WorldWideScience

Sample records for e-region initial results

  1. Model results for the ionospheric E region: solar and seasonal changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titheridge, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    A new, empirical model for NO densities is developed, to include physically reasonable variations with local time, season, latitude and solar cycle. Model calculations making full allowance for secondary production, and ionising radiations at wavelengths down to 25 Å, then give values for the peak density NmE that are only 6% below the empirical IRI values for summer conditions at solar minimum. At solar maximum the difference increases to 16%. Solar-cycle changes in the EUVAC radiation model seem insufficient to explain the observed changes in NmE, with any reasonable modifications to current atmospheric constants. Hinteregger radiations give the correct change, with results that are just 2% below the IRI values throughout the solar cycle, but give too little ionisation in the E-F valley region. To match the observed solar increase in NmE, the high-flux reference spectrum in the EUVAC model needs an overall increase of about 20% (or 33% if the change is confined to the less well defined radiations at Francia->

  2. ALOS-2 initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaku, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) was launched from Tanegashima Space Center by H-IIA rocket successfully on 24th May 2014. ALOS-2 carries the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) as the state-of-the-art L-band SAR system which succeeds to PALSAR onboard ALOS. PALSAR-2 uses almost whole bandwidth allocated for L-band active sensor of Earth Exploration Satellites Service specified by the Radio Regulation in order to realize the high resolution observation, and also, it transmits more than 6 kW power for lower Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero using 180 TRMs driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN) amplifier which is the first use in space. Furthermore, because ALOS-2 carries the SAR system only, PALSAR-2 antenna can be mounted under the satellite body. It enables to observe right-/left-looking observation by satellite maneuvering. And the high accuracy orbit control to maintain the satellite within 500 m radius tube against the reference orbit enables high coherence for the InSAR processing. Using these new technologies, ALOS-2 has been operating to fulfill the mission requirements such as disaster monitoring and so on. This document introduces the initial result of ALOS-2 from the first year operation.

  3. Digital coincidence counting - initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, K. S. A.; Watt, G. C.; Alexiev, D.; van der Gaast, H.; Davies, J.; Mo, Li; Wyllie, H. A.; Keightley, J. D.; Smith, D.; Woods, M. J.

    2000-08-01

    Digital Coincidence Counting (DCC) is a new technique in radiation metrology, based on the older method of analogue coincidence counting. It has been developed by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), in collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) of the United Kingdom, as a faster more reliable means of determining the activity of ionising radiation samples. The technique employs a dual channel analogue-to-digital converter acquisition system for collecting pulse information from a 4π beta detector and an NaI(Tl) gamma detector. The digitised pulse information is stored on a high-speed hard disk and timing information for both channels is also stored. The data may subsequently be recalled and analysed using software-based algorithms. In this letter we describe some recent results obtained with the new acquistion hardware being tested at ANSTO. The system is fully operational and is now in routine use. Results for 60Co and 22Na radiation activity calibrations are presented, initial results with 153Sm are also briefly mentioned.

  4. Initial Blackbeard power survey results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.; Devenport, J.; Holden, D.

    1996-06-01

    The Blackbeard broadband VHF radio receiver is in low-earth orbit aboard the ALEXIS satellite. The receiver has been used to measure the transmitted power in four VHF bands (55.2-75.8, 28.0-94.8, 132.3-152.2, and 107.7-166.0 MHz) over quiet and noisy parts of the earth. The authors present the results of the survey and discuss their implications. They find that there are remote ocean areas over which the observed spectrum is largely free of man-made interference, but that the spectrum over most of the earth is dominated by broadcast VHF signals. The signal characteristics observed over a given area are quite constant when observed at different times of day and at intervals of several weeks to months. It appears that in many cases the bulk of the signal power is coming from a small number of sources.

  5. Care initiation area yields dramatic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The ED at Gaston Memorial Hospital in Gastonia, NC, has achieved dramatic results in key department metrics with a Care Initiation Area (CIA) and a physician in triage. Here's how the ED arrived at this winning solution: Leadership was trained in and implemented the Kaizen method, which eliminates redundant or inefficient process steps. Simulation software helped determine additional space needed by analyzing arrival patterns and other key data. After only two days of meetings, new ideas were implemented and tested.

  6. A fresh look at the mechanisms behind auroral E region irregularities, based on interferometry results from the March 17 storm of 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, Jean-Pierre; Chau, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    During the strong magnetic storm of March 17, 2015, auroral echoes were detected by mid latitude radars operating at 32.5MHz and 36.2 MHz in Northern Germany. As shown in a separate presentation, thanks to several interferometry links, the retrieved spectra could be localized and superposed spectra could be separated in the presence of multiple spectral signatures from different locations with similar ranges. The radars detected four types of spectra. The first type consisted of spectra with moderate widths with a mean Doppler shift comparable to the expected ion-acoustic speed. Those are the often observed so-called Type I waves. They are Farley-Buneman waves at their peak amplitude. The second type had broad spectra with mean Doppler shifts typically less than 200 m/s. Such so-called Type II waves are routinely observed in auroral and equatorial E regions. Those waves are from Farley-Buneman waves observed from a direction perpendicular to their leading wave fronts and are therefore seen at large flow angles. The third class of echoes observed during the storm consisted of very narrow spectra with a Doppler shift that varied little from 180 m/s. These have been described as Type III waves in the literature and were never fully understood, in large part owing to a lack of localization technique. For our observations, interferometry revealed that they came from altitudes well below 100 km, with a target motion of 800 m/s or more in spite of the small Doppler shift. This contrasted with the fourth type, which came from the upper part of the unstable E region and was made once again of very narrow spectra moving at close to the line-of-sight velocity (as found through target motion) when the plasma drift was particularly large, of the order of 1400 m/s. This presentation will show that the Type III waves were in great agreement with the notion of maximum amplitude unstable Farley-Buneman waves excited by very large electric fields in a region strongly affected by non

  7. Initial Results from the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, S R; Arnquist, I J; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Bradley, A W; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Buuck, M; Caldwell, T S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Chu, P -H; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Dunagan, C; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Fullmer, A; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilliss, T; Giovanetti, G K; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howe, M A; Jasinski, B R; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; Leon, J; Lopez, A M; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Massarczyk, R; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Shanks, B; Shirchenko, M; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhitnikov, I

    2016-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-beta decay searches seek to determine the nature of neutrinos, the existence of a lepton violating process, and the effective Majorana neutrino mass. The {\\sc Majorana} Collaboration is assembling an array of high purity Ge detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in $^{76}$Ge. The {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} is composed of 44.8~kg (29.7 kg enriched in $^{76}$Ge) of Ge detectors in total, split between two modules contained in a low background shield at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The initial goals of the {\\sc Demonstrator} are to establish the required background and scalability of a Ge-based, next-generation, tonne-scale experiment. Following a commissioning run that began in 2015, the first detector module started physics data production in early 2016. We will discuss initial results of the Module 1 commissioning and first physics run, as well as the status and potential physics reach of the full {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} experiment. ...

  8. Initial Results from the Majorana Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, S. R.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T., III.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Caldwell, T. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P.-H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Dunagan, C.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Fullmer, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; Leon, J.; Lopez, A. M.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Massarczyk, R.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O’Shaughnessy, C.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2017-09-01

    Neutrinoless double-beta decay searches seek to determine the nature of neutrinos, the existence of a lepton violating process, and the effective Majorana neutrino mass. The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of high purity Ge detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. The Majorana Demonstrator is composed of 44.8 kg (29.7 kg enriched in 76Ge) of Ge detectors in total, split between two modules contained in a low background shield at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The initial goals of the Demonstrator are to establish the required background and scalability of a Ge-based, next-generation, tonne-scale experiment. Following a commissioning run that began in 2015, the first detector module started physics data production in early 2016. We will discuss initial results of the Module 1 commissioning and first physics run, as well as the status and potential physics reach of the full Majorana Demonstrator experiment. The collaboration plans to complete the assembly of the second detector module by mid-2016 to begin full data production with the entire array.

  9. Redox accountability test program: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, R.A.; Bray, L.A.

    1958-11-25

    This report details initial results of a large scale accountability test program which was recently carried out in the Redox Facility. The test, as originally planned which was to consist of the complete processing (no inventory-clean plant basis) of about 55 tons of selected metal in conjunction with an extensive analytical, sampling, and volume measurement program. With the exception of two incidents, the processing requirements (minimum inventory and measurement of all material) necessary to the success of the test, were met. The two incidents which increase the uncertainties associated with some of the material balance values obtained were: the discharge of an estimated 700 pounds of uranium to the floor in a transfer from F-5 to F-4 due tot he improper installation of the F-5 to F-4 transfer line (jumper) and the discovery of a large accumulation of plutonium ({approximately} 15 kg) in the L-2 stripping tower after completion of the test run.

  10. Initial results from MARmara SuperSITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Necmioglu, Ocal; Favali, Paolo; Douglas, John; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Geli, Louis; Ergintav, Semih; Oguz Ozel, Asım; Tan, Onur; Gurbuz, Cemil; Erdik, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    MARSite Project was initiated in November 2012 under the EC/FP-7 framework as an initiative towards establishment of new directions in seismic hazard assessment through focused earth observation in Marmara Region. Within MARSite, collection of the first comprehensive data set of fluids composition around the Sea of Marmara has been accomplished and first insight in the geochemical features of the fluids are expelled from tectonic structures around the Sea of Marmara. GPS time series and velocity fields are periodically updated and a project proposal has been prepared for Supersite initiative to take SAR data and integrate the results with in-situ data sets, which is accepted by the scientific committee of GEOSS. In the meantime, special focus was given to develop the processing algorithms, starting from low level atmospheric correction to high level modeling routines. Considerable progress has been made in the novel design of a multiparameter borehole system consisting of very wide dynamic range and stable borehole (VBB) broad band seismic sensor also incorporating 3-D strain meter, tilt meter, and temperature and local hydrostatic pressure measuring devices. Borehole and surface array locations and borehole bedrock depth of 137 m has been identified. A modeling scheme for the scenario earthquake simulation has been set up in order to realize processing of real-time high-rate GPS data and simulating of scenario earthquakes. The probability of occurrence for the fault segmentation in the Marmara region were calculated using the Poisson, BPT and BPT with a stress interaction models for time intervals of 5-10-30 and 50 years. High resolution seismic reflection and multibeam data in the easternmost Cinarcik basin obtained during the cruise MARMARA 2013 carried out onboard the CNR R/V Urania ship provided information on diffuse gravitational failures. An in situ multi-parameter observational system for landslide monitoring, including displacement, rainfall and seismic

  11. Initial Results from the Kwajalein Micrometeorite Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Price, M. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D. E.; Dearborn, D.; Jones, T.; Barnett, B.; Yakuma, S.; Letendre, T.; Gonzalez, C.; Bastien, R.; Rodriquez, M.

    2014-01-01

    Micrometeorites are constantly arriving at the Earth's surface, however, they are quickly diluted by the natural and anthropogenic back-ground dust. The successful collection of micromete-orites requires either the employment of a separation technique (e.g. using magnets to separate metal-bearing micrometeorites from deepsea sediments [e.g. 1,2] and dissolved pre-historic limestones and salts [e.g. 3,4]), or an approach that limits contamination by terrestrial dust (e.g. collecting from ice, snow and well water in polar regions - locations where the terrestrial dust flux is so low that micrometeorites repre-sent the major dust component [e.g. 5-7]). We have recently set up a micrometeorite collection station on Kwajalein Island in the Republic of the Marshall Is-lands in the Pacific Ocean, using high volume air samplers to collect particles directly from the atmosphere. Collecting at this location exploits the considerably reduced anthropogenic background; Kwajalein is >1000 miles from the nearest continent and for much of the year, trade winds blow from the northeast at 15 to 20 knots providing a continuous stream of oceanic aerosol for sampling. By collecting directly from the atmosphere, the terrestrial age of the particles, and hence weathering they experience, is minimal. We therefore anticipate that the Kwajalein col-lection may include particles that are highly susceptible to weathering and either not preserved well or not found at all in other collections. In addition, this collection method allows for particle arrival times to be constrained so that collections can be timed to correlate with celestial events (e.g. meteor showers). Here we describe the collections and their preparation and report on the initial results.

  12. REXEBTS, design and initial commissioning results

    CERN Document Server

    Wenander, F; Jonson, B; Liljeby, L; Nyman, G H; Rensfelt, K G; Skeppstedt, Ö; Wolf, B

    2001-01-01

    The REXEDIS is an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) developed particularly for charge breeding of rare and short-lived isotopes produced at ISOLDE for the REX-ISOLDE post accelerator. Bunches of singly charged radioactive ions are injected into the EBIS and charge bred to a charge-to-mass ratio of approximately 1/4 and thereafter extracted and injected into a short LINAC. This novel concept, employing a Penning trap to bunch and cool the ions from an on-line mass separator prior to charge breeding in an EBIS, results in an efficient and compact system. In this article the final REXEBIS design is presented together with results from the first tests. (19 refs).

  13. Commissioning of ALFABURST: initial tests and results

    CERN Document Server

    Rajwade, Kaustubh; Lorimer, Duncan; Karastergiou, Aris; Werthimer, Dan; Siemion, Andrew; MacMahon, David; Cobb, Jeff; Williams, Christopher; Armour, Wes

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are apparently one-time, relatively bright radio pulses that have been observed in recent years. The origin of FRBs is currently unknown and many instruments are being built to detect more of these bursts to better characterize their physical properties and identify the source population. ALFABURST is one such instrument. ALFABURST takes advantage of the 7-beam Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver on the 305-m Arecibo Radio Telescope in Puerto Rico, to detect FRBs in real-time at L-band (1.4 GHz). We present the results of recent on-sky tests and observations undertaken during the commissioning phase of the instrument. ALFABURST is now available for commensal observations with other ALFA projects.

  14. [Evolocumab and PROFICIO Project: Initial Results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraml, Pavel

    2015-11-01

    The PROFICIO project includes 20 clinical studies evaluating the effect of evolocumab on the incidence of cardio-vascular disease including its safety profile and tolerance. Most of the included studies follow the average proportional decrease of LDL-cholesterol concentrations over 10 and 12 weeks of administering evolocumab as compared to the input values. The first results were announced at the congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) in London at the end of August and beginning of September 2015. This subanalysis comprised 3146 patients, who underwent one of the selected studies of phase 3 clinical testing and who were administered a dose of 140 mg s.c. evolocumab once in 2 weeks, or 420 mg s.c. once in 4 weeks. LDL-cholesterol levels decreased after evolocumab by 56.5-74.9% in the individual studies as compared to placebo and by 36.9-44.9% compared to ezetimib. The incidence of adverse effects did not differ from the group which used placebo.

  15. Do corporate environmental initiatives lead to results in SMEs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    , it is relevant to study the situation between these two stages in order to identify to which extent corporate environmental initiatives actually lead to results and reductions. The research is based on data collected by surveys of industrial companies in Denmark in 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011. They information...... with previous research demonstrating that companies generally are re-active in their attitude when perceiving stakeholder influence on taking environmental initiative and mainly respond to influence from stakeholders representing authorities, owners or employees. However, the size of the company may have...

  16. The GLOBE Contrail Protocol: Initial Analysis of Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Lin; Duda, David

    2004-01-01

    The GLOBE contrail protocol was launched in March 2003 to obtain surface observer reports of contrail occurrence to complement satellite and model studies underway at NASA Langley, among others. During the first year, more than 30,000 ground observations of contrails were submitted to GLOBE. An initial analysis comparing the GLOBE observations to weather prediction model results for relative humidity at flight altitudes is in progress. This paper reports on the findings to date from this effort.

  17. Initial Results from the ANITA 2006-2007 Balloon Flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorham, P.W.; /Hawaii U.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /SLAC; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; /Hawaii U.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /UC, Irvine

    2011-11-16

    We report initial results of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos. ANITA flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses that might be due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. In our initial high-threshold robust analysis, no neutrino candidates are seen, with no physics background. In a non-signal horizontal-polarization channel, we do detect 6 events consistent with radio impulses from extensive air showers, which helps to validate the effectiveness of our method. Upper limits derived from our analysis now begin to eliminate the highest cosmogenic neutrino models.

  18. Initial diagnostics commissioning results for the APS injector subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, A.; Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Smith, T.; Wang, X.

    1995-05-01

    In recent months the first beams have been introduced into the various injector subsystems of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). An overview will be given of the diagnostics results on beam profiling, beam position monitors (BPMs), loss rate monitors (LRMs), current monitors (CMs), and photon monitors on the low energy transport lines, positron accumulator ring (PAR), and injector synchrotron (IS). Initial measurements have been done with electron beams at energies from 250 to 450 MeV and 50 to 400 pC per macrobunch. Operations in single turn and stored beam conditions were diagnosed in the PAR and IS.

  19. Life cycle Prognostic Model Development and Initial Application Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffries, Brien; Hines, Wesley; Nam, Alan; Sharp, Michael; Upadhyaya, Belle [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    2014-08-15

    In order to obtain more accurate Remaining Useful Life (RUL) estimates based on empirical modeling, a Lifecycle Prognostics algorithm was developed that integrates various prognostic models. These models can be categorized into three types based on the type of data they process. The application of multiple models takes advantage of the most useful information available as the system or component operates through its lifecycle. The Lifecycle Prognostics is applied to an impeller test bed, and the initial results serve as a proof of concept.

  20. High Etendue Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer: initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Richard F.; Conger, Chris A.; Pelligrino, L. S.

    1997-10-01

    At the Denver meeting, last year, we presented the High Etendue Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer, (HEIFTS), theory and optical design. This device uses a new 'image plane interferometer' geometry to produce 'autocorrelation function modulation' in the image plane of a 2D imaging array, such that the phase offset of the modulation varies linearly across the image. As a 2D image is pushbroomed across the imaging, array, the record of an individual scene pixel is recorded for each autocorrelation phase offset. The 3D array of this data is processed to yield an 'autocorrelation function' data cube, which is Fourier transformed to yield a 'wavenumber' hyperspectral data curve. A phase I device has been demonstrated in the laboratory and initial results are presented. The significant increase in signal to noise ratio, which the HEIFTS optical design promises over conventional hyperspectral imaging schemes, has been simulated, and results will be discussed. A Phase II system is being prepared for initial field deployment, and will be described.

  1. Educating medical students about radiation oncology: initial results of the oncology education initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Ariel E; Singh, Deeptej; Ozonoff, Al; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2007-10-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer care requires the integration of teaching across established educational boundaries. Because exposure to oncology and radiation oncology is limited in the undergraduate medical curriculum, the authors introduced an oncology education initiative at their institution. They report on the addition of structured multidisciplinary oncology education to the required radiology core clerkship. An institutional-based cohort study of fourth-year medical students rotating through a required clerkship in radiology at Boston University School of Medicine was conducted, beginning with the class of 2007. An educational questionnaire measuring the perceived quality of oncology education before and after exposure to a structured didactic program was administered. Of the 149 fourth-year students, 121 (81%) have completed the didactics of the initiative. Although 68 of 121 (56%) students reported having limited exposure to cancer care in the clinical years, 107 of 121 (88%) were motivated to learn more about the subject, and 100 of 121 (83%) reported a better understanding of the multidisciplinary nature of cancer care after this oncology education initiative. One hundred ten of 121 (91%) felt that the radiology clerkship was an opportune time to receive oncology and radiation oncology teaching. As a result of the initiative, 32% of the students pursued advanced training in radiation oncology. Of students who before the initiative were not planning on taking oncology electives, 70 of 99 (71%) agreed or strongly agreed that the lecture motivated them to learn more about the subject, and 43 of 99 (43%) agreed or strongly agreed that the lecture motivated them to take oncology electives. Systematic exposure to multidisciplinary oncology education as part of a radiology core clerkship provides an excellent opportunity for the integrated teaching of oncologic principles and patient management. This type of experience addresses an important yet underrepresented

  2. Initial results from the DSPlanar experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, E. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W.; Schmidt, D. W.; Cardenas, T.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    Recently, LANL has begun a project aimed ultimately at fielding a neutron-producing double-shell capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Initial experiments have begun at both the NIF and OMEGA laser facilities over the last year. At OMEGA, halfraum-driven planar targets will be used to study physics issues important to double shell implosions, but outside of a convergent geometry. In particular, side-on radiography through a tube has advantages over imaging through the hohlraum and double-shell capsule at NIF. We plan to study a number physics issues with this platform, including both 1-d and higher dimensional effects. In 1-d, momentum transfer from the ablator to the inner shell, and the effect of pre-heat on the inner shell can be studied. Higher dimensional effects, in the form of hydrodynamic instabilities, can also be studied. Pre-heat expansion of the inner shell can lead to an unstable interface, which can be mitigated by a tamper layer. Manufacturing tolerances can be used to mitigate against feature-driven instability growth, such as from a glue joint or fill tube. Initial results on the amount pre-heat from various ablator materials will be given, along with a discussion of future plans. Supported under the US DOE by the LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-16-25044.

  3. Initial CGE Model Results Summary Exogenous and Endogenous Variables Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rivera, Michael Kelly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    The following discussion presents initial results of tests of the most recent version of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The intent of this is to test and assess the model’s behavioral properties. The test evaluated whether the predicted impacts are reasonable from a qualitative perspective. This issue is whether the predicted change, be it an increase or decrease in other model variables, is consistent with prior economic intuition and expectations about the predicted change. One of the purposes of this effort is to determine whether model changes are needed in order to improve its behavior qualitatively and quantitatively.

  4. Initial Data Analysis Results for ATD-2 ISAS HITL Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanbong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the operational procedures and information requirements for the core functional capabilities of the ATD-2 project, such as tactical surface metering tool, APREQ-CFR procedure, and data element exchanges between ramp and tower, human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations were performed in March, 2017. This presentation shows the initial data analysis results from the HITL simulations. With respect to the different runway configurations and metering values in tactical surface scheduler, various airport performance metrics were analyzed and compared. These metrics include gate holding time, taxi-out in time, runway throughput, queue size and wait time in queue, and TMI flight compliance. In addition to the metering value, other factors affecting the airport performance in the HITL simulation, including run duration, runway changes, and TMI constraints, are also discussed.

  5. Initial Results from the Variable Intensity Sonic Boom Propagation Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Cliatt, Larry J., II; Bunce, Thomas J.; Gabrielson, Thomas B.; Sparrow, Victor W.; Locey, Lance L.

    2008-01-01

    An extensive sonic boom propagation database with low- to normal-intensity booms (overpressures of 0.08 lbf/sq ft to 2.20 lbf/sq ft) was collected for propagation code validation, and initial results and flight research techniques are presented. Several arrays of microphones were used, including a 10 m tall tower to measure shock wave directionality and the effect of height above ground on acoustic level. A sailplane was employed to measure sonic booms above and within the atmospheric turbulent boundary layer, and the sailplane was positioned to intercept the shock waves between the supersonic airplane and the ground sensors. Sailplane and ground-level sonic boom recordings were used to generate atmospheric turbulence filter functions showing excellent agreement with ground measurements. The sonic boom prediction software PCBoom4 was employed as a preflight planning tool using preflight weather data. The measured data of shock wave directionality, arrival time, and overpressure gave excellent agreement with the PCBoom4-calculated results using the measured aircraft and atmospheric data as inputs. C-weighted acoustic levels generally decreased with increasing height above the ground. A-weighted and perceived levels usually were at a minimum for a height where the elevated microphone pressure rise time history was the straightest, which is a result of incident and ground-reflected shock waves interacting.

  6. MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer -Our Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovska-Jankovic, K; Noveski, P; Chakalova, L; Petrusevska, G; Kubelka, K; Plaseska-Karanfilska, D

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small [∼21 nucleotide (nt)] non coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally. About 3.0% of human genes encode for miRNAs, and up to 30.0% of human protein coding genes may be regulated by miRNAs. Currently, more than 2000 unique human mature microRNAs are known. MicroRNAs play a key role in diverse biological processes including development, cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These processes are commonly dysregulated in cancer, implicating miRNAs in carcinogenesis, where they act as tumor supressors or oncogenes. Several miRNAs are associated with breast cancer. Here we present our initial results of miRNA analyses of breast cancer tissues using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (ReTi-PCR) (qPCR) involving stem-loop reverse transcriptase (RT) primers combined with TaqMan® PCR and miRNA microarray analysis.

  7. The status and initial results of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; MAJORANA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an ultra-low background experiment searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. The search for neutrinoless double-beta decay could determine the Dirac vs Majorana nature of neutrino mass and provide insight to the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe. The DEMONSTRATOR is comprised of 44.8 kg (30 kg enriched in 76Ge) of high purity Ge detectors separated into two modules. Construction and commissioning of both modules completed in Summer 2016 and both modules are now acquiring physics data. In my talk, I will discuss the initial results of the first physics run utilizing both modules focusing primarily on the studies of the background and projections to a ton-scale experiment. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  8. Initial water quantification results using neutron computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, A.K. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States)], E-mail: axh174@psu.edu; Shi, L.; Brenizer, J.S.; Mench, M.M. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States)

    2009-06-21

    Neutron computed tomography is an important imaging tool in the field of non-destructive testing and in fundamental research for many engineering applications. Contrary to X-rays, neutrons can be attenuated by some light materials, such as hydrogen, but can penetrate many heavy materials. Thus, neutron computed tomography is useful in obtaining important three-dimensional information about a sample's interior structure and material properties that other traditional methods cannot provide. The neutron computed tomography system at Pennsylvania State University's Radiation Science and Engineering Center is being utilized to develop a water quantification technique for investigation of water distribution in fuel cells under normal conditions. A hollow aluminum cylinder test sample filled with a known volume of water was constructed for purposes of testing the quantification technique. Transmission images of the test sample at different angles were easily acquired through the synthesis of a dedicated image acquisition computer driving a rotary table controller and an in-house developed synchronization software package. After data acquisition, Octopus (version 8.2) and VGStudio Max (version 1.2) were used to perform cross-sectional and three-dimensional reconstructions of the sample, respectively. The initial reconstructions and water quantification results are presented.

  9. Initial Results from the New Stress Map of Texas Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund Snee, J. E.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Modern techniques for characterizing tectonic stress orientation and relative magnitude have been successfully used for more than 35 years. Nevertheless, large areas of North America lack high spatial resolution maps of stress orientation, magnitude, and faulting regime. In Texas, for example, geothermal resources. This year, we launched the Texas Stress Map project to characterize tectonic stress patterns at higher spatial resolution across Texas and nearby areas. Following a successful effort just completed in Oklahoma, we will evaluate borehole breakouts, drilling-induced tensile fractures, shear wave anisotropy, and earthquake data. The principal data source will be FMI (fullbore formation microimager), UBI (ultrasonic borehole imager), cross-dipole sonic, density, and caliper logs provided by private industry. Earthquake moment tensor solutions from the U.S. Geological Survey, Saint Louis University and other sources will also be used. Our initial focus is on the Permian Basin and Barnett Shale petroleum plays due to the availability of data, but we will expand our analysis across the state as the project progresses. In addition, we hope to eventually apply the higher spatial resolution data coverage to understanding tectonic and geodynamic characteristics of the southwestern United States and northeastern Mexico. Here we present early results from our work to constrain stress orientations and faulting regime in and near Texas, and we also provide a roadmap for the ongoing research.

  10. Initial results from the fast imaging solar spectrograph (FISS)

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This collection of papers describes the instrument and initial results obtained from the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph (FISS),  one of the post-focus instruments of the 1.6 meter New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The FISS primarily aims at investigating structures and dynamics of  chromospheric features. This instrument is a dual-band Echelle spectrograph optimized for the simultaneous recording of the H I 656.3 nm band and the Ca II 854.2 nm band. The imaging is done with the fast raster scan realized by the linear motion of a two-mirror scanner, and its quality is determined by the performance of the adaptive optics of the telescope.    These papers illustrate the capability of the early FISS observations in the study of chromospheric features. Since the imaging quality has been improved a lot with the advance of the adaptive optics, one can obtain much better data with the current FISS observations.        This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers working in...

  11. Observations of E region irregularities generated at auroral latitudes by a high-power radio wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuth, F. T.; Jost, R. J.; Noble, S. T.; Gordon, W. E.; Stubbe, P.

    1985-01-01

    The initial results of a series of observations made with the high-power HF heating facility near Tromso, Norway are reported. During these experiments, attention was focused on the production of artificial geomagnetic field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the auroral E region by HF waves. A mobile 46.9-MHz radar was used to diagnose the formation of AFAIs having spatial scales of 3.2 across geomagnetic field lines. The dynamic characteristics of the AFAIs are discussed within the context of current theoretical work dealing with the natural production of AFAIs in the ionosphere.

  12. The Frontier Fields: Survey Design and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, J. M.; Koekemoer, A.; Coe, D.; Grogin, N.; Capak, P.; Mack, J.; Anderson, J.; Avila, R.; Barker, E. A.; Borncamp, D.; Brammer, G.; Durbin, M.; Gunning, H.; Hilbert, B.; Jenkner, H.; Khandrika, H.; Levay, Z.; Lucas, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Ogaz, S.; Porterfield, B.; Reid, N.; Robberto, M.; Royle, P.; Smith, L. J.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Sunnquist, B.; Surace, J.; Taylor, D. C.; Williams, R.; Bullock, J.; Dickinson, M.; Finkelstein, S.; Natarajan, P.; Richard, J.; Robertson, B.; Tumlinson, J.; Zitrin, A.; Flanagan, K.; Sembach, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Mountain, M.

    2017-03-01

    What are the faintest distant galaxies we can see with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) now, before the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope? This is the challenge taken up by the Frontier Fields, a Director’s discretionary time campaign with HST and the Spitzer Space Telescope to see deeper into the universe than ever before. The Frontier Fields combines the power of HST and Spitzer with the natural gravitational telescopes of massive high-magnification clusters of galaxies to produce the deepest observations of clusters and their lensed galaxies ever obtained. Six clusters—Abell 2744, MACSJ0416.1-2403, MACSJ0717.5+3745, MACSJ1149.5+2223, Abell S1063, and Abell 370—have been targeted by the HST ACS/WFC and WFC3/IR cameras with coordinated parallel fields for over 840 HST orbits. The parallel fields are the second-deepest observations thus far by HST with 5σ point-source depths of ∼29th ABmag. Galaxies behind the clusters experience typical magnification factors of a few, with small regions magnified by factors of 10–100. Therefore, the Frontier Field cluster HST images achieve intrinsic depths of ∼30–33 mag over very small volumes. Spitzer has obtained over 1000 hr of Director’s discretionary imaging of the Frontier Field cluster and parallels in IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands to 5σ point-source depths of ∼26.5, 26.0 ABmag. We demonstrate the exceptional sensitivity of the HST Frontier Field images to faint high-redshift galaxies, and review the initial results related to the primary science goals.

  13. Initial Results from CASSIOPE/ePOP Satellite Overpasses above HAARP in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; James, H. G.; Yau, A. W.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility was operated in conjunction with overpasses of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) instruments on the Canadian CASSIOPE satellite. During these overpasses HAARP was operated in several different heating modes and regimes as diagnosed by the characteristics of Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions (SEE) using ground-based receivers while simultaneously ePOP monitored in-situ HF and VLF signals, looked for ion and electron heating, and provided VHF and UHF signals for propagation effects studies. The e-POP suite of instruments and particularly the ePOP Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) offer a unique combination diagnostics appropriate for studying the non-linear plasma effects generated high-power HF waves in the ionosphere. In this presentation, the initial results from ePOP observations from two separate 2014 measurement campaigns at HAARP (April 16 to April 29 and May 25 to June 9) will be discussed. Several innovative experiments were performed during the campaign. Experiments explored a wide range of ionospheric effects. These include: 1) Penetration of HF pump waves into the ionosphere via large and small scale irregularities, 2) effects of gyro-harmonic heating and artificial ionization layers, 3) effects of HAARP beam shape with O- and X-mode transmissions, 4) coupling of Lower Hybrid modes into Whistler waves, 5) D/E-region VLF generation in the ionosphere using VLF modulation of the HF pump 6) scattering of VHF and UHF signals and 7) scattering and non-linear modulation of a 9.5 MHz probe wave propagating through the region of the ionosphere modified by HAARP. This work supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  14. Spectral biopsy for skin cancer diagnosis: initial clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Austin J.; Feng, Xu; Nguyen, Hieu T. M.; Zhang, Yao; Sebastian, Katherine R.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2017-02-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States and is a recognized public health issue. Diagnosis of skin cancer involves biopsy of the suspicious lesion followed by histopathology. Biopsies, which involve excision of the lesion, are invasive, at times unnecessary, and are costly procedures ( $2.8B/year in the US). An unmet critical need exists to develop a non-invasive and inexpensive screening method that can eliminate the need for unnecessary biopsies. To address this need, our group has reported on the continued development of a noninvasive method that utilizes multimodal spectroscopy towards the goal of a "spectral biopsy" of skin. Our approach combines Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to collect comprehensive optical property information from suspicious skin lesions. We previously described an updated spectral biopsy system that allows acquisition of all three forms of spectroscopy through a single fiber optic probe and is composed of off-the-shelf OEM components that are smaller, cheaper, and enable a more clinic-friendly system. We present initial patient data acquired with the spectral biopsy system, the first from an extensive clinical study (n = 250) to characterize its performance in identifying skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma). We also present our first attempts at analyzing this initial set of clinical data using statistical-based models, and with models currently being developed to extract biophysical information from the collected spectra, all towards the goal of noninvasive skin cancer diagnosis.

  15. Solar Influence on the North Atlantic Oscillation - Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Dacie, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Some initial investigations into various atmospheric phenomena and the influence of the solar cycle on weather have been made. Strongly negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) indices, which cause cold and dry winter weather in North West Europe, rarely occur during periods of high solar activity. Coupling between the troposphere and stratosphere is discussed, particularly in the context of Polar-night jet oscillation events (defined by Hitchcock et al., 2013) and the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. The energy of North Atlantic hurricanes (as indicated by the Accumulated Cyclone Energy Index, ACE) is also linked to solar activity, via UV heating at the tropopause (Elsner et al., 2010), and is suggested as a possible mechanism through which solar activity could influence the NAO. Finally the lack of solar influence on the NAO before $\\sim$ 1950 is addressed, with a possible cause being the smaller solar cycle amplitudes. This short report contains several ideas, which may be worth pursuing further.

  16. Initial results of a positron tomograph for prostate imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.S.; Choong, W.S.; Moses, W.W.; Qi, J.; Hu, J.; Wang,G.C.; Wilson, D.; Oh, S.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    2004-11-29

    We present the status and initial images of a positrontomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair ofexternal curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis).The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access andto position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivitywith patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rowsof 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 modules inthe camera. Compared to an ECAT HR PET system operating in 3D mode, ourcamera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and hasapproximately the same sensitivity for a central point source, becauseour detectors are close to the patient. The individual detectors areangled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize resolutiondegradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified CTIdata acquisition electronics. We have completed construction of thegantry and electronics, have developed detector calibration and dataacquisition software, and are taking coincidence data. We demonstratethat we can clearly visualize a "prostate" in a simple phantom.Reconstructed images of two phantoms are shown.

  17. Experience with the "fixateur interne": initial clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, D A

    1992-03-01

    Impressive clinical reports have come from several major spinal research centers regarding the results of using the AO spinal internal fixator, a recently released pedicle screw rod system. A retrospective review of the first 2 years of clinical results from a diverse group of orthopedic surgeons using this device at a Canadian University center may provide some insight into potential clinical outcomes in general use. These results contrast with the outcome data provided to date, which have been presented by expert academic spinal surgeons. The results suggest that there may be room for considering limited release of this device, perhaps with the requirement for special certification in its application.

  18. Litter decomposition patterns and dynamics across biomes: Initial results from the global TeaComposition initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Ika; Kappel Schmidt, Inger; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Beier, Claus

    2017-04-01

    Litter decomposition represents one of the largest fluxes in the global terrestrial carbon cycle and a number of large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process. However, previous studies were most often based on site-specific litters and methodologies. The contrasting litter and soil types used and the general lack of common protocols still poses a major challenge as it adds major uncertainty to meta-analyses across different experiments and sites. In the TeaComposition initiative, we aim to investigate the potential litter decomposition by using standardized substrates (tea) for comparison of temporal litter decomposition rates across different ecosystems worldwide. To this end, Lipton tea bags (Rooibos and Green Tea) has been buried in the H-A or Ah horizon and incubated over the period of 36 months within 400 sites covering diverse ecosystems in 9 zonobiomes. We measured initial litter chemistry and litter mass loss 3 months after the start of decomposition and linked the decomposition rates to site and climatic conditions as well as to the existing decompositions rates of the local litter. We will present and discuss the outcomes of this study. Acknowledgment: We are thankful to colleagues from more than 300 sites who were participating in the implementation of this initiative and who are not mentioned individually as co-authors yet.

  19. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  20. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  1. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  2. Initial commissioning results from the APS loss monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    The design of the beam loss monitor system for the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source is based on using a number of air dielectric coaxial cables as long ionization chambers. Results to date show that the loss monitor is useful in helping to determine the cause of injection losses and losses large enough to limit circulating currents in the storage ring to short lifetimes. Sensitivities ranging from 13 to 240 pC of charge collected in the injector BTS (booster-to-storage-ring) loss monitor per picocoulomb of loss have been measured, depending on the loss location. These results have been used to predict that the storage ring loss monitor leakage current limit of 10 pA per cable should allow detection of losses resulting in beam lifetimes of 100 hours or less with 100 mA stored beam. Significant DC bias levels associated with the presence of stored beam have been observed. These large bias levels are most likely caused by the loss monitor responding to hard x-ray synchrotron radiation. No such response to synchrotron radiation was observed during earlier tests at SSRL. However, the loss monitor response to average stored beam current in APS has provided a reasonable alternative to the DC current transformer (DCCT) for measuring beam lifetimes.

  3. Weather Forecasting for Ka-band Operations: Initial Study Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Wu, L.; Slobin, S.

    2016-08-01

    As lower frequency bands (e.g., 2.3 GHz and 8.4 GHz) have become oversubscribed during the past several decades, NASA has become interested in using higher frequency bands (e.g., 26 GHz and 32 GHz) for telemetry, thus making use of the available wider bandwidth. However, these bands are more susceptible to atmospheric degradation. Currently, flight projects tend to be conservative in preparing their communications links by using worst-case or conservative assumptions. Such assumptions result in nonoptimum data return. We explore the use of weather forecasting for Goldstone and Madrid for different weather condition scenarios to determine more optimal values of atmospheric attenuation and atmospheric noise temperature for use in telecommunication link design. We find that the use of weather forecasting can provide up to 2 dB or more of increased data return when more favorable conditions are forecast. Future plans involve further developing the technique for operational scenarios with interested flight projects.

  4. Initial Hubble Diagram Results from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, S; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Childress, M; Copin, Y; Gangler, E; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Pécontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigaudier, G; Ripoche, P; Runge, K; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Thomas, R C; Wu, C

    2008-01-01

    The use of Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe a decade ago. Now that large second generation surveys have significantly increased the size and quality of the high-redshift sample, the cosmological constraints are limited by the currently available sample of ~50 cosmologically useful nearby supernovae. The Nearby Supernova Factory addresses this problem by discovering nearby supernovae and observing their spectrophotometric time development. Our data sample includes over 2400 spectra from spectral timeseries of 185 supernovae. This talk presents results from a portion of this sample including a Hubble diagram (relative distance vs. redshift) and a description of some analyses using this rich dataset.

  5. Middleware to integrate heterogeneous Learning Management Systems and initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Hijar Miranda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of the Learning Management Systems (LMS has been increased. It is desirable to access multiple learning objects that are managed by Learning Management Systems. The diversity of LMS allow us to consider them as heterogeneous systems; each ones with their own interface to manage the provided functionality. These interfaces can be Web services or calls to remote objects. The functionalities offered by LMS depend on their user roles. A solution to integrate diverse heterogeneous platforms is based on a middleware architecture. In this paper, a middleware architecture is presented to integrate different Learning Management Systems. Furthermore, an implementation of the proposed middleware is presented. This implementation integrates two different Learning Management Systems, using Web services and XML-RPC protocols to access student-role users capabilities. The result is a transparent layer that provides access to LMS contents.

  6. Digital subtraction peripheral angiography using image stacking: initial clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kump, K S; Sachs, P B; Wilson, D L

    2001-07-01

    Using clinically acquired x-ray angiography image sequences, we compared three algorithms for creating a single diagnostic quality image that combined input images containing flowing contrast agent. These image-stacking algorithms were: maximum opacity with the minimum gray-scale value across time recorded at each spatial location, (REC) recursive temporal filtering followed by a maximum opacity operation, and (AMF) an approximate matched filter consisting of a convolution with a kernel approximating the matched filter followed by a maximum opacity operation. Eighteen clinical exams of the peripheral arteries of the legs were evaluated. AMF gave 2.7 times greater contrast to noise ratio than the single best subtraction image and 1.3 times improvement over REC, the second best stacking algorithm. This is consistent with previous simulations showing that AMF performs nearly equal to the optimal result from matched filtering without the well-known limitations. For example, unlike matched filtering, AMF filter coefficients were obtained automatically using an image-processing algorithm. AMF effectively brought out small collateral arteries, otherwise difficult to see, without degrading artery sharpness or stenosis grading. Comparing results using reduced and full contrast agent volumes demonstrated that contrast agent load could be reduced to one-third of the conventional amount with AMF processing. By simulating reduced x-ray exposures on clinical exams, we determined that x-ray exposure could be reduced by 80% with AMF processing. We conclude that AMF is a promising, potential technique for reducing contrast agent load and for improving vessel visibility, both very important characteristics for vascular imaging.

  7. An interactive surgical planning tool for acetabular fractures: initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincek Borut

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetabular fractures still are among the most challenging fractures to treat because of complex anatomy, involved surgical access to fracture sites and the relatively low incidence of these lesions. Proper evaluation and surgical planning is necessary to achieve anatomic reduction of the articular surface and stable fixation of the pelvic ring. The goal of this study was to test the feasibility of preoperative surgical planning in acetabular fractures using a new prototype planning tool based on an interactive virtual reality-style environment. Methods 7 patients (5 male and 2 female; median age 53 y (25 to 92 y with an acetabular fracture were prospectively included. Exclusion criterions were simple wall fractures, cases with anticipated surgical dislocation of the femoral head for joint debridement and accurate fracture reduction. According to the Letournel classification 4 cases had two column fractures, 2 cases had anterior column fractures and 1 case had a T-shaped fracture including a posterior wall fracture. The workflow included following steps: (1 Formation of a patient-specific bone model from preoperative computed tomography scans, (2 interactive virtual fracture reduction with visuo-haptic feedback, (3 virtual fracture fixation using common osteosynthesis implants and (4 measurement of implant position relative to landmarks. The surgeon manually contoured osteosynthesis plates preoperatively according to the virtually defined deformation. Screenshots including all measurements for the OR were available. The tool was validated comparing the preoperative planning and postoperative results by 3D-superimposition. Results Preoperative planning was feasible in all cases. In 6 of 7 cases superimposition of preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up CT showed a good to excellent correlation. In one case part of the procedure had to be changed due to impossibility of fracture reduction from an ilioinguinal approach

  8. Initial Test Results from a 3-axis Vibrating Ring Gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallacher, B J; Neasham, J A; Burdess, J S; Harris, A J [INSAT University of Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-01

    There are several application areas where the simultaneous measurement of rates of rotation about three mutually orthogonal axes is required. In this paper the principle features of a 3-axis vibrating ring gyroscope are described. The fabrication process for the gyroscope is presented and employs standard MEMS techniques. The modal properties for the ring are measured experimentally using laser vibrometry and electrostatic sensing and compared with the design predictions. In operation as a rate gyroscope it is necessary to excite the primary motion of the gyroscope and control is amplitude. As Q-factors of vibratory gyroscope are typically of the order 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} slight variations in environmental conditions will perturb the natural frequency of the primary mode significantly. To ensure the primary motion of the gyroscope is maintained with constant amplitude a control scheme employing both frequency tracking and amplitude control is required. An electronic control system using digital signal processing (DSP) has been developed to ensure excitation of the primary motion occurs at resonance with controlled amplitude. The control scheme employs an embedded processor to generate the drive frequency (via a D/A converter) and to monitor the primary vibration (via an A/D converter). Experimental results from the control scheme highlighting its effectiveness over conventional PLL approaches are presented.

  9. Interventional C-arm tomosynthesis for vascular imaging: initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, David A.; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Al Assad, Omar; Trousset, Yves; Riddell, Cyril; Avignon, Gregoire; Solomon, Stephen B.; Lai, Hao; Wang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    As percutaneous endovascular procedures address more complex and broader disease states, there is an increasing need for intra-procedure 3D vascular imaging. In this paper, we investigate C-Arm 2-axis tomosynthesis ("Tomo") as an alternative to C-Arm Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for workflow situations in which the CBCT acquisition may be inconvenient or prohibited. We report on our experience in performing tomosynthesis acquisitions with a digital angiographic imaging system (GE Healthcare Innova 4100 Angiographic Imaging System, Milwaukee, WI). During a tomo acquisition the detector and tube each orbit on a plane above and below the table respectively. The tomo orbit may be circular or elliptical, and the tomographic half-angle in our studies varied from approximately 16 to 28 degrees as a function of orbit period. The trajectory, geometric calibration, and gantry performance are presented. We overview a multi-resolution iterative reconstruction employing compressed sensing techniques to mitigate artifacts associated with incomplete data reconstructions. In this work, we focus on the reconstruction of small high contrast objects such as iodinated vasculature and interventional devices. We evaluate the overall performance of the acquisition and reconstruction through phantom acquisitions and a swine study. Both tomo and comparable CBCT acquisitions were performed during the swine study thereby enabling the use of CBCT as a reference in the evaluation of tomo vascular imaging. We close with a discussion of potential clinical applications for tomo, reflecting on the imaging and workflow results achieved.

  10. Initial results from the newborn hearing screening programme in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, A

    2013-03-02

    INTRODUCTION: Hearing screening programmes aim to detect hearing loss in the neonate. The Health Service Executive (HSE) South was the first phase of a national roll-out of a neonatal hearing screening programme in Ireland, going live on 28 April 2011. RESULTS: Over 11,738 babies have been screened for permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) during the first 12 months. The percentage of eligible babies offered hearing screening was 99.2 %. Only 0.2 % (n = 25) of those offered screening declined. 493 (4 %) were referred for immediate diagnostic audiological assessment. The average time between screen and diagnostic audiology appointment was 2 weeks. 15 (1.3\\/1,000) babies have been identified with a PCHI over the 12-month period. 946 (4 %) babies screened were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for >48 h. The prevalance of PCHI is 7.3\\/1,000 in the NICU population compared to 0.6\\/1000 in the well baby population. 214 (1.8 % of total babies screened) had a clear response in the screening programmes, but were deemed to be at risk of an acquired childhood hearing impairment. These babies will be reassessed with a diagnostic audiology appointment at 8-9 months of age. To date, there is one case of acquired hearing impairment through this targeted follow-up screen. Of the 15 cases of PCHI identified, 8 (53 %) of these had one or more risk factors for hearing loss and 7 (37 %) were admitted to the NICU for >48 h. Four babies were referred for assessment at the National Cochlear Implant Centre.

  11. Update and Initial Results from The COHERENT Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Taking advantage of technologies which have come to maturity and the availability of a world-class pulsed neutrino source, the COHERENT collaboration seeks to make the first unambiguous measurement of coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS). Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source is, as a by-product of the spallation process, an intense, pulsed neutrino source. The high beam power of the SNS results in a high neutrino flux, and the energy spectrum of emitted neutrinos is well-suited for CEvNS detection: coherence is preserved in nearly all scattering events while generating nuclear recoil events above threshold for a number of established detector technologies. Additionally, the pulsed nature and short duty cycle of the SNS beam allow for powerful reduction of backgrounds not associated with the beam. The COHERENT Collaboration is deploying a suite of low threshold detectors (CsI[Na] scintillator, high-purity Ge detector array, 2-phase Xe TPC) at the SNS to detect CEvNS, in a manner that limits systematic uncertainties and observes the N2-dependence on the cross section. The current status of the efforts of the collaboration's efforts will be discussed and longer-term physics goals of the collaboration will be addressed, including searches for non-standard neutrino interactions and a measurement of the Weak mixing angle. Assessments of the backgrounds present in the detector locations will be discussed, including new measurements of neutrino-induced neutron production in candidate shielding materials. Preliminary measurements will be presented from existing deployments, as will implementation plans for upcoming detector systems.

  12. Initial Satellite Formation Flight Results from the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Trevor; Ottenstein, Neil; Palmer, Eric; Farahmand, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe the results that have been obtained to date concerning MMS formation flying. The MMS spacecraft spin at a rate of 3.1 RPM, with spin axis roughly aligned with Ecliptic North. Several booms are used to deploy instruments: two 5 m magnetometer booms in the spin plane, two rigid booms of length 12.5 m along the positive and negative spin axes, and four flexible wire booms of length 60 m in the spin plane. Minimizing flexible motion of the wire booms requires that reorientation of the spacecraft spin axis be kept to a minimum: this is limited to attitude maneuvers to counteract the effects of gravity-gradient and apparent solar motion. Orbital maneuvers must therefore be carried out in essentially the nominal science attitude. These burns make use of a set of monopropellant hydrazine thrusters: two (of thrust 4.5 N) along the spin axis in each direction, and eight (of thrust 18 N) in the spin plane; the latter are pulsed at the spin rate to produce a net delta-v. An on-board accelerometer-based controller is used to accurately generate a commanded delta-v. Navigation makes use of a weak-signal GPS-based system: this allows signals to be received even when MMS is flying above the GPS orbits, producing a highly accurate determination of the four MMS orbits. This data is downlinked to the MMS Mission Operations Center (MOC) and used by the MOC Flight Dynamics Operations Area (FDOA) for maneuver design. These commands are then uplinked to the spacecraft and executed autonomously using the controller, with the ground monitoring the burns in real time.

  13. Changes in science classrooms resulting from collaborative action research initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil Seok

    Collaborative action research was undertaken over two years between a Korean science teacher and science education researchers at the University of Iowa. For the purpose of realizing science learning as envisioned by constructivist principles, Group-Investigations were implemented three or five times per project year. In addition, the second year project enacted Peer Assessments among students. Student perceptions of their science classrooms, as measured by the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), provided evidence that the collaborative action research was successful in creating constructivist learning environments. Student attitudes toward science lessons, as examined by the Enjoyment of Science Lessons Scale (ESLS), indicated that the action research also contributed to developing more positive attitudes of students about science learning. Discourse analysis was conducted on video-recordings of in-class presentations and discussions. The results indicated that students in science classrooms which were moving toward constructivist learning environments engaged in such discursive practices as: (1) Communicating their inquiries to others, (2) Seeking and providing information through dialogues, and (3) Negotiating conflicts in their knowledge and beliefs. Based on these practices, science learning was viewed as the process of constructing knowledge and understanding of science as well as the process of engaging in scientific inquiry and discourse. The teacher's discursive practices included: (1) Wrapping up student presentations, (2) Addressing misconceptions, (3) Answering student queries, (4) Coaching, (5) Assessing and advising, (6) Guiding students discursively into new knowledge, and (7) Scaffolding. Science teaching was defined as situated acts of the teacher to facilitate the learning process. In particular, when the classrooms became more constructivist, the teacher intervened more frequently and carefully in student activities to fulfill a

  14. Lesion insertion in the projection domain: Methods and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baiyu; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Yu, Zhicong; Ma, Chi; McCollough, Cynthia, E-mail: mccollough.cynthia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To perform task-based image quality assessment in CT, it is desirable to have a large number of realistic patient images with known diagnostic truth. One effective way of achieving this objective is to create hybrid images that combine patient images with inserted lesions. Because conventional hybrid images generated in the image domain fails to reflect the impact of scan and reconstruction parameters on lesion appearance, this study explored a projection-domain approach. Methods: Lesions were segmented from patient images and forward projected to acquire lesion projections. The forward-projection geometry was designed according to a commercial CT scanner and accommodated both axial and helical modes with various focal spot movement patterns. The energy employed by the commercial CT scanner for beam hardening correction was measured and used for the forward projection. The lesion projections were inserted into patient projections decoded from commercial CT projection data. The combined projections were formatted to match those of commercial CT raw data, loaded onto a commercial CT scanner, and reconstructed to create the hybrid images. Two validations were performed. First, to validate the accuracy of the forward-projection geometry, images were reconstructed from the forward projections of a virtual ACR phantom and compared to physically acquired ACR phantom images in terms of CT number accuracy and high-contrast resolution. Second, to validate the realism of the lesion in hybrid images, liver lesions were segmented from patient images and inserted back into the same patients, each at a new location specified by a radiologist. The inserted lesions were compared to the original lesions and visually assessed for realism by two experienced radiologists in a blinded fashion. Results: For the validation of the forward-projection geometry, the images reconstructed from the forward projections of the virtual ACR phantom were consistent with the images physically

  15. Fractional Differential Equations in Terms of Comparison Results and Lyapunov Stability with Initial Time Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coşkun Yakar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The qualitative behavior of a perturbed fractional-order differential equation with Caputo's derivative that differs in initial position and initial time with respect to the unperturbed fractional-order differential equation with Caputo's derivative has been investigated. We compare the classical notion of stability to the notion of initial time difference stability for fractional-order differential equations in Caputo's sense. We present a comparison result which again gives the null solution a central role in the comparison fractional-order differential equation when establishing initial time difference stability of the perturbed fractional-order differential equation with respect to the unperturbed fractional-order differential equation.

  16. Observation of isotropic electron temperature in the turbulent E region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saito

    Full Text Available Using EISCAT radar data, we find that electrons are strongly heated in the magnetic field-line direction during high electric field events. The remote site data show that the electron temperature increases in almost the same way in the field-perpendicular direction; electron heating by E region plasma turbulence is isotropic. We discuss the implications of our observation for the "plasmon"-electron as well as the wave Joule heating models of the anomalous electron heating in the E region.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma temperature and density; plasma waves and instabilities

  17. Investigating controls on debris-flow initiation and surge frequency at Chalk Cliffs, USA: initial results from monitoring and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, J. W.; McCoy, S. W.; Tucker, G. E.; Staley, D. M.; Coe, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent monitoring of a small (0.3 km2) bedrock-dominated catchment in central Colorado, USA, has revealed distinct differences in debris-flow surge dynamics relative to rainfall intensity. Moderate bursts of rainfall (15-40 mm/hr) typically trigger a set of coarse-grained surges with depths that can exceed 1.0 m. High-intensity bursts of rainfall (40-150 mm/hr), in contrast, often generate only a single moderate-amplitude coarse-grained surge (> 0.5 m depth), followed by several minutes of water-rich flow having comparable or greater peak depth. In both cases, debris flows are observed within minutes of rain bursts due to the rapid concentration of runoff from bedrock cliffs to channels loaded with sediment from dry ravel and rockfall. Video observations have shown that the runoff can initiate debris flows both at a steep (~40 degree) bedrock-colluvium interface, and in a lower gradient (~15 degree) section of channel. This latter style of initiation, which has only been observed at moderate rainfall intensity, involves the formation and failure of a highly porous sediment dam created by bedload transport. We speculate that this process may be responsible for the creation of the consistent surge patterns we observe with moderate intensity rainfall, and may explain the relative lack of granular surges with high-intensity rainfall. To investigate this possibility, we have developed a simple one-dimensional morphodynamic model of the formation and failure of sediment dams in an undulating bedrock channel filled with loose bed sediment. The model consists of a coupled surface-subsurface water flow model, which is used to drive bed-sediment topographic adjustments based on the mathematical divergence of the sediment transport rate. Under certain topographic and water-flow conditions, the shear stress in a section of the channel can fall below the critical shear stress, resulting in local deposition of sediment. Consistent with field observations, the modeled deposit

  18. Towards nonaxisymmetry; initial results using the Flux Coordinate Independent method in BOUT++

    CERN Document Server

    Shanahan, Brendan; Dudson, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Fluid simulation of stellarator edge transport is difficult due to the complexities of mesh generation; the stochastic edge and strong nonaxisymmetry inhibit the use of field aligned coordinate systems. The recent implementation of the Flux Coordinate Independent method for calculating parallel derivatives in BOUT++ has allowed for more complex geometries. Here we present initial results of nonaxisymmetric diffusion modelling as a step towards stellarator turbulence modelling. We then present initial (non-turbulent) transport modelling using the FCI method and compare the results with analytical calculations. The prospects for future stellarator transport and turbulence modelling are discussed.

  19. Quality initiatives: improving patient flow for a bone densitometry practice: results from a Mayo Clinic radiology quality initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Kenneth T; Valley, Timothy B; O'Connor, Michael K

    2010-03-01

    Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies have been used in manufacturing for some time. However, Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies also are applicable to radiology as a way to identify opportunities for improvement in patient care delivery settings. A multidisciplinary team of physicians and staff conducted a 100-day quality improvement project with the guidance of a quality advisor. By using the framework of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control), time studies were performed for all aspects of patient and technologist involvement. From these studies, value stream maps for the current state and for the future were developed, and tests of change were implemented. Comprehensive value stream maps showed that before implementation of process changes, an average time of 20.95 minutes was required for completion of a bone densitometry study. Two process changes (ie, tests of change) were undertaken. First, the location for completion of a patient assessment form was moved from inside the imaging room to the waiting area, enabling patients to complete the form while waiting for the technologist. Second, the patient was instructed to sit in a waiting area immediately outside the imaging rooms, rather than in the main reception area, which is far removed from the imaging area. Realignment of these process steps, with reduced technologist travel distances, resulted in a 3-minute average decrease in the patient cycle time. This represented a 15% reduction in the initial patient cycle time with no change in staff or costs. Radiology process improvement projects can yield positive results despite small incremental changes.

  20. 75 FR 4044 - Polyester Staple Fiber From Taiwan: Initiation and Preliminary Results of Changed-Circumstances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... International Trade Administration Polyester Staple Fiber From Taiwan: Initiation and Preliminary Results of... antidumping duty order on polyester staple fiber from Taiwan. We have preliminarily concluded that Far Eastern... the antidumping duty order on polyester staple fiber from Taiwan. Interested parties are invited...

  1. General Atomic reprocessing pilot plant: description and results of initial testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    In June 1976 General Atomic completed the construction of a reprocessing head-end cold pilot plant. In the year since then, each system within the head end has been used for experiments which have qualified the designs. This report describes the equipment in the plant and summarizes the results of the initial phase of reprocessing testing.

  2. The WIND-HAARP Experiment: Initial Results of High Power Radiowave Interactions with Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-10

    Results from the first science experiment with the new HF Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) facility in Alaska are reported. The initial...experiments involved transmission of high frequency waves from HAARP to the NASA/WIND satellite. The objective was to investigate the effects of space

  3. [Results of Booster Vaccination in Children with Primary Vaccine Failure after Initial Varicella Vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozakiv, Takao; Nishimura, Naoko; Gotoh, Kensei; Funahashi, Keiji; Yoshii, Hironori; Okuno, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    In October 2014, the varicella vaccination policy in Japan was changed from a single voluntary inoculation to two routine inoculations. This paper reports the results of booster vaccination in children who did not show seroconversion after initial vaccination (i.e., primary vaccine failure : PVF) over a 7-year period prior to the introduction of routine varicella vaccination. Between November 2007 and May 2014, 273 healthy children aged between 1.1 and 14.5 years (median : 1.7 years) underwent varicella vaccination. Before and 4 to 6 weeks after vaccination, the antibody titers were measured using an immune adherence hemagglutination (IAHA) assay and a glycoprotein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (gpELISA). In addition, side reactions were examined during the four-week period after vaccination. Children who did not show IAHA seroconversion (PVF) were recommended to receive a booster vaccination, and the measurement of antibody titers and an assessment of side reactions were performed after the booster dose. In May 2015, a questionnaire was mailed to each of the 273 participants to investigate whether they had developed varicella and/or herpes zoster after vaccination. After initial vaccination, the IAHA seroconversion rate was 75% and the mean antibody titer (Log2) with seroconversion was 4.7, while the gpELISA seroconversion rate was 84% and the mean antibody titer (Log10) with seroconversion was 2.4. Among children with PVF, 54 received booster vaccination within 81 to 714 days (median : 139 days) after the initial vaccination. After booster vaccination, the IAHA seroconversion rate was 98% and the mean antibody titer (Log2) with seroconversion was 5.8. Both the seroconversion rate and the antibody titer were higher compared with the values after the initial vaccination (p vaccination, the gpELISA seropositive rate was 100% and the mean positive antibody titer (Log 10) was 3.6 ; similar results were obtained for the IAHA assay, with a significantly higher

  4. Factors associated with the frequency of initial total mastectomy: results of a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; James, Ted A; Single, Richard M; Onitilo, Adedayo A; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Barney, Tom; Bakerman, Jordan E; McCahill, Laurence E

    2013-05-01

    Several previous studies have reported conflicting data on recent trends in use of initial total mastectomy (TM); the factors that contribute to TM variation are not entirely clear. Using a multi-institution database, we analyzed how practice, patient, and tumor characteristics contributed to variation in TM for invasive breast cancer. We collected detailed clinical and pathologic data about breast cancer diagnosis, initial, and subsequent breast cancer operations performed on all female patients from 4 participating institutions from 2003 to 2008. We limited this analysis to 2,384 incident cases of invasive breast cancer, stages I to III, and excluded patients with clinical indications for mastectomy. Predictors of initial TM were identified with univariate analyses and random effects multivariable logistic regression models. Initial TM was performed on 397 (16.7%) eligible patients. Use of preoperative MRI more than doubled the rate of TM (odds ratio [OR] = 2.44; 95% CI, 1.58-3.77; p < 0.0001). Increasing tumor size, high nuclear grade, and age were also associated with increased rates of initial TM. Differences by age and ethnicity were observed, and significant variation in the frequency of TM was seen at the individual surgeon level (p < 0.001). Our results were similar when restricted to tumors <20 mm. We identified factors associated with initial TM, including preoperative MRI and individual surgeon, that contribute to the current debate about variation in use of TM for the management of breast cancer. Additional evaluation of patient understanding of surgical options and outcomes in breast cancer and the impact of the surgeon provider is warranted. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Engine systems analysis results of the Space Shuttle Main Engine redesigned powerhead initial engine level testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Erik J.; Gosdin, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    Engineers regularly analyze SSME ground test and flight data with respect to engine systems performance. Recently, a redesigned SSME powerhead was introduced to engine-level testing in part to increase engine operational margins through optimization of the engine internal environment. This paper presents an overview of the MSFC personnel engine systems analysis results and conclusions reached from initial engine level testing of the redesigned powerhead, and further redesigns incorporated to eliminate accelerated main injector baffle and main combustion chamber hot gas wall degradation. The conclusions are drawn from instrumented engine ground test data and hardware integrity analysis reports and address initial engine test results with respect to the apparent design change effects on engine system and component operation.

  6. Results of initial operation for hyperparathyroidism in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaraj, Dina M; Skarulis, Monica C; Libutti, Steven K; Norton, Jeffrey A; Bartlett, David L; Pingpank, James F; Gibril, Fathia; Weinstein, Lee S; Jensen, Robert T; Marx, Stephen J; Alexander, H Richard

    2003-12-01

    Hyperparathyroidism in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is characterized by multiglandular disease and a propensity for recurrence after parathyroidectomy (PTx). This study analyzes outcomes of a cohort of MEN1 patients undergoing initial PTx at one institution. Between April 1960 and September 2002, 92 patients with MEN1 underwent initial PTx. Outcomes were analyzed based on extent of parathyroid resection. Fourteen percent had 2.5 or fewer glands resected, 69% had subtotal PTx, and 17% had total PTx (88% with immediate autotransplantation). The initial surgical cure rate was 98%. Excluding 6 patients lost to follow-up, 33% have developed recurrent hyperparathyroidism (in 46% after < or =2.5 PTx, in 33% after subtotal, and in 23% after total PTx). Median recurrence-free survival was not statistically significantly different between subtotal versus total PTx, but it was longer for subtotal and total PTx compared with lesser resection (16.5 vs 7.0 years, respectively, P=.03). The incidence of severe hypoparathyroidism was 46% after total versus 26% after subtotal PTx. Subtotal and total PTx result in durable control of MEN1-associated hyperparathyroidism and have longer recurrence-free intervals compared with lesser resection. The high incidence of severe hypoparathyroidism after total PTx suggests that subtotal PTx is the initial operation of choice in this setting.

  7. Initial results from NuSTAR observations of the Norma arm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodaghee, Arash; Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for an initial survey of the Norma Arm gathered with the focusing hard X-ray telescope NuSTAR. The survey covers 0.2 deg2 of sky area in the 3-79 keV range with a minimum and maximum raw depth of 15 ks and 135 ks, respectively. Besides a bright black-hole X-ray binary...

