOCYANIN FROM THE SPINY LOBSTER PANULIRUS-INTERRUPTUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHAAS, F; VANBREEMEN, JFL; BOEKEMA, EJ; KEEGSTRA, W; VANBRUGGEN, EFJ

    Structural differences between oxy-hemocyanin and deoxy-hemocyanin from the spiny lobster P. interruptus were studied by electron microscopy and image analysis of negatively stained preparations. Projections of the hexameric P. interruptus hemocyanin from electron microscopy were compared with