  8. Initial experimental results of a machine learning-based temperature control system for an RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    Edelen, A L; Milton, S V; Chase, B E; Crawford, D J; Eddy, N; Edstrom, D; Harms, E R; Ruan, J; Santucci, J K; Stabile, P

    2015-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) have been developing a control system to regulate the resonant frequency of an RF electron gun. As part of this effort, we present initial test results for a benchmark temperature controller that combines a machine learning-based model and a predictive control algorithm. This is part of an on-going effort to develop adaptive, machine learning-based tools specifically to address control challenges found in particle accelerator systems.

  9. Initial results of NEXT-DEMO, a large-scale prototype of the NEXT-100 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, V; Cárcel, S; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vázquez, D; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2012-01-01

    NEXT-DEMO is a large scale prototype and demonstrator of the NEXT-100 High Pressure Xenon Gas TPC, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of Xe-136 using 100-150 kg of enriched xenon gas. The apparatus was built to prove the expected performance of NEXT-100, namely, energy resolution better than 1% FWHM at 2.5 MeV and event topological reconstruction. In this paper we describe the operation and initial results of the detector.

  10. DUMAND II: String 1 deployment, initial operation, results and system retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.; Dumand Collaboration

    1995-06-01

    We summarize the deployment of the first string of 24 optical detector modules with its data and command processing and transmission system, the junction box with its precision sonar and video systems, and the laying of the 36 km twelve-fiber electro-optical cable to shore. Results from the initial operation are discussed as well as the successful retrieval of string 1 for servicing.

  11. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O' Neill, Brian E., E-mail: BEOneill@houstonmethodist.org

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  12. Results of initial analyses of the salt (macro) batch 9 tank 21H qualification samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt (Macro) Batch 9 for processing through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). This document reports the initial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. Analysis of the Tank 21H Salt (Macro) Batch 9 composite sample indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics or observations, such as floating solids, the presence of large amount of solids, or unusual colors. Further results on the chemistry and other tests will be issued in the future.

  13. Results Of Initial Analyses Of The Salt (Macro) Batch 9 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt (Macro) Batch 9 for processing through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). This document reports the initial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. Analysis of the Tank 21H Salt (Macro) Batch 9 composite sample indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics. Further results on the chemistry and other tests will be issued in the future.

  14. The initial mass function of young open clusters in the Galaxy: A preliminary result

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Beomdu; Hur, Hyeonoh; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2015-01-01

    The initial mass function (IMF) is an essential tool with which to study star formation processes. We have initiated the photometric survey of young open clusters in the Galaxy, from which the stellar IMFs are obtained in a homogeneous way. A total of 16 famous young open clusters have preferentially been studied up to now. These clusters have a wide range of surface densities (log sigma = -1 to 3 [stars pc^2] for stars with mass larger than 5M_sun) and cluster masses (M_cl = 165 to 50,000M_sun), and also are distributed in five different spiral arms in the Galaxy. It is possible to test the dependence of star formation processes on the global properties of individual clusters or environmental conditions. We present a preliminary result on the variation of the IMF in this paper.

  15. Introduction to the Payloads and the Initial Observation Results of Chang'E-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Huixian; CHEN Xiaomin; OUYANG Ziyuan; ZOU Yongliao; WU Ji; DAI Shuwu; ZHAO Baochang; SHU Rong; CHANG Jin; WANG Huanyu; ZHANG Xiaohui; REN Qiongying

    2008-01-01

    Chang'E-1, the orbiter circling the moon 200km above the moon surface, is the first Chinese Lunar exploration satellite. The satellite was successfully launched on 24th October 2007.There are 8 kinds of scientific payloads onboard, including the stereo camera, the laser altimeter, the Sagnac-based interferometer image spectrometer, the Gamma ray spectrometer, the X-ray spectrometer, the microwave radiometer, the high energy particle detector, the solar wind plasma detector and a supporting payload data management system. Chang'E-1 opened her eyes to look at the moon and took the first batch of lunar pictures after her stereo camera was switched on in 20th November 2007.Henceforth all the instruments are successfully switched on one by one. After a period of parameter adjustment and initial check out, all scientific instruments are now in their normal operating phase.In this paper, the payloads and the initial observation results are introduced.

  16. Virtual enterprise architecture and methodology - Initial results from the Globeman21 project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterager, Johan; Larsen, Lars Bjørn; Gobbi, Chiara

    1999-01-01

    This paper will focus on presenting the initial results from the IMS project Globeman21 regarding generic models for Extended Enterprise Management (EEM). In particular the paper outlines a proposed architecture for the creation of virtual enterprises, industrial requirements regarding the generic...... models, terminology for describing extended enterprises, and initial considerations regarding a methodology for EEM. Globeman21 see the extended enterprise as a concept covering the totality of different concepts dealing with the expansion or extension of enterprise activities. One way of realising...... the concept of extended enterprise is through the creation of virtual enterprise, based on a more or less formalised network. This approach is the basis for the development of the generic EEM model within Globeman21....

  17. Initial results from a test of the NASA EAARL lidar in the Tampa Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John C.; Wright, Wayne C.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Clayton, Tonya; Hansen, Mark; Longenecker, John; Gesch, Dean B.; Crane, Michael; Dutton, S.

    2002-01-01

    An initial test of the performance of the NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) over coastal environments around the margins of an urbanized Gulf of Mexico estuary was performed over Tampa Bay in January 2002. The EAARL is a raster-scanning, water-penetrating, full-waveform adaptive lidar that is coupled to aircraft positioning systems and a downlooking color digital camera. The EAARL has unique capabilities for simultaneously mapping topography, shallow bathymetry, and vegetation. Initial analysis within 2 Tampa Bay subregions traversed by the survey flightlines has revealed that the EAARL can survey shallow bathymetry and variables associated with benthic cover in remarkable detail. The results of this ongoing study will aid in developing recommendations on the appropriate use of NASA EAARL surveys for mapping bathymetry and benthic habitats in estuaries around the Gulf of Mexico.

  18. First-year treatment costs among new initiators of topical prostaglandin analogs: pooled results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordana K Schmier

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Jordana K Schmier1, David W Covert21Managing Scientist, Exponent Inc., Alexandria, VA, USA; 2Associate Director, Health Economics, Alcon Research Ltd., Ft. Worth, TX, USAObjective: To estimate first-year treatment costs among new initiators of topical prostaglandin analogs in a managed care population.Research design and methods: A model was developed to estimate first-year medical costs. Model inputs were based on weighted results from three previous studies. Treatment patterns were derived from a claims database analysis. Published studies were used to estimate visit-related resource use. Costs were obtained from standard sources.Results: Across studies, 27,809 patients met study criteria, 44.2% of whom remained on their index therapy for 12 months. Adjunctive therapy was needed in 22.5%, 18.5%, and 11.9% of bimatoprost, latanoprost, and benzalkonium chloride (BAK-free travoprost patients, respectively. Median days to initiating adjunctive therapy were 64, 67, and 127 for bimatoprost, latanoprost, and BAK-free travoprost patients. Estimated first-year medical costs were $1,945, $1,803, and $1,730 for patients initiating therapy with bimatoprost, latanoprost, and BAK-free travoprost. Findings were consistent through sensitivity analysis.Conclusions: A BAK-free prostaglandin analog may permit longer duration of monotherapy and be associated with lower first-year treatment costs. Use of a claims database and the selection of new initiators of prostaglandin analogs limit the ability to project findings to all glaucoma patients.Keywords: costs and cost analysis, drug therapy, combination, glaucoma, prostaglandin analogs

  19. Compact Low-Voltage, High-Power, Multi-beam Klystron for ILC: Initial Test Results

    CERN Document Server

    Teryaev, V E; Kazakov, S Yu; Hirshfield, J L; Ives, R L; Marsden, D; Collins, G; Karimov, R; Jensen, R

    2015-01-01

    Initial test results of an L-band multi-beam klystron with parameters relevant for ILC are presented. The chief distinction of this tube from MBKs already developed for ILC is its low operating voltage of 60 kV, a virtue that implies considerable technological simplifications in the accelerator complex. To demonstrate the concept underlying the tubes design, a six-beamlet quadrant (a 54 inch high one-quarter portion of the full 1.3 GHz tube) was built and recently underwent initial tests, with main goals of demonstrating rated gun perveance, rated gain, and at least one-quarter of the full 10-MW rated power. Our initial three-day conditioning campaign without RF drive (140 microsec pulses @ 60 Hz) was stopped at 53% of full rated duty because of time-limits at the test-site; no signs appeared that would seem to prevent achieving full duty operation (i.e., 1.6 msec pulses @ 10 Hz). The subsequent tests with 10-15 microsec RF pulses confirmed the rated gain, produced output powers of up to 2.86 MW at 60 kV with...

  20. Spinal epidural neurostimulation for treatment of acute and chronic intractable pain: initial and long term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R R; Siqueira, E B; Cerullo, L J

    1979-09-01

    Spinal epidural neurostimulation, which evolved from dorsal column stimulation, has been found to be effective in the treatment of acute and chronic intractable pain. Urban and Hashold have shown that it is a safe, simplified alternative to dorsal column stimulation, especially because laminectomy is not required if the electrodes are inserted percutaneously. Percutaneous epidural neurostimulation is also advantageous because there can be a diagnostic trial period before permanent internalization and implantation. This diagnostic and therapeutic modality has been used in 36 patients during the past 3 years at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Eleven of these patients had acute intractable pain, which was defined as pain of less than 1 year in duration. Initial postimplantation results from the 36 patients indicate that spinal epidural neurostimulation is most effective in treating the intractable pain of diabetes, arachnoiditis, and post-traumatic and postamputation neuroma. Long term follow-up, varying from 1 year to 3 years postimplantation in the 20 initially responding patients, indicates that the neurostimulation continues to provide significant pain relief (50% or greater) in a majority of the patients who experienced initial significant pain relief.

  1. Combined Impedance Probe and Langmuir Probe Studies of the Low-Latitude E Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Steigies, C. T.

    2008-01-01

    The EQUIS-2 sounding rocket and radar campaign, launched from Kwajalein Atoll in 2004, included a mission to study low-latitude irregularities and electrodynamics, led by NASA GSFC. This mission included two instrumented rockets launched into the nighttime E region (apogee near 120 km), which included comprehensive electrodynamics and neutral density instrumentation. These rockets carried the first of a new generation of impedance probes, that utilize a wide-band drive signal to simultaneously measure the impedance of an antenna in a plasma as a function of frequency from 7 kEIz to 4 MHz. at a rapid cadence. This technique promises to permit true plasma spectroscopy, and resulted in the identification of multiple plasma resonances and accurate measurements of the plasma density, even in the low density nighttime E region. We present analyses of the technique and resulting spectra, and show how these data may be combined with fixed-bias Langmuir Probe data to infer the temperature structure of the E region as well as providing accurate absolute calibrations for the very high time resolution fixed-bias probe data. The data is shown to agree well with data from ionosonde, the ALTAIR radar, and the Peruvian beacon experiment.

  2. Initial Results from Fitting p-Modes Using Intensity Observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzennik, Sylvain G.

    2017-09-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager project recently started processing the continuum-intensity images following global helioseismology procedures similar to those used to process the velocity images. The spatial decomposition of these images has produced time series of spherical harmonic coefficients for degrees up to ℓ=300, using a different apodization than the one used for velocity observations. The first 360 days of observations were processed and are made available. I present initial results from fitting these time series using my fitting method and compare the derived mode characteristics to those estimated using coeval velocity observations.

  3. The benchmark aeroelastic models program: Description and highlights of initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Farmer, Moses G.; Durham, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental effort was implemented in aeroelasticity called the Benchmark Models Program. The primary purpose of this program is to provide the necessary data to evaluate computational fluid dynamic codes for aeroelastic analysis. It also focuses on increasing the understanding of the physics of unsteady flows and providing data for empirical design. An overview is given of this program and some results obtained in the initial tests are highlighted. The tests that were completed include measurement of unsteady pressures during flutter of a rigid wing with an NACA 0012 airfoil section and dynamic response measurements of a flexible rectangular wing with a thick circular arc airfoil undergoing shock boundary layer oscillations.

  4. Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, Doug; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias

    2007-07-25

    Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005–06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

  5. Compact Multipurpose Mobile Laser Scanning System — Initial Tests and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Glennie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a prototype compact mobile laser scanning system that may be operated from a backpack or unmanned aerial vehicle. The system is small, self-contained, relatively inexpensive, and easy to deploy. A description of system components is presented, along with the initial calibration of the multi-sensor platform. The first field tests of the system, both in backpack mode and mounted on a helium balloon for real-world applications are presented. For both field tests, the acquired kinematic LiDAR data are compared with highly accurate static terrestrial laser scanning point clouds. These initial results show that the vertical accuracy of the point cloud for the prototype system is approximately 4 cm (1σ in balloon mode, and 3 cm (1σ in backpack mode while horizontal accuracy was approximately 17 cm (1σ for the balloon tests. Results from selected study areas on the Sacramento River Delta and San Andreas Fault in California demonstrate system performance, deployment agility and flexibility, and potential for operational production of high density and highly accurate point cloud data. Cost and production rate trade-offs place this system in the niche between existing airborne and tripod mounted LiDAR systems.

  6. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-07-30

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate.

  7. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Schüler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1, the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate.

  8. Initial Results of Aperture Area Comparisons for Exo-Atmospheric Total Solar Irradiance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. Carol; Litorja, Maritoni; Fowler, Joel B.; Butler, James J.

    2009-01-01

    In the measurement of exo-atmospheric total solar irradiance (TSI), instrument aperture area is a critical component in converting solar radiant flux to irradiance. In a May 2000 calibration workshop for the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), the solar irradiance measurement community recommended that NASA and NISI coordinate an aperture area measurement comparison to quantify and validate aperture area uncertainties and their overall effect on TSI uncertainties. From May 2003 to February 2006, apertures from 4 institutions with links to the historical TSI database were measured by NIST and the results were compared to the aperture area determined by each institution. The initial results of these comparisons are presented and preliminary assessments of the participants' uncertainties are discussed.

  9. Initial Results from ST7-Disturbance Reduction System on LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Charles; Barela, Phillip; Cutler, Curt; Denzin, Richard; Franklin, Garth; Gorelik, Jacb; Hsu, Oscar; Javidnia, Shahram; Li, Irena; Maghami, Peiman; Marrese-Reading, Colleen; Mehta, Jitendra; O'Donnell, James; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Slutsky, Jacob; Thorpe, Ira; Umfress, S. Harper; Ziemer, John

    2017-01-01

    The European Space Agency LISA Pathfinder spacecraft was launched on December, 2, 2015 carrying the NASA contribution ST7-Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS). The objective of ST7-DRS is to demonstrate drag-free control and noise reduction technologies for future missions, especially a future space-based gravitational wave observatory. The system consists of a pair of Colloid Micro-Newton Thruster clusters and a computer with control algorithms. Data from the host platform is used for inertial and attitude sensing. ST7-DRS was initially powered on in January 2016 for an on-orbit check out and was fully commissioned in late June and early July. This presentation will report results relative to the 0.1 micro-Newton/ rt Hertz thrust noise requirement and the 10 nanometer/rt Hertz position control requirement. Preliminary extended mission results will be discussed. The work described here was funded by NASA.

  10. Results of initial analyses of the salt (macro) batch 10 tank 21H qualification samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt (Macro) Batch 10 for processing through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). This document reports the initial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. Analysis of the Tank 21H Salt (Macro) Batch 10 composite sample indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics or observations, such as floating solids, the presence of large amount of solids, or unusual colors. Further sample results will be reported in a future document. This memo satisfies part of Deliverable 3 of the Technical Task Request (TTR).

  11. Concerning the results of the initial examination of individuals who have undergone periodontal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerná, H

    1989-01-01

    The results of initial examination of 1,021 patients (460 men and 561 women), admitted for the periodontal surgical treatment during the time period of 5 years at the periodontal department of the 1st Clinic of Stomatology in Olomouc, were retrospectively evaluated from the records in out-patients' clinical notes. The results are essentially in accordance with the generally acknowledged conclusions of epidemiological studies with the only difference consisting in the finding that in this specific group of patients the oral hygiene did not deteriorate with increasing age. From the point of view of the necessity of periodontal surgical treatment the men and women in the age groups between 30 and 39 years have been identified as individuals at the highest risk.

  12. Merging neutron stars. 1. Initial results for coalescence of noncorotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Piran, T.; Thielemann, F. K.

    1994-01-01

    We present three-dimensional Newtonian simulations of the coalescence of two neutron stars, using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. We begin the simulations with the two stars in a hard, circular binary, and have them spiral together as angular momentum is lost through gravitational radiation at the rate predicted by modeling the system as two point masses. We model the neutron stars as hard polytropes (gamma = 2.4) of equal mass, and investigate the effect of the initial spin of the two stars on the coalescence. The process of coalescence, from initial contact to the formation of an axially symmetric object, takes only a few orbital periods. Some of the material from the two neutron stars is shed, forming a thick disk around the central, coalesced object. The mass of this disk is dependent on the initial neutron star spins; higher spin rates result in greater mass loss and thus more massive disks. For spin rates that are most likely to be applicable to real systems, the central coalesced object has a mass of 2.4 solar mass, which is tantalizingly close to the maximum mass allowed by any neutron star equation of state for an object that is supported in part by rotation. Using a realistic nuclear equation of state, we estimate the temperature of the material after the coalescence. We find that the central object is at a temperature of approximately 10 MeV, while the disk is heated by shocks to a temperature of 2 to 4 MeV.

  13. Molecular evolution of contracting clouds - Basic methods and initial results. [interstellar processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerola, H.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between the dynamics of the interstellar gas and the thermal and chemical effects associated with interstellar molecules and dust is investigated. The evolution of a rather massive isolated initially diffuse cloud under self-gravity is studied, using the equations of hydrodynamics; only radial motions are considered, and the heat, chemical, and radiative-transfer equations are solved simultaneously with the hydrodynamic equations. The relevant chemistry is described along with the thermal model, the radiative-transfer process, and the numerical methods employed. Results for a contracting cloud are discussed in terms of the problem of initial conditions, the dynamical evolution of the cloud, its chemical and thermal evolution, time scales, and column densities. It is shown that the chemical evolution of a massive contracting diffuse cloud is sensitive to such physical properties as temperature and ion abundances, that warm and cool versions of a typical cloud evolve differently, and that the physical origin of this effect is the level of heating due to H2 formation on interstellar dust grains.

  14. Animation shows promise in initiating timely cardiopulmonary resuscitation: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attin, Mina; Winslow, Katheryn; Smith, Tyler

    2014-04-01

    Delayed responses during cardiac arrest are common. Timely interventions during cardiac arrest have a direct impact on patient survival. Integration of technology in nursing education is crucial to enhance teaching effectiveness. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of animation on nursing students' response time to cardiac arrest, including initiation of timely chest compression. Nursing students were randomized into experimental and control groups prior to practicing in a high-fidelity simulation laboratory. The experimental group was educated, by discussion and animation, about the importance of starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation upon recognizing an unresponsive patient. Afterward, a discussion session allowed students in the experimental group to gain more in-depth knowledge about the most recent changes in the cardiac resuscitation guidelines from the American Heart Association. A linear mixed model was run to investigate differences in time of response between the experimental and control groups while controlling for differences in those with additional degrees, prior code experience, and basic life support certification. The experimental group had a faster response time compared with the control group and initiated timely cardiopulmonary resuscitation upon recognition of deteriorating conditions (P < .0001). The results demonstrated the efficacy of combined teaching modalities for timely cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Providing opportunities for repetitious practice when a patient's condition is deteriorating is crucial for teaching safe practice.

  15. E-region echo characteristics governed by auroral arc electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of a pair of auroral arc features by two imagers, one ground- and one space-based, allows the associated field-aligned current (FAC and electric field structure to be inferred. Simultaneous observations of HF radar echoes provide an insight into the irregularity-generating mechanisms. This is especially interesting for the E-region echoes observed, which form the focus of our analysis, and from which several conclusions can be drawn, summarized as follows. Latitudinal variations in echo characteristics are governed by the FAC and electric field background. Particularly sharp boundaries are found at the edges of auroral arcs. Within regions of auroral luminosity, echoes have Doppler shifts below the ion-acoustic speed and are proportional to the electric field, suggesting scatter from gradient drift waves. Regions of downward FAC are associated with mixed high and low Doppler shift echoes. The high Doppler shift component is greatly in excess of the ion-acoustic speed, but seems to be commensurate with the driving electric field. The low Doppler shift component appears to be much depressed below expectations.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; electric fields and currents

  16. Quantifying Uncertainty in Model Predictions for the Pliocene (Plio-QUMP): Initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, J.O.; Collins, M.; Haywood, A.M.; Dowsett, H.J.; Hunter, S.J.; Lunt, D.J.; Pickering, S.J.; Pound, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Examination of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP; ~. 3.3 to 3.0. Ma BP) provides an excellent opportunity to test the ability of climate models to reproduce warm climate states, thereby assessing our confidence in model predictions. To do this it is necessary to relate the uncertainty in model simulations of mPWP climate to uncertainties in projections of future climate change. The uncertainties introduced by the model can be estimated through the use of a Perturbed Physics Ensemble (PPE). Developing on the UK Met Office Quantifying Uncertainty in Model Predictions (QUMP) Project, this paper presents the results from an initial investigation using the end members of a PPE in a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean model (HadCM3) running with appropriate mPWP boundary conditions. Prior work has shown that the unperturbed version of HadCM3 may underestimate mPWP sea surface temperatures at higher latitudes. Initial results indicate that neither the low sensitivity nor the high sensitivity simulations produce unequivocally improved mPWP climatology relative to the standard. Whilst the high sensitivity simulation was able to reconcile up to 6 ??C of the data/model mismatch in sea surface temperatures in the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (relative to the standard simulation), it did not produce a better prediction of global vegetation than the standard simulation. Overall the low sensitivity simulation was degraded compared to the standard and high sensitivity simulations in all aspects of the data/model comparison. The results have shown that a PPE has the potential to explore weaknesses in mPWP modelling simulations which have been identified by geological proxies, but that a 'best fit' simulation will more likely come from a full ensemble in which simulations that contain the strengths of the two end member simulations shown here are combined. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Objective assessment of vocal hyperfunction: an experimental framework and initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, R E; Holmberg, E B; Perkell, J S; Walsh, M; Vaughan, C

    1989-06-01

    This report describes the experimental design and initial results of an ongoing clinical investigation of voice disorders. Its major focus is the development and use of quantitative measures to provide objective descriptions of conditions referred to as "vocal hyperfunction." The experimental design for this project is based on a descriptive theoretical framework, which holds that there are different types and stages of hyperfunctionally related voice disorders. Data consist of indirect measures derived from noninvasive aerodynamic and acoustic recordings including (a) parameters derived from inverse filtered approximations of the glottal air flow waveform; (b) estimates of transglottal pressure, average glottal air flow, glottal resistance and vocal efficiency; and (c) measures of vocal intensity and fundamental frequency. Initial results (based on comparisons among 15 voice patients and 45 normal speakers) support major assumptions that underlie the theoretical framework, and indicate that the measurement approach being utilized is capable of differentiating hyperfunctional from normal voices and hyperfunctional conditions from one another. Organic manifestations of vocal hyperfunction (nodules, polyps, contact ulcers) are accompanied by abnormally high values for the glottal waveform parameters of AC flow and maximum flow declination rate, suggesting increased potential for vocal fold trauma due to high vocal fold closure velocities and collision forces. In contrast, nonorganic manifestations of hyperfunction (functional disorders) tend to be associated with abnormally high levels of unmodulated DC flow, without high values for AC flow and maximum flow declination rate, suggesting reduced potential for vocal fold trauma. Measures also suggest different underlying mechanisms for nodules and polyps as compared to contact ulcers. Results are discussed relative to predictions based on the theoretical framework for vocal hyperfunction.

  18. Posture-Dependent Human 3He Lung Imaging in an Open Access MRI System: Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, L L; Li, C -H; Rosen, M S; Patz, S; Walsworth, R L

    2007-01-01

    The human lung and its functions are extremely sensitive to orientation and posture, and debate continues as to the role of gravity and the surrounding anatomy in determining lung function and heterogeneity of perfusion and ventilation. However, study of these effects is difficult. The conventional high-field magnets used for most hyperpolarized 3He MRI of the human lung, and most other common radiological imaging modalities including PET and CT, restrict subjects to lying horizontally, minimizing most gravitational effects. In this paper, we briefly review the motivation for posture-dependent studies of human lung function, and present initial imaging results of human lungs in the supine and vertical body orientations using inhaled hyperpolarized 3He gas and an open-access MRI instrument. The open geometry of this MRI system features a "walk-in" capability that permits subjects to be imaged in vertical and horizontal positions, and potentially allows for complete rotation of the orientation of the imaging su...

  19. Initial results from NuSTAR observations of the Norma arm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodaghee, Arash; Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman;

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for an initial survey of the Norma Arm gathered with the focusing hard X-Ray Telescope NuSTAR. The survey covers 0.2 deg(2) of sky area in the 3-79 keV range with a minimum and maximum raw depth of 15 ks and 135 ks, respectively. Besides a bright black-hole X-ray binary...... in outburst (4U 1630-47) and a new X-ray transient (NuSTAR J163433-473841), NuSTAR locates three sources from the Chandra survey of this region whose spectra are extended above 10 keV for the first time: CXOU J163329.5-473332, CXOU J163350.9-474638, and CXOU J163355.1-473804. Imaging, timing, and spectral...

  20. Initial results for urban metal distributions in house dusts of Syracuse, New York, USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. L. Johnson; D. Prokhorova; L. Tidd; M. M. Millones; M. Vincent; J. Hager; A. Hunt; D. A. Griffith; S. Blount; S. Ellsworth; J. Hintz; R. Lucci; A. Mittiga

    2005-01-01

    A program of house dust sample collection and analysis has begun in Syracuse,New York, USA, in order to determine the feasibility of a geography-based exposure assessment for urban metals. The sampling program, and the protocols it employs, is described for two different types of wipe media, Ghost Wipes and Whatman Filters. Preliminary results show that strong spatial patterns of floor dust loading (mg dust per square foot) can be observed for data aggregated at a spatial scale of about 1600 m (~2.5 kin2). Floor dust metal concentrations were similar to those found in other urban environments, with some regional variation. The median floor dust Pb concentration was ~108 mg· kg-1 for this initial data set of ~264 sampled residential locations, and varied from 50 to 1100 mg Pb · kg-1.

  1. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Manghisoni, M; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Traversi, G; Turner, W C

    2003-01-01

    A novel segmented multigap pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and 0 degrees neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity interaction regions (IRs) and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast pulse-shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper, we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in a super proton synchrotron (SPS) external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentation to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated. (10 refs) .

  2. [Argon plasma surgery (APC) in the upper aerodigestive tract. Initial results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergler, W; Farin, G; Fischer, K; Hörmann, K

    1998-07-01

    Cold knife surgery, electrosurgery and laser surgery all offer techniques, instruments, equipment and systems for resecting and destroying mucosal lesions and for hemostasis in the upper aerodigestive tract. When used in the head and neck, argon plasma surgery (APS) offers a new, contact-free, electrosurgical technique in which high frequency current is applied through ionized, and thus electrically conductive, argon(argon plasma) to the tissue undergoing treatment. Especially noteworthy in APS are its advantages for removing a lesion and controlling bleeding: the technique is easy to control, and the depth of the thermal tissue destruction is limited to a maximum of 3 mm even in wide-area application, so that damage to adjacent or submucosal tissues can be avoided. Initial results with APS in the reduction of hyperplastic nasal turbinates, treatment of hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (Osler's disease) in the nasal mucosa, and in treating progressive juvenile papillomatosis of the larynx have shown clear advantages for APS over other methods used.

  3. An epistemology and expectations survey about experimental physics: Development and initial results

    CERN Document Server

    Zwickl, Benjamin M; Finkelstein, Noah; Lewandowski, H J

    2013-01-01

    In response to national calls to better align physics laboratory courses with the way physicists engage in research, we have developed an epistemology and expectations survey to assess how students perceive the nature of physics experiments in the contexts of laboratory courses and the professional research laboratory. The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS) evaluates students' shifts in epistemology and affect at the beginning and end of a semester. Also, at the end of the semester, the E-CLASS assesses students' reflections on their course's expectations for earning a good grade. By basing survey statements on widely embraced learning goals and common critiques of teaching labs, the E-CLASS serves as an assessment tool for lab courses across the undergraduate curriculum and as a tool for PER research. We present the development, evidence of validation, and initial formative assessment results from a sample that includes 45 classes at 20 institutions. We also d...

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of FEAST-Metal Fuel Performance Code: Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelmann, Paul Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Laboratories

    2012-06-27

    This memo documents the completion of the LANL milestone, M3FT-12LA0202041, describing methodologies and initial results using FEAST-Metal. The FEAST-Metal code calculations for this work are being conducted at LANL in support of on-going activities related to sensitivity analysis of fuel performance codes. The objective is to identify important macroscopic parameters of interest to modeling and simulation of metallic fuel performance. This report summarizes our preliminary results for the sensitivity analysis using 6 calibration datasets for metallic fuel developed at ANL for EBR-II experiments. Sensitivity ranking methodology was deployed to narrow down the selected parameters for the current study. There are approximately 84 calibration parameters in the FEAST-Metal code, of which 32 were ultimately used in Phase II of this study. Preliminary results of this sensitivity analysis led to the following ranking of FEAST models for future calibration and improvements: fuel conductivity, fission gas transport/release, fuel creep, and precipitation kinetics. More validation data is needed to validate calibrated parameter distributions for future uncertainty quantification studies with FEAST-Metal. Results of this study also served to point out some code deficiencies and possible errors, and these are being investigated in order to determine root causes and to improve upon the existing code models.

  5. Gravitational waves from known pulsars: Results from the initial detector era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P. [LIGO - California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Adams, C. [LIGO - Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Adams, T. [Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M. [Nikhef, Science Park, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aggarwal, N. [LIGO - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Aguiar, O. D. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12227-010 - São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Allocca, A. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ceron, E. Amador [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and The Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-20

    We present the results of searches for gravitational waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and GEO600 detectors. This gives a total of 195 pulsars including the most recent results described in this paper.

  6. Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars: Results from the Initial Detector Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of searches for gravitational waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and GEO600 detectors. This gives a total of 195 pulsars including the most recent results described in this paper.

  7. Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars: Results from the Initial Detector Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Ceron, E. A.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; Kanner, J. B.; Hobbs, G. B.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of searches for gravitational waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and GEO600 detectors. This gives a total of 195 pulsars including the most recent results described in this paper.

  8. Initial results from a multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography system for nuclear security

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Buckley E.; Hartwig, Zachary S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Danagoulian, Areg

    2016-10-01

    The detection of assembled nuclear devices and concealed special nuclear materials (SNM) such as plutonium or uranium in commercial cargo traffic is a major challenge in mitigating the threat of nuclear terrorism. Currently available radiographic and active interrogation systems use ∼1-10 MeV bremsstrahlung photon beams. Although simple to build and operate, bremsstrahlung-based systems deliver high radiation doses to the cargo and to potential stowaways. To eliminate problematic issues of high dose, we are developing a novel technique known as multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography (MMGR). MMGR uses ion-induced nuclear reactions to produce two monoenergetic gammas for dual-energy radiography. This allows us to image the areal density and effective atomic number (Zeff) of scanned cargo. We present initial results from the proof-of-concept experiment, which was conducted at the MIT Bates Research and Engineering Center. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the capabilities of MMGR to measure areal density and Zeff of container cargo mockups. The experiment used a 3.0 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator to create sources of 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas from the 11B(d,nγ)12C reaction in a thick natural boron target; the gammas are detected by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors after transmission through cargo mockups . The measured fluxes of transmitted 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas were used to assess the areal density and Zeff. Initial results show that MMGR is capable of discriminating the presence of high-Z materials concealed in up to 30 cm of iron shielding from low- and mid-Z materials present in the cargo mockup.

  9. Predicting episodic memory performance using different biomarkers: results from Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, María Julieta; Cohen, Gabriela; Chrem Mendez, Patricio; Campos, Jorge; Nahas, Federico E; Surace, Ezequiel I; Vazquez, Silvia; Gustafson, Deborah; Guinjoan, Salvador; Allegri, Ricardo F; Sevlever, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (Arg-ADNI) is the first ADNI study to be performed in Latin America at a medical center with the appropriate infrastructure. Our objective was to describe baseline characteristics and to examine whether biomarkers related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) physiopathology were associated with worse memory performance. Patients and methods Fifteen controls and 28 mild cognitive impairment and 13 AD dementia subjects were included. For Arg-ADNI, all biomarker parameters and neuropsychological tests of ADNI-II were adopted. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorodeoxyglucose and 11C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB-PET) were available from all participants. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker results were available from 39 subjects. Results A total of 56 participants were included and underwent baseline evaluation. The three groups were similar with respect to years of education and sex, and they differed in age (F=5.10, P=0.01). Mean scores for the baseline measurements of the neuropsychological evaluation differed significantly among the three groups at P0.1). Baseline amyloid deposition and left hippocampal volume separated the three diagnostic groups and correlated with the memory performance (P<0.001). Conclusion Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data revealed links between cognition, structural changes, and biomarkers. Follow-up of a larger and more representative cohort, particularly analyzing cerebrospinal fluid and brain biomarkers, will allow better characterization of AD in our country. PMID:27695331

  10. Gravitational-waves from known pulsars: results from the initial detector era

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Agathos, M; Affeldt, C; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brüeckner, F; Bulik, T; Buonanno, A; Bulten, H J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cuoco, E; Cunningham, L; D'Antonio, S; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kaw, P; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Krishnan, B; Kucharczyk, C; Kudla, S; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Roux, A Le; Leaci, P; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levine, B; Lewis, J B; Lhuillier, V; Li, T G F; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lloyd, D; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Luan, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Marque, J; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Mokler, F; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Kumar, D Nanda; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishida, E; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; Larcher, W Ortega; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Ou, J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Peiris, P; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pindor, B; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poole, V; Poux, C; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rapagnani, P; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Roever, C; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Soden, K; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stevens, D; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tang, L; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vlcek, B; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vrinceanu, D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, J; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wibowo, S; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yum, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J; Buchner, S; Cognard, I; Corongiu, A; D'Amico, N; Espinoza, C M; Freire, P C C; Gotthelf, E V; Guillemot, L; Hessels, J W T; Hobbs, G B; Kramer, M; Lommen, A N; Lyne, A G; Marshall, F E; Possenti, A; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Roy, J; Stappers, B W

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of searches for gravitational-waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational-wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and G...

  11. Effects of initiating carvedilol in patients with severe chronic heart failure: results from the COPERNICUS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krum, Henry; Roecker, Ellen B; Mohacsi, Paul; Rouleau, Jean L; Tendera, Michal; Coats, Andrew J S; Katus, Hugo A; Fowler, Michael B; Packer, Milton

    2003-02-12

    euvolemic patients, the relation of benefit to risk during initiation of treatment with carvedilol is similar to that seen during long-term therapy with the drug. Our findings should provide the reassurance needed to encourage the high levels of use that are warranted by the results of long-term clinical trials.

  12. Volcano-rift interaction on Venus: initial results from the Beta-Atla-Themis region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, I.; Martin-Gonzalez, F.; Marquez, A.; de Pablo, M. A.; Carreno, F.

    Extensional deformation and volcanism are widespread and geographically related processes on the surface of Venus (e.g. Head et al., 1992; Solomon et al., 1992). We report the initial results of an ongoing study on the interaction between fracture belts (chasmata and fossae) and large to intermediate-size volcanoes on Venus. The initial work focused in Beta-Atla-Themis, a region centered at ˜ 250o of longitude that covers ˜ 20 percent of the surface of the planet in which concentration of volcanic centers and fracture belts exceeds the global mean density (e.g. Crumpler et al., 1993). We carried out a survey of the volcanic features located in and close to fracture belts using existing volcano databases (Crumpler and Aubele, 2000) updated during this initial stage of our study through the analysis of full-resolution Magellan radar images for the studied region. We identified over a hundred volcanic features of different size and type (large volcanoes, intermediate-size volcanoes, steep-side domes and modified or fluted edifices) located in or near fracture belts. In this initial work, we have also established the time relationship that exist between each volcanic feature and the fracture belts and found that volcanic edifices predate, postdate or develop contemporaneously to extensional fracturing. Detailed structural mapping of locations where extensional fracturing and the formation of volcanoes is related is being carried out. In these geological settings the fracture patterns resulting from the interaction between both processes can help to constrain the different processes that operate during volcano growth (i.e. dike intrusion, chamber inflation, volcanic sagging and volcanic spreading) and its interaction with the regional stress fields responsible for the fracture belts. References: - Crumpler L.S. and J.C. Aubele (2000). Volcanism on Venus. In Encyclopedia of volcanoes, (Sigurdsson, H, B. Houghton, S.R. McNutt, H. Rymer, J. Stix, eds), p.727- 770

  13. Southern high-latitude Digisonde observations of ionosphere E-region Bragg scatter during intense lacuna conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Monselesan

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available During summer months at solar cycle minimum, F-region lacuna and slant-Es conditions (SEC are common features of daytime ionograms recorded around local magnetic noon at Casey, Antarctica. Digisonde measurements of drift velocity height profiles show that the occurrence of lacuna prevents the determination of F-region drift velocities and also affects E-region drift velocity measurements. Unique E-region spectral features revealed as intervals of Bragg scatter superimposed on typical background E-region reflection were observed in Digisonde Doppler spectra during intense lacuna conditions. Daytime E-region Doppler spectra recorded at carrier frequencies from 1.5 to 2.7MHz, below the E-region critical frequency foE, have two side-peaks corresponding to Bragg scatter at approximately ±1-2Hz symmetrically located on each side of a central-peak corresponding to near-zenith total reflections. Angle-of-arrival information and ray-tracing simulations show that echo returns are coming from oblique directions most likely resulting from direct backscatter from just below the total reflection height for each sounding frequency. The Bragg backscatter events are shown to manifest during polar lacuna conditions, and to affect the determination of E-region background drift velocities, and as such must be considered when using standard Doppler-sorted interferometry (DSI techniques to estimate ionospheric drift velocities. Given the Doppler and spatial separation of the echoes determined from high-resolution Doppler measurements, we are able to estimate the Bragg scatter phase velocity independently from the bulk E-region motion. The phase velocity coincides with the ExB direction derived from in situ fluxgate magnetometer records. When ionospheric refraction is considered, the phase velocity amplitudes deduced from DSI are comparable to the ion-acoustic speed expected in the E-region. We briefly consider the plausibility that these

  14. [Implementation of a regional system for the emergency care of acute ischemic stroke: Initial results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Oliveira, Miguel; Araújo, Fernando

    2014-06-01

    Implementing integrated systems for emergency care of patients with acute ischemic stroke helps reduce morbidity and mortality. We describe the process of organizing and implementing a regional system to cover around 3.7 million people and its main initial results. We performed a descriptive analysis of the implementation process and a retrospective analysis of the following parameters: number of patients prenotified by the pre-hospital system; number of times thrombolysis was performed; door-to-needle time; and functional assessment three months after stroke. The implementation process started in November 2005 and ended in December 2009, and included 11 health centers. There were 3574 prenotifications from the prehospital system. Thrombolysis was performed in 1142 patients. The percentage of patients receiving thrombolysis rose during the study period, with a maximum of 16%. Median door-to-needle time was 62 min in 2009. Functional recovery three months after stroke was total or near total in 50% of patients. The regional system implemented for emergency care of patients with acute ischemic stroke has led to health gains, with progressive improvements in patients' access to thrombolysis, and to greater equity in the health care system, thus helping to reduce mortality from cerebrovascular disease in Portugal. Our results, which are comparable with those of international studies, support the strategy adopted for implementation of this system. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. The CIDA-QUEST Large Scale Variability Survey in the Orion OB Association initial results

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, C; Calvet, N; Hartmann, L; Briceno, Cesar; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    1999-01-01

    Using the 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera on the 1m Schmidt telescope in Venezuela, we are conducting a large-scale, deep optical, multiepoch, photometric (BVRIHa) survey over 120 sq.deg. in the Orion OB association, aimed at identifying the low mass stellar populations with ages less than about 10 Myr. We present initial results for a 34 sq.deg. area spanning Orion 1b, 1a and the B Cloud. Using variability as our main selection criterion we derive much cleaner samples than with the usual single-epoch photometric selection, allowing us to attain a much higher efficiency in follow up spectroscopy and resulting in an preliminary list of 74 new low-mass (~ 0.4 Msun) pre-main sequence stars. Though preliminary, this list of new T Tauri stars already suggests that the fraction of accreting young stars in 1a is much lower than in 1b, which would be expected if 1a is indeed older than 1b. We are analyzing in detail the light curves of these new stars, and spectroscopy of further candidates is under way.

  16. Epistemology and expectations survey about experimental physics: Development and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hirokawa, Takako; Finkelstein, Noah; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2014-06-01

    In response to national calls to better align physics laboratory courses with the way physicists engage in research, we have developed an epistemology and expectations survey to assess how students perceive the nature of physics experiments in the contexts of laboratory courses and the professional research laboratory. The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS) evaluates students' epistemology at the beginning and end of a semester. Students respond to paired questions about how they personally perceive doing experiments in laboratory courses and how they perceive an experimental physicist might respond regarding their research. Also, at the end of the semester, the E-CLASS assesses a third dimension of laboratory instruction, students' reflections on their course's expectations for earning a good grade. By basing survey statements on widely embraced learning goals and common critiques of teaching labs, the E-CLASS serves as an assessment tool for lab courses across the undergraduate curriculum and as a tool for physics education research. We present the development, evidence of validation, and initial formative assessment results from a sample that includes 45 classes at 20 institutions. We also discuss feedback from instructors and reflect on the challenges of large-scale online administration and distribution of results.

  17. Adrenal medullary transplantation to the caudate nucleus in Parkinson's disease. Initial clinical results in 18 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G S; Burns, R S; Tulipan, N B; Parker, R A

    1989-05-01

    Results from a pilot study of adrenal medullary autotransplantation for Parkinson's disease are presented. Eighteen patients were studied; 12 were followed up for 1 year, and 6 were followed up for 6 months. Four of 12 patients showed distinct improvement in the signs and symptoms of their disease, as assessed using the Columbia Rating Scale, at 1 year; none showed distinct deterioration. The 6 patients who were followed up for only 6 months were an average of 20 years older and generally more severely affected. None distinctly improved. Morbidity was considered to be minor and transient among the first 12 patients, while 4 of the last 6 patients experienced alteration in mental status lasting as long as several months. This problem has led us to conclude that older patients with preexisting cognitive impairment should not be included in future studies until the benefits are more clearly established. However, we believe that the distinct and persistent improvement seen in some of the younger patients warrants the initiation of a well-designed, randomized, and controlled trial of adrenal medullary autotransplantation for the purpose of confirming these results and assessing the effect of the procedure on the natural progression of Parkinson's disease.

  18. MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer —Our Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovska-Jankovic, K; Noveski, P; Chakalova, L; Petrusevska, G; Kubelka, K; Plaseska-Karanfilska, D

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small [∼21 nucleotide (nt)] non coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally. About 3.0% of human genes encode for miRNAs, and up to 30.0% of human protein coding genes may be regulated by miRNAs. Currently, more than 2000 unique human mature microRNAs are known. MicroRNAs play a key role in diverse biological processes including development, cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These processes are commonly dysregulated in cancer, implicating miRNAs in carcinogenesis, where they act as tumor supressors or oncogenes. Several miRNAs are associated with breast cancer. Here we present our initial results of miRNA analyses of breast cancer tissues using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (ReTi-PCR) (qPCR) involving stem-loop reverse transcriptase (RT) primers combined with TaqMan® PCR and miRNA microarray analysis. PMID:24052751

  19. Divergent LIN28-mRNA associations result in translational suppression upon the initiation of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shen Mynn; Altschuler, Gabriel; Zhao, Tian Yun; Ang, Haw Siang; Yang, Henry; Lim, Bing; Vardy, Leah; Hide, Winston; Thomson, Andrew M; Lareu, Ricky R

    2014-07-01

    LIN28 function is fundamental to the activity and behavior of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells. Its main roles in these cell types are the regulation of translational efficiency and let-7 miRNA maturation. However, LIN28-associated mRNA cargo shifting and resultant regulation of translational efficiency upon the initiation of differentiation remain unknown. An RNA-immunoprecipitation and microarray analysis protocol, eRIP, that has high specificity and sensitivity was developed to test endogenous LIN28-associated mRNA cargo shifting. A combined eRIP and polysome analysis of early stage differentiation of hESCs with two distinct differentiation cues revealed close similarities between the dynamics of LIN28 association and translational modulation of genes involved in the Wnt signaling, cell cycle, RNA metabolism and proteasomal pathways. Our data demonstrate that change in translational efficiency is a major contributor to early stages of differentiation of hESCs, in which LIN28 plays a central role. This implies that eRIP analysis of LIN28-associated RNA cargoes may be used for rapid functional quality control of pluripotent stem cells under manufacture for therapeutic applications. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Research Initiatives and Preliminary Results In Automation Design In Airspace Management in Free Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, Kevin; Lebacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA and the FAA have entered into a joint venture to explore, define, design and implement a new airspace management operating concept. The fundamental premise of that concept is that technologies and procedures need to be developed for flight deck and ground operations to improve the efficiency, the predictability, the flexibility and the safety of airspace management and operations. To that end NASA Ames has undertaken an initial development and exploration of "key concepts" in the free flight airspace management technology development. Human Factors issues in automation aiding design, coupled aiding systems between air and ground, communication protocols in distributed decision making, and analytic techniques for definition of concepts of airspace density and operator cognitive load have been undertaken. This paper reports the progress of these efforts, which are not intended to definitively solve the many evolving issues of design for future ATM systems, but to provide preliminary results to chart the parameters of performance and the topology of the analytic effort required. The preliminary research in provision of cockpit display of traffic information, dynamic density definition, distributed decision making, situation awareness models and human performance models is discussed as they focus on the theme of "design requirements".

  1. AKARI IRC survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud: Outline of the survey and initial results

    CERN Document Server

    Ita, Yoshifusa; Kato, Daisuke; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Sakon, Itsuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kawamura, Akiko; Shimonishi, Takashi; Wada, Takehiko; Usui, Fumihiko; Koo, Bon-Chul; Matsuura, Mikako; Takahashi, Hidenori; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Tamura, Motohide

    2008-01-01

    We observed an area of 10 deg^2 of the Large Magellanic Cloud using the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The observations were carried out using five imaging filters (3, 7, 11, 15, and 24 micron) and a dispersion prism (2 -- 5 micron, $\\lambda / \\Delta\\lambda$ $\\sim$ 20) equipped in the IRC. This paper describes the outline of our survey project and presents some initial results using the imaging data that detected over 5.9x10^5 near-infrared and 6.4x10^4 mid-infrared point sources. The 10 $\\sigma$ detection limits of our survey are about 16.5, 14.0, 12.3, 10.8, and 9.2 in Vega-magnitude at 3, 7, 11, 15, and 24 micron, respectively. The 11 and 15 micron data, which are unique to AKARI IRC, allow us to construct color-magnitude diagrams that are useful to identify stars with circumstellar dust. We found a new sequence in the color-magnitude diagram, which is attributed to red giants with luminosity fainter than that of the tip of the first red giant branch. We suggest that this sequence is likely to be related ...

  2. Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) of the kidney at 3 T. Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mie, Moritz B.; Zoellner, Frank G.; Heilmann, Melanie; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Nissen, Johanna C.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2010-07-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging provides diagnostic information in strokes, hemorrhages, and cerebral tumors and has proven to be a valuable tool in imaging venous vessels in the cerebrum. The SWI principle is based on the weighting of T{sub 2}{sup *} weighted magnitude images with a phase mask, therewith improving image contrast of veins or neighbouring structures of different susceptibility, in general. T{sub 2}{sup *} weighted MRI is already used for assessment of kidney function. In this paper, the feasibility of SWI on kidneys was investigated. Translation of SWI from the brain to the kidneys comes along with two main challenges: (i) organ motion due to breathing and (ii) a higher oxygenation level of renal veins compared to the brain. To handle these problems, the acquisition time has been cut down to allow for breath-hold examinations, and different post-processing methods including a new phase mask were investigated to visualize renal veins. Results showed that by a new post-processing strategy SWI contrast was enhanced on average by a factor of 1.33 compared to the standard phase mask. In summary, initial experiences of SWI on the kidneys demonstrated the feasibility. However, further technical developments have to be performed to make this technology applicable in clinical abdominal MRI. (orig.)

  3. Initial results from the rebuilt EXTRAP T2R RFP device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Gravestijn, R. M.; Hedqvist\\ad{2 }, A.; Malmberg, J.-A.

    2001-11-01

    The EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch (RFP) device has recently resumed operation after a major rebuild including the replacement of the graphite armour with molybdenum limiters, a fourfold increase of the shell time constant, and the replacement of the helical coil used for the toroidal field with a conventional solenoid-type coil. Wall-conditioning using hydrogen glow discharge cleaning was instrumental for successful RFP operation. Carbon was permanently removed from the walls during the first week of operation. The initial results from RFP operation with relatively low plasma currents in the range Ip = 70-100 kA are reported. RFP discharges are sustained for more than three shell times. Significant improvements in plasma parameters are observed, compared to operation before the rebuild. There is a substantial reduction in the carbon impurity level. The electron density behaviour is more shot-to-shot reproducible. The typical density is ne = 0.5-1×1019 m-3. Monitors of Hα line radiation indicate that the plasma wall interaction is more toroidally symmetric and that there is less transient gas release from the wall. The minimum loop voltage is in the range Vt = 28-35 V, corresponding to a reduction by a factor of two to three compared to the value before the rebuild.

  4. Research Initiatives and Preliminary Results In Automation Design In Airspace Management in Free Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, Kevin; Lebacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA and the FAA have entered into a joint venture to explore, define, design and implement a new airspace management operating concept. The fundamental premise of that concept is that technologies and procedures need to be developed for flight deck and ground operations to improve the efficiency, the predictability, the flexibility and the safety of airspace management and operations. To that end NASA Ames has undertaken an initial development and exploration of "key concepts" in the free flight airspace management technology development. Human Factors issues in automation aiding design, coupled aiding systems between air and ground, communication protocols in distributed decision making, and analytic techniques for definition of concepts of airspace density and operator cognitive load have been undertaken. This paper reports the progress of these efforts, which are not intended to definitively solve the many evolving issues of design for future ATM systems, but to provide preliminary results to chart the parameters of performance and the topology of the analytic effort required. The preliminary research in provision of cockpit display of traffic information, dynamic density definition, distributed decision making, situation awareness models and human performance models is discussed as they focus on the theme of "design requirements".

  5. Laser immunotherapy: initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C.; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Lunn, John A.; Adelsteinsson, Orn; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is an experimental treatment modality for late-stage, metastatic tumors, which targets solid primary and/or secondary tumors and utilizes an autologous vaccine-like approach to stimulate immune responses. Specifically, laser immunotherapy combines laser-induced in situ tumor devitalization with an immunoadjuvant for local immunostimulation. Here we report the initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial with laser immunotherapy. Six stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options, and preliminary data at the three-month examination are presented. The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the patient tolerance and the toxicity of the therapy, the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Each patient was individually evaluated for toxicity tolerance through physical exams and by appropriate supplemental and routine laboratory tests. Observable tumors in patients were followed with physical examination and radiological evaluations. Treatment efficacy was judged by the size and number of local and distant metastases before and after treatment.

  6. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging with the POLAR CEPPAD/ IPS Instrument : Initial Forward Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Moore, K. R.; Spence, H. E.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Roelof, E. C.

    1999-01-01

    Although the primary function of the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on Polar is the measurement of energetic ions in-situ, it has also proven to be a very capable Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imager. Raw ENA images are currently being constructed on a routine basis with a temporal resolution of minutes during both active and quiet times. However, while analyses of these images by themselves provide much information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of the energetic ion population in the ring current. detailed modeling is required to extract the actual ion distributions. In this paper. we present the initial results of forward modeling an IPS ENA image obtained during a small geo-magnetic storm on June 9, 1997. The equatorial ion distribution inferred with this technique reproduces the expected large noon/midnight and dawn/dusk asymmetries. The limitations of the model are discussed and a number of modifications to the basic forward modeling technique are proposed which should significantly improve its performance in future studies.

  7. The Burrell-Optical-Kepler-Survey (BOKS) I: Survey Description and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmeier, John J; Sherry, William; von Braun, Kaspar; Everett, Mark E; Ciardi, David R; Harding, Paul; Mihos, J Christopher; Rudick, Craig S; Lee, Ting-Hui; Kutsko, Rebecca M; van Belle, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    We present the initial results of a 40 night contiguous ground-based campaign of time series photometric observations of a 1.39 sq. deg field located within the NASA Kepler mission field of view. The goal of this pre-launch survey was to search for transiting extrasolar planets and to provide independent variability information of stellar sources. We have gathered a data set containing light curves of 54,687 stars from which we have created a statistical sub-sample of 13,786 stars between 14< r <18.5 and have statistically examined each light curve to test for variability. We present a summary of our preliminary photometric findings including the overall level and content of stellar variability in this portion of the Kepler field and give some examples of unusual variable stars found within. We present a preliminary catalog of 2,457 candidate variable stars, of which 776 show signs of periodicity. We also present three potential exoplanet candidates, all of which should be observable in detail by the Ke...

  8. Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Results of a National Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bryn Austin, ScD

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionEarly identification and treatment of disordered eating and weight control behaviors may prevent progression and reduce the risk of chronic health consequences.MethodsThe National Eating Disorders Screening Program coordinated the first-ever nationwide eating disorders screening initiative for high schools in the United States in 2000. Students completed a self-report screening questionnaire that included the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 and items on vomiting or exercising to control weight, binge eating, and history of treatment for eating disorders. Multivariate regression analyses examined sex and racial/ethnic differences.ResultsAlmost 15% of girls and 4% of boys scored at or above the threshold of 20 on the EAT-26, which indicated a possible eating disorder. Among girls, we observed few significant differences between ethnic groups in eating disorder symptoms, whereas among boys, more African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Latino boys reported symptoms than did white boys. Overall, 25% of girls and 11% of boys reported disordered eating and weight control symptoms severe enough to warrant clinical evaluation. Of these symptomatic students, few reported that they had ever received treatment.ConclusionPopulation screening for eating disorders in high schools may identify at-risk students who would benefit from early intervention, which could prevent acute and long-term complications of disordered eating and weight control behaviors.

  9. Laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair: a description of the technique and initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharakis, Emmanouil; Hettige, Roland; Purkayastha, Sanjay; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara; Ziprin, Paul

    2008-06-01

    In this study, the authors review their initial results with the laparoscopic approach for parastomal hernia repair. Between 2006 and 2007, 4 patients were treated laparoscopically at our institution. The hernia sac was not excised. A piece of Gore-Tex DualMesh with a central keyhole and a radial incision was cut so that it could provide at least 3 to 5 cm of overlap of the fascial defect. The mesh was secured to the margins of the hernia with circumferential metal tacking and trans-fascial sutures. No complications occurred in the postoperative period. After a median follow-up of 9 months, recurrence occurred in 1 patient. This was our first patient in whom mesh fixation was performed only with circumferential metal tacking. The laparoscopic repair of parastomal hernias seems to be a safe, feasible and promising technique offering the advantages of minimally-invasive surgery. The success of this approach depends on longer follow-up reports and standardization of the technical elements.

  10. Initial results of local grid control using wind farms with grid support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Poul; Hansen, Anca D.; Iov, F.; Blaabjerg, F.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes initial results with simulation of local grid control using wind farms with grid support. The focus is on simulation of the behaviour of the wind farms when they are isolated from the main grid and establish a local grid together with a few other grid components. The isolated subsystems used in the work presented in this report do not intend to simulate a specific subsystem, but they are extremely simplified single bus bar systems using only a few more components than the wind farm. This approach has been applied to make it easier to understand the dynamics of the subsystem. The main observation is that the fast dynamics of the wind turbines seem to be able to contribute significantly to the grid control, which can be useful where the wind farm is isolated with a subsystem from the main grid with surplus of generation. Thus, the fast down regulation of the wind farm using automatic frequency control can keep the subsystem in operation and thereby improve the reliability of the grid. (LN)

  11. Time-domain optical mammography Softscan: initial results on detection and characterization of breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intes, Xavier; Djeziri, Salim; Ichalalene, Zahia; Mincu, Niculae; Wang, Yong; St.-Jean, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric; Hall, David; Boas, David A.; Polyzos, Margaret

    2004-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) technology appears promising as a non-invasive clinical technique for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The technology capitalizes on the relative transparency of human tissue in this spectral range and its sensitivity to the main components of the breast:; water, lipid and hemoglobin. In this work we present initial results obtained using the SoftScan® breast-imaging system developed by ART, Advanced Research Technologies inc., Montreal. This platform consists of a 4-wavelength time-resolved scanning system used to quantify non-invasively the local functional state of breast tissue. The different aspects of the system used to retrieve 3D optical contrast will be presented. Furthermore, preliminary data obtained from a prospective study conducted at The Royal Victoria Hospital of the McGill University Health Center in Montreal will be discussed. Analysis of the data gathered by SoftScan® demonstrated the potential of the technology in discriminating between healthy and diseased tissue.

  12. Initial Results of Optical Vortex Laser Absorption Spectroscopy in the HYPER-I Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Asai, Shoma; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ozawa, Naoya; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortex beams have a potential to make a new Doppler measurement, because not only parallel but perpendicular movement of atoms against the beam axis causes the Doppler shift of their resonant absorption frequency. As the first step of a proof-of-principle experiment, we have performed the optical vortex laser absorption spectroscopy for metastable argon neutrals in an ECR plasma produced in the HYPER-I device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. An external cavity diode laser (TOPTICA, DL100) of which center wavelength was 696.735 nm in vacuum was used for the light source. The Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beam was converted into the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam (optical vortex) by a computer-generated hologram displayed on the spatial light modulator (Hamamatsu, LCOS-SLM X10468-07). In order to make fast neutral flow across the LG beam, a high speed solenoid valve system was installed on the HYPER-I device. Initial results including the comparison of absorption spectra for HG and LG beams will be presented. This study was supported by NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI grant number 15K05365.

  13. The Jubilee ISW Project I: simulated ISW and weak lensing maps and initial power spectra results

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, W A; Gottlöber, S; Iliev, I T; Knebe, A; Martínez-González, E; Yepes, G; Barreiro, R B; González-Nuevo, J; Hotchkiss, S; Marcos-Caballero, A; Nadathur, S; Vielva, P; .,

    2013-01-01

    We present initial results from the Jubilee ISW project, which models the expected \\LambdaCDM Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the Jubilee simulation. The simulation volume is (6 Gpc/h)^3, allowing power on very large-scales to be incorporated into the calculation. Haloes are resolved down to a mass of 1.5x10^12 M_sun/h, which allows us to derive a catalogue of mock Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) for cross-correlation analysis with the ISW signal. We find the ISW effect observed on a projected sky to grow stronger at late times with the evolution of the ISW power spectrum matching expectations from linear theory. Maps of the gravitational lensing effect, including the convergence and deflection fields, are calculated using the same potential as for the ISW. We calculate the redshift dependence of the ISW-LRG cross-correlation signal for a full sky survey with no noise considerations. For l 30 the signal is best observed with surveys covering z ~ 0.6-1.0.

  14. Initial Results from NuSTAR Observations of the Norma Arm

    CERN Document Server

    Bodaghee, Arash; Krivonos, Roman; Stern, Daniel; Bauer, Franz E; Barriere, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Gotthelf, Eric V; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Jaesub; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, William W

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for an initial survey of the Norma Arm gathered with the focusing hard X-ray telescope NuSTAR. The survey covers 0.2 deg$^2$ of sky area in the 3-79 keV range with a minimum and maximum raw depth of 15 ks and 135 ks, respectively. Besides a bright black-hole X-ray binary in outburst (4U 1630-47) and a new X-ray transient (NuSTAR J163433-473841), NuSTAR locates three sources from the Chandra survey of this region whose spectra are extended above 10 keV for the first time: CXOU J163329.5-473332, CXOU J163350.9-474638, and CXOU J163355.1-473804. Imaging, timing, and spectral data from a broad X-ray range (0.3-79 keV) are analyzed and interpreted with the aim of classifying these objects. CXOU J163329.5-473332 is either a cataclysmic variable or a faint low-mass X-ray binary. CXOU J163350.9-474638 varies in intensity on year-long timescales, and with no multi-wavelength counterpart, it could be a distant X-ray binary or possibly a magnetar. CXOU J163355.1-473804 features a helium-like iron l...

  15. The Satellite based Monitoring Initiative for Regional Air quality (SAMIRA): Project summary and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philipp; Stebel, Kerstin; Ajtai, Nicolae; Diamandi, Andrei; Horalek, Jan; Nemuc, Anca; Stachlewska, Iwona; Zehner, Claus

    2017-04-01

    We present a summary and some first results of a new ESA-funded project entitled Satellite based Monitoring Initiative for Regional Air quality (SAMIRA), which aims at improving regional and local air quality monitoring through synergetic use of data from present and upcoming satellite instruments, traditionally used in situ air quality monitoring networks and output from chemical transport models. Through collaborative efforts in four countries, namely Romania, Poland, the Czech Republic and Norway, all with existing air quality problems, SAMIRA intends to support the involved institutions and associated users in their national monitoring and reporting mandates as well as to generate novel research in this area. The primary goal of SAMIRA is to demonstrate the usefulness of existing and future satellite products of air quality for improving monitoring and mapping of air pollution at the regional scale. A total of six core activities are being carried out in order to achieve this goal: Firstly, the project is developing and optimizing algorithms for the retrieval of hourly aerosol optical depth (AOD) maps from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard of Meteosat Second Generation. As a second activity, SAMIRA aims to derive particulate matter (PM2.5) estimates from AOD data by developing robust algorithms for AOD-to-PM conversion with the support from model- and Lidar data. In a third activity, we evaluate the added value of satellite products of atmospheric composition for operational European-scale air quality mapping using geostatistics and auxiliary datasets. The additional benefit of satellite-based monitoring over existing monitoring techniques (in situ, models) is tested by combining these datasets using geostatistical methods and demonstrated for nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), and aerosol optical depth/particulate matter. As a fourth activity, the project is developing novel algorithms for downscaling coarse

  16. Initial Results from the STEM Student Experiences Aboard Ships (STEMSEAS) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. C.; Cooper, S. K.; Thomson, K.; Rabin, B.; Alberts, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Science Technology Engineering and Math Student Experiences Aboard Ships (STEMSEAS) program was created as a response to NSF's call (through GEOPATHS) for improving undergraduate STEM education and enhancing diversity in the geosciences. It takes advantage of unused berths on UNOLS ships during transits between expeditions. During its 2016 pilot year - which consisted of three transits on three different research vessels in different parts of the country, each with a slightly different focus - the program has gained significant insights into how best to create and structure these opportunities and create impact on individual students. A call for applications resulted in nearly 900 applicants for 30 available spots. Of these applicants, 32% are from minority groups underrepresented in the geosciences (Black, Hispanic, or American Indian) and 20% attend community colleges. The program was able to sail socioeconomically diverse cohorts and include women, veterans, and students with disabilities and from two- and four-year colleges. Twenty-three are underrepresented minorities, 6 attend community colleges, 5 attend an HBCU or tribal college, and many are at HSIs or other MSIs. While longer term impact assessment will have to wait, initial results and 6-month tracking for the first cohort indicate that these kinds of relatively short but intense experiences can indeed achieve significant impacts on students' perception of the geosciences, in their understanding of STEM career opportunities, their desire to work in a geoscience lab setting, and to incorporate geosciences into non-STEM careers. Insights were also gained into the successful makeup of mentor/leader groups, factors to consider in student selection, necessary pre- and post-cruise logistics management, follow-up activities, structure of activities during daily life at sea, increasing student networks and access to mentorships, and leveraging of pre-existing resources and ship-based opportunities

  17. Initial results in the assessment of multiple myeloma using{sup 18}F-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirrmeister, H.; Buck, A.K.; Mueller, S.; Reske, S.N. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm (Germany); Bommer, M.; Bunjes, D.; Doehner, H. [Department of Hematology, University of Ulm (Germany); Messer, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm (Germany); Bergmann, L. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt (Germany)

    2002-03-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to investigate the appearance of multiple myeloma on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Furthermore, the accuracy of FDG-PET in detecting myeloma lesions and its influence on patient management were evaluated. Forty-three patients with known multiple myeloma (n=28) or solitary plasmacytoma (n=15) underwent FDG-PET. The results of routinely performed radiographs and of scans obtained using all available imaging modalities (MRI, CT), as well as the clinical course, were used for verification of detected lesions. Focally increased tracer uptake was observed in 38 of 41 known osteolytic bone lesions (sensitivity 92.7%) in 23 patients. In addition, 71 further bone lesions which were negative on radiographs were detected in 14 patients. Twenty-six (36.6%) of these lesions could be confirmed in ten patients. As a result of FDG-PET imaging, clinical management was influenced in five (14.0%) patients. The positive predictive value for active disease was 100% in patients with focal or mixed focal/diffuse skeletal FDG uptake and 75% in patients with diffuse bone marrow uptake. Depending on the interpretation of the PET scans in patients with diffuse bone marrow uptake, the sensitivity ranged from 83.8% to 91.9% and the specificity from 83.3% to 100%. FDG-PET thus proved highly accurate in detecting multiple myeloma, and revealed a greater extent of disease than routine radiographs in 14 of 23 (60.9%) patients who had osteolytic bone lesions. FDG-PET might contribute to the initial staging of solitary plasmacytoma. (orig.)

  18. High Fidelity Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing: Analysis and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system, providing system characterization data and allowing one to work through various fabrication, assembly and integration issues without the cost and time associated with a full ground nuclear test. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Testing with non-optimized heater elements allows one to assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. High fidelity thermal simulators that match both the static and the dynamic fuel pin performance that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor can vastly increase the value of non-nuclear test results. With optimized simulators, the integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronie response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing, providing a better assessment of system integration issues, characterization of integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assessment of potential design improvements' at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial conceptual thermal simulator designs are determined by simple one-dimensional analysis at a single axial location and at steady state conditions; feasible concepts are then input into a detailed three-dimensional model for comparison to expected fuel pin performance. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance for a proposed reactor design is determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and comparison is made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analyses, a conceptual high fidelity design can developed. Test results presented in this paper correspond to a "first cut" simulator design for a potential

  19. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  20. Design of and initial results from a highly instrumented reactor for atmospheric chemistry (HIRAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Glowacki

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry (HIRAC is described and initial results obtained from HIRAC are presented. The ability of HIRAC to perform in-situ laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH and HO2 radicals with the Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE technique establishes it as internationally unique for a chamber of its size and pressure/temperature variable capabilities. In addition to the FAGE technique, HIRAC features a suite of analytical instrumentation, including: a multipass FTIR system; a conventional gas chromatography (GC instrument and a GC instrument for formaldehyde detection; and NO/NO2, CO, O3, and H2O vapour analysers. Ray tracing simulations and measurements of the blacklamp flux have been utilized to develop a detailed model of the radiation field within HIRAC. Comparisons between the analysers and the FTIR coupled to HIRAC have been performed, and HIRAC has also been used to investigate pressure dependent kinetics of the chlorine atom reaction with ethene and the reaction of O3 and t-2-butene. The results obtained are in good agreement with literature recommendations and Master Chemical Mechanism predictions. HIRAC thereby offers a highly instrumented platform with the potential for: (1 high precision kinetics investigations over a range of atmospheric conditions; (2 detailed mechanism development, significantly enhanced according to its capability for measuring radicals; and (3 field instrument intercomparison, calibration, development, and investigations of instrument response under a range of atmospheric conditions.

  1. Ultrasonographic features of vascular closure devices: initial and 6-month follow-up results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Jung Choo

    2014-10-01

    Initial ultrasonographic evaluation reflected the unique structure of each VCD, with most of them being easily distinguishable. Follow-up ultrasonography revealed various changes in the affected vessels.

  2. An Enhanced Box-Wing Solar Radiation pressure model for BDS and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qunhe; Wang, Xiaoya; Hu, Xiaogong; Guo, Rui; Shang, Lin; Tang, Chengpan; Shao, Fan

    2016-04-01

    Solar radiation pressure forces are the largest non-gravitational perturbations acting on GNSS satellites, which is difficult to be accurately modeled due to the complicated and changing satellite attitude and unknown surface material characteristics. By the end of 2015, there are more than 50 stations of the Multi-GNSS Experiment(MGEX) set-up by the IGS. The simple box-plate model relies on coarse assumptions about the dimensions and optical properties of the satellite due to lack of more detailed information. So, a physical model based on BOX-WING model is developed, which is more sophisticated and more detailed physical structure has been taken into account, then calculating pressure forces according to the geometric relations between light rays and surfaces. All the MGEX stations and IGS core stations had been processed for precise orbit determination tests with GPS and BDS observations. Calculation range covers all the two kinds of Eclipsing and non-eclipsing periods in 2015, and we adopted the un-differential observation mode and more accurate values of satellite phase centers. At first, we tried nine parameters model, and then eliminated the parameters with strong correlation between them, came into being five parameters of the model. Five parameters were estimated, such as solar scale, y-bias, three material coefficients of solar panel, x-axis and z-axis panels. Initial results showed that, in the period of yaw-steering mode, use of Enhanced ADBOXW model results in small improvement for IGSO and MEO satellites, and the Root-Mean-Square(RMS) error value of one-day arc orbit decreased by about 10%~30% except for C08 and C14. The new model mainly improved the along track acceleration, up to 30% while in the radial track was not obvious. The Satellite Laser Ranging(SLR) validation showed, however, that this model had higher prediction accuracy in the period of orbit-normal mode, compared to GFZ multi-GNSS orbit products, as well with relative post

  3. Cloud Base Height Measurements at Manila Observatory: Initial Results from Constructed Paired Sky Imaging Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrosas, N.; Tan, F.; Antioquia, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Fabricated all sky imagers are efficient and cost effective instruments for cloud detection and classification. Continuous operation of this instrument can result in the determination of cloud occurrence and cloud base heights for the paired system. In this study, a fabricated paired sky imaging system - consisting two commercial digital cameras (Canon Powershot A2300) enclosed in weatherproof containers - is developed in Manila Observatory for the purpose of determining cloud base heights at the Manila Observatory area. One of the cameras is placed on the rooftop of Manila Observatory and the other is placed on the rooftop of the university dormitory, 489m from the first camera. The cameras are programmed to simultaneously gather pictures every 5 min. Continuous operation of these cameras were implemented since the end of May of 2014 but data collection started end of October 2013. The data were processed following the algorithm proposed by Kassianov et al (2005). The processing involves the calculation of the merit function that determines the area of overlap of the two pictures. When two pictures are overlapped, the minimum of the merit function corresponds to the pixel column positions where the pictures have the best overlap. In this study, pictures of overcast sky prove to be difficult to process for cloud base height and were excluded from processing. The figure below shows the initial results of the hourly average of cloud base heights from data collected from November 2013 to July 2014. Measured cloud base heights ranged from 250m to 1.5km. These are the heights of cumulus and nimbus clouds that are dominant in this part of the world. Cloud base heights are low in the early hours of the day indicating low convection process during these times. However, the increase in the convection process in the atmosphere can be deduced from higher cloud base heights in the afternoon. The decrease of cloud base heights after 15:00 follows the trend of decreasing solar

  4. Initial results of the oesophageal and gastric cancer registry from the Comunidad Valenciana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrig, Javier; Mingol, Fernando; Martí, Roberto; Puche, José; Trullenque, Ramón; Barreras, José Antonio; Asencio, Francisco; Aguiló, Javier; Navarro, José Manuel; Alberich, Carmen; Salas, Dolores; Lacueva, Francisco Javier

    2017-08-11

    To evaluate the initial results of the oesophagogastric cancer registry developed for the Sociedad Valenciana de Cirugía and the Health Department of the Comunidad Valenciana (Spain). Fourteen of the 24 public hospitals belonging to the Comunidad Valenciana participated. All patients with diagnosis of oesophageal or gastric carcinomas operated from January 2013 to December 2014 were evaluated. Demographic, clinical and pathological data were analysed. Four hundred and thirty-four patients (120 oesophageal carcinomas and 314 gastric carcinomas) were included. Only two hospitals operated more than 10 patients with oesophageal cancer per year. Transthoracic oesophaguectomy was the most frequent approach (84.2%) in tumours localized within the oesophagus. A total gastrectomy was performed in 50.9% patients with gastroesophageal junction (GOJ) carcinomas. Postoperative 30-day and 90-day mortality were 8% and 11.6% in oesophageal carcinoma and 5.9 and 8.6% in gastric carcinoma. Before surgery, middle oesophagus carcinomas were treated mostly (76,5%) with chemoradiotherapy. On the contrary, lower oesophagus and GOJ carcinomas were treated preferably with chemotherapy alone (45.5 and 53.4%). Any neoadjuvant treatment was administered to 73.6% of gastric cancer patients. Half patients with oesophageal carcinoma or gastric carcinoma received no adjuvant treatment. This registry revealed that half patients with oesophageal cancer were operated in hospitals with less than 10 cases per year at the Comunidad Valenciana. Also, it detected capacity improvement for some clinical outcomes of oesophageal and gastric carcinomas. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and Galaxies survey (SLUGGS): sample definition, methods, and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Jennings, Zachary G.; Pota, Vincenzo; Kader, Justin; Roediger, Joel C.; Villaume, Alexa; Arnold, Jacob A.; Woodley, Kristin A. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Forbes, Duncan A.; Pastorello, Nicola; Usher, Christopher; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Foster, Caroline; Spitler, Lee R., E-mail: jbrodie@ucsc.edu [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2014-11-20

    We introduce and provide the scientific motivation for a wide-field photometric and spectroscopic chemodynamical survey of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) and their globular cluster (GC) systems. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey is being carried out primarily with Subaru/Suprime-Cam and Keck/DEIMOS. The former provides deep gri imaging over a 900 arcmin{sup 2} field-of-view to characterize GC and host galaxy colors and spatial distributions, and to identify spectroscopic targets. The NIR Ca II triplet provides GC line-of-sight velocities and metallicities out to typically ∼8 R {sub e}, and to ∼15 R {sub e} in some cases. New techniques to extract integrated stellar kinematics and metallicities to large radii (∼2-3 R {sub e}) are used in concert with GC data to create two-dimensional (2D) velocity and metallicity maps for comparison with simulations of galaxy formation. The advantages of SLUGGS compared with other, complementary, 2D-chemodynamical surveys are its superior velocity resolution, radial extent, and multiple halo tracers. We describe the sample of 25 nearby ETGs, the selection criteria for galaxies and GCs, the observing strategies, the data reduction techniques, and modeling methods. The survey observations are nearly complete and more than 30 papers have so far been published using SLUGGS data. Here we summarize some initial results, including signatures of two-phase galaxy assembly, evidence for GC metallicity bimodality, and a novel framework for the formation of extended star clusters and ultracompact dwarfs. An integrated overview of current chemodynamical constraints on GC systems points to separate, in situ formation modes at high redshifts for metal-poor and metal-rich GCs.

  6. Tangible Results and Progress in Flood Risks Management with the PACTES Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Murielle; Abadie, Jean-Paul; Ducuing, Jean-Louis; Denier, Jean-Paul; Stéphane

    The PACTES project (Prévention et Anticipation des Crues au moyen des Techniques Spatiales), initiated by CNES and the French Ministry of Research, aims at improving flood risk management, over the following three main phases : - Prevention : support and facilitate the analysis of flood risks and socio-economic impacts (risk - Forecasting and alert : improve the capability to predict and anticipate the flooding event - Crisis management : allow better situation awareness, communication and sharing of In order to achieve its ambitious objectives, PACTES: - integrates state-of-the-art techniques and systems (integration of the overall processing chains, - takes advantage of integrating recent model developments in wheather forecasting, rainfall, In this approach, space technology is thus used in three main ways : - radar and optical earth observation data are used to produce Digital Elevation Maps, land use - earth observation data are also an input to wheather forecasting, together with ground sensors; - satellite-based telecommunication and mobile positioning. Started in December 2000, the approach taken in PACTES is to work closely with users such as civil security and civil protection organisms, fire fighter brigades and city councils for requirements gathering and during the validation phase. It has lead to the development and experimentation of an integrated pre-operational demonstrator, delivered to different types of operational users. Experimentation has taken place in three watersheds representative of different types of floods (flash and plain floods). After a breaf reminder of what the PACTES project organization and aims are, the PACTES integrated pre-operational demonstrator is presented. The main scientific inputs to flood risk management are summarized. Validation studies for the three watersheds covered by PACTES (Moselle, Hérault and Thoré) are detailed. Feedback on the PACTES tangible results on flood risk management from an user point of view

  7. Iron Isotope Systematics of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausberg, N.; Lesher, C. E.; Hoffmann-Barfod, G.; Glessner, J. J.; Tegner, C.

    2014-12-01

    Iron isotopes show systematic changes in igneous rocks that have been ascribed to fractional crystallization, partial melting, as well as, diffusion effects. Layered mafic intrusions, such as the Paleoproterozoic Bushveld Igneous Complex, are ideally suited to investigate stable isotope fractionation arising principally by fractional crystallization. The upper 2.1km of the Bushveld Complex (Upper and Upper Main Zone, UUMZ) crystallized from a basaltic magma produced by a major recharge event, building up a sequence of tholeiitic, Fe-rich, gabbroic cumulate rocks that display systematic variations in mineralogy and mineral compositions consistent with fractional crystallization. Within this sequence, magnetite joins the liquidus assemblage at ˜260m, followed by olivine at 460m and apatite at 1000m. Here, we present iron isotope measurements of bulk cumulate rocks from the Bierkraal drill core of UUMZ of the western limb. Iron was chemically separated from its matrix and analyzed for δ56Fe (relative to IRMM- 014) with a Nu plasma MC-ICPMS at the University of California, Davis, using (pseudo-) high resolution and sample-standard bracketing. The δ56Fe values for Bushveld cumulates span a range from 0.04‰ to 0.36‰, and systematically correlate with the relative abundance of pyroxene + olivine, magnetite and plagioclase. Notably, the highest δ56Fe values are found in plagioclase-rich cumulates that formed prior to magnetite crystallization. δ56Fe is also high in magnetite-rich cumulates at the onset of magnetite crystallization, while subsequent cumulates exhibit lower and variable δ56Fe principally reflecting fractionation of and modal variations in magnetite, pyroxene and fayalitic olivine. The overall relationships for δ56Fe are consistent with positive mineral - liquid Fe isotope fractionation factors for magnetite and plagioclase, and negative to near zero values for pyroxene and olivine. These initial results are being integrated into a forward model of

  8. NASADEM Initial Production Processing Results: Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Reprocessing with Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, S.; Agram, P. S.; Belz, J. E.; Crippen, R. E.; Gurrola, E. M.; Hensley, S.; Kobrick, M.; Lavalle, M.; Martin, J. M.; Neumann, M.; Nguyen, Q.; Rosen, P. A.; Shimada, J.; Simard, M.; Tung, W.

    2016-12-01

    NASADEM is a significant modernization of SRTM digital elevation model (DEM) data supported by the NASA MEaSUREs program. We are reprocessing the raw radar signal data using improved algorithms and incorporating ICESat and DEM data unavailable during the original processing. The NASADEM products will be freely-available through the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC) at one-arcsecond spacing and delivered by continent: North America, South America, Australia, Eurasia, Africa, and Island Groups. We are in the production phase of the project. This involves radar interferometry (InSAR) processing on thousands of radar datatakes. New phase unwrapping and height ripple error correction (HREC) procedures are applied to the data. The resulting strip DEMs and ancillary information are passed to a back-end processor to create DEM mosaics and new geocoded single-swath products. Manual data quality assessment (QA) and fixes are performed at several steps in the processing chain. Post-production DEM void-filling is described in a companion AGU Fall Meeting presentation. The team completed the InSAR processing for all continents and the manual QA of the strip DEMs for more than half the world. North America strip DEM void areas are reduced by more than 50%. The ICESat data is used for height ripple error correction and as control for continent-scale adjustment of the strip DEMs. These ripples are due to uncompensated mast motion most pronounced after Shuttle roll angle adjustment maneuvers. After an initial assessment of the NASADEM production processing for the Americas, we further refined the selection of ICESat data for control by excluded data over glaciers, snow cover, forest clear cuts, and sloped areas. The HREC algorithm reduces the North America ICESat-SRTM bias from 80 cm to 3 cm and the RMS from 5m to 4m.

  9. Initial reconstruction results from a simulated adaptive small animal C shaped PET/MR insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimiou, Nikos [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Kostou, Theodora; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras (Greece); Charalampos, Tsoumpas [Division of Biomedical Imaging, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    Traditionally, most clinical and preclinical PET scanners, rely on full cylindrical geometry for whole body as well as dedicated organ scans, which is not optimized with regards to sensitivity and resolution. Several groups proposed the construction of dedicated PET inserts for MR scanners, rather than the construction of new integrated PET/MR scanners. The space inside an MR scanner is a limiting factor which can be reduced further with the use of extra coils, and render the use of non-flexible cylindrical PET scanners difficult if not impossible. The incorporation of small SiPM arrays, can provide the means to design adaptive PET scanners to fit in tight locations, which, makes imaging possible and improve the sensitivity, due to the closer approximation to the organ of interest. In order to assess the performance of such a device we simulated the geometry of a C shaped PET, using GATE. The design of the C-PET was based on a realistic SiPM-BGO scenario. In order reconstruct the simulated data, with STIR, we had to calculate system probability matrix which corresponds to this non standard geometry. For this purpose we developed an efficient multi threaded ray tracing technique to calculate the line integral paths in voxel arrays. One of the major features is the ability to automatically adjust the size of FOV according to the geometry of the detectors. The initial results showed that the sensitivity improved as the angle between the detector arrays increases, thus better angular sampling the scanner's field of view (FOV). The more complete angular coverage helped in improving the shape of the source in the reconstructed images, as well. Furthermore, by adapting the FOV to the closer to the size of the source, the sensitivity per voxel is improved.

  10. Initial results from NuSTAR observations of the Norma Arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodaghee, Arash; Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifica Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Fornasini, Francesca M. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hong, Jaesub [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Zhang, William W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    Results are presented for an initial survey of the Norma Arm gathered with the focusing hard X-Ray Telescope NuSTAR. The survey covers 0.2 deg{sup 2} of sky area in the 3-79 keV range with a minimum and maximum raw depth of 15 ks and 135 ks, respectively. Besides a bright black-hole X-ray binary in outburst (4U 1630–47) and a new X-ray transient (NuSTAR J163433–473841), NuSTAR locates three sources from the Chandra survey of this region whose spectra are extended above 10 keV for the first time: CXOU J163329.5–473332, CXOU J163350.9–474638, and CXOU J163355.1–473804. Imaging, timing, and spectral data from a broad X-ray range (0.3-79 keV) are analyzed and interpreted with the aim of classifying these objects. CXOU J163329.5–473332 is either a cataclysmic variable or a faint low-mass X-ray binary. CXOU J163350.9–474638 varies in intensity on year-long timescales, and with no multi-wavelength counterpart, it could be a distant X-ray binary or possibly a magnetar. CXOU J163355.1–473804 features a helium-like iron line at 6.7 keV and is classified as a nearby cataclysmic variable. Additional surveys are planned for the Norma Arm and Galactic Center, and those NuSTAR observations will benefit from the lessons learned during this pilot study.

  11. Dacriocistorrinostomia transcanalicular com laser diodo: resultados preliminares Transcanalicular laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy: initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Tomoyoshi Kanecadan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a técnica e os resultados iniciais da dacriocistorrinostomia com laser diodo, realizada pela via transcanalicular. MÉTODOS: Dez pacientes com diagnóstico de obstrução lacrimal baixa foram submetidos à dacriocistorrinostomia com laser diodo, realizada pela via transcanalicular. A via lacrimal foi entubada com silicone, onde deveria permanecer por 6 meses. RESULTADOS: Todas as dez cirurgias foram realizadas sem intercorrências. Um paciente apresentou saída do tubo de silicone, um dia após a cirurgia. Após uma semana, os outros nove, relataram desaparecimento da epífora. Durante o primeiro mês de seguimento, mais um paciente apresentou perda do tubo de silicone e outro voltou apresentar epífora, por obstrução da fístula lacrimonasal. CONCLUSÕES: A dacriocistorrinostomia assistida por laser diodo, realizada pela via transcanalicular, é novo método para tratamento da obstrução das vias lacrimais. Com o desenvolvimento desta técnica espera-se aumento no índice de sucesso cirúrgico, tanto imediato como a longo prazo.PURPOSE: To describe the technique and initial results of laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy performed through the canaliculi. METHODS: Ten patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction underwent transcanalicular laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy. A silicone tube was inserted through the canaliculi and the ostium into the nasal cavity where it will be kept for 6 months. RESULTS: All ten operations were performed without negative occurrences. One patient presented displacement of the silicone tube one day after surgery. Nine of the ten patients reported disappearance of epiphora at the end of the first week following surgery. During the first month, one of these patients presented with epiphora due to obstruction of the lacrimal-nasal fistula and another lost the silicone tube in the first month following surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Transcanalicular laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy is a

  12. Exploratory X-ray monitoring of luminous radio-quiet quasars at high redshift: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Stein, Matthew S. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Paolillo, Maurizio [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II di Napoli, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Kaspi, Shai [School of Physics and Astronomy and the Wise Observatory, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Vignali, Cristian [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Università degli studi di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Santiago (Chile); Gibson, Robert R., E-mail: ohad@unt.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    We present initial results from an exploratory X-ray monitoring project of two groups of comparably luminous radio-quiet quasars (RQQs). The first consists of four sources at 4.10 ≤ z ≤ 4.35, monitored by Chandra, and the second is a comparison sample of three sources at 1.33 ≤ z ≤ 2.74, monitored by Swift. Together with archival X-ray data, the total rest-frame temporal baseline spans ∼2-4 yr and ∼5-13 yr for the first and second group, respectively. Six of these sources show significant X-ray variability over rest-frame timescales of ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} days; three of these also show significant X-ray variability on rest-frame timescales of ∼1-10 days. The X-ray variability properties of our variable sources are similar to those exhibited by nearby and far less luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). While we do not directly detect a trend of increasing X-ray variability with redshift, we do confirm previous reports of luminous AGNs exhibiting X-ray variability above that expected from their luminosities, based on simplistic extrapolation from lower luminosity sources. This result may be attributed to luminous sources at the highest redshifts having relatively high accretion rates. Complementary UV-optical monitoring of our sources shows that variations in their optical-X-ray spectral energy distribution are dominated by the X-ray variations. We confirm previous reports of X-ray spectral variations in one of our sources, HS 1700+6416, but do not detect such variations in any of our other sources in spite of X-ray flux variations of up to a factor of ∼4. This project is designed to provide a basic assessment of the X-ray variability properties of RQQs at the highest accessible redshifts that will serve as a benchmark for more systematic monitoring of such sources with future X-ray missions.

  13. Initial results of noble gases in micrometeorites from the Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecker, B.; Cordier, C.; Folco, L.; Trieloff, M.; Ott, U.

    2012-12-01

    The bulk of extraterrestrial matter collected by Earth is in the form of micrometeorites, which have a main flux onto Earth at about 220 μm in diameter [1]. According to the petrographic and geochemical data, most of the small micrometeorites have been related to CM chondrites [2]. Recent studies suggest that larger micrometeorites (> 300μm) mostly derive from ordinary chondrite sources e.g. [3-5]. Following some models [6], they may have made important contributions to the volatile inventory of the Earth. We have initiated a coupled comprehensive survey of noble gas contents and petrography in micrometeorites. While helium and neon are generally dominated by the solar wind contribution, the inventory of heavy primordial noble gases has been hardly characterized so far. In particular, useful data are lacking on the diagnostic isotopic composition of xenon. We hope to fill this gap, since huge amounts of material are available. This might make a contribution towards understanding some aspects of the formation of the solar system and in particular the terrestrial atmosphere. We will present results obtained on "large" micrometeorites from Victoria Land, Transantarctic Mountains. These were collected during a PNRA (Programma Nazionale delle Ricerche in Antartide, Italy) expedition on top of the Miller Butte micrometeorite traps #45 b and c [7]. We reported first results in [8]. Our research includes however, also material from other collections, e.g. CONCORDIA [9, 10]. [1] Love, S.G., Brownlee, D.E. (1993) Science 262, 550-553. [2] Kurat, G. et al. (1994) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 58, 3879-3904. [3] Genge, M.J. et al. (2008) Meteoritics & Planetary Science 43, 497-515. [4] Dobrica, E. et al. (2011) Meteoritics & Planetary Science 46, 1363-1375. [5] Van Ginneken M. et al. (2012) Meteoritics & Planetary Science 47, 228-247. [6] Maurette, M. et al. (2000) Planetary and Space Science 48, 1117-1137. [7] Rochette P. et al. (2008) Proceedings of the National Academy

  14. Results of an initiative to charge for previously uncompensated care in an academic primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Daniel P; Marcelo, Karen; Baker, David W

    2013-01-01

    Increasing clinical workload with dwindling compensation has challenged primary care medical practices over the past decade. This has led to more physicians leaving and fewer medical trainees entering primary care. In an effort to make primary care practices viable, many groups routinely charge for providing care that was uncompensated in the past. We initiated a program in our practice that charged for certain after-hour and electronic communications, completion of forms outside of office visits, and failure to show for appointments. We assessed the effect on workload, patient adherence to appointments, and financial outcomes. This initiative decreased our physicians' workload, increased physicians' satisfaction, and produced a modest increase in revenues.

  15. Fast pyrolysis in a novel wire-mesh reactor: design and initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Hogendoorn, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolysis is known to occur by decomposition processes followed by vapour phase reactions. The goal of this research is to develop a novel device to study the initial decomposition processes. For this, a novel wire-mesh reactor was constructed. A small sample (<0.1 g) was clamped between two meshes

  16. Child Sexual Abuse and Psychological Impairment in Victims: Results of an Online Study Initiated by Victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Gerard A.; Mundt, Ingrid A.; Ahlers, Christoph J.; Bahls, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Sexual abuse of children has been a topic of scientific investigation for the past few decades. Research in this area, however, is rarely initiated, conceptualized, and conducted by victims themselves. Apart from possibly having painted a one-sided picture of sexual abuse, this presumed dominance of nonvictims might also have marginalized victims…

  17. Human percutaneous and intraoperative laser thermal angioplasty: initial clinical results as an adjunct to balloon angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, T A; Greenfield, A J; Guben, J K; Menzoian, J O; LoGerfo, F W

    1987-01-01

    In this study, the safety and efficacy of percutaneous laser thermal angioplasty as an adjunct to balloon angioplasty were investigated in 13 patients with severe peripheral vascular disease. By means of a novel fiberoptic laser delivery system (Laserprobe) in which argon laser energy is converted to heat in a metallic tip at the end of the fiberoptic fiber, improvement in the angiographic luminal diameter was noted in 14 of 15 femoropopliteal vessels (93%) by delivering 8 to 13 watts of continuous argon laser energy as the Laserprobe was advanced through the lesion. Initial clinical success (indicated by relief of symptoms and increase in Doppler index) for the combined laser and balloon angioplasty procedures was obtained in 12 of 15 vessels (80%), with inadequate balloon dilatation being the limiting factor in three patients. No significant complications of vessel perforation, dissection, pain, spasm, or embolization of debris occurred. Of the 12 patients who had procedures with initial angiographic and clinical success, 10 (83%) were asymptomatic in the initial follow-up period of 1 to 9 months (mean 6 months). Thus, laser thermal angioplasty with a Laserprobe is a safe and effective adjunct to peripheral balloon angioplasty. This technique has the potential to increase the initial success rate of angioplasty for lesions that are difficult or impossible to treat by conventional means. By removing most of the obstructing lesion, this technique may also reduce recurrent stenosis.

  18. Accelerated increase of arteriovenous fistula use in haemodialysis centres : results of the multicentre CIMINO initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbregts, Henricus J. T. A. M.; Bots, Michiel L.; Moll, Frans L.; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Background. In the Netherlands, arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are used in 60-65% of the haemodialysis patients and this compares poorly with the European average. A multicentre guidelines implementation programme, CIMINO, was initiated aiming at increasing the use of AVFs. Methods. Physicians and di

  19. Fast pyrolysis in a novel wire-mesh reactor: design and initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Hogendoorn, Kees

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolysis is known to occur by decomposition processes followed by vapour phase reactions. The goal of this research is to develop a novel device to study the initial decomposition processes. For this, a novel wire-mesh reactor was constructed. A small sample (<0.1 g) was clamped between two meshes

  20. Review of dWindDS Model Initial Results; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, Ian; Gleason, Michael; Preus, Robert; Sigrin, Ben

    2015-06-17

    The dWindDS model analyses the market diffusion of distributed wind generation for behind the meter applications. It is consumer decision based and uses a variety of data sets including a high resolution wind data set. It projects market development through 2050 based on input on specified by the user. This presentation covers some initial runs with draft base case assumptions.

  1. Effect of Microgravity on Sinorhizobium meliloti: Initial Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael S.; Stutte, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIe) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species of the legume family, was innoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiment one was designed to determine if S. meliloti infect M. truncatula and initiate physiological changes associated with nodule formation. Roots of five-day-old M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 (Enodll::gus) were innoculated 24 hr before launch with either S. meliloti strain 1021 or strain ABS7 and integrated into BRIC-PDFU hardware placed in a 4 C Cold Bag for launch on Atlantis. Innoculated plants and uninoculated controls were maintained in the dark at ambient temperature in the middeck of STS-135 for 11 days before fixation in RNA/ate/M by crew activation of the PDFU. Experiment two was designed to determine if microgravity altered the process of bacterial infection and host plant nodule formation. Seeds of two M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 lines, the Enodll::gus used in experiment 1, and SUNN, a super-nodulating mutant of A17, were germinated on orbit for 11 days in the middeck cabin and returned to Earth alive inside of BRIC-PDFU's at 4 C S. meliloti strains 1021 and ABS7 were cultivated separately in broth culture on orbit and also returned to Earth alive. After landing, flight- and ground-grown plants and bacteria were transferred from BRIC-PDFU's into Nunc(TradeMark) 4-well plates for reciprocity crosses. Rates of plant growth and nodule development on Buffered Nodulation Medium (lacking nitrogen) were measured for 14 days. Bacteria cultivated in microgravity in the

  2. Evaluation of the Early Results of the Initial 500 Cardiac Operations Performed in a New Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan Erdoğan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The initial 500 cases of a new center which is established in a province having no history of open heart surgery are evaluated with respect to mortality especially.Methods: A total of 500 patients underwent operations at our clinic between March 2008 and November 2009. Of these patients 373 (74.6% were male, 127 (25.4% were female and the mean age was 64.15±11.54. Four hundred eleven patients had coronary artery disease (19 had left ventricular aneurysm, 46 patients had coronary artery disease together with heart valve disease (of these 2 had ascending aortic aneurysm, 1 had left ventricular aneurysm, 1 had rupture of sinus valsalva aneurysm, 30 patients had valvular disease ( 1 had also patent ductus arteriosus, 4 patients had type 1 aortic dissection, 4 patients had ascending aortic aneurysm (3 had aortic valve disease, 4 patients had coarctation of the aorta, and 1 of the patients underwent surgery with the diagnosis of secundum atrial septal defect. Results: In-hospital mortality rate was 2% with 10 patients. The reasons of deaths were; low cardiac output in 3, renal insufficiency in 2, peroperative myocardial infarction in 2, bleeding in 1, lung complications in 1 and cardiac tamponade in 1. Fifteen patients (3% due to bleeding caused for surgical re-exploration. Postoperative atrial fibrillation developed in 97 patients (19.4%. Four patients (0.8% suffered wound infections on saphenous vein region, one patient (0.2% developed mediastinitis. Three patients (0.6% had neurological complications (two patients developed hemiplegia, one suffered from persistent tonic-clonic convultion. Prolonged entubation, prolonged intensive care unit stay and readmission to intensive care were other complications with rates of 20 (4%, 31(6.2% and 13(2.6% respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed that there is a strong relationship between peroperative myocard infarction and mortality, and patients who had diminished renal functions

  3. Initial Results from the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Acuna, M.; Le, G.; Farrell, W.; Holzworth, R.; Wilson, G.; Burke, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. The DC electric field detector has revealed zonal and meridional electric fields that undergo a diurnal variation, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. In general, the measured DC electric field amplitudes are in the 0.5-2 mV/m range, corresponding to I3 x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. What is surprising is the high degree of large-scale (10's to 100's of km) structure in the DC electric field, particularly at night, regardless of whether well-defined spread-F plasma density depletions are present. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. On some occasions, localized regions of low frequency (field broadband irregularities have been detected, suggestive of filamentary currents, although there is no one-to-one correspondence of these waves with the observed plasma density depletions, at least within the data examined thus far. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF waves corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence triggered by lightning

  4. Penn State geoPebble system: Design,Implementation, and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, J. V.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Bilen, S. G.; Fleishman, A.; Burkett, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Penn State geoPebble system is a new network of wirelessly interconnected seismic and GPS sensor nodes with flexible architecture. This network will be used for studies of ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland, as well as to investigate mountain glaciers. The network will consist of ˜150 geoPebbles that can be deployed in a user-defined spatial geometry. We present our design methodology, which has enabled us to develop these state-of- the art sensors using commercial-off-the-shelf hardware combined with custom-designed hardware and software. Each geoPebble is a self- contained, wirelessly connected sensor for collecting seismic measurements and position information. Key elements of each node encompasses a three-component seismic recorder, which includes an amplifier, filter, and 24- bit analog-to-digital converter that can sample up to 10 kHz. Each unit also includes a microphone channel to record the ground-coupled airwave. The timing for each node is available from GPS measurements and a local precision oscillator that is conditioned by the GPS timing pulses. In addition, we record the carrier-phase measurement of the L1 GPS signal in order to determine location at sub-decimeter accuracy (relative to other geoPebbles within a few kilometers radius). Each geoPebble includes 16 GB of solid-state storage, wireless communications capability to a central supervisory unit, and auxiliary measurements capability (including tilt from accelerometers, absolute orientation from magnetometers and temperature). A novel aspect of the geoPebble is a wireless charging system for the internal battery (using inductive coupling techniques). The geoPebbles include all the sensors (geophones, GPS, microphone), communications (WiFi), and power (battery and charging) internally, so the geoPebble system can operate without any cabling connections (though we do provide an external connector so that different geophones can be used). We report initial field-deployment results and

  5. Simpatectomia cervicotoracica por videotoracoscopia: experiência inicial Thoracoscopic cervicodorsal sympathectomy: initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Kauffman

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho é avaliar os resultados iniciais obtidos com a simpatectomia cervicotorácica videotoracoscópica. De outubro de 1995 a outubro de 1997 foram realizados 24 procedimentos em 14 pacientes: dez homens e quatro mulheres, com idades que variaram de 16 a 56 anos, média de 30 anos. Indicações para a operação foram: hiperidrose palmar em dez pacientes, isquemia de mão em três e causalgia em um. Nos casos de hiperidrose, a ressecção da cadeia simpática incluiu T2 e T3. Nos portadores de isquemia e causalgia também o gânglio estrelado foi ressecado. Vinte e três das 24 extremidades mostraram excelente resposta imediata à simpatectomia. Somente uma extremidade de paciente com hiperidrose permaneceu inalterada devido a procedimento incompleto, tendo sido desnervada pela mesma técnica em reoperação posterior, com bom resultado. Pneumotórax residual pós-operatório ocorreu em uma paciente com resolução espontânea. Treze pacientes tiveram seguimento que variou de dois a 18 meses, com média de 11 meses. Não houve mortalidade nessa série, e a principal complicação tardia observada nos pacientes operados por hiperidrose foi a hiperidrose compensatória, que ocorreu, em grau variado, nos nove pacientes com seguimento, sendo que em 30% deles esta manifestação foi significativa. Concluímos tratar-se de procedimento simples, seguro, eficiente e de melhor aceitação por parte dos pacientes do que a operação convencional.This report analyzes the initial results of thoracoscopic cervicodorsal sympathectomy. From October 1995 to October 1997, 24 procedures were accomplished in 14 patients. Ten were males and four were females ranging in age from 16 to 56 (mean 30. Surgical indications were: palmar hyperhidrosis in ten, ischemia of the hand in three and causalgia in one. Resection of the sympathetic chain in hyperhidrosis included T2 and T3. In those with ischemia and causalgia the stellate ganglion was

  6. Possible interaction between thermal electrons and vibrationally excited N2 in the lower E-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. Cheng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As one of the tasks to find the energy source(s of thermal electrons, which elevate(s electron temperature higher than neutral temperature in the lower ionosphere E-region, energy distribution function of thermal electron was measured with a sounding rocket at the heights of 93–131 km by the applying second harmonic method. The energy distribution function showed a clear hump at the energy of ~0.4 eV. In order to find the reason of the hump, we conducted laboratory experiment. We studied difference of the energy distribution functions of electrons in thermal energy range, which were measured with and without EUV radiation to plasma of N2/Ar and N2/O2 gas mixture respectively. For N2/Ar gas mixture plasma, the hump is not clearly identified in the energy distribution of thermal electrons. On the other hand for N2/O2 gas mixture, which contains vibrationally excited N2, a clear hump is found when irradiated by EUV. The laboratory experiment seems to suggest that the hump is produced as a result of interaction between vibrationally excited N2 and thermal electrons, and this interaction is the most probable heating source for the electrons of thermal energy range in the lower E-region. It is also suggested that energy distribution of the electrons in high energy part may not be Maxwellian, and DC probe measures the electrons which are non Maxwellian, and therefore "electron temperature" is calculated higher.

  7. 30 MHz radar observations of artificial E region field-aligned plasma irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned irregularities (FAIs have been observed during heating experiments at the HAARP facility using a new 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager deployed near Homer, Alaska. Irregularities were observed during brief experiments on three quiet days in July and August, 2007, when the daytime E region critical frequency was close to 3 MHz. Irregularities were consistently generated and detected during experiments with O-mode HF pumping on zenith with a 1-min on, 1-min off CW modulation. The scattering cross sections, rise, and fall times of the echoes were observed as well as their spectral properties. Results were found to be mainly in agreement with observations from other mid- and high-latitude sites with some discrepancies. Radar images of the irregularity-filled volume on one case exhibited clear variations in backscatter power and Doppler shift across the volume. The images furthermore show the emergence of a small irregularity-filled region to the south southwest of the main region in the approximate direction of magnetic zenith.

  8. Long time existence results for bore-type initial data for BBM-Boussinesq systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtea, Cosmin

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we deal with the long time existence for the Cauchy problem associated to BBM-type Boussinesq systems of equations which are asymptotic models for long wave, small amplitude gravity surface water waves. As opposed to previous papers devoted to the long time existence issue, we consider initial data with nontrivial behavior at infinity which may be used to model bore propagation.

  9. Ultrasonographic features of vascular closure devices: initial and 6 month followup results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Hye Jung; Jeong, Hae Woong; Park, Jin Young; Kim, Sung Tae; Seo, Jung Hwa; Lee, Sun Joo; Park, Young Mi [Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Sung Chul [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings for various types of vascular closure devices (VCDs) immediately after the angiographic procedure and at 6-month follow-up. We included 18 VCDs including Angio-Seal (n=4), FemoSeal (n=8), ExoSeal (n=3), Perclose (n=2), and StarClose (n=1) in this study. Four patients were implanted with 2 VCDs at the each side of bilateral femoral arteries, while the remaining 8 patients were inserted 1 VCD at the right femoral artery. Ultrasonography was performed within 10 days and at approximately 6 months after the angiographic procedure. Ultrasonographic morphology of the attached VCD and its relationship with the arterial wall were analyzed. Initial ultrasonography revealed the attached VCD as the relevant unique structure with successful deployment and hemostasis. Follow-up ultrasonography demonstrated partial absorption of hemostatic materials in cases of Angio-Seal (n=3), FemoSeal (n=5), and ExoSeal (n=3), changes in the soft tissue surrounding the femoral artery in case of Angio-Seal (n=1), arterial intimal hyperplasia in cases of FemoSeal (n=3), and no gross changes as compared with the initial ultrasonographic findings in cases of Perclose (n=2) and StarClose (n=1). Initial ultrasonographic evaluation reflected the unique structure of each VCD, with most of them being easily distinguishable. Follow-up ultrasonography revealed various changes in the affected vessels.

  10. The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis: Phase I Status and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard; Bostelmann, Friederike; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2014-10-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. One way to address the uncertainties in the HTGR analysis tools is to assess the sensitivity of critical parameters (such as the calculated maximum fuel temperature during loss of coolant accidents) to a few important input uncertainties. The input parameters were identified by engineering judgement in the past but are today typically based on a Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT) process. The input parameters can also be derived from sensitivity studies and are then varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, there is often no easy way to compensate for these uncertainties. In engineering system design, a common approach for addressing performance uncertainties is to add compensating margins to the system, but with passive properties credited it is not so clear how to apply it in the case of modular HTGR heat removal path. Other more sophisticated uncertainty modelling approaches, including Monte Carlo analysis, have also been proposed and applied. Ideally one wishes to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies, and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Therefore some safety analysis calculations may use a mixture of these approaches for different parameters depending upon the particular requirements of the analysis problem involved. Sensitivity analysis can for example be used to provide information as part of an uncertainty analysis to determine best estimate plus uncertainty results to the

  11. Initial results from the Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) project at NASA Lewis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1995-01-01

    A government/industry team designed, built, and tested a 2 kWe solar dynamic space power system in a large thermal/vacuum facility with a simulated sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Lewis facility provides an accurate simulation of temperatures, high vacuum, and solar flux as encountered in low earth orbit. This paper reviews the goals and status of the Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program and describes the initial testing, including both operational and performance data. This SD technology has the potential as a future power source for the International Space Station Alpha.

  12. Virtual Iraq: initial results from a VR exposure therapy application for combat-related PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Albert A; Graap, Ken; Perlman, Karen; McLay, Robert N; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Reger, Greg; Parsons, Thomas; Difede, Joann; Pair, Jarrell

    2008-01-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is reported to be caused by traumatic events that are outside the range of usual human experience including (but not limited to) military combat, violent personal assault, being kidnapped or taken hostage and terrorist attacks. Initial data suggests that at least 1 out of 6 Iraq War veterans are exhibiting symptoms of depression, anxiety and PTSD. Virtual Reality (VR) delivered exposure therapy for PTSD has been used with reports of positive outcomes. The aim of the current paper is to present the rationale and brief description of a Virtual Iraq PTSD VR therapy application and present initial findings from its use with PTSD patients. Thus far, Virtual Iraq consists of a series of customizable virtual scenarios designed to represent relevant Middle Eastern VR contexts for exposure therapy, including a city and desert road convoy environment. User-centered design feedback needed to iteratively evolve the system was gathered from returning Iraq War veterans in the USA and from a system deployed in Iraq and tested by an Army Combat Stress Control Team. Clinical trials are currently underway at Ft. Lewis, Camp Pendleton, Emory University, Weill Cornell Medical College, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, San Diego Naval Medical Center and 12 other sites.

  13. Radiofrequency thermo-ablation of PVNS in the knee: initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalam, Radhesh K; Cribb, Gillian L; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N; Cool, Wim P; Singh, Jaspreet; Tyrrell, Prudencia N M; Tins, Bernhard J; Winn, Naomi

    2015-12-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is normally treated by arthroscopic or open surgical excision. We present our initial experience with radiofrequency thermo-ablation (RF ablation) of PVNS located in an inaccessible location in the knee. Review of all patients with histologically proven PVNS treated with RF ablation and with at least 2-year follow-up. Three patients met inclusion criteria and were treated with RF ablation. Two of the patients were treated successfully by one ablation procedure. One of the three patients had a recurrence which was also treated successfully by repeat RF ablation. There were no complications and all patients returned to their previous occupations following RF ablation. In this study we demonstrated the feasibility of performing RF ablation to treat PVNS in relatively inaccessible locations with curative intent. We have also discussed various post-ablation imaging appearances which can confound the assessment for residual/recurrent disease.

  14. Performance of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and initial experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, W.; Conde, M.; Cox, G.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). High Energy Physics Div.; Barov, N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-09-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility has begun its experimental program. This unique facility is designed to address advanced acceleration research which requires very short, intense electron bunches. The facility incorporates two photo-cathode based electron sources. One produces up to 100 nC, multi-kiloamp drive bunches which are used to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures and in plasma. The second source produces much lower intensity witness pulses which are used to probe the fields produced by the drive. The drive and witness pulses can be precisely timed as well as laterally positioned with respect to each other. The authors discuss commissioning, initial experiments, and outline plans for a proposed 1 GeV demonstration accelerator.

  15. High fidelity studies of exploding foil initiator bridges, Part 2: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, William; Bowden, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Simulations of high voltage detonators, such as Exploding Bridgewire (EBW) and Exploding Foil Initiators (EFI), have historically been simple, often empirical, one-dimensional models capable of predicting parameters such as current, voltage, and in the case of EFIs, flyer velocity. Experimental methods have correspondingly generally been limited to the same parameters. With the advent of complex, first principles magnetohydrodynamic codes such as ALEGRA MHD, it is now possible to simulate these components in three dimensions and predict greater range of parameters than before. A significant improvement in experimental capability was therefore required to ensure these simulations could be adequately verified. In this second paper of a three part study, data is presented from a flexible foil EFI header experiment. This study has shown that there is significant bridge expansion before time of peak voltage and that heating within the bridge material is spatially affected by the microstructure of the metal foil.

  16. Using X-ray computed tomography to evaluate the initial saturation resulting from different saturation procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun; Wildenschild, D; Jensen, K.H.

    2006-01-01

    with pressurized nitrogen between each saturation and allowed to saturate for the same length of time for all the different procedures. Both gravimetric measurements and CT attenuation levels showed that venting the sample with carbon dioxide prior to saturation clearly improved initial saturation whereas the use...... saturation. In this study three techniques often applied in the laboratory have been evaluated for a fine sand sample: (1) venting of the sample with carbon dioxide prior to saturation, (2) applying vacuum to the sample in the beginning of the saturation procedure, and finally (3) the use of degassed water...... the sample was scanned in 1 mm intervals over the height of the 3.5 cm tall sample, providing detailed information on the performance of the different procedures. Five different combinations of the above mentioned saturation procedures were applied to a disturbed silica sand sample. The sample was drained...

  17. [Prediction and prevention of type 1 diabetes mellitus: initial results and recent prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madácsy, László

    2011-11-27

    Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence and prevalence of type 1 diabetes mellitus is rising worldwide. The increase in incidence has been most prominent in the youngest age group of childhood. Prediction of type 1a autoimmune diabetes can be established by a positive family history or by genetic, immunological or metabolic markers. Prevention of type 1 diabetes can be implemented at three different levels of pathogenesis: primary prevention in individuals without any sign of beta-cell damage, secondary prevention in individuals with signs of beta-cell destruction and tertiary prevention in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. In recent years our knowledge of the disease pathogenesis has grown quickly, and several new prevention trials have been initiated worldwide. Immunologic intervention for type 1 diabetes will prove to be probably the most effective.

  18. Ten Years of Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI): Results and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, P. Y.; Gutman, G.; Gulev, S.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    During recent decades, Northern Eurasia was affected by unprecedented climate and environmental changes. Several droughts and heat waves alternated with hazardous extreme precipitation and flood events. Permafrost thaw, retreating Arctic sea ice, increasing areas of forest fire, and dramatic regional warming buffeted this region, tossing northern Eurasia from one extreme condition to the next. The region stores nearly half of the Earth's terrestrial carbon in permafrost, wetlands, and forested land, so ecosystem changes that release stored carbon could profoundly affect the world's climate. Furthermore, changes to climate and to hydrological and biogeochemical cycles are starting to affect daily life. For example, infrastructure is collapsing as permafrost thaws, severe winter storms increasingly bring businesses to a halt, and a growing water deficit is beginning to strain agricultural production and forestry. To pool resources and facilitate research, the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI, http://neespi.org) was launched in 2004. With its multidisciplinary focus, the internationally funded NEESPI (more than165 individual international projects during the past decade) has challenged participants to research climate-ecosystem interactions, societal impacts from extreme events in Northern Eurasia, and the feedbacks of these interactions and impacts to the global Earth system. Among the numerous Institutional and private sponsors from the United States, European Union, Russia, China, and Japan, the cornerstone support for the NEESPI studies was provided by the NASA Land Cover and Land Use Change Program and the Russian Academy of Sciences. At this presentation we shall overview the environmental studies conducted by the NEESPI community, brief the audience about the main achievements of the NEESPI researchers, and lay down the plans for the future studies. At the side event of the Meeting, we are going to initiate preparation of the book

  19. Design of an Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Performance prediction of turbomachines is a significant part of aircraft propulsion design. In the conceptual design stage, there is an important need to quantify compressor and turbine aerodynamic performance and develop initial geometry parameters at the 2-D level prior to more extensive Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses. The Object-oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code (OTAC) is being developed to perform 2-D meridional flowthrough analysis of turbomachines using an implicit formulation of the governing equations to solve for the conditions at the exit of each blade row. OTAC is designed to perform meanline or streamline calculations; for streamline analyses simple radial equilibrium is used as a governing equation to solve for spanwise property variations. While the goal for OTAC is to allow simulation of physical effects and architectural features unavailable in other existing codes, it must first prove capable of performing calculations for conventional turbomachines. OTAC is being developed using the interpreted language features available in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) code described by Claus et al (1991). Using the NPSS framework came with several distinct advantages, including access to the pre-existing NPSS thermodynamic property packages and the NPSS Newton-Raphson solver. The remaining objects necessary for OTAC were written in the NPSS framework interpreted language. These new objects form the core of OTAC and are the BladeRow, BladeSegment, TransitionSection, Expander, Reducer, and OTACstart Elements. The BladeRow and BladeSegment consumed the initial bulk of the development effort and required determining the equations applicable to flow through turbomachinery blade rows given specific assumptions about the nature of that flow. Once these objects were completed, OTAC was tested and found to agree with existing solutions from other codes; these tests included various meanline and streamline comparisons of axial

  20. Design Architecture and Initial Results from an FPGA Based Digital Receiver for Multistatic Meteor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, Scott; Vaudrin, Cody

    Defined by a minimal RF front-end followed by an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and con-trolled by a reconfigurable logic device (FPGA), the digital receiver will replace conventional heterodyning analog receivers currently in use by the COBRA meteor radar. A basic hardware overview touches on the major digital receiver components, theory of operation and data han-dling strategies. We address concerns within the community regarding the implementation of digital receivers in small-scale scientific radars, and outline the numerous benefits with a focus on reconfigurability. From a remote sensing viewpoint, having complete visibility into a band of the EM spectrum allows an experiment designer to focus on parameter estimation rather than hardware limitations. Finally, we show some basic multistatic receiver configurations enabled through GPS time synchronization. Currently, the digital receiver is configured to facilitate range and radial velocity determination of meteors in the MLT region for use with the COBRA meteor radar. Initial measurements from data acquired at Platteville, Colorado and Tierra Del Fuego in Argentina will be presented. We show an improvement in detection rates compared to conventional analog systems. Scientific justification for a digital receiver is clearly made by the presentation of RTI plots created using data acquired from the receiver. These plots reveal an interesting phenomenon concerning vacillating power structures in a select number of meteor trails.

  1. New results on Initial State and Quarkonia with ALICE arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00537162

    The study of quarkonia in heavy-ion collisions has been the subject of intense experimental and theoretical effort, ever since their production was predicted to be sensitive to the formation of a deconfined state of strongly-interacting matter, known as the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). In p-Pb collisions, Cold Nuclear Matter (CNM) effects, such as nuclear shadowing or partonic energy loss, are expected to influence quarkonium production. The study of such system is therefore crucial to shed light on the mechanisms taking place at the initial-state of quarkonium production, and to disentangle the cold and hot nuclear effects envisioned in Pb-Pb collisions. The ALICE experiment at the LHC, is capable of reconstructing J/$\\psi$, $\\psi$(2S) and $\\Upsilon$ states at forward rapidity through their $\\mu^{\\rm{+}}\\mu^{\\rm{-}}$ decay channel, as well as J/$\\psi$ at central rapidity through their $e^{\\rm{+}}e^{\\rm{-}}$ decay channel, down to zero transverse momentum. A review of the main ALICE findings from the measurement...

  2. Core competencies for emergency medicine clerkships: results of a Canadian consensus initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penciner, Rick; Woods, Robert A; McEwen, Jill; Lee, Richard; Langhan, Trevor; Bandiera, Glen

    2013-01-01

    There is no consensus on what constitutes the core competencies for emergency medicine (EM) clerkship rotations in Canada. Existing EM curricula have been developed through informal consensus and often focus on EM content to be known at the end of training rather than what is an appropriate focus for a time-limited rotation in EM. We sought to define the core competencies for EM clerkship in Canada through consensus among an expert panel of Canadian EM educators. We used a modified Delphi method and the CanMEDS 2005 Physician Competency Framework to develop a consensus among expert EM educators from across Canada. Thirty experts from nine different medical schools across Canada participated on the panel. The initial list consisted of 152 competencies organized in the seven domains of the CanMEDS 2005 Physician Competency Framework. After the second round of the Delphi process, the list of competencies was reduced to 62 (59% reduction). A complete list of competencies is provided. This study established a national consensus defining the core competencies for EM clerkship in Canada.

  3. Facilitating Change in Undergraduate STEM: Initial Results from an Interdisciplinary Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Charles; Beach, Andrea; Finkelstein, Noah; Larson, R. Sam

    2008-10-01

    Although decades of research have identified effective instructional practices for improving Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education, these practices are not widely implemented. Scholars in three fields are interested in promoting these practices and have engaged in research on pedagogical change: Disciplinary-based STEM Education Researchers, Faculty Development Researchers, and Higher Education Researchers. There is little interaction between the fields and efforts in all areas have met with only modest success. In this paper we present an initial examination of 130 randomly chosen articles from a set of 295 we identified as addressing efforts to promote change in the instructional practices of STEM faculty. We identify four core change strategies and note that change strategies differ by fields. Articles in all fields frequently do not provide enough evidence to convincingly argue for the success of the change strategy studied and have few connections to theoretical or empirical literature related to change. This literature review and related efforts sit within broader efforts to promote interdisciplinary directed at facilitating lasting change.

  4. Initial results of bio-potential signal (Seismic Electric Signal) related to seismic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwah, Vinod; Tiwari, Rudraksh; Gaur, Mulayam; Tiwari, Rajeev

    2013-08-01

    In recent year, there has been growing interest in the possible use of electromagnetic observations to study earthquakes and possible precursors prior to seismic activity, in response to the success in United States, Japan, Russia, China, and other countries using seismo-electromagnetic methods. We have established a new experimental setup (i.e., biopotential sensor) in Farah region (geographic coordinates: 27.17°N, 77.47°E), Mathura, India. The setup has started operating and analyzed the data since November 2011. The data have been tested by various methods and a good correlation with seismic events was found; thus, a real-time analysis from 21:00 p.m. through 8:00 a.m. every day was initiated. First, we recorded the amplitude enhancement in bio-potential and found positive correlation with seismic activities (near Delhi and Rajasthan) and analyzed the data with solar flares and magnetic storms during the same period, finding a negative correlation of these events. The studies of these events are in progress with statistical analysis of the data. We chose the observing site in Farah region because this region is well known for being a site of a conductive channel of seismic activity.

  5. Initial Content Validation Results of a New Simulation Model for Flexible Ureteroscopy: The Key-Box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Luca; Şener, Tarik Emre; Somani, Bhaskar K; Cloutier, Jonathan; Butticè, Salvatore; Marson, Francesco; Doizi, Steeve; Proietti, Silvia; Traxer, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    We sought to test the content validity of a new training model for flexible ureteroscopy: the Key-Box. Sixteen medical students were randomized to undergo a 10-day training consisting of performing 10 different exercises aimed at learning specific movements with the flexible ureteroscope, and how to catch and release stones with a nitinol basket using the Key-Box (n = 8 students in the training group, n = 8 students in the nontraining control group). Subsequently, an expert endourologist (O.T.) blindly assessed skills acquired by the whole cohort of students through two exercises on ureteroscope manipulation and one exercise on stone capture selected among those used for the training. A performance scale (1-5) assessing different steps of the procedure was used to evaluate each student. Time to complete the exercises was measured. Mann-Whitney Rank Sum test was used for comparisons between the two groups. Mean scores obtained by trained students were significantly higher compared with those obtained by nontrained students (all p six (75%) nontrained students were not able to finish one out of the two exercises on ureteroscope manipulation and the exercise on stone capture, respectively. The mean time to complete the three exercises was 76.3, 69.9, and 107 and 172.5, 137.9, and 168 seconds in the trained and nontrained groups, respectively (all p Box(®) seems to be a valid easy-to-use training model for initiating novel endoscopists to flexible ureteroscopy.

  6. The Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap Pulsar Survey - I: Survey Description, Data Analysis, and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, K; Ransom, S M; Archibald, A M; Banaszak, S; Biwer, C M; Boyles, J; Dartez, L P; Day, D; Ford, A J; Flanigan, J; Garcia, A; Hessels, J W T; Hinojosa, J; Jenet, F A; Kaplan, D L; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; Kondratiev, V I; Leake, S; Lorimer, D R; Lunsford, G; Martinez, J G; Mata, A; McLaughlin, M A; Roberts, M S E; Rohr, M D; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; van Leeuwen, J; Walker, A N; Wells, B L

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ongoing search for pulsars and dispersed pulses of radio emission, such as those from rotating radio transients (RRATs) and fast radio bursts (FRBs), at 350 MHz using the Green Bank Telescope. With the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument, we record 100 MHz of bandwidth divided into 4,096 channels every 81.92 $\\mu s$. This survey will cover the entire sky visible to the Green Bank Telescope ($\\delta > -40^\\circ$, or 82% of the sky) and outside of the Galactic Plane will be sensitive enough to detect slow pulsars and low dispersion measure ($<$30 $\\mathrm{pc\\,cm^{-3}}$) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with a 0.08 duty cycle down to 1.1 mJy. For pulsars with a spectral index of $-$1.6, we will be 2.5 times more sensitive than previous and ongoing surveys over much of our survey region. Here we describe the survey, the data analysis pipeline, initial discovery parameters for 62 pulsars, and timing solutions for 5 new pulsars. PSR J0214$+$5222 is an MSP in a long-period (512 days) orbit a...

  7. Initial results for a 170 GHz high power ITER waveguide component test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Dukes, Carl; Killough, Stephen; Kaufman, Michael; White, John; Bell, Gary; Hanson, Greg; Rasmussen, Dave

    2014-10-01

    A high power microwave test stand is being setup at ORNL to enable prototype testing of 170 GHz cw waveguide components being developed for the ITER ECH system. The ITER ECH system will utilize 63.5 mm diameter evacuated corrugated waveguide and will have 24 >150 m long runs. A 170 GHz 1 MW class gyrotron is being developed by Communications and Power Industries and is nearing completion. A HVDC power supply, water-cooling and control system has been partially tested in preparation for arrival of the gyrotron. The power supply and water-cooling system are being designed to operate for >3600 second pulses to simulate the operating conditions planned for the ITER ECH system. The gyrotron Gaussian beam output has a single mirror for focusing into a 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide in the vertical plane. The output beam and mirror are enclosed in an evacuated duct with absorber for stray radiation. Beam alignment with the waveguide is a critical task so a combination of mirror tilt adjustments and a bellows for offsets will be provided. Analysis of thermal patterns on thin witness plates will provide gyrotron mode purity and waveguide coupling efficiency data. Pre-prototype waveguide components and two dummy loads are available for initial operational testing of the gyrotron. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  8. REFIR/BB initial observations in the water vapour rotational band: Results from a field campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Grieco, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Leone, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Restieri, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Serio, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente (DIFA)-Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano10, 85100 Potenza (Italy) and Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy)]. E-mail: serio@unibas.it; Bianchini, G. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , IFAC-CNR, Via Panciatichi 64, Firenze (Italy); Palchetti, L. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , IFAC-CNR, Via Panciatichi 64, Firenze (Italy); Pellegrini, M. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , IFAC-CNR, Via Panciatichi 64, Firenze (Italy); Cuomo, V. [Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Masiello, G. [Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Pavese, G. [Istituto di Metodologie per l' Analisi Ambientale, IMAA-CNR, C. da S. Loya, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    There is a growing interest in the far infrared spectral region 17-50 {mu}m as a remote sensing tool in atmospheric sciences, since this portion of the spectrum contains the characteristic molecular rotational band for water vapour. Much of the Earth energy lost to space is radiated through this spectral region. The Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed Breadboard (REFIR/BB) spectrometer was born because of the quest to make observations in the far infrared. REFIR/BB is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a sampling resolution of 0.5 cm{sup -1} and it was tested for the first time in the field to check its reliability and radiometric performance. The field campaign was held at Toppo di Castelgrande (40{sup o} 49' N, 15{sup o} 27' E, 1258 m a. s. l.), a mountain site in South Italy. The spectral and radiometric performance of the instrument and initial observations are shown in this paper. Comparisons to both (1) BOMEM MR100 Fourier Transform spectrometer observations and (2) line-by-line radiative transfer calculations for selected clear sky are presented and discussed. These comparisons (1) show a very nice agreement between radiance measured by REFIR/BB and by BOMEM MR100 and (2) demonstrate that REFIR/BB accurately observes the very fine spectral structure in the water vapour rotational band.

  9. E-region decameter-scale plasma waves observed by the dual TIGER HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Carter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dual Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER HF radars regularly observe E-region echoes at sub-auroral magnetic latitudes 58°–60° S including during geomagnetic storms. We present a statistical analysis of E-region backscatter observed in a period of ~2 years (late 2004–2006 by the TIGER Bruny Island and Unwin HF radars, with particular emphasis on storm-time backscatter. It is found that the HF echoes normally form a 300-km-wide band at ranges 225–540 km. In the evening sector during geomagnetic storms, however, the HF echoes form a curved band joining to the F-region band at ~700 km. The curved band lies close to the locations where the geometric aspect angle is zero, implying little to no refraction during geomagnetic storms, which is an opposite result to what has been reported in the past. The echo occurrence, Doppler velocity, and spectral width of the HF echoes are examined in order to determine whether new HF echo types are observed at sub-auroral latitudes, particularly during geomagnetic storms. The datasets of both TIGER radars are found to be dominated by low-velocity echoes. A separate population of storm-time echoes is also identified within the datasets of both radars with most of these echoes showing similar characteristics to the low-velocity echo population. The storm-time backscatter observed by the Bruny Island radar, on the other hand, includes near-range echoes (r<405 km that exhibit some characteristics of what has been previously termed the High Aspect angle Irregularity Region (HAIR echoes. We show that these echoes appear to be a storm-time phenomenon and further investigate this population by comparing their Doppler velocity with the simultaneously measured F- and E-region irregularity velocities. It is suggested that the HAIR-like echoes are observed only by HF radars with relatively poor geometric aspect angles when electron density is low and when the electric field is particularly

  10. No Increase in Fractures After Stopping Hormone Therapy: Results From the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Nelson B; Cauley, Jane A; Jackson, Rebecca D; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Lewis, Cora E; Manson, JoAnn E; Neuner, Joan M; Phillips, Lawrence S; Stefanick, Marcia L; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Crandall, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) hormone therapy (HT) trials showed protection against hip and total fractures, but a later observational report suggested loss of benefit and a rebound increased risk after cessation of HT. The purpose of this study was to examine fractures after discontinuation of HT. Two placebo-controlled randomized trials served as the study setting. Study patients included WHI participants (N = 15,187) who continued active HT or placebo through the intervention period and who did not take HT in the postintervention period. Trial interventions included conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in naturally menopausal women and CEE alone in women with prior hysterectomy. Total fractures and hip fractures through 5 years after discontinuation of HT were recorded. Hip fractures were infrequent (∼2.5 per 1000 person-years); this finding was similar between trials and in former HT and placebo groups. There was no difference in total fractures in the CEE + MPA trial for former HT vs former placebo users (28.9 per 1000 person-years and 29.9 per 1000 person-years, respectively; hazard ratio [HR], 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87 to 1.09; P = 0.63); however, in the CEE-alone trial, total fractures were higher in former placebo users (36.9 per 1000 person-years) compared with the former active group (31.1 per 1000 person-years), a finding that was suggestive of a residual benefit of CEE against total fractures (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73 to 0.98; P = 0.03). We found no evidence for increased fracture risk, either sustained or transient, for former HT users compared with former placebo users after stopping HT. There was residual benefit for total fractures in former HT users from the CEE-alone study.

  11. Regional Collaboration Among Urban Area Security Initiative Regions: Results of the Johns Hopkins Urban Area Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Calvin; Barnett, Daniel J.; Resnick, Beth A.; Frattaroli, Shannon; Rutkow, Lainie

    2014-01-01

    Regional collaboration has been identified as a potential facilitator of public health preparedness efforts. The Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) grant program, administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) since 2003, has provided 64 high-risk metropolitan areas funding to enhance their regional preparedness capabilities. This study describes informal and formal regional collaboration infrastructure, as well as regional collaboration–related activities and assessment methods, in FFY2010 UASI regions. A cross-sectional online survey was administered via Survey Monkey from September through December 2013. Points of contact from FFY2010 funded UASI metropolitan areas completed the survey, with a response rate of 77.8% (n=49). Summary statistics were calculated to describe the current informal and formal regional collaboration infrastructure. Additionally, the cross-sectional survey collected rates of agreement with 8 collaborative preparedness statements at 3 time points. The survey found that UASI regions are engaging in collaborative activities and investments to build capabilities, with most collaboration occurring in the prevention, protection, and response mission areas. Collaborative relationships in preparedness among emergency managers and municipal chief executive officers improved during the FFY2010 UASI performance period compared to the pre-UASI award period, with lasting effects. The majority of UASI regions reported conducting independent assessments of capabilities and their measurement at the UASI region level. Urban areas that received a FFY2010 UASI grant award are engaging in collaborative activities and have established interjurisdictional relationships in preparedness. The use of grant funds to encourage collaboration in preparedness has the potential to leverage limited resources and promote informed investments. PMID:25398073

  12. First breast cancer mammography screening program in Mexico: initial results 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Guisa-Hohenstein, Fernando; Labastida-Almendaro, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant neoplasia worldwide. In emergent countries as Mexico, an increase has been shown in frequency and mortality, unfortunately, most cases in advanced loco-regional stages developed in young women. The success of breast screening in mortality reduction has been observed since 1995 in Western Europe and the United States, where as many as 40% mortality reduction has been achieved. Most countries guidelines recommends an annual or biannual mammography for all women >40 years of age. In 2005, FUCAM, a nonlucrative civil foundation in Mexico join with Mexico City government, initiated the first voluntary mammography screening program for women >40 years of age residing in Mexico City's Federal District. Mammographies were carried out with analogical mammographs in specially designed mobile units and were performed in the area of women's domiciles. This report includes data from the first 96,828 mammographies performed between March 2005 and December 2006. There were 1% of mammographies in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 0, 4, or 5 and 208 out of 949 women with abnormal mammographies (27.7%) had breast cancer, a rate of 2.1 per thousand, most of them in situ or stage I (29.4%) or stage II (42.2%) nevertheless 21% of those women with abnormal mammography did not present for further clinical and radiologic evaluation despite being personally notified at their home addresses. The breast cancer rate of Mexican women submitted to screening mammography is lower than in European or North American women. Family history of breast cancer, nulliparity, absence of breast feeding, and increasing age are factors that increase the risk of breast cancer. Most cancers were diagnosed in women's age below 60 years (68.5%) with a mean age of 53.55 corroborating previous data published. It is mandatory to sensitize and educate our population with regard to accepting to visit the Specialized Breast Centers.

  13. 77 FR 64953 - Notice of Initiation and Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ...-caught warmwater species include, but are not limited to, whiteleg shrimp (Penaeus vannemei), banana...), citing Brass Sheet and Strip from Canada; Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 57...

  14. 75 FR 37757 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Vietnam: Initiation and Preliminary Results of Changed-Circumstances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ..., but are not limited to, whiteleg shrimp (Penaeus vannemei), banana prawn (Penaeus merguiensis), fleshy... its predecessor. See Brass Sheet and Strip from Canada; Notice of Final Results of Antidumping...

  15. Initial experience with a group presentation of study results to research participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Stephen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite ethical imperatives, informing research participants about the results of the studies in which they take part is not often performed. This is due, in part, to the costs and burdens of communicating with each participant after publication of the results. Methods Following the closeout and publication of a randomized clinical trial of saw palmetto for treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, patients were invited back to the research center to participate in a group presentation of the study results. Results Approximately 10% of participants attended one of two presentation sessions. Reaction to the experience of the group presentation was very positive among the attendees. Conclusion A group presentation to research participants is an efficient method of communicating study results to those who desire to be informed and was highly valued by those who attended. Prospectively planning for such presentations and greater scheduling flexibility may result in higher attendance rates. Trial Registration Number Clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00037154

  16. Initial results from a reconnaissance of cyanobacteria and associated toxins in Illinois, August--October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrio, Paul J.; Ostrodka, Lenna M.; Loftin, Keith A.; Good, Gregg; Holland, Teri

    2013-01-01

    Ten lakes and two rivers in Illinois were sampled in August–October 2012 to determine the concentrations and spatial distribution of cyanobacteria and associated cyanotoxins throughout the State. The reconnaissance was a collaborative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency. Sample results indicated that concentrations of both total cyanobacterial cells and microcystin were commonly at levels likely to result in adverse human health effects, according to World Health Organization guidance values. Concentrations generally decreased from August to October following precipitation events and lower temperatures.

  17. Initial Results from the Third Round of Remediated Nitrate Salt Surrogate Formulation and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Geoffrey Wayne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leonard, Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hartline, Ernest Leon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tian, Hongzhao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    High explosives science and technology (M-7) is currently working on the third round of formulation and testing of Remediated nitrate salt (RNS) surrogates. This report summarizes the calorimetry results from the 15% sWheat mixtures. All formulation and testing was carried out according to PLAN-TA9-2443 Rev B, "Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) surrogate formulation and testing standard procedure", released February 16, 2016. Results from the first and second rounds of formulation and testing were documented in memoranda M7-16-6042 and M7-16-6053.

  18. A numerical model of the ionosphere, including the E-region above EISCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-Y. Diloy

    Full Text Available It has been previously demonstrated that a two-ion (O+ and H+ 8-moment time-dependent fluid model was able to reproduce correctly the ionospheric structure in the altitude range probed by the EISCAT-VHF radar. In the present study, the model is extended down to the E-region where molecular ion chemistry (NO+ and O+2, essentially prevails over transport; EISCAT-UHF observations confirmed previous theoretical predictions that during events of intense E×B induced convection drifts, molecular ions (mainly NO+ predominate over O+ ions up to altitudes of 300 km. In addition to this extension of the model down to the E-region, the ionization and heating resulting from both solar insolation and particle precipitation is now taken into account in a consistent manner through a complete kinetic transport code. The effects of E×B induced convection drifts on the E- and F-region are presented: the balance between O+ and NO+ ions is drastically affected; the electric field acts to deplete the O+ ion concentration. The [NO+]/[O+] transition altitude varies from 190 km to 320 km as the perpendicular electric field increases from 0 to 100 mV m-1. An interesting additional by-product of the model is that it also predicts the presence of a noticeable fraction of N+ ions in the topside ionosphere in good agreement with Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer measurements onboard Dynamic Explorer.

  19. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Yost, S. A.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the first phase of a Mechatronics Curriculum Development effort--the design of an "Introduction to Mechatronics" course, the infusion of mechatronics activities throughout the curriculum and in outreach activities, and assessment results. In addition, the relevance and impact of such a curriculum on the education of engineers…

  20. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Yost, S. A.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the first phase of a Mechatronics Curriculum Development effort--the design of an "Introduction to Mechatronics" course, the infusion of mechatronics activities throughout the curriculum and in outreach activities, and assessment results. In addition, the relevance and impact of such a curriculum on the education of engineers…

  1. Initial Results in Power System Identification from Injected Probing Signals Using a Subspace Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ning; Pierre, John W.; Hauer, John F.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, the authors use the Numerical algorithm for Subspace State Space System IDentification (N4SID) to extract dynamic parameters from phasor measurements collected on the western North American Power Grid. The data were obtained during tests on June 7, 2000, and they represent wide area response to several kinds of probing signals including Low-Level Pseudo-Random Noise (LLPRN) and Single-Mode Square Wave (SMSW) injected at the Celilo terminal of the Pacific HVDC In-tertie (PDCI). An identified model is validated using a cross vali-dation method. Also, the obtained electromechanical modes are compared with the results from Prony analysis of a ringdown and with signal analysis of ambient data measured under similar op-erating conditions. The consistent results show that methods in this class can be highly effective even when the probing signal is small.

  2. Image deblurring applied to infrared tongue position imaging: Initial simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poots, J. Kent

    2013-10-01

    Paper describes development work for a new biomedical application of image deblurring. Optical imaging is not currently used to assess tongue position during speech, nor is optical imaging the modality of choice for imaging tissue of moderate thickness. Tongue position assessment is important during rehabilitation. Optical imaging of biological tissue provides good contrast, but incident light is scattered, seriously restricting clinical usefulness. Paper describes simulation results for scattering correction and suggests possible directions for future work. Images are represented by sparse matrices.

  3. Improved blasting results with precise initiation:Numerical simulation of sublevel caving blasting

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Changping

    2013-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of rock blasting using LS-DYNA software havebeen conducted to investigate the effect of short delay time on the fragmentation inunderground mines. The purpose was to test the hypothesis proposed by Rossmaniththat stress wave interaction could result in finer fragmentation by controlling theinitiation times. The blasted rock was simulated with RHT material model. After thecalculation, the elements with damage level above 0.6 were removed to simulate thefractur...

  4. ARCS, The Arcminute Radio Cluster-lens Search - I. Selection Criteria and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, P M; Wilkinson, P N

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an unbiased radio search for gravitational lensing events with image separations between 15 and 60 arcsec, which would be associated with clusters of galaxies with masses >10^{13-14}M_{\\sun}. A parent population of 1023 extended radio sources stronger than 35 mJy with stellar optical identifications was selected using the FIRST radio catalogue at 1.4 GHz and the APM optical catalogue. The FIRST catalogue was then searched for companions to the parent sources stronger than 7 mJy and with separation in the range 15 to 60 arcsec. Higher resolution observations of the resulting 38 lens candidates were made with the VLA at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz, and with MERLIN at 5 GHz in order to test the lens hypothesis in each case. None of our targets was found to be a gravitational lens system. These results provide the best current constraint on the lensing rate for this angular scale, but improved calculations of lensing rates from realistic simulations of the clustering of matter on the relevant scal...

  5. Design of a low cost miniaturized SFCW GPR with initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Swati; Sinha, Piyush; Gupta, Manish; Patel, Anand; Vedam, V. V.; Mevada, Pratik; Chavda, Rajesh; Shah, Amita; Putrevu, Deepak

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses about the design &developmental of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), various scientific and commercial applications of GPR along with the testing and results of GPR at Antarctica for Ice thickness measurement. GPR instruments are categorised as per their frequency of operation, which is inversely proportional to the depth of penetration. GPRs are also categorized as per method of operation which is time-domain or frequency-domain. Indian market is presently procuring GPRs from only foreign suppliers. Space Applications Centre (SAC) had taken up GPR as R&D Technological development with a view to benchmark the technology which may be transferred to local industry for mass production of instrument at a relatively cheaper cost (~20 times cheaper). Hence, this instrument presents a viable indigenous alternative. Also, the design and configuration was targeted for terrestrial as well as future interplanetary (Lander/Rover) missions of ISRO to map subsurface features. The developed GPR has a very large bandwidth (100%, i.e. bandwidth of 500MHz with centre-frequency of 500MHz) and high dynamic range along with the advantage of being highly portable (goal, innovative electronic equipment have been designed and developed. Three prototypes were developed and two of them have been delivered for Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica (ISEA) in 2013 and 2014-15, respectively and promising results have been obtained. The results from the same closely compare with that from commercial GPR too.

  6. Influence of a Company’s Social Initiatives on the Consumer Attitude towards It. Results of Experimental Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Pawlak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article constitutes an attempt to answer the question whether social initiatives undertaken by a company influence the consumer attitude towards it. The afore-mentioned aim has been achieved by presenting the results of experimental research. Six scenarios of social initiatives undertaken by a food sector company were used in the research. Research work was conducted using a sample of real consumers. It was shown that information about undertaking a single social initiative by a company does not lead to a more favourable consumer attitude towards it. The results obtained show that when undertaking a social programme, which is not consistent with the company’s actions to date, the attitude towards it can even become worse.

  7. Coupling Landform Evolution and Soil Pedogenesis - Initial Results From the SSSPAM5D Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgoose, G. R.; Welivitiya, W. D. D. P.; Hancock, G. R.; Cohen, S.

    2015-12-01

    Evolution of soil on a dynamic landform is a crucial next step in landscape evolution modelling. Some attempts have been taken such as MILESD by Vanwalleghem et al. to develop a first model which is capable of simultaneously evolving both the soil profile and the landform. In previous work we have presented physically based models for soil pedogenesis, mARM and SSSPAM. In this study we present the results of coupling a landform evolution model with our SSSPAM5D soil pedogenesis model. In previous work the SSSPAM5D soil evolution model was used to identify trends of the soil profile evolution on a static landform. Two pedogenetic processes, namely (1) armouring due to erosion, and (2) physical and chemical weathering were used in those simulations to evolve the soil profile. By incorporating elevation changes (due to erosion and deposition) we have advanced the SSSPAM5D modelling framework into the realm of landscape evolution. Simulations have been run using elevation and soil grading data of the engineered landform (spoil heap) at the Ranger Uranium Mine, Northern Territory, Australia. The results obtained for the coupled landform-soil evolution simulations predict the erosion of high slope areas, development of rudimentary channel networks in the landform and deposition of sediments in lowland areas, and qualitatively consistent with landform evolution models on their own. Examination of the soil profile characteristics revealed that hill crests are weathering dominated and tend to develop a thick soil layer. The steeper hillslopes at the edge of the landform are erosion dominated with shallow soils while the foot slopes are deposition dominated with thick soil layers. The simulation results of our coupled landform and soil evolution model provide qualitatively correct and timely characterization of the soil evolution on a dynamic landscape. Finally we will compare the characteristics of erosion and deposition predicted by the coupled landform-soil SSSPAM

  8. Neutral wind acceleration in the polar lower E-region during an intense electric-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Takuo T.; Buchert, Stephan C.; Nozawa, Satonori; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Fujii, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    The Joule heating and ion drag effects are considered as important factors in the neutral wind dynamics in the polar E-region. However, quantitative evaluations for these effects are insufficient for correct understanding, particularly, in the lower E-region (100-110 km heights) where the anomalous heating effect, related with the electron Pedersen currents, can occur during the intense electric field. In the present study, using EISCAT Svalbard radar data, we have investigated, for the first time, the normal and anomalous heating effects to the neutral wind acceleration in the lower E-region.

  9. Robotic radical prostatectomy-a minimally invasive therapy for prostate cancer: results of initial 530 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tewari

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In 2000, the number of new cases of prostate cancer was estimated at 5 13 000 worldwide [Eur J Cancer 2001; 37 (Suppl 8: S4]. In next 15 years, prostate cancer is predicted to be the most common cancer in men [Eur J Cancer 2001; 37 (Suppl 8: S4]. Radical prostatectomy is one of the most common surgical treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer. In spite of its excellent oncological results, due to the fear of pain, risk for side effects, and inconvenience (Semin Urol Oncol 2002; 20: 55, many patients seek alternative treatments for their prostate cancer. At Vattikuti Urology institute, we have developed a minimally invasive technique for treating prostate cancer, which achieves oncological results of surgical treatment without causing significant pain, large surgical incision, and side effects (BJU Int, 2003; 92: 205. This technique involves a da Vinci™ (Intuitive Surgical ®, Sunnyvale, CA surgical robot with 3-D stereoscopic visualization and ergonomic multijointed instruments. Presented herein are our results after treating 750 patients. Methods: We prospectively collected baseline demographic data such as age, race, body mass index (BMI, serum prostate specific antigen, prostate volume, Gleason score, percentage cancer, TNM clinical staging, and comorbidities. Urinary symptoms were measured with the international prostate symptom score (IPSS, and sexual health with the sexual health inventory of males (SHIM. In addition, the patients were mailed the expanded prostate inventory composite at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after the procedure. Results: Gleason seven or more cancer grade was noted in 33.5% of patients. The average BMI was high (27.7 and 87% patients had pathological stage PT2a-b. The mean operative time was 160 min and the mean blood loss was 153 cm3. No patient required blood transfusion. At 6 months 82% of the men who were younger and 75% of those older than 60 years had return of sexual

  10. Initial results with time series forecasting of TJ-II heliac waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, G., E-mail: gonzalo.farias@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso (Chile); Dormido-Canto, S. [Departamento de Informática y Automática, UNED, Madrid (Spain); Vega, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión. CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Díaz, N. [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-10-15

    This article discusses about how to apply forecasting techniques to predict future samples of plasma signals during a discharge. One application of the forecasting could be to detect in real time anomalous behaviors in fusion waveforms. The work describes the implementation of three prediction techniques; two of them based on machine learning methods such as artificial neural networks and support vector machines for regression. The results have shown that depending on the temporal horizon, the predictions match the real samples in most cases with an error less than 5%, even more the forecasting of five samples ahead can reach accuracy over 90% in most signals analyzed.

  11. Initial results from 3D-DDTC detectors on p-type substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoboli, A., E-mail: zoboli@disi.unitn.i [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, and INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), Via Sommarive, 14, I-38100 Povo di Trento (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi, Via Sommarive, 18, I-38100 Povo di Trento (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Via A. Valerio, 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, and INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), Via Sommarive, 14, I-38100 Povo di Trento (Italy); Piemonte, C.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi, Via Sommarive, 18, I-38100 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2010-01-11

    Owing to their superior radiation hardness compared to planar detectors, 3D detectors are one of the most promising technologies for the LHC upgrade foreseen in 2017. Fondazione Bruno Kessler has developed 3D Double-side Double-Type Column (3D-DDTC) detectors providing a technological simplifications with respect to a standard 3D process while aiming at comparable detector performance. We present selected results from the electrical characterization of 3D-DDTC structures from the second batch made on p-type substrates, supported also by TCAD simulations.

  12. Initial SAM Calibration Gas Experiments on Mars: Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H,; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  13. NEOSurvey 1: Initial results from the Warm Spitzer Exploration Science Survey of Near Earth Object Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Trilling, David E; Hora, Joseph; Chesley, Steve; Emery, Joshua; Fazio, Giovanni; Harris, Alan; Mueller, Michael; Smith, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Near Earth Objects (NEOs) are small Solar System bodies whose orbits bring them close to the Earth's orbit. We are carrying out a Warm Spitzer Cycle 11 Exploration Science program entitled NEOSurvey --- a fast and efficient flux-limited survey of 597 known NEOs in which we derive diameter and albedo for each target. The vast majority of our targets are too faint to be observed by NEOWISE, though a small sample has been or will be observed by both observatories, which allows for a cross-check of our mutual results. Our primary goal is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties. We present here the first results from this new program: fluxes and derived diameters and albedos for 80 NEOs, together with a description of the overall program and approach, including several updates to our thermal model. The largest source of error in our diameter and albedo solutions, which derive from our single band thermal emission measurements, is uncertainty in eta, the beaming parameter used in our thermal modelin...

  14. Rectangular computed tomography using a stationary array of CNT emitters: initial experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Brian; Spronk, Derrek; Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Xiaochuan; Beckmann, Moritz; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2013-03-01

    XinRay Systems Inc has a rectangular x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging setup using multibeam x-ray tubes. These multibeam x-ray tubes are based on cold cathodes using carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters. Due to their unique design, a CNT x-ray tube can contain a dense array of independently controlled electron emitters which generate a linear array of x-ray focal spots. XinRay uses a set of linear CNT x-ray tubes to design and construct a stationary CT setup which achieves sufficient CT coverage from a fixed set of views. The CT system has no moving gantry, enabling it to be enclosed in a compact rectangular tunnel. The fixed locations of the x-ray focal spots were optimized through simulations. The rectangular shape creates significant variation in path length from the focal spots to the detector for different x-ray views. The shape also results in unequal x-ray coverage in the imaged space. We discuss the impact of this variation on the reconstruction. XinRay uses an iterative reconstruction algorithm to account for this unique geometry, which is implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The fixed focal spots prohibit the use of an antiscatter grid. Quantitative measure of the scatter and its impact on the reconstruction will be discussed. These results represent the first known implementation of a completely stationary CT setup using CNT x-ray emitter arrays.

  15. Value of three-dimensional reconstructions in pancreatic carcinoma using multidetector CT: Initial results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miriam Klauβ; Max Sch(o)binger; Ivo Wolf; Jens Werner; Hans-Peter Meinzer; Hans-Ulrich Kauczor; Lars Grenacher

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the use of three-dimensional imaging of pancreatic carcinoma using multidetector computed tomography (CT) in a prospective study. METHODS: Ten patients with suspected pancreatic tumors were examined prospectively using multidetector CT (Somatom Sensation 16, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The images were evaluated for the presence of a pancreatic carcinoma and invasion of the peripancreatic vessels and surrounding organs. Using the isotropic CT data sets, a three-dimensional image was created with automatic vascular analysis and semiautomatic segmentation of the organs and pancreatic tumor by a radiologist. The CT examinations and the three-dimensional images were presented to the surgeon directly before and during the patient's operation using the Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit-based software "ReLiver". Immediately after surgery, the value of the two images was judged by the surgeon. The operation and the histological results served as the gold standard. RESULTS: Nine patients had a pancreatic carcinoma (all pT3), and one patient had a serous cystadenoma. One tumor infiltrated the superior mesenteric vein. The infiltration was correctly evaluated. All carcinomas were resectable. In comparison to the CT image with axial and coronal reconstructions, the three-dimensional image was judged by the surgeons as better for operation planning and consistently described as useful. CONCLUSION: A 3D-image of the pancreas represents an invaluable aid to the surgeon. However, the 3D-software must be further developed in order to be integrated into daily clinical routine.

  16. Initial SAM calibration gas experiments on Mars: Quadrupole mass spectrometer results and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H.; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; Manning, Heidi L. K.; Prats, Benito D.; Raaen, Eric; Wong, Michael H.

    2017-04-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  17. The MARIA Helicon Plasma Experiment at UW Madison: Upgrade, Initial Scientific Goals Mission and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Victoria; Green, Jonathan; Hershkowitz, Noah; Schmitz, Oliver; Severn, Greg

    2015-11-01

    The versatile helicon plasma device, MARIA (Magnetized AnisotRopic Ion-distribution Apparatus), was upgraded with stronger magnetic field B planned as well as design of an ion cyclotron-heating antenna. To quantify the plasma characteristics, diagnostics including a Triple Langmuir Probe, Emissive Probe, and Laser Induced Fluorescence were established. We show first results from characterization of the device. The coupling of the helicon mode in the electron temperature and density parameter space in Argon was mapped out with regard to neutral pressure, B-field and RF power. In addition, validity of the Bohm Criterion and of the Chodura model starting in the weakly collisional regime is tested. A key goal in all efforts is to develop methods of quantitative spectroscopy based on cutting-edge models and active laser spectroscopy. This work was funded by Startup funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at UW Madison, the NSF CAREER award PHY-1455210 and NSF grant PHY-1206421.

  18. Radio Observations of the Hubble Deep Field South region: I. Survey Description and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, R P; Jackson, C A; Boyle, B J; Ekers, R D; Mitchell, D A; Sault, R J; Wieringa, M H; Williams, R E; Hopkins, A M; Higdon, J; Norris, Ray P.; Huynh, Minh T.; Jackson, Carole A.; Boyle, Brian J.; Ekers, Ronald. D.; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Sault, Robert J.; Wieringa, Mark H.; Williams, Robert E.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Higdon, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the first of a series describing the results of the Australia Telescope Hubble Deep Field South (ATHDFS) radio survey. The survey was conducted at four wavelengths - 20, 11, 6, and 3 cm, over a 4-year period, and achieves an rms sensitivity of about 10 microJy at each wavelength. We describe the observations and data reduction processes, and present data on radio sources close to the centre of the HDF-S. We discuss in detail the properties of a subset of these sources. The sources include both starburst galaxies and galaxies powered by an active galactic nucleus, and range in redshift from 0.1 to 2.2. Some of them are characterised by unusually high radio-to-optical luminosities, presumably caused by dust extinction.

  19. Optical design and initial results from NIST's AMMT/TEMPS facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, Steven; Lane, Brandon; Neira, Jorge; Mekhontsev, Sergey; Vlasea, Mihaela; Hanssen, Leonard

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Physical Measurement and Engineering Laboratories are jointly developing the Additive Manufacturing Measurement Test bed (AMMT)/ Temperature and Emittance of Melts, Powders and Solids (TEMPS) facilities. These facilities will be co-located on an open architecture laser-based powder bed fusion system allowing users full access to the system's operation parameters. This will provide users with access to machine-independent monitoring and control of the powder bed fusion process. In this paper there will be emphasis on the AMMT, which incorporates in-line visible light collection optics for monitoring and feedback control of the powder bed fusion process. We shall present an overview of the AMMT/TEMPs program and it goals. The optical and mechanical design of the open architecture powder-bed fusion system and the AMMT will be also be described. In addition, preliminary measurement results from the system along with the current system status of the system the will be described.

  20. Angiography of the temporomandibular joint. Description of an experimental technique with initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, R; Shimoda, T; Westesson, P L; Takahashi, A; Morris, T W; Sano, T; Moses, J J

    1994-10-01

    The vascular supply to the temporomandibular joint is not completely understood. To form a base for advancement in this area we developed a method for experimental angiography of the temporomandibular joint that was applied to fresh temporomandibular joint autopsy specimens. Via the external carotid artery the vessels were infused with a mixture of barium and an acrylic resin. The specimens were sectioned and contact radiographs were obtained. These showed the vascularity of the joint and the surrounding structures with great detail. Most of the vascular supply appears to come from the lateral and medial aspects of the condyle head and from the anterior and posterior disk attachments. The method was applied to both normal and abnormal joints and the results suggest that this method could be used to gather further understanding of the vascularity of the temporomandibular joint relative to disease.

  1. Initial results of sensitivity tests - Performed on the RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Tests have been performed over several years to investigate the dynamics of a free-piston Stirling engine for the purpose of computer code validation. Tests on the 1 kW (1.33 hp) single cylinder engine have involved the determination of the sensitivity of the engine performance to variations in working space pressure, heater and cooler temperatures, regenerator porosity, power piston mass, and displacer dynamics. Maps of engine performance have been recorded with the use of an 81.2 percent porosity regenerator. Both a high-efficiency displacer and a high-power displacer were tested; efficiencies up to 33 percent were recorded, and power output of approximately 1500 W was obtained. Preliminary results of the sensitivity tests are presented, and descriptions of future tests are given.

  2. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  3. Using Empirical Data to Estimate Potential Functions in Commodity Markets: Some Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C.; Haven, E.

    2017-07-01

    This paper focuses on estimating real and quantum potentials from financial commodities. The log returns of six common commodities are considered. We find that some phenomena, such as the vertical potential walls and the time scale issue of the variation on returns, also exists in commodity markets. By comparing the quantum and classical potentials, we attempt to demonstrate that the information within these two types of potentials is different. We believe this empirical result is consistent with the theoretical assumption that quantum potentials (when embedded into social science contexts) may contain some social cognitive or market psychological information, while classical potentials mainly reflect `hard' market conditions. We also compare the two potential forces and explore their relationship by simply estimating the Pearson correlation between them. The Medium or weak interaction effect may indicate that the cognitive system among traders may be affected by those `hard' market conditions.

  4. Byggmeister Test Home: Analysis and Initial Results of Cold Climate Wood-Framed Home Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C.

    2013-01-01

    BSC seeks to further the energy efficiency market for New England area retrofit projects by supporting projects that are based on solid building science fundamentals and verified implementation. With the high exposure of energy efficiency and retrofit terminology being used in the general media at this time, it is important to have evidence that measures being proposed will in fact benefit the homeowner through a combination of energy savings, improved durability, and occupant comfort. There are several basic areas of research to which the technical report for these test homes can be expected to contribute. These include the combination of measures that is feasible, affordable and acceptable to homeowners as well as expectations versus results. Two Byggmeister multi-family test homes in Massachusetts are examined with the goal of providing case studies that could be applied to other similar New England homes.

  5. Byggmeister Test Home: Analysis and Initial Results of Cold Climate Wood-Framed Home Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C.

    2013-01-01

    BSC seeks to further the energy efficiency market for New England area retrofit projects by supporting projects that are based on solid building science fundamentals and verified implementation. With the high exposure of energy efficiency and retrofit terminology being used in the general media at this time, it is important to have evidence that measures being proposed will in fact benefit the homeowner through a combination of energy savings, improved durability, and occupant comfort. There are several basic areas of research to which the technical report for these test homes can be expected to contribute. These include the combination of measures that is feasible, affordable and acceptable to homeowners as well as expectations versus results. Two Byggmeister multi-family test homes in Massachusetts are examined with the goal of providing case studies that could be applied to other similar New England homes.

  6. [Initial results of transurethral enucleation with bipolar system for benign prostate hypertrophy patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Fukui, Koji; Togo, Yoshikazu; Kokura, Koji

    2010-07-01

    We have performed transurethral enucleation with bipolar system (TUEB) on 60 patients since April 2008. The patients were 61 to 81 years old (average 71.7 years old), and estimated prostate volumes were 25 cm3 to 80.43 cm3 (average 51.1 cm3). The weight of prostate removed was 8 g to 56 g (average 27.4 g) during the operations which lasted between 40 min to 200 min (average 117.5 min). The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life index (QOL) maximum flow rate (Q max) and average flow rate (Qave) were recorded before operation, and at 1 and at 3 months after operation. The results indicated a high safety with TUEB compared to TUR-P even for beginners. In conclusion, TUEB may become the most common approach in the treatment of BPH.

  7. Initial results of the National Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskus, Tomas; Strupas, Kestutis; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Bitinaitė, Dominyka; Kavaliauskas, Augustas; Samalavicius, Narimantas E; Saladzinskas, Zilvinas

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to review the National Colorectal Cancer Screening Program (the Program) in Lithuania according to the criteria set by the European Union. In Lithuania, screening services are provided free of charge to the population. The National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) reimburses the institutions for performing each service; each procedure within the Program has its own administrative code. All the information about the performance of the Program is collected in one institution - the NHIF. The results of the Program were retrieved from the database of NHIF from the start of the Program from 1 July 2009 to 1 July 2012. Descriptive analysis of epidemiological indicators was carried out. Results were compared with the references in the guidelines of the European Union for quality assurance in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and diagnosis. Information service [which involves fecal immunochemical test (FIT)] was provided to 271,396 of 890,309 50-74-year-old residents. The screening uptake was 46.0% over 3 years. During this period, 19,455 (7.2%) FITs were positive and 251,941 (92.8%) FITs were negative. Referral for colonoscopy was performed in 10,190 (52.4%) patients. Colonoscopy was performed in 12,864 (66.1%) patients. Colonoscopy did not indicate any pathological findings in 8613 (67.0%) patients. Biopsies were performed in 4251 (33.0%) patients. The rate of high-grade neoplasia reported by pathologists was 3.9%; the rate of cancer was 3.1% of all colonoscopies. The rate of CRC detected by the Program was 0.2%. The CRC screening program in Lithuania meets most of the requirements for standardized CRC screening programs. The invitation coverage and rate of referral for colonoscopy after positive FIT should be improved.

  8. Imaging of patients with hippocampal sclerosis at 7 Tesla: initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyer, Tobias; Wanke, Isabel; Maderwald, Stefan; Woermann, Friedrich G; Kraff, Oliver; Theysohn, Jens M; Ebner, Alois; Forsting, Michael; Ladd, Mark E; Schlamann, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Focal epilepsies potentially can be cured by neurosurgery; other treatment options usually remain symptomatic. High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the central imaging strategy in the evaluation of focal epilepsy. The most common substrate of temporal epilepsies is hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which cannot always be sufficiently characterized with current MR field strengths. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging at 7 Tesla in patients with focal epilepsy resulting from a HS and to improve image resolution at 7 Tesla in patients with HS. Six patients with known HS were investigated with T1-, T2-, T2(*)-, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery-weighted sequences at 7 Tesla with an eight-channel transmit-receive head coil. Total imaging time did not exceed 90 minutes per patient. High-resolution imaging at 7 Tesla is feasible and reveals high resolution of intrahippocampal structures in vivo. HS was confirmed in all patients. The maximum non-interpolated in-plane resolution reached 0.2 x 0.2 mm(2) in T2(*)-weighted images. The increased susceptibility effects at 7 Tesla revealed identification of intrahippocampal structures in more detail than at 1.5 Tesla, but otherwise led to stronger artifacts. Imaging revealed regional differences in hippocampal atrophy between patients. The scan volume was limited because of specific absorption rate restrictions, scanning time was reasonable. High-resolution imaging at 7 Tesla is promising in presurgical epilepsy imaging. "New" contrasts may further improve detection of even very small intrahippocampal structural changes. Therefore, further investigations will be necessary to demonstrate the potential benefit for presurgical selection of patients with various lesion patterns in mesial temporal epilepsies resulting from a unilateral HS. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Percutaneous mechanical mitral commissurotomy performed with a Cribier's metallic valvulotome. Initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos Maria Dias de Azeredo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the immediate results of percutaneous mechanical mitral commissurotomy. METHODS: Thirty patients underwent percutaneous mechanical mitral commissurotomy performed with a Cribier's metallic valvulotome from 8/11/99 to 2/4/00. Mean age was 30.7 years, and 73.3% were women. With regards to functional class, 63.3% were class III, and 36.7% were class IV. The echocardiographic score had a mean value of 7.5± 1.8. RESULTS: The mitral valve area increased from 0.97±0.15cm² to 2.16±0.50cm² (p>0.0001. The mean diastolic gradient decreased from 17.9±5.0mmHg to 3.2±1.4mmHg. The mean left atrial pressure decreased from 23.6±5.4mmHg to 8.6±3.1mmHg, (p>0.0001. Systolic pressure in the pulmonary artery decreased from 52.7±18.3mmHg to 32.2±7.4mmHg. Twenty-nine cases were successful. One patient developed severe mitral regurgitation. Interatrial septal defect was observed and one patient. One patient had cardiac tamponade due to left ventricular perforation. No deaths occurred. CONCLUSION: This method has proven to be safe and efficient in the treatment of rheumatic mitral stenosis. The potential advantage is that it can be used multiple times after sterilization, which decreases procedural costs significantly.

  10. Myocardial delayed contrast enhancement in patients with arterial hypertension: Initial results of cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Kjel [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: kjel_andersen@web.de; Hennersdorf, Marcus [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: hennersdorf@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Cohnen, Mathias [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: cohnen@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Blondin, Dirk [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Moedder, Ulrich [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: moedder@uni-duesseldorf.de; Poll, Ludger W. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: poll@gmx.de

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: In arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy comprises myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and structural alterations of the coronary microcirculation. MRI enables the detection of myocardial fibrosis, infarction and scar tissue by delayed enhancement (DE) after contrast media application. Aim of this study was to investigate patients with arterial hypertension but without known coronary disease or previous myocardial infarction to detect areas of DE. Methods and material: Twenty patients with arterial hypertension with clinical symptoms of myocardial ischemia, but without history of myocardial infarction and normal coronary arteries during coronary angiography were investigated on a 1.0 T superconducting magnet (Gyroscan T10-NT, Intera Release 8.0, Philips). Fast gradient-echo cine sequences and T2-weighted STIR-sequences were acquired. Fifteen minutes after injection of Gadobenate dimeglumine inversion recovery gradient-echo sequences were performed for detection of myocardial DE. Presence or absence of DE on MRI was correlated with clinical data and the results of echocardiography and electrocardiography, respectively. Results: Nine of 20 patients showed DE in the interventricular septum and the anteroseptal left ventricular wall. In 6 patients, DE was localized intramurally and in 3 patients subendocardially. There was a significant correlation between myocardial DE and ST-segment depressions during exercise and between DE and left-ventricular enddiastolic pressure. Patients with intermittent atrial fibrillation showed a myocardial DE more often than patients without atrial fibrillation. Conclusion: In our series, 45% of patients with arterial hypertension showed DE on cardiac MRI. In this clinical setting, delayed enhancement may be due to coronary microangiopathy. The more intramurally localization of DE, however, rather indicates myocardial interstitial fibrosis.

  11. The Cluster Magnetic Field Investigation: overview of in-flight performance and initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Balogh

    Full Text Available The accurate measurement of the magnetic field along the orbits of the four Cluster spacecraft is a primary objective of the mission. The magnetic field is a key constituent of the plasma in and around the magnetosphere, and it plays an active role in all physical processes that define the structure and dynamics of magnetospheric phenomena on all scales. With the four-point measurements on Cluster, it has become possible to study the three-dimensional aspects of space plasma phenomena on scales commeasurable with the size of the spacecraft constellation, and to distinguish temporal and spatial dependences of small-scale processes. We present an overview of the instrumentation used to measure the magnetic field on the four Cluster spacecraft and an overview the performance of the operational modes used in flight. We also report on the results of the preliminary in-orbit calibration of the magnetometers; these results show that all components of the magnetic field are measured with an accuracy approaching 0.1 nT. Further data analysis is expected to bring an even more accurate determination of the calibration parameters. Several examples of the capabilities of the investigation are presented from the commissioning phase of the mission, and from the different regions visited by the spacecraft to date: the tail current sheet, the dusk side magnetopause and magnetosheath, the bow shock and the cusp. We also describe the data processing flow and the implementation of data distribution to other Cluster investigations and to the scientific community in general.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (instruments and techniques – magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics – space plasma physics (shock waves

  12. Initial experience with fecal microbiota transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection: transplant protocol and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ponte

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI constitutes an important cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Recurrence after first-line treatment with antibiotics is high and fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT may be effective for refractory and recurrent CDI. This series aims to describe the efficacy of FMT in the treatment of refractory and recurrent CDI. Methods: A prospectively recorded single-centre case series of patients with persistent or recurrent CDI treated with FMT between June 2014 and March 2015 was analyzed. Primary and secondary outcomes were defined as resolution of diarrhea without recurrence of CDI within 2 months after one or more FMT, respectively. A descriptive analysis was performed. Results: 8 FMT were performed in 6 patients, 3 with refractory CDI and 3 with recurrent CDI. The median age of recipients was 71 years and 66.7% were women. One FMT was delivered through colonoscopy and the remaining 87.5% through esophagogastroduodenoscopy. One upper FMT was excluded due to recurrence of CDI after antibiotic exposure for a respiratory infection. The overall cure rate of FMT was total with lower route and 83.3% with upper route. Primary cure rate was achieved in 83.3% of patients and secondary cure rate was achieved in all patients. Median time to resolution of diarrhea after FMT was 1 day and no complications were reported during follow-up. Conclusion: FMT appears to constitute a safe and effective approach in the management of refractory and recurrent CDI. Difference between primary and secondary cure rates may result of insufficient restoration of intestinal microbiota with a single FMT.

  13. Experimental warming delays autumn senescence in a boreal spruce bog: Initial results from the SPRUCE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew; Furze, Morgan; Aubrecht, Donald; Milliman, Thomas; Nettles, Robert; Krassovski, Misha; Hanson, Paul

    2016-04-01

    August through December. These patterns can also be seen in other daily images recorded at the site since January 2012. Air warming treatments at SPRUCE began in August 2015, and had a substantial influence on autumn senescence of the plant community, as a whole, within each chamber. Generally, vegetation in the warmed chambers stayed green longer than that in the unwarmed chambers. We characterized the seasonality by fitting a sigmoid curve to the Gcc time series data, and we used the autumn half-maximum date of the sigmoid as an indicator of the timing of senescence. We found a strong linear relationship between senescence date and temperature treatment (r2 = 0.71,n = 10). Overall, senescence was delayed by 3.5 ± 0.7 days per 1° C of warming. Thus, although photoperiod is widely believed to be the key trigger for autumn senescence, our results do not indicate that the autumn response to warming is in any way constrained by day length. The SPRUCE experiment is planned to running through 2025. Looking forward, we anticipate that different results may be obtained in year 2 of the SPRUCE experiment if warming treatments result in earlier spring onset, and increased evapotranspiration during spring and early summer, leading to drought conditions by late summer.

  14. Understanding Extension Within a Convergent Orogen: Initial Results From the Carpathian Basins Seismic Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, G. W.; Houseman, G.; Dando, B.; Hegedus, E.; Brueckl, E.; Radovanovic, S.; Falus, G.; Kovacs, A.; Hausmann, H.; Brisbourne, A.

    2007-12-01

    The Carpathian Basins Project (CBP) aims to understand the origin of Miocene-age extensional basins, of which the Pannonian Basin is the largest, within the arc of the Alpine-Carpathian Mountain Ranges - a compressional structure. Analysis of the subsidence history of the Pannonian Basin shows that its mantle lithosphere has undergone a much greater degree of extension than the overlying crust. We describe the results of a temporary seismic deployment to test competing theories of how the continental lithosphere evolved in the region. We deployed a 46-element seismic network, 450 km x 80 km, oriented in a NW-SE direction, crossing the Vienna and western Pannonian Basins in Austria, Hungary and Serbia. The network ran for 14 months from early May 2006. The stations were broadband to 30s and spaced at ~30 km along 3 parallel lines, which are 40 km apart. The principal object of this network is to use P and S-wave teleseismic tomography to image the upper mantle. P- wave residuals from sources perpendicular to the tectonic grain show a ~1s variation across the Mid-Hungarian High in to the Pannonian Basin. This delay cannot be explained by sedimentary or crustal thickness variations, which are well-controlled by boreholes, deep seismic soundings and our own receiver function analyses. We must infer significant lithospheric thinning and anomalously low asthenospheric velocities underlying the Pannonian Basin to explain our observations. These travel time delays are accompanied by a dramatic change in the orientation of SKS splitting measurements from E-W to NW-SE across the Mid-Hungarian High. We have also installed a more broadly distributed regional broadband array of 10 instruments (broadband to 120 sec) for 2 years from September 2005, spaced at ~100km within Hungary, Croatia and Serbia to augment the data available from permanent broadband networks in central Europe. Preliminary interstation surface wave dispersion results from across the Pannonian Basin imply

  15. Spatial harmonic imaging of X-ray scattering--initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Han; Bennett, Eric E; Hegedus, Monica M; Carroll, Stefanie C

    2008-08-01

    Coherent X-ray scattering is related to the electron density distribution by a Fourier transform, and therefore a window into the microscopic structures of biological samples. Current techniques of scattering rely on small-angle measurements from highly collimated X-ray beams produced from synchrotron light sources. Imaging of the distribution of scattering provides a new contrast mechanism which is different from absorption radiography, but is a lengthy process of raster or line scans of the beam over the object. Here, we describe an imaging technique in the spatial frequency domain capable of acquiring both the scattering and absorption distributions in a single exposure. We present first results obtained with conventional X-ray equipment. This method interposes a grid between the X-ray source and the imaged object, so that the grid-modulated image contains a primary image and a grid harmonic image. The ratio between the harmonic and primary images is shown to be a pure scattering image. It is the auto-correlation of the electron density distribution at a specific distance. We tested a number of samples at 60-200 nm autocorrelation distance, and found the scattering images to be distinct from the absorption images and reveal new features. This technique is simple to implement, and should help broaden the imaging applications of X-ray scattering.

  16. Initial Test Results from a Multicusp Source for TRIUMF's Radioactive Beam Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Thomas; Yuan, Dick; Jayamanna, Keerthi; McDonald, Mike; Baartman, Rick; MacKenzie, Georges; Bricault, Pierre; Dombsky, Marik; Schmor, Paul; Leung, Kow; Williams, Don; Gough, Rick

    1997-05-01

    A multicusp source for positive ion beams has been designed and constructed in collaboration with the Ion Beam Technology Department of LBNL for the TRIUMF ISAC project. This type of source has demonstrated a high yield of singly charged ions, a low energy spread and a good emittance and is compact and simple. Several stages of tests and measurements using non-radioactive beams to characterize the source performance are being carried out prior to the final phase of radioactive target-source tests. Source properties such as the ion species population, beam intensity, gas efficiency and the ionization of a substance of diminutive quantity mixed with a carrier gas, were tested at the LBNL site. At present, these tests are being repeated at TRIUMF. A cross check on the source-extraction system gas efficiency in comparison with IGUN calculations is in progress. Emittance and beam energy spread measurements will be made both at LBNL and TRIUMF. Results of these tests will be reported and certain problems encountered during the tests will be discussed.

  17. The Mediterranean Moored Multi-sensor Array (M3A: system development and initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nittis

    Full Text Available Operational forecasting of ocean circulation and marine ecosystem fluctuations requires multi-parametric real-time measurements of physical and biochemical properties. The architecture of a system that is able to provide such measurements from the upper-thermocline layers of the Mediterranean Sea is described here. The system was developed for the needs of the Mediterranean Forecasting System and incorporates state-of-the-art sensors for optical and chemical measurements in the upper 100 m and physical measurements down to 500 m. Independent moorings that communicate via hydro-acoustic modems are hosting the sensors. The satellite data transfer and the large autonomy allow for the operation of the system in any open-ocean site. The system has been in pre-operational use in the Cretan Sea since January 2000. The results of this pilot phase indicate that multi-parametric real-time observations with the M3A system are feasible, if a consistent maintenance and re-calibration program is followed. The main limitations of the present configuration of M3A are related: (a to bio-fouling that primarily affects the turbidity and secondarily affects the other optical sensors, and (b to the limited throughput of the currently used satellite communication system.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (instruments and techniques. Oceanography: general (ocean prediction Oceanography: physical (upper ocean process

  18. Longitudinal Study of the Impacts of a Climate Change Curriculum on Undergraduate Student Learning: Initial Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin C. Burkholder

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study assesses the efficacy of a semester-long undergraduate sustainability curriculum designed from a systems approach. The three-course curriculum, which incorporated environmental science and ethics courses along with an integrative course using a community-based learning pedagogy, was intended to provide students with experience using knowledge and skills from distinct disciplines in a holistic way in order to address the complex problems of the human acceptance of and response to anthropogenic climate change. In the fall of 2013, 23 of the 24 sophomore general education students enrolled in the three courses were surveyed at the beginning and end of the semester; 17 of those same students completed the survey again in the spring of 2016, their senior year. Results, which focus on the 17 students who continued to participate through their senior year, were analyzed with quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The pre/post data from the surveys demonstrated significant improvement in climate literacy, certainty, concern and urgency over the course of the semester; the senior data indicated that those improvements were largely retained. The study also suggests that the nine-credit curriculum improved transferable skills such as interdisciplinary thinking, self-confidence and public speaking. A qualitative analysis of three student cases, informed by a focus group (n = 7 of seniors along with other sources of information, suggested retention of such transferable skills, and, in some cases, deeper involvement in climate and sustainability action.

  19. Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for assessment of renal allograft dysfunction - initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, M.; Rodt, T.; Wacker, F.; Galanski, M.; Hartung, D. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School - Germany, Hannover (Germany); Gwinner, W. [Clinic for Nephrology, Hannover Medical School - Germany, Hannover (Germany); Lehner, F. [Clinic for General, Abdominal and Transplant Surgery, Hannover Medical School - Germany, Hannover (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    To evaluate MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as non-invasive diagnostic tool for detection of acute and chronic allograft dysfunction and changes of organ microstructure. 15 kidney transplanted patients with allograft dysfunction and 14 healthy volunteers were examined using a fat-saturated echo-planar DTI-sequence at 1.5 T (6 diffusion directions, b = 0, 600 s/mm{sup 2}). Mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and mean fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated separately for the cortex and for the medulla and compared between healthy and transplanted kidneys. Furthermore, the correlation between diffusion parameters and estimated GFR was determined. The ADC in the cortex and in the medulla were lower in transplanted than in healthy kidneys (p < 0.01). Differences were more distinct for FA, especially in the renal medulla, with a significant reduction in allografts (p < 0.001). Furthermore, in transplanted patients a correlation between mean FA in the medulla and estimated GFR was observed (r = 0.72, p < 0.01). Tractography visualized changes in renal microstructure in patients with impaired allograft function. Changes in allograft function and microstructure can be detected and quantified using DTI. However, to prove the value of DTI for standard clinical application especially correlation of imaging findings and biopsy results is necessary. (orig.)

  20. Collagen Microstructure in the Vocal Ligament: Initial Results on the Potential Effects of Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Jordan E.; Siegmund, Thomas; Chan, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This investigation quantitatively characterizes the collagenous microstructure of human vocal ligament specimens excised postmortem from non-smokers and smokers. Study Design Retrospective Cohort Study Methods Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging was performed at three anatomical locations of vocal ligament specimens: anterior, mid-membranous, and posterior regions. Two microstructural parameters were extracted from the SHG images: (1) normalized fiber density, and (2) fiber dispersion coefficient, quantifying the degree of collagen fiber dispersion about a preferred direction. Results For both the non-smoker and smoker subjects, the fiber dispersion coefficient was heterogeneous. Differences in the collagenous structure of non-smokers and smoker subjects were pronounced at the mid-membranous location. However, the directionality of the heterogeneity in the smoker subjects was opposite to that in the non-smoker subjects. Specifically, the fiber dispersion coefficient in the non-smoker subjects was lower in the midmembranous region (indicating more fiber alignment) than at the anterior/posterior regions, but for the smoker subjects the fiber dispersion coefficient was higher at the mid-membranous region. The normalized fiber density was near constant in the non-smoker subjects, but the smoker subjects had fewer fibers in the mid-membranous region than at the anterior/posterior regions. Conclusion Spatial microstructural variations may exist in the vocal fold ligament both in non-smokers and smokers. Smoking appears to influence the degree and direction of microstructure heterogeneity in the vocal fold ligament. PMID:24473992

  1. Initial results of a silicon sensor irradiation study for ILC extreme forward calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, Reyer; Fadeyev, Vitaliy [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and the University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Field, R. Clive [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Key, Spencer; Kim, Tae Sung [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and the University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Markiewicz, Thomas [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Martinez-McKinney, Forest [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and the University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Maruyama, Takashi [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Mistry, Khilesh; Nidumolu, Ravi [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and the University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Schumm, Bruce A., E-mail: baschumm@ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and the University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Spencer, Edwin; Timlin, Conor; Wilder, Max [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and the University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-11-21

    Detectors proposed for the International Linear Collider (ILC) incorporate a tungsten sampling calorimeter (‘BeamCal’) intended to reconstruct showers of electrons, positrons and photons that emerge from the interaction point of the collider with angles between 5 and 50 milliradians. For the innermost radius of this calorimeter, radiation doses at shower-max are expected to reach 100 MRad per year, primarily due to minimum-ionizing electrons and positrons that arise in the induced electromagnetic showers of e+e− ‘beamstrahlung’ pairs produced in the ILC beam–beam interaction. However, radiation damage to calorimeter sensors may be dominated by hadrons induced by nuclear interactions of shower photons, which are much more likely to contribute to the non-ionizing energy loss that has been observed to damage sensors exposed to hadronic radiation. We report here on the results of SLAC Experiment T-506, for which several different types of silicon diode sensors were exposed to doses of radiation induced by showering electrons of energy 3.5–10.6 GeV. By embedding the sensor under irradiation within a tungsten radiator, the exposure incorporated hadronic species that would potentially contribute to the degradation of a sensor mounted in a precision sampling calorimeter. Depending on sensor technology, efficient charge collection was observed for doses as large as 220 MRad.

  2. ROLE OF ACULASER THERAPY IN CEREBRAL PALSY CHILDERN(INITIAL DATA & RESULTS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahzad Anwar; Malik Mohammad Nadeem Khan; Imtiaz Ahmed; Abid Hareef Awan

    2004-01-01

    A single, open and non-comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah's First C.P. & Paralysis Clinic and Research Center to evaluate the effects of Aculaser (acupoint-laser) Therapy for children suffering from cerebral palsy (CP) of various types. These children were further classified according to their major complaints. Analysis of the data indicated that 11 children with severe spasticity and stiffness all showed marked improvement (100% success rate); of the 8 children with epileptic fits, 6 patients had a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of epileptic fits, while the rest 2 cases showed no any improvement or aggravation (75% success rate); out of 5 children with cortical blindness, 2 cases showed complete recovery of vision and 3 had marked improvement (40% cure rate); out of 4 children with hearing difficulties, 2 showed marked improvement (50% success rate); out of 14 children with aphasis, 8 showed improvement (57% improvement rate). Results of this study show that Aculaser Therapy has a high improvement rate of CP children, not only improving the spasticity and stiffness but also the cortical blindness, epilepsy, deafness and speech.

  3. Cataloging of the Digitized POSS-II, and Some Initial Scientific Results From It

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Gal, R R; Pahre, M A; Scaramella, R; Longo, G

    1996-01-01

    We are conducting an effort to catalog all sources detected in the digitized POSS-II (DPOSS). This is now becoming an international collaboration including Caltech and the Observatories of Rome and Naples (project CRONA). There are also ongoing extensive CCD calibration efforts at Palomar. The resulting Palomar-Norris Sky Catalog (PNSC) is expected to contain > 5 x 10^7 galaxies, and > 2 x 10^9 stars, in 3 colors (photographic JFN bands, calibrated to CCD gri system), down to the limiting magnitude equivalent of B approx 22 mag. The star-galaxy classification is accurate to 90 - 95% down to the equivalent of B approx 21 mag. The catalog will be made available to the community via computer networks or other suitable media, probably in installments, as soon as scientific validation and quality checks are completed and the funding allows it. Analysis and manipulation software will also be freely available. A great variety of scientific projects will be possible with this vast new data base, including studies of ...

  4. Treatment Result in the Initial Stage of Kanazawa Mobile Embolectomy Team for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    UCHIYAMA, Naoyuki; MISAKI, Kouichi; MOHRI, Masanao; KAMIDE, Tomoya; HIROTA, Yuichi; HIGASHI, Ryo; MINAMIDE, Hisato; KOHDA, Yukihiko; ASAHI, Takashi; SHOIN, Katsuo; IWATO, Masayuki; KITA, Daisuke; HAMADA, Yoshitaka; YOSHIDA, Yuya; NAKADA, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Five recent multicenter randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have clearly shown the superiority of mechanical thrombectomy in large vessel occlusion acute ischemic stroke compared to systemic thrombolysis. Although 14 hospitals in Ishikawa prefecture have uninterrupted availability of systemic thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy is not available at all of these hospitals. Therefore, we established a Kanazawa mobile embolectomy team (KMET), which could travel to these hospitals and perform the acute reperfusion therapy. In this article, we report early treatment outcomes and validate the effectiveness of a network between affiliated hospitals and KMET. Between January 2014 and December 2015, 48 patients, aged 45–92 years (mean: 73.0 years), underwent acute reperfusion therapy provided by KMET in 10 affiliated hospitals of Kanazawa University Hospital. The pre-treatment NIHSS scores ranged from 5 to 39 (mean: 19.1). ASPECTS+W ranged from 1 to 11 (mean: 7.3). Successful revascularization, defined as thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) 2b or 3, was achieved in 38/48 cases (80%), and a good outcome, defined as modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score from 0 to 2 at 90 days after the treatment, was achieved in 24/48 cases (50%). There were two cases of intracranial bleeding (4%). Mean time from onset to recanalization was 297 min. These results, which are similar to those of five previous RCTs, suggest that a collaborative network between affiliated hospitals and KMET is effective for acute reperfusion therapy in local areas wherein experienced neuroendovascular specialists are insufficient. PMID:27725522

  5. Initial HI results from the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, David W.; Davis, Cory; Johnson, Cory; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Jones, Michael G.; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey is a targeted HI survey of galaxies that began its second observing season in October 2016. The survey is conducted by members of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT) and extensively involves undergraduates in observations, data reduction, and analysis. It aims to complement the HI sources identified by the ALFALFA extragalactic HI line survey by probing deeper in HI mass (to lower masses) than the legacy survey itself. Measurements of the HI line velocity widths will be combined with uniform processing of images obtained in the SDSS and GALEX public databases to localize the sample within the baryonic Tully Fisher relation, allowing estimates of their redshift-independent distances and thus their peculiar velocities.The survey is designed to constrain Pisces-Perseus Supercluster infall models by producing 5-σ detections of infall velocities to a precision of about 500 km/s. By targeting galaxies based on SDSS and GALEX photometry, we have achieved detection rates of 68% of the galaxies in our sample. We will discuss the target selection process, HI velocities and mass estimates from the 2015 fall observing season, preliminary results from 2016 observations, and preliminary comparisons with inflow models predicted by numerical simulations.This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-1211005, AST-1637339, AST-1637262.

  6. Quantification of renal allograft perfusion using arterial spin labeling MRI: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Bilk, Philip; Kroepil, Patric; Blondin, Dirk [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Martirosian, Petros; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital Tuebingen, Section for Experimental Radiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Zgoura, Panagiota; Voiculescu, Adina [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Nephrology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    To quantify renal allograft perfusion in recipients with stable allograft function and acute decrease in allograft function using nonenhanced flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR)-TrueFISP arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging. Following approval of the local ethics committee, 20 renal allograft recipients were included in this study. ASL perfusion measurement and an anatomical T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo (HASTE) sequence were performed on a 1.5-T scanner (Magnetom Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). T2-weighted MR urography was performed in patients with suspected ureteral obstruction. Patients were assigned to three groups: group a, 6 patients with stable allograft function over the previous 4 months; group b, 7 patients with good allograft function who underwent transplantation during the previous 3 weeks; group c, 7 allograft recipients with an acute deterioration of renal function. Mean cortical perfusion values were 304.8 {+-} 34.4, 296.5 {+-} 44.1, and 181.9 {+-} 53.4 mg/100 ml/min for groups a, b and c, respectively. Reduction in cortical perfusion in group c was statistically significant. Our results indicate that ASL is a promising technique for nonenhanced quantification of cortical perfusion of renal allografts. Further studies are required to determine the clinical value of ASL for monitoring renal allograft recipients. (orig.)

  7. The 21-SPONGE HI Absorption Survey I: Techniques and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, Claire E; Goss, W M; Dickey, John M; Heiles, Carl; Lindner, Robert R; Babler, Brian; Pingel, Nickolas M; Lawrence, Allen; Jencson, Jacob; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We present methods and results from "21-cm Spectral Line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA" (21-SPONGE), a large survey for Galactic neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With the upgraded capabilities of the VLA, we reach median root-mean-square (RMS) noise in optical depth of $\\sigma_{\\tau}=9\\times 10^{-4}$ per $0.42\\rm\\,km\\,s^{-1}$ channel for the 31 sources presented here. Upon completion, 21-SPONGE will be the largest HI absorption survey with this high sensitivity. We discuss the observations and data reduction strategies, as well as line fitting techniques. We prove that the VLA bandpass is stable enough to detect broad, shallow lines associated with warm HI, and show that bandpass observations can be combined in time to reduce spectral noise. In combination with matching HI emission profiles from the Arecibo Observatory ($\\sim3.5'$ angular resolution), we estimate excitation (or spin) temperatures ($\\rm T_s$) and column densities for Gaussian componen...

  8. Initial Results from SQUID Sensor: Analysis and Modeling for the ELF/VLF Atmospheric Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Hao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the amplitude probability density (APD of the wideband extremely low frequency (ELF and very low frequency (VLF atmospheric noise is studied. The electromagnetic signals from the atmosphere, referred to herein as atmospheric noise, was recorded by a mobile low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID receiver under magnetically unshielded conditions. In order to eliminate the adverse effect brought by the geomagnetic activities and powerline, the measured field data was preprocessed to suppress the baseline wandering and harmonics by symmetric wavelet transform and least square methods firstly. Then statistical analysis was performed for the atmospheric noise on different time and frequency scales. Finally, the wideband ELF/VLF atmospheric noise was analyzed and modeled separately. Experimental results show that, Gaussian model is appropriate to depict preprocessed ELF atmospheric noise by a hole puncher operator. While for VLF atmospheric noise, symmetric α-stable (SαS distribution is more accurate to fit the heavy-tail of the envelope probability density function (pdf.

  9. [The department budget, in the context of the hospital global budget. Initial results in general medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, F

    1984-02-23

    In a general hospital (Hôtel-Dieu, in the center of Paris), run with a global budget, budgets determined for each unit were introduced as an experiment in 1980. Physicians were in charge of certain expenses, mainly: linen, drugs, transportation of patients to and from other hospitals within Paris, and blood fractions. The whole does not exceed 4% of the turnover (FF 20 millions in 1980) of a 67 bed internal medicine unit. Other accounts deal with the stays, admissions, prescriptions of technical acts, laboratory analyses, and X-rays. In 1980, expenses were 11% more than budgeted, but the increase in stays and particularly in admissions was significantly greater. The resulting savings were 8.8% and 18.7% for stays and admissions respectively. Psychic reactions were variable. The subsequent budgets followed the fluctuations of recorded expenses, which were fairly important in both directions. The unit budget may be an advance or a regression, in a restrictive and past-perpetuating context. The coherence between the unit budget and the global hospital budget is questionable. Physicians were willing to take part in accounting and saving. They have good reason for not enlarging their financial responsibilities. Conversely, they may give more attention to diseases of public opinion.

  10. Initial results of a silicon sensor irradiation study for ILC extreme forward calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Reyer; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Field, R. Clive; Key, Spencer; Kim, Tae Sung; Markiewicz, Thomas; Martinez-McKinney, Forest; Maruyama, Takashi; Mistry, Khilesh; Nidumolu, Ravi; Schumm, Bruce A.; Spencer, Edwin; Timlin, Conor; Wilder, Max

    2014-11-01

    Detectors proposed for the International Linear Collider (ILC) incorporate a tungsten sampling calorimeter ('BeamCal') intended to reconstruct showers of electrons, positrons and photons that emerge from the interaction point of the collider with angles between 5 and 50 milliradians. For the innermost radius of this calorimeter, radiation doses at shower-max are expected to reach 100 MRad per year, primarily due to minimum-ionizing electrons and positrons that arise in the induced electromagnetic showers of e+e- 'beamstrahlung' pairs produced in the ILC beam-beam interaction. However, radiation damage to calorimeter sensors may be dominated by hadrons induced by nuclear interactions of shower photons, which are much more likely to contribute to the non-ionizing energy loss that has been observed to damage sensors exposed to hadronic radiation. We report here on the results of SLAC Experiment T-506, for which several different types of silicon diode sensors were exposed to doses of radiation induced by showering electrons of energy 3.5-10.6 GeV. By embedding the sensor under irradiation within a tungsten radiator, the exposure incorporated hadronic species that would potentially contribute to the degradation of a sensor mounted in a precision sampling calorimeter. Depending on sensor technology, efficient charge collection was observed for doses as large as 220 MRad.

  11. Initial Results of a Silicon Sensor Irradiation Study for ILC Extreme Forward Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Band, R; Field, R C; Key, S; Kim, T; Markiewicz, T; Martinez-McKinney, F; Maruyama, T; Mistry, K; Nidumolu, R; Schumm, B A; Spencer, E; Timlin, C; Wilder, M

    2014-01-01

    Detectors proposed for the International Linear Collider (ILC) incorporate a tungsten sampling calorimeter (`BeamCal') intended to reconstruct showers of electrons, positrons and photons that emerge from the interaction point of the collider with angles between 5 and 50 milliradians. For the innermost radius of this calorimeter, radiation doses at shower-max are expected to reach 100 MRad per year, primarily due to minimum-ionizing electrons and positrons that arise in the induced electromagnetic showers of e+e- `beamstrahlung' pairs produced in the ILC beam-beam interaction. However, radiation damage to calorimeter sensors may be dominated by hadrons induced by nuclear interactions of shower photons, which are much more likely to contribute to the non-ionizing energy loss that has been observed to damage sensors exposed to hadronic radiation. We report here on the results of SLAC Experiment T-506, for which several different types of silicon diode sensors were exposed to doses of radiation induced by showeri...

  12. Iterative reconstruction techniques for computed tomography part 2: initial results in dose reduction and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Leiner, Tim; Jong, Pim A. de; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Heer, Linda M. de [Cardiothoracic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gelre Hospital, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    To present the results of a systematic literature search aimed at determining to what extent the radiation dose can be reduced with iterative reconstruction (IR) for cardiopulmonary and body imaging with computed tomography (CT) in the clinical setting and what the effects on image quality are with IR versus filtered back-projection (FBP) and to provide recommendations for future research on IR. We searched Medline and Embase from January 2006 to January 2012 and included original research papers concerning IR for CT. The systematic search yielded 380 articles. Forty-nine relevant studies were included. These studies concerned: the chest(n = 26), abdomen(n = 16), both chest and abdomen(n = 1), head(n = 4), spine(n = 1), and no specific area (n = 1). IR reduced noise and artefacts, and it improved subjective and objective image quality compared to FBP at the same dose. Conversely, low-dose IR and normal-dose FBP showed similar noise, artefacts, and subjective and objective image quality. Reported dose reductions ranged from 23 to 76 % compared to locally used default FBP settings. However, IR has not yet been investigated for ultra-low-dose acquisitions with clinical diagnosis and accuracy as endpoints. Benefits of IR include improved subjective and objective image quality as well as radiation dose reduction while preserving image quality. Future studies need to address the value of IR in ultra-low-dose CT with clinically relevant endpoints. (orig.)

  13. Resonant Frequency Control For the PIP-II Injector Test RFQ: Control Framework and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, A. L. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Bowring, D.; Chase, B. E.; Edelen, J. P.; Nicklaus, D.; Steimel, J.

    2016-12-16

    For the PIP-II Injector Test (PI-Test) at Fermilab, a four-vane radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is designed to accelerate a 30-keV, 1-mA to 10-mA, H- beam to 2.1 MeV under both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) RF operation. The available headroom of the RF amplifiers limits the maximum allowable detuning to 3 kHz, and the detuning is controlled entirely via thermal regulation. Fine control over the detuning, minimal manual intervention, and fast trip recovery is desired. In addition, having active control over both the walls and vanes provides a wider tuning range. For this, we intend to use model predictive control (MPC). To facilitate these objectives, we developed a dedicated control framework that handles higher-level system decisions as well as executes control calculations. It is written in Python in a modular fashion for easy adjustments, readability, and portability. Here we describe the framework and present the first control results for the PI-Test RFQ under pulsed and CW operation.

  14. A web application for moderation training: initial results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Reid K; Delaney, Harold D; Campbell, William; Handmaker, Nancy

    2009-10-01

    Eighty-four heavy drinkers who responded to a newspaper recruitment advertisement were randomly assigned to receive either (a) training in a Moderate Drinking protocol via an Internet-based program (www.moderatedrinking.com) and use of the online resources of Moderation Management (MM; www.moderation.org) or (b) use of the online resources of MM alone. Follow-ups are being conducted at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results of the recently completed 3-month follow-up (86% follow-up) indicated both groups significantly reduced their drinking based on these variables: standard drinks per week, percent days abstinent, and mean estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) per drinking day. Both groups also significantly reduced their alcohol-related problems. Relative to the control group, the experimental group had better outcomes on percent days abstinent and log drinks per drinking day. These short-term outcome data provide evidence for the effectiveness of both the Moderate Drinking Web application and of the resources available online at MM in helping heavy drinkers reduce their drinking and alcohol-related problems.

  15. Four-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Axial Body Area as Respiratory Surrogate: Initial Patient Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Juan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Cai, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Wang, Hongjun [School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Bashir, Mustafa R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang, E-mail: fangfang.yin@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a retrospective binning technique for 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using body area (BA) as a respiratory surrogate. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (4 of 7) or liver metastases (3 of 7) were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. All patients were simulated with both computed tomography (CT) and MRI to acquire 3-dimensinal and 4D images for treatment planning. Multiple-slice multiple-phase cine-MR images were acquired in the axial plane for 4D-MRI reconstruction. Image acquisition time per slice was set to 10-15 seconds. Single-slice 2-dimensinal cine-MR images were also acquired across the center of the tumor in orthogonal planes. Tumor motion trajectories from 4D-MRI, cine-MRI, and 4D-CT were analyzed in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and medial–lateral (ML) directions, respectively. Their correlation coefficients (CC) and differences in tumor motion amplitude were determined. Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was measured and compared between 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and conventional T2-weighted fast spin echo MRI. Results: The means (±standard deviations) of CC comparing 4D-MRI with cine-MRI were 0.97 ± 0.03, 0.97 ± 0.02, and 0.99 ± 0.04 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.61 ± 0.17 mm, 0.32 ± 0.17 mm, and 0.14 ± 0.06 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The means of CC comparing 4D-MRI and 4D-CT were 0.95 ± 0.02, 0.94 ± 0.02, and 0.96 ± 0.02 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.74 ± 0.02 mm, 0.33 ± 0.13 mm, and 0.18 ± 0.07 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean tumor-to-tissue CNRs were 2.94 ± 1.51, 19.44 ± 14.63, and 39.47 ± 20.81 in 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and T2-weighted MRI, respectively. Conclusions: The preliminary evaluation of our 4D-MRI technique results in oncologic patients demonstrates its

  16. Assessment of pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with FAIR in comparison with DCE-MRI-Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Li [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, No. 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)], E-mail: fanli0930@163.com; Liu Shiyuan [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, No. 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Sun Fei [GE Healthcare China (China)], E-mail: Fei.sun@med.ge.com; Xiao Xiangsheng [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, No. 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)], E-mail: lizhaobin79@163.com

    2009-04-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) in comparison with 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging in healthy volunteers and in patients with pulmonary embolism or lung cancer. Materials and methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers and 16 patients with pulmonary embolism (5 cases) or lung cancer (11 cases) were included in this study. Firstly, the optimized inversion time of FAIR (TI) was determined in 12 healthy volunteers. Then, FAIR imaging with the optimized TI was performed followed by DCE-MRI on the other 4 healthy volunteers and 16 patients. Tagging efficiency of lung and SNR of perfusion images were calculated with different TI values. In the comparison of FAIR with DCE-MRI, the homogeneity of FAIR and DCE-MRI perfusion was assessed. In the cases of perfusion abnormality, the contrast between normal lung and perfusion defects was quantified by calculating a normalized signal intensity ratio. Results: One thousand milliseconds was the optimal TI, which generated the highest lung tagging efficiency and second highest PBF SNR. In the volunteers, the signal intensity of perfusion images acquired with both FAIR and DCE-MRI was homogeneous. Wedged-shaped or triangle perfusion defects were visualized in five pulmonary embolisms and three lung cancer cases. There was no significant statistical difference in signal intensity ratio between FAIR and DCE-MRI (P > 0.05). In the rest of eight lung cancers, all the lesions showed low perfusion against the higher perfused pulmonary parenchyma in both FAIR and DCE-MRI. Conclusion: Pulmonary parenchyma perfusion imaging with FAIR was feasible, consistent and could obtain similar functional information to that from DCE-MRI.

  17. CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, T.P. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Gulati, M.S. [Department of Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Makharia, G.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)]. E-mail: govindmakharia@aiims.ac.in; Bandhu, S. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Garg, P.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2007-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Materials and methods: In a prospective study, CT enteroclysis was performed in 21 patients (median age 50 years; range 13-71 years) with obscure GI bleeding in which the source of the bleeding could not be detected despite the patient having undergone both upper GI endoscopic and colonoscopic examinations. The entire abdomen and pelvis was examined in the arterial and venous phases using multisection CT after distending the small intestine with 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose as a neutral enteral contrast medium and the administration of 150 ml intravenous contrast medium. Results: Adequate distension of the small intestine was achieved in 20 of the 21 (95.2%) patients. Potential causes of GI bleeding were identified in 10 of the 21 (47.6%) patients using CT enteroclysis. The cause of the bleeding could be detected nine of 14 (64.3%) patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding. However, for patients with occult, obscure GI bleeding, the cause of the bleeding was identified in only one of the seven (14.3%) patients. The lesions identified by CT enteroclysis included small bowel tumours (n = 2), small bowel intussusceptions (n = 2), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 2), and vascular lesions (n = 3). All vascular lesions were seen equally well in both the arterial and venous phases. Conclusions: The success rate in detection of the cause of bleeding using CT enteroclysis was 47.6% in patients with obscure GI bleeding. The diagnostic yield was higher in patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding than in those with occult obscure GI bleeding.

  18. Impact of different study populations on reader behavior and performance metrics: initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Brandon D.; Pisano, Etta; Cole, Elodia; Myers, Kyle

    2017-03-01

    The FDA recently completed a study on design methodologies surrounding the Validation of Imaging Premarket Evaluation and Regulation called VIPER. VIPER consisted of five large reader sub-studies to compare the impact of different study populations on reader behavior as seen by sensitivity, specificity, and AUC, the area under the ROC curve (receiver operating characteristic curve). The study investigated different prevalence levels and two kinds of sampling of non-cancer patients: a screening population and a challenge population. The VIPER study compared full-field digital mammography (FFDM) to screenfilm mammography (SFM) for women with heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts. All cases and corresponding images were sampled from Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) archives. There were 20 readers (American Board Certified radiologists) for each sub-study, and instead of every reader reading every case (fully-crossed study), readers and cases were split into groups to reduce reader workload and the total number of observations (split-plot study). For data collection, readers first decided whether or not they would recall a patient. Following that decision, they provided an ROC score for how close or far that patient was from the recall decision threshold. Performance results for FFDM show that as prevalence increases to 50%, there is a moderate increase in sensitivity and decrease in specificity, whereas AUC is mainly flat. Regarding precision, the statistical efficiency (ratio of variances) of sensitivity and specificity relative to AUC are 0.66 at best and decrease with prevalence. Analyses comparing modalities and the study populations (screening vs. challenge) are still ongoing.

  19. The Vermont oxford neonatal encephalopathy registry: rationale, methods, and initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfister Robert H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, the Vermont Oxford Network (VON established the Neonatal Encephalopathy Registry (NER to characterize infants born with neonatal encephalopathy, describe evaluations and medical treatments, monitor hypothermic therapy (HT dissemination, define clinical research questions, and identify opportunities for improved care. Methods Eligible infants were ≥ 36 weeks with seizures, altered consciousness (stupor, coma during the first 72 hours of life, a 5 minute Apgar score of ≤ 3, or receiving HT. Infants with central nervous system birth defects were excluded. Results From 2006–2010, 95 centers registered 4232 infants. Of those, 59% suffered a seizure, 50% had a 5 minute Apgar score of ≤ 3, 38% received HT, and 18% had stupor/coma documented on neurologic exam. Some infants experienced more than one eligibility criterion. Only 53% had a cord gas obtained and only 63% had a blood gas obtained within 24 hours of birth, important components for determining HT eligibility. Sixty-four percent received ventilator support, 65% received anticonvulsants, 66% had a head MRI, 23% had a cranial CT, 67% had a full channel encephalogram (EEG and 33% amplitude integrated EEG. Of all infants, 87% survived. Conclusions The VON NER describes the heterogeneous population of infants with NE, the subset that received HT, their patterns of care, and outcomes. The optimal routine care of infants with neonatal encephalopathy is unknown. The registry method is well suited to identify opportunities for improvement in the care of infants affected by NE and study interventions such as HT as they are implemented in clinical practice.

  20. Impact of Different Study Populations on Reader Behavior and Performance Metrics: Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Brandon D; Pisano, Etta; Cole, Elodia; Myers, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    The FDA recently completed a study on design methodologies surrounding the Validation of Imaging Premarket Evaluation and Regulation called VIPER. VIPER consisted of five large reader sub-studies to compare the impact of different study populations on reader behavior as seen by sensitivity, specificity, and AUC, the area under the ROC curve (receiver operating characteristic curve). The study investigated different prevalence levels and two kinds of sampling of non-cancer patients: a screening population and a challenge population. The VIPER study compared full-field digital mammography (FFDM) to screen-film mammography (SFM) for women with heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts. All cases and corresponding images were sampled from Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) archives. There were 20 readers (American Board Certified radiologists) for each sub-study, and instead of every reader reading every case (fully-crossed study), readers and cases were split into groups to reduce reader workload and the total number of observations (split-plot study). For data collection, readers first decided whether or not they would recall a patient. Following that decision, they provided an ROC score for how close or far that patient was from the recall decision threshold. Performance results for FFDM show that as prevalence increases to 50%, there is a moderate increase in sensitivity and decrease in specificity, whereas AUC is mainly flat. Regarding precision, the statistical efficiency (ratio of variances) of sensitivity and specificity relative to AUC are 0.66 at best and decrease with prevalence. Analyses comparing modalities and the study populations (screening vs. challenge) are still ongoing.

  1. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRI of lung perfusion in children with cystic fibrosis - initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, Monika; Puderbach, Michael; Zuna, Ivan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Fink, Christian [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der LMU Grosshadern, Department of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Gahr, Julie; Mueller, Frank-Michael [Universitaetskinderklinik III Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Cystic Fibrosis Centre and Infectious Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Ley, Sebastian [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetskinderklinik Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Plathow, Christian [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Tuengerthal, Siegfried [Thoraxklinik am Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    This paper is a feasibility study of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lung perfusion in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) using contrast-enhanced 3D MRI. Correlation assessment of perfusion changes with structural abnormalities. Eleven CF patients (9 f, 2 m; median age 16 years) were examined at 1.5 T. Morphology: HASTE coronal, transversal (TR/TE/{alpha}/ST: 600 ms/28 ms/180 /6 mm), breath-hold 18 s. Perfusion: Time-resolved 3D GRE pulse sequence (FLASH, TE/TR/{alpha}: 0.8/1.9 ms/40 ), parallel imaging (GRAPPA, PAT 2). Twenty-five data sets were acquired after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of gadodiamide, 3-5 ml/s. A total of 198 lung segments were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus and scored for morphological and perfusion changes. Statistical analysis was performed by Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. Results showed that perfusion defects were observed in all patients and present in 80% of upper, and 39% of lower lobes. Normal lung parenchyma showed homogeneous perfusion (86%, P<0.0001). Severe morphological changes led to perfusion defects (97%, P<0.0001). Segments with moderate morphological changes showed normal (53%) or impaired perfusion (47%). In conclusion, pulmonary perfusion is easy to judge in segments with normal parenchyma or severe changes. In moderately damaged segments, MRI of lung perfusion may help to better assess actual functional impairment. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRI of lung perfusion has the potential for early vascular functional assessment and therapy control in CF patients. (orig.)

  2. Initial quality performance results using a phantom to simulate chest computed radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhogora Wilbroad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a homemade phantom for quantitative quality control in chest computed radiography (CR. The phantom was constructed from copper, aluminium, and polymenthylmethacrylate (PMMA plates as well as Styrofoam materials. Depending on combinations, the literature suggests that these materials can simulate the attenuation and scattering characteristics of lung, heart, and mediastinum. The lung, heart, and mediastinum regions were simulated by 10 mm x 10 mm x 0.5 mm, 10 mm x 10 mm x 0.5 mm and 10 mm x 10 mm x 1 mm copper plates, respectively. A test object of 100 mm x 100 mm and 0.2 mm thick copper was positioned to each region for CNR measurements. The phantom was exposed to x-rays generated by different tube potentials that covered settings in clinical use: 110-120 kVp (HVL=4.26-4.66 mm Al at a source image distance (SID of 180 cm. An approach similar to the recommended method in digital mammography was applied to determine the CNR values of phantom images produced by a Kodak CR 850A system with post-processing turned off. Subjective contrast-detail studies were also carried out by using images of Leeds TOR CDR test object acquired under similar exposure conditions as during CNR measurements. For clinical kVp conditions relevant to chest radiography, the CNR was highest over 90-100 kVp range. The CNR data correlated with the results of contrast detail observations. The values of clinical tube potentials at which CNR is the highest are regarded to be optimal kVp settings. The simplicity in phantom construction can offer easy implementation of related quality control program.

  3. Field data collection of miscellaneous electrical loads in Northern California: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.; Pratt, Stacy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.; Willem, Henry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.; Claybaugh, Erin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.; Desroches, Louis-Benoit [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.; Beraki, Bereket [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.; Nagaraju, Mythri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.; Price, Sarah K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.; Young, Scott J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.

    2013-02-25

    This report describes efforts to measure energy use of miscellaneous electrical loads (MELs) in 880 San Francisco Bay Area homes during the summer of 2012. Ten regions were selected for metering: Antioch, Berkeley, Fremont, Livermore, Marin County (San Rafael, Novato, Fairfax, and Mill Valley), Oakland/Emeryville, Pleasanton, Richmond, San Leandro, and Union City. The project focused on three major categories of devices: entertainment (game consoles, set-top boxes, televisions and video players), home office (computers, monitors and network equipment), and kitchen plug-loads (coffee/espresso makers, microwave ovens/toaster ovens/toasters, rice/slow cookers and wine chillers). These categories were important to meter because they either dominated the estimated overall energy use of MELs, are rapidly changing, or there are very little energy consumption data published. A total of 1,176 energy meters and 143 other sensors were deployed, and 90% of these meters and sensors were retrieved. After data cleaning, we obtained 711 valid device energy use measurements, which were used to estimate, for a number of device subcategories, the average time spent in high power, low power and “off” modes, the average energy use in each mode, and the average overall energy use. Consistent with observations made in previous studies, we find on average that information technology (IT) devices (home entertainment and home office equipment) consume more energy (15.0 and 13.0 W, respectively) than non-IT devices (kitchen plug-loads; 4.9 W). Opportunities for energy savings were identified in almost every device category, based on the time spent in various modes and/or the power levels consumed in those modes. Future reports will analyze the collected data in detail by device category and compare results to those obtained from prior studies.

  4. Endoscopic endonasal skull base approach for parasellar lesions: Initial experiences, results, efficacy, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigetoshi Yano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endoscopic surgery is suitable for the transsphenoidal approach; it is minimally invasive and provides a well-lit operative field. The endoscopic skull base approach through the large opening of the sphenoid sinus through both nostrils has extended the surgical indication for various skull base lesions. In this study, we describe the efficacy and complications associated with the endoscopic skull base approach for extra- or intradural parasellar lesions based on our experiences. Methods: Seventy-four cases were treated by an endoscopic skull base approach. The indications for these procedures included 55 anterior extended approaches, 10 clival approaches, and 9 cavernous approaches. The operations were performed through both the nostrils using a rigid endoscope. After tumor removal, the skull base was reconstructed by a multilayered method using a polyglactin acid (PGA sheet. Results: Gross total resection was achieved in 82% of pituitary adenomas, 68.8% of meningiomas, and 60% of craniopharyngiomas in anterior extended approach and in 83.3% of chordomas in clival approach, but only in 50% of the tumors in cavernous approach. Tumor consistency, adhesion, and/or extension were significant limitations. Visual function improvements were achieved in 37 of 41 (90.2% cases. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage (9.5%, infections (5.4%, neural injuries (4.1%, and vascular injuries (2.7% were the major complications. Conclusions: Our experiences show that the endoscopic skull base approach is a safe and effective procedure for various parasellar lesions. Selection of patients who are unlikely to develop complications seems to be an important factor for procedure efficacy and good outcome.

  5. Cardiac remodeling following percutaneous mitral valve repair. Initial results assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radunski, U.K [University Heart Center, Hamburg (Germany). Cardiology; Franzen, O. [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Cardiology; Barmeyer, A. [Klinikum Dortmund (Germany). Kardiologie; and others

    2014-10-15

    Percutaneous mitral valve repair with the MitraClip device (Abbott Vascular, Redwood City, California, USA) is a novel therapeutic option in patients with mitral regurgitation. This study evaluated the feasibility of cardiac volume measurements by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) to assess reverse myocardial remodeling in patients after MitraClip implantation. 12 patients underwent CMR at baseline (BL) before and at 6 months follow-up (FU) after MitraClip implantation. Cine-CMR was performed in short- and long-axes for the assessment of left ventricular (LV), right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) volumes. Assessment of endocardial contours was not compromised by the device-related artifact. No significant differences in observer variances were observed for LV, RV and LA volume measurements between BL and FU. LV end-diastolic (median 127 [IQR 96-150] vs. 112 [86-150] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.03) and LV end-systolic (82 [54-91] vs. 69 [48-99] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.03) volume indices decreased significantly from BL to FU. No significant differences were found for RV end-diastolic (94 [75-103] vs. 99 [77-123] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.91), RV end-systolic (48 [42-80] vs. 51 [40-81] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.48), and LA (87 [55-124] vs. 92 [48-137]R ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.20) volume indices between BL and FU. CMR enables the assessment of cardiac volumes in patients after MitraClip implantation. Our CMR findings indicate that percutaneous mitral valve repair results in reverse LV but not in RV or LA remodeling.

  6. Initial results of a thoracic aortic endovascular program: safer in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouffer, Chadwick W; Mansour, M Ashraf; Ott, Mickey M; Hooker, Robert L; Gorsuch, Jill M; Cuff, Robert F; Davis, Alan T

    2009-01-01

    Results are presented from our single-institutional experience with thoracic endovascular aortic repair to confirm that it is safe in patients with significant comorbidities. A retrospective review of all patients undergoing endovascular or open thoracic aortic repair at our institution since 2002 was performed. Main outcome measures included clinical presentation, demographics, preoperative risk factors, operative details, and clinical outcomes. The endovascular group included 37 patients (22 males), whereas the open group included 19 patients (eight males). Eight patients per group were treated emergently for trauma or rupture (22% and 42%, respectively; p=0.11). Endovascular patients were significantly older with more comorbid conditions (p<0.05). However, the overall perioperative complication rate was similar in the two groups (32.4% and 31.6%, respectively). Postoperative renal failure occurred only in four open patients (21.1% vs. 0%, p < 0.05). Operative time, ventilator days, and total length of stay were also greater for open patients (p<0.05). There was one death in the endovascular group and three in the open group (2.7% and 15.8%, respectively; p=0.07). Endovascular patients had shorter operative time and length of stay, fewer ventilator days and intensive care unit days, and fewer transfusions. Although the endovascular patients were significantly older with more comorbidities, the complication rate was similar to the open group. Also, there was a trend toward lower mortality in the endovascular group (p=0.07). Endovascular repair is the procedure of choice for treating the descending thoracic aorta in high-risk patients even in the emergent setting.

  7. Mediterranean diet and cognitive health: Initial results from the Hellenic Longitudinal Investigation of Ageing and Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Costas A; Yannakoulia, Mary; Kosmidis, Mary H; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Hadjigeorgiou, Giorgos M; Sakka, Paraskevi; Arampatzi, Xanthi; Bougea, Anastasia; Labropoulos, Ioannis; Scarmeas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    strongest for memory. Fish consumption was negatively associated with dementia and cognitive performance positively associated with non-refined cereal consumption. Our results suggest that adherence to the MeDi is associated with better cognitive performance and lower dementia rates in Greek elders. Thus, the MeDi in its a priori constructed prototype form may have cognitive benefits in traditional Mediterranean populations.

  8. TU-A-BRD-01: Outcomes of Hypofractionated Treatments - Initial Results of the WGSBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, P [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ohri, N [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Joiner, M [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Kong, F [Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Jackson, A [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged in recent decades as a treatment paradigm that is becoming increasingly important in clinical practice. Clinical outcomes data are rapidly accumulating. Although published relations between outcomes and dose distributions are still sparse, the field has progressed to the point where evidence-based normal tissue dose-volume constraints, prescription strategies, and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) models can be developed. The Working Group on SBRT (WGSBRT), under the Biological Effects Subcommittee of AAPM, is a group of physicists and physicians working in the area of SBRT. It is currently performing critical literature reviews to extract and synthesize usable data and to develop guidelines and models to aid with safe and effective treatment. The group is investigating clinically relevant findings from SBRT in six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session of AAPM 2014, interim results are presented on TCP for lung and liver, NTCP for thoracic organs, and radiobiological foundations:• Lung TCP: Detailed modeling of TCP data from 118 published studies on early stage lung SBRT investigates dose response and hypothesized mechanisms to explain the improved outcomes of SBRT. This is presented from the perspective of a physicist, a physician, and a radiobiologist.• Liver TCP: For primary and metastatic liver tumors, individual patient data were extracted from published reports to examine the effects of biologically effective dose on local control.• Thoracic NTCP: Clinically significant SBRT toxicity of lung, rib / chest wall and other structures are evaluated and compared among published clinical data, in terms of risk, risk factors, and safe practice.• Improving the clinical utility of published toxicity reports from SBRT and Hypofractionated treatments. What do we want, and how do we get it? Methods

  9. Site characterization of the Romanian Seismic Network stations: a national initiative and its first preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Bogdan; Zahria, Bogdan; Manea, Elena; Neagoe, Cristian; Borleanu, Felix; Diaconescu, Mihai; Constantinescu, Eduard; Bala, Andrei

    2017-04-01

    The seismic activity in Romania is dominated by the intermediate-depth earthquakes occurring in Vrancea region, although weak to moderate crustal earthquakes are produced regularly in different areas of the country. The National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) built in the last years an impressive infrastructure for monitoring this activity, known as the Romanian Seismic Network (RSN). At present, RSN consists of 122 seismic stations, of which 70 have broadband velocity sensors and 42 short period sensors. One hundred and eleven stations out of 122 have accelerometer sensors collocated with velocity sensors and only 10 stations have only accelerometers. All the stations record continuously the ground motion and the data are transmitted in real-time to the Romanian National Data Center (RoNDC), in Magurele. Last year, NIEP has started a national project that addresses the characterization of all real-time seismic stations that constitute the RSN. We present here the steps that were undertaken and the preliminary results obtained since the beginning the project. The first two activities consisted of collecting all the existent technical and geological data, with emphasize on the latter. Then, we performed station noise investigations and analyses in order to characterize the noise level and estimate the resonances of the sites. The computed H/V ratios showed clear resonant peaks at different frequencies which correlate relatively well with the thickness of the sedimentary package beneath the stations. The polarization analysis of the H/V ratios indicates for some stations a strong directivity of the resonance peak which suggests possible topographic effects at the stations. At the same time, special attention was given to the estimation of the site amplification from earthquake data. The spectral ratios obtained from the analysis of more than 50 earthquakes with magnitudes (Mw) larger than 4.1 are characterized by similar resonance peaks as those obtained from

  10. [The methodology and initial results of the census of the Sangha district (Dogon-Mali territory)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, V; Vandewalle, H

    1991-01-01

    The methodology and preliminary results are presented of a census conducted in September 1991 in the Dogon country of the district of Sangha, Mali. Dogon country is located in eastern Mali and covers the length of the Bandiagara Cliff, around 200 km. 3 levels are distinguished topographically, the plateau, the cliff with altitudes ranging from 400 to 1000 m, and the plain. Each has a different style of living. The climate is Sahelian, and there are no important rivers to provide extra water. The study was done in the 56 villages of the district of Sangha which extends the length of the cliff. 40 were villages along the cliff and 15 were on the plateau at an average of 2-3 km from the cliff. The Dogon are the largest ethnic group in the region, but there are also Peuls at the foot of the cliffs. The Dogon are agricultural and the Peul are herders. The population census was the 1st stage of a general study of population genetics organized by the Department of Anthropology and Population Genetics of France's National Institute of Demographic Studies. The enumeration took place over 18 months from January 1990 to August 1991. Heads of households were interviewed and their official tax identification cards were reviewed. All persons including migrants and deceased persons who were mentioned by any respondent were included. Each person received a unique number composed of the number of the quarter of residence, the number of the family, and the number for the individual in the family. Married women do not immediately move to the husband's residence. Married women were counted where they actually resided at the time of the census. Methodological problems were encountered in defining families. The criterion of common residence was replaced by a locally more valid 1 of descent from a common ancestor, sharing of meals, and obedience to the same extended family head. Dating of ages was, as expected, difficult, but at this stage an internally coherent approximation was

  11. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE): Initial Science Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphic, R. C.; Hine, B.; Delory, G. T.; Salute, J. S.; Noble, S.; Colaprete, A.; Horanyi, M.; Mahaffy, P.

    2014-01-01

    On September 6, 2013, a near-perfect launch of the first Minotaur V rocket successfully carried NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) into a high-eccentricity geocentric orbit. LADEE arrived at the Moon on October 6, 2013, dur-ing the government shutdown. The spacecraft impact-ed the lunar surface on April 18, 2014, following a completely successful mission. LADEE's science objectives were twofold: (1) De-termine the composition and variability of the lunar atmosphere; (2) Characterize the lunar exospheric dust environment, and its variability. The LADEE science payload consisted of the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX), which sensed dust impacts in situ, for parti-cles between 100 nm and 5 micrometers; a neutral mass spectrometer (NMS), which sampled lunar exo-spheric gases in situ, over the 2-150 Dalton mass range; an ultraviolet/visible spectrometer (UVS) ac-quired spectra of atmospheric emissions and scattered light from tenuous dust, spanning a 250-800 nm wave-length range. UVS also performed dust extinction measurements via a separate solar viewer optic. The following are preliminary results for the lunar exosphere: (1) The helium exosphere of the Moon, first observed during Apollo, is clearly dominated by the delivery of solar wind He++. (2) Neon 20 is clearly seen as an important constituent of the exosphere. (3) Argon 40, also observed during Apollo and arising from interior outgassing, exhibits variations related to surface temperature-driven condensation and release, and is also enhanced over specific selenographic longi-tudes. (4) The sodium abundance varies with both lu-nar phase and with meteoroid influx, implicating both solar wind sputtering and impact vaporization process-es. (5) Potassium was also routinely monitored and exhibits some of the same properties as sodium. (6) Other candidate species were seen by both NMS and UVS, and await confirmation. Dust measurements have revealed a persistent "shroud" of small dust particles

  12. The Canadian survey of health, lifestyle and ageing with multiple sclerosis: methodology and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploughman, Michelle; Beaulieu, Serge; Harris, Chelsea; Hogan, Stephen; Manning, Olivia J; Alderdice, Penelope W; Fisk, John D; Sadovnick, A Dessa; O'Connor, Paul; Morrow, Sarah A; Metz, Luanne M; Smyth, Penelope; Mayo, Nancy; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Knox, Katherine B; Stefanelli, Mark; Godwin, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    Objective People with multiple sclerosis (MS) are living longer so strategies to enhance long-term health are garnering more interest. We aimed to create a profile of ageing with MS in Canada by recruiting 1250 (5% of the Canadian population above 55 years with MS) participants and focusing data collection on health and lifestyle factors, disability, participation and quality of life to determine factors associated with healthy ageing. Design National multicentre postal survey. Setting Recruitment from Canadian MS clinics, MS Society of Canada chapters and newspaper advertisements. Participants People aged 55 years or older with MS symptoms more than 20 years. Outcome measures Validated outcome measures and custom-designed questions examining MS disease characteristics, living situation, disability, comorbid conditions, fatigue, health behaviours, mental health, social support, impact of MS and others. Results Of the 921 surveys, 743 were returned (80.7% response rate). Participants (mean age 64.6±6.2 years) reported living with MS symptoms for an average of 32.9±9.5 years and 28.6% were either wheelchair users or bedridden. There was only 5.4% missing data and 709 respondents provided optional qualitative information. According to data derived from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey of Canadians above 55 years of age, older people with MS from this survey sample are about eight times less likely to be employed full-time. Older people with MS were less likely to engage in regular physical activity (26.7%) compared with typical older Canadians (45.2%). However, they were more likely to abstain from alcohol and smoking. Conclusions Despite barriers to participation, we were able to recruit and gather detailed responses (with good data quality) from a large proportion of older Canadians with MS. The data suggest that this sample of older people with MS is less likely to be employed, are less active and more disabled than other older Canadians

  13. Critical rainfall conditions for the initiation of torrential flows. Results from the Rebaixader catchment (Central Pyrenees)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abancó, Clàudia; Hürlimann, Marcel; Moya, José; Berenguer, Marc

    2016-10-01

    , and mean intensity, Imean, of the rainfall event, and (ii) using floating durations, D, and intensities, Ifl, based on the maximum values over floating periods of different duration. The resulting thresholds are considerably different (Imean = 6.20 Dtot-0.36 and Ifl_90% = 5.49 D-0.75, respectively) showing a strong dependence on the applied methodology. On the other hand, the definition of the thresholds is affected by several types of uncertainties. Data from both rain gauges and weather radar were used to analyze the uncertainty associated with the spatial variability of the triggering rainfalls. The analysis indicates that the precipitation recorded by the nearby rain gauges can introduce major uncertainties, especially for convective summer storms. Thus, incorporating radar rainfall can significantly improve the accuracy of the measured triggering rainfall. Finally, thresholds were also derived according to three different criteria for the definition of the duration of the triggering rainfall: (i) the duration until the peak intensity, (ii) the duration until the end of the rainfall; and, (iii) the duration until the trigger of the torrential flow. An important contribution of this work is the assessment of the threshold relationships obtained using the third definition of duration. Moreover, important differences are observed in the obtained thresholds, showing that ID relationships are significantly dependent on the applied methodology.

  14. A New 50-MHz VHF Digital Bistatic Radar for E-region Space Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, G. C.; Huyghebaert, D. R.; St-Maurice, J. P.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    A new fully digital bistatic 50-MHz VHF radar is currently being developed by the radar group in the Institute of Space and Atmospheric Studies (ISAS) at the University of Saskatchewan. This paper presents the scientific motivation for the new radar. Traditionally bistatic radars have had excellent time resolution, but were significantly lacking in range resolution. With the now available accurate timing abilities and advanced pulse modulation techniques, bistatic radar configurations with both excellent temporal and spatial resolution are able to map or 'image' the E-region. The E-region portion of the ionosphere being the base of the magnetosphere has both global (ionosphere-magnetosphere system) and local phenomena of interest. The currents in the magnetosphere close in the E-region. Field-aligned currents (FACs) and Alfven waves are phenomena with origins in the magnetosphere which present their 'signatures' in the E-region. For example, Alfven waves (produced by the Alfven wave resonator) have different time scales, from less than a Hertz to periods of tens of minutes --- and the high temporal and spatial resolution of this new digital E-region radar will be able to detect them all. The E-region is also a dynamic plasma medium with the two-steam and gradient drift instabilities present and the improved measurement abilities will give fresh physical insight.

  15. Federating clinical data from six pediatric hospitals: process and initial results for microbiology from the PHIS+ consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouripeddi, Ramkiran; Warner, Phillip B; Mo, Peter; Levin, James E; Srivastava, Rajendu; Shah, Samir S; de Regt, David; Kirkendall, Eric; Bickel, Jonathan; Korgenski, E Kent; Precourt, Michelle; Stepanek, Richard L; Mitchell, Joyce A; Narus, Scott P; Keren, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Microbiology study results are necessary for conducting many comparative effectiveness research studies. Unlike core laboratory test results, microbiology results have a complex structure. Federating and integrating microbiology data from six disparate electronic medical record systems is challenging and requires a team of varied skills. The PHIS+ consortium which is partnership between members of the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network, the Children's Hospital Association and the University of Utah, have used "FURTHeR' for federating laboratory data. We present our process and initial results for federating microbiology data from six pediatric hospitals.

  16. Characteristics of low latitude ionospheric E-region irregularities linked with daytime VHF scintillations measured from Varanasi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Patel; A K Singh; R P Patel; R P Singh

    2009-12-01

    VHF amplitude scintillations recorded during the daytime period from January 1991 to December 1993, April 1998 to December 1999 and January 2008 to December 2008 at low latitude station Varanasi (geographic lat. = 25° 15′N; long. = 82° 59′E; geomagnetic lat. = 14° 55′N, long. = 154°E, dip angle = 37.3°, sub-ionospheric dip = 34°) have been analyzed to study the behaviour of ionospheric E-region irregularities during the active solar and magnetic periods. The autocorrelation functions, power spectral densities, signal de-correlation times are computed to study the temporal features of ionospheric E-region irregularities linked with daytime scintillations. Derived spectral index ranges between −2 and −9. Assuming velocity of irregularities, the characteristic lengths of the E-region irregularities are estimated. We have estimated the minimum and maximum range of scale length of sporadic-E () irregularities to be observed over Varanasi. These results are in close agreement with those reported from this latitude region.

  17. Design considerations and initial physical layer performance results for a space time coded OFDM 4G cellular network

    OpenAIRE

    Doufexi, A; Armour, SMD; Nix, AR; Beach, MA

    2002-01-01

    The exponential growth of cellular radio, WLANs and the Internet sets the context for a discussion on the role and objectives of 4G. In this paper OFDM is proposed as a leading candidate for a 4G cellular communications standard. The key design considerations and link parameters for a 4G OFDM system are identified and initial physical layer performance results are presented for a number of transmission modes and channel scenarios. Additionally, space-time techniques are considered as a means ...

  18. a New 2.0-6.0 GHz Chirped Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer: Instrumental Analysis and Initial Molecular Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Thomas, Javix; Jäger, Wolfgang; Xu, Yunjie

    2017-06-01

    Low frequency microwave spectroscopy (generation 7.5-18.0 GHz spectrometer at the University of Alberta will be presented using the microwave spectrum of methyl lactate as a benchmark. Finally, initial results for several novel molecular systems studied using this new spectrometer, including the tetramer of 2-fluoroethanol, will be presented. C. Perez, S. Lobsiger, N. A. Seifert, D. P. Zaleski, B. Temelso, G. C. Shields, Z. Kisiel, B. H. Pate, Chem. Phys. Lett., 2013, 571, 1-15.

  19. A first comparison of irregularity and ion drift velocity measurements in the E-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Makarevich

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available E-region irregularity velocity measurements at large flow angles with the STARE Finland coherent VHF radar are considered in context of the ion and electron velocity data provided by the EISCAT tristatic radar system, CUTLASS Finland coherent HF radar, and IMAGE fluxgate magnetometers. The data have been collected during a special experiment on 27 March 2004 during which EISCAT was scanning between several E- and one F-region altitudes along the magnetic field line. Within the E-region, the EISCAT measurements at two altitudes of 110 and 115 km are considered while the electron velocity is inferred from the EISCAT ion velocity measurements at 278 km. The line-of-sight (l-o-s VHF velocity measured by STARE VHF los is compared to the ion and electron velocity components (Vi0 comp and Ve0 comp along the STARE l-o-s direction. The comparison with Ve0 comp for the entire event shows that the measurements exhibit large scatter and small positive correlation. The correlation with Ve0 comp was substantial in the first half of the interval under study when Ve0 comp was larger in magnitude. The comparison with Vi0 comp at 110 and 115 km shows a considerable positive correlation, with VHF velocity being typically larger (smaller in magnitude than Vi0 comp at 110 km (115 km so that VVHF los appears to be bounded by the ion velocity components at two altitudes. It is also demonstrated that the difference between VVHF los and Vi0 comp at 110 km can be treated, in the first approximation, as a linear function of the effective backscatter height heff also counted from 110 km; heff varies in the range 108–114 km due to the altitude integration effects in the scattering cross-section. Our results are consistent with the notion that VHF

  20. Initial results of a model rotor higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel experiment on BVI impulsive noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Lehmann, G.; van der Wall, B.

    1989-09-01

    Initial acoustic results are presented from a higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel pilot experiment on helicopter rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise reduction, making use of the DFVLR 40-percent-scaled BO-105 research rotor in the DNW 6m by 8m closed test section. Considerable noise reduction (of several decibels) has been measured for particular HHC control settings, however, at the cost of increased vibration levels and vice versa. The apparently adverse results for noise and vibration reduction by HHC are explained. At optimum pitch control settings for BVI noise reduction, rotor simulation results demonstrate that blade loading at the outer tip region is decreased, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are increased, resulting altogether in reduced BVI noise generation. At optimum pitch control settings for vibration reduction adverse effects on blade loading, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are found.

  1. A classification of spectral populations observed in HF radar backscatter from the E region auroral electrojets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of HF radar backscatter from the auroral electrojet E region indicate the presence of five major spectral populations, as opposed to the two predominant spectral populations, types I and II, observed in the VHF regime. The Doppler shift, spectral width, backscatter power, and flow angle dependencies of these five populations are investigated and described. Two of these populations are identified with type I and type II spectral classes, and hence, are thought to be generated by the two-stream and gradient drift instabilities, respectively. The remaining three populations occur over a range of velocities which can greatly exceed the ion acoustic speed, the usual limiting velocity in VHF radar observations of the E region. The generation of these spectral populations is discussed in terms of electron density gradients in the electrojet region and recent non-linear theories of E region irregularity generation.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities

  2. Implementation of a 3-D-Var system for atmospheric profiling data assimilation into the RAMS model: initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Federico

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the current status of development of a three-dimensional variational data assimilation system. The system can be used with different numerical weather prediction models, but it is mainly designed to be coupled with the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS. Analyses are given for the following parameters: zonal and meridional wind components, temperature, relative humidity, and geopotential height. Important features of the data assimilation system are the use of incremental formulation of the cost-function, and the use of an analysis space represented by recursive filters and eigenmodes of the vertical background error matrix. This matrix and the length-scale of the recursive filters are estimated by the National Meteorological Center (NMC method. The data assimilation and forecasting system is applied to the real context of atmospheric profiling data assimilation, and in particular to the short-term wind prediction. The analyses are produced at 20 km horizontal resolution over central Europe and extend over the whole troposphere. Assimilated data are vertical soundings of wind, temperature, and relative humidity from radiosondes, and wind measurements of the European wind profiler network. Results show the validity of the analysis solutions because they are closer to the observations (lower RMSE compared to the background (higher RMSE, and the differences of the RMSEs are consistent with the data assimilation settings. To quantify the impact of improved initial conditions on the short-term forecast, the analyses are used as initial conditions of a three-hours forecast of the RAMS model. In particular two sets of forecasts are produced: (a the first uses the ECMWF analysis/forecast cycle as initial and boundary conditions; (b the second uses the analyses produced by the 3-D-Var scheme as initial conditions, then is driven by the ECMWF forecast. The improvement is quantified by considering the horizontal components of

  3. The Evolution of P-wave Velocity in Fault Gouge: Initial Results for Samples from the SAFOD Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; Marone, C.

    2008-12-01

    We present initial results from a new technique for observing the evolution of elastic properties in sheared fault zone materials via acoustic wave velocity. The relationship between the mechanical strength of fault gouge and acoustic velocity during active deformation has important implications not only for a physical understanding of elasticity in deforming granular media, but also for the interpretation of the seismic velocity at the field scale. Experiments are conducted at atmospheric temperature and saturation state in a double-direct-shear testing apparatus, with normal stress stepped from 1 to 19 MPa to interrogate behavior during compaction, and sheared at a rate of 10 microns/second to observe changes in velocity with increasing strain. Tests are divided between those involving continuous shear to a displacement of 22.5 mm, and those with intervals of 3.75 mm shear separated by unloading and reloading sequences in normal stress. Velocity is measured by time-of-flight between two piezoelectric P-wave transducers set into the sample configuration on either side of the shearing layers. Samples tested include common laboratory standards for simulated fault gouge and field samples taken from representative localities in the 3D rock volume containing the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth experiment in Parkfield, California. The velocities of sand and clay end-member gouges are observed to behave differently under shear, and mixtures of quartz sand and montmorillonite behave differently from both end-member materials. Initial results suggest that particle sorting exerts a strong influence on both the absolute velocity and the evolution of velocity in response to increasing shear strain where the elastic properties of the grains are similar. We also observe a first-order relationship between the coefficient of friction and P-wave velocity that appears to be related to grain reorganization at the onset of shear following initial compaction.

  4. Involving local health departments in community health partnerships: evaluation results from the partnership for the public's health initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Allen; Hsu, Clarissa; Schwartz, Pamela M; Pearson, David; Greenwald, Howard P; Beery, William L; Flores, George; Casey, Maria Campbell

    2008-03-01

    Improving community health "from the ground up" entails a comprehensive ecological approach, deep involvement of community-based entities, and addressing social determinants of population health status. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Office of the Surgeon General, and other authorities have called for public health to be an "inter-sector" enterprise, few models have surfaced that feature local health departments as a key part of the collaborative model for effecting community-level change. This paper presents evaluation findings and lessons learned from the Partnership for the Public's Health (PPH), a comprehensive community initiative that featured a central role for local health departments with their community partners. Funded by The California Endowment, PPH provided technical and financial resources to 39 community partnerships in 14 local health department jurisdictions in California to promote community and health department capacity building and community-level policy and systems change designed to produce long-term improvements in population health. The evaluation used multiple data sources to create progress ratings for each partnership in five goal areas related to capacity building, community health improvement programs, and policy and systems change. Overall results were generally positive; in particular, of the 37 partnerships funded continuously throughout the 5 years of the initiative, between 25% and 40% were able to make a high level of progress in each of the Initiative's five goal areas. Factors associated with partnership success were also identified by local evaluators. These results showed that health departments able to work effectively with community groups had strong, committed leaders who used creative financing mechanisms, inclusive planning processes, organizational changes, and open communication to promote collaboration with the communities they served.

  5. Paleomagnetic results from IODP Expedition 344 Site U1381 and implications for the initial subduction of the Cocos Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Xixi; Jovane, Luigi; Petronotis, Katerina; Gong, Zheng; Xie, Siyi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the processes that govern the strength, nature, and distribution of slip along subduction zones is a fundamental and societally relevant goal of modern earth science. The Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (CRISP) is specially designed to understand the processes that control nucleation and seismic rupture of large earthquakes at erosional subduction zones. Drilling directly on the Cocos Ridge (CR) during International Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344 discovered a sedimentary hiatus in Site U1381 cores. In this study, we conducted a magnetostratigraphic and rock magnetic study on the Cenozoic sedimentary sequences of site U1381. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data from sediments above and below the hiatus show oblate fabrcis, but the Kmin axes of the AMS data from sediments below the hiatus are more dispersed than those from sediments above the hiatus, implying that formation of hiatus may have affected AMS. Paleomagnetic results of the U1381 core, together with available Ar-Ar dates of ash layers from sediments below the hiatus, allow us to establish a geomagnetic polarity timescale that brackets the hiatus between ca. 9.61 and 1.52 Ma. Analyses of sedimentary records from ODP/IODP cores in the vicinity reveal that the hiatus appears to be regional, spanning the northeastern end of the CR. Also, the hiatus appears to occur only at certain locations. Its regional occurrence at unique locations implies a link to the initial shallow subduction of the Cocos Ridge. The hiatus was probably produced by either bottom current erosion or the CR buckling upon its initial collision with the Middle American trench (MAT). Thus, the initial subduction of the CR must have taken place on or before 1.52 Ma.

  6. Assessment of effectiveness measures in patients with schizophrenia initiated on risperidone long-acting therapy: the SOURCE study results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirani Riad D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate effectiveness outcomes in a real-world setting in patients with schizophrenia initiating risperidone long-acting therapy (RLAT. Methods This was a 24-month, multicenter, prospective, longitudinal, observational study in patients with schizophrenia who were initiated on RLAT. Physicians could change treatment during the study as clinically warranted. Data were collected at baseline and subsequently every 3 months up to 24 months. Effectiveness outcomes included changes in illness severity as measured by Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S scale; functional scores as measured by Personal and Social Performance (PSP scale, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF, and Strauss-Carpenter Levels of Functioning (LOF; and health status (Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 [SF-36]. Life-table methodology was used to estimate the cumulative probability of relapse over time. Adverse events were evaluated for safety. Results 532 patients were enrolled in the study; 209 (39.3% completed the 24-month study and 305 (57.3% had at least 12 months of follow-up data. The mean (SD age of patients was 42.3 (12.8 years. Most patients were male (66.4% and either Caucasian (60.3% or African American (23.7%. All changes in CGI-S from baseline at each subsequent 3-month follow-up visit were statistically significant (p Conclusions Patients with schizophrenia who were initiated on RLAT demonstrated improvements in measures of effectiveness within 3 months, which persisted over 24 months. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00246194

  7. FPGA based, DSP integrated, 8-channel SIMCON, ver. 3.0. Initial results for 8-channel algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giergusiewicz, W.; Koprek, W.; Jalmuzna, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Electronic Systems

    2005-07-01

    The paper describes design, construction and initial measurements of an eight channel electronic LLRF device predicted for building of the control system for the VUV-FEL accelerator at DESY (Hamburg). The device, referred in the paper to as the SIMCON 3.0 (from the SC cavity simulator and controller) consists of a 16 layer, VME size, PCB, a large FPGA chip (VirtexII-4000 by Xilinx), eight fast ADCs and four DACs (by Analog Devices). To our knowledge, the proposed device is the first of this kind for the accelerator technology in which there was achieved (the FPGA based) DSP latency below 200 ns. With the optimized data transmission system, the overall LLRF system latency can be as low as 500 ns. The SIMCON 3.0 sub-system was applied for initial tests with the ACC1 module of the VUV FEL accelerator (eight channels) and with the CHECHIA test stand (single channel), both at the DESY. The promising results with the SIMCON 3.0. encouraged us to enter the design of SIMCON 3.1. possessing 10 measurement and control channels and some additional features to be reported in the next technical note. SIMCON 3.0. is a modular solution, while SIMCON 3.1. will be an integrated board of the all-in-one type. Two design approaches - modular and all-in-one, after branching off in this version of the Simcon, will be continued. (orig.)

  8. Results of applying a non-evaporative mitigation technique to laser-initiated surface damage on fused-silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J J; Bolourchi, M; Bude, J D; Guss, G M; Matthews, M J; Nostrand, M C

    2010-10-26

    We present results from a study to determine an acceptable CO{sub 2} laser-based non-evaporative mitigation protocol for use on surface damage sites in fused-silica optics. A promising protocol is identified and evaluated on a set of surface damage sites created under ICF-type laser conditions. Mitigation protocol acceptability criteria for damage re-initiation and growth, downstream intensification, and residual stress are discussed. In previous work, we found that a power ramp at the end of the protocol effectively minimizes the residual stress (<25 MPa) left in the substrate. However, the biggest difficulty in determining an acceptable protocol was balancing between low re-initiation and problematic downstream intensification. Typical growing surface damage sites mitigated with a candidate CO{sub 2} laser-based mitigation protocol all survived 351 nm, 5 ns damage testing to fluences >12.5 J/cm{sup 2}. The downstream intensification arising from the mitigated sites is evaluated, and all but one of the sites has 100% passing downstream damage expectation values. We demonstrate, for the first time, a successful non-evaporative 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser mitigation protocol applicable to fused-silica optics used on fusion-class lasers like the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  9. [Key measures for developing palliative care from a public health perspective. Initial results from a three-round Delphi study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behmann, M; Jünger, S; Radbruch, L; Schneider, N

    2011-05-01

    Recently, six key targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care in Germany were defined. This article reports the initial results of a follow-up study aiming at developing concrete measures to achieve these targets. We carried out a three-round Delphi study with stakeholders acting on the meso- and macro-levels of the German healthcare system (e.g., representatives of patient organizations, health insurance funds, politics, medical and nursing associations). In the first Delphi round, participants proposed measures to achieve the six key targets using free-text answers. The answers were analyzed with a qualitative-descriptive approach. In total, 107 stakeholders responded to the first Delphi round. After data reduction, 37 measures were extracted and grouped into six major categories: family carers, qualification, quality, public relations, services, and coordination. The range of measures on the different levels of policy, health care, and education presents a substantiated basis for the elaboration of targeted public health action plans to improve palliative care. Prioritization of measures in the second and third Delphi rounds will provide empirical support for decision making.

  10. Long-Term Glycemic Control as a Result of Initial Education for Children With New Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Susanne M.; Srivastava, Nayan T.; Behzadi, Jennifer M.; Pottorff, Tina M.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Walvoord, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the role of initial diabetes education delivery at an academic medical center (AMC) versus non-AMCs on long-term glycemic control. Methods We performed a retrospective study of children with type 1 diabetes referred to an AMC after being educated at non-AMCs. These children were matched to a group of children diagnosed and educated as inpatients at an AMC. The A1C levels at 2, 3, and 5 years from diagnosis were compared between the 2 groups of children. Results Records were identified from 138 children. Glycemic control was comparable in the non-AMC-educated versus AMC-educated patients at 2, 3, and 5 years from diagnosis. The A1C was also highly consistent in each patient over time. Conclusions Long-term glycemic control was independent of whether initial education was delivered at an AMC or non-AMC. Formal education and location at time of diagnosis do not appear to play a significant role in long-term glycemic control. Novel educational constructs, focusing on developmental stages of childhood and reeducation over time, are likely more important than education at time of diagnosis. PMID:23427241

  11. Results of the 3rd Workshop of the Interdisciplinary Biomass Burning Initiative IBBI of WMO, IGAC & iLEAPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Johannes; Keywood, Melita

    2014-05-01

    IGAC, iLEAPS and WMO founded the Interdisciplinary Biomass Burning Initiative (IBBI) in 2013. Its primary goal is to foster interdisciplinary research on biomass burning (BB), to improve atmospheric composition and air quality monitoring and forecasting through better scientific understanding of the various processes around BB. IBBI has organised a workshop that is being held on 23-26 April 2014 at Schloss Ringberg in Germany. It is the third and final in a series of workshops for the establishment of IBBI, the first in Geneva during July 2012, the second in Vienna during May 2013. The aims of the third workshop are to (1) Identify secondary goals for IBBI (2) Develop strategies to achieve the goals (3) Plan a COST action (4) Plan a special issue of Atmospheric Environment for publication on emerging issues in BB research (5) Identify members of the IBBI scientific steering committee. We report highlights and results from this workshop.

  12. School Assistance in Special Schools in North Rhine-Westphalia: Initial Position, Study Design, and First Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Kißgen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available School assistance, where it is practiced in Germany, appears to be a permanent personnel resource in the daily routine of special schools, as the first initial surveys in the counties ofBavaria and Thuringia show. To clarify the situation in special schools in the counry of North Rhine-Westphalia, a study was designed to examine the topic from the perspective of the school management, class teachers, and school assistants using a questionnaire-based survey. In this article, in addition to the study design, the results of the survey from the school management questionnaire are presented. Among other things, it shows that the utilization of school assistants has increased more than thirtyfold between the school years 2000/2001 and 2010/2011. The consequences of this development are discussed in terms of inclusive education in general schools.

  13. Radiologic Results and Hearing Preservation With a Straight Narrow Electrode via Round Window Versus Cochleostomy Approach at Initial Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassepass, Frederike; Aschendorff, Antje; Bulla, Stefan; Arndt, Susan; Maier, Wolfgang; Laszig, Roland; Beck, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the potential influence of two different cochlear implant (CI) electrode carrier approaches to the scala tympani in terms of insertion depth and angle as well as hearing preservation. Retrospective follow-up study. Tertiary care academic center. Forty-one adult subjects underwent cochlear implantation using the Cochlear Nucleus CI 422 slim straight electrode (Cochlear Limited, New South Wales, Australia) with the intent of achieving atraumatic electrode insertion and hearing preservation. Fourteen subjects were implanted using a cochleostomy approach and 27 via a round window approach. Radiologic assessment of insertion depth and angle was performed on postoperative rotational tomography. Postoperative low-frequency hearing preservation, complete loss of residual low-frequency hearing, and speech perception in quiet measures were obtained in defined intervals for both groups. Mean insertion depth reached 21.5 mm (standard deviation, 1.1), whereas mean insertion angle of 388 degrees (standard deviation, 34.7) was revealed for all CI recipients, with no significant difference between the cochleostomy cohort and the round window cohort. The CI-aided speech perception in quiet showed significantly higher scores 3 to 4 months after activation compared with the preoperative speech perception results. The audiologic data demonstrated no statistically significant difference in probability of complete loss of residual low-frequency hearing at initial activation between the cochleostomy group and the round window group. The present results suggest that similar insertion depth and angle as well as similar low-frequency hearing preservation can be achieved in cochlear implantation with this straight narrow electrode via either cochleostomy approach or round window approach at least at initial activation. This fact gives the surgeon the opportunity to adapt access to the scala tympani as needed.

  14. A multi-source inverse-geometry CT system: initial results with an 8 spot x-ray source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jongduk; De Man, Bruno; Uribe, Jorge; Longtin, Randy; Harrison, Daniel; Reynolds, Joseph; Neculaes, Bogdan; Frutschy, Kristopher; Inzinna, Louis; Caiafa, Antonio; Senzig, Robert; Pelc, Norbert J

    2014-03-07

    We present initial experimental results of a rotating-gantry multi-source inverse-geometry CT (MS-IGCT) system. The MS-IGCT system was built with a single module of 2 × 4 x-ray sources and a 2D detector array. It produced a 75 mm in-plane field-of-view (FOV) with 160 mm axial coverage in a single gantry rotation. To evaluate system performance, a 2.5 inch diameter uniform PMMA cylinder phantom, a 200 µm diameter tungsten wire, and a euthanized rat were scanned. Each scan acquired 125 views per source and the gantry rotation time was 1 s per revolution. Geometric calibration was performed using a bead phantom. The scanning parameters were 80 kVp, 125 mA, and 5.4 µs pulse per source location per view. A data normalization technique was applied to the acquired projection data, and beam hardening and spectral nonlinearities of each detector channel were corrected. For image reconstruction, the projection data of each source row were rebinned into a full cone beam data set, and the FDK algorithm was used. The reconstructed volumes from upper and lower source rows shared an overlap volume which was combined in image space. The images of the uniform PMMA cylinder phantom showed good uniformity and no apparent artifacts. The measured in-plane MTF showed 13 lp cm(-1) at 10% cutoff, in good agreement with expectations. The rat data were also reconstructed reliably. The initial experimental results from this rotating-gantry MS-IGCT system demonstrated its ability to image a complex anatomical object without any significant image artifacts and to achieve high image resolution and large axial coverage in a single gantry rotation.

  15. Mean PB To Failure - Initial results from a long-term study of disk storage patterns at the RACF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramarcu, C.; Hollowell, C.; Rao, T.; Strecker-Kellogg, W.; Wong, A.; Zaytsev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The RACF (RHIC-ATLAS Computing Facility) has operated a large, multi-purpose dedicated computing facility since the mid-1990’s, serving a worldwide, geographically diverse scientific community that is a major contributor to various HEPN projects. A central component of the RACF is the Linux-based worker node cluster that is used for both computing and data storage purposes. It currently has nearly 50,000 computing cores and over 23 PB of storage capacity distributed over 12,000+ (non-SSD) disk drives. The majority of the 12,000+ disk drives provide a cost-effective solution for dCache/XRootD-managed storage, and a key concern is the reliability of this solution over the lifetime of the hardware, particularly as the number of disk drives and the storage capacity of individual drives grow. We report initial results of a long-term study to measure lifetime PB read/written to disk drives in the worker node cluster. We discuss the historical disk drive mortality rate, disk drive manufacturers' published MPTF (Mean PB to Failure) data and how they are correlated to our results. The results help the RACF understand the productivity and reliability of its storage solutions and have implications for other highly-available storage systems (NFS, GPFS, CVMFS, etc) with large I/O requirements.

  16. Rapid screening test for gestational diabetes: public health need, market requirement, initial product design, and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Zwisler, Greg; Peck, Roger; Abu-Haydar, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Gestational diabetes is a global epidemic where many urban areas in Southeast Asia have found prevalence rates as high as 20%, exceeding the highest prevalence rates in the developed world. It can have serious and life-threatening consequences for mothers and babies. We are developing two variants of a new, simple, low-cost rapid test for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus for use primarily in low-resource settings. The pair of assays, both semiquantitative rapid diagnostic strip tests for glycated albumin, require neither fasting nor an oral glucose challenge test. One variant is an extremely simple strip test to estimate the level of total glycated albumin in blood. The other, which is slightly more complex and expensive, is a test that determines the ratio of glycated albumin to total albumin. The screening results can be used to refer women to receive additional care during delivery to avoid birth complications as well as counseling on diet and exercise during and after pregnancy. Results with the latter test may also be used to start treatment with glucose-lowering drugs. Both assays will be read visually. We present initial results of a preliminary cost-performance comparison model evaluating the proposed test versus existing alternatives. We also evaluated user needs and schematic paper microfluidics-based designs aimed at overcoming the challenge of visualizing relatively narrow differences between normal and elevated levels of glycated albumin in blood.

  17. Full Life-Cycle Defect Management Assessment: Initial Inspection Data Collection Results and Research Questions for Further Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Forrest; Feldmann, Raimund; Haingaertner, Ralf; Regardie, Myrna; Seaman, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    It is often the case in software projects that when schedule and budget resources are limited, the Verification and Validation (V&V) activities suffer. Fewer V&V activities can be afforded and moreover, short-term challenges can result in V&V activities being scaled back or dropped altogether. As a result, too often the default solution is to save activities for improving software quality until too late in the life-cycle, relying on late-term code inspections followed by thorough testing activities to reduce defect counts to acceptable levels. As many project managers realize, however, this is a resource-intensive way of achieving the required quality for software. The Full Life-cycle Defect Management Assessment Initiative, funded by NASA s Office of Safety and Mission Assurance under the Software Assurance Research Program, aims to address these problems by: Improving the effectiveness of early life-cycle V&V activities to make their benefits more attractive to team leads. Specifically, we focus on software inspection, a proven method that can be applied to any software work product, long before executable code has been developed; Better communicating this effectiveness to software development teams, along with suggestions for parameters to improve in the future to increase effectiveness; Analyzing the impact of early life-cycle V&V on the effectiveness and cost required for late life-cycle V&V activities, such as testing, in order to make the tradeoffs more apparent. This white paper reports on an initial milestone in this work, the development of a preliminary model of inspection effectiveness across multiple NASA Centers. This model contributes toward reaching our project goals by: Allowing an examination of inspection parameters, across different types of projects and different work products, for an analysis of factors that impact defect detection effectiveness. Allowing a comparison of this NASA-specific model to existing recommendations in the literature

  18. Initial Operative Experience and Short-term Hearing Preservation Results With a Mid-scala Cochlear Implant Electrode Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svrakic, Maja; Roland, J Thomas; McMenomey, Sean O; Svirsky, Mario A

    2016-12-01

    To describe our initial operative experience and hearing preservation results with the Advanced Bionics (AB) Mid Scala Electrode (MSE). Retrospective review. Tertiary referral center. Sixty-three MSE implants in pediatric and adult patients were compared with age- and sex-matched 1j electrode implants from the same manufacturer. All patients were severe to profoundly deaf. Cochlear implantation with either the AB 1j electrode or the AB MSE. The MSE and 1j electrodes were compared in their angular depth of insertion and pre to postoperative change in hearing thresholds. Hearing preservation was analyzed as a function of angular depth of insertion. Secondary outcome measures included operative time, incidence of abnormal intraoperative impedance and telemetry values, and incidence of postsurgical complications. Depth of insertion was similar for both electrodes, but was more consistent for the MSE array and more variable for the 1j array. Patients with MSE electrodes had better hearing preservation. Thresholds shifts at four audiometric frequencies ranging from 250 to 2000 Hz were 10, 7, 2, and 6 dB smaller for the MSE electrode than for the 1j (p Hearing preservation at low frequencies was worse with deeper insertion, regardless of array. Secondary outcome measures were similar for both electrodes. The MSE electrode resulted in more consistent insertion depth and somewhat better hearing preservation than the 1j electrode. Differences in other surgical outcome measures were small or unlikely to have a meaningful effect.

  19. Diabetes, metformin and incidence of and death from invasive cancer in postmenopausal women: Results from the women's health initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhihong; Aragaki, Aaron K; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Manson, JoAnn E; Rohan, Thomas E; Chen, Chu; Vitolins, Mara Z; Tinker, Lesley F; LeBlanc, Erin S; Kuller, Lewis H; Hou, Lifang; LaMonte, Michael J; Luo, Juhua; Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2016-04-15

    Findings from studies of metformin use with risk of cancer incidence and outcome provide mixed results; with few studies examined associations by recency of diabetes diagnosis or duration of medication use. Thus, in the Women's Health Initiative, we examined these associations and further explored whether associations differ by recency of diabetes and duration of metformin use. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals. Diabetes was associated with higher risk of total invasive cancer (HR, 1.13; p metformin users, compared to users of other medications, relative to women without diabetes, overall (HRs, 1.08 vs. 1.45; p = 0.007) and for breast cancer (HRs, 0.50 vs. 1.29; p = 0.05). Results also suggested that lower cancer risk associated with metformin may be evident only for a longer duration of use in certain cancer sites or subgroup populations. We provide further evidence that postmenopausal women with diabetes are at higher risk of invasive cancer and cancer death. Metformin users, particularly long-term users, may be at lower risk of developing certain cancers and dying from cancer, compared to users of other anti-diabetes medications. Future studies are needed to determine the long-term effect of metformin in cancer risk and survival from cancer.

  20. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Renz, D.M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Dromain, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif cedex (France); Diekmann, F. [St. Joseph-Stift Bremen, Department of Medical Imaging, Bremen (Germany); Engelken, F.; Krohn, M.; Singh, J.M.; Bick, U. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ingold-Heppner, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Winzer, K.J. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Breast Center, Department of Gynecology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  1. Initial results and clinical application of non dedicated 18-FDG/PET in head and neck oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Luiz Mauricio; Priante, Antonio Vitor; Carvalho, Andre Lopes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia do Pescoco e da Cabeca]. E-mail: lp_kowalski@uol.com.br; Torres, Ivone Goncalves; Lima, Eduardo Nobrega Pereira [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2005-07-01

    Imaging procedures are important methods for proper stage and treatment planning. Especially in previously treated patients, although not perfectly accurate. PET scan is a functional and imaging technique that has been used to diagnose and stage recurrent cancer from different sites. The combination of computed tomography coupled with FDG-PET (18-FDG-PET/CT) reaches high quality anatomical and functional images. Objective: to describe the initial results of FDG-PET/CT performed at a single institution. Material and methods: this technique was used in 63 patients with head and neck tumors. The purposes of the exam were to rule out recurrent disease - 55 patients; to search for hidden primary tumor - 2 patients; and postoperative follow-up of residual disease - 6 patients. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 56 cases (88.9%). Pathological confirmation was obtained in 24 cases (38.1%), all the remaining cases were considered negative based on clinical follow-up information with no evidence of recurrent disease 12 months after the PET/CT exam. Results: overall results for the accuracy of FDG-PET were: 93.9% of sensitivity, 64.2% of specificity, 75.6% of positive predictive value and 90.0% of negative predictive value. FDG-PET was able to find 1 out of 2 undetected primary tumors (base of the tongue). The best results were obtained regarding the detection of local and distant recurrences of larynx, thyroid and oral cavity cancers. Conclusion: the FDG-PET/CT fusion image makes anatomical localization easier and the accuracy for detection of recurrent disease was found to be higher than CT alone. (author)

  2. Investigating the Present Day Cosmic Dust Flux at the Earth's Surface: Initial Results from the Kwajalein Micrometeorite Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Price, M. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D. E.; Russell, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Examination of impact craters on the Long Duration Exposure Facility satellite indicate a present day micrometeoroid flux of approx. 30,000 tonnes [1 after 2]. But what portion of this material arrives at the Earth's surface as micrometeorites? Studies of available micrometeorite collections from deep sea sediments [e.g. 3], Greenland blue ice [e.g. 4] and the South Pole water well [e.g. 1] may be complicated by terrestrial weathering and, in some cases, collection bias (magnetic separation for deep sea sediments) and poorly constrained ages. We have recently set up a micrometeorite collection station on Kwajalein Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean, using high volume air samplers to collect particles directly from the atmosphere. By collecting in this way, the terrestrial age of the particles is known, the weathering they experience is minimal, and we are able to constrain particle arrival times. Collecting at this location also exploits the considerably reduced anthropogenic background [5]. Method: High volume air samplers were installed on top of the two-story airport building on Kwajalein. These were fitted with polycarbonate membrane filters with 5µm diameter perforations. The flow rates were set to 0.5m3/min, and filters were changed once a week. After collection, filters were washed to remove salt and concentrate particles [see 5] in preparation for analysis by SEM. Results and Discussion: A selection of filters have been prepared and surveyed. Due to their ease of identification our initial investigations have focused on particles resembling cosmic spherules. The spheres can be divided into three main groups: 1. Silicate spherules rich in Al, Ca, K and Na (to varying degrees), 2. Silicate spherules rich in Mg and Fe and 3. Fe-rich spherules. Group 1 spherules are often vesiculated and can occur as aggregates. They are similar in appearance and composition to volcanic microspheres [e.g. 6] and are thus likely terrestrial in

  3. Pulmonary vein triggers play an important role in the initiation of atrial flutter: Initial results from the prospective randomized Atrial Fibrillation Ablation in Atrial Flutter (Triple A) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ralph; Lauschke, Joerg; Tischer, Tina; Schneider, Cindy; Voss, Wolfgang; Moehlenkamp, Felix; Glass, Aenne; Diedrich, Doreen; Bänsch, Dietmar

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after ablation of a cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI)-dependent atrial flutter (AFL) is high. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that AFL and AF may be initiated by pulmonary vein triggers. This prospective randomized trial tested the efficacy of a standalone pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in patients with AFL but without AF. Patients with AFL but without documented AF were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: (1) antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD), (2) CTI ablation, or (3) circumferential PVI. The primary end-point was defined as any recurrent atrial tachyarrhythmia and the secondary end-point as recurrence of AFL. In case of tachyarrhythmia recurrence in the PVI group, a second PVI was performed to close gaps in the ablation lines. Of the 60 patients, 17 were randomized to AAD, 23 to CTI ablation, and 20 to PVI. During follow-up of 1.42 ± 0.83 years, 14 of 17 patients (82.4%) in the AAD group, 14 of 23 patients (60.9%) in the CTI group, and 2 of 20 patients (10%) in the PVI group reached the primary end-point (P PVI procedures per patient. AFL reoccurred in 9 patients (52.9.%) in the AAD group, in 2 patients (8.7%) in the CTI group, and after a single PVI in 3 patients (15%) in the PVI group (P = .003). After closure of gaps, 1 patient (5%) in the PVI group presented with recurrent AFL. Pulmonary vein triggers play an important role in AFL. PVI can prevent the recurrence of AFL, even without CTI ablation. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Plant functional type classification for Earth System Models: results from the European Space Agency's Land Cover Climate Change Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Poulter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Global land cover is a key variable in the earth system with feedbacks on climate, biodiversity and natural resources. However, global land-cover datasets presently fall short of user needs in providing detailed spatial and thematic information that is consistently mapped over time and easily transferable to the requirements of earth system models. In 2009, the European Space Agency launched the Climate Change Initiative (CCI, with land cover (LC_CCI as one of thirteen Essential Climate Variables targeted for research development. The LC_CCI was implemented in three phases, first responding to a survey of user needs, then developing a global, moderate resolution, land-cover dataset for three time periods, or epochs, 2000, 2005, and 2010, and the last phase resulting in a user-tool for converting land cover to plant functional type equivalents. Here we present the results of the LC_CCI project with a focus on the mapping approach used to convert the United Nations Land Cover Classification System to plant functional types (PFT. The translation was performed as part of consultative process among map producers and users and resulted in an open-source conversion tool. A comparison with existing PFT maps used by three-earth system modeling teams shows significant differences between the LC_CCI PFT dataset and those currently used in earth system models with likely consequences for modeling terrestrial biogeochemistry and land–atmosphere interactions. The LC_CCI tool is flexible for users to modify land cover to PFT conversions and will evolve as Phase 2 of the European Space Agency CCI program continues.

  5. Plant functional type classification for earth system models: results from the European Space Agency's Land Cover Climate Change Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, B.; MacBean, N.; Hartley, A.; Khlystova, I.; Arino, O.; Betts, R.; Bontemps, S.; Boettcher, M.; Brockmann, C.; Defourny, P.; Hagemann, S.; Herold, M.; Kirches, G.; Lamarche, C.; Lederer, D.; Ottlé, C.; Peters, M.; Peylin, P.

    2015-07-01

    Global land cover is a key variable in the earth system with feedbacks on climate, biodiversity and natural resources. However, global land cover data sets presently fall short of user needs in providing detailed spatial and thematic information that is consistently mapped over time and easily transferable to the requirements of earth system models. In 2009, the European Space Agency launched the Climate Change Initiative (CCI), with land cover (LC_CCI) as 1 of 13 essential climate variables targeted for research development. The LC_CCI was implemented in three phases: first responding to a survey of user needs; developing a global, moderate-resolution land cover data set for three time periods, or epochs (2000, 2005, and 2010); and the last phase resulting in a user tool for converting land cover to plant functional type equivalents. Here we present the results of the LC_CCI project with a focus on the mapping approach used to convert the United Nations Land Cover Classification System to plant functional types (PFTs). The translation was performed as part of consultative process among map producers and users, and resulted in an open-source conversion tool. A comparison with existing PFT maps used by three earth system modeling teams shows significant differences between the LC_CCI PFT data set and those currently used in earth system models with likely consequences for modeling terrestrial biogeochemistry and land-atmosphere interactions. The main difference between the new LC_CCI product and PFT data sets used currently by three different dynamic global vegetation modeling teams is a reduction in high-latitude grassland cover, a reduction in tropical tree cover and an expansion in temperate forest cover in Europe. The LC_CCI tool is flexible for users to modify land cover to PFT conversions and will evolve as phase 2 of the European Space Agency CCI program continues.

  6. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for atherosclerotic stenosis of the intracranial cerebral arteries. initial results and long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, A; Kato, N; Nakai, Y; Anno, I; Sato, H; Okazaki, M; Matsumaru, Y; Nose, T

    1999-11-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was carried out 52 times for 49 lesions in 47 cases of atheroscrelotic stenosis of the intracranial or skull base cerebral arteries. The stenotic lesions involved the middle cerebral artery in 21 cases, the basilar artery in eight cases, the internal carotid artery (petrous-supraclinoid portion) in 15 cases, and the intracranial vertebral artery in five cases. Nearly all cases were symptomatic, such as TIA or stroke, and the degree of stenosis ranged from 70 to 99 percent, with a mean of 80 percent. PTA was performed using a STEALTH balloon angioplasty catheter. In these trials, PTA was successfully performed (as indicated by a residual stenosis under 50%) 41 times. The initial success rate was 79% and stenosis was reduced from 80% to 25%. Clinical follow-up was performed from 7 to 84 months with a mean of 44 months. During this period, death due to myocardial infarction or pneumonia occurred in five cases, stroke related to previous PTA occurred ih one case (due to re-stenosis) and stroke unrelated tl? previous PTA occurred in two cases. Angiographic follow-up was performed in 31 cases after 41 successful PTA procedures. Re-stenosis was seen in 20% of the cases, symptomrltic complications occurred in 6%, and asymptomatic complications occurred in 6% of the cases. One case suffered severe subarachnoid hemorrhage just after the PTA due to preexisting aneurysm rupture and he died a week after the PTA. So mortality in this series was 2%. From the results described here, we may conclude that PTA of the intracranial or skull base cerebral artery is technically feasible, and it can be performed with relatively low risk. From our results, it may be a useful method and effective for long-term survival of patients. But results from a larger number of patients and more long-term follow-up data are still necessary in order to evaluate the safety and usefulness of this method.

  7. Large volume unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: acute toxicity and initial outcome results with rapid arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute toxicity, initial outcome results and planning therapeutic parameters in radiation treatment of advanced lung cancer (stage III with volumetric modulated arcs using RapidArc (RA. Methods Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with stage IIIA-IIIB and with large volumes (GTV:299 ± 175 cm3, PTV:818 ± 206 cm3. Dose prescription was 66Gy in 33 fractions to mean PTV. Delivery was performed with two partial arcs with a 6 MV photon beam. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA allowed us to respect most planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk. In particular: for GTV D1% = 105.6 ± 1.7%, D99% = 96.7 ± 1.8%, D5%-D95% = 6.3 ± 1.4%; contra-lateral lung mean dose resulted in 13.7 ± 3.9Gy, for spinal cord D1% = 39.5 ± 4.0Gy, for heart V45Gy = 9.0 ± 7.0Gy, for esophagus D1% = 67.4 ± 2.2Gy. Delivery time was 133 ± 7s. At three months partial remission > 50% was observed in 56% of patients. Acute toxicities at 3 months showed 91% with grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 esophageal toxicity; 18% presented grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 pneumonia; no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The short follow-up does not allow assessment of local control and progression free survival. Conclusions RA proved to be a safe and advantageous treatment modality for NSCLC with large volumes. Long term observation of patients is needed to assess outcome and late toxicity.

  8. Characteristics of very large aspect angle E-region coherent echoes at 933 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Jackel

    Full Text Available The EISCAT UHF radar system was used to study the characteristics of E-region coherent backscatter at very large magnetic aspect angles (5–11°. Data taken using 60 μs pulses during elevation scans through horizontally uniform backscatter permitted the use of inversion techniques to determine height profiles of the scattering layer. The layer was always singly peaked, with a mean height of 104 km, and mean thickness (full width at half maximum of 10 km, both independent of aspect angle. Aspect sensitivities were also estimated, with the Sodankylä-Tromsø link observing 5 dB/degree at aspect angles near 5°, decreasing to 3 dB/degree at 10° aspect angle. Observed coherent phase velocities from all three stations were found to be roughly consistent with LOS measurements of a common E-region phase velocity vector. The E-region phase velocity had the same orientation as the F-region ion drift velocity, but was approximately 50% smaller in magnitude. Spectra were narrow with skewness of about +1 (for negative velocities, increasing slightly with aspect angle.

  9. Flare X-ray photochemistry of the E region ionosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, S. A.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.; Santos, A. M.; Shah, Siddhi Y.; Thirupathaiah, P.

    2016-07-01

    Based on electron density profiles obtained from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) we report X-ray flare responses in the E region ionosphere of Mars during six events that occurred on 28 March and 6 April 2001, 17 and 18 March and 21 April 2003, and 19 February 2005. We have developed a time-dependent Analytical Yield Spectrum model to calculate a time series of photoionization rate, photoelectron impact ionization rate, photoelectron flux, ion density, electron density, and ionospheric electron content (IEC) of the E region for each flare day. The estimated production rate, flux, and densities increase by 1-2 orders of magnitude due to effect of these flares in the E region ionosphere of Mars. The estimated IEC are compared with the measured IEC. It is found that the normalized IEC of the simulated E layer increased by a factor of 5-10 at the flare time compared to a factor of 2 enhancements in the normalized IEC of the corresponding MGS profiles.

  10. Application of RPR to Monoclinic and Triclinic Symmetries: Initial Results on Elasticity of Single-Crystal Diopside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, D. G.; Ohno, I.

    2001-12-01

    In past years, the rectangular parallelepiped resonance (RPR) method has been used to measure single-crystal elastic moduli, and their temperature dependences, of several materials important to geophysics. The high-temperature elastic properties of cubic, orthorhombic, tetragonal, and trigonal crystals, in addition to polycrystals, have all been studied with the RPR method. One feature of the RPR method is that, in principle, all the single-crystal elastic moduli (Cij) can be obtained from a single spectral sweep. However, no materials with crystal symmetry lower than orthorhombic symmetry have been reported in RPR studies. We extend the RPR theory to monoclinic and triclinic crystal symmetries. With these developments, we are able to compute single-crystal resonant spectra using a set of assumed Cij for right-rectangular parallelepiped monoclinic specimens cut along the b and c axes, or monoclinic specimens cut along known, but arbitrary, axes. We present initial results showing the comparison of calculated and measured resonance modes for single-crystal monoclinic diopside. Our measured resonance spectrum on chrome diopside is markedly more consistent with the spectrum calculated from the elasticity data of Collins and Brown (PCM, 26, 7-13, 1998) using a specimen that is 72% diopside than the end-member diopside elasticity data reported by Levien et al. (PCM, 4, 105-113, 1979).

  11. Integrated water vapor from IGS ground-based GPS observations. Initial results from a global 5-min data set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, S.; Dick, G.; Gendt, G.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany). Dept. 1 Geodesy and Remote Sensing

    2009-07-01

    Ground based GPS zenith path delay (ZPD) measurements are well established as a powerful tool for integrated water vapor (IWV) observation. The International GNSS Service (IGS) provides ZPD data of currently more than 300 globally distributed GPS stations. To derive IWV from these data, meteorological information (ground pressure and mean temperature above the station) are needed. Only a limited number of IGS stations is equipped with meteorological ground sensors up to now. Thus, meteorological data for IWV conversion are usually derived from nearby ground meteorological observations (ground pressure) and meteorological analyses (mean temperature). In this paper we demonstrate for the first time the applicability of ground pressure data from ECMWF meteorological analysis fields in this context. Beside simplified data handling (no single station data and quality control) this approach allows for IWV derivation if nearby meteorological stations are not available. Using ECMWF ground pressure and mean temperature data the new IGS 5-min ZPD data set has been converted to IWV for the first time. We present initial results from selected stations with ground meteorological sensors including pressure and temperature comparisons between ECMWF and local measurements. The GPS IWV is generally validated by comparison with ECMWF IWV. The ECMWF derived station meteorological data are compared with local measurements at all accordingly equipped stations. Based on this comparison, the mean error (in terms of standard deviation) introduced by time interpolation of the 6-hourly ECMWF data is estimated below 0.2 mm IWV. (orig.)

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Optical Tomographic Imaging of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions: Initial Clinical Results of 19 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quing Zhu

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of solid benign and malignant tumors presents a unique challenge to all noninvasive imaging modalities. Ultrasound is used in conjunction with mammography to differentiate simple cysts from solid lesions. However, the overlapping appearances of benign and malignant lesions make ultrasound less useful in differentiating solid lesions, resulting in a large number of benign biopsies. Optical tomography using near-infrared diffused light has great potential for imaging functional parameters of 1 tumor hemoglobin concentration, 2 oxygen saturation, 3 metabolism, as well as other tumor distinguishing characteristics. These parameters can differentiate benign from malignant lesions. However, optical tomography, when used alone, suffers from low spatial resolution and target localization uncertainty due to intensive light scattering. Our aim is to combine diffused light imaging with ultrasound in a novel way for the detection and diagnosis of solid lesions. Initial findings of two earlystage invasive carcinomas, one combined fibroadenoma and fibrocystic change with scattered foci of lobular neoplasia/lobular carcinoma in situ, 16 benign lesions are reported in this paper. The invasive cancer cases reveal about two-fold greater total hemoglobin concentration (mean 119 μmol than benign cases (mean 67 μmol, suggest that the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions might be enhanced by this type of achievable optical quantification with ultrasound localization. Furthermore, the small invasive cancers are well localized and have wavelength-dependent appearance in optical absorption maps, whereas the benign lesions appear diffused and relatively wavelength-independent.

  13. Simulating the mid-Pliocene climate with the MIROC general circulation model: experimental design and initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-L. Chan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, PlioMIP (Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project was established to assess the ability of various climate models to simulate the mid-Pliocene warm period (mPWP, 3.3–3.0 million years ago. We use MIROC4m, a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM, and its atmospheric component alone to simulate the mPWP, utilizing up-to-date data sets designated in PlioMIP as boundary conditions and adhering to the protocols outlined. In this paper, a brief description of the model is given, followed by an explanation of the experimental design and implementation of the boundary conditions, such as topography and sea surface temperature. Initial results show increases of approximately 10°C in the zonal mean surface air temperature at high latitudes accompanied by a decrease in the equator-to-pole temperature gradient. Temperatures in the tropical regions increase more in the AOGCM. However, warming of the AOGCM sea surface in parts of the northern North Atlantic Ocean and Nordic Seas is less than that suggested by proxy data. An investigation of the model-data discrepancies and further model intercomparison studies can lead to a better understanding of the mid-Pliocene climate and of its role in assessing future climate change.

  14. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: Initial Results and Catalog from the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Mullaney, J R; Aird, J; Alexander, D M; Civano, F M; Hickox, R C; Lansbury, G B; Ajello, M; Assef, R; Ballantyne, D R; Balokovic, M; Bauer, F E; Brandt, W N; Boggs, S E; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Elvis, M; Forster, K; Gandhi, P; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Koss, M; LaMassa, S M; Luo, B; Madsen, K K; Puccetti, S; Saez, C; Stern, D; Treister, E; Urry, C M; Wik, D R; Zappacosta, L; Zhang, W

    2015-01-01

    We present initial results and the source catalog from the NuSTAR survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (hereafter, ECDFS) - currently the deepest contiguous component of the NuSTAR extragalactic survey program. The survey covers the full ~30 arcmin x 30 arcmin area of this field to a maximum depth of ~360 ks (~220 ks when corrected for vignetting at 3-24 keV), reaching sensitivity limits of ~1.3 x 10^-14 erg/cm2/s (3-8 keV), ~3.4 x 10^-14 erg/cm2/s (8-24 keV) and ~3.0 x 10^-14 erg/cm2/s (3-24 keV). Fifty four (54) sources are detected over the full field, although five of these are found to lie below our significance threshold once contaminating flux from neighboring (i.e., blended) sources is taken into account. Of the remaining 49 that are significant, 19 are detected in the 8-24 keV band. The 8-24 keV to 3-8 keV band ratios of the twelve sources that are detected in both bands span the range 0.39-1.7, corresponding to a photon index range of Gamma ~ 0.5-2.3, with a median photon index of 1.70 +/...

  15. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition: Initial Evaluation of 3-C PIV Results of the Hart-II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughes; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2002-01-01

    An initial evaluation is made of extensive three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements within the wake across a rotor disk plane. The model is a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in forward flight simulation. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). Included are wake vortex field measurements over the advancing and retreating sides of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition important for impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Also included are advancing side results for rotor angle variations from climb to steep descent. Using detailed PIV vector maps of the vortex fields, methods of extracting key vortex parameters are examined and a new method was developed and evaluated. An objective processing method, involving a center-of-vorticity criterion and a vorticity 'disk' integration, was used to determine vortex core size, strength, core velocity distribution characteristics, and unsteadiness. These parameters are mapped over the rotor disk and offer unique physical insight for these parameters of importance for rotor noise and vibration prediction.

  16. Initial Results of a Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Survey of Nearby Star-forming Galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwine, Keith; McCandliss, Stephan R.; Wofford, Aida; Leitherer, Claus; Heckman, Timothy M.; France, Kevin; Fleming, Brian

    2017-01-01

    We present initial results for the HST Cycle 22 proposal 13761. We proposed to observe 75 target star-forming galaxies at a redshift 0.02 COS, spanning a bandpass of 1100 < λ < 2400 angstroms, and have thus far observed 34 of them. The main thrust of this project is to provide a previously unavailable survey of star-forming galaxies in this redshift range, allowing investigation into the factors that determine the Lyman-alpha emission at these low redshifts. We have begun a statistical analysis of the relationship between Lyman-alpha emission and the morphologies of the galaxies, such as absorption line strengths of other species, including various ionization states of oxygen, silicon, and other species to probe intrinsic properties of the emitting galaxy, such as metallicity, the gas-to-dust ratio, and local velocity fields. We have acquired a very rich dataset, with enough samples to try to answer a variety of open questions regarding the far-ultraviolet spectra of bright Lyman-alpha emitters. This work is supported by a NASA Grant HST-GO-13761 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  17. Crustal Structure Across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Initial Results From the PRIDE-SEISORZ Active-Source Seismic Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, J. P.; Moffat, L.; Lizarralde, D.; Laletsang, K.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Modisi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa Rift System, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi. The SEISORZ active-source seismic component of PRIDE focused on the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana, with the main goal of imaging the crustal structure across the ORZ. This will allow us to estimate total crustal extension, determine the pattern and amount of thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrasts in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a fold belt. In November 2014 we conducted a crustal-scale, 450-km-long seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile consisting of 19 sources (shots in 30-m-deep boreholes) spaced ~25 km apart from each other, and 900 receivers (IRIS/PASSCAL "Texan" dataloggers and 4.5Hz geophones) with ~500 m spacing. From NW to SE, the profile crosses several tectonic domains: the Congo craton, the Damara metamorphic belt and the Ghanzi-Chobe fold belt where the axis of the ORZ is located, and continues into the Kalahari craton. The record sections display clear crustal refraction (Pg) and wide-angle Moho reflection (PmP) phases for all 17 of the good-quality shots, and a mantle refraction arrival (Pn), with the Pg-PmP-Pn triplication appearing at 175 km offset. There are distinct changes in the traveltime and amplitude of these phases along the transect, and on either side of the axis, that seem to correlate with sharp transitions across tectonic terrains. Initial modeling suggests: (1) the presence of a sedimentary half-graben structure at the rift axis beneath the Okavango delta, bounded to the SE by the Kunyere-Thamalakane fault system; (2) faster crustal Vp in the domains to the NW of the ORZ; and (3) thicker crust (45-50 km) at both ends of the profile within the Congo and Kalahari craton domains than at the ORZ and

  18. Developing Methodologies for Applying TRMM-Estimated Precipitation Data to Hydrological Modeling of a South TX Watershed - Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, K. J.; Bennett, M. E.

    2007-05-01

    Previous experience with hydrological modeling in South Texas, which is located along the Texas-Mexico border, suggests that NWS ground measurements are too widely scattered to provide reliable precipitation input for modeling. In addition, a significant fraction of the study region is located at the edge of the coverage envelopes of the NWS NEXRAD weather radars present in the region limiting the accuracy of these systems to provide reliable precipitation estimates. Therefore, we are exploring whether TRMM estimated-precipitation data (3B42), in some form, can be used to support hydrological modeling in the Middle Rio Grande and Nueces River Basin watersheds. We have begun our modeling efforts by focusing on the middle Nueces watershed (7770 sq km). To model this largely rural watershed we selected the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Three precipitation datasets were selected for our initial model runs that include: (1) nearest NWS cooperative hourly rain gauge data, (2) three hourly TRMM 3B42 estimated precipitation, and (3) combination TRMM 3B42/NWS rain gauge datasets in which ground measurements are used for three hourly periods lacking high quality satellite microwave precipitation estimates as determined from TRMM 3G68 data. Three dataset were aggregated into an average daily estimate of precipitation for each TRMM grid cell. Manual calibration of was completed achieving model results that yield realistic monthly and annual water balances with both gauge and satellite estimate precipitation datasets. In the future, we plan to use the newly developed automatic calibration routine for SWAT, which is based on the Shuffled Complex Evolution algorithm, to optimize modeled discharge results from this study.

  19. Initial results in the development of a highly portable sensor for multi-faceted studies of ocean acidificatio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbacher, E.; Byrne, R. H.; Adornato, L.; Liu, X.

    2016-02-01

    The lowering of seawater pH due to increased anthropogenic carbon dioxide (known as ocean acidification, or OA) has received attention from scientists and lawmakers around the globe. It is generally recognized that many of the laboratories engaged in OA research do not possess the facilities or expertise necessary to measure carbon system parameters at the precision required to produce reliable, actionable results. To address this deficiency, we are developing the next evolution in carbon-system sensors. Drawing on our experience in developing and deploying our multi-parameter inorganic carbon analyzer (MICA) instruments, we will build a new system (MICA III) that will be easy to use and will require virtually no supporting infrastructure. Advances in commercial technology and refinement of our methods enables us to dramatically reduce the size and cost of MICA instrumentation. MICA III will measure three parameters: pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and total alkalinity (TA). Our instrument will include innovative designs for temperature compensation and total alkalinity measurements and will utilize an embedded display/user interface to produce a truly portable (about the size of a large briefcase) sensor for studies of OA and environmental change. Our goal is to develop an instrument that is easily deployed by both chemists and non-chemists to produce carbon system data fully consistent with best practices protocols. In this presentation we discuss overall objectives, highlight the key elements of our initial design, and present results from laboratory calibrations and measurements using certified reference materials. We also share plans for upcoming sensor field evaluations and future development of MICA III.

  20. Initial Results from the Miniature Imager for Neutral Ionospheric Atoms and Magnetospheric Electrons (MINI-ME) on the FASTSAT Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Rowland, Douglas; Keller, John W.; Chornay, Dennis; Khazanov, George; Herrero, Federico; Moore, Thomas E.; Kujawski, Joseph; Casas, Joseph C.; Wilson, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    The MINI-ME instrument is a collaborative effort between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the U.S. Naval Academy, funded solely through GSFC Internal Research and Development (IRAD) awards. It detects neutral atoms from about 10 eV to about 700 eV (in 30 energy steps) in its current operating configuration with an approximately 10 degree by 360 degree field-of-view, divided into six sectors. The instrument was delivered on August 3, 2009 to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for integration with the FASTSAT-HSV01 small spacecraft bus developed by MSFC and a commercial partner, one of six Space Experiment Review Board (SERB) experiments on FASTSAT and one of three GSFC instruments (PISA and TTI being the other two). The FASTSAT spacecraft was launched on November 21, 2010 from Kodiak, Alaska on a Minotaur IV as a secondary payload and inserted into a 650 km, 72 degree inclination orbit, very nearly circular. MINI-ME has been collecting science data, as spacecraft resources would permit, in "optimal science mode" since January 20, 2011. In this presentation, we report initial science results including the potential first observations of neutral molecular ionospheric outflow. At the time of this abstract, we have identified 15 possible molecular outflow events. All these events occur between about 65 and 82 degrees geomagnetic latitude and most map to the auroral oval. The MINI-ME results provide an excellent framework for interpretation of the MILENA data, two instruments almost identical to MINI-ME that will launch on the VISIONS suborbital mission

  1. Soil processes and functions across an international network of Critical Zone Observatories: Introduction to experimental methods and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwart, Steven; Menon, Manoj; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Bloem, Jaap; Blum, Winfried E. H.; Souza, Danielle Maia de; Davidsdotir, Brynhildur; Duffy, Christopher; Lair, Georg J.; Kram, Pavel; Lamacova, Anna; Lundin, Lars; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P.; Novak, Martin; Panagos, Panos; Ragnarsdottir, Kristin Vala; Reynolds, Brian; Robinson, David; Rousseva, Svetla; de Ruiter, Peter; van Gaans, Pauline; Weng, Liping; White, Tim; Zhang, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Growth in human population and demand for wealth creates ever-increasing pressure on global soils, leading to soil losses and degradation worldwide. Critical Zone science studies the impact linkages between these pressures, the resulting environmental state of soils, and potential interventions to protect soil and reverse degradation. New research on soil processes is being driven by the scientific hypothesis that soil processes can be described along a life cycle of soil development. This begins with formation of new soil from parent material, development of the soil profile, and potential loss of the developed soil functions and the soil itself under overly intensive anthropogenic land use, thus closing the cycle. Four Critical Zone Observatories in Europe have been selected focusing research at sites that represent key stages along the hypothetical soil life cycle; incipient soil formation, productive use of soil for farming and forestry, and decline of soil due to longstanding intensive agriculture. Initial results from the research show that soil develops important biogeochemical properties on the time scale of decades and that soil carbon and the development of favourable soil structure takes place over similar time scales. A new mathematical model of soil aggregate formation and degradation predicts that set-aside land at the most degraded site studied can develop substantially improved soil structure with the accumulation of soil carbon over a period of several years. Further results demonstrate the rapid dynamics of soil carbon; how quickly it can be lost, and also demonstrate how data from the CZOs can be used to determine parameter values for models at catchment scale. A structure for a new integrated Critical Zone model is proposed that combines process descriptions of carbon and nutrient flows, a simplified description of the soil food web, and reactive transport; all coupled with a dynamic model for soil structure and soil aggregation. This approach

  2. Design of a digital beam attenuation system for computed tomography. Part II. Performance study and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Mistretta, Charles A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1550 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to present a performance study of the digital beam attenuator (DBA) for implementing fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) using a simulation framework developed to model the incorporation of the DBA into an existing CT system. Additionally, initial results will be presented using a prototype DBA and the realization of the prototype will be described. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental use of a device capable of modulating x-ray fluence as a function of fan angle using a CT geometry. Methods: To realize FFMCT, the authors propose to use a wedge design in which one wedge is held stationary and another wedge is moved over the stationary wedge. Due to the wedge shape, the composite thickness of the two wedges changes as a function of the amount of overlap between the wedges. This design allows for the wedges to modulate the photon fluence incident onto a patient. Using a simulation environment, the effect of changing the number of wedges has on dose, scatter, detector dynamic range, and noise uniformity is explored. Experimental results are presented using a prototype DBA having ten Fe wedges and a c-arm CT system geometry. The experimental DBA results are compared to non-DBA scans using scatter and detector dynamic range as metrics. Both flat field and bowtie filtered CT acquisitions were simulated for comparison with the DBA. Results: Numerical results suggest that substantial gains in noise uniformity and scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) can be obtained using only seven wedges. After seven wedges, the decrease in noise ununiformity and SPR falls off at a lower rate. Simulations comparing CT acquisitions between flat field, bowtie enabled, and DBA CT acquisitions suggest DBA-FFMCT can reduce dose relative to flat field CT by Almost-Equal-To 3 times. A bowtie filter under the same imaging conditions was shown to only allow a dose reduction of 1.65 times. Experimentally, a 10 wedge DBA prototype result showed

  3. High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing: Analysis and Initial Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Kapernick, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system, providing system characterization data and allowing one to work through various fabrication, assembly and integration issues without the cost and time associated with a full ground nuclear test. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Testing with non-optimized heater elements allows one to assess thermal, heat transfer. and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. High fidelity thermal simulators that match both the static and the dynamic fuel pin performance that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor can vastly increase the value of non-nuclear test results. With optimized simulators, the integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics and assess potential design improvements at relatively small fiscal investment. Initial conceptual thermal simulator designs are determined by simple one-dimensional analysis at a single axial location and at steady state conditions; feasible concepts are then input into a detailed three-dimensional model for comparison to expected fuel pin performance. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance for a proposed reactor design is determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and comparison is made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analyses, a conceptual high fidelity design is developed

  4. Percutaneous transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects: initial single-centre experience and follow-up results. Initial experience with three-dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Serge; Suttorp, Maarten-Jan; Ernst, Sjef M P G; Six, Jacob A; Mannaerts, Herman F J; Kamp, Otto; Plokker, Thijs H W M; Jaarsma, Wybren

    2005-04-01

    Registry to report our single-centre experience in closing defects of the atrial septum. Between 1996 and 2001, transcatheter device closure of significant atrial septal defects was performed in 32 adults (mean age 45.1 years, range from 15 to 76 years), using different device types. Six patients had a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and 26 patients had a secundum atrial septal defect (ASD II). Defects were selected by means of two-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (2D TOE). For 12 defects additional three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3D TOE) was performed. Mean balloon-stretched diameter was 19.3 mm (range from 11 to 24 mm). A device was successfully placed in all PFO patients (100%) without complications at follow-up. Successful immediate device placement occurred in 24 out of 26 ASD patients. Two immediate placement failures, 1 device embolisation and 1 device non-fixation, occurred and required urgent surgery. There was 1 patient with pericardial effusion after the intervention, requiring pericardiocentesis. Three late placement failures occurred: 2 device embolisations and 1 device dislocation. Clinical success after 3 to 6 months follow-up, defined as the absence of shunt or small shunt, was achieved in all 6 PFO patients and in 21 out of 23 ASD patients (1 device embolisation, requiring surgery, occurred before follow-up was completed). Two patients with significant shunt, 1 late device dislocation and 1 late device embolisation, underwent elective surgery. For patient selection, 3D TOE proved useful in the evaluation of large and/or complex defects. Transcatheter device closure of carefully selected atrial septal defects is an alternative to surgery. Although the results are promising, surgical back-up is often needed.

  5. Characteristics of very large aspect angle E-region coherent echoes at 933 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackel, B. J.; Moorcroft, D. R.; Schlegel, K.

    1997-01-01

    The EISCAT UHF radar system was used to study the characteristics of E-region coherent backscatter at very large magnetic aspect angles (5-11°). Data taken using 60 s pulses during elevation scans through horizontally uniform backscatter permitted the use of inversion techniques to determine height profiles of the scattering layer. The layer was always singly peaked, with a mean height of 104 km, and mean thickness (full width at half maximum) of 10 km, both independent of aspect angle. Aspect sensitivities were also estimated, with the Sodankylä-Tromsø link observing 5 dB/degree at aspect angles near 5°, decreasing to 3 dB/degree at 10° aspect angle. Observed coherent phase velocities from all three stations were found to be roughly consistent with LOS measurements of a common E-region phase velocity vector. The E-region phase velocity had the same orientation as the F-region ion drift velocity, but was approximately 50% smaller in magnitude. Spectra were narrow with skewness of about +1 (for negative velocities), increasing slightly with aspect angle. Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood (Imperial College, London), J. C. Samson (University of Alberta, Edmonton), L. J. Lanzerotti (AT&T Bell Laboratories), A. Wolfe (New York City Technical College) and to Dr. M. Vellante (University of LÁquila) for helpful discussions. They also thank Dr. A. Meloni (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Roma) who made available geomagnetic field observations from LÁquila Geomagnetic Observatory. This research activity at LÁquila is supported by MURST (40% and 60% contracts) and by GIFCO/CNR. Topical Editor K.-H. Glaßmeier thanks C. Waters and S. Fujita for their help in evaluating this paper.-> Correspondence to :P. Francia->

  6. Nonlinear wave structures in collisional plasma of auroral E-region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volosevich

    Full Text Available Studies of the auroral plasma with small-scale inhomogenieties producing the VHF-radar reflections (radar aurora when observed in conditions of the saturated Farley-Buneman instability within the auroral E region, show strong nonlinear interactions and density fluctuations of 5–15%. Such nonlinearity and high fluctation amplitudes are inconsistent with the limitations of the weak turbulence theory, and thus a theory for arbitrary amplitudes is needed. To this end, a nonlinear theory is described for electrostatic MHD moving plasma structures of arbitrary amplitude for conditions throughout the altitude range of the collisional auroral E region. The equations are derived, from electron and ion motion self-consistent with the electric field, for the general case of the one-dimensional problem. They take into account nonlinearity, electron and ion inertia, diffusion, deviation from quasi-neutrality, and dynamical ion viscosity. The importance of the ion viscosity for dispersion is stressed, while deviation from the quasi-neutrality can be important only at rather low plasma densities, not typical for the auroral E region. In a small amplitude limit these equations have classical nonlinear solutions of the type of "electrostatic shock wave" or of knoidal waves. In a particular case these knoidal waves degrade to a dissipative soliton. A two-dimensional case of a quasi-neutral plasma is considered in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field by way of the Poisson brackets, but neglecting the nonlinearity and ion inertia. It is shown that in these conditions an effective saturation can be achieved at the stationary turbulence level of order of 10%.

  7. Proliferation Security Initiative: Agencies Have Adopted Policies and Procedures but Steps Needed to Meet Reporting Requirement and to Measure Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    has been actively participating in the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) to assist in U.S. efforts to break up black markets , detect and...Committee on Armed Services United States Senate The Honorable John Kerry Chairman The Honorable Richard G. Lugar Ranking Member Committee on

  8. Long-Term Collaboration--Building Relationships and Achieving Results Through a Neighborhoods Initiative Program: The Resurrection Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiewel, Wim; Guerrero, Ismael

    1997-01-01

    Describes the University of Illinois at Chicago's Neighborhoods Initiative, a partnership with a community-based development corporation designed to strengthen life in two local neighborhoods. Objectives include university/community agency partnerships, development of community organizational capacity to address future needs, institutional changes…

  9. Initial Results of Image-Guided Percutaneous Ablation as Second-Line Treatment for Symptomatic Vascular Anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Scott M., E-mail: Thompson.scott@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Mayo Graduate School, Mayo Medical School and the Mayo Clinic Medical Scientist Training Program, College of Medicine (United States); Callstrom, Matthew R., E-mail: callstrom.matthew@mayo.edu; McKusick, Michael A., E-mail: mckusick.michael@mayo.edu; Woodrum, David A., E-mail: woodrum.david@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine (United States)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, safety, and early effectiveness of percutaneous image-guided ablation as second-line treatment for symptomatic soft-tissue vascular anomalies (VA).Materials and MethodsAn IRB-approved retrospective review was undertaken of all patients who underwent percutaneous image-guided ablation as second-line therapy for treatment of symptomatic soft-tissue VA during the period from 1/1/2008 to 5/20/2014. US/CT- or MRI-guided and monitored cryoablation or MRI-guided and monitored laser ablation was performed. Clinical follow-up began at one-month post-ablation.ResultsEight patients with nine torso or lower extremity VA were treated with US/CT (N = 4) or MRI-guided (N = 2) cryoablation or MRI-guided laser ablation (N = 5) for moderate to severe pain (N = 7) or diffuse bleeding secondary to hemangioma–thrombocytopenia syndrome (N = 1). The median maximal diameter was 9.0 cm (6.5–11.1 cm) and 2.5 cm (2.3–5.3 cm) for VA undergoing cryoablation and laser ablation, respectively. Seven VA were ablated in one session, one VA initially treated with MRI-guided cryoablation for severe pain was re-treated with MRI-guided laser ablation due to persistent moderate pain, and one VA was treated in a planned two-stage session due to large VA size. At an average follow-up of 19.8 months (range 2–62 months), 7 of 7 patients with painful VA reported symptomatic pain relief. There was no recurrence of bleeding at five-year post-ablation in the patient with hemangioma–thrombocytopenia syndrome. There were two minor complications and no major complications.ConclusionImage-guided percutaneous ablation is a feasible, safe, and effective second-line treatment option for symptomatic VA.

  10. Periodontal Disease and Incident Cancer Risk among Postmenopausal Women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwizu, Ngozi N; Marshall, James R; Moysich, Kirsten; Genco, Robert J; Hovey, Kathleen M; Mai, Xiaodan; LaMonte, Michael J; Freudenheim, Jo L; Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2017-08-01

    Background: Periodontal pathogens have been isolated from precancerous and cancerous lesions and also shown to promote a procarcinogenic microenvironment. Few studies have examined periodontal disease as a risk factor for total cancer, and none have focused on older women. We examined whether periodontal disease is associated with incident cancer among postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.Methods: Our prospective cohort study comprised 65,869 women, ages 54 to 86 years. Periodontal disease information was obtained via self-report questionnaires administered between 1999 and 2003, whereas ascertainment of cancer outcomes occurred through September 2013, with a maximum follow-up period of 15 years. Physician-adjudicated incident total cancers were the main outcomes and site-specific cancers were secondary outcomes. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. All analyses were conducted two-sided.Results: During a mean follow-up of 8.32 years, 7,149 cancers were identified. Periodontal disease history was associated with increased total cancer risk (multivariable-adjusted HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.08-1.20); findings were similar in analyses limited to 34,097 never-smokers (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.04-1.22). Associations were observed for breast (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.03-1.23), lung (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.14-1.51), esophagus (HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.64-6.53), gallbladder (HR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.01-2.95), and melanoma skin (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.48) cancers. Stomach cancer was borderline (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.94-2.67).Conclusions: Periodontal disease increases risk of total cancer among older women, irrespective of smoking, and certain anatomic sites appear to be vulnerable. Impact: Our findings support the need for further understanding of the effect of periodontal disease on cancer outcomes. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1255-65. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer

  11. Is mercury in Tibetan Medicine toxic? Clinical, neurocognitive and biochemical results of an initial cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallon, Sarah; Dory, Yahav; Barghouthy, Yazeed; Tamdin, Tsewang; Sangmo, Rigzin; Tashi, Jamyang; Yangdon, Sonam; Yeshi, Tenzin; Sadutshang, Tsetan; Rotenberg, Michal; Cohen, Elinor; Harlavan, Yehudit; Sharabi, Galit; Bdolah-Abram, Tali

    2017-02-01

    Mercury an important therapeutic substance in Tibetan Medicine undergoes complex "detoxification" prior to inclusion in multi-ingredient formulas. In an initial cross-sectional study, patients taking Tibetan Medicine for various conditions were evaluated for mercury toxicity. Two groups were identified: Group 1, patients taking " Tsothel" the most important detoxified mercury preparation and Group 2, patients taking other mercury preparations or mercury free Tibetan Medicine. Atomic fluorescence spectrometry of Tibetan Medicine showed mercury consumption 130 µg/kg/day (Group 1) and 30 µg/kg/day (Group 2) ( P ≤ 0.001), levels above EPA (RfDs) suggested threshold (0.3 µg/kg /day) for oral chronic exposure. Mean duration of Tibetan Medicine treatment was 9 ± 17 months (range 3-116) (Group 1) and 5 ± 1.96 months (range 1-114) (Group 2) (NS) with cumulative days of mercury containing Tibetan Medicine, 764 days ± 1214 (range 135-7330) vs. 103 days ± 111 (range 0-426), respectively ( P ≤ 0.001). Comparison of treatment groups with healthy referents (Group 3) not taking Tibetan Medicine showed no significant differences in prevalence of 23 non-specific symptoms of mercury toxicity, abnormal neurological, cardiovascular and dental findings and no correlation with mercury exposure variables; consumption, cumulative treatment days, blood/ urine Hg. Liver and renal function tests in treatment groups were not significantly increased compared to referents, with mean urine Beta2 Microglobulin within the normal range and not significantly associated with Hg exposure variables after correcting for confounding variables. Neurocognitive testing showed no significant intergroup differences for Wechsler Memory Scale, Grooved Pegboard, Visual Retention, but Group1 scores were better for Mini-Mental, Brief Word Learning, Verbal Fluency after correcting for confounding variables. These results suggest mercury containing Tibetan Medicine does not

  12. Initiation of an anal cancer screening in HIV+MSM: results of cytology, biopsy and determination of risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Libois

    2012-11-01

    ±biopsy is the only way to detect those lesions and should be performed systematically in HIV+MSM. Risk factor for AIN2+was a nadir CD4<100/µl. A normal cytology was associated with an undetectable VL and a longer duration of HAART. Those results provide further argument for early initiation of HAART.

  13. The INTERBALL-Tail ELECTRON experiment: initial results on the low-latitude boundary layer of the dawn magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-A. Sauvaud

    Full Text Available The Toulouse electron spectrometer flown on the Russian project INTERBALL-Tail performs electron measurements from 10 to 26 000 eV over a 4 solid angle in a satellite rotation period. The INTERBALL-Tail probe was launched on 3 August 1995 together with a subsatellite into a 65° inclination orbit with an apogee of about 30 RE. The INTERBALL mission also includes a polar spacecraft launched in August 1996 for correlated studies of the outer magnetosphere and of the auroral regions. We present new observations concerning the low-latitude boundary layers (LLBL of the magnetosphere obtained near the dawn magnetic meridian. LLBL are encountered at the interface between two plasma regimes, the magnetosheath and the dayside extension of the plasma sheet. Unexpectedly, the radial extent of the region where LLBL electrons can be sporadically detected as plasma clouds can reach up to 5 RE inside the magnetopause. The LLBL core electrons have an average energy of the order of 100 eV and are systematically field-aligned and counterstreaming. As a trend, the temperature of the LLBL electrons increases with decreasing distance to Earth. Along the satellite orbit, the apparent time of occurrence of LLBL electrons can vary from about 5 to 20 min from one pass to another. An initial first comparison between electron- and magnetic-field measurements indicates that the LLBL clouds coincide with a strong increase in the magnetic field (by up to a factor of 2. The resulting strong magnetic field gradient can explain why the plasma-sheet electron flux in the keV range is strongly depressed in LLBL occurrence regions (up to a factor of sim10. We also show that LLBL electron encounters are related to field-aligned current structures and that wide LLBL correspond to northward interplanetary magnetic field. Evidence for LLBL/plasma-sheet electron leakage into the magnetosheath during southward IMF is also presented.

  14. Chest pain control with kinesiology taping after lobectomy for lung cancer: initial results of a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Andrea; Grande, Annamaria; Castiglioni, Massimo; Gasperini, Laura; Faini, Agnese; Spampatti, Sebastiano; Nardecchia, Elisa; Terzaghi, Lorena; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Rotolo, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Kinesiology taping (KT) is a rehabilitative technique performed by the cutaneous application of a special elastic tape. We tested the safety and efficacy of KT in reducing postoperative chest pain after lung lobectomy. One-hundred and seventeen consecutive patients, both genders, age 18-85, undergoing lobectomy for lung cancer between January 2013 and July 2015 were initially considered. Lobectomies were performed by the same surgical team, with thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) access. Exclusion criteria (n = 25 patients) were: previous KT exposure, recent trauma, pre-existing chest pain, lack of informed consent, >24-h postoperative intensive care unit treatment. After surgery, the 92 eligible patients were randomized to KT experimental group (n = 46) or placebo control group (n = 46). Standard postoperative analgesia was administered in both groups (paracetamol/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, epidural analgesia including opioids), with supplemental analgesia boluses at patient request. On postoperative day 1 in addition, in experimental group patients a specialized physiotherapist applied KT, with standardized tape length, tension and shape, over three defined skin areas: at the chest access site pain trigger point; over the ipsilateral deltoid/trapezius; lower anterior chest. In control group, usual dressing tape mimicking KT was applied over the same areas, as placebo. Thoracic pain severity score [visual analogue scale (VAS) ranging 0-10] was self-assessed by all patients on postoperative days 1, 2, 5, 8, 9 and 30. The KT group and the control group had similar demographics, lung cancer clinico-pathological features and thoracotomy/VATS ratio. Postoperatively, the two groups also resulted similar in supplemental analgesia, complication rate, mean duration of chest drainage and length of stay. There were no adverse events with KT application. After tape application, KT patients reported overall less thoracic pain than the

  15. [Organisation of care and initial management of severe head injury in Spain: Results of a national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanes, Vicente

    The main objective of the study is to obtain knowledge about the organisation of care for severe head trauma as well as the initial management of these patients in Neurosurgical Departments in Spain. A 22-item questionnaire was designed and sent to 59 Neurosurgical Departments. The aim of the questionnaire was to collect data regarding the general profile of the patients with a severe head injury, the general characteristics of the hospitals, the initial care of these patients, the monitoring techniques used, and the measures used to control Intracranial pressure (ICP). Of the 59 Neurosurgical Departments identified, 29 (49.2%) completed the questionnaire. There was a wide variability in the number of patients treated per year between the different departments. The leadership of care often fell (58.6%) on the intensive care specialist. Many (69%) of the departments did not have a neurosurgeon specially dedicated to the management and monitoring of these patients. The initial care in the Emergency department usually fell (51.7%) on the general medicine practitioner. The availability of computed tomography (CT) was universal. The use of telemedicine was highly variable. ICP monitoring was performed on more than 75% of patients in most (89.7%) of departments, but there was limited use of other monitoring techniques. Most Departments followed the recommendations of the Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF) guidelines for the control of ICP. The organisation of care and the initial management of severe head trauma in Spain is very similar to its neighbouring countries. However, there are shortcomings, such as low participation by a neurosurgeon in the initial management of these patients, insufficient use of telemedicine, and the low implementation of certain brain monitoring techniques (SjO2, PtiO2, and Doppler). Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Electric Field, Ring Current, Plasmasphere, and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fok, M.-C.; Ridley, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Further development of our self-consistent model of interacting ring current (RC) ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is presented. This model incorporates large scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and treats self-consistently not only EMIC waves and RC ions, but also the magnetospheric electric field, RC, and plasmasphere. Initial simulations indicate that the region beyond geostationary orbit should be included in the simulation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Additionally, a self-consistent description, based on first principles, of the ionospheric conductance is required. These initial simulations further show that in order to model the EMIC wave distribution and wave spectral properties accurately, the plasmasphere should also be simulated self-consistently, since its fine structure requires as much care as that of the RC. Finally, an effect of the finite time needed to reestablish a new potential pattern throughout the ionosphere and to communicate between the ionosphere and the equatorial magnetosphere cannot be ignored.

  17. Debris-flow monitoring at the Rebaixader torrent, Central Pyrenees, Spain: results on initiation, volume and dynamic behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Hurlimann Ziegler, Marcel; Abancó, Clàudia; Moya Sánchez, José

    2014-01-01

    The sophisticated monitoring system installed in the Rebaixader catchment incorporates a total of 6 different stations: four stations recording information on the initiation mechanisms (two meteorological stations and two infiltration stations), and two stations focussing on the debris flow detection and the dynamic behaviour of the flows. Between August 2009 and August 2013, seven debris flows and seventeen debris floods were detected. The volumes of the debris flows ranged from 2,100 to 16,...

  18. Mid-latitude E-region bulk motions inferred from digital ionosonde and HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Delloue

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-latitude E-region there is now evidence suggesting that neutral winds play a significant role in driving the local plasma instabilities and electrodynamics inside sporadicE layers. Neutral winds can be inferred from coherent radar backscatter measurements of the range-/azimuth-time-intensity (RTI/ATI striations of quasi-periodic (QP echoes, or from radar interferometer/imaging observations. In addition, neutral winds in the E-region can be estimated from angle-of-arrival ionosonde measurements of sporadic-E layers. In the present paper we analyse concurrent ionosonde and HF coherent backscatter observations obtained when a Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI was operated under a portion of the field-of-view of the Valensole high frequency (HF radar. The Valensole radar, a mid-latitude radar located in the south of France with a large azimuthal scanning capability of 82° (24° E to 58° W, was used to deduce zonal bulk motions of QP echoing regions using ATI analysis. The CADI was used to measure angle-of-arrival information in two orthogonal horizontal directions and thus derive the motion of sporadic-E patches drifting with the neutral wind. This paper compares the neutral wind drifts of the unstable sporadic-E patches as determined by the two instruments. The CADI measurements show a predominantly westward aligned motion, but the measured zonal drifts are underestimated relative to those observed with the Valensole radar.

  19. Radar observations of artificial E-region field-aligned irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nossa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs were generated using HAARP in four different experimental modes and observed with a coherent scatter radar imager located 450 km to the southwest where it could detect field-aligned backscatter. The experiments were conducted in July of 2008, during the Polar Aeronomy and Radio Science Summer School (PARS, during quiet conditions in the daytime when the E layer was dense and absorption was modest. The echoes observed during zenith and magnetic zenith heating experiments were deflected from their nominally anticipated horizontal positions toward the midpoint position. The occurrence of hysteresis when heating with amplitude modulated pulses implied the development of the resonance instability, although the threshold for the onset of instability appeared to be higher than what has been predicted theoretically. Heating experiments involving pump frequencies slightly above and below the second electron gyroharmonic frequency produced no significant differences in the observed echoes. Finally, heating with a pump frequency slightly above the E region critical frequency appears to have produced FAIs at two distinct altitudes where the upper-hybrid resonance condition could be satisfied.

  20. More evidence for a planetary wave link with midlatitude E region coherent backscatter and sporadic E layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schlegel

    Full Text Available Measurements of midlatitude E region coherent backscatter obtained during four summers with SESCAT, a 50 MHz Doppler system operating in Crete, Greece, and concurrent ionosonde recordings from the same ionospheric volume obtained with a CADI for one of these summers, are used to analyse the long-term variability in echo and Es occurrence. Echo and Es layer occurrences, computed in percent of time over a 12-h nighttime interval, take the form of time sequences. Linear power spectrum analysis shows that there are dominant spectral peaks in the range of 2–9 days, the most commonly observed periods appearing in two preferential bands, of 2–3 days and 4–7 days. No connection with geomagnetic activity was found. The characteristics of these periodicities compare well with similar properties of planetary waves, which suggests the possibility that planetary waves are responsible for the observed long-term periodicities. These findings indicate also a likely close relation between planetary wave (PW activity and the well known but not well understood seasonal Es dependence. To test the PW postulation, we used simultaneous neutral wind data from the mesopause region around 95 km, measured from Collm, Germany. Direct comparison of the long-term periodicities in echo and Es layer occurrence with those in the neutral wind show some reasonable agreement. This new evidence, although not fully conclusive, is the first direct indication in favour of a planetary wave role on the unstable midlatitude E region ionosphere. Our results suggest that planetary waves observation is a viable option and a new element into the physics of midlatitude Es layers that needs to be considered and investigated.Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere irregularities; mid-latitude ionosphere – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (waves and tides

  1. Behavior of irradiated BWR fuel under reactivity-initiated-accident conditions; Results of tests FK-1, -2 and -3

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) fuels with burnups of 41 to 45 GWd/tU were pulse-irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate fuel behavior under cold startup reactivity-initiated-accident (RIA) conditions. BWR fuel segment rods of 8times8BJ (STEP I) type from Fukushima-Daiichi Unit 3 nuclear power plant were refabricated into short test rods, and they were subjected to prompt enthalpy insertion from 293 to 607 J/g (70 to 145 cal/g) within about 20 ms. The fuel cladding...

  2. The influence of age at disease onset on disease activity and disability: results from the Ontario Best Practices Research Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, T N; Jacob, B; Pope, J E; Keystone, E C; Bombardier, C; Kuriya, B

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to compare characteristics between late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and young-onset RA and determine the association between age at disease onset and disease severity. We cross-sectionally studied 971 patients at the time of entry into the Ontario Best Practices Research Initiative, a registry of RA patients followed up in routine care. We restricted patients to ≤5 years of disease duration. Late-onset RA was defined as an onset ≥60 years of age and young-onset RA <60 years. Group differences were compared, and multivariate linear regression models were used to test the influence of age at onset on Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR), Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI), and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores. The swollen joint count (6.2 vs. 5.3), acute phase reactants (C-reactive protein (CRP) 17.4 vs. 11.8 mg/L, ESR 30.6 vs. 21.5 mm/h), and comorbidity burden were higher in late-onset RA compared to young-onset RA (p < 0.01). Mean DAS28-ESR (4.6 vs. 4.3) and HAQ (1.2 vs. 1.1) scores were higher in late-onset RA patients (p < 0.05). Late-onset RA patients received more initial disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) monotherapy and corticosteroids in comparison to greater DMARD/biologic combination therapy in young-onset RA patients (p < 0.05). Adjusted multivariate analyses showed that late-onset RA was independently associated with higher mean DAS28-ESR and HAQ scores, but not CDAI. Late-onset RA patients have greater disease activity that may contribute to disability early in the disease course. Despite this, initial treatment consists of less combination DMARD and biologic use in late-onset RA patients. This may have implications for future response to therapy and development of joint damage, disability, and comorbidities in this group.

  3. SAGA advances in ShApes, Geometry, and Algebra : results from the Marie Curie initial training network

    CERN Document Server

    Muntingh, Georg

    2014-01-01

    This book summarizes research carried out in workshops of the SAGA project, an Initial Training Network exploring the interplay of Shapes, Algebra, Geometry and Algorithms. Written by a combination of young and experienced researchers, the book introduces new ideas in an established context. Among the central topics are approximate and sparse implicitization and surface parametrization; algebraic tools for geometric computing; algebraic geometry for computer aided design applications and problems with industrial applications. Readers will encounter new methods for the (approximate) transition between the implicit and parametric representation; new algebraic tools for geometric computing; new applications of isogeometric analysis, and will gain insight into the emerging research field situated between algebraic geometry and computer aided geometric design.

  4. Measurement of Atomic Oxygen in Diffuse Aurora and Ion Density in the E-Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, William E.

    1997-01-01

    An ion mass spectrometer (IMS) was refurbished, calibrated and supplied to the University of Colorado payload (Dr. Charles Barth, P.I.) which was launched from White Sands in September of 1993 as NASA 33.062. The nose cone failed to deploy and their were problems with the ACS so the mission was declared a failure. However, the door covering the IMS deployed and the instrument obtained data. The launch occurred shortly after a payload carrying solar x-ray detectors was launched. Thus a small portion of the Colorado payload science was salvaged; namely, the NO(+)/O2(+) ratio to compare with the measured x-ray flux. Figure I shows the NO(+) to O2(+) ratio vs. altitude. The behavior is typical of the E-region.

  5. Survey of Revegetated Areas on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve: Status and Initial Monitoring Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Link, Steven O.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Durham, Robin E.; Cruz, Rico O.; Mckee, Sadie A.

    2011-09-01

    During 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office removed a number of facilities and debris from the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM). Revegetation of disturbed sites is necessary to stabilize the soil, reduce invasion of these areas by exotic weeds, and to accelerate re-establishment of native plant communities. Seven revegetation units were identified on ALE based on soils and potential native plant communities at the site. Native seed mixes and plant material were identified for each area based on the desired plant community. Revegetation of locations affected by decommissioning of buildings and debris removal was undertaken during the winter and early spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. This report describes both the details of planting and seeding for each of the units, describes the sampling design for monitoring, and summarizes the data collected during the first year of monitoring. In general, the revegetation efforts were successful in establishing native bunchgrasses and shrubs on most of the sites within the 7 revegetation units. Invasion of the revegetation areas by exotic annual species was minimal for most sites, but was above initial criteria in 3 areas: the Hodges Well subunit of Unit 2, and Units 6 and 7.

  6. USPIO-enhanced MR imaging of macrophage infiltration in native and transplanted kidneys: initial results in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauger, Olivier; Grenier, Nicolas; Deminère, Colette; Lasseur, Catherine; Delmas, Yahsou; Merville, Pierre; Combe, Christian

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the detection and characterization of macrophage infiltration in native and transplanted kidneys using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIO). Among 21 patients initially enrolled, 12 scheduled for renal biopsy for acute or rapidly progressive renal failure (n = 7) or renal graft rejection (n = 5) completed the study. Three magnetic resonance (MR) sessions were performed with a 1.5-T system, before, immediately after and 72 h after i.v. injection of USPIO at doses of 1.7-2.6 mg of iron/kg. Signal intensity change was evaluated visually and calculated based on a region of interest (ROI) positioned on the kidney compartments. Histological examination showed cortical macrophage infiltration in four patients (>5 macrophages/mm(2)), two in native kidneys (proliferative extracapillary glomerulonephritis) and two in transplants (acute rejection). These patients showed a 33 +/- 18% mean cortical signal loss on T2*-weighted images. In the remaining eight patients, with <5 macrophages/mm(2), there was no cortical signal loss. However, in three of these, presenting with ischemic acute tubular necrosis, a strong (42 +/- 18%) signal drop was found in the medulla exclusively. USPIO-enhanced MR imaging can demonstrate infiltration of the kidneys by macrophages both in native and transplanted kidneys and may help to differentiate between kidney diseases.

  7. Variations in the initial mass function in early-type galaxies: A critical comparison between dynamical and spectroscopic results

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Russell J

    2014-01-01

    I present a comparison between published dynamical (ATLAS3D) and spectroscopic (Conroy & van Dokkum) constraints on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in early-type galaxies, using the 34 galaxies in common between the two works. Both studies infer an average IMF mass factor $\\alpha$ (the stellar mass relative to a Kroupa-IMF population of similar age and metallicity) greater than unity, i.e. both methods favour an IMF which is heavier than that of the Milky Way, on average over the sample. However, on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis, there is no correlation between $\\alpha$ inferred from the two approaches. I investigate how the two estimates of $\\alpha$ are correlated systematically with the galaxy velocity dispersion, $\\sigma$, and with the Mg/Fe abundance ratio. The spectroscopic method, based on the strengths of metal absorption lines, yields a correlation only with metal abundance ratios: at fixed Mg/Fe, there is no residual correlation with $\\sigma$. The dynamical method, applied to exactly the same ...

  8. USPIO-enhanced MR imaging of macrophage infiltration in native and transplanted kidneys: initial results in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauger, Olivier; Grenier, Nicolas [Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Therapeutique de l' Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Laboratoire d' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle, ERT CNRS/Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux (France); Deminere, Colette [Service d' Anatomo-pathologie, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Lasseur, Catherine; Delmas, Yahsou; Merville, Pierre; Combe, Christian [Departement de Nephrologie, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France)

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the detection and characterization of macrophage infiltration in native and transplanted kidneys using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIO). Among 21 patients initially enrolled, 12 scheduled for renal biopsy for acute or rapidly progressive renal failure (n = 7) or renal graft rejection (n = 5) completed the study. Three magnetic resonance (MR) sessions were performed with a 1.5-T system, before, immediately after and 72 h after i.v. injection of USPIO at doses of 1.7-2.6 mg of iron/kg. Signal intensity change was evaluated visually and calculated based on a region of interest (ROI) positioned on the kidney compartments. Histological examination showed cortical macrophage infiltration in four patients (>5 macrophages/mm{sup 2}), two in native kidneys (proliferative extracapillary glomerulonephritis) and two in transplants (acute rejection). These patients showed a 33 {+-} 18% mean cortical signal loss on T2*-weighted images. In the remaining eight patients, with <5 macrophages/mm{sup 2}, there was no cortical signal loss. However, in three of these, presenting with ischemic acute tubular necrosis, a strong (42 {+-} 18%) signal drop was found in the medulla exclusively. USPIO-enhanced MR imaging can demonstrate infiltration of the kidneys by macrophages both in native and transplanted kidneys and may help to differentiate between kidney diseases. (orig.)

  9. Beginning with sustainable scale up in mind: initial results from a population, health and environment project in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiron, Laura; Shillingi, Lucy; Kabiswa, Charles; Ogonda, Godfrey; Omimo, Antony; Ntabona, Alexis; Simmons, Ruth; Fajans, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Small-scale pilot projects have demonstrated that integrated population, health and environment approaches can address the needs and rights of vulnerable communities. However, these and other types of health and development projects have rarely gone on to influence larger policy and programme development. ExpandNet, a network of health professionals working on scaling up, argues this is because projects are often not designed with future sustainability and scaling up in mind. Developing and implementing sustainable interventions that can be applied on a larger scale requires a different mindset and new approaches to small-scale/pilot testing. This paper shows how this new approach is being applied and the initial lessons from its use in the Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin Project currently underway in Uganda and Kenya. Specific lessons that are emerging are: 1) ongoing, meaningful stakeholder engagement has significantly shaped the design and implementation, 2) multi-sectoral projects are complex and striving for simplicity in the interventins is challenging, and 3) projects that address a sharply felt need experience substantial pressure for scale up, even before their effectiveness is established. Implicit in this paper is the recommendation that other projects would also benefit from applying a scale-up perspective from the outset. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Improving performance of long-term care networks at their initial stage: an empirical study of factors affecting results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiola, Nunzio; Bianchi, Piervito

    2016-06-10

    Until now very little research has been carried out on the performance of health and human services networks in evolution. In particular, previous studies mainly referred to "centrally governed services networks" in the US context. According to Provan and Kenis (2008), these networks are "lead organization-governed", and are different from the "participant-governed" model or the "network administrative organization (NAO)" solution. We focused our attention on the Apulia region care services networks (Italy). In the last few years, the governance of these networks has passed from the "participant-governed" model to the NAO approach. We examined how the integration mechanisms work in this type of networks, and if there were challenges to tackle in order to improve their overall performance. These networks were examined at their initial stage, exactly when their governance model moved to a more integrated solution. We collected survey data from 17 health and human services networks out of 45 (38%). The research is carried out by means of statistical methods (OLS). The analysis is cross sectional. The implementation of "rational/technocratic" factors is important but not sufficient to enhance collaboration. The integration at the "professional level" should be kept in mind. In particular, the role of network (case) managers is paramount. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. [The regional network ADAPTHERA : Rheumatology care through coordinated cooperation: comprehensive, trans-sectoral, covering all health insurance. Initial results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarting, A; Pfeiff, B; Amberger, C; Pick, D; Hesse, M; Jendro, M; Engels, J; Böttger, A; Kuhn, C; Majdandzic, J; Ziese, W; Stadelmann, M-L; Kessler, F W; Dinges, H; Ultes-Kaiser, S; Droste, U; Schmalhofer, M; Hazenbiller, A; Rector, M; Weinmann-Menke, J; Triantafyllias, K; Becker, M; Ataian, M; Lablans, M; Ueckert, F; Panholzer, T; Blettner, M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the rheumatology network ADAPTHERA ("risk-adapted rheumatology therapy") is to achieve a comprehensive improvement in rheumatology care by coordinating treatment in a regional, trans-sectoral network. Accompanying biomedical research projects, training concepts, and the construction of a rheumatology register (gathering data and biomaterials) should furthermore ensure the stable and sustainable optimisation of care. In the pilot phase (2012-2015) the focus of the ADAPTHERA network, required as a "regional key project" within the framework of the Initiative on Health Economy of Rheinland-Palatinate (RL-P), Germany, was placed on the optimisation of the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, where it is well-known that there is a significant care deficit.Through the intensive, stable, and coordinated cooperation of all health care partners in the field of rheumatology (registered general practitioners and orthopaedic specialists, registered core rheumatologists as well as the Association of Rheumatology of RL-P) a unique regional, comprehensive offer with verifiable care optimisation has been established in RL-P. The network is supported by outstanding collaboration with the Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians and the self-help organisation Rheumatology League.The aims that were established at the start of the project will be achieved by the end of the pilot phase:- significant improvement in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (an average of 23.7 days until diagnosis by rheumatologists)- access covering all health insurance (regardless of the particular scheme the patients belong to)- comprehensive (verifiable participation of general practitioners from all over RL-P)- data and biomaterials collection, established as a basis for biomarker research, and a rheumatology register for RL-P.

  12. Initial and middle-term results of treatment for symptomatic spontaneous isolated dissection of superior mesenteric artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Z Z; Zhao, J W; Tian, F; Li, S Q; Wang, K; Wang, Y; Jiang, L Q; Jiang, G M

    2013-05-01

    Spontaneous isolated dissection of the superior mesenteric artery (SIDSMA) is extremely rare. Various treatment options are currently available, including conservative treatment, endovascular stenting (ES) and surgical repair. Herein, we present our experience in the treatment of symptomatic SIDSMA. A retrospective study was conducted on 17 consecutive patients with symptomatic SIDSMA from May 2002 to May 2012. Conservative treatment consisted of strict blood-pressure control, bowel rest, nasogastric suction, intravenous fluid therapy and nutritional support as required; fasting was released on resolution of abdominal pain, and fluid food was given first; then, diet was resumed after complete resolution of abdominal pain. The decision to intervene was based on patient symptoms and signs, as well as the morphological characteristics of SMA dissection on computed tomography (CT) angiography. Self-expandable stents were placed via the common femoral artery approach. ES was indicated in patients with severe compression of the true lumen or dissecting aneurysm likely to rupture. All patients had acute-onset abdominal pain. Treatment included conservative treatment with the use of anticoagulation in five and without in nine patients, respectively. Three patients with severe compression of the true lumen or large dissecting aneurysm underwent ES as a primary treatment. ES was performed in two patients in whom initial conservative treatment failed. Patients who underwent ES were maintained on anti-platelet therapy for 3 months postoperatively. The median follow-up time was 24 months (range, 2-72 months). No complications were associated with the SIDSMA or ES. The patency of stents was demonstrated on follow-up CT scans up to 8.5 months (range, 4-38 months). Conservative treatment without anticoagulation can be applied successfully to the patients with symptomatic SIDSMA. Our strategy of restricting ES for these patients who have compression of the true lumen or dissecting

  13. A novel, integrated PET-guided MRS technique resulting in more accurate initial diagnosis of high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ellen S; Satter, Martin; Reed, Marilyn; Fadell, Ronald; Kardan, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal malignant glioma in adults. Currently, the modality of choice for diagnosing brain tumor is high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast, which provides anatomic detail and localization. Studies have demonstrated, however, that MRI may have limited utility in delineating the full tumor extent precisely. Studies suggest that MR spectroscopy (MRS) can also be used to distinguish high-grade from low-grade gliomas. However, due to operator dependent variables and the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, the potential for error in diagnostic accuracy with MRS is a concern. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been shown to add additional information with respect to tumor grade, extent, and prognosis based on the premise of biochemical changes preceding anatomic changes. Combined PET/MRS is a technique that integrates information from PET in guiding the location for the most accurate metabolic characterization of a lesion via MRS. We describe a case of glioblastoma multiforme in which MRS was initially non-diagnostic for malignancy, but when MRS was repeated with PET guidance, demonstrated elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratio in the right parietal mass consistent with a high-grade malignancy. Stereotactic biopsy, followed by PET image-guided resection, confirmed the diagnosis of grade IV GBM. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an integrated PET/MRS technique for the voxel placement of MRS. Our findings suggest that integrated PET/MRS may potentially improve diagnostic accuracy in high-grade gliomas.

  14. Tectonic evolution of the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc system: initial results from IODP Expedition 352

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, W.; Ferre, E. C.; Robertson, A. H. F.; Avery, A. J.; Kutterolf, S.

    2015-12-01

    During International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 352, a section through the volcanic stratigraphy of the outer fore arc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) system was drilled to trace magmatism, tectonics, and crustal accretion associated with subduction initiation. Structures within drill cores, borehole and site survey seismic data indicate that tectonic deformation in the outer IBM fore arc is mainly post-magmatic. Extension generated asymmetric sediment basins such as half-grabens at sites 352-U1439 and 352-U1442 on the upper trench slope. Along their eastern margins the basins are bounded by west-dipping normal faults. Deformation was localized along multiple sets of faults, accompanied by syn-tectonic pelagic and volcaniclastic sedimentation. The lowermost sedimentary units were tilted eastward by ~20°. Tilted beds were covered by sub-horizontal beds. Biostratigraphic constraints reveal a minimum age of the oldest sediments at ~ 35 Ma; timing of the sedimentary unconformities is between ~ 27 and 32 Ma. At sites 352-U1440 and 352-U1441 on the outer fore arc strike-slip faults are bounding sediment basins. Sediments were not significantly affected by tectonic tilting. Biostratigraphy gives a minimum age of the basement-cover contact between ~29.5 and 32 Ma. The post-magmatic structures reveal a multiphase tectonic evolution of the outer IBM fore arc. At sites 352-U1439 and 352-U1442, shear with dominant reverse to oblique reverse displacement was localized along subhorizontal fault zones, steep slickensides and shear fractures. These were either re-activated as or cut by normal-faults and strike-slip faults. Extension was also accommodated by steep to subvertical mineralized veins and extensional fractures. Faults at sites 352-U1440 and 352-U1441 show mainly strike-slip kinematics. Sediments overlying the igneous basement(maximum Late Eocene to Recent age), document ash and aeolian input, together with mass wasting of the fault-bounded sediment ponds.

  15. What Lies beneath Seemingly Positive Campus Climate Results: Institutional Sexism, Racism, and Male Hostility toward Equity Initiatives and Liberal Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2010-01-01

    This article presents qualitative results from a campus climate study at one predominately white university. Data analysis uncovered "what lies beneath" a seemingly positive campus climate. Gender differences in survey responses suggest that men and women experienced the climate in vastly different ways. Additionally, lack of deep diversity…

  16. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-velocity E-region echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Uspensky

    Full Text Available A short event of high-velocity E-region echo observations by the Pykkvibaer HF radar is analysed to study echo parameters and the echo relation to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability. The echoes were detected in several beams aligned closely to the magnetic L-shell direction. Two echo groups were identified: one group corresponded to the classical type 1 echoes with velocities close to the nominal ion-acoustic speed of 400 ms1 , while the other group had significantly larger velocities, of the order of 700 ms1 . The mutual relationship between the echo power, Doppler velocity, spectral width and elevation angles for these two groups was studied. Plotting of echo parameters versus slant range showed that all ~700 ms1 echoes originated from larger heights and distances of 500–700 km, while all ~400 ms1 echoes came from lower heights and from farther distances; 700–1000 km. We argue that both observed groups of echoes occurred due to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability excited by strong ( ~70 mVm1 and uniformly distributed electric fields. We show that the echo velocities for the two groups were different because the echoes were received from different heights. Such a separation of echo heights occurred due to the differing amounts of ionospheric refraction at short and large ranges. Thus, the ionospheric refraction and related altitude modulation of ionospheric parameters are the most important factors to consider, when various characteristics of E-region decametre irregularities are derived from HF radar measurements.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; polar ionosphere

  17. Fully-automated left ventricular mass and volume MRI analysis in the UK Biobank population cohort: evaluation of initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Sanghvi, Mihir M; Aung, Nay; Paiva, Jose Miguel; Zemrak, Filip; Fung, Kenneth; Lukaschuk, Elena; Lee, Aaron M; Carapella, Valentina; Kim, Young Jin; Francis, Jane; Piechnik, Stefan K; Neubauer, Stefan; Greiser, Andreas; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Hayes, Carmel; Young, Alistair A; Petersen, Steffen E

    2017-08-23

    UK Biobank, a large cohort study, plans to acquire 100,000 cardiac MRI studies by 2020. Although fully-automated left ventricular (LV) analysis was performed in the original acquisition, this was not designed for unsupervised incorporation into epidemiological studies. We sought to evaluate automated LV mass and volume (Siemens syngo InlineVF versions D13A and E11C), against manual analysis in a substantial sub-cohort of UK Biobank participants. Eight readers from two centers, trained to give consistent results, manually analyzed 4874 UK Biobank cases for LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and LV mass (LVM). Agreement between manual and InlineVF automated analyses were evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Tenfold cross-validation was used to establish a linear regression calibration between manual and InlineVF results. InlineVF D13A returned results in 4423 cases, whereas InlineVF E11C returned results in 4775 cases and also reported LVM. Rapid visual assessment of the E11C results found 178 cases (3.7%) with grossly misplaced contours or landmarks. In the remaining 4597 cases, LV function showed good agreement: ESV -6.4 ± 9.0 ml, 0.853 (mean ± SD of the differences, ICC) EDV -3.0 ± 11.6 ml, 0.937; SV 3.4 ± 9.8 ml, 0.855; and EF 3.5 ± 5.1%, 0.586. Although LV mass was consistently overestimated (29.9 ± 17.0 g, 0.534) due to larger epicardial contours on all slices, linear regression could be used to correct the bias and improve accuracy. Automated InlineVF results can be used for case-control studies in UK Biobank, provided visual quality control and linear bias correction are performed. Improvements between InlineVF D13A and InlineVF E11C show the field is rapidly advancing, with further improvements expected in the near future.

  18. Incorporating Variational Local Analysis and Prediction System (vLAPS) Analyses with Nudging Data Assimilation: Methodology and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    thus the linearization and simplification applied in the inner loop can hinder the capability of 4DVAR to fully reach its potential. EnKF relies on...complete, we discovered that a software error resulted in profiler and ACARS observations not being included at 13, 19, and 21 UTC. Quality...labeled with that letter in the figure. Most of the components are standard WRF Preprocessing System (WPS) software , or altered versions of the

  19. Growth and form of Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior respond distinctly different to initial growing space: results from 24-year-old Nelder experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Kuehne; Edgar Kublin; Patrick Pyttel; Jürgen Bauhus

    2013-01-01

    Initial growing space is of critical importance to growth and quality development of individual trees.We investigated how mortality,growth (diameter at breast height,total height),natural pruning (height to first dead and first live branch and branchiness) and stem and crown form of 24-year-old pedunculate oak (Quercus robur [L.]) and European ash (Fraxinus excelsior [L.]) were affected by initial spacing.Data were recorded from two replicate single-species Nelder wheels located in southern Germany with eight initial stocking regimes varying from 1,020to 30,780 seedlings·ha-1.Mortality substantially decreased with increasing initial growing space but significantly differed among the two species,averaging 59% and 15% for oak and ash plots,respectively.In contrast to oak,the low self-thinning rate found in the ash plots over the investigated study period resulted in a high number of smaller intermediate or suppressed trees,eventually retarding individual tree as well as overall stand development.As a result,oak gained greater stem dimensions throughout all initial spacing regimes and the average height of ash significantly increased with initial growing space.The survival of lower crown class ashes also appeared to accelerate self-pruning dynamics.In comparison to oak,we observed less dead and live primary branches as well as a smaller number of epicormic shoots along the first 6 m of the lower stem of dominant and co-dominant ashes in all spacing regimes.Whereas stem form of both species was hardly affected by initial growing space,the percentage of brushy crowns significantly increased with initial spacing in oak and ash.Our findings suggest that initial stockings of ca.12,000seedlings per hectare in oak and 2,500 seedlings per hectare in ash will guarantee a sufficient number of at least 300 potential crop trees per hectare in pure oak and ash plantations at the end of the self-thinning phase,respectively.If the problem of epicormic shoots and inadequate self

  20. [Performance assessment of health services in Catalonia (Spain): evaluation of initial results of the Catalan healthcare service project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Altés, Anna; Dalmau-Bueno, Albert; Colls, Cristina; Mendivil, Joan; Benet, Josep; Mompart, Anna; Torné, Elvira; Zara, Corinne; Borrell, Carme; Brugulat, Pilar; Guarga, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Performance assessment of healthcare services is receiving greater attention due to increasing health care expenditures, greater expectations among the population, and the need to obtain results from the invested resources. Taking advantage of the existing experience of the Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona and the Consorci Sanitari de Barcelona, which compared the healthcare services of Barcelona and Montreal, a grant from the Agència d'Avaluació de Tecnologia i Recerca Mèdiques, and the health planning interest of the Departament de Salut, the performance assessment of the Catalan healthcare service project was started in Catalonia in 2005. This article aims to present the development of the project, to provide some examples that illustrate the kind of numerical and graphical information that could be obtained and the kind of analysis that could be performed, to provide possible explanations for the results shown, and to discuss some limitations and implications. Currently, the added value of this project is that it identifies the extent to which the healthcare system is achieving its objectives, establishes a set of homogeneous indicators that could be used in the future, and is a key tool in the development of the Central de Resultats del Departament de Salut de la Generalitat de Catalunya.

  1. NEOSurvey 1: Initial Results from the Warm Spitzer Exploration Science Survey of Near-Earth Object Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, David E.; Mommert, Michael; Hora, Joseph; Chesley, Steve; Emery, Joshua; Fazio, Giovanni; Harris, Alan; Mueller, Michael; Smith, Howard

    2016-12-01

    Near-Earth objects (NEOs) are small solar system bodies whose orbits bring them close to the Earth’s orbit. We are carrying out a Warm Spitzer Cycle 11 Exploration Science program entitled NEOSurvey—a fast and efficient flux-limited survey of 597 known NEOs in which we derive a diameter and albedo for each target. The vast majority of our targets are too faint to be observed by NEOWISE, though a small sample has been or will be observed by both observatories, which allows for a cross-check of our mutual results. Our primary goal is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties. We present here the first results from this new program: fluxes and derived diameters and albedos for 80 NEOs, together with a description of the overall program and approach, including several updates to our thermal model. The largest source of error in our diameter and albedo solutions, which derive from our single-band thermal emission measurements, is uncertainty in η, the beaming parameter used in our thermal modeling; for albedos, improvements in solar system absolute magnitudes would also help significantly. All data and derived diameters and albedos from this entire program are being posted on a publicly accessible Web page at nearearthobjects.nau.edu.

  2. Initial results of 'Language for Health': cardiovascular disease nutrition education for English-as-a-second-language students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, J P; Candelaria, J; Woodruff, S I; Golbeck, A L; Criqui, M H; Talavera, G A; Rupp, J W; Domier, C P

    1998-12-01

    Low literacy skills may negatively affect health through misuse of medication, inability to follow medical directions or due to limitations placed on the consumer's ability to access health information. The association between low literacy among adults and cardiovascular disease has not been thoroughly investigated in some ethnic groups. The purpose of this comprehensive study is to describe the results of a nutritional-related cardiovascular health program for limited English proficient adults enrolled in English-as-a-second-language (ESL) classes. Subjects (n = 408), nearly 87% of whom were Latino, were exposed to either nutrition education (intervention group) or stress management (attention-placebo control group) classes designed specifically for ESL classes. Subjects completed physiological measures assessing blood pressure, total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, waist and hip circumference, and body mass. Self-report surveys were administered to collect students' nutrition-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. Data were collected at baseline, 3 month post-test and 6 month follow-up. Analyses showed that differential group change was seen for fat avoidance, nutrition knowledge, HDL and total cholesterol:HDL ratio, but, for the two latter variables, the effect was not maintained at the 6 month follow-up. Both groups showed positive changes in blood pressure, total cholesterol and nutrition-related attitudes. Results showed moderate success of the intervention, but suggest contamination between experimental groups may have occurred.

  3. Effectiveness of Computed Tomography Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy for Osteoid Osteoma: Initial Results and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöz, Erdal; Özel, Deniz; Özkan, Fuat; Özel, Betül Duran; Özer, Özgur; Coşkun, Zafer Ünsal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this retrospective study is to determine our experience of technique success rate, complications and clinical results in long term follow up for computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency ablation [RA] therapy for osteoid osteoma (OO). Material/Methods We performed RA therapy to 18 patients with OO referred to interventional radiology from other clinics primarily from orthopedics; between January 2011 to May 2014. Daytime and nighttime pain intensity of 18 patients was noted according to visual analog scale (VAS). After procedure pain intensity was compared with before one. We also discussed other factors can affect it. Results All procedures were completed technically successful for all patients [100%]. We did not experience any major complication or mortality. However we had 3 minor complications. Pain came back in 1 patient after 5 months from procedure and it was considered as recurrence. Dramatic pain intensity fall was seen in patients after procedure, both daytime and nighttime. However we did not find and statistically significant change in comparison of pain intensity reduce and time needed to return back to routine life when using patients demographic data and lesion size. Conclusions CT guided RA therapy of OO is minimally invasive, effective and secure procedure. PMID:27429671

  4. Performance of gadofosveset-enhanced MRI for staging rectal cancer nodes: can the initial promising results be reproduced?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijnen, Luc A.; Martens, Milou H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique; Bakers, Frans C.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Cappendijk, Vincent C. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, ' s Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Oliveira, Pedro [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, Department of Radiology, Porto (Portugal); Lammering, Guido [Maastro Clinic, Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Riedl, Robert G. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    A previous study showed promising results for gadofosveset-trisodium as a lymph node magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to prospectively confirm the diagnostic performance of gadofosveset MRI for nodal (re)staging in rectal cancer in a second patient cohort. Seventy-one rectal cancer patients were prospectively included, of whom 13 (group I) underwent a primary staging gadofosveset MRI (1.5-T) followed by surgery (± preoperative 5 x 5 Gy) and 58 (group II) underwent both primary staging and restaging gadofosveset MRI after a long course of chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. Nodal status was scored as (y)cN0 or (y)cN+ by two independent readers (R1, R2) with different experience levels. Results were correlated with histology on a node-by-node basis. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) were 94 %, 79 % and 0.89 for the more experienced R1 and 50 %, 83 % and 0.74 for the non-experienced R2. R2's performance improved considerably after a learning curve, to an AUC of 0.83. Misinterpretations mainly occurred in nodes located in the superior mesorectum, nodes located in between vessels and nodes containing micrometastases. This prospective study confirms the good diagnostic performance of gadofosveset MRI for nodal (re)staging in rectal cancer. (orig.)

  5. On the Dependence of the Ionospheric E-Region Electric Field of the Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Moro, Juliano; Araujo Resende, Laysa Cristina; Chen, Sony Su; Costa, D. Joaquim

    2016-07-01

    We have being studying the zonal and vertical E region electric field components inferred from the Doppler shifts of type 2 echoes (gradient drift irregularities) detected with the 50 MHz backscatter coherent (RESCO) radar set at Sao Luis, Brazil (SLZ, 2.3° S, 44.2° W) during the solar cycle 24. In this report we present the dependence of the vertical and zonal components of this electric field with the solar activity, based on the solar flux F10.7. For this study we consider the geomagnetically quiet days only (Kp <= 3+). A magnetic field-aligned-integrated conductivity model was developed for proving the conductivities, using the IRI-2007, the MISIS-2000 and the IGRF-11 models as input parameters for ionosphere, neutral atmosphere and Earth magnetic field, respectively. The ion-neutron collision frequencies of all the species are combined through the momentum transfer collision frequency equation. The mean zonal component of the electric field, which normally ranged from 0.19 to 0.35 mV/m between the 8 and 18 h (LT) in the Brazilian sector, show a small dependency with the solar activity. Whereas, the mean vertical component of the electric field, which normally ranges from 4.65 to 10.12 mV/m, highlight the more pronounced dependency of the solar flux.

  6. The national neonatal screening programme for congenital toxoplasmosis in Denmark: results from the initial four years, 1999-2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Dorte Remmer; Høgh, Birthe; Andersen, O;

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To describe the outcome of four years' nationwide neonatal screening for congenital toxoplasmosis in liveborn newborns. METHODS: Congenital toxoplasmosis was diagnosed if specific Toxoplasma gondii IgM antibodies were detected in eluate from the PKU Guthrie filter paper card from a child....... Infants diagnosed with congenital toxoplasmosis were examined for intracranial and retinal lesions and treated for three months with sulphadiazine, pyrimethamine, and folinic acid continuously. RESULTS: Eluates from PKU-cards from 262 912 newborns were analysed. The birth prevalence of congenital...... toxoplasma infection was 2.1 per 10 000 liveborns. Congenital toxoplasmosis was suspected in 96 infants and confirmed in 55. Forty seven children were examined for intracranial and retinal lesions soon after birth; 12 had clinical signs at this first examination. Of these, 5 had intracranial calcifications...

  7. NGNP Point Design - Results of the Initial Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulic Assessments During FY-03, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip E. MacDonald; James W. Sterbentz; Robert L. Sant; P. Bayless; H. D. Gougar; R. L. Moore; A. M. Ougouag; W. K. Terry

    2003-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary preconceptual designs for two possible versions of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), one for a prismatic fuel type helium gas-cooled reactor and one for a pebble bed fuel helium gas reactor. Both designs are to meet three basic requirements: a coolant outlet temperature of 1000 °C, passive safety, and a total power output consistent with that expected for commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The two efforts are discussed separately below. The analytical results presented in this report are very promising, however, we wish to caution the reader that future, more detailed, design work will be needed to provide final answers to a number of key questions including the allowable power level, the inlet temperature, the power density, the optimum fuel form, and others. The point design work presented in this report provides a starting point for other evaluations, and directions for the detailed design, but not final answers.

  8. Design and initial results from a kilojoule level dense plasma focus with hollow anode and cylindrically symmetric gas puff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, J. L.; Falabella, S.; Tang, V.; Schmidt, A.; Guethlein, G.; Hawkins, S.; Rusnak, B.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and built a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) Z-pinch device using a kJ-level capacitor bank and a hollow anode, and fueled by a cylindrically symmetric gas puff. Using this device, we have measured peak deuteron beam energies of up to 400 keV at 0.8 kJ capacitor bank energy and pinch lengths of ˜6 mm, indicating accelerating fields greater than 50 MV/m. Neutron yields of on the order of 107 per shot were measured during deuterium operation. The cylindrical gas puff system permitted simultaneous operation of DPF with a radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator for beam-into-plasma experiments. This paper describes the machine design, the diagnostic systems, and our first results.

  9. Limiting and Enabling Factors of Collective Farmers' Marketing Initiatives: Results of a Comparative Analysis of the Situation and Trends in 10 European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knickel, K.; Zerger, C.; Jahn, G.; Renting, H.

    2008-01-01

    Linked with the growing power of retailers, European farmers have gradually lost control over supply chains. The resulting pressure on producer prices and the decline in policy support underpin the need for collective action among farmers. Co-operative initiatives in production, processing, and mark

  10. Limiting and Enabling Factors of Collective Farmers' Marketing Initiatives: Results of a Comparative Analysis of the Situation and Trends in 10 European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knickel, K.; Zerger, C.; Jahn, G.; Renting, H.

    2008-01-01

    Linked with the growing power of retailers, European farmers have gradually lost control over supply chains. The resulting pressure on producer prices and the decline in policy support underpin the need for collective action among farmers. Co-operative initiatives in production, processing, and

  11. Dependence of sports results on data of physical development, morphofunctional and special power preparedness of weight-lifters at the stage of initial preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Bugaev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the establishment of nature of the interrelation between sports results of weight-lifters and level of their special physical and morphofunctional preparedness. Material & Methods: 48 sportsmen of group of initial preparation of the first year of training were involved to the experiment. The research was conducted on the basis of the chair of weightlifting and boxing of Kharkov state academy of physical culture and CYSS “HTZ”. Results: the correlation between indicators of morphofunctional, high-speed and power and special (competitive preparedness of weight-lifters is revealed at the stage of initial preparation. The conducted research shows that the result of competitive exercises of the sportsmen, specializing in weightlifting at the stage of initial preparation, depends on power and high-speed and power preparedness. Conclusions: it is established that the correlation between results of competitive exercises and jumps uphill from the place, in length from the place, run on 30 m can demonstrate the interrelation of power and high-speed and power preparedness of the sportsmen, specializing in weightlifting at the stage of initial preparation.

  12. Procedural results and 30-day clinical events analysis following Edwards transcatheter aortic valve implantation in 48 consecutive patients: initial experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Quan-ming; Therese Lognone; Calin Ivascau; Remi Sabatier; Vincent Roule; Ziad Dahdouh; Massimo Massetti; Gilles Grollier

    2012-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a rapidly evolving strategy for therapy of aortic stenosis.We presented the procedural results and analyzed the death causes of 30-day mortality and clinical events in patients who underwent TAVI with Edwards prosthetic valves in University Hospital of Caen,France.Methods The patients with severe aortic stenosis but at high surgical risk or inoperable were considered as candidates for TAVI.Forty-eight patients undergoing TAVI from July 2010 to September 2011 were enrolled in this registry.The Edwards prosthetic valves were solely used in this clinical trial.Results Overall 48 patients underwent TAVI,28 of which accepted TAVI by trans-femoral (TF) approaches,20 by trans-apical approaches (TA).The aortic valve area (AVA) was (0.70±0.23) cm2,left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)was (57.4±17.6)%,Log EuroSCORE was (19.2±15.8)%,mean gradient was (47.0±16.6) mmHg.There were no significant differences between TF and TA groups in all these baseline parameters.Device success rate was 95.8%,and procedural success rate was 93.7% in total.Procedural mortality was 6.7% (3/48):two deaths in TA group (10%),and one death in TF group (3.6%).Forty-six Edwards valves were implanted:10 Edwards Sapien and 36 Edwards XT.Procedure-related complications included cardiac tamponade in 2 cases (4.2%),acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in 1 case (2.1%),permanent pacemaker implantation in 1 case (2.1%),life-threatening and major bleeding in 3 cases; access site related major complication in 1 case,AKI stage 3 in 3 cases (6.3%),minor stroke in 1 case (2.1%).Thirty-day survival rate was 89.6%.There were 5 deaths in total (10.4%):4 in TA group (20%) and 1 in TF group (3.6%).Conclusion The procedural success rate and 30-day mortality were acceptable in these high risk patients with Edwards prosthetic valves in the first 48 TAVI.

  13. Printed Three-dimensional Anatomic Templates for Virtual Preoperative Planning Before Reconstruction of Old Pelvic Injuries: Initial Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Bao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Old pelvis fractures are among the most challenging fractures to treat because of their complex anatomy, difficult-to-access surgical sites, and the relatively low incidence of such cases. Proper evaluation and surgical planning are necessary to achieve the pelvic ring symmetry and stable fixation of the fracture. The goal of this study was to assess the use of three-dimensional (3D printing techniques for surgical management of old pelvic fractures. Methods: First, 16 dried human cadaveric pelvises were used to confirm the anatomical accuracy of the 3D models printed based on radiographic data. Next, nine clinical cases between January 2009 and April 2013 were used to evaluate the surgical reconstruction based on the 3D printed models. The pelvic injuries were all type C, and the average time from injury to reconstruction was 11 weeks (range: 8-17 weeks. The workflow consisted of: (1 Printing patient-specific bone models based on preoperative computed tomography (CT scans, (2 virtual fracture reduction using the printed 3D anatomic template, (3 virtual fracture fixation using Kirschner wires, and (4 preoperatively measuring the osteotomy and implant position relative to landmarks using the virtually defined deformation. These models aided communication between surgical team members during the procedure. This technique was validated by comparing the preoperative planning to the intraoperative procedure. Results: The accuracy of the 3D printed models was within specification. Production of a model from standard CT DICOM data took 7 hours (range: 6-9 hours. Preoperative planning using the 3D printed models was feasible in all cases. Good correlation was found between the preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up X-ray in all nine cases. The patients were followed for 3-29 months (median: 5 months. The fracture healing time was 9-17 weeks (mean: 10 weeks. No delayed incision healing, wound infection, or nonunions occurred. The

  14. Printed Three-dimensional Anatomic Templates for Virtual Preoperative Planning Before Reconstruction of Old Pelvic Injuries: Initial Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Bao Wu; Jun-Qiang Wang; Chun-Peng Zhao; Xu Sun; Yin Shi; Zi-An Zhang; Yu-Neng Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Old pelvis fractures are among the most challenging fractures to treat because of their complex anatomy,difficult-to-access surgical sites,and the relatively low incidence of such cases.Proper evaluation and surgical planning are necessary to achieve the pelvic ring symmetry and stable fixation of the fracture.The goal of this study was to assess the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques for surgical management of old pelvic fractures.Methods:First,16 dried human cadaveric pelvises were used to confirm the anatomical accuracy of the 3D models printed based on radiographic data.Next,nine clinical cases between January 2009 and April 2013 were used to evaluate the surgical reconstruction based on the 3D printed models.The pelvic injuries were all type C,and the average time from injury to reconstruction was 11 weeks (range:8-17 weeks).The workflow consisted of.:(1) Printing patient-specific bone models based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans,(2) virtual fracture reduction using the printed 3D anatomic template,(3) virtual fracture fixation using Kirschner wires,and (4) preoperatively measuring the osteotomy and implant position relative to landmarks using the virtually defined deformation.These models aided communication between surgical team members during the procedure.This technique was validated by comparing the preoperative planning to the intraoperative procedure.Results:The accuracy of the 3D printed models was within specification.Production of a model from standard CT DICOM data took 7 hours (range:6-9 hours).Preoperative planning using the 3D printed models was feasible in all cases.Good correlation was found between the preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up X-ray in all nine cases.The patients were followed for 3-29 months (median:5 months).The fracture healing time was 9-17 weeks (mean:l0 weeks).No delayed incision healing,wound infection,or nonunions occurred.The results were excellent in two cases,good in

  15. TU-EF-204-12: Quantitative Evaluation of Spectral Detector CT Using Virtual Monochromatic Images: Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, X; Guild, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Arbique, G; Anderson, J [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Dhanantwari, A [Philips Healthcare, Highland Heights, OH (United States); Yagil, Y [Philips Medical Systems, Haifa (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the image quality and spectral information of a spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner using virtual monochromatic (VM) energy images. Methods The SDCT scanner (Philips Healthcare) was equipped with a dual-layer detector and spectral iterative reconstruction (IR), which generates conventional 80–140 kV polychromatic energy (PE) CT images using both detector layers, PE images from the low-energy (upper) and high-energy (lower) detector layers and VM images. A solid water phantom with iodine (2.0–20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50.0–600.0 mg Ca/ml) rod inserts was used to evaluate effective energy estimate (EEE) and iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR). The EEE corresponding to an insert CT number in a PE image was calculated from a CT number fit to the VM image set. Since PE image is prone to beam-hardening artifact EEE may underestimate the actual energy separation from two layers of the detector. A 30-cm-diameter water phantom was used to evaluate noise power spectrum (NPS). The phantoms were scanned at 120 and 140 kV with the same CTDIvol. Results The CT number difference for contrast inserts in VM images (50–150 keV) was 1.3±6% between 120 and 140 kV scans. The difference of EEE calculated from low- and high-energy detector images was 11.5 and 16.7 keV for 120 and 140 kV scans, respectively. The differences calculated from 140 and 100 kV conventional PE images were 12.8, and 20.1 keV from 140 and 80 kV conventional PE images. The iodine CNR increased monotonically with decreased keV. Compared to conventional PE images, the peak of NPS curves from VM images were shifted to lower frequency. Conclusion The EEE results indicates that SDCT at 120 and 140 kV may have energy separation comparable to 100/140 kV and 80/140 kV dual-kV imaging. The effects of IR on CNR and NPS require further investigation for SDCT. Author YY and AD are Philips Healthcare employees.

  16. Volumetric response classification in metastatic solid tumors on MSCT: Initial results in a whole-body setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, A.M., E-mail: a.wulff@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Fabel, M. [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Freitag-Wolf, S., E-mail: freitag@medinfo.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Medizinische Informatik und Statistik, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Tepper, M., E-mail: m.tepper@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Knabe, H.M., E-mail: h.knabe@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Schäfer, J.P., E-mail: jp.schaefer@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Jansen, O., E-mail: o.jansen@neurorad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Bolte, H., E-mail: hendrik.bolte@ukmuenster.de [Klinik für Nuklearmedizin, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Gebäude A1, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To examine technical parameters of measurement accuracy and differences in tumor response classification using RECIST 1.1 and volumetric assessment in three common metastasis types (lung nodules, liver lesions, lymph node metastasis) simultaneously. Materials and methods: 56 consecutive patients (32 female) aged 41–82 years with a wide range of metastatic solid tumors were examined with MSCT for baseline and follow up. Images were evaluated by three experienced radiologists using manual measurements and semi-automatic lesion segmentation. Institutional ethics review was obtained and all patients gave written informed consent. Data analysis comprised interobserver variability operationalized as coefficient of variation and categorical response classification according to RECIST 1.1 for both manual and volumetric measures. Continuous data were assessed for statistical significance with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and categorical data with Fleiss kappa. Results: Interobserver variability was 6.3% (IQR 4.6%) for manual and 4.1% (IQR 4.4%) for volumetrically obtained sum of relevant diameters (p < 0.05, corrected). 4–8 patients’ response to therapy was classified differently across observers by using volumetry compared to standard manual measurements. Fleiss kappa revealed no significant difference in categorical agreement of response classification between manual (0.7558) and volumetric (0.7623) measurements. Conclusion: Under standard RECIST thresholds there was no advantage of volumetric compared to manual response evaluation. However volumetric assessment yielded significantly lower interobserver variability. This may allow narrower thresholds for volumetric response classification in the future.

  17. The Wyoming Survey for H-alpha. I. Initial Results at z ~ 0.16 and 0.24

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, Daniel A; Cohen, Seth A; Johnson, L Clifton; Kattner, ShiAnne M; Lamanna, Christine A; Moore, Carolynn A; Schuster, Micah D; Thatcher, Jacob W

    2008-01-01

    The Wyoming Survey for H-alpha, or WySH, is a large-area, ground-based, narrowband imaging survey for H-alpha-emitting galaxies over the latter half of the age of the Universe. The survey spans several square degrees in a set of fields of low Galactic cirrus emission. The observing program focuses on multiple dz~0.02 epochs from z~0.16 to z~0.81 down to a uniform (continuum+line) luminosity at each epoch of ~10^33 W uncorrected for extinction (3sigma for a 3" diameter aperture). First results are presented here for 98+208 galaxies observed over approximately 2 square degrees at redshifts z~0.16 and 0.24, including preliminary luminosity functions at these two epochs. These data clearly show an evolution with lookback time in the volume-averaged cosmic star formation rate. Integrals of Schechter fits to the extinction-corrected H-alpha luminosity functions indicate star formation rates per co-moving volume of 0.009 and 0.014 h_70 M_sun/yr/Mpc^3 at z~0.16 and 0.24, respectively. The formal uncertainties in the ...

  18. Extraction of Urban Trees from Integrated Airborne Based Digital Image and LIDAR Point Cloud Datasets - Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogon-yaro, M. A.; Kumar, P.; Rahman, A. Abdul; Buyuksalih, G.

    2016-10-01

    Timely and accurate acquisition of information on the condition and structural changes of urban trees serves as a tool for decision makers to better appreciate urban ecosystems and their numerous values which are critical to building up strategies for sustainable development. The conventional techniques used for extracting tree features include; ground surveying and interpretation of the aerial photography. However, these techniques are associated with some constraint, such as labour intensive field work, a lot of financial requirement, influences by weather condition and topographical covers which can be overcome by means of integrated airborne based LiDAR and very high resolution digital image datasets. This study presented a semi-automated approach for extracting urban trees from integrated airborne based LIDAR and multispectral digital image datasets over Istanbul city of Turkey. The above scheme includes detection and extraction of shadow free vegetation features based on spectral properties of digital images using shadow index and NDVI techniques and automated extraction of 3D information about vegetation features from the integrated processing of shadow free vegetation image and LiDAR point cloud datasets. The ability of the developed algorithms shows a promising result as an automated and cost effective approach to estimating and delineated 3D information of urban trees. The research also proved that integrated datasets is a suitable technology and a viable source of information for city managers to be used in urban trees management.

  19. [Maternal mortality at the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). Initial results from a reduction intervention strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Murillo, Vitelio; Navarrete-Hernández, Eduardo; Hernández-Alemán, Francisco; Anaya-Coeto, Sergio; Pozos-Cavanzo, José Luis; Chavarría-Olarte, María Eugenia

    2004-01-01

    To analyze the preliminary results of a medical manager intervention to improve the quality of medical care during pregnancy, delivery and puerperium, on the maternal mortality rates in population covered by the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). We selected the 14 administrative delegations of IMSS that showed the highest rates and absolute numbers of maternal deaths in the years 1999 to 2001. Within this group, the manager medical staff developed activities for medical training of family physicians and gynecologists, to improve medical resources, to achieve a better coordination among medical services, to adequate reference of obstetrical complications to higher-level hospitals, and for monitoring of maternal mortality committees operation. The other 23 IMSS administrative delegations were used as controls. Maternal mortality rates fell down from 40.7 to 28.2 per 100,000 live births among the delegations included in the strategy (mean reduction 30.7%). Among the control delegations maternal mortality rate fell down 1.5% only (32.3 to 31.8 per 100,000 live births). A similar phenomenon was observed for the absolute number of maternal deaths, with a reduction of 36.7% and 8.4%, respectively. The improving intervention was associated with a noticeable reduction in the maternal mortality rate. It is necessary a long-term observation to confirm a cause-effect relationship.

  20. Optical design and Initial Results from The National Institute of Standards and Technology’s AMMT/TEMPS Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, Steven; Lane, Brandon; Neira, Jorge; Mekhontsev, Sergey; Vlasea, Mihaela; Hanssen, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) Physical Measurement and Engineering Laboratories are jointly developing the Additive Manufacturing Measurement Testbed (AMMT)/ Temperature and Emittance of Melts, Powders and Solids (TEMPS) facilities. These facilities will be co-located on an open architecture laser-based powder bed fusion system allowing users full access to the system’s operation parameters. This will provide users with access to machine-independent monitoring and control of the powder bed fusion process. In this paper there will be emphasis on the AMMT, which incorporates in-line visible light collection optics for monitoring and feedback control of the powder bed fusion process. We shall present an overview of the AMMT/TEMPS program and its goals. The optical and mechanical design of the open architecture powder-bed fusion system and the AMMT will also be described. In addition, preliminary measurement results from the system along with the current status of the system will be described. PMID:28579666

  1. [Dental assisted distraction osteogenesis of the mandible. Results of an animal experimental study and initial clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braumann, B; Niederhagen, B; Schmolke, C; von Lindern, J J

    1999-01-01

    In recent years lengthening of the human mandible by distraction osteogenesis has become an accepted treatment for correction of severe mandibular disto-basal discrepancies. Using extra-oral and intra-oral distraction devices the technique of osseous anchorage is usually preferred. To avoid the disadvantages of this method it is the aim of many research groups to develop a tooth-borne distraction. In the present animal study, six minipigs were treated with a new solely dentally fixed orthodontic device for mandibular distraction osteogenesis. Following bilateral osteotomy in the dentigerous area of the mandibular body and a latent period of 2-7 days, a mandibular lengthening of 9 mm was reached within a period of 9 days. This situation was retained using the distraction device for 6 weeks. After the removal of the apparatus, there followed a period of another 6 weeks of consolidation. The callus and bone formation and potential dental, periodontal and nerval reactions were radiologically examined and histological examination was performed at the end of the experiment. At 12 weeks after the mandibular lengthening, the osteogenesis in the distraction areas was complete. No destructive processes were recognizable, either at the roots or at the periodontium of the teeth near the osteotomy gap. The mandibular nerve at the osteotomy site remained intact. The results justified transferring this procedure to humans. The clinical application of the device is presented.

  2. Microbial borehole observatories deployed within the oceanic crust: Design considerations and initial results from long-term colonization experiments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Bach, W.; Becker, K.; Fisher, A. T.; Hulme, S.; Toner, B. M.; Wheat, C. G.; Edwards, K. J.; Iodp Expedition 327 Shipboard Party

    2010-12-01

    Borehole observatories developed for long-term sampling and monitoring in the subseafloor of the deep ocean must satisfy design and operation requirements that are similar to systems deployed on land. Many of these systems are used to achieve simultaneous hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological goals, requiring innovative design, installation, and operation. There are major logistical challenges for subseafloor observatories, the foremost being having to remotely access sites kilometers underwater using multiple oceanographic platforms (drill ship, surface ship, submersible, remotely-operated vehicle) and reliance on autonomous devices that are serviced only after several years. Contamination of the analytical environment is probable during installation operations, requiring vigilance during analysis for interpretation. Subseafloor observatories also require self-contained and robust instrumentation that can withstand long-term exposure to seawater at high pressures, elevated temperatures, a variety of redox conditions, and little to no access to external power. Although subseafloor borehole observatories have been in development for hydrologic monitoring for two decades, the inclusion of experimentation to examine the deep biosphere in the marine subsurface has only recently been developed. Results from some of the first microbial colonization experiments in young basaltic rocks on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge demonstrate in situ microbial-mineral interactions that can be identified using complementary geochemical and microbiological techniques. Mineral surfaces were first colonized by iron oxidizing bacteria, and as fluid composition changed, the microbial community became dominated by Firmicutes bacteria, some of which are phylogenetically similar to microbial communities observed in the terrestrial deep biosphere.

  3. Long-term results of first salvage treatment in CLL patients treated initially with FCR (fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, rituximab).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Constantine S; O'Brien, Susan; Plunkett, William; Wierda, William; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wang, Xuemei; Do, Kim-Anh; Cortes, Jorge; Khouri, Issa; Kantarjian, Hagop; Lerner, Susan; Keating, Michael J

    2014-11-13

    Although fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) together are established as a standard first-line treatment of younger patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), there is little information to guide the management of patients with CLL refractory to, or who have relapsed after, receiving frontline FCR treatment. To define optimal salvage strategy and identify patients unsuitable for retreatment with FCR, we examined the survival and treatment outcome of 300 patients enrolled in a phase 2 study of FCR. After a median 142 months of follow-up, 156 patients developed progressive CLL, with a median survival of 51 months after disease progression. The duration of first remission (REM1) was a key determinant of survival after disease progression and first salvage. Patients with a short REM1 (<3 years) had a short survival period, irrespective of salvage therapy received; these patients have high unmet medical needs and are good candidates for investigation of novel therapies. In patients with a long REM1 (≥3 years), salvage treatment with either repeat FCR or lenalidomide-based therapy results in subsequent median survival exceeding 5 years; for these patients, FCR rechallenge represents a reasonable standard of care.

  4. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Microwave Radiometer Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation: Initial On-Orbit Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Johnson, Joel T.; Aksoy, Mustafa; Bringer, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched in January 2015, provides global measurements of soil moisture using a microwave radiometer. SMAPs radiometer passband lies within the passive frequency allocation. However, both unauthorized in-band transmitters as well as out-of-band emissions from transmitters operating at frequencies adjacent to this allocated spectrum have been documented as sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) to the L-band radiometers on SMOS and Aquarius. The spectral environment consists of high RFI levels as well as significant occurrences of low level RFI equivalent to 0.1 to 10 K. The SMAP ground processor reports the antenna temperature both before and after RFI mitigation is applied. The difference between these quantities represents the detected RFI level. The presentation will review the SMAP RFI detection and mitigation procedure and discuss early on-orbit RFI measurements from the SMAP radiometer. Assessments of global RFI properties and source types will be provided, as well as the implications of these results for SMAP soil moisture measurements.

  5. The Three-mm Ultimate Mopra Milky Way Survey. I. Survey Overview, Initial Data Releases, and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Peter J; Indermuehle, Balthasar; O'Dougherty, Stefan N; Lowe, Vicki; Cunningham, Maria R; Hernandez, Audra K; Fuller, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new mm-wave molecular-line mapping survey of the southern Galactic Plane and its first data releases. The Three-mm Ultimate Mopra Milky Way Survey (ThrUMMS) maps a 60{\\deg}x2{\\deg} sector of our Galaxy's fourth quadrant, using a combination of fast mapping techniques with the Mopra radio telescope, simultaneously in the J=1-0 lines of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, C$^{18}$O, and CN near 112 GHz at ~arcminute and ~0.3 km s$^{-1}$ resolution, with ~2 K channel$^{-1}$ sensitivity for $^{12}$CO and ~1 K channel$^{-1}$ for the other transitions. The calibrated data cubes from these observations are made available to the community after processing through our pipeline. Here, we describe the motivation for ThrUMMS, the development of new observing techniques for Mopra, and how these techniques were optimised to the objectives of the survey. We showcase some sample data products and describe the first science results on CO-isotopologue line ratios. These vary dramatically across the Galactic Plane, indicating a...

  6. MRI-guided breast biopsy at 3T using a dedicated large core biopsy set: Feasibility and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeuwis, Carla, E-mail: cmeeuwis@alysis.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein-Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Rijnstate Hospital, Alysis Zorggroep, Wagnerlaan 55, 6815 AD Arnhem (Netherlands); Mann, Ritse M., E-mail: r.mann@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein-Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Mus, Roel D.M., E-mail: r.mus@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein-Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Winkel, Axel, E-mail: awinkel@invivocorp.de [Interventional Instruments, INVIVO Germany GMBH, Schwerin (Germany); Boetes, Carla, E-mail: c.boetes@mumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein-Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O., E-mail: j.barentsz@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein-Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Veltman, Jeroen, E-mail: veltman@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein-Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: The increasing importance of breast MRI in the diagnostic processes concerning breast cancer yield often lesions that are visible on MRI only. To assess the nature of these lesions, pathologic analysis is necessary. Therefore, MR-guided biopsy should be available. Breast MRI at 3T has shown advantage over 1.5T. Unfortunately, current equipment for MR-guided biopsy is better suited for intervention at 1.5T due to the danger of heating titanium co-axial sleeves and large susceptibility artifacts. We evaluated a dedicated 3T breast biopsy set that uses plastic coaxial needles to overcome these problems. Materials and methods: We performed MRI-guided breast biopsy in 23 women with 24 MRI-only visible breast lesions at 3T. Biopsy procedures were performed with plastic coaxial needles in a closed bore 3T clinical MR system on a dedicated phased array breast coil with a commercially available add-on stereotactic biopsy device. Results: Width of the needle artifact was 2 mm in all 24 cases. Biopsy procedure was completed between 35 and 67 min. The procedure was judged moderately easy in 12 and normal in 10 cases. One procedure was judged difficult and there was one technical failure. Conclusion: MRI-guided breast biopsy at 3T is a fast and accurate procedure. The plastic coaxial needles reduce the susceptibility artifact largely and do not increase the difficulty of the procedure. The diagnostic yield is at least equal to the diagnostic yield of the same procedure at 1.5T. Therefore, this technique can be safely used for lesions only visible at 3T MRI.

  7. Accessible integration of agriculture, groundwater, and economic models using the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI: methodology and initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bulatewicz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Policy for water resources impacts not only hydrological processes, but the closely intertwined economic and social processes dependent on them. Understanding these process interactions across domains is an important step in establishing effective and sustainable policy. Multidisciplinary integrated models can provide insight to inform this understanding, though the extent of software development necessary is often prohibitive, particularly for small teams of researchers. Thus there is a need for practical methods for building interdisciplinary integrated models that do not incur a substantial development effort. In this work we adopt the strategy of linking individual domain models together to build a multidisciplinary integrated model. The software development effort is minimized through the reuse of existing models and existing model-linking tools without requiring any changes to the model source codes, and linking these components through the use of the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI. This was found to be an effective approach to building an agricultural-groundwater-economic integrated model for studying the effects of water policy in irrigated agricultural systems. The construction of the integrated model provided a means to evaluate the impacts of two alternative water-use policies aimed at reducing irrigated water use to sustainable levels in the semi-arid grasslands overlying the Ogallala Aquifer of the Central US. The results show how both the economic impact in terms of yield and revenue and the environmental impact in terms of groundwater level vary spatially throughout the study region for each policy. Accessible integration strategies are necessary if the practice of interdisciplinary integrated simulation is to become widely adopted.

  8. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); Bailly, Pascal [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); CHU d' Amiens, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, unite TEP, Hopital Sud, Amiens cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV{sub MAX} and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV{sub MAX} (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  9. SYSIPHE system: a state of the art airborne hyperspectral imaging system: initial results from the first airborne campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset-Rouviere, Laurent; Coudrain, Christophe; Fabre, Sophie; Poutier, Laurent; Løke, Trond; Fridman, Andrei; Blaaberg, Søren; Baarstad, Ivar; Skauli, Torbjorn; Mocoeur, Isabelle

    2014-10-01

    SYSIPHE is an airborne hyperspectral imaging system, result of a cooperation between France (Onera and DGA) and Norway (NEO and FFI). It is a unique system by its spatial sampling -0.5m with a 500m swath at a ground height of 2000m- combined with its wide spectral coverage -from 0.4μm to 11.5μm in the atmospheric transmission bands. Its infrared component, named SIELETERS, consists in two high étendue imaging static Fourier transform spectrometers, one for the midwave infrared and one for the longwave infrared. These two imaging spectrometers are closely similar in design, since both are made of a Michelson interferometer, a refractive imaging system, and a large IRFPA (1016x440 pixels). Moreover, both are cryogenically cooled and mounted on their own stabilization platform which allows the line of sight to be controlled and recorded. These data are useful to reconstruct and to georeference the spectral image from the raw interferometric images. The visible and shortwave infrared component, named Hyspex ODIN-1024, consists of two spectrographs for VNIR and SWIR based on transmissive gratings. These share a common fore-optics and a common slit, to ensure perfect registration between the VNIR and the SWIR images. The spectral resolution varies from 5nm in the visible to 6nm in the shortwave infrared. In addition, the STAD, the post processing and archiving system, is developed to provide spectral reflectance and temperature products (SRT products) from calibrated georeferenced and inter-band registered spectral images at the sensor level acquired and pre-processed by SIELETERS and Hyspex ODIN-1024 systems.

  10. Tumor perfusion assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI correlates to the grading of renal cell carcinoma: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmowski, Moritz, E-mail: mpalmowski@ukaachen.d [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Schifferdecker, Isabel [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Zwick, Stefan [Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Macher-Goeppinger, Stephan [Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Laue, Hendrik [MeVis Research, Center for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Haferkamp, Axel [Department of Urology, Heidelberg University (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Kiessling, Fabian [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Hallscheidt, Peter [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    In this study, we investigated whether assessment of the tumor perfusion by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) enables to estimate the morphologic grading of renal cell carcinomas. A total of 21 patients with suspected renal cell cancer were examined using a Gadobutrol-enhanced, dynamic saturation-recovery, turbo-fast, low-angle shot sequence. Tumor perfusion and the tissue-blood ratio within the entire tumor and the most highly vascularized part of the tumor were calculated according to the model of Miles. Immediately after examination, patients underwent surgery, and the results from imaging were compared with the morphological analysis of the histologic grading. Fourteen patients had G2 tumors, and seven patients had G3 tumors. Significantly higher perfusion values (p < 0.05) were obtained in G3 tumors than in G2 tumors when the entire tumor area was considered (1.59 {+-} 0.44 (ml/g/min) vs. 1.08 {+-} 0.38 (ml/g/min)) or its most highly vascularized part (2.14 {+-} 0.89 (ml/g/min) vs. 1.40 {+-} 0.49 (ml/g/min)). By contrast, the tissue-blood ratios did not differ significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, unlike tissue-blood ratio, surrogate parameters of the tumor perfusion determined by DCE MRI seem to allow an estimation of the grading of renal cell carcinoma. However, further studies with high case numbers and including patients with G1 tumors are required to evaluate the full potential and clinical impact.

  11. Design and initial results of a multi-phase randomized trial of ceftriaxone in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Berry

    Full Text Available Ceftriaxone increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter, EAAT2, which might protect from glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. A trial using a novel three stage nonstop design, incorporating Phases I-III, tested ceftriaxone in ALS. Stage 1 determined the cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in subjects with ALS. Stage 2 evaluated safety and tolerability for 20-weeks. Analysis of the pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety was used to determine the ceftriaxone dosage for Stage 3 efficacy testing.In Stage 1, 66 subjects at ten clinical sites were enrolled and randomized equally into three study groups receiving intravenous placebo, ceftriaxone 2 grams daily or ceftriaxone 4 grams daily divided BID. Participants provided serum and cerebrospinal fluid for pharmacokinetic analysis on study day 7. Participants continued their assigned treatment in Stage 2. The Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB reviewed the data after the last participants completed 20 weeks on study drug.Stage 1 analysis revealed linear pharmacokinetics, and CSF trough levels for both dosage levels exceeding the pre-specified target trough level of 1 µM (0.55 µg/mL. Tolerability (Stages 1 and 2 results showed that ceftriaxone at dosages up to 4 grams/day was well tolerated at 20 weeks. Biliary adverse events were more common with ceftriaxone but not dose-dependent and improved with ursodeoxycholic (ursodiol therapy.The goals of Stages 1 and 2 of the ceftriaxone trial were successfully achieved. Based on the pre-specified decision rules, the DSMB recommended the use of ceftriaxone 4 g/d (divided BID for Stage 3, which recently closed.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00349622.

  12. Sequential Percutaneous LAA Ligation and Pulmonary Vein Isolation in Patients with Persistent AF: Initial Results of a Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, Nitish; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Kawamura, Mitsuharu; Han, Frederick T; Iyer, Sivaraman K; Moyers, Brian S; Dewland, Thomas A; Woods, Chris; Ferrell, Ryan; Nath, Jayant; Earnest, Mathew; Lee, Randall J

    2015-06-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) ligation results in LAA electrical isolation and a decrease in atrial fibrillation (AF) burden. This study assessed the feasibility of combined percutaneous LAA ligation and pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in patients with persistent AF. A total of 22 patients with persistent AF underwent LAA ligation with the LARIAT device followed by PVI. PVI was confirmed with the demonstration of both entrance and exit block. Patients (n = 10) in sinus rhythm pre- and post-LAA ligation underwent P-wave analysis. Monitoring for AF was performed at 1, 3, and 6 months postablation. LAA ligation was successful in 21 of 22 (95%) patients. The procedure was aborted in one patient due to pericardial adhesions. PVI was performed in 20 of 21 patients. One patient converted to atrial flutter with a controlled ventricular response after LAA ligation and refused subsequent PVI. Demonstration of entrance and exit block was achieved in 19 of 20 patients. At 3 months, 13 of 19 (68.4%) patients were in sinus rhythm. Four patients underwent a second PVI. At 6 months, 15 of 20 (75%) patients were in sinus rhythm. There was a significant decrease in P-wave duration and P-wave dispersion after LAA ligation. Complications with LAA ligation included pericarditis, a delayed pleural effusion, and a late pericardial effusion. Staged LAA ligation and PVI is feasible and decreases P-wave dispersion. Randomized studies are needed to assess the efficacy of LAA ligation as adjunctive therapy to PVI for maintaining sinus rhythm in patients with persistent AF. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Integration of intraoperative and model-updated images into an industry-standard neuronavigation system: initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaewe, Timothy J.; Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Hiemenz Holton, Leslie; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Simon, David A.

    2013-03-01

    Dartmouth and Medtronic have established an academic-industrial partnership to develop, validate, and evaluate a multimodality neurosurgical image-guidance platform for brain tumor resection surgery that is capable of updating the spatial relationships between preoperative images and the current surgical field. Previous studies have shown that brain shift compensation through a modeling framework using intraoperative ultrasound and/or visible light stereovision to update preoperative MRI appears to result in improved accuracy in navigation. However, image updates have thus far only been produced retrospective to surgery in large part because of gaps in the software integration and information flow between the co-registration and tracking, image acquisition and processing, and image warping tasks which are required during a case. This paper reports the first demonstration of integration of a deformation-based image updating process for brain shift modeling with an industry-standard image guided surgery platform. Specifically, we have completed the first and most critical data transfer operation to transmit volumetric image data generated by the Dartmouth brain shift modeling process to the Medtronic StealthStation® system. StealthStation® comparison views, which allow the surgeon to verify the correspondence of the received updated image volume relative to the preoperative MRI, are presented, along with other displays of image data such as the intraoperative 3D ultrasound used to update the model. These views and data represent the first time that externally acquired and manipulated image data has been imported into the StealthStation® system through the StealthLink® portal and visualized on the StealthStation® display.

  14. Use of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) for the detection of insulinomas: initial experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotthardt, Martin; Fischer, Marc; Naeher, Inga; Holz, Josefin B.; Jungclas, Hartmut; Fritsch, Hans-Walter; Behe, Martin; Joseph, Klaus; Behr, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg (Germany); Goeke, Burkhard [Department of Internal Medicine II, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany)

    2002-05-01

    The non-invasive detection of insulinomas remains a diagnostic problem that is not solved by means of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. We investigated the biokinetics and specificity of uptake and degradation of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in a rat insulinoma cell line (RINm5F) in order to ascertain whether radiolabelled GLP-1 may be suitable for specific visualisation of insulinomas in vivo. GLP-1 (7-36)amide was radioiodinated according to the iodogen method. The specificity of the uptake of [{sup 125}I]GLP-1(7-36)amide by RINm5F cells was investigated. Degradation products of GLP-1 (7-36)amide in the cell medium were purified by HPLC. Their masses and amino acid sequences were determined by {sup 252}Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry. Lysosomal degradation was inhibited and after differential centrifugation the amount of radiotracer incorporated into lysosomes was determined. Biodistribution studies were performed in a rat insulinoma model (NEDH rats and RINm5F cells) with [{sup 123}I]GLP-1(7-36)amide and its more stable agonist [{sup 123}I]exendin 3. The uptake of radiotracer into insulinoma cells reached a maximum within 5 min. It was inhibited by an excess of unlabelled peptide. [{sup 125}I]GLP-1(7-36)amide accumulated in the cells if lysosomal degradation was inhibited. Degradation products of the peptide were found in the cell medium. We determined their mass and derived their amino acid sequence. Radiolabelling of exendin 3 was more difficult than that of GLP-1 because of the lack of tyrosine in its primary structure. Biodistribution studies showed rapid blood clearance and uptake of the radiotracer into the tumour and the pancreas. It was also possible to detect insulinomas in an animal model by external scintigraphy using radioiodinated GLP-1 (7-36)amide and exendin 3. GLP-1 (7-36)amide is specifically internalised into insulinoma cells by a receptor-mediated mechanism. Our results demonstrate that GLP-1 receptor

  15. Initial results of simultaneous PET/MRI experiments with an MRI-compatible silicon photomultiplier PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun Suk; Ko, Guen Bae; Kwon, Sun Il; Lee, Chan Mi; Ito, Mikiko; Chan Song, In; Lee, Dong Soo; Hong, Seong Jong; Lee, Jae Sung

    2012-04-01

    The most investigated semiconductor photosensor for MRI-compatible PET detectors is the avalanche photodiode (APD). However, the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), also called the Geiger-mode APD, is gaining attention in the development of the next generation of PET/MRI systems because the SiPM has much better performance than the APD. We have developed an MRI-compatible PET system based on multichannel SiPM arrays to allow simultaneous PET/MRI. The SiPM PET scanner consists of 12 detector modules with a ring diameter of 13.6 cm and an axial extent of 3.2 cm. In each detector module, 4 multichannel SiPM arrays (with 4 × 4 channels arranged in a 2 × 2 array to yield 8 × 8 channels) were coupled with 20 × 18 Lu(1.9)Gd(0.1)SiO(5):Ce crystals (each crystal is 1.5 × 1.5 × 7 mm) and mounted on a charge division network for multiplexing 64 signals into 4 position signals. Each detector module was enclosed in a shielding box to reduce interference between the PET and MRI scanners, and the temperature inside the box was monitored for correction of the temperature-dependent gain variation of the SiPM. The PET detector signal was routed to the outside of the MRI room and processed with a field programmable gate array-based data acquisition system. MRI compatibility tests and simultaneous PET/MRI acquisitions were performed inside a 3-T clinical MRI system with 4-cm loop receiver coils that were built into the SiPM PET scanner. Interference between the imaging systems was investigated, and phantom and mouse experiments were performed. No radiofrequency interference on the PET signal or degradation in the energy spectrum and flood map was shown during simultaneous PET/MRI. The quality of the MRI scans acquired with and without the operating PET showed only slight degradation. The results of phantom and mouse experiments confirmed the feasibility of this system for simultaneous PET/MRI. Simultaneous PET/MRI was possible with a multichannel SiPM-based PET scanner, with no

  16. Posthole Sensor Performance in the USArray Transportable Array - Results from Testing and Initial Deployments in Alaska and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassetto, A.; Busby, R. W.; Hafner, K.; Sauter, A.; Woodward, R.

    2014-12-01

    To prepare for the deployment of EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska and adjacent Canada over the next several years, IRIS has evaluated different strategies for emplacing posthole seismometers. The goal of this work has been to maintain or enhance a TA station's noise performance while reducing the weight and logistical considerations required for its installation. Motivating this research are developments in posthole broadband seismometer design and the unique conditions for operating in this region, where many potential sites are located on frost-fractured outcrops or underlain by permafrost, in either case only accessible by helicopter. Current emplacement methods use a portable rig to auger or hammer-drill a hole 2.5-5 meters deep, in unconsolidated materials and permafrost, or by diamond bit coring 1-3 meters into rock. These emplacements are used at new TA installations and upgrades to existing AK network stations, and we compare their performance to the lower-48 TA vault installations. Through July 2014 there are eight TA and six upgraded AK stations operating under USArray; including five since at least October 2012, providing a detailed record of seasonal and/or site-specific behavior. We also discuss testing of different downhole configurations for 13 stations deployed at Piñon Flat Observatory in California since April 2014. Station performance is presented and compared using probability density functions summed from hourly power spectral density calculations. These are computed for the continuous time series of seismic data recorded on each seismic channel. Our results show that the noise performance of seismometers in Alaska with cased- or core- hole installations sometimes exceeds that of the quietest TA stations in the lower-48, particularly for the horizontal channels at long periods. We analyze and discuss the performance of example stations, comparing to other nearby seismometers. We also examine the performance of AK

  17. Benign painful shoulder syndrome. Initial results of a single-center prospective randomized radiotherapy dose-optimization trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Hertel, S.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Department of Radiation Oncology

    2012-12-15

    Background and purpose: To compare the efficacy of two different dose-fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of patients with benign painful shoulder syndrome. Patients and methods: Between February 2006 and February 2010, 312 consecutive evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective randomized trial. All patients received radiotherapy with an orthovoltage technique. One radiotherapy course consisted of 6 single fractions in 3 weeks. In case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks, a second radiation series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. The endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, right after, and 6 weeks after radiotherapy using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). Results: The overall response rate for all patients was 83% directly after and 85% 6 weeks after radiotherapy. The mean VAS values before, directly after, and 6 weeks after treatment for the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy groups were 56.8 {+-} 23.7 and 53.2 {+-} 21.8 (p = 0.158), 38.2 {+-} 26.1 and 34.0 {+-} 24.5 (p = 0.189), and 33.0 {+-} 27.2 and 23.7 {+-} 22.7 (p = 0.044), respectively. The mean CPS before, directly after, and 6 weeks after treatment was 9.7 {+-} 3.0 and 9.5 {+-} 2.7 (p = 0.309), 6.1 {+-} 3.6 and 5.4 {+-} 3.6 (p = 0.096), 5.3 {+-} 3.7 and 4.1 {+-} 3.7 (p = 0.052), respectively. Despite a slight advantage in the VAS analysis for the 1.0 Gy group for delayed response, the CPS analysis revealed no statistically significant differences between the two single-dose trial arms for early (p = 0.652) and delayed response quality (p = 0.380). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for the management of benign painful shoulder syndrome. Concerning radiation protection, the dose for a radiotherapy series is recommended not to exceed 3-6 Gy. (orig.)

  18. Overview of Initial Results From Studies of the Bagnold Dune Field on Mars by the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Nathan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Ewing, Ryan; Newman, Claire; Sullivan, Robert; Conrad, Pamela; Cousin, Agnes; Edgett, Kenneth; Fisk, Martin; Fraeman, Abigail; Johnson, Jeffrey; Lamb, Michael; Lapotre, Mathieu; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Martinez, German; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Thompson, Lucy; van Beek, Jason; Vasavada, Ashwin; Wiens, Roger

    2016-04-01

    The Curiosity Rover is currently studying the Bagnold Dunes in Gale Crater. Here we provide a general overview of results and note that other EGU presentations will focus on specific aspects. The in situ activities have not yet occurred as of this writing, but other analyses have been performed approaching and within the dunefield. ChemCam passive spectra of Bagnold Dune sands are consistent with the presence of olivine. Two APXS spots on the High Dune stoss slope margin, and two others in an engineering test sand patch, show less inferred dust, greater Si, and higher Fe/Mn than other "soils" in Gale Crater. ChemCam analyses of more than 300 soils along the Curiosity traverse show that both fine and coarse soils have increasing iron and alkali content as the Bagnold Dunes are approached, a trend that may reflect admixtures of local rocks (alkalis + iron) to the fines, but also a contribution of Bagnold-like sand (iron) that increases toward the dunefield. MAHLI images of sands on the lower east stoss slope of High Dune show medium and coarse sand in ripple forms, and very fine and fine sand in ripple troughs. Most grains are dark gray, but some are also brick-red/brown, white, green translucent, yellow, brown„ colorless translucent, or vitreous spheres HiRISE orbital images show that the Bagnold Dunes migrate on the order of decimeters or more per Earth year. Prior to entering the dune field, wind disruption of dump piles and grain movement was observed over multi-sol time spans, demonstrating that winds are of sufficient strength to mobilize unconsolidated material, either through direct aerodynamic force or via the action of smaller impacting grains. Within the dune field, we are, as of this writing, engaged in change detection experiments with Mastcam and ChemCam's RMI camera. Data we have so far, spanning 8 sols from the same location, shows no changes. Mastcam and RMI images of the stoss sides of Namib, Noctivaga, and High Dune show that the "ripples" seen

  19. Trends and determinants for early initiation of and exclusive breastfeeding under six months in Vietnam: results from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2000–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quyen Thi-Tu Bui

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is strong evidence that breastfeeding (BF significantly benefits mothers and infants in various ways. Yet the proportion of breastfed babies in Vietnam is low and continues to decline. This study fills an important evidence gap in BF practices in Vietnam. Objective: This paper examines the trend of early initiation of BF and exclusive BF from 2000 to 2011 in Vietnam and explores the determinants at individual and contextual levels. Design: Data from three waves of the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey were combined to estimate crude and adjusted trends over time for two outcomes – early initiation of BF and exclusive BF. Three-level logistic regressions were fitted to examine the impacts of both individual and contextual characteristics on early initiation of BF and exclusive BF in the 2011 data. Results: Both types of BF showed a decreasing trend over time after controlling for individual-level characteristics but this trend was more evident for early initiation of BF. Apart from child's age, individual-level characteristics were not significant predictors of the BF outcomes, but provincial characteristics had a strong association. When controlling for individual-level characteristics, mothers living in provinces with a higher percentage of mothers with more than three children were more likely to have initiated early BF (odds ratio [OR]: 1.06; confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.11 but less likely to exclusively breastfeed their babies (OR: 0.94; CI: 0.88–1.01. Mothers living in areas with a higher poverty rate were more likely to breastfeed exclusively (OR: 1.07; CI: 1.02–1.13, and those who delivered by Caesarean section were less likely to initiate early BF. Conclusions: Our results suggest that environmental factors are becoming more important for determining BF practices in Vietnam. Intervention programs should therefore not only consider individual factors, but should also consider the potential impact of

  20. Impact of plasma sheath on rocket-based E-region ion measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Burchill, Johnathan; Marchand, Richard

    2015-01-01

    We model the particle velocity distribution functions around the entrance window of the Suprathermal Ion Imager (SII). The SII sensor was mounted on a 1 m boom carried by the scientific payload of NASA rocket 36.234 as part of Joule II mission to investigate Joule heating in the E-region ionosphere. The rocket flew above Northern Alaska on 19 January 2007. The payload was spin-stabilized with a period of 1.6 s, giving an apparent rotation of the ion flow velocity in the frame of reference of the payload. The SII sensor is an electrostatic analyzer that measures two dimensional slices of the distribution of the kinetic energies and arrival-angles of low energy ions. The study is concerned with the interpretation of data obtained from the SII sensor. For this purpose, we numerically investigate ram velocity effects on ions velocity distributions in the vicinity of the SII sensor aperture at an altitudes of approximately 150 km. The electrostatic sheath profiles surrounding the SII sensor, boom and payload are calculated numerically with the PIC code PTetra. It is observed that the direction of the ion flow velocity modifies the plasma sheath potential profile. This in turn impacts the velocity distributions of NO+ and ions at the aperture of the particle sensor. The velocity distribution functions at the sensor aperture are calculated by using test-particle modeling. These particle distribution functions are then used to inject particles in the sensor, and calculate the fluxes on the sensor microchannel plate (MCP), from which comparisons with the measurements can be made.

  1. Characterization of hexabundles: Initial results

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, J J; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Leon-Saval, S G

    2011-01-01

    New multi-core imaging fibre bundles -- hexabundles -- being developed at the University of Sydney will provide simultaneous integral field spectroscopy for hundreds of celestial sources across a wide angular field. These are a natural progression from the use of single fibres in existing galaxy surveys. Hexabundles will allow us to address fundamental questions in astronomy without the biases introduced by a fixed entrance aperture. We have begun to consider instrument concepts that exploit hundreds of hexabundles over the widest possible field of view. To this end, we have compared the performance of a 61-core fully-fused hexabundle and 5 lightly-fused bundles with 7 cores each. All fibres in the bundles have 100 micron cores. In the fully-fused bundle, the cores are distorted from a circular shape in order to achieve a higher fill fraction. The lightly-fused bundles have circular cores and five different cladding thicknesses which affect the fill fraction. We compare the optical performance of all 6 bundle...

  2. Can community retail pharmacist and diabetes expert support facilitate insulin initiation by family physicians? Results of the AIM@GP randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Stewart B

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited evidence exists on the effectiveness of external diabetes support provided by diabetes specialists and community retail pharmacists to facilitate insulin-prescribing in family practice. Methods A stratified, parallel group, randomized control study was conducted in 15 sites across Canada. Family physicians received insulin initiation/titration education, a physician-specific ‘report card’ on the characteristics of their type 2 diabetes (T2DM population, and a registry of insulin-eligible patients at a workshop. Intervention physicians in addition received: (1 diabetes specialist/educator consultation support (active diabetes specialist/educator consultation support for 2 months [the educator initiated contact every 2 weeks] and passive consultation support for 10 months [family physician initiated as needed]; and (2 community retail pharmacist support (option to refer patients to the pharmacist(s for a 1-hour insulin-initiation session. The primary outcome was the insulin prescribing rate (IPR per physician defined as the number of insulin starts of insulin-eligible patients during the 12-month strategy. Results Consenting, eligible physicians (n = 151 participated with 15 specialist sites and 107 community pharmacists providing the intervention. Most physicians were male (74%, and had an average of 81 patients with T2DM. Few (9% routinely initiated patients on insulin. Physicians were randomly allocated to usual care (n = 78 or the intervention (n = 73. Intervention physicians had a mean (SE IPR of 2.28 (0.27 compared to 2.29 (0.25 for control physicians, with an estimated adjusted RR (95% CI of 0.99 (0.80 to 1.24, p = 0.96. Conclusions An insulin support program utilizing diabetes experts and community retail pharmacists to enhance insulin prescribing in family practice was not successful. Too few physicians are appropriately intensifying diabetes management through insulin initiation, and

  3. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  4. Neutral temperature and electron-density measurements in the lower E region by vertical HF sounding in the presence of an acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, E.

    1982-04-01

    It is noted that an acoustic wave generated at ground level and propagating vertically through the lower ionosphere produces partial reflections of radio waves transmitted by a vertical sounder. The Doppler effect of the radio wave produced by the acoustic wave motion depends on the properties of the atmosphere and ionosphere. It is shown that this permits a determination of both the neutral-temperature and the electron-density profiles of the lower E region. The accuracy and the advantages offered by this method are discussed, and some experimental results are compared with those of other measurement techniques.

  5. Thyroid nodules with initially non-diagnostic, fine-needle aspiration results: comparison of core-needle biopsy and repeated fine-needle aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Young Jun; Hong, Min Ji; Song, Dong Eun; Kim, Jae Kyun; Yoon, Jong Ho; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the role of core-needle biopsy (CNB) by comparing the results of CNB and repeated fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for thyroid nodules with initially non-diagnostic FNA results. From October 2008 to December 2011, 360 nodules - 180 consecutive repeated FNAs and 180 consecutive CNBs -- from 360 patients (83 men, 277 women; mean age, 54.4 years) with initially non-diagnostic FNA results were analyzed retrospectively. The incidence of non-diagnostic results, inconclusive results, diagnostic surgery, and diagnostic performance of repeated FNA and CNB were assessed, and factors affecting second non-diagnostic results were evaluated. CNB achieved a significantly lower non-diagnostic and inconclusive rate than repeated FNA (1.1 % versus 40.0 %, P needle biopsy achieved a lower number of non-diagnostic and inconclusive results. • Core-needle biopsy achieved better diagnostic performance. • Use of core-needle biopsy could prevent unnecessary diagnostic surgery. • Repeated fine-needle aspiration was significantly associated with a second non-diagnosis.

  6. Drag Forces, Neutral Wind and Electric Conductivity Changes in the Ionospheric E Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nenovski, Petko

    2014-01-01

    The neutrals in the Earth environment are in fact free and subjected to drag forces (by ions). In this study we show that drag or friction forces in the ionosphere-thermosphere system initiate changes in the plasma flow, neutral wind, and the conductivity, as well. Ions and electrons embedded in neutral wind field of velocity u acquire drifts perpendicular both to the initial neutral wind velocity and to the ambient magnetic field producing a perpendicular electric current. This perpendicular electric current is defined by a conductivity derived previously and the polarization electric field u x B. Self-consistently, the free neutrals acquires an additional neutral velocity component perpendicular to the initial neutral wind velocity u. The Pedersen and Hall currents wane within a specific time inversely proportional to neutral-ion collision frequency. These findings are relevant to a better understanding of electric current generation, distribution and closure in weakly ionized plasmas where charged particle...

  7. Influence of uncertainties of the empirical models for inferring the E-region electric fields at the dip equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Juliano; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Resende, Laysa Cristina Araújo; Chen, Sony Su; Schuch, Nelson Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Daytime E-region electric fields play a crucial role in the ionospheric dynamics at the geomagnetic dip latitudes. Due to their importance, there is an interest in accurately measuring and modeling the electric fields for both climatological and near real-time studies. In this work, we present the daytime vertical ( Ez) and eastward ( Ey) electric fields for a reference quiet day (February 7, 2001) at the São Luís Space Observatory, Brazil (SLZ, 2.31°S, 44.16°W). The component Ez is inferred from Doppler shifts of type II echoes (gradient drift instability) and the anisotropic factor, which is computed from ion and electron gyro frequencies as well as ion and electron collision frequencies with neutral molecules. The component Ey depends on the ratio of Hall and Pedersen conductivities and Ez. A magnetic field-line-integrated conductivity model is used to obtain the anisotropic factor for calculating Ez and the ionospheric conductivities for calculating Ey. This model uses the NRLMSISE-00, IRI-2007, and IGRF-11 empirical models as input parameters for neutral atmosphere, ionosphere, and geomagnetic field, respectively. Consequently, it is worth determining the uncertainties (or errors) in Ey and Ez associated with these empirical model outputs in order to precisely define the confidence limit for the estimated electric field components. For this purpose, errors of ±10 % were artificially introduced in the magnitude of each empirical model output before estimating Ey and Ez. The corresponding uncertainties in the ionospheric conductivity and electric field are evaluated considering the individual and cumulative contribution of the artificial errors. The results show that the neutral densities and temperature may be responsible for the largest changes in Ey and Ez, followed by changes in the geomagnetic field intensity and electron and ions compositions.

  8. Ion and neutral temperature distributions in the E-region observed by the EISCAT Tromsø and Svalbard radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maeda

    Full Text Available Simultaneous Common Program Two experiments by the EISCAT UHF radar at Tromsø and the EISCAT Svalbard radar at Longyearbyen from 00:00 to 15:00 UT on 22 September 1998 and 9 March 1999 have been utilized to investigate distributions of the ion and neutral temperatures in the E-region between 105 and 115 km. During the experiments, soft particle precipitations in the dayside cusp were observed over the Svalbard radar site by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F11 satellite. It is found that the dayside electric field in the regions of the low-latitude boundary of the polar cap and the cusp was greater and more variable than that in the auroral region. The ion temperature, parallel to the geomagnetic field at Longyearbyen, was higher than that at Tromsø during the daytime from 06:00 to 12:00 UT. The steady-state ion energy equation has been applied to derive neutral temperature under the assumption of no significant heat transport and viscous heating. The estimated neutral temperature at Longyearbyen was also higher than that at Tromsø. The ion and neutral energy budget was discussed in terms of the ion frictional heating and the Joule heating. The results indicate two possibilities: either the neutral temperature was high in the low latitude boundary of the polar cap and the cusp, or the heat transport by the polar cap neutral winds toward the dayside sector was significant.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere–atmosphere interactions; polar ionosphere

  9. The Role of Core Needle Biopsy for Thyroid Nodules with Initially Indeterminate Results on Previous Fine-Needle Aspiration: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, C H; Baek, J H; Park, C; Choi, Y J; Lee, J H

    2017-07-01

    Sonography-guided fine-needle aspiration leads to relatively frequent cases of indeterminate cytology for the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of core needle biopsy for the examination of thyroid nodules with initially indeterminate results on fine-needle aspiration. A computerized search of the MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed to identify relevant original articles. Studies investigating the use of core needle biopsy for thyroid nodules with initially indeterminate results on previous fine-needle aspiration were eligible for inclusion. The pooled proportions for nondiagnostic results, inconclusive results, malignancy on core needle biopsy, the ability of core needle biopsy to diagnose malignancy, and the related complications of the procedure were analyzed. The meta-analytic pooling was based on a random-effects model. Nine eligible studies, involving 2240 patients with 2245 thyroid nodules, were included. The pooled proportion for nondiagnostic results was 1.8% (95% CI, 0.4%-3.2%), and the pooled proportion for inconclusive results was 25.1% (95% CI, 15.4%-34.9%). The pooled proportion for malignancy was 18.9% (95% CI, 8.4%-29.5%). With regard to the diagnostic performance for malignancy, the sensitivity of core needle biopsy varied, ranging from 44.7% to 85.0%, but the specificity was 100% in all cases. No major complications of core needle biopsy were observed. The relatively small number of included studies and retrospective nature were limitations. Core needle biopsy has low nondiagnostic result rates and high specificity for the diagnosis of malignancy. It is a safe diagnostic technique with a higher diagnostic yield, especially when molecular testing is not available or fine-needle aspiration did not yield enough cells for molecular testing. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  10. Prognostic significance of the interval between the initiation of antiretroviral therapy and the initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment in HIV/tuberculosis-coinfected patients: results from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S H; Zhou, J; Lee, M P; Zhao, H; Chen, Y-M A; Kumarasamy, N; Pujari, S; Lee, C; Omar, S F S; Ditangco, R; Phanuphak, N; Kiertiburanakul, S; Chaiwarith, R; Merati, T P; Yunihastuti, E; Tanuma, J; Saphonn, V; Sohn, A H; Choi, J Y

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of the time interval between the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the initiation of tuberculosis (TB) treatment on clinical outcomes in HIV/TB-coinfected patients in an Asian regional cohort. Adult HIV/TB-coinfected patients in an observational HIV-infected cohort database who had a known date of ART initiation and a history of TB treatment were eligible for study inclusion. The time interval between the initiation of ART and the initiation of TB treatment was categorized as follows: TB diagnosed while on ART, ART initiated ≤ 90 days after initiation of TB treatment ('early ART'), ART initiated > 90 days after initiation of TB treatment ('delayed ART'), and ART not started. Outcomes were assessed using survival analyses. A total of 768 HIV/TB-coinfected patients were included in this study. The median CD4 T-cell count at TB diagnosis was 100 [interquartile range (IQR) 40-208] cells/μL. Treatment outcomes were not significantly different between the groups with early ART and delayed ART initiation. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that mortality was highest for those diagnosed with TB while on ART (3.77 deaths per 100 person-years), and the prognoses of other groups were not different (in deaths per 100 person-years: 2.12 for early ART, 1.46 for delayed ART, and 2.94 for ART not started). In a multivariate model, the interval between ART initiation and TB therapy initiation did not significantly impact all-cause mortality. A negative impact of delayed ART in patients coinfected with TB was not observed in this observational cohort of moderately to severely immunosuppressed patients. The broader impact of earlier ART initiation in actual clinical practice should be monitored more closely. © 2013 British HIV Association.

  11. Lake records of Northern Hemisphere South American summer monsoon variability from the Cordillera Oriental, Colombia: Initial results from Lago de Tota and Laguna de Ubaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, J.; Rudloff, O.; Bird, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    The lack of terrestrial paleoclimate records from the Northern Hemisphere Andes with decadal resolution has meant that our understanding of abrupt South American summer monsoon (SASM) variability during the Holocene is almost exclusively based on data from Southern Hemisphere sites. In order to develop a more integrated and complete picture of the SASM as a system and its response during rapid climate changes, high-resolution paleoclimate records are needed from the Northern Hemisphere Andes. We present initial results from analysis of lake sediment cores that were collected from Lago de Tota (N 5.554, W 72.916) and Laguna de Ubaque (N 4.500, W 73.935) in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. These sediment cores were collected in July 2013 as part on an ongoing paleoclimate research initiative in Colombia. Located in the Boyacá Provence, Lago de Tota is the largest high-altitude lake (3010 masl) in the Northern Hemisphere Andes and the second largest Andean lake in South America. As such, hydrologic changes recorded in the lake's sediment record reflect regional climate responses. Lago de Ubaque (2070 masl) is a small east facing moraine-dammed lake near the capital of Bogotá that contains finely laminated clastic sediments. The initial sedimentological and chronological results demonstrate that Lago de Tota and Laguna de Ubaque have excellent potential for resolving Northern Hemisphere SASM variability at decadal time scales or better. Such records will provide important counterparts to high-resolution paleoclimate records from the Southern Hemisphere Andes.

  12. Reflection imaging of the Moho and the aseismic Nazca slab in the Malargüe region with global-phase seismic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganov, D.; Nishitsuji, Y.; Ruigrok, E.; Gomez, M.; Wapenaar, C. P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A number of passive seismic methods have been developed over many decades. Still, imaging of aseismical zones of the subducting slabs is one of challenging themes in the geoscience community. Conventional seismological approaches, such as hypocentral mapping, receiver functions, and global tomography, have been providing useful imaging of the Nazca slab, which subducts under the South American plate; however, the aseismic zones remained unclear. Here, we propose to apply global-phase seismic interferometry (GloPSI) for the imaging of the aseismic zones of the Nazca slab beneath the Malargüe region (Mendoza, Argentina). GloPSI uses global phases (epicentral distances ≥ 120°) such as PKP, PKiKP, and PKIKP, recorded on the vertical component of the seismic sensors. These phases illuminate the lithosphere below the receivers with small angles of incidence, which illumination suffices for creating virtual sources that radiate primarily downwards. We then migrate the retrieved virtual responses to obtain a subsurface reflection image with high resolution (< 15 km in depth). We use data recorded in the Malargüe region using an exploration-type receiver array called MalARRgue. This array was recording continuously in 2012 for one year. In this presentation, we show the imaging results from the Moho down to the aseismic Nazca slab, including the upper mantle.

  13. Percutaneous treatment of liver tumors with an adapted probe for cooled-tip, impedance-controlled radio-frequency ablation under open-magnet MR guidance: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelekis, Alexis D.; Terraz, Sylvain; Roggan, Andre; Terrier, Francois; Majno, Pietro; Mentha, Gilles; Roth, Arnaud; Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, 24 rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2003-05-01

    Percutaneous radio-frequency (RF) ablation of liver tumors is usually performed under guidance of real-time US, but some tumor nodules in some patients cannot be adequately visualized with this technique. We report our preliminary results with an MR-compatible, internally perfused 17-G RF probe adapted to a standard RF generator for impedance-controlled RF ablation under MR guidance. Following initial testing of the probe for MR compatibility, artifacts and macroscopic effects on an ex vivo pig liver, four patients with eight neoplastic liver nodules (five metastatic and three primary), which could not be properly targeted by US, were treated with the cooled-tip technique under MRI guidance in an open 0.23-T magnet. Metallic artifacts produced by the probe were useful for accurate placement and did not interfere with MRI monitoring at the end of the procedure. Based on imaging findings, the immediate result of RF was considered adequate in all instances. Local recurrence occurred in one instance after 6 months, requiring repeat treatment. No adverse effects were noted. Initial experience suggests that the probe we used allows to perform impedance-controlled cooled-tip RF ablation of liver tumors under open-magnet MR guidance. (orig.)

  14. Parallel electron streaming in the high-latitude E region and its effect on the incoherent scatter spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcivan, H.; Cosgrove, R. B.; Tsunoda, R. T.

    2006-07-01

    This article investigates the combined electron heating and streaming effects of low-frequency parallel electric fields on the incoherent scatter measurements of the high-latitude E region. The electric fields distort the electron distribution function, inducing changes on the amplitude and frequency of the ion-acoustic line in the measured incoherent scatter spectrum. If one assumes Maxwellian electrons, the measurements of electron and ion temperatures and electron density are subject to significant percentage errors during geomagnetically active conditions.

  15. Delay in cART Initiation Results in Persistent Immune Dysregulation and Poor Recovery of T-Cell Phenotype Despite a Decade of Successful HIV Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumbi, Patricia; Falutz, Julian; Pant Pai, Nitika; Tsoukas, Christos M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Successful combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) increases levels of CD4+ T-cells, however this increase may not accurately reflect long-term immune recovery since T-cell dysregulation and loss of T-cell homeostasis often persist. We therefore assessed the impact of a decade of effective cART on immune regulation, T-cell homeostasis, and overall T-cell phenotype. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 288 HIV+ cART-naïve patients initiating therapy. We identified 86 individuals who received cART for at least a decade, of which 44 consistently maintained undetectable plasma HIV-RNA levels throughout therapy. At baseline, participants were classified into three groups according to pre-treatment CD4+ T-cell counts: Group I (CD4350 cells/mm3). Outcomes of interest were: (1) CD4+ T-cell count restoration (CD4>532 cells/mm3); (2) normalization of CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio (1.2–3.3); (3) maintenance of CD3+ T-cell homeostasis (CD3: 65%–85% of peripheral lymphocytes); (4) normalization of the complete T-cell phenotype (TCP). Results Despite a decade of sustained successful cART, complete T-cell phenotype normalization only occurred in 16% of patients, most of whom had initiated therapy at high CD4+ T-cell counts (>350 cells/mm3). The TCP parameter that was the least restored among patients was the CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio. Conclusions Failure to normalize the complete T-cell phenotype was most apparent in patients who initiated cART with a CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/mm3. The impact of this impaired T-cell phenotype on life-long immune function and potential comorbidities remains to be elucidated. PMID:24710051

  16. Delay in cART initiation results in persistent immune dysregulation and poor recovery of T-cell phenotype despite a decade of successful HIV suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ndumbi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful combination antiretroviral therapy (cART increases levels of CD4+ T-cells, however this increase may not accurately reflect long-term immune recovery since T-cell dysregulation and loss of T-cell homeostasis often persist. We therefore assessed the impact of a decade of effective cART on immune regulation, T-cell homeostasis, and overall T-cell phenotype. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 288 HIV+ cART-naïve patients initiating therapy. We identified 86 individuals who received cART for at least a decade, of which 44 consistently maintained undetectable plasma HIV-RNA levels throughout therapy. At baseline, participants were classified into three groups according to pre-treatment CD4+ T-cell counts: Group I (CD4350 cells/mm3. Outcomes of interest were: (1 CD4+ T-cell count restoration (CD4>532 cells/mm3; (2 normalization of CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio (1.2-3.3; (3 maintenance of CD3+ T-cell homeostasis (CD3: 65%-85% of peripheral lymphocytes; (4 normalization of the complete T-cell phenotype (TCP. RESULTS: Despite a decade of sustained successful cART, complete T-cell phenotype normalization only occurred in 16% of patients, most of whom had initiated therapy at high CD4+ T-cell counts (>350 cells/mm3. The TCP parameter that was the least restored among patients was the CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Failure to normalize the complete T-cell phenotype was most apparent in patients who initiated cART with a CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/mm3. The impact of this impaired T-cell phenotype on life-long immune function and potential comorbidities remains to be elucidated.

  17. Breastfeeding Progression in Preterm Infants Is Influenced by Factors in Infants, Mothers and Clinical Practice: The Results of a National Cohort Study with High Breastfeeding Initiation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Kronborg, Hanne; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Hallum, Karin; Frandsen, Annemi; Kyhnaeb, Anne; Svarer, Inge; Hallström, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Many preterm infants are not capable of exclusive breastfeeding from birth. To guide mothers in breastfeeding, it is important to know when preterm infants can initiate breastfeeding and progress. The aim was to analyse postmenstrual age (PMA) at breastfeeding milestones in different preterm gestational age (GA) groups, to describe rates of breastfeeding duration at pre-defined times, as well as analyse factors associated with PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Methods The study was part of a prospective survey of a national Danish cohort of preterm infants based on questionnaires and structured telephone interviews, including 1,221 mothers and their 1,488 preterm infants with GA of 24–36 weeks. Results Of the preterm infants, 99% initiated breastfeeding and 68% were discharged exclusively breastfed. Breastfeeding milestones were generally reached at different PMAs for different GA groups, but preterm infants were able to initiate breastfeeding at early times, with some delay in infants less than GA 32 weeks. Very preterm infants had lowest mean PMA (35.5 weeks) at first complete breastfeed, and moderate preterm infants had lowest mean PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding (36.4 weeks). Admitting mothers to the NICU together with the infant and minimising the use of a pacifier during breastfeeding transition were associated with 1.6 (95% CI 0.4–2.8) and 1.2 days (95% CI 0.1–2.3) earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding respectively. Infants that were small for gestational age were associated with 5.6 days (95% CI 4.1–7.0) later establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion Breastfeeding competence is not developed at a fixed PMA, but is influenced by multiple factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice. Admitting mothers together with their infants to the NICU and minimising the use of pacifiers may contribute to earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. PMID:25251690

  18. Mortality in members of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa and implications for antiretroviral therapy initiation: Results of analyses from a multicenter randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bruyn Guy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk of HIV-1 related mortality is strongly related to CD4 count. Guidance on optimal timing for initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART is still evolving, but the contribution of HIV-1 infection to excess mortality at CD4 cell counts above thresholds for HIV-1 treatment has not been fully described, especially in resource-poor settings. To compare mortality among HIV-1 infected and uninfected members of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples followed for up to 24 months, we conducted a secondary data analysis examining mortality among HIV-1 serodiscordant couples participating in a multicenter, randomized controlled trial at 14 sites in seven sub-Saharan African countries. Methods Predictors of death were examined using Cox regression and excess mortality by CD4 count and plasma HIV-1 RNA was computed using Poisson regression for correlated data. Results Among 3295 HIV serodiscordant couples, we observed 109 deaths from any cause (74 deaths among HIV-1 infected and 25 among HIV-1 uninfected persons. Among HIV-1 infected persons, the risk of death increased with lower CD4 count and higher plasma viral levels. HIV-1 infected persons had excess mortality due to medical causes of 15.2 deaths/1000 person years at CD4 counts of 250 – 349 cells/μl and 8.9 deaths at CD4 counts of 350 – 499 cells/μl. Above a CD4 count of 500 cells/μl, mortality was comparable among HIV-1 infected and uninfected persons. Conclusions Among African serodiscordant couples, there is a high rate of mortality attributable to HIV-1 infection at CD4 counts above the current threshold (200 – 350 cells/μl for ART initiation in many African countries. These data indicate that earlier initiation of treatment is likely to provide clinical benefit if further expansion of ART access can be achieved. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00194519

  19. Decreased use of glucocorticoids in biological-experienced patients with rheumatoid arthritis who initiated intravenous abatacept: results from the 2-year ACTION study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alten, Rieke; Nüßlein, Hubert; Galeazzi, Mauro; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Nurmohamed, Michael T; Bensen, William G; Burmester, Gerd R; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Pavelka, Karel; Chartier, Mélanie; Poncet, Coralie; Rauch, Christiane; Elbez, Yedid; Le Bars, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged glucocorticoid use may increase the risk of adverse safety outcomes, including cardiovascular events. The European League Against Rheumatism and the Canadian Rheumatology Association advise tapering glucocorticoid dose as rapidly as clinically feasible. There is a paucity of published data on RA that adequately describe concomitant treatment patterns. Methods ACTION (AbataCepT In rOutiNe clinical practice) is a non-interventional cohort study of patients from Europe and Canada that investigated the long-term retention of intravenous abatacept in clinical practice. We assessed concomitant glucocorticoids in patients with established RA who had participated in ACTION and received ≥1 biological agent prior to abatacept initiation. Results The analysis included 1009 patients. Glucocorticoids were prescribed at abatacept initiation in 734 (72.7%) patients at a median 7.5 mg/day dose (n=692). Of the patients who remained on abatacept at 24 months, 40.7% were able to decrease their dose of glucocorticoids, including 26.9% who decreased their dose from >5 mg/day to ≤5 mg/day. Conclusion Reduction and/or cessation of glucocorticoid therapy is possible with intravenous abatacept in clinical practice. PMID:26925253

  20. Daytime E-Region Irregularities During the 22 July 2009 Solar Eclipse over Chung-Li (24.9°N, 121.2°E, a Moderate Mid-Latitude Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potula Sree Brahmanandam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 22 July 2009 solar eclipse with an obscuration of > 83% at Chung-Li (24.9¢XN, 121.2¢XE, Dip 35¢XN in Taiwan during noon hours has provided a unique opportunity for us to examine its impact on E-region irregularities which were observed simultaneously by the 52 MHz coherent radar and a co-located ionosonde. Significant observations revealed that the daytime E-region strong backscatter echoes at multiple heights and a sudden intensification of the weak sporadic E-layer during the 22 July 2009 solar eclipse. These results follow the research findings of Patra et al. (2009. As the incident solar radiation suddenly blocked by intruding Moon during solar eclipse events that would generally create night-like ionospheric conditions, it is surmised that the E-region irregularities were indeed induced by the eclipse associated effects. The induced effects resulted in faster recombination of molecular ions, generation of gravity waves and electric fields that could have created a conducive environment to excite plasma irregularities through a gradient-drift instability mechanism. The vertical shears of radar Doppler velocity and the peak radar backscatter at the node of Doppler velocity shear, as resolved by the coherent scatter radar with interferometer technique, were possibly due to the upward propagating gravity waves and wave-induced polarization electric fields. The present observational results should not only be highly useful to ascertain plausible mechanisms responsible for nighttime E-region irregularities, but also provided evidence that a solar eclipse could generate E-region plasma irregularities over temperate mid-latitudes for the first time.

  1. The calibration and initial results of the HeI D3 line flash spectrum obtained during the 2008 total solar eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; ZHOU TuanHui; LI JingWei; SHEN JinHua; JI HaiSheng; NI HouKun; ZHANG HaiYing; ZHANG YaNan; LIU HongRui; DENG YuanYong; WANG DongGuang; DU QiuSheng

    2009-01-01

    The flash spectra in the Hel D3 line were obtained during the 2008 total solar eclipse. This paper describes the instrument and the calibration of the obtained flash spectrum, and presents our initial results.The average integrated intensity is E_(ave)=8.13×10~(13)erg·cm~(-1)·s~(-1)·ster~(-1)ath=1100km,which confirms that the Hel D3 emission is negatively correlated with the solar activity. The surface brightness reaches a maximum of F_(ave)=8.25×10~5 erg·cm~(-2)·s~(-1)·ster(-1) at about h≈(1290±75) km and then decreases exponentially with height when h > 1800 km with an exponential index β= 1.63×10~(-8)cm~(-1).

  2. The calibration and initial results of the HeI D3 line flash spectrum obtained during the 2008 total solar eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The flash spectra in the HeI D3 line were obtained during the 2008 total solar eclipse. This paper describes the instrument and the calibration of the obtained flash spectrum, and presents our initial results. The average integrated intensity is Eave = 8.13×1013 erg·cm-1· s-1·ster-1 at h = 1100 km, which confirms that the HeI D3 emission is negatively correlated with the solar activity. The surface brightness reaches a maximum of F ave = 8.25×105 erg·cm-2·s-1·ster-1 at about h ≈ (1290 ± 75) km and then decreases exponentially with height when h >1800 km with an exponential index β = 1.63×10-8 cm-1.

  3. DESIGN AND INITIAL RESULTS OF A TURN-BY-TURN BEAM POSITION MONITORING SYSTEM FOR MULTIPLE BUNCH OPERATION OF THE ATF DAMPING RING

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, G B; Bett, D R; Burrows, P N; Davis, M R; Gerbershagen, A; Perry, C; Constance, B; Resta-Lopez, J

    2011-01-01

    An FPGA-based monitoring system has been developed to study multi-bunch beam instabilities in the damping ring (DR) of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), utilising a stripline beam position monitor (BPM) and existing BPM processor hardware. The system is designed to record the horizontal and/or vertical positions of up to three bunches in the DR in single-bunch multi-train mode or the head bunch of up to three trains in multi-bunch mode, with a bunch spacing of 5.6 ns. The FPGA firmware and data acquisition software were modified to record turn-by-turn data for up to six channels and 1–3 bunches in the DR. An overview of the system and initial results will be presented.

  4. Diel cycling of zinc in a stream impacted by acid rock drainage: initial results from a new in situ Zn analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Thomas P; Nimick, David A; Gammons, Christopher H; Wanty, Richard B

    2007-10-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that many trace metals undergo dramatic diel (24-h) cycles in near neutral pH streams with metal concentrations reproducibly changing up to 500% during the diel period (Nimick et al., 2003). To examine diel zinc cycles in streams affected by acid rock drainage, we have developed a novel instrument, the Zn-DigiScan, to continuously monitor in situ zinc concentrations in near real-time. Initial results from a 3-day deployment at Fisher Creek, Montana have demonstrated the ability of the Zn-DigiScan to record diel Zn cycling at levels below 100 microg/l. Longer deployments of this instrument could be used to examine the effects of episodic events such as rainstorms and snowmelt pulses on zinc loading in streams affected by acid rock drainage.

  5. Diel cycling of zinc in a stream impacted by acid rock drainage: Initial results from a new in situ Zn analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, T.P.; Nimick, D.A.; Gammons, C.H.; Wanty, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that many trace metals undergo dramatic diel (24-h) cycles in near neutral pH streams with metal concentrations reproducibly changing up to 500% during the diel period (Nimick et al., 2003). To examine diel zinc cycles in streams affected by acid rock drainage, we have developed a novel instrument, the Zn-DigiScan, to continuously monitor in situ zinc concentrations in near real-time. Initial results from a 3-day deployment at Fisher Creek, Montana have demonstrated the ability of the Zn-DigiScan to record diel Zn cycling at levels below 100 ??g/l. Longer deployments of this instrument could be used to examine the effects of episodic events such as rainstorms and snowmelt pulses on zinc loading in streams affected by acid rock drainage. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  6. High definition clouds and precipitation for climate prediction -results from a unified German research initiative on high resolution modeling and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauser, F.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from the German BMBF initiative 'High Definition Cloud and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction -HD(CP)2'. This initiative addresses most of the problems that are discussed in this session in one, unified approach: cloud physics, convection, boundary layer development, radiation and subgrid variability are approached in one organizational framework. HD(CP)2 merges both observation and high performance computing / model development communities to tackle a shared problem: how to improve the understanding of the most important subgrid-scale processes of cloud and precipitation physics, and how to utilize this knowledge for improved climate predictions. HD(CP)2 is a coordinated initiative to: (i) realize; (ii) evaluate; and (iii) statistically characterize and exploit for the purpose of both parameterization development and cloud / precipitation feedback analysis; ultra-high resolution (100 m in the horizontal, 10-50 m in the vertical) regional hind-casts over time periods (3-15 y) and spatial scales (1000-1500 km) that are climatically meaningful. HD(CP)2 thus consists of three elements (the model development and simulations, their observational evaluation and exploitation/synthesis to advance CP prediction) and its first three-year phase has started on October 1st 2012. As a central part of HD(CP)2, the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) has been carried out in spring 2013. In this campaign, high resolution measurements with a multitude of instruments from all major centers in Germany have been carried out in a limited domain, to allow for unprecedented resolution and precision in the observation of microphysics parameters on a resolution that will allow for evaluation and improvement of ultra-high resolution models. At the same time, a local area version of the new climate model ICON of the Max Planck Institute and the German weather service has been developed that allows for LES-type simulations on high resolutions on

  7. Associations Between Initial Water Pipe Tobacco Smoking and Snus Use and Subsequent Cigarette Smoking Results From a Longitudinal Study of US Adolescents and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Samir; Sargent, James D.; Tanski, Susanne E.; Primack, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Many adolescents and young adults use alternative tobacco products, such as water pipes and snus, instead of cigarettes. OBJECTIVE To assess whether prior water pipe tobacco smoking and snus use among never smokers are risk factors for subsequent cigarette smoking. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We conducted a 2-wave national longitudinal study in the United States among 2541 individuals aged 15 to 23 years old. At baseline (October 25, 2010, through June 11, 2011), we ascertained whether respondents had smoked cigarettes, smoked water pipe tobacco, or used snus. At the 2-year follow-up (October 27, 2012, through March 31, 2013), we determined whether baseline non–cigarette smokers had subsequently tried cigarette smoking, were current (past 30 days) cigarette smokers, or were high-intensity cigarette smokers. We fit multivariable logistic regression models among baseline non–cigarette smokers to assess whether baseline water pipe tobacco smoking and baseline snus use were associated with subsequent cigarette smoking initiation and current cigarette smoking, accounting for established sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors. We fit similarly specified multivariable ordinal logistic regression models to assess whether baseline water pipe tobacco smoking and baseline snus use were associated with high-intensity cigarette smoking at follow-up. EXPOSURES Water pipe tobacco smoking and the use of snus at baseline. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Among baseline non–cigarette smokers, cigarette smoking initiation, current (past 30 days) cigarette smoking at follow-up, and the intensity of cigarette smoking at follow-up. RESULTS Among 1596 respondents, 1048 had never smoked cigarettes at baseline, of whom 71 had smoked water pipe tobacco and 20 had used snus at baseline. At follow-up, accounting for behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors, baseline water pipe tobacco smoking and snus use were independently associated with cigarette smoking

  8. Effect of Microgravity on Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Initial Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species of the legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiment one was designed to determine if S. meliloti infect M. truncatula and initiate physiological changes associated with nodule formation. Roots of five-day-old M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 (Enodll::gus) were inoculated 24 hr before launch with either S. meliloti strain 1021 or strain ABS7 and integrated into BRIC-PDFU hardware placed in a 4 C Cold Bag for launch on Atlantis. Inoculated plants and uninoculated controls were maintained in the dark at ambient temperature in the middeck of STS-135 for 11 days before fixation in RNAlater(tM) by crew activation of the PDFU. Experiment two was designed to determine if microgravity altered the process of bacterial infection and host plant nodule formation. Seeds of two M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 lines, the Enodll::gus used in experiment 1, and SUNN, a super-nodulating mutant of A17, were germinated on orbit for 11 days in the middeck cabin and returned to Earth alive inside of BRIC-PDFU's at 4 C. S. meliloti strains 1021 and ABS7 were cultivated separately in broth culture on orbit and also returned to Earth alive. After landing, flight- and groundgrown plants and bacteria were transferred from BRIC-PDFU's into Nunc(tm) 4-well plates for reciprocity crosses. Rates of plant growth and nodule development on Buffered Nodulation Medium (lacking nitrogen) were measured for 14 days. Preliminary analysis' of Experiment 1 confirms that

  9. 3D modeling of void nucleation and initial void growth due to Tin diffusion as a result of electromigration in polycrystalline lead-free solders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Deepak

    Electromigration (EM) has been a serious reliability concern in microelectronics packaging for close to half a century now. Whenever the challenges of EM are overcome newer complications arise such as the demand for better performance due to increased miniaturization of semiconductor devices or the problems faced due to undesirable properties of lead-free solders. The motivation for the work is that there exists no fully computational modeling study on EM damage in lead-free solders (and also in lead-based solders). Modeling techniques such as one developed here can give new insights on effects of different grain features and offer high flexibility in varying parameters and study the corresponding effects. In this work, a new computational approach has been developed to study void nucleation and initial void growth in solders due to metal atom diffusion. It involves the creation of a 3D stochastic mesoscale model of the microstructure of a polycrystalline Tin structure. The next step was to identify regions of current crowding or 'hot-spots'. This was done through solving a finite difference scheme on top of the 3D structure. The nucleation of voids due to atomic diffusion from the regions of current crowding was modeled by diffusion from the identified hot-spot through a rejection free kinetic Monte-Carlo scheme. This resulted in the net movement of atoms from the cathode to the anode. The above steps of identifying the hotspot and diffusing the atoms at the hotspot were repeated and this lead to the initial growth of the void. This procedure was studied varying different grain parameters. In the future, the goal is to explore the effect of more grain parameters and consider other mechanisms of failure such as the formation of intermetallic compounds due to interstitial diffusion and dissolution of underbump metallurgy.

  10. Initial Results from the Survey of Organizational Research Climates (SOuRCe) in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Brian C.; Nelson, David; Hagel-Campbell, Emily; Mohr, David; Charns, Martin P.; Bangerter, Ann; Thrush, Carol R.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Bloomfield, Hanna; Owen, Richard; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background In service to its core mission of improving the health and well-being of veterans, Veterans Affairs (VA) leadership is committed to supporting research best practices in the VA. Recognizing that the behavior of researchers is influenced by the organizational climates in which they work, efforts to assess the integrity of research climates and share such information with research leadership in VA may be one way to support research best practices. The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SOuRCe) is the first validated survey instrument specifically designed to assess the organizational climate of research integrity in academic research organizations. The current study reports on an initiative to use the SOuRCe in VA facilities to characterize the organizational research climates and pilot test the effectiveness of using SOuRCe data as a reporting and feedback intervention tool. Methods We administered the SOuRCe using a cross-sectional, online survey, with mailed follow-up to non-responders, of research-engaged employees in the research services of a random selection of 42 VA facilities (e.g., Hospitals/Stations) believed to employ 20 or more research staff. We attained a 51% participation rate, yielding more than 5,200 usable surveys. Results We found a general consistency in organizational research climates across a variety of sub-groups in this random sample of research services in the VA. We also observed similar SOuRCe scale score means, relative rankings of these scales and their internal reliability, in this VA-based sample as we have previously documented in more traditional academic research settings. Results also showed more substantial variability in research climate scores within than between facilities in the VA research service as reflected in meaningful subgroup differences. These findings suggest that the SOuRCe is suitable as an instrument for assessing the research integrity climates in VA and that the tool has similar patterns of

  11. Breslow thickness and (18)F-FDG PET-CT result in initial staging of cutaneous melanoma: Can a cut-off point be established?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Candil, A; Rodríguez-Rey, C; Cano-Carrizal, R; Cala-Zuluaga, E; González Larriba, J L; Jiménez-Ballvé, A; Fuentes-Ferrer, M E; Cabrera-Martín, M N; Pérez-Castejón, M J; García García-Esquinas, M; Lapeña-Gutierrez, L; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    2016-01-01

    To establish a Breslow Thickness (BT) cut-off point for indication of PET-CT of cutaneous melanoma in early stages and evaluate its prognostic value. Retrospective analysis of 347 PET-CT studies with diagnosis of melanoma, of which 108 were performed for initial staging. Thirty-one patients were excluded, and a final sample of 77 patients remained. A ROC curve analysis was performed to establish an optimal cut-off point. A survival analysis was performed, considering death assignable to melanoma as the main event, for the evaluation of its prognostic value. Forty-seven (61.04%) of all 77 patients selected were men, and 11 (14.29%) had a positive PET-CT result. Mean age was 65.17±15.00 years. The median BT in patients with a negative PET-CT result was 2.75 mm (IQR 1.83-4.50) and in the positive group 6.25 mm (IQR 5.40-7.50) (P=.0013). In the ROC curve analysis (AUC 0.804, SE 0.054), an optimal value of 5 mm BT with the following values was obtained: sensitivity 90.91%, specificity 78.79%, negative predictive value (NPV) 98.1%, positive predictive value (PPV) 41.7%, diagnostic OR 37.1, and accuracy 80.52%. Mean follow-up was 18.66±14,35 months, detecting 2/53 (3.77%) deaths in the BT<5 mm group, and 7/24 (29.17%) in the BT≥5 mm group. Survival curves between both groups were significantly different (P=.0013). A 5 mm cut-off point correctly distinguishes those patients with positive PET-CT from those with negative results in the early stages of cutaneous melanoma; therefore it could be included in initial staging of this subgroup of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. Controlling Mercury Release from Source Zones to Surface Water: Initial Results of Pilot Tests at the Y-12 National Security Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Bogle, Mary Anna [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Elliott, Mike [Y-12 National Security Complex

    2009-01-01

    This report presents initial results obtained during year 2008 and satisfies a deliverable listed in the work breakdown structure (WBS) element OR081301. Broad objectives of the multi-year project are: (1) evaluation of remediation technologies for waterborne mercury, (2) development of treatment methods for soil mercury, and (3) source identification, characterization and analyses to improve mass balance on mercury estimates. This report presents the results of pilot tests, conducted in summer and fall 2008, which focused on remediation of waterborne mercury. The goal of this task is to develop strategies and treatment technologies that reduce the concentration and loading of waterborne mercury discharges to the UEFPC, thus minimizing mercury uptake by fish. The two specific studies are: (1) reducing flow augmentation in UEFPC to lessen mercury mobilization from contaminated stream sediments, and (2) treatment of contaminated source waters with a chemical reductant to convert dissolved mercury to a volatile form that can be removed by air stripping or natural evasion. Diversion of 50% of the flow currently added to UEFPC by the flow management system appeared to reduce mercury inputs from a localized, highly contaminated streambed by 0.6-1.5 grams per day (g/d). A reduction of 0.6 g/d represents {approx} 7-10% decrease in mercury input to UEFPC. Mercury concentrations within UEFPC did not rise proportionately with the loss of dilution, in part because of the reduction in input from the streambed source and in part because of reduced flow from the Y-12 NSC storm drain system. A longer-term test that includes seasonal variability will be the next step to validate these initial field observations of the flow diversion experiment. Preliminary laboratory experiments show that a large fraction ({approx} 90%) of the mercury can be chemically reduced to Hg(0) by addition of low concentrations of tin, Sn(II). Conversion of mercury to volatile Hg(0) in UEFPC was also

  13. Initial Results from a New Lake Elsinore Sediment Core Reveal Evidence for Hydrologic Change During the Late-Glacial/Holocene Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, J. M.; Kirby, M. E.; Lund, S.; Hiner, C.

    2010-12-01

    While there are several well-developed records of marine climate from Southern California that span the late-Glacial/Holocene transition, there are currently no high-resolution terrestrial counterparts. In June 2010, a 20 meter sediment core covering 10-30 meters below the sediment-water interface was extracted from the depocenter of Lake Elsinore, California - the largest natural, permanent lake in the region. Here, we present the initial results of a multi-proxy study on the section of this sediment core that spans the late-Glacial/Holocene transition (10-18.5 m below the sediment-water line [bswl]). Initial results reveal three distinct sediment units. Unit I (10-15m bswl) is composed of a homogeneous, often mottled (bioturbated?), gray mud with high and moderately variable magnetic susceptibility values (avg=1.20±0.29x10-7m3/kg), low organic matter content (6.50±0.83%), and highly variable carbonate content (12.21±4.89%). Unit II (15-17m bswl) is a transitional unit that begins as a gray mud similar to that of Unit I and transitions into a massive to laminated brown mud with low and variable magnetic susceptibility values (0.88±0.38x10-7m3/kg), increasing organic matter content (11.52±2.19%), and highly variable carbonate content (10.84±4.75%). Unit III (17-18.5m bswl) is characterized by a massive to laminated brown mud with very low and stable magnetic susceptibility values (0.87±0.19x10-7m3/kg), declining organic matter content (11.21±2.02%), and low to negligible carbonate content (5.0±0.87%). Together, these data indicate a significant change in Lake Elsinore’s depositional environment that is likely related to hydrologic change (i.e. average lake level) during the late Glacial to Holocene transition - a change that has not previously been documented in Southern California.

  14. Initial Results from the Survey of Organizational Research Climates (SOuRCe in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C Martinson

    Full Text Available In service to its core mission of improving the health and well-being of veterans, Veterans Affairs (VA leadership is committed to supporting research best practices in the VA. Recognizing that the behavior of researchers is influenced by the organizational climates in which they work, efforts to assess the integrity of research climates and share such information with research leadership in VA may be one way to support research best practices. The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SOuRCe is the first validated survey instrument specifically designed to assess the organizational climate of research integrity in academic research organizations. The current study reports on an initiative to use the SOuRCe in VA facilities to characterize the organizational research climates and pilot test the effectiveness of using SOuRCe data as a reporting and feedback intervention tool.We administered the SOuRCe using a cross-sectional, online survey, with mailed follow-up to non-responders, of research-engaged employees in the research services of a random selection of 42 VA facilities (e.g., Hospitals/Stations believed to employ 20 or more research staff. We attained a 51% participation rate, yielding more than 5,200 usable surveys.We found a general consistency in organizational research climates across a variety of sub-groups in this random sample of research services in the VA. We also observed similar SOuRCe scale score means, relative rankings of these scales and their internal reliability, in this VA-based sample as we have previously documented in more traditional academic research settings. Results also showed more substantial variability in research climate scores within than between facilities in the VA research service as reflected in meaningful subgroup differences. These findings suggest that the SOuRCe is suitable as an instrument for assessing the research integrity climates in VA and that the tool has similar patterns of results that

  15. Initial Results from the Survey of Organizational Research Climates (SOuRCe) in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Brian C; Nelson, David; Hagel-Campbell, Emily; Mohr, David; Charns, Martin P; Bangerter, Ann; Thrush, Carol R; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Bloomfield, Hanna; Owen, Richard; Wells, James A

    2016-01-01

    In service to its core mission of improving the health and well-being of veterans, Veterans Affairs (VA) leadership is committed to supporting research best practices in the VA. Recognizing that the behavior of researchers is influenced by the organizational climates in which they work, efforts to assess the integrity of research climates and share such information with research leadership in VA may be one way to support research best practices. The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SOuRCe) is the first validated survey instrument specifically designed to assess the organizational climate of research integrity in academic research organizations. The current study reports on an initiative to use the SOuRCe in VA facilities to characterize the organizational research climates and pilot test the effectiveness of using SOuRCe data as a reporting and feedback intervention tool. We administered the SOuRCe using a cross-sectional, online survey, with mailed follow-up to non-responders, of research-engaged employees in the research services of a random selection of 42 VA facilities (e.g., Hospitals/Stations) believed to employ 20 or more research staff. We attained a 51% participation rate, yielding more than 5,200 usable surveys. We found a general consistency in organizational research climates across a variety of sub-groups in this random sample of research services in the VA. We also observed similar SOuRCe scale score means, relative rankings of these scales and their internal reliability, in this VA-based sample as we have previously documented in more traditional academic research settings. Results also showed more substantial variability in research climate scores within than between facilities in the VA research service as reflected in meaningful subgroup differences. These findings suggest that the SOuRCe is suitable as an instrument for assessing the research integrity climates in VA and that the tool has similar patterns of results that have been

  16. Results of a sector-wide quality improvement initiative for substance-abuse care: an uncontrolled before-after study in Catalonia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colom Joan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Health Department of the Regional Government of Catalonia, Spain, issued a quality plan for substance abuse centers. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the impact of a multidimensional quality improvement initiative in the field of substance abuse care and to discuss potentials and limitations for further quality improvement. Methods The study uses an uncontrolled, sector-wide pre-post design. All centers providing services for persons with substance abuse issues in the Autonomous Community of Catalonia participated in this assessment. Measures of compliance were developed based on indicators reported in the literature and by broad stakeholder involvement. We compared pre-post differences in dimension-specific and overall compliance-scores using one-way ANOVA for repeated measures and the Friedman statistic. We described the spread of the data using the inter-quartile range and the Fligner-Killen statistic. Finally, we adjusted compliance scores for location and size using linear and logistic regression models. Results We performed a baseline and follow up assessment in 22 centers for substance abuse care and observed substantial and statistically significant improvements for overall compliance (pre: 60.9%; post: 79.1% and for compliance in the dimensions 'care pathway' (pre: 66.5%; post: 83.5% and 'organization and management' (pre: 50.5%; post: 77.2%. We observed improvements in the dimension 'environment and infrastructure' (pre: 81.8%; post: 95.5% and in the dimension 'relations and user rights' (pre: 66.5%; post: 72.5%; however, these were not statistically significant. The regression analysis suggests that improvements in compliance are positively influenced by being located in the Barcelona region in case of the dimension 'relations and user rights'. Conclusion The positive results of this quality improvement initiative are possibly associated with the successful involvement of stakeholders, the consciously

  17. Possible evidence for partial demagnetization of electrons in the auroral E-region plasma during electron gas heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haldoupis

    Full Text Available A previous study, based on incoherent and coherent radar measurements, suggested that during auroral E-region electron heating conditions, the electron flow in the auroral electrojet undergoes a systematic counterclockwise rotation of several degrees relative to the E×B direction. The observational evidence is re-examined here in the light of theoretical predictions concerning E-region electron demagnetization caused by enhanced anomalous cross-field diffusion during strongly-driven Farley-Buneman instability. It is shown that the observations are in good agreement with this theory. This apparently endorses the concept of wave-induced diffusion and anomalous electron collision frequency, and consequently electron demagnetization, under circumstances of strong heating of the electron gas in the auroral electrojet plasma. We recognize, however, that the evidence for electron demagnetization presented in this report cannot be regarded as definitive because it is based on a limited set of data. More experimental research in this direction is thus needed.

  18. Penetration of ELF Currents and Electromagnetic Fields into the Off-Equatorial E-Region of the Earth's Ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Neeraj; Sharma, A S; Papadopoulos, K

    2012-01-01

    The generation of ELF (of the order of 10 Hz) currents and electromagnetic fields in the off-equatorial E-region (90-120 km) of the Earth's ionosphere and their subsequent penetration into the deeper ionospheric layers is studied theoretically and numerically. These ELF currents and fields are generated by the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse with the E-region at its lower boundary located at 90 km above the Earth's surface. The wave penetration (with a typical wavelength of the order of 10 km) of the generated ELF currents and fields into the deeper ionospheric layers up to 120 km takes place due to the dominance of the Hall conductivity over the Pederson conductivity in the region between 90-120 km and penetration becomes diffusive above 120 km. During night time, the increase in the wave speed due to the reduced conductivities leads to the deeper penetration. As the angle between Earth's magnetic field and horizontal is increased (going away from the equator), the currents and fields penetrate deepe...

  19. Artificial E-region field-aligned plasma irregularities generated at pump frequencies near the second electron gyroharmonic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available E region ionospheric modification experiments have been performed at HAARP using pump frequencies about 50 kHz above and below the second electron gyroharmonic frequency. Artificial E region field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs were created and observed using the imaging coherent scatter radar near Homer, Alaska. Echoes from FAIs generated with pump frequencies above and below 2Ωe did not appear to differ significantly in experiments conducted on summer afternoons in 2008, and the resonance instability seemed to be at work in either case. We argue that upper hybrid wave trapping and resonance instability at pump frequencies below the second electron gyroharmonic frequency are permitted theoretically when the effects of finite parallel wavenumbers are considered. Echoes from a sporadic E layer were observed to be somewhat weaker when the pump frequency was 50 kHz below the second electron gyroharmonic frequency. This may indicate that finite parallel wavenumbers are inconsistent with wave trapping in thin sporadic E ionization layers.

  20. A systems approach to water recovery testing for space life support - Initial biomedical results from the ECLSS Water Recovery Test and plans for testbed utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aten, Laurie A.; Crump, William J.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Among the challenges of designing and constructing Space Station Freedom is the development of the water system. A review of past efforts in reclaiming waste water in enclosed environments reveals that there are many gaps in the biomedical understanding of this process. Some of the key uncertainties of human interaction with a closed water system include determining potential contaminants and establishing safe levels of multiple compounds in the enclosed system of Space Station. Another uncertainty is the microbial constituency of such a system and what impact it could have on crew health and performance. The use of iodine as the passive biocide may have both an indirect and direct impact on the crew. In this paper the initial results of the Water Recovery Test are reviewed from a biomedical perspective, revealing areas where more information is needed to develop the ECLSS water system. By including the approach of 'man as a subsystem', consideration is given to how man interacts with the total water system. Taking this systems approach to providing the crew with a safe source of water gives useful insight into the most efficient design and utilization of closed system testbeds.

  1. Percutaneous laser-assisted thermal coronary angioplasty in native coronary arteries and saphenous vein grafts: initial results and angiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemeier, T J; Rothbaum, D A; Cumberland, D C; Landin, R J; Hodes, Z I; Ball, M W

    1990-01-01

    Percutaneous laser-assisted thermal coronary angioplasty was attempted in 29 vessels (27 patients): 10 left anterior descending, 2 left circumflex and 17 mid-shaft (non-anastomotic) saphenous vein grafts. Argon or YAG laser thermal energy was applied via a 1.3, 1.6 or 1.9 mm metal capped probe followed by conventional balloon angioplasty in 27 vessels and sole thermal laser therapy in two vessels. The laser probe successfully crossed 83% (24/29) of vessels and subsequent balloon dilatation increased the success rate to 93% (25/27). Perforation occurred in a vein graft resulting in one in-hospital death post repeat emergency coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Angiographic follow-up was obtained in 85% (24/28) of vessels. Angiographic restenosis ( greater than 50% reduction in lumen diameter) occurred in 27% (3/11) of native coronary arteries and 62% (8/13) of saphenous vein grafts. Therefore, despite high initial success rates, the application of laser thermal energy with small laser probes relative to vessel size, followed by conventional balloon angioplasty, does not appear to alter restenosis. Further evaluation of coronary laser systems should be continued only with catheters that are capable of creating channels closer to the size of the vessel treated.

  2. Initial results on the correlation between the magnetic and electric fields observed from the DE-2 satellite in the field-aligned current regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Farthing, W. H.; Heppner, J. P.; Ledley, B. G.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Initial results of the electric and magnetic field observations from the DE-2 satellite show a remarkably good correlation between the north-south component of the electric field and the east-west component of the magnetic field in many passes of the field-aligned current regions. For a dayside cusp pass on August 15, 1981 the coefficient of correlation between these components was 0.996. A preliminary inspection of the available data from the first 6 months of the DE operation indicates that the similarity between the electric and magnetic field signatures of the field-aligned currents is a commonly observed feature at all local times. This high correlation is interpreted to be an indication that the closure of the field-aligned current is essentially meridional. When the correlation between these components is not good, the closure current is likely to be flowing along the auroral belt. When the correlation between the electric and magnetic fields is high, it is possible to estimate the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity from the observed field components.

  3. Development of a custom-designed echo particle image velocimetry system for multi-component hemodynamic measurements: system characterization and initial experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingli; Zheng, Hairong; Williams, Logan; Zhang, Fuxing; Wang, Rui; Hertzberg, Jean; Shandas, Robin

    2008-03-01

    We have recently developed an ultrasound-based velocimetry technique, termed echo particle image velocimetry (Echo PIV), to measure multi-component velocity vectors and local shear rates in arteries and opaque fluid flows by identifying and tracking flow tracers (ultrasound contrast microbubbles) within these flow fields. The original system was implemented on images obtained from a commercial echocardiography scanner. Although promising, this system was limited in spatial resolution and measurable velocity range. In this work, we propose standard rules for characterizing Echo PIV performance and report on a custom-designed Echo PIV system with increased spatial resolution and measurable velocity range. Then we employed this system for initial measurements on tube flows, rotating flows and in vitro carotid artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) models to acquire the local velocity and shear rate distributions in these flow fields. The experimental results verified the accuracy of this technique and indicated the promise of the custom Echo PIV system in capturing complex flow fields non-invasively.

  4. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence triggered by lightning-induced sferics. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics and irregularities inherent to the Earth's low latitude ionosphere.

  5. Time-Distance Helioseismology Data-Analysis Pipeline for Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO-HMI) and Its Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Couvidat, S.; Bogart, R. S.; Parchevsky, K. V.; Birch, A. C.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Beck, J. G.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2011-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/HMI) provides continuous full-disk observations of solar oscillations. We develop a data-analysis pipeline based on the time-distance helioseismology method to measure acoustic travel times using HMI Doppler-shift observations, and infer solar interior properties by inverting these measurements. The pipeline is used for routine production of near-real-time full-disk maps of subsurface wave-speed perturbations and horizontal flow velocities for depths ranging from 0 to 20 Mm, every eight hours. In addition, Carrington synoptic maps for the subsurface properties are made from these full-disk maps. The pipeline can also be used for selected target areas and time periods. We explain details of the pipeline organization and procedures, including processing of the HMI Doppler observations, measurements of the travel times, inversions, and constructions of the full-disk and synoptic maps. Some initial results from the pipeline, including full-disk flow maps, sunspot subsurface flow fields, and the interior rotation and meridional flow speeds, are presented.

  6. Development of a custom-designed echo particle image velocimetry system for multi-component hemodynamic measurements: system characterization and initial experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lingli; Zheng Hairong; Williams, Logan; Zhang Fuxing; Wang Rui; Hertzberg, Jean; Shandas, Robin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0427 (United States)], E-mail: Robin.shandas@colorado.edu

    2008-03-07

    We have recently developed an ultrasound-based velocimetry technique, termed echo particle image velocimetry (Echo PIV), to measure multi-component velocity vectors and local shear rates in arteries and opaque fluid flows by identifying and tracking flow tracers (ultrasound contrast microbubbles) within these flow fields. The original system was implemented on images obtained from a commercial echocardiography scanner. Although promising, this system was limited in spatial resolution and measurable velocity range. In this work, we propose standard rules for characterizing Echo PIV performance and report on a custom-designed Echo PIV system with increased spatial resolution and measurable velocity range. Then we employed this system for initial measurements on tube flows, rotating flows and in vitro carotid artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) models to acquire the local velocity and shear rate distributions in these flow fields. The experimental results verified the accuracy of this technique and indicated the promise of the custom Echo PIV system in capturing complex flow fields non-invasively.

  7. 50 MHz continuous wave interferometer observations of the unstable mid-latitude E-region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haldoupis

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the conversion of SESCAT (Sporadic-E SCATter experiment, a bistatic 50 MHz continuous wave (CW Doppler radar located on the island of Crete, Greece, to a single (east-west baseline interferometer. The first results show that SESCAT, which provides high quality Doppler spectra and excellent temporal resolution, has its measurement capabilities enhanced significantly when operated as an interferometer, as it can also study short-term dynamics of localized scattering regions within mid-latitude sporadic E-layers. The interferometric observations reveal that the aspect sensitive area viewed by the radar often contains a few zonally located backscatter regions, presumably blobs or patches of unstable metallic ion plasma, which drift across the radar field-of-view with the neutral wind. On average, these active regions of backscatter have mean zonal scales ranging from a few kilometers to several tens of kilometers and drift with westward speeds from ~ 20 m/s to 100 m/s, and occasionally up to 150 m/s. The cross-spectral analysis shows that mid-latitude type 1 echoes occur much more frequently than has been previously assumed and they originate in single and rather localized areas of elevat